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Sample records for drosophila embryonic gut

  1. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  2. Gut-associated microbes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Nichole; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in using Drosophila melanogaster to elucidate mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between a host and its microbiota. In addition to the many genetic resources and tools Drosophila provides, its associated microbiota is relatively simple (1–30 taxa), in contrast to the complex diversity associated with vertebrates (> 500 taxa). These attributes highlight the potential of this system to dissect the complex cellular and molecular interactions that occur between a host and its microbiota. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding the composition of gut-associated microbes of Drosophila and their impact on host physiology. We also discuss these interactions in the context of their natural history and ecology and describe some recent insights into mechanisms by which Drosophila and its gut microbiota interact. “Workers with Drosophila have been considered fortunate in that they deal with the first multicellular invertebrate to be cultured monoxenically (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910); the first to be handled axenically on a semisynthetic diet (Guyenot, 1917); and the first to be grown on a defined diet (Schultz et al., 1946). This list of advantages is somewhat embarrassing, since it implies an interest in nutrition that, in reality, was only secondary. The very first studies were concerned with the reduction of variability in genetic experiments (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910) and standardization of the nutritional environment.” -James Sang, 1959 Ann NY Acad 1 PMID:22572876

  3. The Drosophila Midkine/Pleiotrophin Homologues Miple1 and Miple2 Affect Adult Lifespan but Are Dispensable for Alk Signaling during Embryonic Gut Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hugosson, Fredrik; Sjögren, Camilla; Birve, Anna; Hedlund, Ludmilla; Eriksson, Therese; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MDK) and Pleiotrophin (PTN) are small heparin-binding cytokines with closely related structures. The Drosophila genome harbours two genes encoding members of the MDK/PTN family of proteins, known as miple1 and miple2. We have investigated the role of Miple proteins in vivo, in particular with regard to their proposed role as ligands for the Alk receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Here we show that Miple proteins are neither required to drive Alk signaling during Drosophila embryogenesis, nor are they essential for development in the fruit fly. Additionally we show that neither MDK nor PTN can activate hALK in vivo when ectopically co-expressed in the fly. In conclusion, our data suggest that Alk is not activated by MDK/PTN related growth factors Miple1 and Miple 2 in vivo. PMID:25380037

  4. The Drosophila midkine/pleiotrophin homologues Miple1 and Miple2 affect adult lifespan but are dispensable for alk signaling during embryonic gut formation.

    PubMed

    Hugosson, Fredrik; Sjögren, Camilla; Birve, Anna; Hedlund, Ludmilla; Eriksson, Therese; Palmer, Ruth H

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MDK) and Pleiotrophin (PTN) are small heparin-binding cytokines with closely related structures. The Drosophila genome harbours two genes encoding members of the MDK/PTN family of proteins, known as miple1 and miple2. We have investigated the role of Miple proteins in vivo, in particular with regard to their proposed role as ligands for the Alk receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Here we show that Miple proteins are neither required to drive Alk signaling during Drosophila embryogenesis, nor are they essential for development in the fruit fly. Additionally we show that neither MDK nor PTN can activate hALK in vivo when ectopically co-expressed in the fly. In conclusion, our data suggest that Alk is not activated by MDK/PTN related growth factors Miple1 and Miple 2 in vivo.

  5. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Gut microbiota dictates the metabolic response of Drosophila to diet.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adam C-N; Dobson, Adam J; Douglas, Angela E

    2014-06-01

    Animal nutrition is profoundly influenced by the gut microbiota, but knowledge of the scope and core mechanisms of the underlying animal-microbiota interactions is fragmentary. To investigate the nutritional traits shaped by the gut microbiota of Drosophila, we determined the microbiota-dependent response of multiple metabolic and performance indices to systematically varied diet composition. Diet-dependent differences between Drosophila bearing its unmanipulated microbiota (conventional flies) and experimentally deprived of its microbiota (axenic flies) revealed evidence for: microbial sparing of dietary B vitamins, especially riboflavin, on low-yeast diets; microbial promotion of protein nutrition, particularly in females; and microbiota-mediated suppression of lipid/carbohydrate storage, especially on high sugar diets. The microbiota also sets the relationship between energy storage and body mass, indicative of microbial modulation of the host signaling networks that coordinate metabolism with body size. This analysis identifies the multiple impacts of the microbiota on the metabolism of Drosophila, and demonstrates that the significance of these different interactions varies with diet composition and host sex.

  7. Gut microbiota dictates the metabolic response of Drosophila to diet

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adam C.-N.; Dobson, Adam J.; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    Animal nutrition is profoundly influenced by the gut microbiota, but knowledge of the scope and core mechanisms of the underlying animal–microbiota interactions is fragmentary. To investigate the nutritional traits shaped by the gut microbiota of Drosophila, we determined the microbiota-dependent response of multiple metabolic and performance indices to systematically varied diet composition. Diet-dependent differences between Drosophila bearing its unmanipulated microbiota (conventional flies) and experimentally deprived of its microbiota (axenic flies) revealed evidence for: microbial sparing of dietary B vitamins, especially riboflavin, on low-yeast diets; microbial promotion of protein nutrition, particularly in females; and microbiota-mediated suppression of lipid/carbohydrate storage, especially on high sugar diets. The microbiota also sets the relationship between energy storage and body mass, indicative of microbial modulation of the host signaling networks that coordinate metabolism with body size. This analysis identifies the multiple impacts of the microbiota on the metabolism of Drosophila, and demonstrates that the significance of these different interactions varies with diet composition and host sex. PMID:24577449

  8. Domain-specific functions of Stardust in Drosophila embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Leonie; Feicht, Sabine; Sun, Rui; Sen, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, the adaptor protein Stardust is essential for the stabilization of the polarity determinant Crumbs in various epithelial tissues, including the embryonic epidermis, the follicular epithelium and photoreceptor cells of the compound eye. In turn, Stardust recruits another adaptor protein, PATJ, to the subapical region to support adherens junction formation and morphogenetic events. Moreover, Stardust binds to Lin-7, which is dispensable in epithelial cells but functions in postsynaptic vesicle fusion. Finally, Stardust has been reported to bind directly to PAR-6, thereby linking the Crumbs–Stardust–PATJ complex to the PAR-6/aPKC complex. PAR-6 and aPKC are also capable of directly binding Bazooka (the Drosophila homologue of PAR-3) to form the PAR/aPKC complex, which is essential for apical–basal polarity and cell–cell contact formation in most epithelia. However, little is known about the physiological relevance of these interactions in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila in vivo. Thus, we performed a structure–function analysis of the annotated domains with GFP-tagged Stardust and evaluated the localization and function of the mutant proteins in epithelial cells of the embryonic epidermis. The data presented here confirm a crucial role of the PDZ domain in binding Crumbs and recruiting the protein to the subapical region. However, the isolated PDZ domain is not capable of being recruited to the cortex, and the SH3 domain is essential to support the binding to Crumbs. Notably, the conserved N-terminal regions (ECR1 and ECR2) are not crucial for epithelial polarity. Finally, the GUK domain plays an important role for the protein's function, which is not directly linked to Crumbs stabilization, and the L27N domain is essential for epithelial polarization independently of recruiting PATJ. PMID:28018665

  9. Comparisons of embryonic development in Drosophila, Nasonia, and Tribolium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Susan J.

    2017-01-01

    Studying the embryogenesis of diverse insect species is crucial to understanding insect evolution. Here we review current advances in understanding the development of two emerging model organisms: the wasp Nasonia vitripennis, and the beetle Tribolium castaneum in comparison to the well-studied fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Although Nasonia represents the most basally branching order of holometabolous insects, it employs a derived long germband mode of embryogenesis, more like that of Drosophila, while Tribolium undergoes an intermediate germband mode of embryogenesis, which is more similar to the ancestral mechanism. Comparing the embryonic development and genetic regulation of early patterning events in these three insects has given invaluable insights into insect evolution. The similar mode of embryogenesis of Drosophila and Nasonia is reflected in their reliance on maternal morphogenetic gradients. However, they employ different genes as maternal factors, reflecting the evolutionary distance separating them. Tribolium on the other hand relies heavily on self-regulatory mechanisms other than maternal cues, reflecting its sequential nature of segmentation and the need for reiterated patterning. PMID:23801665

  10. Comparisons of the embryonic development of Drosophila, Nasonia, and Tribolium.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jeremy A; El-Sherif, Ezzat; Brown, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    Studying the embryogenesis of diverse insect species is crucial to understanding insect evolution. Here, we review current advances in understanding the development of two emerging model organisms: the wasp Nasonia vitripennis and the beetle Tribolium castaneum in comparison with the well-studied fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Although Nasonia represents the most basally branching order of holometabolous insects, it employs a derived long germband mode of embryogenesis, more like that of Drosophila, whereas Tribolium undergoes an intermediate germband mode of embryogenesis, which is more similar to the ancestral mechanism. Comparing the embryonic development and genetic regulation of early patterning events in these three insects has given invaluable insights into insect evolution. The similar mode of embryogenesis of Drosophila and Nasonia is reflected in their reliance on maternal morphogenetic gradients. However, they employ different genes as maternal factors, reflecting the evolutionary distance separating them. Tribolium, on the other hand, relies heavily on self-regulatory mechanisms other than maternal cues, reflecting its sequential nature of segmentation and the need for reiterated patterning.

  11. Live Imaging Of Drosophila melanogaster Embryonic Hemocyte Migrations

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Iwan R.; Zanet, Jennifer; Wood, Will; Stramer, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies address cell migration using in vitro methods, whereas the physiologically relevant environment is that of the organism itself. Here we present a protocol for the mounting of Drosophila melanogaster embryos and subsequent live imaging of fluorescently labeled hemocytes, the embryonic macrophages of this organism. Using the Gal4-uas system1 we drive the expression of a variety of genetically encoded, fluorescently tagged markers in hemocytes to follow their developmental dispersal throughout the embryo. Following collection of embryos at the desired stage of development, the outer chorion is removed and the embryos are then mounted in halocarbon oil between a hydrophobic, gas-permeable membrane and a glass coverslip for live imaging. In addition to gross migratory parameters such as speed and directionality, higher resolution imaging coupled with the use of fluorescent reporters of F-actin and microtubules can provide more detailed information concerning the dynamics of these cytoskeletal components. PMID:20154641

  12. Prediction of gene expression in embryonic structures of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Samsonova, Anastasia A; Niranjan, Mahesan; Russell, Steven; Brazma, Alvis

    2007-07-01

    Understanding how sets of genes are coordinately regulated in space and time to generate the diversity of cell types that characterise complex metazoans is a major challenge in modern biology. The use of high-throughput approaches, such as large-scale in situ hybridisation and genome-wide expression profiling via DNA microarrays, is beginning to provide insights into the complexities of development. However, in many organisms the collection and annotation of comprehensive in situ localisation data is a difficult and time-consuming task. Here, we present a widely applicable computational approach, integrating developmental time-course microarray data with annotated in situ hybridisation studies, that facilitates the de novo prediction of tissue-specific expression for genes that have no in vivo gene expression localisation data available. Using a classification approach, trained with data from microarray and in situ hybridisation studies of gene expression during Drosophila embryonic development, we made a set of predictions on the tissue-specific expression of Drosophila genes that have not been systematically characterised by in situ hybridisation experiments. The reliability of our predictions is confirmed by literature-derived annotations in FlyBase, by overrepresentation of Gene Ontology biological process annotations, and, in a selected set, by detailed gene-specific studies from the literature. Our novel organism-independent method will be of considerable utility in enriching the annotation of gene function and expression in complex multicellular organisms.

  13. Prediction of Gene Expression in Embryonic Structures of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Samsonova, Anastasia A; Niranjan, Mahesan; Russell, Steven; Brazma, Alvis

    2007-01-01

    Understanding how sets of genes are coordinately regulated in space and time to generate the diversity of cell types that characterise complex metazoans is a major challenge in modern biology. The use of high-throughput approaches, such as large-scale in situ hybridisation and genome-wide expression profiling via DNA microarrays, is beginning to provide insights into the complexities of development. However, in many organisms the collection and annotation of comprehensive in situ localisation data is a difficult and time-consuming task. Here, we present a widely applicable computational approach, integrating developmental time-course microarray data with annotated in situ hybridisation studies, that facilitates the de novo prediction of tissue-specific expression for genes that have no in vivo gene expression localisation data available. Using a classification approach, trained with data from microarray and in situ hybridisation studies of gene expression during Drosophila embryonic development, we made a set of predictions on the tissue-specific expression of Drosophila genes that have not been systematically characterised by in situ hybridisation experiments. The reliability of our predictions is confirmed by literature-derived annotations in FlyBase, by overrepresentation of Gene Ontology biological process annotations, and, in a selected set, by detailed gene-specific studies from the literature. Our novel organism-independent method will be of considerable utility in enriching the annotation of gene function and expression in complex multicellular organisms. PMID:17658945

  14. Immunostaining of the developing embryonic and larval Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Danielle C; Hirth, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Immunostaining is used to visualize the spatiotemporal expression pattern of developmental control genes that regulate the genesis and specification of the embryonic and larval brain of Drosophila. Immunostaining uses specific antibodies to mark expressed proteins and allows their localization to be traced throughout development. This method reveals insights into gene regulation, cell-type specification, neuron and glial differentiation, and posttranslational protein modifications underlying the patterning and specification of the maturing brain. Depending on the targeted protein, it is possible to visualize a multitude of regions of the Drosophila brain, such as small groups of neurons or glia, defined subcomponents of the brain's axon scaffold, or pre- and postsynaptic structures of neurons. Thus, antibody probes that recognize defined tissues, cells, or subcellular structures like axons or synaptic terminals can be used as markers to identify and analyze phenotypes in mutant embryos and larvae. Several antibodies, combined with different labels, can be used concurrently to examine protein co-localization. This protocol spans over 3-4 days.

  15. Homeostasis between gut-associated microorganisms and the immune system in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    You, Hyejin; Lee, Won Jun; Lee, Won-Jae

    2014-10-01

    The metabolic activities of a given gut bacterium or gut commensal community fluctuate in a manner largely depending on the physicochemical parameters within the gut niche. Recognition of the bacterial metabolic status in situ, by a sensing of the gut metabolites as a signature of a specific bacterial metabolic activity, has been suggested to be a highly beneficial means for the host to maintain gut-microbe homeostasis. Recently, analysis of Drosophila gut immunity revealed that bacterial-derived uracil and uracil-modulated intestinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation play a pivotal role in diverse aspects of host-microbe interactions, such as pathogen clearance, commensal protection, intestinal cell regeneration, colitogenesis, and possibly also interorgan immunological communication. A deeper understanding of the role of uracil in Drosophila immunity will provide additional insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying host-microbe symbiosis and dysbiosis.

  16. In vitro organogenesis of gut-like structures from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, M; Ogaeri, T; Matsuura, R; Kogo, H; Fujimoto, T; Torihashi, S

    2004-04-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have pluripotency and give rise to many cell types and tissues, including representatives of all three germ layers in the embryo. We have reported previously that mouse ES cells formed contracting gut-like organs from embryoid bodies (EBs). These gut-like structures contracted spontaneously, and had large lumens surrounded by three layers, i.e. epithelium, lamina propria and muscularis. Ganglia were scattered along the periphery, and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were distributed among the smooth muscle cells. In the present study, to determine whether they can be a model of gut organogenesis, we investigated the formation process of the gut-like structures in comparison with embryonic gut development. As a result, we found that the fundamental process of formation in vitro was similar to embryonic gut development in vivo. The result indicates that the gut-like structure is a useful tool not only for developmental study to determine the factors that induce gut organogenesis, but also for studies of enteric neurone and ICC development.

  17. Formation of gut-like structures in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Shigeko

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from the three germ layers; however, there are still few reports about the formation of functional organs from embryonic stem cells. Recently, we reported that by hanging drops of mouse ES cells, embryoid bodies (EBs) formed gut-like structures in vitro composed of three layers corresponding to the epithelium, lamina propria, and musculature. The morphological features and the process of formation are similar to gut and its organogenesis in vivo. Thus, this is a good model for development of the gut and a useful tool for analysis of the factors required for gut organogenesis. The protocol basically involves a method of hanging drops to make EBs, which are then plated on coated dishes for outgrowth. EBs develop to form gut-like structures when induced to spontaneously enter a program of differentiation in vitro without addition of any extrinsic factors.

  18. Kin recognition in Drosophila: the importance of ecology and gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lizé, Anne; McKay, Raegan; Lewis, Zenobia

    2014-01-01

    The animal gut commonly contains a large reservoir of symbiotic microbes. Although these microbes have obvious functions in digestion and immune defence, gut microbes can also affect behaviour. Here, we explore whether gut microbiota has a role in kin recognition. We assessed whether relatedness, familiarity and food eaten during development altered copulation investment in three species of Drosophila with diverse ecologies. We found that a monandrous species exhibited true kin recognition, whereas familiarity determined kin recognition in a species living in dense aggregations. Finally, in a food generalist species, food eaten during development masked kin recognition. The effect of food type on copulation duration, in addition to the removal of this effect via antibiotic treatment, suggests the influence of bacteria associated with the gut. Our results provide the first evidence that varied ecologically determined mechanisms of kin recognition occur in Drosophila, and that gut bacteria are likely to have a key role in these mechanisms. PMID:24030598

  19. Kin recognition in Drosophila: the importance of ecology and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Lizé, Anne; McKay, Raegan; Lewis, Zenobia

    2014-02-01

    The animal gut commonly contains a large reservoir of symbiotic microbes. Although these microbes have obvious functions in digestion and immune defence, gut microbes can also affect behaviour. Here, we explore whether gut microbiota has a role in kin recognition. We assessed whether relatedness, familiarity and food eaten during development altered copulation investment in three species of Drosophila with diverse ecologies. We found that a monandrous species exhibited true kin recognition, whereas familiarity determined kin recognition in a species living in dense aggregations. Finally, in a food generalist species, food eaten during development masked kin recognition. The effect of food type on copulation duration, in addition to the removal of this effect via antibiotic treatment, suggests the influence of bacteria associated with the gut. Our results provide the first evidence that varied ecologically determined mechanisms of kin recognition occur in Drosophila, and that gut bacteria are likely to have a key role in these mechanisms.

  20. Stable Host Gene Expression in the Gut of Adult Drosophila melanogaster with Different Bacterial Mono-Associations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Vivian; Ludington, William B.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the microbes found in the digestive tracts of animals influence host biology, but we still do not understand how they accomplish this. Here, we evaluated how different microbial species commonly associated with laboratory-reared Drosophila melanogaster impact host biology at the level of gene expression in the dissected adult gut and in the entire adult organism. We observed that guts from animals associated from the embryonic stage with either zero, one or three bacterial species demonstrated indistinguishable transcriptional profiles. Additionally, we found that the gut transcriptional profiles of animals reared in the presence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae alone or in combination with bacteria could recapitulate those of conventionally-reared animals. In contrast, we found whole body transcriptional profiles of conventionally-reared animals were distinct from all of the treatments tested. Our data suggest that adult flies are insensitive to the ingestion of the bacteria found in their gut, but that prior to adulthood, different microbes impact the host in ways that lead to global transcriptional differences observable across the whole adult body. PMID:27898741

  1. Tension regulates myosin dynamics during Drosophila embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Kobb, Anna B; Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2017-02-15

    Embryos repair epithelial wounds rapidly in a process driven by collective cell movements. Upon wounding, actin and the molecular motor non-muscle myosin II are redistributed in the cells adjacent to the wound, forming a supracellular purse string around the lesion. Purse string contraction coordinates cell movements and drives rapid wound closure. By using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in Drosophila embryos, we found that myosin turns over as the purse string contracts. Myosin turnover at the purse string was slower than in other actomyosin networks that had a lower level of contractility. Mathematical modelling suggested that myosin assembly and disassembly rates were both reduced by tension at the wound edge. We used laser ablation to show that tension at the purse string increased as wound closure progressed, and that the increase in tension was associated with reduced myosin turnover. Reducing purse string tension by laser-mediated severing resulted in increased turnover and loss of myosin. Finally, myosin motor activity was necessary for its stabilization around the wound and for rapid wound closure. Our results indicate that mechanical forces regulate myosin dynamics during embryonic wound repair.

  2. Epithelial homeostasis and the underlying molecular mechanisms in the gut of the insect model Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Royet, Julien

    2011-11-01

    Insects mostly develop on decaying and contaminated organic matter and often serve as vectors of biologically transmitted diseases by transporting microorganisms to the plant and animal hosts. As such, insects are constantly ingesting microorganisms, a small fraction of which reach their epithelial surfaces, mainly their digestive tract, where they can establish relationships ranging from symbiosis to mutualism or even parasitism. Understanding the tight physical, genetic, and biochemical interactions that takes place between intestinal epithelia and either resident or infectious microbes has been a long-lasting objective of the immunologist. Research in this field has recently been re-vitalized with the development of deep sequencing techniques, which allow qualitative and quantitative characterization of gut microbiota. Interestingly, the recent identification of regenerative stem cells in the Drosophila gut together with the initial characterization of Drosophila gut microbiota have opened up new avenues of study aimed at understanding the mechanisms that regulate the dialog between the Drosophila gut epithelium and its microbiota of this insect model. The fact that some of the responses are conserved across species combined with the power of Drosophila genetics could make this organism model a useful tool to further elucidate some aspects of the interaction occurring between the microbiota and the human gut.

  3. Regulation of post-embryonic neuroblasts by Drosophila Grainyhead.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Mara S; Bray, Sarah J

    2005-12-01

    The Drosophila post-embryonic neuroblasts (pNBs) are neural stem cells that persist in the larval nervous system where they proliferate to produce neurons for the adult CNS. These pNBs provide a good model to investigate mechanisms regulating the maintenance and proliferation of stem cells. The transcription factor Grainyhead (Grh), which is required for morphogenesis of epidermal and tracheal cells, is also expressed in all pNBs. Here, we show that grh is essential for pNBs to adopt the stem cell programme appropriate to their position within the CNS. In grh mutants the abdominal pNBs produced more progeny while the thoracic pNBs, in contrast, divided less and produced fewer progeny than wild type. We investigated three candidates; the Neuroblast identify gene Castor, the signalling molecule Notch and the adhesion protein E-Cadherin, to determine whether they could mediate these effects. Neither Castor nor Notch fulfilled the criteria for intermediaries, and in particular Notch activity was found to be dispensable for the normal proliferation and survival of the pNBs. In contrast E-Cadherin, which has been shown to regulate pNB proliferation, was present at greatly reduced levels in the grh mutant pNBs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of Grh was sufficient to promote ectopic E-Cadherin and two conserved Grh-binding sites were identified in the E-Cadherin/shotgun flanking sequences, arguing that this gene is a downstream target. Thus one way Grh could regulate pNBs is through expression of E-cadherin, a protein that is thought to mediate interactions with the glial niche.

  4. From mouth to anus: Functional and structural relevance of enteric neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster gut.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Takayuki; Kenmoku, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal tract is the main organ involved in host nutritional homeostasis. Intestinal function in both vertebrates and invertebrates is partly controlled by enteric neurons that innervate the gut. Though anatomical and functional aspects of enteric neurons are relatively less characterized in Drosophila than in large insects, analyses of the role of the enteric neurons in flies have remarkably progressed in the last few years. In this review, we first provide a summary of the structure and function of the Drosophila intestine. We then discuss recent studies of the structure and function of enteric neurons in Drosophila melanogaster. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction Between Familial Transmission and a Constitutively Active Immune System Shapes Gut Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rupal; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2017-06-01

    Resident gut bacteria are constantly influencing the immune system, yet the role of the immune system in shaping microbiota composition during an organism's life span has remained unclear. Experiments in mice have been inconclusive due to differences in husbandry schemes that led to conflicting results. We used Drosophila as a genetically tractable system with a simpler gut bacterial population structure streamlined genetic backgrounds and established cross schemes to address this issue. We found that, depending on their genetic background, young flies had microbiota of different diversities that converged with age to the same Acetobacteraceae-dominated pattern in healthy flies. This pattern was accelerated in immune-compromised flies with higher bacterial load and gut cell death. Nevertheless, immune-compromised flies resembled their genetic background, indicating that familial transmission was the main force regulating gut microbiota. In contrast, flies with a constitutively active immune system had microbiota readily distinguishable from their genetic background with the introduction and establishment of previously undetectable bacterial families. This indicated the influence of immunity over familial transmission. Moreover, hyperactive immunity and increased enterocyte death resulted in the highest bacterial load observed starting from early adulthood. Cohousing experiments showed that the microenvironment also played an important role in the structure of the microbiota where flies with constitutive immunity defined the gut microbiota of their cohabitants. Our data show that, in Drosophila, constitutively active immunity shapes the structure and density of gut microbiota. Copyright © 2017 Mistry et al.

  6. The Mechanical Properties of Drosophila Jump Muscle Expressing Wild-Type and Embryonic Myosin Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Eldred, Catherine C.; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Koppes, Ryan A.; Yang, Chaoxing; Corr, David T.; Swank, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic Drosophila are highly useful for structure-function studies of muscle proteins. However, our ability to mechanically analyze transgenically expressed mutant proteins in Drosophila muscles has been limited to the skinned indirect flight muscle preparation. We have developed a new muscle preparation using the Drosophila tergal depressor of the trochanter (TDT or jump) muscle that increases our experimental repertoire to include maximum shortening velocity (Vslack), force-velocity curves and steady-state power generation; experiments not possible using indirect flight muscle fibers. When transgenically expressing its wild-type myosin isoform (Tr-WT) the TDT is equivalent to a very fast vertebrate muscle. TDT has a Vslack equal to 6.1 ± 0.3 ML/s at 15°C, a steep tension-pCa curve, isometric tension of 37 ± 3 mN/mm2, and maximum power production at 26% of isometric tension. Transgenically expressing an embryonic myosin isoform in the TDT muscle increased isometric tension 1.4-fold, but decreased Vslack 50% resulting in no significant difference in maximum power production compared to Tr-WT. Drosophila expressing embryonic myosin jumped <50% as far as Tr-WT that, along with comparisons to frog jump muscle studies, suggests fast muscle shortening velocity is relatively more important than high tension generation for Drosophila jumping. PMID:20371321

  7. Microsatellite repeat instability fuels evolution of embryonic enhancers in Hawaiian Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Andrew; Stroebele, Elizabeth; Erives, Albert

    2014-01-01

    For ∼30 million years, the eggs of Hawaiian Drosophila were laid in ever-changing environments caused by high rates of island formation. The associated diversification of the size and developmental rate of the syncytial fly embryo would have altered morphogenic gradients, thus necessitating frequent evolutionary compensation of transcriptional responses. We investigate the consequences these radiations had on transcriptional enhancers patterning the embryo to see whether their pattern of molecular evolution is different from non-Hawaiian species. We identify and functionally assay in transgenic D. melanogaster the Neurogenic Ectoderm Enhancers from two different Hawaiian Drosophila groups: (i) the picture wing group, and (ii) the modified mouthparts group. We find that the binding sites in this set of well-characterized enhancers are footprinted by diverse microsatellite repeat (MSR) sequences. We further show that Hawaiian embryonic enhancers in general are enriched in MSR relative to both Hawaiian non-embryonic enhancers and non-Hawaiian embryonic enhancers. We propose embryonic enhancers are sensitive to Activator spacing because they often serve as assembly scaffolds for the aggregation of transcription factor activator complexes. Furthermore, as most indels are produced by microsatellite repeat slippage, enhancers from Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, which experience dynamic evolutionary pressures, would become grossly enriched in MSR content.

  8. Microsatellite Repeat Instability Fuels Evolution of Embryonic Enhancers in Hawaiian Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Andrew; Stroebele, Elizabeth; Erives, Albert

    2014-01-01

    For ∼30 million years, the eggs of Hawaiian Drosophila were laid in ever-changing environments caused by high rates of island formation. The associated diversification of the size and developmental rate of the syncytial fly embryo would have altered morphogenic gradients, thus necessitating frequent evolutionary compensation of transcriptional responses. We investigate the consequences these radiations had on transcriptional enhancers patterning the embryo to see whether their pattern of molecular evolution is different from non-Hawaiian species. We identify and functionally assay in transgenic D. melanogaster the Neurogenic Ectoderm Enhancers from two different Hawaiian Drosophila groups: (i) the picture wing group, and (ii) the modified mouthparts group. We find that the binding sites in this set of well-characterized enhancers are footprinted by diverse microsatellite repeat (MSR) sequences. We further show that Hawaiian embryonic enhancers in general are enriched in MSR relative to both Hawaiian non-embryonic enhancers and non-Hawaiian embryonic enhancers. We propose embryonic enhancers are sensitive to Activator spacing because they often serve as assembly scaffolds for the aggregation of transcription factor activator complexes. Furthermore, as most indels are produced by microsatellite repeat slippage, enhancers from Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, which experience dynamic evolutionary pressures, would become grossly enriched in MSR content. PMID:24978198

  9. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Krogsdam, Anne; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27093431

  10. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sebald, Johanna; Willi, Michaela; Schoberleitner, Ines; Krogsdam, Anne; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. Preparation of embryos for electron microscopy of the Drosophila embryonic heart tube.

    PubMed

    Soplop, Nadine H; Patel, Rajesh; Kramer, Sunita G

    2009-12-21

    The morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic heart tube has emerged as a valuable model system for studying cell migration, cell-cell adhesion and cell shape changes during embryonic development. One of the challenges faced in studying this structure is that the lumen of the heart tube, as well as the membrane features that are crucial to heart tube formation, are difficult to visualize in whole mount embryos, due to the small size of the heart tube and intra-lumenal space relative to the embryo. The use of transmission electron microscopy allows for higher magnification of these structures and gives the advantage of examining the embryos in cross section, which easily reveals the size and shape of the lumen. In this video, we detail the process for reliable fixation, embedding, and sectioning of late stage Drosophila embryos in order to visualize the heart tube lumen as well as important cellular structures including cell-cell junctions and the basement membrane.

  12. Preparation of embryos for Electron Microscopy of the Drosophila embryonic heart tube

    PubMed Central

    Soplop, Nadine H.; Patel, Rajesh; Kramer, Sunita G.

    2009-01-01

    The morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic heart tube has emerged as a valuable model system for studying cell migration, cell-cell adhesion and cell shape changes during embryonic development. One of the challenges faced in studying this structure is that the lumen of the heart tube, as well as the membrane features that are crucial to heart tube formation, are difficult to visualize in whole mount embryos, due to the small size of the heart tube and intra-lumenal space relative to the embryo. The use of transmission electron microscopy allows for higher magnification of these structures and gives the advantage of examining the embryos in cross section, which easily reveals the size and shape of the lumen. In this video, we detail the process for reliable fixation, embedding, and sectioning of late stage Drosophila embryos in order to visualize the heart tube lumen as well as important cellular structures including cell-cell junctions and the basement membrane. PMID:20027180

  13. Transient adult microbiota, gut homeostasis and longevity: novel insights from the Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Erkosar, Berra; Leulier, François

    2014-11-17

    In the last decade, Drosophila has emerged as a useful model to study host-microbiota interactions, creating an active research field with prolific publications. In the last 2 years, several studies contributed to a better understanding of the dynamic nature of microbiota composition and its impact on gut immunity and intestinal tissue homeostasis. These studies depicted the mechanisms by which microbiota regulates gut homeostasis to modulate host fitness and lifespan. Moreover, the latest findings demonstrating that the gut is a physiologically and histologically compartmentalized organ brought fresh perspectives to study the region-specific nature of the interactions between the commensal microbes and the intestinal tissue, and consequences of these interactions on overall host biology.

  14. Genetic control of cuticle formation during embryonic development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Stephen; Dierick, Herman A; Bejsovec, Amy

    2002-01-01

    The embryonic cuticle of Drosophila melanogaster is deposited by the epidermal epithelium during stage 16 of development. This tough, waterproof layer is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the larval body. We have characterized mutations in a set of genes required for proper deposition and/or morphogenesis of the cuticle. Zygotic disruption of any one of these genes results in embryonic lethality. Mutant embryos are hyperactive within the eggshell, resulting in a high proportion reversed within the eggshell (the "retroactive" phenotype), and all show poor cuticle integrity when embryos are mechanically devitellinized. This last property results in embryonic cuticle preparations that appear grossly inflated compared to wild-type cuticles (the "blimp" phenotype). We find that one of these genes, krotzkopf verkehrt (kkv), encodes the Drosophila chitin synthase enzyme and that a closely linked gene, knickkopf (knk), encodes a novel protein that shows genetic interaction with the Drosophila E-cadherin, shotgun. We also demonstrate that two other known mutants, grainy head (grh) and retroactive (rtv), show the blimp phenotype when devitellinized, and we describe a new mutation, called zeppelin (zep), that shows the blimp phenotype but does not produce defects in the head cuticle as the other mutations do. PMID:12019232

  15. Vestigial expression in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Guss, Kirsten A; Mistry, Hemlata; Skeath, James B

    2008-09-01

    The Drosophila central nervous system is an excellent model system in which to resolve the genetic and molecular control of neuronal differentiation. Here we show that the wing selector vestigial is expressed in discrete sets of neurons. We track the axonal trajectories of VESTIGIAL-expressing cells in the ventral nerve cord and show that these cells descend from neuroblasts 1-2, 5-1, and 5-6. In addition, along the midline, VESTIGIAL is expressed in ventral unpaired median motorneurons and cells that may descend from the median neuroblast. These studies form the requisite descriptive foundation for functional studies addressing the role of vestigial during interneuron differentiation.

  16. A distinctive and host-restricted gut microbiota in populations of a cactophilic Drosophila species.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Vincent G; Carpinteyro-Ponce, Javier; Moran, Nancy A; Markow, Therese A

    2017-09-22

    Almost all animals possess microbial gut communities, but the nature of these communities varies immensely. For example, in social bees and mammals, composition is relatively constant within species and dominated by specialist bacteria that do not live elsewhere; whereas, in laboratory studies and field surveys of Drosophila melanogaster, gut communities consist of bacteria that are ingested with food and that vary widely among individuals and localities. We addressed whether an ecological specialist in its natural habitat has a microbiota dominated by gut specialists or by environmental bacteria. Drosophila nigrospiracula is a Sonoran Desert endemic restricted to decaying tissues of two giant columnar cacti, Pachycereus pringlei (cardón) and Carnegeia gigantea (saguaro). We found that the D. nigrospiracula microbiota differs strikingly from that of the cactus tissue on which the same flies feed. The most abundant bacteria in the flies are rare or completely absent in the cactus tissue and are consistently abundant in flies from different cacti and localities. Several of these fly-associated bacterial groups, such as the bacterial order Orbales and the genera Serpens and Dysgonomonas, have been identified in prior surveys of insects from the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Diptera, including several Drosophila species. Although functions of these bacterial groups are mostly unexplored, Orbales species studied in bees are known to breakdown plant polysaccharides and use resulting sugars. Thus, these bacterial groups appear to be specialized to the insect gut environment, where they may colonize by direct host-to-host transmission in natural settings.Importance Flies in the genus Drosophila have become laboratory models for microbiota research, yet the bacteria commonly used in these experiments are rarely found in wild-caught flies and instead represent bacteria also present in the food. This study shows that an ecologically specialized Drosophila

  17. The Host as the Driver of the Microbiota in the Gut and External Environment of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adam C.-N.; Luo, Yuan; Jing, Xiangfeng; Franzenburg, Soeren; Bost, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Most associations between animals and their gut microbiota are dynamic, involving sustained transfer of food-associated microbial cells into the gut and shedding of microorganisms into the external environment with feces, but the interacting effects of host and microbial factors on the composition of the internal and external microbial communities are poorly understood. This study on laboratory cultures of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster reared in continuous contact with their food revealed time-dependent changes of the microbial communities in the food that were strongly influenced by the presence and abundance of Drosophila. When germfree Drosophila eggs were aseptically added to nonsterile food, the microbiota in the food and flies converged to a composition dramatically different from that in fly-free food, showing that Drosophila has microbiota-independent effects on the food microbiota. The microbiota in both the flies that developed from unmanipulated eggs (bearing microorganisms) and the associated food was dominated by the bacteria most abundant on the eggs, demonstrating effective vertical transmission via surface contamination of eggs. Food coinoculated with a four-species defined bacterial community of Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species revealed the progressive elimination of Lactobacillus from the food bearing few or no Drosophila, indicating the presence of antagonistic interactions between Acetobacter and Lactobacillus. Drosophila at high densities ameliorated the Acetobacter/Lactobacillus antagonism, enabling Lactobacillus to persist. This study with Drosophila demonstrates how animals can have major, coordinated effects on the composition of microbial communities in the gut and immediate environment. PMID:26150460

  18. From pathogens to microbiota: How Drosophila intestinal stem cells react to gut microbes.

    PubMed

    Bonfini, Alessandro; Liu, Xi; Buchon, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    The intestine acts as one of the interfaces between an organism and its external environment. As the primary digestive organ, it is constantly exposed to a multitude of stresses as it processes and absorbs nutrients. Among these is the recurring damage induced by ingested pathogenic and commensal microorganisms. Both the bacterial activity and immune response itself can result in the loss of epithelial cells, which subsequently requires replacement. In the Drosophila midgut, this regenerative role is fulfilled by intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Microbes not only trigger cell loss and replacement, but also modify intestinal and whole organism physiology, thus modulating ISC activity. Regulation of ISCs is integrated through a complex network of signaling pathways initiated by other gut cell populations, including enterocytes, enteroblasts, enteroendocrine and visceral muscles cells. The gut also receives signals from circulating immune cells, the hemocytes, to properly respond against infection. This review summarizes the types of gut microbes found in Drosophila, mechanisms for their elimination, and provides an integrated view of the signaling pathways that regulate tissue renewal in the midgut. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-diversity bacterial community in the gut of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chun Nin Adam; Ng, Patrick; Douglas, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The bacteria in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster of different life stages was quantified by 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The sequence reads were dominated by 5 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at ≤ 97% sequence identity that could be assigned to Acetobacter pomorum, A. tropicalis, Lactobacillus brevis, L. fructivorans and L. plantarum. The saturated rarefaction curves and species richness indices indicated that the sampling (85 000–159 000 reads per sample) was comprehensive. Parallel diagnostic PCR assays revealed only minor variation in the complement of the five bacterial species across individual insects and three D. melanogaster strains. Other gut-associated bacteria included 6 OTUs with low %ID to previously reported sequences, raising the possibility that they represent novel taxa within the genera Acetobacter and Lactobacillus. A developmental change in the most abundant species, from L. fructivorans in young adults to A. pomorum in aged adults was identified; changes in gut oxygen tension or immune system function might account for this effect. Host immune responses and disturbance may also contribute to the low bacterial diversity in the Drosophila gut habitat. PMID:21631690

  20. Gut microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster interacts with Wolbachia but does not contribute to Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yixin H; Seleznev, Andrei; Flores, Heather A; Woolfit, Megan; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-01

    Animals experience near constant infection with microorganisms. A significant proportion of these microbiota reside in the alimentary tract. There is a growing appreciation for the roles gut microbiota play in host biology. The gut microbiota of insects, for example, have been shown to help the host overcome pathogen infection either through direct competition or indirectly by stimulating host immunity. These defenses may also be supplemented by coinfecting maternally inherited microbes such as Wolbachia. The presence of Wolbachia in a host can delay and/or reduce death caused by RNA viruses. Whether the gut microbiota of the host interacts with Wolbachia, or vice versa, the precise role of Wolbachia in antiviral protection is not known. In this study, we used 16S rDNA sequencing to characterise changes in gut microbiota composition in Drosophila melanogaster associated with Wolbachia infection and antibiotic treatment. We subsequently tested whether changes in gut composition via antibiotic treatment altered Wolbachia-mediated antiviral properties. We found that both antibiotics and Wolbachia significantly reduced the biodiversity of the gut microbiota without changing the total microbial load. We also showed that changing the gut microbiota composition with antibiotic treatment enhanced Wolbachia density but did not confer greater antiviral protection against Drosophila C virus to the host. We concluded there are significant interactions between Wolbachia and gut microbiota, but changing gut microbiota composition is not likely to be a means through which Wolbachia conveys antiviral protection to its host.

  1. Genetic Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Uncovers a Novel Set of Genes Required for Embryonic Epithelial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Isabel; Geiger, Jennifer A.; Santos, Ana Catarina; Carlos, Vanessa; Jacinto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The wound healing response is an essential mechanism to maintain the integrity of epithelia and protect all organisms from the surrounding milieu. In the “purse-string” mechanism of wound closure, an injured epithelial sheet cinches its hole closed via an intercellular contractile actomyosin cable. This process is conserved across species and utilized by both embryonic as well as adult tissues, but remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In an effort to identify new players involved in purse-string wound closure we developed a wounding strategy suitable for screening large numbers of Drosophila embryos. Using this methodology, we observe wound healing defects in Jun-related antigen (encoding DJUN) and scab (encoding Drosophila αPS3 integrin) mutants and performed a forward genetics screen on the basis of insertional mutagenesis by transposons that led to the identification of 30 lethal insertional mutants with defects in embryonic epithelia repair. One of the mutants identified is an insertion in the karst locus, which encodes Drosophila βHeavy-spectrin. We show βHeavy-spectrin (βH) localization to the wound edges where it presumably exerts an essential function to bring the wound to normal closure. PMID:19884309

  2. Morphological differentiation of the embryonic peripheral neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bodmer, Rolf; Jan, Yuh Nung

    1987-02-01

    The stereotyped segmental and dorso-ventral organization of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of Drosophila embryos allows the identification of all the neurons in the body wall. Distinct classes of neurons are distinguishable according to their location, the targets they innervate, the particular shape of their dendrites and their cell size. Those neurons innervating external sensory structures (es) and chordotonal organs (ch) have single dendrites and have been previously described (Ghysen et al. 1986; Dambly-Chaudiere and Ghysen 1986; Campos-Ortega and Hartenstein 1985). We describe here the identity and morphological features of three other classes of neurons in the body segments which have multiple dendrites (md neurons): 1) neurons that give rise to elaborate dendritic arborisations (da neurons); 2) neurons that have bipolar dendrites (bd neurons); 3) neurons that arborize around particular tracheal branches (td neurons). The thoracic hemisegment (T2 and T3) contains 13 da, one bd, one td, 21 es and four ch neurons; the abdominal hemisegment (A1 to A7) contains 14 da, three bd, three td, 15 es and eight ch neurons. The arrangement of the segmented peripheral neurons is highly invariant and provides a favorable assay system for the genetic analysis of neurodevelopment.

  3. Spatial expression of transcription factors in Drosophila embryonic organ development.

    PubMed

    Hammonds, Ann S; Bristow, Christopher A; Fisher, William W; Weiszmann, Richard; Wu, Siqi; Hartenstein, Volker; Kellis, Manolis; Yu, Bin; Frise, Erwin; Celniker, Susan E

    2013-12-20

    Site-specific transcription factors (TFs) bind DNA regulatory elements to control expression of target genes, forming the core of gene regulatory networks. Despite decades of research, most studies focus on only a small number of TFs and the roles of many remain unknown. We present a systematic characterization of spatiotemporal gene expression patterns for all known or predicted Drosophila TFs throughout embryogenesis, the first such comprehensive study for any metazoan animal. We generated RNA expression patterns for all 708 TFs by in situ hybridization, annotated the patterns using an anatomical controlled vocabulary, and analyzed TF expression in the context of organ system development. Nearly all TFs are expressed during embryogenesis and more than half are specifically expressed in the central nervous system. Compared to other genes, TFs are enriched early in the development of most organ systems, and throughout the development of the nervous system. Of the 535 TFs with spatially restricted expression, 79% are dynamically expressed in multiple organ systems while 21% show single-organ specificity. Of those expressed in multiple organ systems, 77 TFs are restricted to a single organ system either early or late in development. Expression patterns for 354 TFs are characterized for the first time in this study. We produced a reference TF dataset for the investigation of gene regulatory networks in embryogenesis, and gained insight into the expression dynamics of the full complement of TFs controlling the development of each organ system.

  4. Genomic Regions Required for Morphogenesis of the Drosophila Embryonic Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, D.; Scott, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila midgut is an excellent system for studying the cell migration, cell-cell communication, and morphogenetic events that occur in organ formation. Genes representative of regulatory gene families common to all animals, including homeotic, TGFβ, and Wnt genes, play roles in midgut development. To find additional regulators of midgut morphogenesis, we screened a set of genomic deficiencies for midgut phenotypes. Fifteen genomic intervals necessary for proper midgut morphogenesis were identified; three contain genes already known to act in the midgut. Three other genomic regions are required for formation of the endoderm or visceral mesoderm components of the midgut. Nine regions are required for proper formation of the midgut constrictions. The E75 ecdysone-induced gene, which encodes a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is the relevant gene in one region and is essential for proper formation of midgut constrictions. E75 acts downstream of the previously known constriction regulators or in parallel. Temporal hormonal control may therefore work in conjunction with spatial regulation by the homeotic genes in midgut development. Another genomic region is required to activate transcription of the homeotic genes Antp and Scr specifically in visceral mesoderm. The genomic regions identified by this screen provide a map to novel midgut development regulators. PMID:8582615

  5. Microbiota-Induced Changes in Drosophila melanogaster Host Gene Expression and Gut Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Buchon, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To elucidate mechanisms underlying the complex relationships between a host and its microbiota, we used the genetically tractable model Drosophila melanogaster. Consistent with previous studies, the microbiota was simple in composition and diversity. However, analysis of single flies revealed high interfly variability that correlated with differences in feeding. To understand the effects of this simple and variable consortium, we compared the transcriptome of guts from conventionally reared flies to that for their axenically reared counterparts. Our analysis of two wild-type fly lines identified 121 up- and 31 downregulated genes. The majority of these genes were associated with immune responses, tissue homeostasis, gut physiology, and metabolism. By comparing the transcriptomes of young and old flies, we identified temporally responsive genes and showed that the overall impact of microbiota was greater in older flies. In addition, comparison of wild-type gene expression with that of an immune-deficient line revealed that 53% of upregulated genes exerted their effects through the immune deficiency (Imd) pathway. The genes included not only classic immune response genes but also those involved in signaling, gene expression, and metabolism, unveiling new and unexpected connections between immunity and other systems. Given these findings, we further characterized the effects of gut-associated microbes on gut morphology and epithelial architecture. The results showed that the microbiota affected gut morphology through their impacts on epithelial renewal rate, cellular spacing, and the composition of different cell types in the epithelium. Thus, while bacteria in the gut are highly variable, the influence of the microbiota at large has far-reaching effects on host physiology. PMID:24865556

  6. EGFR-dependent TOR-independent endocycles support Drosophila gut epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinyi; Bandura, Jennifer; Zhang, Peng; Jin, Yinhua; Reuter, Hanna; Edgar, Bruce A

    2017-05-09

    Following gut epithelial damage, epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase (EGFR/MAPK) signalling triggers Drosophila intestinal stem cells to produce enteroblasts (EBs) and enterocytes (ECs) that regenerate the gut. As EBs differentiate into ECs, they become postmitotic, but undergo extensive growth and DNA endoreplication. Here we report that EGFR/RAS/MAPK signalling is required and sufficient to drive damage-induced EB/EC growth. Endoreplication occurs exclusively in EBs and newborn ECs that inherit EGFR and active MAPK from fast-dividing progenitors. Mature ECs lack EGF receptors and are refractory to growth signalling. Genetic tests indicated that stress-dependent EGFR/MAPK promotes gut regeneration via a novel mechanism that operates independently of Insulin/Pi3K/TOR signalling, which is nevertheless required in nonstressed conditions. The E2f1 transcription factor is required for and sufficient to drive EC endoreplication, and Ras/Raf signalling upregulates E2f1 levels posttranscriptionally. We illustrate how distinct signalling mechanisms direct stress-dependent versus homeostatic regeneration, and highlight the importance of postmitotic cell growth in gut epithelial repair.

  7. EGFR-dependent TOR-independent endocycles support Drosophila gut epithelial regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinyi; Bandura, Jennifer; Zhang, Peng; Jin, Yinhua; Reuter, Hanna; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Following gut epithelial damage, epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase (EGFR/MAPK) signalling triggers Drosophila intestinal stem cells to produce enteroblasts (EBs) and enterocytes (ECs) that regenerate the gut. As EBs differentiate into ECs, they become postmitotic, but undergo extensive growth and DNA endoreplication. Here we report that EGFR/RAS/MAPK signalling is required and sufficient to drive damage-induced EB/EC growth. Endoreplication occurs exclusively in EBs and newborn ECs that inherit EGFR and active MAPK from fast-dividing progenitors. Mature ECs lack EGF receptors and are refractory to growth signalling. Genetic tests indicated that stress-dependent EGFR/MAPK promotes gut regeneration via a novel mechanism that operates independently of Insulin/Pi3K/TOR signalling, which is nevertheless required in nonstressed conditions. The E2f1 transcription factor is required for and sufficient to drive EC endoreplication, and Ras/Raf signalling upregulates E2f1 levels posttranscriptionally. We illustrate how distinct signalling mechanisms direct stress-dependent versus homeostatic regeneration, and highlight the importance of postmitotic cell growth in gut epithelial repair. PMID:28485389

  8. The Gut Commensal Microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster Is Modified by the Endosymbiont Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Fast, Eva M.; Guo, Rong; Vaisman, Natalie; Ortiz, Luis; Bybee, Joanna; Slatko, Barton E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria and the gut microbiome have independently been shown to affect several aspects of insect biology, including reproduction, development, life span, stem cell activity, and resistance to human pathogens, in insect vectors. This work shows that Wolbachia bacteria, which reside mainly in the fly germline, affect the microbial species present in the fly gut in a lab-reared strain. Drosophila melanogaster hosts two main genera of commensal bacteria—Acetobacter and Lactobacillus. Wolbachia-infected flies have significantly reduced titers of Acetobacter. Sampling of the microbiome of axenic flies fed with equal proportions of both bacteria shows that the presence of Wolbachia bacteria is a significant determinant of the composition of the microbiome throughout fly development. However, this effect is host genotype dependent. To investigate the mechanism of microbiome modulation, the effect of Wolbachia bacteria on Imd and reactive oxygen species pathways, the main regulators of immune response in the fly gut, was measured. The presence of Wolbachia bacteria does not induce significant changes in the expression of the genes for the effector molecules in either pathway. Furthermore, microbiome modulation is not due to direct interaction between Wolbachia bacteria and gut microbes. Confocal analysis shows that Wolbachia bacteria are absent from the gut lumen. These results indicate that the mechanistic basis of the modulation of composition of the microbiome by Wolbachia bacteria is more complex than a direct bacterial interaction or the effect of Wolbachia bacteria on fly immunity. The findings reported here highlight the importance of considering the composition of the gut microbiome and host genetic background during Wolbachia-induced phenotypic studies and when formulating microbe-based disease vector control strategies. IMPORTANCE Wolbachia bacteria are intracellular bacteria present in the microbiome of a large fraction of

  9. Electrolyte transport pathways induced in the midgut epithelium of Drosophila melanogaster larvae by commensal gut microbiota and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Shubha R; Vazhappilly, Abraham T; Sane, Abhay; D'Silva, Natalie M; Tripathi, Subrata

    2017-01-15

    The digestive tract of larval and adult Drosophila is an excellent analogue of the mammalian gut. Enterocytes of the posterior midgut are separated by septa, with no paracellular path, and therefore perform both immune and transport functions. Using microperfusion electrophysiology, we show that larvae emerging from the embryo into sterile medium have symmetrical apical and basal membrane conductances while larvae emerging into non-sterile medium have apical membranes fivefold more conductive than basal membranes. The channels inserted into the apical membranes could originate in microbiata or host and mediate recognition of microbes. Entomopathogenic cyclic peptide toxins deplete intracellular ions reversibly, forming transient ion channels that do not conduct water, unlike an ionophore like nystatin that depletes ions irreversibly. We show the feasibility of studying the interaction of a single microbial species, or tractable combinatorials of microbial species, with only enterocytes in the primary epithelial barrier. Microbiota colonizing exposed epithelial surfaces are vital for sustenance of metazoan life, but communication between microbiota, epithelial cells and the host immune system is only beginning to be understood. We address this issue in the posterior midgut epithelium of Drosophila larvae where nutrient transport and immune functions are exclusively transcellular. We showed that larvae emerging into a sterile post-embryonic environment have symmetrical apical and basal membranes. In contrast, larvae emerging into non-sterile media, the source of microbiota, have markedly asymmetrical membranes, with apical membrane conductance more than fivefold higher than the basal membrane. As an example of pathogen action, we showed that the entomopathogenic fungal toxin destruxin A (Dx) depleted intracellular ions. Reversibility of action of Dx was verified by bilayer reconstitution in forming transient non-specific channels that conduct ions but not water. Dx

  10. The Embryonically Active Gene, Unkempt, of Drosophila Encodes a Cys(3)his Finger Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, J.; Weiss, N.; Murli, S.; Mohammadi, S.; Vani, K.; Vasilakis, G.; Song, C. H.; Epstein, A.; Kuang, T.; English, J.; Cherdak, D.

    1992-01-01

    The unkempt gene of Drosophila encodes a set of embryonic RNAs, which are abundant during early stages of embryogenesis and are present ubiquitously in most somatic tissues from the syncytial embryo through stage 15 of embryogenesis. Expression of unkempt RNAs becomes restricted predominantly to the central nervous system in stages 16 and early 17. Analysis of cDNAs from this locus reveals the presence of five Cys(3)His fingers in the protein product. Isolation and analysis of mutations affecting the unkempt gene, including complete deletions of this gene, indicate that there is no zygotic requirement for unkempt during embryogenesis, presumably due to the contribution of maternally supplied RNA, although the gene is essential during post-embryonic development. PMID:1339381

  11. Dynamics of Drosophila embryonic patterning network perturbed in space and time using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, Elena M; Lee, Ji Hwan; Fu, Lydia A; Patel, Nipam H; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2005-04-28

    Biochemical networks are perturbed both by fluctuations in environmental conditions and genetic variation. These perturbations must be compensated for, especially when they occur during embryonic pattern formation. Complex chemical reaction networks displaying spatiotemporal dynamics have been controlled and understood by perturbing their environment in space and time. Here, we apply this approach using microfluidics to investigate the robust network in Drosophila melanogaster that compensates for variation in the Bicoid morphogen gradient. We show that the compensation system can counteract the effects of extremely unnatural environmental conditions--a temperature step--in which the anterior and posterior halves of the embryo are developing at different temperatures and thus at different rates. Embryonic patterning was normal under this condition, suggesting that a simple reciprocal gradient system is not the mechanism of compensation. Time-specific reversals of the temperature step narrowed down the critical period for compensation to between 65 and 100 min after onset of embryonic development. The microfluidic technology used here may prove useful to future studies, as it allows spatial and temporal regulation of embryonic development.

  12. In vivo function and comparative genomic analyses of the Drosophila gut microbiota identify candidate symbiosis factors

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Chaston, John M.; Wang, Yiping; Winans, Nathan J.; Sannino, David R.; Wong, Adam C. N.; Dobson, Adam J.; Kagle, Jeanne; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis is often characterized by co-evolutionary changes in the genomes of the partners involved. An understanding of these changes can provide insight into the nature of the relationship, including the mechanisms that initiate and maintain an association between organisms. In this study we examined the genome sequences of bacteria isolated from the Drosophila melanogaster gut with the objective of identifying genes that are important for function in the host. We compared microbiota isolates with con-specific or closely related bacterial species isolated from non-fly environments. First the phenotype of germ-free Drosophila (axenic flies) was compared to that of flies colonized with specific bacteria (gnotobiotic flies) as a measure of symbiotic function. Non-fly isolates were functionally distinct from bacteria isolated from flies, conferring slower development and an altered nutrient profile in the host, traits known to be microbiota-dependent. Comparative genomic methods were next employed to identify putative symbiosis factors: genes found in bacteria that restore microbiota-dependent traits to gnotobiotic flies, but absent from those that do not. Factors identified include riboflavin synthesis and stress resistance. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify protein coding genes for which fly-isolate sequences were more similar to each other than to other sequences, reasoning that these genes may have a shared function unique to the fly environment. This method identified genes in Acetobacter species that cluster in two distinct genomic loci: one predicted to be involved in oxidative stress detoxification and another encoding an efflux pump. In summary, we leveraged genomic and in vivo functional comparisons to identify candidate traits that distinguish symbiotic bacteria. These candidates can serve as the basis for further work investigating the genetic requirements of bacteria for function and persistence in the Drosophila gut. PMID:25408687

  13. FlyPNS, a database of the Drosophila embryonic and larval peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Orgogozo, Virginie; Grueber, Wesley B

    2005-01-01

    Background The embryonic and larval peripheral nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster is extensively studied as a very powerful model of developmental biology. One main advantage of this system is the ability to study the origin and development of individual sensory cells. However, there remain several discrepancies regarding the organization of sensory organs in each abdominal segment A1-A7. Description We have constructed a web site called FlyPNS (for Fly Peripheral Nervous System) that consolidates a wide range of published and unpublished information about the embryonic and larval sensory organs. It communicates (1) a PNS pattern that solves the discrepancies that have been found in the recent literature, (2) the correspondence between the different nomenclatures that have been used so far, (3) a comprehensive description of each sensory organ, and (4) a list of both published and unpublished markers to reliably identify each PNS cell. Conclusions The FlyPNS database integrates disparate data and nomenclature and thus helps understanding the conflicting observations that have been published recently. Furthermore, it is designed to provide assistance in the identification and study of individual sensory cells. We think it will be a useful resource for any researcher with interest in Drosophila sensory organs. PMID:15717925

  14. senseless is necessary for the survival of embryonic salivary glands in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Beckendorf, Steven K

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis in developing Drosophila embryos is rare and confined to specific groups of cells. We explain how one organ, salivary glands, of Drosophila embryos avoids apoptosis. senseless (sens), a Zn-finger transcription factor, is expressed in the salivary primordium and later in the differentiated salivary glands. The regulation of sens expression in the salivary placodes is more complex than observed in the embryonic PNS. We have shown that sens expression is initiated in the salivary placodes by fork head (fkh), a winged helix transcription factor. The expression of sens is maintained in the salivary glands by fkh and by daughterless (da), a bHLH family member. In this study, we have identified sage, a salivary-specific bHLH protein as a new heterodimeric partner for da protein in the salivary glands. In addition, our data suggest that sage RNAi embryos have a phenotype similar to sens and that sage is necessary to maintain expression of sens in the embryonic salivary glands. Furthermore, we show that in the salivary glands, sens acts as an anti-apoptotic protein by repressing reaper and possibly hid.

  15. Discovery of progenitor cell signatures by time-series synexpression analysis during Drosophila embryonic cell immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Dequéant, Mary-Lee; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Hu, Yanhui; Spirohn, Kerstin; Simcox, Amanda; Hannon, Gregory J.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The use of time series profiling to identify groups of functionally related genes (synexpression groups) is a powerful approach for the discovery of gene function. Here we apply this strategy during RasV12 immortalization of Drosophila embryonic cells, a phenomenon not well characterized. Using high-resolution transcriptional time-series datasets, we generated a gene network based on temporal expression profile similarities. This analysis revealed that common immortalized cells are related to adult muscle precursors (AMPs), a stem cell-like population contributing to adult muscles and sharing properties with vertebrate satellite cells. Remarkably, the immortalized cells retained the capacity for myogenic differentiation when treated with the steroid hormone ecdysone. Further, we validated in vivo the transcription factor CG9650, the ortholog of mammalian Bcl11a/b, as a regulator of AMP proliferation predicted by our analysis. Our study demonstrates the power of time series synexpression analysis to characterize Drosophila embryonic progenitor lines and identify stem/progenitor cell regulators. PMID:26438832

  16. Development of the embryonic and larval peripheral nervous system of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Singhania, Aditi; Grueber, Wesley B.

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) of embryonic and larval stage Drosophila consists of diverse types of sensory neurons positioned along the body wall. Sensory neurons, and associated end organs, show highly stereotyped locations and morphologies. The many powerful genetic tools for gene manipulation available in Drosophila make the PNS an advantageous system for elucidating basic principles of neural development. Studies of the Drosophila PNS have provided key insights into molecular mechanisms of cell fate specification, asymmetric cell division, and dendritic morphogenesis. A canonical lineage gives rise to sensory neurons and associated organs, and cells within this lineage are diversified through asymmetric cell divisions. Newly specified sensory neurons develop specific dendritic patterns, which are controlled by numerous factors including transcriptional regulators, interactions with neighboring neurons, and intracellular trafficking systems. In addition, sensory axons show modality specific terminations in the central nervous system, which are patterned by secreted ligands and their receptors expressed by sensory axons. Modality-specific axon projections are critical for coordinated larval behaviors. We review the molecular basis for PNS development and address some of the instances in which the mechanisms and molecules identified are conserved in vertebrate development. PMID:24896657

  17. Development of the embryonic and larval peripheral nervous system of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Aditi; Grueber, Wesley B

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) of embryonic and larval stage Drosophila consists of diverse types of sensory neurons positioned along the body wall. Sensory neurons, and associated end organs, show highly stereotyped locations and morphologies. Many powerful genetic tools for gene manipulation available in Drosophila make the PNS an advantageous system for elucidating basic principles of neural development. Studies of the Drosophila PNS have provided key insights into molecular mechanisms of cell fate specification, asymmetric cell division, and dendritic morphogenesis. A canonical lineage gives rise to sensory neurons and associated organs, and cells within this lineage are diversified through asymmetric cell divisions. Newly specified sensory neurons develop specific dendritic patterns, which are controlled by numerous factors including transcriptional regulators, interactions with neighboring neurons, and intracellular trafficking systems. In addition, sensory axons show modality specific terminations in the central nervous system, which are patterned by secreted ligands and their receptors expressed by sensory axons. Modality-specific axon projections are critical for coordinated larval behaviors. We review the molecular basis for PNS development and address some of the instances in which the mechanisms and molecules identified are conserved in vertebrate development.

  18. Gut-like structures from mouse embryonic stem cells as an in vitro model for gut organogenesis preserving developmental potential after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Shigeko; Kuwahara, Masaki; Ogaeri, Takunori; Zhu, Pu; Kurahashi, Masaaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2006-12-01

    Recently, we reported the formation of gut-like structures from mouse ESCs in vitro. To determine whether ESCs provide an in vitro model of gastrointestinal (GI) tracts and their organogenesis, we investigated the morphological features, formation process, cellular development, and regional location within the GI tract by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We also examined the developmental potential by transplantation into kidney capsules. The results demonstrated that Id2-expressing epithelium developed first, alpha-smooth muscle actin appeared around the periphery, and finally, the gut-like structures were formed into a three-layer organ with well-differentiated epithelium. A connective tissue layer and musculature with interstitial cells of Cajal developed, similar to organogenesis of the embryonic gut. Enteric neurons appeared underdeveloped, and blood vessels were absent. Many structures expressed intestinal markers Cdx2 and 5-hydroxytryptamine but not the stomach marker H(+)/K(+) ATPase. Transplants obtained blood vessels and extrinsic nerve growth from the host to prolong life, and even grafts of premature structures did not form teratoma. In conclusion, gut-like structures were provided with prototypical tissue components of the GI tract and are inherent in the intestine rather than the stomach. The formation process was basically same as in gut organogenesis. They maintain their developmental potential after transplantation. Therefore, gut-like structures provide a unique and useful in vitro system for development and stem cell studies of the GI tract, including transplantation experiments.

  19. Tissue distribution of PEBBLE RNA and pebble protein during Drosophila embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, S N; Saint, R; Bellen, H J

    2000-02-01

    pebble (pbl) is required for cytokinesis during postblastoderm mitoses (Hime, G., Saint, R., 1992. Zygotic expression of the pebble locus is required for cytokinesis during the postblastoderm mitoses of Drosophila. Development 114, 165-171; Lehner, C.F., 1992. The pebble gene is required for cytokinesis in Drosophila. J. Cell Sci. 103, 1021-1030) and encodes a putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rho1 GTPase (Prokopenko, S.N., Brumby, A., O'Keefe, L., Prior, L., He, Y., Saint, R., Bellen, H.J., 1999. A putative exchange factor for Rho1 GTPase is required for initiation of cytokinesis in Drosophila. Genes Dev. 13, 2301-2314). Mutations in pbl result in the absence of a contractile ring leading to a failure of cytokinesis and formation of polyploid multinucleate cells. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of PBL demonstrated that during mitosis, PBL accumulates at the cleavage furrow at the anaphase to telophase transition when assembly of a contractile ring is initiated (Prokopenko, S.N., Brumby, A., O'Keefe, L., Prior, L., He, Y., Saint, R., Bellen, H.J., 1999. A putative exchange factor for Rho1 GTPase is required for initiation of cytokinesis in Drosophila. Genes Dev. 13, 2301-2314). In addition, levels of PBL protein cycle during each round of cell division with the highest levels of PBL found in telophase and interphase nuclei. Here, we report the expression pattern of pbl during embryonic development. We show that PEBBLE RNA and PBL protein have a similar tissue distribution and are expressed in a highly dynamic pattern throughout embryogenesis. We show that PBL is strongly enriched in dividing nuclei in syncytial embryos and in pole cells as well as in nuclei of dividing cells in postblastoderm embryos. Our expression data correlate well with the phenotypes observed in pole cells and, particularly, with the absence of cytokinesis after cellular blastoderm formation in pbl mutants.

  20. Expression of a set of glial cell-specific markers in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hui Jeong; Jeon, Sang-Hak; Kim, Sang Hee

    2014-06-01

    The types of glia in the central nervous system (CNS) of the Drosophila embryo include longitudinal glia (LG), cell body glia (CBG), and peripheral glia (PG). Transcription factors, such as glial cell missing and reverse polarity, are well-established general glial cell markers. Only a few glial cell-specific markers have been identified in the Drosophila embryonic CNS, thus far. In the present study, we employed the glial cell-specific markers for LG (vir-1/CG5453 and CG31235), CBG (fabp/CG6783 and CG11902), and PG (CG2310 and moody/CG4322), and comprehensively analyzed their expression patterns, during the embryonic CNS development. Our study validated the specificity of a set of glial markers, and further revealed their spatio-temporal expression patterns, which will aid in the understanding of the developmental lineage, and investigating their role in the development and homeostasis of the Drosophila CNS in vivo.

  1. JNK activity in somatic stem cells causes loss of tissue homeostasis in the aging Drosophila gut

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoît; Hochmuth, Christine E.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Metazoans employ cytoprotective and regenerative strategies to maintain tissue homeostasis. Understanding the coordination of these strategies is critical to develop accurate models for aging and associated diseases. Here we show that cytoprotective Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling influences regeneration in the Drosophila gut by directing proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Interestingly, this function of JNK contributes to the loss of tissue homeostasis in old and stressed intestines by promoting the accumulation of mis-differentiated ISC daughter cells. Ectopic Delta/Notch signaling in these cells causes their abnormal differentiation, but also limits JNK-induced proliferation. Protective JNK signaling, and control of cell proliferation and differentiation by Delta/Notch signaling thus have to be carefully balanced to ensure tissue homeostasis. Our findings suggest that this balance is lost in old animals, increasing the potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID:18940735

  2. The role of the microbial environment in Drosophila post-embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Strigini, Maura; Leulier, François

    2016-11-01

    Development, growth and maturation of animals are under genetic and environmental control. Multicellular organisms interact throughout their lives with a variety of environment- and body-associated microorganisms. It has now been appreciated that the very conspicuous and varied microbial population associated with the food and the gastro-intestinal tract is a critical factor that can influence growth. Beyond the phenomenology, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of microbes on development are being revealed from studies in Drosophila melanogaster, a particularly well suited system for a mechanistic understanding of host/microbiota interactions. Association of otherwise germ-free eggs with specific bacterial strains isolated from Drosophila gut samples can accelerate growth in larvae raised on restrictive diets. We review advances made possible by the exploitation of such simplified gnotobiotic systems in the search for the genes, molecules and physiological adaptations responsible for this effect in both host and microbes. Transposon mutagenesis and gene-trait match studies in bacteria can identify the key microbial genes and metabolites required for the beneficial effect, acetic acid being one of them. In the fly, functional genomic analysis, transcriptomics and metabolomics point to the modulation of systemic insulin and steroid hormone signalling as well as the regulation of intestinal physiology, including the enhancement of intestinal protease activity, as crucial mediators of the host's response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid phosphate phosphatase activity regulates dispersal and bilateral sorting of embryonic germ cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Andrew D.; Kunwar, Prabhat S.; Lehmann, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, germ cell survival and directionality of migration are controlled by two lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPP), wunen (wun) and wunen-2 (wun2). wun wun2 double mutant analysis reveals that the two genes, hereafter collectively called wunens, act redundantly in primordial germ cells. We find that wunens mediate germ cell-germ cell repulsion and that this repulsion is necessary for germ cell dispersal and proper transepithelial migration at the onset of migration and for the equal sorting of the germ cells between the two embryonic gonads during their migration. We propose that this dispersal function optimizes adult fecundity by assuring maximal germ cell occupancy of both gonads. Furthermore, we find that the requirement for wunens in germ cell survival can be eliminated by blocking germ cell migration. We suggest that this essential function of Wunen is needed to maintain cell integrity in actively migrating germ cells. PMID:20431117

  4. The function of the Drosophila argos gene product in the development of embryonic chordotonal organs.

    PubMed

    Okabe, M; Sawamoto, K; Okano, H

    1996-04-10

    We characterized the embryonic expression pattern and mutant phenotypes of the Drosophila gene argos, which encodes a secreted protein with an epidermal growth factor motif. The argos null mutation caused an increase in chordotonal (Ch) organs in both the thoracic and the abdominal segments, whereas overexpression of the argos gene resulted in a decrease in these organs. We showed that the argos transcripts are expressed transiently in the cells surrounding the Ch organ precursor and that the gene rhomboid (rho), which is involved in the regulation of the number of Ch organs, acts epistatically to argos in this event. Our findings suggest that argos plays a role in Ch organ precursor formation and regulates the final number of Ch organs.

  5. Identification of the protective effects of traditional medicinal plants against SDS-induced Drosophila gut damage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Liu, Zonglin; Chen, Yuchen; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-10-01

    Traditional medicinal plants are widely used as immunomodulatory medicines that help improve health. A total of 50 different plants used for the treatment of toxicity were screened for their in vivo protective effects. Flies were fed a standard cornmeal-yeast medium (control group) or the standard medium containing medicinal plant extracts (experimental groups). Assessment of the survival rate was performed by feeding flies with toxic compounds. Gut epithelial cells were analyzed for cell proliferation and death by green fluorescent protein antibodies and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining under the microscope. The expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) was evaluated by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the results revealed that after feeding the flies with toxic compounds, aqueous extracts from Codonopsis pilosula (Franch.) Nannf (C. pilosula), Saussurea lappa (Decne.) C.B.Clarke (S. lappa), Imperata cylindrica Beauv.var.major (Nees) C.E. Hubb. (I. cylindrical var. major) and Melia toosendan Sied. Et Zucc. (M.toosendan) increased the fly survival rate, reduced epithelial cell death and improved gut morphology. In addition, C. pilosula extracts induced the antimicrobial peptide levels (Dpt and Mtk) following treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). However, these extracts were not observed to increase SDS-induced cell proliferation in vivo. These results indicate that there are strong protective effects in extracts of C. pilosula, S. lappa, I. cylindrical var. major and M. toosendan on Drosophila intestinal cells among 50 medicinal plants.

  6. Identification of the protective effects of traditional medicinal plants against SDS-induced Drosophila gut damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Liu, Zonglin; Chen, Yuchen; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Traditional medicinal plants are widely used as immunomodulatory medicines that help improve health. A total of 50 different plants used for the treatment of toxicity were screened for their in vivo protective effects. Flies were fed a standard cornmeal-yeast medium (control group) or the standard medium containing medicinal plant extracts (experimental groups). Assessment of the survival rate was performed by feeding flies with toxic compounds. Gut epithelial cells were analyzed for cell proliferation and death by green fluorescent protein antibodies and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining under the microscope. The expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) was evaluated by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the results revealed that after feeding the flies with toxic compounds, aqueous extracts from Codonopsis pilosula (Franch.) Nannf (C. pilosula), Saussurea lappa (Decne.) C.B.Clarke (S. lappa), Imperata cylindrica Beauv.var.major (Nees) C.E. Hubb. (I. cylindrical var. major) and Melia toosendan Sied. Et Zucc. (M.toosendan) increased the fly survival rate, reduced epithelial cell death and improved gut morphology. In addition, C. pilosula extracts induced the antimicrobial peptide levels (Dpt and Mtk) following treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). However, these extracts were not observed to increase SDS-induced cell proliferation in vivo. These results indicate that there are strong protective effects in extracts of C. pilosula, S. lappa, I. cylindrical var. major and M. toosendan on Drosophila intestinal cells among 50 medicinal plants. PMID:27698771

  7. Tramtrack controls glial number and identity in the Drosophila embryonic CNS.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, P

    2001-10-01

    Neurons and glia are often derived from common multipotent stem cells. In Drosophila, neural identity appears to be the default fate of these precursors. Stem cells that generate either neurons or glia transiently express neural stem cell-specific markers. Further development as glia requires the activation of glial-specific regulators. However, this must be accompanied by simultaneous repression of the alternate neural fate. I show that the Drosophila transcriptional repressor Tramtrack is a key repressor of neuronal fates. It is expressed at high levels in all mature glia of the embryonic central nervous system. Analysis of the temporal profile of Tramtrack expression in glia shows that it follows that of existing glial markers. When expressed ectopically before neural stem cell formation, Tramtrack represses the neural stem cell-specific genes asense and deadpan. Surprisingly, Tramtrack protein levels oscillate in a cell cycle-dependent manner in proliferating glia, with expression dropping before replication, but re-initiating after S phase. Overexpression of Tramtrack blocks glial development by inhibiting S-phase and repressing expression of the S-phase cyclin, cyclin E. Conversely, in tramtrack mutant embryos, glia are disrupted and undergo additional rounds of replication. I propose that Tramtrack ensures stable mature glial identity by both repressing neuroblast-specific genes and controlling glial cell proliferation.

  8. An Embryonic Myosin Isoform Enables Stretch Activation and Cyclical Power in Drosophila Jump Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cuiping; Swank, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind stretch activation (SA), a mechanical property that increases muscle force and oscillatory power generation, is not known. We used Drosophila transgenic techniques and our new muscle preparation, the jump muscle, to determine if myosin heavy chain isoforms influence the magnitude and rate of SA force generation. We found that Drosophila jump muscles show very low SA force and cannot produce positive power under oscillatory conditions at pCa 5.0. However, we transformed the jump muscle to be moderately stretch-activatable by replacing its myosin isoform with an embryonic isoform (EMB). Expressing EMB, jump muscle SA force increased by 163% and it generated net positive power. The rate of SA force development decreased by 58% with EMB expression. Power generation is Pi dependent as >4 mM Pi was required for positive power from EMB. Pi increased EMB SA force, but not wild-type SA force. Our data suggest that when muscle expressing EMB is stretched, EMB is more easily driven backward to a weakly bound state than wild-type jump muscle. This increases the number of myosin heads available to rapidly bind to actin and contribute to SA force generation. We conclude that myosin heavy chain isoforms influence both SA kinetics and SA force, which can determine if a muscle is capable of generating oscillatory power at a fixed calcium concentration. PMID:23790374

  9. The DOCK protein sponge binds to ELMO and functions in Drosophila embryonic CNS development.

    PubMed

    Biersmith, Bridget; Liu, Ze Cindy; Bauman, Kenneth; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2011-01-25

    Cell morphogenesis, which requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, is essential to coordinate the development of tissues such as the musculature and nervous system during normal embryonic development. One class of signaling proteins that regulate actin cytoskeletal rearrangement is the evolutionarily conserved CDM (C. elegansCed-5, human DOCK180, DrosophilaMyoblast city, or Mbc) family of proteins, which function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTPase Rac. This CDM-Rac protein complex is sufficient for Rac activation, but is enhanced upon the association of CDM proteins with the ELMO/Ced-12 family of proteins. We identified and characterized the role of Drosophila Sponge (Spg), the vertebrate DOCK3/DOCK4 counterpart as an ELMO-interacting protein. Our analysis shows Spg mRNA and protein is expressed in the visceral musculature and developing nervous system, suggesting a role for Spg in later embryogenesis. As maternal null mutants of spg die early in development, we utilized genetic interaction analysis to uncover the role of Spg in central nervous system (CNS) development. Consistent with its role in ELMO-dependent pathways, we found genetic interactions with spg and elmo mutants exhibited aberrant axonal defects. In addition, our data suggests Ncad may be responsible for recruiting Spg to the membrane, possibly in CNS development. Our findings not only characterize the role of a new DOCK family member, but help to further understand the role of signaling downstream of N-cadherin in neuronal development.

  10. Requirement for highly efficient pre-mRNA splicing during Drosophila early embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Guilgur, Leonardo Gastón; Prudêncio, Pedro; Sobral, Daniel; Liszekova, Denisa; Rosa, André; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila syncytial nuclear divisions limit transcription unit size of early zygotic genes. As mitosis inhibits not only transcription, but also pre-mRNA splicing, we reasoned that constraints on splicing were likely to exist in the early embryo, being splicing avoidance a possible explanation why most early zygotic genes are intronless. We isolated two mutant alleles for a subunit of the NTC/Prp19 complexes, which specifically impaired pre-mRNA splicing of early zygotic but not maternally encoded transcripts. We hypothesized that the requirements for pre-mRNA splicing efficiency were likely to vary during development. Ectopic maternal expression of an early zygotic pre-mRNA was sufficient to suppress its splicing defects in the mutant background. Furthermore, a small early zygotic transcript with multiple introns was poorly spliced in wild-type embryos. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the existence of a developmental pre-requisite for highly efficient splicing during Drosophila early embryonic development and suggest in highly proliferative tissues a need for coordination between cell cycle and gene architecture to ensure correct gene expression and avoid abnormally processed transcripts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02181.001 PMID:24755291

  11. An embryonic myosin isoform enables stretch activation and cyclical power in Drosophila jump muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cuiping; Swank, Douglas M

    2013-06-18

    The mechanism behind stretch activation (SA), a mechanical property that increases muscle force and oscillatory power generation, is not known. We used Drosophila transgenic techniques and our new muscle preparation, the jump muscle, to determine if myosin heavy chain isoforms influence the magnitude and rate of SA force generation. We found that Drosophila jump muscles show very low SA force and cannot produce positive power under oscillatory conditions at pCa 5.0. However, we transformed the jump muscle to be moderately stretch-activatable by replacing its myosin isoform with an embryonic isoform (EMB). Expressing EMB, jump muscle SA force increased by 163% and it generated net positive power. The rate of SA force development decreased by 58% with EMB expression. Power generation is Pi dependent as >4 mM Pi was required for positive power from EMB. Pi increased EMB SA force, but not wild-type SA force. Our data suggest that when muscle expressing EMB is stretched, EMB is more easily driven backward to a weakly bound state than wild-type jump muscle. This increases the number of myosin heads available to rapidly bind to actin and contribute to SA force generation. We conclude that myosin heavy chain isoforms influence both SA kinetics and SA force, which can determine if a muscle is capable of generating oscillatory power at a fixed calcium concentration. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional analysis of the Drosophila embryonic germ cell transcriptome by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Jankovics, Ferenc; Henn, László; Bujna, Ágnes; Vilmos, Péter; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, primordial germ cells are specified at the posterior pole of the very early embryo. This process is regulated by the posterior localized germ plasm that contains a large number of RNAs of maternal origin. Transcription in the primordial germ cells is actively down-regulated until germ cell fate is established. Bulk expression of the zygotic genes commences concomitantly with the degradation of the maternal transcripts. Thus, during embryogenesis, maternally provided and zygotically transcribed mRNAs determine germ cell development collectively. In an effort to identify novel genes involved in the regulation of germ cell behavior, we carried out a large-scale RNAi screen targeting both maternal and zygotic components of the embryonic germ line transcriptome. We identified 48 genes necessary for distinct stages in germ cell development. We found pebble and fascetto to be essential for germ cell migration and germ cell division, respectively. Our data uncover a previously unanticipated role of mei-P26 in maintenance of embryonic germ cell fate. We also performed systematic co-RNAi experiments, through which we found a low rate of functional redundancy among homologous gene pairs. As our data indicate a high degree of evolutionary conservation in genetic regulation of germ cell development, they are likely to provide valuable insights into the biology of the germ line in general.

  13. An embryonic myosin converter domain influences Drosophila indirect flight muscle stretch activation, power generation and flight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Newhard, Christopher S; Ramanath, Seemanti; Sheppard, Debra; Swank, Douglas M

    2014-01-15

    Stretch activation (SA) is critical to the flight ability of insects powered by asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFMs). An essential muscle protein component for SA and power generation is myosin. Which structural domains of myosin are significant for setting SA properties and power generation levels is poorly understood. We made use of the transgenic techniques and unique single muscle myosin heavy chain gene of Drosophila to test the influence of the myosin converter domain on IFM SA and power generation. Replacing the endogenous converter with an embryonic version decreased SA tension and the rate of SA tension generation. The alterations in SA properties and myosin kinetics from the converter exchange caused power generation to drop to 10% of control fiber power when the optimal conditions for control fibers - 1% muscle length (ML) amplitude and 150 Hz oscillation frequency - were applied to fibers expressing the embryonic converter (IFI-EC). Optimizing conditions for IFI-EC fiber power production, by doubling ML amplitude and decreasing oscillation frequency by 60%, improved power output to 60% of optimized control fiber power. IFI-EC flies altered their aerodynamic flight characteristics to better match optimal fiber power generation conditions as wing beat frequency decreased and wing stroke amplitude increased. This enabled flight in spite of the drastic changes to fiber mechanical performance.

  14. P-Element Mutations Affecting Embryonic Peripheral Nervous System Development in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kania, A.; Salzberg, A.; Bhat, M.; D'Evelyn, D.; He, Y.; Kiss, I.; Bellen, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) is an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanisms governing neural development. To identify genes controlling PNS development, we screened 2000 lethal P-element insertion strains. The PNS of mutant embryos was examined using the neural specific marker MAb 22C10, and 92 mutant strains were retained for further analysis. Genetic and cytological analysis of these strains shows that 42 mutations affect previously isolated genes that are known to be required for PNS development: longitudinals lacking (19), mastermind (15), numb (4), big brain (2), and spitz (2). The remaining 50 mutations were classified into 29 complementation groups and the P-element insertions were cytologically mapped. The mutants were classified in five major classes on the basis of their phenotype: gain of neurons, loss of neurons, organizational defects, pathfinding defects and morphological defects. Herein we report the preliminary phenotypic characterization of each of these complementation groups as well as the embryonic lacZ expression pattern of each P-element strain. Our analysis indicates that in most of the P-element insertion strains, the lacZ reporter gene is not expressed in the developing PNS. PMID:7789767

  15. Functional Analysis of the Drosophila Embryonic Germ Cell Transcriptome by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Bujna, Ágnes; Vilmos, Péter; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, primordial germ cells are specified at the posterior pole of the very early embryo. This process is regulated by the posterior localized germ plasm that contains a large number of RNAs of maternal origin. Transcription in the primordial germ cells is actively down-regulated until germ cell fate is established. Bulk expression of the zygotic genes commences concomitantly with the degradation of the maternal transcripts. Thus, during embryogenesis, maternally provided and zygotically transcribed mRNAs determine germ cell development collectively. In an effort to identify novel genes involved in the regulation of germ cell behavior, we carried out a large-scale RNAi screen targeting both maternal and zygotic components of the embryonic germ line transcriptome. We identified 48 genes necessary for distinct stages in germ cell development. We found pebble and fascetto to be essential for germ cell migration and germ cell division, respectively. Our data uncover a previously unanticipated role of mei-P26 in maintenance of embryonic germ cell fate. We also performed systematic co-RNAi experiments, through which we found a low rate of functional redundancy among homologous gene pairs. As our data indicate a high degree of evolutionary conservation in genetic regulation of germ cell development, they are likely to provide valuable insights into the biology of the germ line in general. PMID:24896584

  16. P-element mutations affecting embryonic peripheral nervous system development in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, A.; Salzberg, A.; Bhat, M.

    1995-04-01

    The Drosophila embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) is an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanisms governing neural development. To identify genes controlling PNS development, we screened 2000 lethal P-element insertion strains. The PNS of mutant embryos was examined using the neural specific marker MAb 22C10, and 92 mutant strains were retained for further analysis. Genetic and cytological analysis of these strains shows that 42 mutations affect previously isolated genes that are known to be required for PNS development: longitudinals lacking (19), mastermind (15), numb (4), big brain (2), and spitz (2). The remaining 50 mutations were classified into 29 complementation groups and the P-element insertions were cytologically mapped. The mutants were classified in five major classes on the basis of their phenotype: gain of neurons, loss of neurons, organizational defects, pathfinding defects and morphological defects. Herein we report the preliminary phenotypic characterization of each of these complementation groups as well as the embryonic lacZ expression pattern of each P-element strain. Our analysis indicates that in most of the P-element insertion strains, the lacZ reporter gene is not expressed in the developing PNS. 52 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Apical deficiency triggers JNK-dependent apoptosis in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Bardet, Pierre-Luc; Langton, Paul F.; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial homeostasis and the avoidance of diseases such as cancer require the elimination of defective cells by apoptosis. Here, we investigate how loss of apical determinants triggers apoptosis in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila. Transcriptional profiling and in situ hybridisation show that JNK signalling is upregulated in mutants lacking Crumbs or other apical determinants. This leads to transcriptional activation of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper and to apoptosis. Suppression of JNK signalling by overexpression of Puckered, a feedback inhibitor of the pathway, prevents reaper upregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, removal of endogenous Puckered leads to ectopic reaper expression. Importantly, disruption of the basolateral domain in the embryonic epidermis does not trigger JNK signalling or apoptosis. We suggest that apical, not basolateral, integrity could be intrinsically required for the survival of epithelial cells. In apically deficient embryos, JNK signalling is activated throughout the epidermis. Yet, in the dorsal region, reaper expression is not activated and cells survive. One characteristic of these surviving cells is that they retain discernible adherens junctions despite the apical deficit. We suggest that junctional integrity could restrain the pro-apoptotic influence of JNK signalling. PMID:21693518

  18. Drosophila melanogaster - an embryonic model for studying behavioral and biochemical effects of manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Ternes, Ana Paula Lausmann; Zemolin, Ana Paula; da Cruz, Litiele Cezar; da Silva, Gustavo Felipe; Saidelles, Ana Paula Fleig; de Paula, Mariane Trindade; Wagner, Caroline; Golombieski, Ronaldo Medeiros; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes; Picoloto, Rochele Sogari; Pereira, Antônio Batista; Franco, Jeferson Luis; Posser, Thaís

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic animals are especially susceptible to metal exposure. Manganese (Mn) is an essential element, but in excess it can induce toxicity. In this study we used Drosophila melanogaster as an embryonic model to investigate biochemical and behavioral alterations due to Mn exposure. Flies were treated with standard medium supplemented with MnCl2 at 0.1 mM, 0.5 mM or 1 mM from the egg to the adult stage. At 0.5 mM and 1 mM Mn, newly ecloded flies showed significantly enhanced locomotor activity when assessed by negative geotaxis behavior. In addition, a significant increase in Mn levels (p < 0.0001) was observed, while Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and S levels were significantly decreased. A significant drop in cell viability occurred in flies exposed to 1 mM Mn. There was also an induction of reactive oxygen species at 0.5 mM and 1 mM Mn (p < 0.05). At 1 mM, Mn increased Catalase (p < 0.005), Superoxide Dismutase (p < 0.005) and Hsp83 (p < 0.0001) mRNA expression, without altering Catalase or Superoxide Dismutase activity; the activity of Thioredoxin reductase and Glutatione-S-transferase enzymes was increased. Mn treatment did not alter ERK or JNK1/2 phosphorylation, but at 1 mM caused an inhibition of p38(MAPK) phosphorylation. Together these data suggest mechanisms of adaptation in the fly response to Mn exposure in embryonic life.

  19. Drosophila melanogaster - an embryonic model for studying behavioral and biochemical effects of manganese exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ternes, Ana Paula Lausmann; Zemolin, Ana Paula; da Cruz, Litiele Cezar; da Silva, Gustavo Felipe; Saidelles, Ana Paula Fleig; de Paula, Mariane Trindade; Wagner, Caroline; Golombieski, Ronaldo Medeiros; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes; Picoloto, Rochele Sogari; Pereira, Antônio Batista; Franco, Jeferson Luis; Posser, Thaís

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic animals are especially susceptible to metal exposure. Manganese (Mn) is an essential element, but in excess it can induce toxicity. In this study we used Drosophila melanogaster as an embryonic model to investigate biochemical and behavioral alterations due to Mn exposure. Flies were treated with standard medium supplemented with MnCl2 at 0.1 mM, 0.5 mM or 1 mM from the egg to the adult stage. At 0.5 mM and 1 mM Mn, newly ecloded flies showed significantly enhanced locomotor activity when assessed by negative geotaxis behavior. In addition, a significant increase in Mn levels (p < 0.0001) was observed, while Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and S levels were significantly decreased. A significant drop in cell viability occurred in flies exposed to 1 mM Mn. There was also an induction of reactive oxygen species at 0.5 mM and 1 mM Mn (p < 0.05). At 1 mM, Mn increased Catalase (p < 0.005), Superoxide Dismutase (p < 0.005) and Hsp83 (p < 0.0001) mRNA expression, without altering Catalase or Superoxide Dismutase activity; the activity of Thioredoxin reductase and Glutatione-S-transferase enzymes was increased. Mn treatment did not alter ERK or JNK1/2 phosphorylation, but at 1 mM caused an inhibition of p38MAPK phosphorylation. Together these data suggest mechanisms of adaptation in the fly response to Mn exposure in embryonic life. PMID:26417337

  20. Regulation of DUOX by the Galphaq-phospholipase Cbeta-Ca2+ pathway in Drosophila gut immunity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Eun-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Ah; Park, Seon Hwa; Kim, Sung-Hee; Nam, Hyuck-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Young; Kang, Dongmin; Lee, Won-Jae

    2009-03-01

    All metazoan guts are in constant contact with diverse food-borne microorganisms. The signaling mechanisms by which the host regulates gut-microbe interactions, however, are not yet clear. Here, we show that phospholipase C-beta (PLCbeta) signaling modulates dual oxidase (DUOX) activity to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) essential for normal host survival. Gut-microbe contact rapidly activates PLCbeta through Galphaq, which in turn mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate generation for DUOX-dependent ROS production. PLCbeta mutant flies had a short life span due to the uncontrolled propagation of an essential nutritional microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the gut. Gut-specific reintroduction of the PLCbeta restored efficient DUOX-dependent microbe-eliminating capacity and normal host survival. These results demonstrate that the Galphaq-PLCbeta-Ca(2+)-DUOX-ROS signaling pathway acts as a bona fide first line of defense that enables gut epithelia to dynamically control yeast during the Drosophila life cycle.

  1. wing blister, A New Drosophila Laminin α Chain Required for Cell Adhesion and Migration during Embryonic and Imaginal Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Doris; Zusman, Susan; Li, Xitong; Williams, Erin L.; Khare, Narmada; DaRocha, Sol; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Baumgartner, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    We report the molecular and functional characterization of a new α chain of laminin in Drosophila. The new laminin chain appears to be the Drosophila counterpart of both vertebrate α2 (also called merosin) and α1 chains, with a slightly higher degree of homology to α2, suggesting that this chain is an ancestral version of both α1 and α2 chains. During embryogenesis, the protein is associated with basement membranes of the digestive system and muscle attachment sites, and during larval stage it is found in a specific pattern in wing and eye discs. The gene is assigned to a locus called wing blister (wb), which is essential for embryonic viability. Embryonic phenotypes include twisted germbands and fewer pericardial cells, resulting in gaps in the presumptive heart and tracheal trunks, and myotubes detached from their target muscle attachment sites. Most phenotypes are in common with those observed in Drosophila laminin α3, 5 mutant embryos and many are in common with those observed in integrin mutations. Adult phenotypes show blisters in the wings in viable allelic combinations, similar to phenotypes observed in integrin genes. Mutation analysis in the eye demonstrates a function in rhabdomere organization. In summary, this new laminin α chain is essential for embryonic viability and is involved in processes requiring cell migration and cell adhesion. PMID:10189378

  2. Dynamic expression of the cell adhesion molecule fasciclin I during embryonic development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    McAllister, L; Goodman, C S; Zinn, K

    1992-05-01

    A number of different cell surface glycoproteins expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) have been identified in insects and shown to mediate cell adhesion in tissue culture systems. The fasciclin I protein is expressed on a subset of CNS axon pathways in both grasshopper and Drosophila. It consists of four homologous 150-amino acid domains which are unrelated to other sequences in the current databases, and is tethered to the cell surface by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linkage. In this paper we examine in detail the expression of fasciclin I mRNA and protein during Drosophila embryonic development. We find that fasciclin I is expressed in several distinct patterns at different stages of development. In blastoderm embryos it is briefly localized in a graded pattern. During the germ band extended period its expression evolves through two distinct phases. Fasciclin I mRNA and protein are initially localized in a 14-stripe pattern which corresponds to segmentally repeated patches of neuroepithelial cells and neuroblasts. Expression then becomes confined to CNS and peripheral sensory (PNS) neurons. Fasciclin I is expressed on all PNS neurons, and this expression is stably maintained for several hours. In the CNS, fasciclin I is initially expressed on all commissural axons, but then becomes restricted to specific axon bundles. The early commissural expression pattern is not observed in grasshopper embryos, but the later bundle-specific pattern is very similar to that seen in grasshopper. The existence of an initial phase of expression on all commissural bundles helps to explain the loss-of-commissures phenotype of embryos lacking expression of both fasciclin I and of the D-abl tyrosine kinase. Fasciclin I is also expressed in several nonneural tissues in the embryo.

  3. Analysis of Adhesion Molecules and Basement Membrane Contributions to Synaptic Adhesion at the Drosophila Embryonic NMJ

    PubMed Central

    Koper, Andre; Schenck, Annette; Prokop, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Synapse formation and maintenance crucially underlie brain function in health and disease. Both processes are believed to depend on cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Many different classes of CAMs localise to synapses, including cadherins, protocadherins, neuroligins, neurexins, integrins, and immunoglobulin adhesion proteins, and further contributions come from the extracellular matrix and its receptors. Most of these factors have been scrutinised by loss-of-function analyses in animal models. However, which adhesion factors establish the essential physical links across synaptic clefts and allow the assembly of synaptic machineries at the contact site in vivo is still unclear. To investigate these key questions, we have used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of Drosophila embryos as a genetically amenable model synapse. Our ultrastructural analyses of NMJs lacking different classes of CAMs revealed that loss of all neurexins, all classical cadherins or all glutamate receptors, as well as combinations between these or with a Laminin deficiency, failed to reveal structural phenotypes. These results are compatible with a view that these CAMs might have no structural role at this model synapse. However, we consider it far more likely that they operate in a redundant or well buffered context. We propose a model based on a multi-adaptor principle to explain this phenomenon. Furthermore, we report a new CAM-independent adhesion mechanism that involves the basement membranes (BM) covering neuromuscular terminals. Thus, motorneuronal terminals show strong partial detachment of the junction when BM-to-cell surface attachment is impaired by removing Laminin A, or when BMs lose their structural integrity upon loss of type IV collagens. We conclude that BMs are essential to tie embryonic motorneuronal terminals to the muscle surface, lending CAM-independent structural support to their adhesion. Therefore, future developmental studies of these synaptic junctions in Drosophila need

  4. mRNA cycles through hypoxia-induced stress granules in live Drosophila embryonic muscles.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Annelies M A; van Gemert, Alice M C; Dirks, Roeland W; Noordermeer, Jasprina N; Fradkin, Lee G; Tanke, Hans J; Jost, Carolina R

    2012-01-01

    In some myopathies, hypoxia can be the result of pathologic effects like muscle necrosis and abnormal blood flow. At the molecular level, the consequence of hypoxic conditions is not yet fully understood. Under stress conditions, many housekeeping gene mRNAs are translationally silenced, while translation of other mRNAs increases. Alterations to the pool of mRNAs available for translation lead to the formation of so-called stress granules containing both mRNAs and proteins. Stress granule formation and dynamics have been investigated using cells in culture, but have not yet been examined in vivo. In Drosophila embryonic muscles, we found that hypoxia induces the formation of sarcoplasmic granules containing the established stress granule markers RIN and dFMR1. Upon restoration of normoxia, the observed granules were decreased in size, indicating that their formation might be reversible. Employing photobleaching approaches, we found that a cytoplasmic reporter mRNA rapidly shuttles in and out of the granules. Hence, stress granules are highly dynamic complexes and not simple temporary storage sites. Although mRNA rapidly cycles through the granules, its movement throughout the muscle is, remarkably, spatially restricted by the presence of yet undefined myofiber domains. Our results suggest that in hypoxic muscles mRNA remains highly mobile; however, its movement throughout the muscle is restricted by certain boundaries. The development of this Drosophila hypoxia model makes it possible to study the formation and dynamics of stress granules and their associated mRNAs and proteins in a living organism.

  5. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    von Hilchen, Christian M; Bustos, Alvaro E; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo.

  6. Regulation of Drosophila embryonic tracheogenesis by dVHL and hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Nathan T.; Moberg, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    The tracheal system of Drosophila melanogaster is an interconnected network of gas-filled epithelial tubes that develops during embryogenesis and functions as the main gas-exchange organ in the larva. Larval tracheal cells respond to hypoxia by activating a program of branching and growth driven by HIF-1α/sima-dependent expression of the breathless (btl) FGF receptor. By contrast, the ability of the developing embryonic tracheal system to respond to hypoxia and integrate hard-wired branching programs with sima-driven tracheal remodeling is not well understood. Here we show that embryonic tracheal cells utilize the conserved ubiquitin ligase dVHL to control the HIF-1 α/sima hypoxia response pathway, and identify two distinct phases of tracheal development with differing hypoxia sensitivities and outcomes: a relatively hypoxia-resistant ‘early’ phase during which Sima activity conflicts with normal branching and stunts migration, and a relatively hypoxia-sensitive ‘late’ phase during which the tracheal system uses the dVHL/sima/btl pathway to drive increased branching and growth. Mutations in the archipelago (ago) gene, which antagonizes btl transcription, re-sensitize early embryos to hypoxia, indicating that their relative resistance can be reversed by elevating activity of the btl promoter. These findings reveal a second type of tracheal hypoxic response in which Sima activation conflicts with developmental tracheogenesis, and identify the dVHL and ago ubiquitin ligases as key determinants of hypoxia sensitivity in tracheal cells. The identification of an early stage of tracheal development that is vulnerable to hypoxia is an important addition to models of the invertebrate hypoxic response. PMID:19285057

  7. Reduced Gut Acidity Induces an Obese-Like Phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jui-Hung; Kuo, Ping-Chang; Yeh, Sheng-Rong; Lin, Hung-Yu; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wang, Horng-Dar; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify genes involved in stress and metabolic regulation, we carried out a Drosophila P-element-mediated mutagenesis screen for starvation resistance. We isolated a mutant, m2, that showed a 23% increase in survival time under starvation conditions. The P-element insertion was mapped to the region upstream of the vha16-1 gene, which encodes the c subunit of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase. We found that vha16-1 is highly expressed in the fly midgut, and that m2 mutant flies are hypomorphic for vha16-1 and also exhibit reduced midgut acidity. This deficit is likely to induce altered metabolism and contribute to accelerated aging, since vha16-1 mutant flies are short-lived and display increases in body weight and lipid accumulation. Similar phenotypes were also induced by pharmacological treatment, through feeding normal flies and mice with a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (acetazolamide) or proton pump inhibitor (PPI, lansoprazole) to suppress gut acid production. Our study may thus provide a useful model for investigating chronic acid suppression in patients. PMID:26436771

  8. Both Cyclin B levels and DNA-replication checkpoint control the early embryonic mitoses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jun-Yuan; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Schubiger, Gerold

    2013-01-01

    Summary The earliest embryonic mitoses in Drosophila, as in other animals except mammals, are viewed as synchronous and of equal duration. However, we observed that total cell-cycle length steadily increases after cycle 7, solely owing to the extension of interphase. Between cycle 7 and cycle 10, this extension is DNA-replication checkpoint independent, but correlates with the onset of Cyclin B oscillation. In addition, nuclei in the middle of embryos have longer metaphase and shorter anaphase than nuclei at the two polar regions. Interestingly, sister chromatids move faster in anaphase in the middle than the posterior region. These regional differences correlate with local differences in Cyclin B concentration. After cycle 10, interphase and total cycle duration of nuclei in the middle of the embryo are longer than at the poles. Because interphase also extends in checkpoint mutant (grapes) embryo after cycle 10, although less dramatic than wild-type embryos, interphase extension after cycle 10 is probably controlled by both Cyclin B limitation and the DNA-replication checkpoint. PMID:14681192

  9. Reciprocal regulatory interactions between the Notch and Ras signaling pathways in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Ana; Buff, Eugene; Halfon, Marc S; Gisselbrecht, Stephen; Jiménez, Fernando; Baylies, Mary K; Michelson, Alan M

    2002-04-15

    Convergent intercellular signals must be precisely integrated in order to elicit specific biological responses. During specification of muscle and cardiac progenitors from clusters of equivalent cells in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm, the Ras/MAPK pathway--activated by both epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptors--functions as an inductive cellular determination signal, while lateral inhibition mediated by Notch antagonizes this activity. A critical balance between these signals must be achieved to enable one cell of an equivalence group to segregate as a progenitor while its neighbors assume a nonprogenitor identity. We have investigated whether these opposing signals directly interact with each other, and we have examined how they are integrated by the responding cells to specify their unique fates. Our findings reveal that Ras and Notch do not function independently; rather, we have uncovered several modes of cross-talk between these pathways. Ras induces Notch, its ligand Delta, and the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist, Argos. We show that Delta and Argos then synergize to nonautonomously block a positive autoregulatory feedback loop that amplifies a fate-inducing Ras signal. This feedback loop is characterized by Ras-mediated upregulation of proximal components of both the epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptor pathways. In turn, Notch activation in nonprogenitors induces its own expression and simultaneously suppresses both Delta and Argos levels, thereby reinforcing a unidirectional inhibitory response. These reciprocal interactions combine to generate the signal thresholds that are essential for proper specification of progenitors and nonprogenitors from groups of initially equivalent cells.

  10. Septate Junction Proteins Play Essential Roles in Morphogenesis Throughout Embryonic Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sonia; Ward, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The septate junction (SJ) is the occluding junction found in the ectodermal epithelia of invertebrate organisms, and is essential to maintain chemically distinct compartments in epithelial organs, to provide the blood–brain barrier in the nervous system, and to provide an important line of defense against invading pathogens. More than 20 genes have been identified to function in the establishment or maintenance of SJs in Drosophila melanogaster. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cell biological function of these proteins in establishing the occluding junction, whereas very few studies have examined further developmental roles for them. Here we examined embryos with mutations in nine different core SJ genes and found that all nine result in defects in embryonic development as early as germ band retraction, with the most penetrant defect observed in head involution. SJ genes are also required for cell shape changes and cell rearrangements that drive the elongation of the salivary gland during midembryogenesis. Interestingly, these developmental events occur at a time prior to the formation of the occluding junction, when SJ proteins localize along the lateral membrane and have not yet coalesced into the region of the SJ. Together, these observations reveal an underappreciated role for a large group of SJ genes in essential developmental events during embryogenesis, and suggest that the function of these proteins in facilitating cell shape changes and rearrangements is independent of their role in the occluding junction. PMID:27261004

  11. Impact of Ultrabithorax alternative splicing on Drosophila embryonic nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Aenne; Koltsaki, Ioanna; Hessinger, Christian; Renner, Simone; Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana

    2015-11-01

    Hox genes control divergent segment identities along the anteroposterior body axis of bilateral animals by regulating a large number of processes in a cell context-specific manner. How Hox proteins achieve this functional diversity is a long-standing question in developmental biology. In this study we investigate the role of alternative splicing in functional specificity of the Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx). We focus specifically on the embryonic central nervous system (CNS) and provide a description of temporal expression patterns of three major Ubx isoforms during development of this tissue. These analyses imply distinct functions for individual isoforms in different stages of neural development. We also examine the set of Ubx isoforms expressed in two isoform-specific Ubx mutant strains and analyze for the first time the effects of splicing defects on regional neural stem cell (neuroblast) identity. Our findings support the notion of specific isoforms having different effects in providing individual neuroblasts with positional identity along the anteroposterior body axis, as well as being involved in regulation of progeny cell fate.

  12. Drosophila UNC-45 accumulates in embryonic blastoderm and in muscles, and is essential for muscle myosin stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi F; Melkani, Girish C; Yu, Qin; Suggs, Jennifer A; Kronert, William A; Suzuki, Yoko; Hipolito, Lori; Price, Maureen G; Epstein, Henry F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2011-03-01

    UNC-45 is a chaperone that facilitates folding of myosin motor domains. We have used Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the role of UNC-45 in muscle development and function. Drosophila UNC-45 (dUNC-45) is expressed at all developmental stages. It colocalizes with non-muscle myosin in embryonic blastoderm of 2-hour-old embryos. At 14 hours, it accumulates most strongly in embryonic striated muscles, similarly to muscle myosin. dUNC-45 localizes to the Z-discs of sarcomeres in third instar larval body-wall muscles. We produced a dunc-45 mutant in which zygotic expression is disrupted. This results in nearly undetectable dUNC-45 levels in maturing embryos as well as late embryonic lethality. Muscle myosin accumulation is robust in dunc-45 mutant embryos at 14 hours. However, myosin is dramatically decreased in the body-wall muscles of 22-hour-old mutant embryos. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed only a few thick filaments and irregular thick-thin filament lattice spacing. The lethality, defective protein accumulation, and ultrastructural abnormalities are rescued with a wild-type dunc-45 transgene, indicating that the mutant phenotypes arise from the dUNC-45 deficiency. Overall, our data indicate that dUNC-45 is important for myosin accumulation and muscle function. Furthermore, our results suggest that dUNC-45 acts post-translationally for proper myosin folding and maturation.

  13. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  14. Female-biased dimorphism underlies a female-specific role for post-embryonic Ilp7 neurons in Drosophila fertility

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Monica C.; Tang, Jonathan C. Y.; Allan, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, much of our understanding of sexually dimorphic neuronal development and function comes from the study of male behavior, leaving female behavior less well understood. Here, we identify a post-embryonic population of Insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7)-expressing neurons in the posterior ventral nerve cord that innervate the reproductive tracts and exhibit a female bias in their function. They form two distinct dorsal and ventral subsets in females, but only a single dorsal subset in males, signifying a rare example of a female-specific neuronal subset. Female post-embryonic Ilp7 neurons are glutamatergic motoneurons innervating the oviduct and are required for female fertility. In males, they are serotonergic/glutamatergic neuromodulatory neurons innervating the seminal vesicle but are not required for male fertility. In both sexes, these neurons express the sex-differentially spliced fruitless-P1 transcript but not doublesex. The male fruitless-P1 isoform (fruM) was necessary and sufficient for serotonin expression in the shared dorsal Ilp7 subset, but although it was necessary for eliminating female-specific Ilp7 neurons in males, it was not sufficient for their elimination in females. By contrast, sex-specific RNA-splicing by female-specific transformer is necessary for female-type Ilp7 neurons in females and is sufficient for their induction in males. Thus, the emergence of female-biased post-embryonic Ilp7 neurons is mediated in a subset-specific manner by a tra- and fru-dependent mechanism in the shared dorsal subset, and a tra-dependent, fru-independent mechanism in the female-specific subset. These studies provide an important counterpoint to studies of the development and function of male-biased neuronal dimorphism in Drosophila. PMID:23981656

  15. The Drosophila CD36 Homologue croquemort Is Required to Maintain Immune and Gut Homeostasis during Development and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Aurélien; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an ancient mechanism central to both tissue homeostasis and immune defense. Both the identity of the receptors that mediate bacterial phagocytosis and the nature of the interactions between phagocytosis and other defense mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that Croquemort (Crq), a Drosophila member of the CD36 family of scavenger receptors, is required for microbial phagocytosis and efficient bacterial clearance. Flies mutant for crq are susceptible to environmental microbes during development and succumb to a variety of microbial infections as adults. Crq acts parallel to the Toll and Imd pathways to eliminate bacteria via phagocytosis. crq mutant flies exhibit enhanced and prolonged immune and cytokine induction accompanied by premature gut dysplasia and decreased lifespan. The chronic state of immune activation in crq mutant flies is further regulated by negative regulators of the Imd pathway. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Crq plays a key role in maintaining immune and organismal homeostasis. PMID:27780230

  16. Concerted control of gliogenesis by InR/TOR and FGF signalling in the Drosophila post-embryonic brain

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Rochex, Amélie; Kaul, Aamna K.; Gatt, Ariana P.; McNeill, Helen; Bateman, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells are essential for the development and function of the nervous system. In the mammalian brain, vast numbers of glia of several different functional types are generated during late embryonic and early foetal development. However, the molecular cues that instruct gliogenesis and determine glial cell type are poorly understood. During post-embryonic development, the number of glia in the Drosophila larval brain increases dramatically, potentially providing a powerful model for understanding gliogenesis. Using glial-specific clonal analysis we find that perineural glia and cortex glia proliferate extensively through symmetric cell division in the post-embryonic brain. Using pan-glial inhibition and loss-of-function clonal analysis we find that Insulin-like receptor (InR)/Target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling is required for the proliferation of perineural glia. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling is also required for perineural glia proliferation and acts synergistically with the InR/TOR pathway. Cortex glia require InR in part, but not downstream components of the TOR pathway, for proliferation. Moreover, cortex glia absolutely require FGF signalling, such that inhibition of the FGF pathway almost completely blocks the generation of cortex glia. Neuronal expression of the FGF receptor ligand Pyramus is also required for the generation of cortex glia, suggesting a mechanism whereby neuronal FGF expression coordinates neurogenesis and cortex gliogenesis. In summary, we have identified two major pathways that control perineural and cortex gliogenesis in the post-embryonic brain and have shown that the molecular circuitry required is lineage specific. PMID:22745312

  17. Two Enhancers Control Transcription of Drosophila muscleblind in the Embryonic Somatic Musculature and in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Cerro-Herreros, Estefanía; Artero, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetically conserved family of Muscleblind proteins are RNA-binding factors involved in a variety of gene expression processes including alternative splicing regulation, RNA stability and subcellular localization, and miRNA biogenesis, which typically contribute to cell-type specific differentiation. In humans, sequestration of Muscleblind-like proteins MBNL1 and MBNL2 has been implicated in degenerative disorders, particularly expansion diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. Drosophila muscleblind was previously shown to be expressed in embryonic somatic and visceral muscle subtypes, and in the central nervous system, and to depend on Mef2 for transcriptional activation. Genomic approaches have pointed out candidate gene promoters and tissue-specific enhancers, but experimental confirmation of their regulatory roles was lacking. In our study, luciferase reporter assays in S2 cells confirmed that regions P1 (515 bp) and P2 (573 bp), involving the beginning of exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, were able to initiate RNA transcription. Similarly, transgenic Drosophila embryos carrying enhancer reporter constructs supported the existence of two regulatory regions which control embryonic expression of muscleblind in the central nerve cord (NE, neural enhancer; 830 bp) and somatic (skeletal) musculature (ME, muscle enhancer; 3.3 kb). Both NE and ME were able to boost expression from the Hsp70 heterologous promoter. In S2 cell assays most of the ME enhancer activation could be further narrowed down to a 1200 bp subregion (ME.3), which contains predicted binding sites for the Mef2 transcription factor. The present study constitutes the first characterization of muscleblind enhancers and will contribute to a deeper understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the gene. PMID:24667536

  18. Two enhancers control transcription of Drosophila muscleblind in the embryonic somatic musculature and in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Ariadna; Llamusi, Beatriz; Cerro-Herreros, Estefanía; Artero, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetically conserved family of Muscleblind proteins are RNA-binding factors involved in a variety of gene expression processes including alternative splicing regulation, RNA stability and subcellular localization, and miRNA biogenesis, which typically contribute to cell-type specific differentiation. In humans, sequestration of Muscleblind-like proteins MBNL1 and MBNL2 has been implicated in degenerative disorders, particularly expansion diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. Drosophila muscleblind was previously shown to be expressed in embryonic somatic and visceral muscle subtypes, and in the central nervous system, and to depend on Mef2 for transcriptional activation. Genomic approaches have pointed out candidate gene promoters and tissue-specific enhancers, but experimental confirmation of their regulatory roles was lacking. In our study, luciferase reporter assays in S2 cells confirmed that regions P1 (515 bp) and P2 (573 bp), involving the beginning of exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, were able to initiate RNA transcription. Similarly, transgenic Drosophila embryos carrying enhancer reporter constructs supported the existence of two regulatory regions which control embryonic expression of muscleblind in the central nerve cord (NE, neural enhancer; 830 bp) and somatic (skeletal) musculature (ME, muscle enhancer; 3.3 kb). Both NE and ME were able to boost expression from the Hsp70 heterologous promoter. In S2 cell assays most of the ME enhancer activation could be further narrowed down to a 1200 bp subregion (ME.3), which contains predicted binding sites for the Mef2 transcription factor. The present study constitutes the first characterization of muscleblind enhancers and will contribute to a deeper understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the gene.

  19. The Drosophila Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 Family Member Has Two Isoforms and Is Potentially Involved in Embryonic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Oosthuysen, Brent; Cajee, Umar-Faruq; Mokgohloa, Lehlogonolo; Nweke, Ekene; Antunes, Ricardo Jorge; Coetzer, Theresa H. T.; Ntwasa, Monde

    2015-01-01

    The human retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) is implicated in esophageal, lung, hepatocellular and colon cancers. Furthermore, RBBP6 was identified as a strong marker for colon cancer prognosis and as a predisposing factor in familial myeloproliferative neoplasms. Functionally, the mammalian protein interacts with p53 and enhances the activity of Mdm2, the prototypical negative regulator of p53. However, since RBBP6 (known as PACT in mice) exists in multiple isoforms and pact−/− mice exhibit a more severe phenotype than mdm2−/− mutants, it must possess some Mdm2-independent functions. The function of the invertebrate homologue is poorly understood. This is complicated by the absence of the Mdm2 gene in both Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We have experimentally identified the promoter region of Snama, the Drosophila homologue, analyzed potential transcription factor binding sites and confirmed the existence of an additional isoform. Using band shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays combined with mass spectrometry, we found evidence that this gene may be regulated by, amongst others, DREF, which regulates hundreds of genes related to cell proliferation. The potential transcription factors for Snama fall into distinct functional groups, including anteroposterior embryonic patterning and nucleic acid metabolism. Significantly, previous work in mice shows that pact−/− induces an anteroposterior phenotype in embryos when rescued by simultaneous deletion of p53. Taken together, these observations indicate the significance of RBBP6 proteins in carcinogenesis and in developmental defects. PMID:25955646

  20. Genomewide analysis of the Drosophila tetraspanins reveals a subset with similar function in the formation of the embryonic synapse

    PubMed Central

    Fradkin, Lee G.; Kamphorst, Jessica T.; DiAntonio, Aaron; Goodman, Corey S.; Noordermeer, Jasprina N.

    2002-01-01

    Tetraspanins encode a large conserved family of proteins that span the membrane four times and are expressed in a variety of eukaryotic tissues. They are part of membrane complexes that are involved in such diverse processes as intracellular signaling, cellular motility, metastasis, and tumor suppression. The single fly tetraspanin characterized to date, late bloomer (lbm), is expressed on the axons, terminal arbors, and growth cones of motoneurons. In embryos lacking Lbm protein, motoneurons reach their muscle targets, but initially fail to form synaptic terminals. During larval stages, however, functional contacts are formed. The newly available genomic sequence of Drosophila melanogaster indicates the existence of 34 additional members of the tetraspanin family in the fly. To address the possibility that other tetraspanins with functions that might compensate for a lack of lbm exist, we determined the expression domains of the Drosophila tetraspanin gene family members by RNA in situ analysis. We found two other tetraspanins also expressed in motoneurons and subsequently generated a small chromosomal deletion that removes all three motoneuron-specific tetraspanins. The deletion results in a significant enhancement in the lbm phenotype, indicating that the two additional motoneuron-expressed tetraspanins can, at least in part, compensate for the absence of lbm during the formation of the embryonic synapse. PMID:12370414

  1. Drosophila Dachsous and Fat polarize actin-based protrusions over a restricted domain of the embryonic denticle field

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Kynan T.; Ly, Daniel C.; DiNardo, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Atypical cadherins Dachsous (Ds) and Fat coordinate the establishment of planar polarity, essential for the patterning of complex tissues and organs. The precise mechanisms by which this system acts, particularly in cases where Ds and Fat act independently of the ‘core’ Frizzled system, are still the subject of investigation. Examining the deployment of the Ds-Fat system in different tissues of the model organism Drosophila, has provided insights into the general mechanisms by which polarity is established and propagated to coordinate outcomes across a field of cells. The Drosophila embryonic epidermis provides a simple model epithelia where the establishment of polarity can be observed from start to finish, and in the absence of proliferation, over a fixed number of cells. Using the asymmetric placement of f-actin during denticle assembly as a read-out of polarity, we examine the requirement for Ds and Fat in establishing polarity across the denticle field. Comparing detailed phenotypic analysis with steady state protein enrichment revealed a spatially restricted requirement for the Ds-Fat system within the posterior denticle field. Ectopic Ds signaling provides evidence for a model whereby Ds acts to asymmetrically enrich Fat in a neighboring cell, in turn polarizing the cell to specify the position of the actin-based protrusions at the cell cortex. PMID:24051227

  2. The embryonic linker histone H1 variant of Drosophila, dBigH1, regulates zygotic genome activation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Morán, Tomás; Vaquero, Alejandro; Azorín, Fernando

    2013-09-30

    Histone H1 is an essential chromatin component. Metazoans usually contain multiple stage-specific H1s. In particular, specific variants replace somatic H1s during early embryogenesis. In this regard, Drosophila was an exception because a single dH1 was identified that, starting at cellularization, is detected throughout development in somatic cells. Here, we identify the embryonic H1 of Drosophila, dBigH1. dBigH1 is abundant before cellularization occurs, when somatic dH1 is absent and the zygotic genome is inactive. Upon cellularization, when the zygotic genome is progressively activated, dH1 replaces dBigH1 in the soma, but not in the primordial germ cells (PGCs) that have delayed zygotic genome activation (ZGA). In addition, a loss-of-function mutant shows premature ZGA in both the soma and PGCs. Mutant embryos die at cellularization, showing increased levels of active RNApol II and zygotic transcripts, along with DNA damage and mitotic defects. These results show an essential function of dBigH1 in ZGA regulation.

  3. Bacterial diversity shift determined by different diets in the gut of the spotted wing fly Drosophila suzukii is primarily reflected on acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vacchini, Violetta; Gonella, Elena; Crotti, Elena; Prosdocimi, Erica M; Mazzetto, Fabio; Chouaia, Bessem; Callegari, Matteo; Mapelli, Francesca; Mandrioli, Mauro; Alma, Alberto; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    The pivotal role of diet in shaping gut microbiota has been evaluated in different animal models, including insects. Drosophila flies harbour an inconstant microbiota among which acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important components. Here, we investigated the bacterial and AAB components of the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii microbiota, by studying the same insect population separately grown on fruit-based or non-fruit artificial diet. AAB were highly prevalent in the gut under both diets (90 and 92% infection rates with fruits and artificial diet respectively). Fluorescent in situ hybridization and recolonization experiments with green fluorescent protein (Gfp)-labelled strains showed AAB capability to massively colonize insect gut. High-throughput sequencing on 16S rRNA gene indicated that the bacterial microbiota of guts fed with the two diets clustered separately. By excluding AAB-related OTUs from the analysis, insect bacterial communities did not cluster separately according to the diet, suggesting that diet-based diversification of the community is primarily reflected on the AAB component of the community. Diet influenced also AAB alpha-diversity, with separate OTU distributions based on diets. High prevalence, localization and massive recolonization, together with AAB clustering behaviour in relation to diet, suggest an AAB role in the D. suzukii gut response to diet modification. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  5. NIP/DuoxA is essential for Drosophila embryonic development and regulates oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaojun; Hu, Jack; Liu, Xiping; Qin, Hanjuan; Percival-Smith, Anthony; Rao, Yong; Li, Shawn S C

    2010-05-11

    NIP/DuoxA, originally cloned as a protein capable of binding to the cell fate determinant Numb in Drosophila, was recently identified as a modulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mammalian systems. Despite biochemical and cellular studies that link NIP/DuoxA to the generation of ROS through the dual oxidase (Duox) enzyme, the in vivo function of NIP/DuoxA has not been characterized to date. Here we report a genetic and functional characterization of nip in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that nip is essential for Drosophila development as nip null mutants die at the 1(st) larval instar. Expression of UAS-nip, but not UAS-Duox, rescued the lethality. To understand the function of nip beyond the early larval stage, we generated GAL4 inducible UAS-RNAi transgenes. da(G32)-GAL4 driven, ubiquitous RNAi-mediated silencing of nip led to profound abnormality in pre-adult development, crinkled wing and markedly reduced lifespan at 29 degrees C. Compared to wild type flies, da-GAL4 induced nip-RNAi transgenic flies exhibited significantly reduced ability to survive under oxidative stress and displayed impaired mitochondrial aconitase function. Our work provides in vivo evidence for a critical role for nip in the development and oxidative stress response in Drosophila.

  6. Stereotypic founder cell patterning and embryonic muscle formation in Drosophila require nautilus (MyoD) gene function

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qin; Rong, Yikang; Paterson, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    nautilus is the only MyoD-related gene in Drosophila. Nautilus expression begins around stage 9 at full germ-band extension in a subset of mesodermal cells organized in a stereotypic pattern in each hemisegment. The muscle founder cell marker Duf-LacZ, produced by the enhancer trap line rP298LacZ, is coexpressed in numerous Nautilus-positive cells when founders first appear. Founders entrain muscle identity through the restricted expression of transcription factors such as S59, eve, and Kr, all of which are observed in subsets of the nautilus expressing founders. We inactivated the nautilus gene using homology-directed gene targeting and Gal4/UAS regulated RNAi to determine whether loss of nautilus gene activity affected founder cell function. Both methods produced a range of defects that included embryonic muscle disruption, reduced viability and female sterility, which could be rescued by hsp70-nautilus cDNA transgenes. Our results demonstrate Nautilus expression marks early founders that give rise to diverse muscle groups in the embryo, and that nautilus gene activity is required to seed the correct founder myoblast pattern that prefigures the muscle fiber arrangement during embryonic development. PMID:17376873

  7. Bridging the gap between postembryonic cell lineages and identified embryonic neuroblasts in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Oliver; Rickert, Christof; Nowak, Julia; Coban, Ivo C.; Technau, Gerhard M.

    2015-01-01

    The clarification of complete cell lineages, which are produced by specific stem cells, is fundamental for understanding mechanisms, controlling the generation of cell diversity and patterning in an emerging tissue. In the developing Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila, neural stem cells (neuroblasts) exhibit two periods of proliferation: During embryogenesis they produce primary lineages, which form the larval CNS. After a phase of mitotic quiescence, a subpopulation of them resumes proliferation in the larva to give rise to secondary lineages that build up the CNS of the adult fly. Within the ventral nerve cord (VNC) detailed descriptions exist for both primary and secondary lineages. However, while primary lineages have been linked to identified neuroblasts, the assignment of secondary lineages has so far been hampered by technical limitations. Therefore, primary and secondary neural lineages co-existed as isolated model systems. Here we provide the missing link between the two systems for all lineages in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres. Using the Flybow technique, embryonic neuroblasts were identified by their characteristic and unique lineages in the living embryo and their further development was traced into the late larval stage. This comprehensive analysis provides the first complete view of which embryonic neuroblasts are postembryonically reactivated along the anterior/posterior-axis of the VNC, and reveals the relationship between projection patterns of primary and secondary sublineages. PMID:25819843

  8. An F1 genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations affecting embryonic pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard; Krauss, Jana; Desjeux, Isabelle; Perkovic, Josip; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale screens for female-sterile mutations have revealed genes required maternally for establishment of the body axes in the Drosophila embryo. Although it is likely that the majority of components involved in axis formation have been identified by this approach, certain genes have escaped detection. This may be due to (1) incomplete saturation of the screens for female-sterile mutations and (2) genes with essential functions in zygotic development that mutate to lethality, precluding their identification as female-sterile mutations. To overcome these limitations, we performed a genetic mosaic screen aimed at identifying new maternal genes required for early embryonic patterning, including zygotically required ones. Using the Flp-FRT technique and a visible germline clone marker, we developed a system that allows efficient screening for maternal-effect phenotypes after only one generation of breeding, rather than after the three generations required for classic female-sterile screens. We identified 232 mutants showing various defects in embryonic pattern or morphogenesis. The mutants were ordered into 10 different phenotypic classes. A total of 174 mutants were assigned to 86 complementation groups with two alleles on average. Mutations in 45 complementation groups represent most previously known maternal genes, while 41 complementation groups represent new loci, including several involved in dorsoventral, anterior-posterior, and terminal patterning. PMID:15166158

  9. Functions and Mechanisms of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Torso Signaling: Lessons From Drosophila Embryonic Terminal Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Willis X.

    2011-01-01

    The Torso receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is required for cell fate specification in the terminal regions (head and tail) of the early Drosophila embryo. Torso contains a split tyrosine kinase domain and belongs to the type III subgroup of the RTK superfamily that also includes the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, stem cell or steel factor receptor c-Kit proto-oncoprotein, colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The Torso pathway has been a model system for studying RTK signal transduction. Genetic and biochemical studies of Torso signaling have provided valuable insights into the biological functions and mechanisms of RTK signaling during early Drosophila embryogenesis. PMID:15704136

  10. Generation of cell diversity and segmental pattern in the embryonic central nervous system of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Technau, Gerhard M; Berger, Christian; Urbach, Rolf

    2006-04-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) involves the transformation of a two-dimensional epithelial sheet of uniform ectodermal cells, the neuroectoderm, into a highly complex three-dimensional structure consisting of a huge variety of different neural cell types. Characteristic numbers of each cell type become arranged in reproducible spatial patterns, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of specific functional contacts. The fruitfly Drosophila is a suitable model to approach the mechanisms controlling the generation of cell diversity and pattern in the developing CNS, as it allows linking of gene function to individually identifiable cells. This review addresses aspects of the formation and specification of neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in Drosophila in the light of recent studies on their segmental diversification.

  11. The effects of methylmercury on Notch signaling during embryonic neural development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Engel, GL; Delwig, A; Rand, MD

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous toxicant that targets the developing fetal nervous system. MeHg interacts with the Notch signaling pathway, a highly-conserved intercellular signaling mechanism required for normal development. Notch signaling is conveyed by activation of the genes in the Enhancer of Split (E(spl)) locus in Drosophila. We have previously shown that acute high doses of MeHg upregulate several E(spl) genes in Drosophila neural-derived C6 cells. Furthermore, MeHg induction of E(spl) can occur independent of the Notch receptor itself. We now show that MeHg, unlike inorganic mercury (HgCl2), preferentially upregulates E(spl)mδ and E(spl)mγ in Drosophila C6 cells. This is distinct from Delta ligand-induced Notch signaling in which no induction of E(spl)mδ is seen. MeHg is also seen to specifically upregulate E(spl)mδ in Drosophila embryos where HgCl2 showed no such effect. Additionally, treatment of embryos with MeHg caused a consistent failure in axonal outgrowth of the intersegmental nerve (ISN). This ISN phenotype was partially replicated by genetic activation of the Notch pathway, but was not replicated by increasing expression of E(spl)mδ. These data suggest a role for Notch signaling and the E(spl)mδ target gene in MeHg toxicity, however, the site of action for E(spl)mδ in this system remains to be elucidated. PMID:22230562

  12. [Hidden polyteny in giant embryonic nuclei of Drosophila melanogaster gnu mutants].

    PubMed

    Mal'tseva, N I; Kozlova, T Iu; Zhimulev, I F

    1991-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster embryos, whose mothers are homozygous for the gnu (a recessive lethal mutation with maternal effect) undergo DNA synthesis but are defective in nuclear division. This leads to formation of giant nuclei in the syncytial blastoderm. The interior spatial chromatin organization and possibility of obtaining polytene chromosomes in these nuclei was analysed. Partial conjugation of homologous chromatids, which is an evidence for cryptic polyteny in the gnu embryos nuclei, was shown.

  13. CCHamide-2 Is an Orexigenic Brain-Gut Peptide in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Guilin R.; Hauser, Frank; Rewitz, Kim F.; Kondo, Shu; Engelbrecht, Alexander F.; Didriksen, Anders K.; Schjøtt, Suzanne R.; Sembach, Frederikke E.; Li, Shizhong; Søgaard, Karen C.; Søndergaard, Leif; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine peptides CCHamide-1 and -2, encoded by the genes ccha1 and -2, are produced by endocrine cells in the midgut and by neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to disrupt the ccha1 and -2 genes and identify mutant phenotypes with a focus on ccha-2 mutants. We found that both larval and adult ccha2 mutants showed a significantly reduced food intake as measured in adult flies by the Capillary Feeding (CAFE) assay (up to 72% reduced food intake compared to wild-type). Locomotion tests in adult flies showed that ccha2 mutants had a significantly reduced locomotor activity especially around 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., where adult Drosophila normally feeds (up to 70% reduced locomotor activity compared to wild-type). Reduced larval feeding is normally coupled to a delayed larval development, a process that is mediated by insulin. Accordingly, we found that the ccha2 mutants had a remarkably delayed development, showing pupariation 70 hours after the pupariation time point of the wild-type. In contrast, the ccha-1 mutants were not developmentally delayed. We also found that the ccha2 mutants had up to 80% reduced mRNA concentrations coding for the Drosophila insulin-like-peptides-2 and -3, while these concentrations were unchanged for the ccha1 mutants. From these experiments we conclude that CCHamide-2 is an orexigenic peptide and an important factor for controlling developmental timing in Drosophila. PMID:26168160

  14. Proteomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Landscape in the Drosophila Embryonic Nervous System and the Adult Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juanma; Martinez, Aitor; Lectez, Benoit; Lee, So Young; Franco, Maribel; Barrio, Rosa; Dittmar, Gunnar; Mayor, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Background Ubiquitination is known to regulate physiological neuronal functions as well as to be involved in a number of neuronal diseases. Several ubiquitin proteomic approaches have been developed during the last decade but, as they have been mostly applied to non-neuronal cell culture, very little is yet known about neuronal ubiquitination pathways in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an in vivo biotinylation strategy we have isolated and identified the ubiquitinated proteome in neurons both for the developing embryonic brain and for the adult eye of Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic comparison of both datasets indicates a significant difference on the ubiquitin substrates, which logically correlates with the processes that are most active at each of the developmental stages. Detection within the isolated material of two ubiquitin E3 ligases, Parkin and Ube3a, indicates their ubiquitinating activity on the studied tissues. Further identification of the proteins that do accumulate upon interference with the proteasomal degradative pathway provides an indication of the proteins that are targeted for clearance in neurons. Last, we report the proof-of-principle validation of two lysine residues required for nSyb ubiquitination. Conclusions/Significance These data cast light on the differential and common ubiquitination pathways between the embryonic and adult neurons, and hence will contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms by which neuronal function is regulated. The in vivo biotinylation methodology described here complements other approaches for ubiquitome study and offers unique advantages, and is poised to provide further insight into disease mechanisms related to the ubiquitin proteasome system. PMID:26460970

  15. Friend, foe or food? Recognition and the role of antimicrobial peptides in gut immunity and Drosophila-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Nichole A

    2016-05-26

    Drosophila melanogaster lives, breeds and feeds on fermenting fruit, an environment that supports a high density, and often a diversity, of microorganisms. This association with such dense microbe-rich environments has been proposed as a reason that D. melanogaster evolved a diverse and potent antimicrobial peptide (AMP) response to microorganisms, especially to combat potential pathogens that might occupy this niche. Yet, like most animals, D. melanogaster also lives in close association with the beneficial microbes that comprise its microbiota, or microbiome, and recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the epithelial immune response play an important role in dictating these interactions and controlling the host response to gut microbiota. Moreover, D. melanogaster also eats microbes for food, consuming fermentative microbes of decaying plant material and their by-products as both larvae and adults. The processes of nutrient acquisition and host defence are remarkably similar and use shared functions for microbe detection and response, an observation that has led to the proposal that the digestive and immune systems have a common evolutionary origin. In this manner, D. melanogaster provides a powerful model to understand how, and whether, hosts differentiate between the microbes they encounter across this spectrum of associations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Differential expression and function of the Drosophila Pax6 genes eyeless and twin of eyeless in embryonic central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Kammermeier, L; Leemans, R; Hirth, F; Flister, S; Wenger, U; Walldorf, U; Gehring, W J; Reichert, H

    2001-05-01

    We analyzed the expression and function of eyeless (ey) and twin of eyeless (toy) in the embryonic central nervous system (CNS) of Drosophila. Both genes are differentially expressed in specific neuronal subsets (but not in glia) in every CNS neuromere, and in the brain, specific cell populations co-expressing both proteins define a longitudinal domain which is intercalated between broad exclusive expression domains of ey and toy. Studies of genetic null alleles and dsRNA interference did not reveal any gross neuroanatomical effects of ey, toy, or ey/toy elimination in the embryonic CNS. In contrast, targeted misexpression of ey, but not of toy, resulted in profound axonal abnormalities in the embryonic ventral nerve cord and brain.

  17. Analysis of RNA Interference Lines Identifies New Functions of Maternally-Expressed Genes Involved in Embryonic Patterning in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Niankun; Lasko, Paul

    2015-03-31

    Embryonic patterning in Drosophila melanogaster is initially established through the activity of a number of maternally expressed genes that are expressed during oogenesis. mRNAs from some of these genes accumulate in the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte and early embryo and localize further into RNA islands, which are transient ring-like structures that form around the nuclei of future primordial germ cells (pole cells) at stage 3 of embryogenesis. As mRNAs from several genes with known functions in anterior-posterior patterning and/or germ cell specification accumulate in RNA islands, we hypothesized that some other mRNAs that localize in this manner might also function in these developmental processes. To test this, we investigated the developmental functions of 51 genes whose mRNAs accumulate in RNA islands by abrogating their activity in the female germline using RNA interference. This analysis revealed requirements for ttk, pbl, Hip14, eIF5, eIF4G, and CG9977 for progression through early oogenesis. We observed dorsal appendage defects in a proportion of eggs produced by females expressing double-stranded RNA targeting Mkrn1 or jvl, implicating these two genes in dorsal-ventral patterning. In addition, posterior patterning defects and a reduction in pole cell number were seen in the progeny of Mkrn1 females. Because the mammalian ortholog of Mkrn1 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, these results suggest an additional link between protein ubiquitination and pole plasm activity.

  18. Actomyosin contractility and Discs large contribute to junctional conversion in guiding cell alignment within the Drosophila embryonic epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Robert P.; DiNardo, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Proper control of epithelial morphogenesis is vital to development and is often disrupted in disease. After germ band extension, the cells of the Drosophila ventral embryonic epidermis are packed in a two-dimensional polygonal array. Although epithelial cell rearrangements are being studied productively in several tissues, the ventral epidermis is of particular interest as the final cell arrangement is, uniquely, far from equilibrium. We show that over the course of several hours, a subset of cells within each parasegment adopts a rectilinear configuration and aligns into parallel columns. Live imaging shows that this is accomplished by the shrinkage of select cell interfaces, as three-cell junctions are converted to four-cell junctions. Additionally, we show that non-muscle Myosin II and the polarity proteins Discs large (Dlg) and Bazooka are enriched along cell interfaces in a complex but reproducible pattern that suggests their involvement in junctional conversion and cell alignment. Indeed, depletion of Myosin II or dlg disrupts these processes. These results show that tight spatial regulation of actomyosin contractility is required to produce this high-energy arrangement of cells. PMID:20332153

  19. Analysis of RNA Interference Lines Identifies New Functions of Maternally-Expressed Genes Involved in Embryonic Patterning in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Niankun; Lasko, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic patterning in Drosophila melanogaster is initially established through the activity of a number of maternally expressed genes that are expressed during oogenesis. mRNAs from some of these genes accumulate in the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte and early embryo and localize further into RNA islands, which are transient ring-like structures that form around the nuclei of future primordial germ cells (pole cells) at stage 3 of embryogenesis. As mRNAs from several genes with known functions in anterior–posterior patterning and/or germ cell specification accumulate in RNA islands, we hypothesized that some other mRNAs that localize in this manner might also function in these developmental processes. To test this, we investigated the developmental functions of 51 genes whose mRNAs accumulate in RNA islands by abrogating their activity in the female germline using RNA interference. This analysis revealed requirements for ttk, pbl, Hip14, eIF5, eIF4G, and CG9977 for progression through early oogenesis. We observed dorsal appendage defects in a proportion of eggs produced by females expressing double-stranded RNA targeting Mkrn1 or jvl, implicating these two genes in dorsal–ventral patterning. In addition, posterior patterning defects and a reduction in pole cell number were seen in the progeny of Mkrn1 females. Because the mammalian ortholog of Mkrn1 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, these results suggest an additional link between protein ubiquitination and pole plasm activity. PMID:25834215

  20. The bipolar kinesin, KLP61F, cross-links microtubules within interpolar microtubule bundles of Drosophila embryonic mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    Sharp, D J; McDonald, K L; Brown, H M; Matthies, H J; Walczak, C; Vale, R D; Mitchison, T J; Scholey, J M

    1999-01-11

    Previous genetic and biochemical studies have led to the hypothesis that the essential mitotic bipolar kinesin, KLP61F, cross-links and slides microtubules (MTs) during spindle assembly and function. Here, we have tested this hypothesis by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM). We show that Drosophila embryonic spindles at metaphase and anaphase contain abundant bundles of MTs running between the spindle poles. These interpolar MT bundles are parallel near the poles and antiparallel in the midzone. We have observed that KLP61F motors, phosphorylated at a cdk1/cyclin B consensus domain within the BimC box (BCB), localize along the length of these interpolar MT bundles, being concentrated in the midzone region. Nonphosphorylated KLP61F motors, in contrast, are excluded from the spindle and display a cytoplasmic localization. Immunoelectron microscopy further suggested that phospho-KLP61F motors form cross-links between MTs within interpolar MT bundles. These bipolar KLP61F MT-MT cross-links should be capable of organizing parallel MTs into bundles within half spindles and sliding antiparallel MTs apart in the spindle midzone. Thus we propose that bipolar kinesin motors and MTs interact by a "sliding filament mechanism" during the formation and function of the mitotic spindle.

  1. Ribbon regulates morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland through transcriptional activation and repression

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Lee, Joslynn S.; Wells, Michael B.; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Slattery, Matthew; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors affect spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression often regulating multiple aspects of tissue morphogenesis, including cell-type specification, cell proliferation, cell death, cell polarity, cell shape, cell arrangement and cell migration. In this work, we describe a distinct role for Ribbon (Rib) in controlling cell shape/volume increases during elongation of the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). Notably, the morphogenetic changes in rib mutants occurred without effects on general SG cell attributes such as specification, proliferation and apoptosis. Moreover, the changes in cell shape/volume in rib mutants occurred without compromising epithelial-specific morphological attributes such as apicobasal polarity and junctional integrity. To identify the genes regulated by Rib, we performed ChIP-seq analysis in embryos driving expression of GFP-tagged Rib specifically in the SGs. To learn if the Rib binding sites identified in the ChIP-seq analysis were linked to changes in gene expression, we performed microarray analysis comparing RNA samples from age-matched wild-type and rib null embryos. From the superposed ChIP-seq and microarray gene expression data, we identified 60 genomic sites bound by Rib likely to regulate SG-specific gene expression. We confirmed several of the identified Rib targets by qRT-pCR and/or in situ hybridization. Our results indicate that Rib regulates cell growth and tissue shape in the Drosophila salivary gland via a diverse array of targets through both transcriptional activation and repression. Furthermore, our results suggest that autoregulation of rib expression may be a key component of the SG morphogenetic gene network. PMID:26477561

  2. Gut-neuron interaction via Hh signaling regulates intestinal progenitor cell differentiation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui; Pan, Chenyu; Liu, Chunying; Lv, Xiangdong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Yue; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Han, Junhai; Zhou, Zhaocai; Jiang, Hai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their progenies. A complex autonomic nervous system spreads over posterior intestine. However, whether and how neurons regulate posterior intestinal homeostasis is largely unknown. Here we report that neurons regulate Drosophila posterior intestinal homeostasis. Specifically, downregulation of neuronal Hedgehog (Hh) signaling inhibits the differentiation of ISCs toward enterocytes (ECs), whereas upregulated neuronal Hh signaling promotes such process. We demonstrate that, among multiple sources of Hh ligand, those secreted by ECs induces similar phenotypes as does neuronal Hh. In addition, intestinal JAK/STAT signaling responds to activated neuronal Hh signaling, suggesting that JAK/STAT signaling acts downstream of neuronal Hh signaling in intestine. Collectively, our results indicate that neuronal Hh signaling is essential for the determination of ISC fate.

  3. Retinoic Acid Upregulates Ret and Induces Chain Migration and Population Expansion in Vagal Neural Crest Cells to Colonise the Embryonic Gut

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Johanna E.; Zhang, Dongcheng; Rollo, Benjamin N.; Newgreen, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    Vagal neural crest cells (VNCCs) arise in the hindbrain, and at (avian) embryonic day (E) 1.5 commence migration through paraxial tissues to reach the foregut as chains of cells 1–2 days later. They then colonise the rest of the gut in a rostrocaudal wave. The chains of migrating cells later resolve into the ganglia of the enteric nervous system. In organ culture, E4.5 VNCCs resident in the gut (termed enteric or ENCC) which have previously encountered vagal paraxial tissues, rapidly colonised aneural gut tissue in large numbers as chains of cells. Within the same timeframe, E1.5 VNCCs not previously exposed to paraxial tissues provided very few cells that entered the gut mesenchyme, and these never formed chains, despite their ability to migrate in paraxial tissue and in conventional cell culture. Exposing VNCCs in vitro to paraxial tissue normally encountered en route to the foregut conferred enteric migratory ability. VNCC after passage through paraxial tissue developed elements of retinoic acid signalling such as Retinoic Acid Binding Protein 1 expression. The paraxial tissue's ability to promote gut colonisation was reproduced by the addition of retinoic acid, or the synthetic retinoid Am80, to VNCCs (but not to trunk NCCs) in organ culture. The retinoic acid receptor antagonist CD 2665 strongly reduced enteric colonisation by E1.5 VNCC and E4.5 ENCCs, at a concentration suggesting RARα signalling. By FACS analysis, retinoic acid application to vagal neural tube and NCCs in vitro upregulated Ret; a Glial-derived-neurotrophic-factor receptor expressed by ENCCs which is necessary for normal enteric colonisation. This shows that early VNCC, although migratory, are incapable of migrating in appropriate chains in gut mesenchyme, but can be primed for this by retinoic acid. This is the first instance of the characteristic form of NCC migration, chain migration, being attributed to the application of a morphogen. PMID:23717535

  4. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation. PMID:24047959

  5. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity.

    PubMed

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation.

  6. The Drosophila Shark tyrosine kinase is required for embryonic dorsal closure

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Rafael; Takahashi, Fumitaka; Liu, Zhao; Steward, Ruth; Stein, David; Stanley, E. Richard

    2000-01-01

    Dorsal closure (DC) in the Drosophila embryo requires the coordinated interaction of two different functional domains of the epidermal cell layer—the leading edge (LE) and the lateral epidermis. In response to activation of a conserved c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling module, the dorsal-most layer of cells, which constitute the LE of the stretching epithelial sheet, secrete Dpp, a member of the TGFβ superfamily. Dpp and other LE cell-derived signaling molecules stimulate the bilateral dorsal elongation of cells of the dorsolateral epidermis over the underlaying amnioserosa and the eventual fusion of their LEs along the dorsal midline. We have found that flies bearing a Shark tyrosine kinase gene mutation, shark1, exhibit a DC-defective phenotype. Dpp fails to be expressed in shark1 mutant LE cells. Consistent with these observations, epidermal-specific reconstitution of shark function or overexpression of an activated form of c-Jun in the shark1 mutant background, rescues the DC defect. Thus, Shark regulates the JNK signaling pathway leading to Dpp expression in LE cells. Furthermore, constitutive activation of the Dpp pathway throughout the epidermis fails to rescue the shark1 DC defect, suggesting that Shark may function in additional pathways in the LE and/or lateral epithelium. PMID:10716948

  7. Drosophila Hey is a target of Notch in asymmetric divisions during embryonic and larval neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Monastirioti, Maria; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Koumbanakis, Konstantinos A; Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Deligiannaki, Myrto; Wech, Irmgard; Almeida, Mara; Preiss, Anette; Bray, Sarah; Delidakis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    bHLH-O proteins are a subfamily of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factors characterized by an 'Orange' protein-protein interaction domain. Typical members are the Hairy/E(spl), or Hes, proteins, well studied in their ability, among others, to suppress neuronal differentiation in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Hes proteins are often effectors of Notch signalling. In vertebrates, another bHLH-O protein group, the Hey proteins, have also been shown to be Notch targets and to interact with Hes. We have studied the single Drosophila Hey orthologue. We show that it is primarily expressed in a subset of newly born neurons, which receive Notch signalling during their birth. Unlike in vertebrates, however, Hey is not expressed in precursor cells and does not block neuronal differentiation. It rather promotes one of two alternative fates that sibling neurons adopt at birth. Although in the majority of cases Hey is a Notch target, it is also expressed independently of Notch in some lineages, most notably the larval mushroom body. The availability of Hey as a Notch readout has allowed us to study Notch signalling during the genesis of secondary neurons in the larval central nervous system.

  8. Drosophila Hey is a target of Notch in asymmetric divisions during embryonic and larval neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Monastirioti, Maria; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Koumbanakis, Konstantinos A.; Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Deligiannaki, Myrto; Wech, Irmgard; Almeida, Mara; Preiss, Anette; Bray, Sarah; Delidakis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    bHLH-O proteins are a subfamily of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factors characterized by an ‘Orange’ protein-protein interaction domain. Typical members are the Hairy/E(spl), or Hes, proteins, well studied in their ability, among others, to suppress neuronal differentiation in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Hes proteins are often effectors of Notch signalling. In vertebrates, another bHLH-O protein group, the Hey proteins, have also been shown to be Notch targets and to interact with Hes. We have studied the single Drosophila Hey orthologue. We show that it is primarily expressed in a subset of newly born neurons, which receive Notch signalling during their birth. Unlike in vertebrates, however, Hey is not expressed in precursor cells and does not block neuronal differentiation. It rather promotes one of two alternative fates that sibling neurons adopt at birth. Although in the majority of cases Hey is a Notch target, it is also expressed independently of Notch in some lineages, most notably the larval mushroom body. The availability of Hey as a Notch readout has allowed us to study Notch signalling during the genesis of secondary neurons in the larval central nervous system. PMID:20040486

  9. Nutrient Sensor in the Brain Directs the Action of the Brain-Gut Axis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dus, Monica; Sih-Yu Lai, Jason; Gunapala, Keith M.; Min, Soohong; Tayler, Timothy D.; Hergarden, Anne C.; Geraud, Eliot; Joseph, Christina M.; Suh, Greg S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals can detect and consume nutritive sugars without the influence of taste. However, the identity of the taste-independent nutrient sensor and the mechanism by which animals respond to the nutritional value of sugar are unclear. Here, we report that six neurosecretory cells in the Drosophila brain that produce Diuretic hormone 44 (Dh44), a homologue of the mammalian corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), were specifically activated by nutritive sugars. Flies in which the activity of these neurons or the expression of Dh44 was disrupted failed to select nutritive sugars. Manipulation of the function of Dh44 receptors had a similar effect. Notably, artificial activation of Dh44 receptor-1 neurons resulted in proboscis extensions, and frequent episodes of excretion. Conversely, reduced Dh44 activity led to decreased excretion. Together, these actions facilitate ingestion and digestion of nutritive foods. We propose that the Dh44 system directs the detection and consumption of nutritive sugars through a positive feedback loop. PMID:26074004

  10. Ion-selective microelectrode analysis of salicylate transport by the Malpighian tubules and gut of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael J; Rheault, Mark R

    2005-01-01

    Transport of the organic anion salicylate by the Malpighian tubules and gut of larval and adult fruit flies was studied using two salicylate-selective microelectrode methods. The first method combined the high selectivity of tridodecylmethylammonium-based electrodes for salicylate with the self-referencing ion-selective microelectrode technique for non-invasive spatial and temporal analysis of salicylate flux. Measurements with this technique revealed secretion of salicylate across the main and distal segments of the Malpighian tubule as well as the midgut, ileum and rectum. The second method used a salicylate-selective microelectrode to measure the concentration of salicylate in fluid droplets secreted by isolated Drosophila Malpighian tubules set up in a Ramsay secretion assay. Transepithelial salicylate flux was calculated as the product of fluid secretion rate and secreted fluid salicylate concentration. Measurements with this method revealed that salicylate transport was active and saturable; the kinetic parameters J(max) and K(t) were 2.72 pmol min(-1) tubule(-1) and 0.046 mmol l(-1), respectively. Measurements of transepithelial salicylate flux determined by both microelectrode methods were in good agreement. Transepithelial flux measurements measured by microelectrodes were also validated by comparing them with measurements of radiolabelled salicylate levels in secreted droplets. Salicylate concentrations in haemolymph samples were measured with salicylate-selective microelectrodes after injection of salicylate into the haemocoel or after insects were fed salicylate-rich diets. The rate of salicylate secretion by Malpighian tubules in vitro was sufficient to account for the measured rate of decline of salicylate concentration in the haemolymph in vivo.

  11. Ion permeation properties of the glutamate receptor channel in cultured embryonic Drosophila myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H; Ciani, S; Kidokoro, Y

    1994-01-01

    Ion permeation properties of the glutamate receptor channel in cultured myotubes of Drosophila embryos were studied using the inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Lowering the NaCl concentration in the bath (intracellular solution), while maintaining that of the external solution constant, caused a shift of the reversal potential in the positive direction, thus indicating a higher permeability of the channel to Na+ than to Cl- (PCl/PNa < 0.04), and suggesting that the channel is cation selective. With 145 mM Na+ on both sides of the membrane, the single-channel current-voltage relation was almost linear in the voltage range between -80 and +80 mV, the conductance showing some variability in the range between 140 and 170 pS. All monovalent alkali cations tested, as well as NH4+, permeated the channel effectively. Using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the reversal potential, the permeability ratios with respect to Na+ were estimated to be: 1.32 for K+, 1.18 for NH4+, 1.15 for Rb+, 1.09 for Cs+, and 0.57 for Li+. Divalent cations, i.e. Mg2+ and Ca2+, in the external solution depressed not only the inward but also the outward Na+ currents, although reversal potential measurements indicated that both ions have considerably higher permeabilities than Na+ (PMg/PNa = 2.31; PCa/PNa = 9.55). The conductance-activity relation for Na+ was described by a hyperbolic curve. The maximal conductance was about 195 pS and the half-saturating activity 45 mM. This result suggests that Na+ ions bind to sites in the channel. All data were fitted by a model based on the Eyring's reaction rate theory, in which the receptor channel is a one-ion pore with three energy barriers and two internal sites. PMID:7519261

  12. Opposite effects of 5-HT/AKH and octopamine on the crop contractions in adult Drosophila melanogaster: Evidence of a double brain-gut serotonergic circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Picciau, Lorenzo; Murru, Ludovico; Stoffolano, John G.

    2017-01-01

    This study showed that in adult Drosophila melanogaster, the type of sugar—either present within the crop lumen or in the bathing solution of the crop—had no effect on crop muscle contraction. What is important, however, is the volume within the crop lumen. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that exogenous applications of serotonin on crop muscles increases both the amplitude and the frequency of crop contraction rate, while adipokinetic hormone mainly enhances the crop contraction frequency. Conversely, octopamine virtually silenced the overall crop activity. The present study reports for the first time an analysis of serotonin effects along the gut-brain axis in adult D. melanogaster. Injection of serotonin into the brain between the interocellar area shows that brain applications of serotonin decrease the frequency of crop activity. Based on our results, we propose that there are two different, opposite pathways for crop motility control governed by serotonin: excitatory when added in the abdomen (i.e., directly bathing the crop) and inhibitory when supplied within the brain (i.e., by injection). Finally, our results point to a double brain-gut serotonergic circuitry suggesting that not only the brain can affect gut functions, but the gut can also affect the central nervous system. On the basis of our results, and data in the literature, a possible mechanism for these two discrete serotonergic functions is suggested. PMID:28334024

  13. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  14. The Drosophila chk2 gene loki is essential for embryonic DNA double-strand-break checkpoints induced in S phase or G2.

    PubMed

    Masrouha, Nisrine; Yang, Long; Hijal, Sirine; Larochelle, Stéphane; Suter, Beat

    2003-03-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are signal transduction pathways that control the order and timing of cell cycle transitions, ensuring that critical events are completed before the occurrence of the next cell cycle transition. The Chk2 family of kinases is known to play a central role in mediating the cellular responses to DNA damage or DNA replication blocks in various organisms. Here we show through a phylogenetic study that the Drosophila melanogaster serine/threonine kinase Loki is the homolog of the yeast Mek1p, Rad53p, Dun1p, and Cds1 proteins as well as the human Chk2. Functional analyses allowed us to conclude that, in flies, chk2 is involved in monitoring double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by irradiation during S and G2 phases. In this process it plays an essential role in inducing a cell cycle arrest in embryonic cells. Our results also show that, in contrast to C. elegans chk2, Drosophila chk2 is not essential for normal meiosis and recombination, and it also appears to be dispensable for the MMS-induced DNA damage checkpoint and the HU-induced DNA replication checkpoint during larval development. In addition, Drosophila chk2 does not act at the same cell cycle phases as its yeast homologs, but seems rather to be involved in a pathway similar to the mammalian one, which involves signaling through the ATM/Chk2 pathway in response to genotoxic insults. As mutations in human chk2 were linked to several cancers, these similarities point to the usefulness of the Drosophila model system.

  15. The Drosophila chk2 gene loki is essential for embryonic DNA double-strand-break checkpoints induced in S phase or G2.

    PubMed Central

    Masrouha, Nisrine; Yang, Long; Hijal, Sirine; Larochelle, Stéphane; Suter, Beat

    2003-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are signal transduction pathways that control the order and timing of cell cycle transitions, ensuring that critical events are completed before the occurrence of the next cell cycle transition. The Chk2 family of kinases is known to play a central role in mediating the cellular responses to DNA damage or DNA replication blocks in various organisms. Here we show through a phylogenetic study that the Drosophila melanogaster serine/threonine kinase Loki is the homolog of the yeast Mek1p, Rad53p, Dun1p, and Cds1 proteins as well as the human Chk2. Functional analyses allowed us to conclude that, in flies, chk2 is involved in monitoring double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by irradiation during S and G2 phases. In this process it plays an essential role in inducing a cell cycle arrest in embryonic cells. Our results also show that, in contrast to C. elegans chk2, Drosophila chk2 is not essential for normal meiosis and recombination, and it also appears to be dispensable for the MMS-induced DNA damage checkpoint and the HU-induced DNA replication checkpoint during larval development. In addition, Drosophila chk2 does not act at the same cell cycle phases as its yeast homologs, but seems rather to be involved in a pathway similar to the mammalian one, which involves signaling through the ATM/Chk2 pathway in response to genotoxic insults. As mutations in human chk2 were linked to several cancers, these similarities point to the usefulness of the Drosophila model system. PMID:12663536

  16. A synthetic combination of mutations, including fs(1)pyrSu(b), rSu(b) and b, causes female sterility and reduces embryonic viability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Piskur, J; Gojković, Z; Bahn, E

    1999-04-01

    A Drosophila melanogaster mutant, fs(1)pyrSu(b), carrying a mutation that maps to the tip of the X chromosome, has been isolated. The mutation, when present alone, does not confer a detectable phenotype. However, this mutation causes female sterility and reduces embryonic viability when combined with mutations which deregulate the pyrimidine and beta-alanine pools. Embryos that are homozygous for the mutations fs(1)pyrSu(b), rSu(b) [previously designated as Su(b)] and b, and originate from a female parent homozygous for the three mutations show severely reduced viability. Newly laid eggs begin development normally, but the majority of the embryos die just before the eggs are due to hatch.

  17. Identification of the Drosophila core 1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase gene that synthesizes T antigen in the embryonic central nervous system and hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Fuwa, Takashi J; Arima, Mikiko; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Norihiko; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Osawa, Ken-Ichi; Ueda, Ryu; Nishihara, Shoko

    2008-12-01

    T antigen (Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr), the well-known tumor-associated antigen, is a core 1 mucin-type O-glycan structure that is synthesized by core 1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1beta3GalT), which transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to Tn antigen (GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr). Three putative C1beta3GalTs have been identified in Drosophila. However, although all three are expressed in embryos, their roles during embryogenesis have not yet been clarified. In this study, we used P-element inserted mutants to show that CG9520, one of the three putative C1beta3GalTs, synthesizes T antigen expressed on the central nervous system (CNS) during embryogenesis. We also found that T antigen was expressed on a subset of the embryonic hemocytes. CG9520 mutant embryos showed the loss of T antigens on the CNS and on a subset of hemocytes. Then, the loss of T antigens was rescued by precise excision of the P-element inserted into the CG9520 gene. Our data demonstrate that T antigens expressed on the CNS and on a subset of hemocytes are synthesized by CG9520 in the Drosophila embryo. In addition, we found that the number of circulating hemocytes was reduced in third instar larvae of CG9520 mutant. We, therefore, named the CG9520 gene Drosophila core 1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase 1 because it is responsible for the synthesis and function of T antigen in vivo.

  18. Ubiquitous overexpression of a transgene encoding the extracellular portion of the Drosophila roughest-irregular chiasm C protein induces early embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Moda, L; Machado, R C; Ramos, R G

    2000-09-01

    The cell adhesion molecule Rst-irreC is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily involved in several important developmental processes in Drosophila, including axonal pathfinding in the optic lobe and programmed cell death and pigment cell differentiation in the pupal retina. As an initial step towards the "in vivo" functional analysis of this protein we have generated transgenic fly stocks carrying a truncated cDNA construct encoding only the extracellular domain of Rst-IrreC under the transcriptional control of the heat shock inducible promoter hsp70. We show that heat-shocking embryos bearing the transgene during the first 8hs of development lead to a 3-4 fold reduction in their viability compared to wild type controls. The embryonic lethality can already be produced by applying the heat pulse in the first 3hs of embryonic development, does not seem to be suppressed in the absence of wildtype product and is progressively reduced as the heat treatment is applied later in embryogenesis. These results are compatible with the hypothesis of the lethal phenotype being primarily due to heterophilic interactions between Rst-IrreC extracellular domain and an yet unknown ligand.

  19. Six3, a medaka homologue of the Drosophila homeobox gene sine oculis is expressed in the anterior embryonic shield and the developing eye.

    PubMed

    Loosli, F; Köster, R W; Carl, M; Krone, A; Wittbrodt, J

    1998-06-01

    homologue Six3 (Oliver, G., Mailhos, A., Wehr, R., Copeland, N.G., Jenkins, N.A., Gruss, P., 1995. Six3, a murine homologue of the sine oculis gene, demarcates the most anterior border of the developing neural plate and is expressed during eye development. Development 121, 4045-4055). sine oculis (so) is essential for the development of the larval and adult visual system (Cheyette, B.N.R., Green, P.J., Martin, K., Garren, H., Hartenstein, V., Zipursky, S.L., 1994. The Drosophila sine oculis locus encodes a homeodomain-containing protein required for the development of the entire visual system. Neuron l2, 977-996). Six3 is expressed in the anterior neural plate and optic vesicles, lens, olfactory placodes and ventral forebrain (Oliver, G., Mailhos, A., Wehr, R., Copeland, N.G., Jenkins, N.A., Gruss, P., 1995. Six3, a murine homologue of the sine oculis gene, demarcates the most anterior border of the developing neural plate and is expressed during eye development. Development 121, 4045-4055). Overexpression of mouse Six3 gene in medaka fish embryos (Orvzias latipes) results in the formation of an ectopic lens, indicating that Six3 activity can trigger the genetic pathway leading to lens formation (Oliver, G., Loosli, F., Koster, R., Wittbrodt, J., Gruss, P., 1996. Ectopic lens induction in fish in response to the murine homeobox gene Six3. Mech. Dev. 60, 233-239). We isolated the medaka Six3 homologue and analyzed its expression pattern in the medaka embryo. It is expressed initially in the anterior embryonic shield and later in the developing eye and prosencephalon. The early localized expression of Six3 suggests a role in the regionalization of the rostral head.

  20. Cloning of an arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT1) from Drosophila melanogaster expressed in the nervous system and the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Hintermann, E; Grieder, N C; Amherd, R; Brodbeck, D; Meyer, U A

    1996-01-01

    In insects, neurotransmitter catabolism, melatonin precursor formation, and sclerotization involve arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT, EC 2.3.1.87) activity. It is not known if one or multiple aaNAT enzymes are responsible for these activities. We recently have purified an aaNAT from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we report the cloning of the corresponding aaNAT cDNA (aaNAT1) that upon COS cell expression acetylates dopamine, tryptamine, and the immediate melatonin precursor serotonin. aaNAT1 represents a novel gene family unrelated to known acetyl-transferases, except in two weakly conserved amino acid motifs. In situ hybridization studies of aaNAT1 mRNA in embryos reveal hybridization signals in the brain, the ventral cord, the gut, and probably in oenocytes, indicating a broad tissue distribution of aaNAT1 transcripts. Moreover, in day/ night studies we demonstrate a diurnal rhythm of melatonin concentration without a clear-cut change in aaNAT1 mRNA levels. The data suggest that tissue-specific regulation of aaNAT1 may be associated with different enzymatic functions and do not exclude the possibility of additional aaNAT genes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8901578

  1. The FHA domain determines Drosophila Chk2/Mnk localization to key mitotic structures and is essential for early embryonic DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Takada, Saeko; Collins, Eric R; Kurahashi, Kayo

    2015-05-15

    DNA damage responses, including mitotic centrosome inactivation, cell-cycle delay in mitosis, and nuclear dropping from embryo cortex, maintain genome integrity in syncytial Drosophila embryos. A conserved signaling kinase, Chk2, known as Mnk/Loki, is essential for the responses. Here we demonstrate that functional EGFP-Mnk expressed from a transgene localizes to the nucleus, centrosomes, interkinetochore/centromere region, midbody, and pseudocleavage furrows without DNA damage and in addition forms numerous foci/aggregates on mitotic chromosomes upon DNA damage. We expressed EGFP-tagged Mnk deletion or point mutation variants and investigated domain functions of Mnk in vivo. A triple mutation in the phosphopeptide-binding site of the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain disrupted normal Mnk localization except to the nucleus. The mutation also disrupted Mnk foci formation on chromosomes upon DNA damage. FHA mutations and deletion of the SQ/TQ-cluster domain (SCD) abolished Mnk transphosphorylations and autophosphorylations, indicative of kinase activation after DNA damage. A potent NLS was found at the C-terminus, which is required for normal Mnk function. We propose that the FHA domain in Mnk plays essential dual functions in mediating embryonic DNA damage responses by means of its phosphopeptide-binding ability: activating Mnk in the nucleus upon DNA damage and recruiting Mnk to multiple subcellular structures independently of DNA damage.

  2. The Drosophila SH2-SH3 adapter protein Dock is expressed in embryonic axons and facilitates synapse formation by the RP3 motoneuron.

    PubMed

    Desai, C J; Garrity, P A; Keshishian, H; Zipursky, S L; Zinn, K

    1999-04-01

    The Dock SH2-SH3 domain adapter protein, a homolog of the mammalian Nck oncoprotein, is required for axon guidance and target recognition by photoreceptor axons in Drosophila larvae. Here we show that Dock is widely expressed in neurons and at muscle attachment sites in the embryo, and that this expression pattern has both maternal and zygotic components. In motoneurons, Dock is concentrated in growth cones. Loss of zygotic dock function causes a selective delay in synapse formation by the RP3 motoneuron at the cleft between muscles 7 and 6. These muscles often completely lack innervation in late stage 16 dock mutant embryos. RP3 does form a synapse later in development, however, because muscles 7 and 6 are normally innervated in third-instar mutant larvae. The absence of zygotically expressed Dock also results in subtle defects in a longitudinal axon pathway in the embryonic central nervous system. Concomitant loss of both maternally and zygotically derived Dock dramatically enhances these central nervous system defects, but does not increase the delay in RP3 synaptogenesis. These results indicate that Dock facilitates synapse formation by the RP3 motoneuron and is also required for guidance of some interneuronal axons The involvement of Dock in the conversion of the RP3 growth cone into a presynaptic terminal may reflect a role for Dock-mediated signaling in remodeling of the growth cone's cytoskeleton.

  3. The FHA domain determines Drosophila Chk2/Mnk localization to key mitotic structures and is essential for early embryonic DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Saeko; Collins, Eric R.; Kurahashi, Kayo

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage responses, including mitotic centrosome inactivation, cell-cycle delay in mitosis, and nuclear dropping from embryo cortex, maintain genome integrity in syncytial Drosophila embryos. A conserved signaling kinase, Chk2, known as Mnk/Loki, is essential for the responses. Here we demonstrate that functional EGFP-Mnk expressed from a transgene localizes to the nucleus, centrosomes, interkinetochore/centromere region, midbody, and pseudocleavage furrows without DNA damage and in addition forms numerous foci/aggregates on mitotic chromosomes upon DNA damage. We expressed EGFP-tagged Mnk deletion or point mutation variants and investigated domain functions of Mnk in vivo. A triple mutation in the phosphopeptide-binding site of the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain disrupted normal Mnk localization except to the nucleus. The mutation also disrupted Mnk foci formation on chromosomes upon DNA damage. FHA mutations and deletion of the SQ/TQ-cluster domain (SCD) abolished Mnk transphosphorylations and autophosphorylations, indicative of kinase activation after DNA damage. A potent NLS was found at the C-terminus, which is required for normal Mnk function. We propose that the FHA domain in Mnk plays essential dual functions in mediating embryonic DNA damage responses by means of its phosphopeptide-binding ability: activating Mnk in the nucleus upon DNA damage and recruiting Mnk to multiple subcellular structures independently of DNA damage. PMID:25808488

  4. Receptor guanylyl cyclase Gyc76C is required for invagination, collective migration and lumen shape in the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Unisha; Myat, Monn Monn

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Drosophila embryonic salivary gland is formed by the invagination and collective migration of cells. Here, we report on a novel developmental role for receptor-type guanylyl cyclase at 76C, Gyc76C, in morphogenesis of the salivary gland. We demonstrate that Gyc76C and downstream cGMP-dependent protein kinase 1 (DG1) function in the gland and surrounding mesoderm to control invagination, collective migration and lumen shape. Loss of gyc76C resulted in glands that failed to invaginate, complete posterior migration and had branched lumens. Salivary gland migration defects of gyc76C mutant embryos were rescued by expression of wild-type gyc76C specifically in the gland or surrounding mesoderm, whereas invagination defects were rescued primarily by expression in the gland. In migrating salivary glands of gyc76C mutant embryos, integrin subunits localized normally to gland–mesoderm contact sites but talin localization in the surrounding circular visceral mesoderm and fat body was altered. The extracellular matrix protein, laminin, also failed to accumulate around the migrating salivary gland of gyc76C mutant embryos, and gyc76C and laminin genetically interacted in gland migration. Our studies suggest that gyc76C controls salivary gland invagination, collective migration and lumen shape, in part by regulating the localization of talin and the laminin matrix. PMID:23862019

  5. Control of germline torso expression by the BTB/POZ domain protein pipsqueak is required for embryonic terminal patterning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Marco; Furriols, Marc; Casanova, Jordi; Luschnig, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    Early embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster is controlled by maternal gene products, which are deposited in the egg during oogenesis. It is not well understood how maternal gene expression is controlled during germline development. pipsqueak (psq) is a complex locus that encodes several nuclear protein variants containing a PSQ DNA-binding domain and a BTB/POZ domain. Psq proteins are thought to regulate germline gene expression through epigenetic silencing. While psq was originally identified as a posterior-group gene, we show here a novel role of psq in embryonic terminal patterning. We characterized a new psq loss-of-function allele, psq(rum), which specifically affects signaling by the Torso (Tor) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Using genetic epistasis, gene expression analyses, and rescue experiments, we demonstrate that the sole function impaired by the psq(rum) mutation in the terminal system is an essential requirement for controlling transcription of the tor gene in the germline. In contrast, the expression of several other maternal genes, including those encoding Tor pathway components, is not affected by the mutation. Rescue of the psq(rum) terminal phenotype does not require the BTB/POZ domain, suggesting that the PSQ DNA-binding domain can function independently of the BTB/POZ domain. Our finding that tor expression is subject to dedicated transcriptional regulation suggests that different maternal genes may be regulated by multiple distinct mechanisms, rather than by a general program controlling nurse-cell transcription.

  6. Lineage-specific effects of Notch/Numb signaling in post-embryonic development of the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Suewei; Lai, Sen-Lin; Yu, Huang-Hsiang; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun; Lee, Tzumin

    2010-01-01

    Numb can antagonize Notch signaling to diversify the fates of sister cells. We report here that paired sister cells acquire different fates in all three Drosophila neuronal lineages that make diverse types of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs). Only one in each pair of postmitotic neurons survives into the adult stage in both anterodorsal (ad) and ventral (v) PN lineages. Notably, Notch signaling specifies the PN fate in the vPN lineage but promotes programmed cell death in the missing siblings in the adPN lineage. In addition, Notch/Numb-mediated binary sibling fates underlie the production of PNs and local interneurons from common precursors in the lAL lineage. Furthermore, Numb is needed in the lateral but not adPN or vPN lineages to prevent the appearance of ectopic neuroblasts and to ensure proper self-renewal of neural progenitors. These lineage-specific outputs of Notch/Numb signaling show that a universal mechanism of binary fate decision can be utilized to govern diverse neural sibling differentiations. PMID:20023159

  7. Lineage-specific effects of Notch/Numb signaling in post-embryonic development of the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suewei; Lai, Sen-Lin; Yu, Huang-Hsiang; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun; Lee, Tzumin

    2010-01-01

    Numb can antagonize Notch signaling to diversify the fates of sister cells. We report here that paired sister cells acquire different fates in all three Drosophila neuronal lineages that make diverse types of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs). Only one in each pair of postmitotic neurons survives into the adult stage in both anterodorsal (ad) and ventral (v) PN lineages. Notably, Notch signaling specifies the PN fate in the vPN lineage but promotes programmed cell death in the missing siblings in the adPN lineage. In addition, Notch/Numb-mediated binary sibling fates underlie the production of PNs and local interneurons from common precursors in the lAL lineage. Furthermore, Numb is needed in the lateral but not adPN or vPN lineages to prevent the appearance of ectopic neuroblasts and to ensure proper self-renewal of neural progenitors. These lineage-specific outputs of Notch/Numb signaling show that a universal mechanism of binary fate decision can be utilized to govern diverse neural sibling differentiations.

  8. Genetic regulation and function of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in patterning of the embryonic Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Jussen, David; von Hilchen, Janina

    2016-01-01

    The specification of distinct neural cell types in central nervous system development crucially depends on positional cues conferred to neural stem cells in the neuroectoderm. Here, we investigate the regulation and function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling pathway in early development of the Drosophila brain. We find that localized EGFR signalling in the brain neuroectoderm relies on a neuromere-specific deployment of activating (Spitz, Vein) and inhibiting (Argos) ligands. Activated EGFR controls the spatially restricted expression of all dorsoventral (DV) patterning genes in a gene- and neuromere-specific manner. Further, we reveal a novel role of DV genes—ventral nervous system defective (vnd), intermediate neuroblast defective (ind), Nkx6—in regulating the expression of vein and argos, which feed back on EGFR, indicating that EGFR signalling stands not strictly atop the DV patterning genes. Within this network of genetic interactions, Vnd acts as a positive EGFR feedback regulator. Further, we show that EGFR signalling becomes dependent on single-minded-expressing midline cells in the posterior brain (tritocerebrum), but remains midline-independent in the anterior brain (deuto- and protocerebrum). Finally, we demonstrate that activated EGFR controls the proper formation of brain neuroblasts by regulating the number, survival and proneural gene expression of neuroectodermal progenitor cells. These data demonstrate that EGFR signalling is crucially important for patterning and early neurogenesis of the brain. PMID:27974623

  9. Planar cell polarity: the Dachsous/Fat system contributes differently to the embryonic and larval stages of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Pedro; Brittle, Amy; Palacios, Isabel M.; Strutt, David; Casal, José; Lawrence, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal patterns of all three larval instars (L1–L3) of Drosophila are made by one unchanging set of cells. The seven rows of cuticular denticles of all larval stages are consistently planar polarised, some pointing forwards, others backwards. In L1 all the predenticles originate at the back of the cells but, in L2 and L3, they form at the front or the back of the cell depending on the polarity of the forthcoming denticles. We find that, to polarise all rows, the Dachsous/Fat system is differentially utilised; in L1 it is active in the placement of the actin-based predenticles but is not crucial for the final orientation of the cuticular denticles, in L2 and L3 it is needed for placement and polarity. We find Four-jointed to be strongly expressed in the tendon cells and show how this might explain the orientation of all seven rows. Unexpectedly, we find that L3 that lack Dachsous differ from larvae lacking Fat and we present evidence that this is due to differently mislocalised Dachs. We make some progress in understanding how Dachs contributes to phenotypes of wildtype and mutant larvae and adults. PMID:26935392

  10. Distinct effects of Abelson kinase mutations on myocytes and neurons in dissociated Drosophila embryonic cultures: mimicking of high temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) is known to regulate axon guidance, muscle development, and cell-cell interaction in vivo. The Drosophila primary culture system offers advantages in exploring the cellular mechanisms mediated by Abl with utilizing various experimental manipulations. Here we demonstrate that single-embryo cultures exhibit stage-dependent characteristics of cellular differentiation and developmental progression in neurons and myocytes, as well as nerve-muscle contacts. In particular, muscle development critically depends on the stage of dissociated embryos. In wild-type (WT) cultures derived from embryos before stage 12, muscle cells remained within cell clusters and were rarely detected. Interestingly, abundant myocytes were spotted in Abl mutant cultures, exhibiting enhanced myocyte movement and fusion, as well as neuron-muscle contacts even in cultures dissociated from younger, stage 10 embryos. Notably, Abl myocytes frequently displayed well-expanded lamellipodia. Conversely, Abl neurons were characterized with fewer large veil-like lamellipodia, but instead had increased numbers of filopodia and darker nodes along neurites. These distinct phenotypes were equally evident in both homo- and hetero-zygous cultures (Abl/Abl vs. Abl/+) of different alleles (Abl(1) and Abl(4) ) indicating dominant mutational effects. Strikingly, in WT cultures derived from stage 10 embryos, high temperature (HT) incubation promoted muscle migration and fusion, partially mimicking the advanced muscle development typical of Abl cultures. However, HT enhanced neuronal growth with increased numbers of enlarged lamellipodia, distinct from the characteristic Abl neuronal morphology. Intriguingly, HT incubation also promoted Abl lamellipodia expansion, with a much greater effect on nerve cells than muscle. Our results suggest that Abl is an essential regulator for myocyte and neuron development and that high-temperature incubation partially mimics the faster muscle development

  11. Gene expression profiles uncover individual identities of gnathal neuroblasts and serial homologies in the embryonic CNS of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Urbach, Rolf; Jussen, David; Technau, Gerhard M.

    2016-01-01

    The numbers and types of progeny cells generated by neural stem cells in the developing CNS are adapted to its region-specific functional requirements. In Drosophila, segmental units of the CNS develop from well-defined patterns of neuroblasts. Here we constructed comprehensive neuroblast maps for the three gnathal head segments. Based on the spatiotemporal pattern of neuroblast formation and the expression profiles of 46 marker genes (41 transcription factors), each neuroblast can be uniquely identified. Compared with the thoracic ground state, neuroblast numbers are progressively reduced in labial, maxillary and mandibular segments due to smaller sizes of neuroectodermal anlagen and, partially, to suppression of neuroblast formation and induction of programmed cell death by the Hox gene Deformed. Neuroblast patterns are further influenced by segmental modifications in dorsoventral and proneural gene expression. With the previously published neuroblast maps and those presented here for the gnathal region, all neuroectodermal neuroblasts building the CNS of the fly (ventral nerve cord and brain, except optic lobes) are now individually identified (in total 2×567 neuroblasts). This allows, for the first time, a comparison of the characteristics of segmental populations of stem cells and to screen for serially homologous neuroblasts throughout the CNS. We show that approximately half of the deutocerebral and all of the tritocerebral (posterior brain) and gnathal neuroblasts, but none of the protocerebral (anterior brain) neuroblasts, display serial homology to neuroblasts in thoracic/abdominal neuromeres. Modifications in the molecular signature of serially homologous neuroblasts are likely to determine the segment-specific characteristics of their lineages. PMID:27095493

  12. Cell-Autonomous and Non-cell-autonomous Function of Hox Genes Specify Segmental Neuroblast Identity in the Gnathal Region of the Embryonic CNS in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Becker, Henrike; Renner, Simone; Technau, Gerhard M; Berger, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development neural stem cells (Neuroblasts, NBs) have to acquire an identity appropriate to their location. In thoracic and abdominal segments of Drosophila, the expression pattern of Bithorax-Complex Hox genes is known to specify the segmental identity of NBs prior to their delamination from the neuroectoderm. Compared to the thoracic, ground state segmental units in the head region are derived to different degrees, and the precise mechanism of segmental specification of NBs in this region is still unclear. We identified and characterized a set of serially homologous NB-lineages in the gnathal segments and used one of them (NB6-4 lineage) as a model to investigate the mechanism conferring segment-specific identities to gnathal NBs. We show that NB6-4 is primarily determined by the cell-autonomous function of the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd). Interestingly, however, it also requires a non-cell-autonomous function of labial and Antennapedia that are expressed in adjacent anterior or posterior compartments. We identify the secreted molecule Amalgam (Ama) as a downstream target of the Antennapedia-Complex Hox genes labial, Dfd, Sex combs reduced and Antennapedia. In conjunction with its receptor Neurotactin (Nrt) and the effector kinase Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), Ama is necessary in parallel to the cell-autonomous Dfd pathway for the correct specification of the maxillary identity of NB6-4. Both pathways repress CyclinE (CycE) and loss of function of either of these pathways leads to a partial transformation (40%), whereas simultaneous mutation of both pathways leads to a complete transformation (100%) of NB6-4 segmental identity. Finally, we provide genetic evidences, that the Ama-Nrt-Abl-pathway regulates CycE expression by altering the function of the Hippo effector Yorkie in embryonic NBs. The disclosure of a non-cell-autonomous influence of Hox genes on neural stem cells provides new insight into the process of segmental

  13. Cell-Autonomous and Non-cell-autonomous Function of Hox Genes Specify Segmental Neuroblast Identity in the Gnathal Region of the Embryonic CNS in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Henrike; Renner, Simone; Technau, Gerhard M.; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development neural stem cells (Neuroblasts, NBs) have to acquire an identity appropriate to their location. In thoracic and abdominal segments of Drosophila, the expression pattern of Bithorax-Complex Hox genes is known to specify the segmental identity of NBs prior to their delamination from the neuroectoderm. Compared to the thoracic, ground state segmental units in the head region are derived to different degrees, and the precise mechanism of segmental specification of NBs in this region is still unclear. We identified and characterized a set of serially homologous NB-lineages in the gnathal segments and used one of them (NB6-4 lineage) as a model to investigate the mechanism conferring segment-specific identities to gnathal NBs. We show that NB6-4 is primarily determined by the cell-autonomous function of the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd). Interestingly, however, it also requires a non-cell-autonomous function of labial and Antennapedia that are expressed in adjacent anterior or posterior compartments. We identify the secreted molecule Amalgam (Ama) as a downstream target of the Antennapedia-Complex Hox genes labial, Dfd, Sex combs reduced and Antennapedia. In conjunction with its receptor Neurotactin (Nrt) and the effector kinase Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), Ama is necessary in parallel to the cell-autonomous Dfd pathway for the correct specification of the maxillary identity of NB6-4. Both pathways repress CyclinE (CycE) and loss of function of either of these pathways leads to a partial transformation (40%), whereas simultaneous mutation of both pathways leads to a complete transformation (100%) of NB6-4 segmental identity. Finally, we provide genetic evidences, that the Ama-Nrt-Abl-pathway regulates CycE expression by altering the function of the Hippo effector Yorkie in embryonic NBs. The disclosure of a non-cell-autonomous influence of Hox genes on neural stem cells provides new insight into the process of segmental

  14. Smooth muscles and stem cells of embryonic guts express KIT, PDGFRRA, CD34 and many other stem cell antigens: suggestion that GIST arise from smooth muscles and gut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is believed to original from interstitial cells of (ICC) present in Auerbach's nerve plexus. GIST frequently shows gain-of-function mutations of KIT and PDGFRA. In practical pathology, GIST is diagnosed by positive immunostaining or KIT and/or CD34. The author herein demonstrates that human embryonic gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles (HEGITSM) and human embryonic stem gastrointestinal cells (HEGISC) consistently express KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA and other stem cell (SC) antigens NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, bcl-2, ErbB, and MET throughout the embryonic development of 7-40 gestational week (GW). CK14 was negative. The author examines 42 cases (7-40 GW) of embryonic GI tract (EGI). The HEGISM, HEGIST, and gall bladder smooth muscles (SM) were consistently positive for KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA, synaptophysin, chromogranin, NSE, bcl-2, ErbB2, and MET in foregut, stomach, GB, midgut, and hindgut throughout the fetal life (7-40 GW). The stem cells (SC) were seen to create the SM, nerves, ICC, and other all structures of GI tract. In adult gastrointestinal walls (n=30), KIT, CD34, PDGFRA, and S100 proteins were expressed in Auerbach's nerve plexus and ICC. The bronchial and vascular SM of embryos did not express these molecules. In GIST, frequent expressions of KIT (100%, 30/30), CD34 (90%, 27/30), and PDGFRA (83%, 25/30) were seen. In general, characteristics of tumors recapitulate their embryonic life. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that GIST may be originated from GI SM and/or GI SC in addition to ICC.

  15. Symbiosis: Gut Bacteria Manipulate Host Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Yuval, Boaz

    2017-08-07

    Bacteria resident in the gut of Drosophila modify the fly's innate chemosensory responses to nutritional stimuli. In effect, the gut microbiome compels the host to forage on food patches that favour particular assemblages of bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss of function of the Drosophila Ninein-related centrosomal protein Bsg25D causes mitotic defects and impairs embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Kowanda, Michelle; Bergalet, Julie; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary; Lécuyer, Éric

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The centrosome-associated proteins Ninein (Nin) and Ninein-like protein (Nlp) play significant roles in microtubule stability, nucleation and anchoring at the centrosome in mammalian cells. Here, we investigate Blastoderm specific gene 25D (Bsg25D), which encodes the only Drosophila protein that is closely related to Nin and Nlp. In early embryos, we find that Bsg25D mRNA and Bsg25D protein are closely associated with centrosomes and astral microtubules. We show that sequences within the coding region and 3′UTR of Bsg25D mRNAs are important for proper localization of this transcript in oogenesis and embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of eGFP-Bsg25D from an unlocalized mRNA disrupts microtubule polarity in mid-oogenesis and compromises the distribution of the axis polarity determinant Gurken. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show that an N-terminal fragment of Bsg25D can bind microtubules in vitro and can move along them, predominantly toward minus-ends. While flies homozygous for a Bsg25D null mutation are viable and fertile, 70% of embryos lacking maternal and zygotic Bsg25D do not hatch and exhibit chromosome segregation defects, as well as detachment of centrosomes from mitotic spindles. We conclude that Bsg25D is a centrosomal protein that, while dispensable for viability, nevertheless helps ensure the integrity of mitotic divisions in Drosophila. PMID:27422905

  17. Drosophila RhoGEF4 encodes a novel RhoA-specific guanine exchange factor that is highly expressed in the embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Mihye; Baek, Seung-Hak; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Seungbok

    2006-12-15

    Rho family small GTPases act as molecular switches that regulate neuronal morphogenesis, including axon growth and guidance, dendritic spine formation, and synapse formation. These proteins are positively regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) of the Dbl family. This study describes the identification and characterization of Drosophila RhoGEF4 (DRhoGEF4), a novel Dbl family protein that is specifically expressed in the central nervous system during Drosophila embryogenesis. The predicted amino acid sequence of DRhoGEF4 contains a Dbl homology (DH) domain and an adjacent C-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, which are most closely related to those of mammalian frabins. In this study, the DH-PH motif is shown to enhance the dissociation of GDP from either RhoA or Rac1 but not from Cdc42 in vitro. In addition, p21-binding domain pull-down assays demonstrate that DRhoGEF4 activates RhoA, but neither Rac1 nor Cdc42 in HEK293 cells. Finally, overexpression of DRhoGEF4 is able to induce assembly of stress fibers in cultured NIH3T3 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that DRhoGEF4 may participate in cytoskeleton-related cellular events by specifically activating RhoA in neuronal morphogenesis.

  18. GUTs without guts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gato-Rivera, B.; Schellekens, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    The structure of a Standard Model family is derived in a class of brane models with a U(M)×U(N) factor, from two mildly anthropic requirements: a massless photon and a universe that does not turn into a plasma of massless charged particles. If we choose M=3 and N=2, the only option is shown to be the Standard Model with an undetermined number of families. We do not assume the U(1) embedding, charge quantization, family repetition, nor the fermion representations; all of these features are derived, assuming a doublet Higgs. With a slightly stronger assumption even the Higgs representation is determined. We also consider a more general class, requiring an asymptotically free strong SU(M) (with M⩾3) interaction from the first factor and an electromagnetic U(1) embedded in both factors. We allow Higgs symmetry breaking of the U(N)×U(1) flavor group by at most one Higgs boson in any representation, combined with any allowed chiral symmetry breaking by SU(M). For M=3 there is a large number of solutions with an unbroken U(1). In all of these, “quarks” have third-integral charges and color singlets have integer charges in comparison to leptons. Hence Standard Model charge quantization holds for any N. Only for N=2 these models allow an SU(5) GUT extension, but this extension offers no advantages whatsoever for understanding the Standard Model; it only causes complications, such as the doublet-triplet splitting problem. Although all these models have a massless photon, all except the Standard Model are ruled out by the second anthropic requirement. In this class of brane models the Standard Model is realized as a GUT with its intestines removed, to keep only the good parts: a GUT without guts.

  19. New functions of the Drosophila rhomboid gene during embryonic and adult development are revealed by a novel genetic method, enhancer piracy.

    PubMed

    Noll, R; Sturtevant, M A; Gollapudi, R R; Bier, E

    1994-08-01

    Localized expression of the Drosophila rhomboid (rho) gene has been proposed to hyperactivate EGF-Receptor signaling in specific cells during development of the embryo and adult. In this report we use a novel transposon based genetic method, enhancer piracy, to drive ectopic expression of a rho cDNA transgene by endogenous genomic enhancers. Many enhancer piracy transposon-rho insertions cause dominant phenotypes, over half of which cannot be duplicated by ubiquitous expression of rho. Genetic interactions between various dominant enhancer piracy alleles and mutations in the EGF-R/RAS signaling pathway indicate that many of these novel phenotypes result from ectopic activation of EGF-R signaling. Patterned mis-expression of the rho cDNA transgene correlates in several cases with localized dominant enhancer piracy phenotypes. Enhancer piracy lines reveal an unanticipated role for rho in imaginal disc formation and provide the first evidence that mis-expression of rho is sufficient for converting entire intervein sectors into veins. Enhancer piracy may prove to be a general strategy for obtaining dominant alleles of a gene of interest in diverse insects, worms, plants, and potentially in vertebrates such as mice and fish.

  20. Partitioning the roles of CYP6G1 and gut microbes in the metabolism of the insecticide imidacloprid in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fusetto, Roberto; Denecke, Shane; Perry, Trent; O'Hair, Richard A J; Batterham, Philip

    2017-09-12

    Resistance to insecticides through enhanced metabolism is a worldwide problem. The Cyp6g1 gene of the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a paradigm for the study of metabolic resistance. Constitutive overexpression of this gene confers resistance to several classes of insecticides, including the neonicotinoid imidacloprid (IMI). The metabolism of IMI in this species has been previously shown to yield oxidative and nitro-reduced metabolites. While levels of the oxidative metabolites are correlated with CYP6G1 expression, nitro-reduced metabolites are not, raising the question of how these metabolites are produced. Some IMI metabolites are known to be toxic, making their fate within the insect a second question of interest. These questions have been addressed by coupling the genetic tools of gene overexpression and CRISPR gene knock-out with the mass spectrometric technique, the Twin-Ion Method (TIM). Analysing axenic larvae indicated that microbes living within D. melanogaster are largely responsible for the production of the nitro-reduced metabolites. Knock-out of Cyp6g1 revealed functional redundancy, with some metabolites produced by CYP6G1 still detected. IMI metabolism was shown to produce toxic products that are not further metabolized but readily excreted, even when produced in the Central Nervous System (CNS), highlighting the significance of transport and excretion in metabolic resistance.

  1. [Regulatory functions of Pax gene family in Drosophila development].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Yang; Xue, Lei

    2010-02-01

    The Pax gene family encodes a group of important transcription factors that have been evolutionary conserved from Drosophila to human. Pax genes play pivotal roles in regulating diverse signal transduction pathways and organogenesis during embryonic development through modulating cell proliferation and self-renewal, embryonic precursor cell migration, and the coordination of specific differentiation programs. Ten members of the Pax gene family, which perform crucial regulatory functions during embryonic and postembryonic development, have been identified in Drosophila. In this report, we described the protein structures, expression patterns, and main functions of Drosophila Pax genes.

  2. Single Amino Acid Exchanges in Separate Domains of the Drosophila Serendipity δ Zinc Finger Protein Cause Embryonic and Sex Biased Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Crozatier, M.; Kongsuwan, K.; Ferrer, P.; Merriam, J. R.; Lengyel, J. A.; Vincent, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Drosophila serendipity (sry) delta (δ) zinc finger protein is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein, maternally inherited by the embryo and present in nuclei of transcriptionally active cells throughout fly development. We report here the isolation and characterization of four ethyl methanesulfate-induced zygotic lethal mutations of different strengths in the sry δ gene. For the stronger allele, all of the lethality occurs during late embryogenesis or the first larval instar. In the cases of the three weaker alleles, most of the lethality occurs during pupation; moreover, those adult escapers that emerge are sterile males lacking partially or completely in spermatozoa bundles. Genetic analysis of sry δ thus indicates that it is an essential gene, whose continued expression throughout the life cycle, notably during embryogenesis and pupal stage, is required for viability. Phenotypic analysis of sry δ hemizygote escaper males further suggests that sry δ may be involved in regulation of two different sets of genes: genes required for viability and genes involved in gonadal development. All four sry δ alleles are fully rescued by a wild-type copy of sry δ, but not by an additional copy of the sry β gene, reinforcing the view that, although structurally related, these two genes exert distinct functions. Molecular characterization of the four sry δ mutations revealed that these mutations correspond to single amino acid replacements in the sry δ protein. Three of these replacements map to the same (third out of seven) zinc finger in the carboxy-terminal DNA binding domain; interestingly, none affects the zinc finger consensus residues. The fourth mutation is located in the NH(2)-proximal part of the protein, in a domain proposed to be involved in specific protein-protein interactions. PMID:1516821

  3. Crystallization of Spätzle, a cystine-knot protein involved in embryonic development and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Anita; Neumann, Piotr; Schierhorn, Angelika; Stubbs, Milton T.

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of the cystine-knot protein Spätzle occurred following serendipitous limited degradation of the pro-Spätzle propeptide during the crystallization experiment. The Spätzle protein is involved in both the definition of the dorsal–ventral axis during embryonic development and in the adult innate immune response. The disulfide-linked dimeric cystine-knot protein has been expressed as a proprotein in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and refolded in vitro by rapid dilution. Initial orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 7 Å resolution were obtained after three months by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Optimization of the crystallization conditions resulted in orthorhombic crystals (space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.0, b = 59.2, c = 62.5 Å) that diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution in-house. The small volume of the asymmetric unit indicated that it was not possible for the crystals to contain the complete pro-Spätzle dimer. Mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing and Western-blot analysis revealed that the crystals contained the C-terminal disulfide-linked cystine-knot dimer. Comparison of various crystallization experiments indicated that degradation of the N-terminal prodomain was dependent on the buffer conditions.

  4. Reduced cell number in the hindgut epithelium disrupts hindgut left-right asymmetry in a mutant of pebble, encoding a RhoGEF, in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Matsumoto, Kenjiroo; Iwamoto, Yuta; Muguruma, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Maeda, Reo; Matsuno, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    Animals often show left-right (LR) asymmetry in their body structures. In some vertebrates, the mechanisms underlying LR symmetry breaking and the subsequent signals responsible for LR asymmetric development are well understood. However, in invertebrates, the molecular bases of these processes are largely unknown. Therefore, we have been studying the genetic pathway of LR asymmetric development in Drosophila. The embryonic gut is the first organ that shows directional LR asymmetry during Drosophila development. We performed a genetic screen to identify mutations affecting LR asymmetric development of the embryonic gut. From this screen, we isolated pebble (pbl), which encodes a homolog of a mammalian RhoGEF, Ect2. The laterality of the hindgut was randomized in embryos homozygous for a null mutant of pbl. Pbl is a multi-functional protein required for cytokinesis and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in Drosophila. Consistent with Pbl's role in cytokinesis, we found reduced numbers of cells in the hindgut epithelium in pbl homozygous embryos. The specific expression of pbl in the hindgut epithelium, but not in other tissues, rescued the LR defects and reduced cell number in embryonic pbl homozygotes. Embryos homozygous for string (stg), a mutant that reduces cell number through a different mechanism, also showed LR defects of the hindgut. However, the reduction in cell number in the pbl mutants was not accompanied by defects in the specification of hindgut epithelial tissues or their integrity. Based on these results, we speculate that the reduction in cell number may be one reason for the LR asymmetry defect of the pbl hindgut, although we cannot exclude contributions from other functions of Pbl, including regulation of the actin cytoskeleton through its RhoGEF activity.

  5. Characterization of Drosophila larval crawling at the level of organism, segment, and somatic body wall musculature.

    PubMed

    Heckscher, Ellie S; Lockery, Shawn R; Doe, Chris Q

    2012-09-05

    Understanding rhythmic behavior at the developmental and genetic levels has important implications for neurobiology, medicine, evolution, and robotics. We studied rhythmic behavior--larval crawling--in the genetically and developmentally tractable organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We used narrow-diameter channels to constrain behavior to simple, rhythmic crawling. We quantified crawling at the organism, segment, and muscle levels. We showed that Drosophila larval crawling is made up of a series of periodic strides. Each stride consists of two phases. First, while most abdominal segments remain planted on the substrate, the head, tail, and gut translocate; this "visceral pistoning" moves the center of mass. The movement of the center of mass is likely powered by muscle contractions in the head and tail. Second, the head and tail anchor while a body wall wave moves each abdominal segment in the direction of the crawl. These two phases can be observed occurring independently in embryonic stages before becoming coordinated at hatching. During forward crawls, abdominal body wall movements are powered by simultaneous contraction of dorsal and ventral muscle groups, which occur concurrently with contraction of lateral muscles of the adjacent posterior segment. During reverse crawls, abdominal body wall movements are powered by phase-shifted contractions of dorsal and ventral muscles; and ventral muscle contractions occur concurrently with contraction of lateral muscles in the adjacent anterior segment. This work lays a foundation for use of Drosophila larva as a model system for studying the genetics and development of rhythmic behavior.

  6. Drosophila laminins act as key regulators of basement membrane assembly and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Jose M.; Torgler, Catherine N.; Molnar, Cristina; Tepass, Ulrich; López-Varea, Ana; Brown, Nicholas H.; de Celis, Jose F.; Martín-Bermudo, Maria D.

    2009-01-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric molecules found in all basement membranes. In mammals, they have been involved in diverse developmental processes, from gastrulation to tissue maintenance. The Drosophila genome encodes two laminin α chains, one β and one Γ, which form two distinct laminin trimers. So far, only mutations affecting one or other trimer have been analysed. In order to study embryonic development in the complete absence of laminins, we mutated the gene encoding the sole laminin β chain in Drosophila, LanB1, so that no trimers can be made. We show that LanB1 mutant embryos develop until the end of embryogenesis. Electron microscopy analysis of mutant embryos reveals that the basement membranes are absent and the remaining extracellular material appears disorganised and diffuse. Accordingly, abnormal accumulation of major basement membrane components, such as Collagen IV and Perlecan, is observed in mutant tissues. In addition, we show that elimination of LanB1 prevents the normal morphogenesis of most organs and tissues, including the gut, trachea, muscles and nervous system. In spite of the above structural roles for laminins, our results unravel novel functions in cell adhesion, migration and rearrangement. We propose that while an early function of laminins in gastrulation is not conserved in Drosophila and mammals, their function in basement membrane assembly and organogenesis seems to be maintained throughout evolution. PMID:19906841

  7. Drosophila laminins act as key regulators of basement membrane assembly and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Jose M; Torgler, Catherine N; Molnar, Cristina; Tepass, Ulrich; López-Varea, Ana; Brown, Nicholas H; de Celis, Jose F; Martín-Bermudo, Maria D

    2009-12-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric molecules found in all basement membranes. In mammals, they have been involved in diverse developmental processes, from gastrulation to tissue maintenance. The Drosophila genome encodes two laminin alpha chains, one beta and one Gamma, which form two distinct laminin trimers. So far, only mutations affecting one or other trimer have been analysed. In order to study embryonic development in the complete absence of laminins, we mutated the gene encoding the sole laminin beta chain in Drosophila, LanB1, so that no trimers can be made. We show that LanB1 mutant embryos develop until the end of embryogenesis. Electron microscopy analysis of mutant embryos reveals that the basement membranes are absent and the remaining extracellular material appears disorganised and diffuse. Accordingly, abnormal accumulation of major basement membrane components, such as Collagen IV and Perlecan, is observed in mutant tissues. In addition, we show that elimination of LanB1 prevents the normal morphogenesis of most organs and tissues, including the gut, trachea, muscles and nervous system. In spite of the above structural roles for laminins, our results unravel novel functions in cell adhesion, migration and rearrangement. We propose that while an early function of laminins in gastrulation is not conserved in Drosophila and mammals, their function in basement membrane assembly and organogenesis seems to be maintained throughout evolution.

  8. Impact of gut microbiota on the fly's germ line

    PubMed Central

    Elgart, Michael; Stern, Shay; Salton, Orit; Gnainsky, Yulia; Heifetz, Yael; Soen, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Unlike vertically transmitted endosymbionts, which have broad effects on their host's germ line, the extracellular gut microbiota is transmitted horizontally and is not known to influence the germ line. Here we provide evidence supporting the influence of these gut bacteria on the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster. Removal of the gut bacteria represses oogenesis, expedites maternal-to-zygotic-transition in the offspring and unmasks hidden phenotypic variation in mutants. We further show that the main impact on oogenesis is linked to the lack of gut Acetobacter species, and we identify the Drosophila Aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh) gene as an apparent mediator of repressed oogenesis in Acetobacter-depleted flies. The finding of interactions between the gut microbiota and the germ line has implications for reproduction, developmental robustness and adaptation. PMID:27080728

  9. Inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir) channels in Drosophila. A crucial role of cellular milieu factors Kir channel function.

    PubMed

    Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Kühnlein, Ronald P; Jäckle, Herbert; Karschin, Andreas

    2002-07-12

    Three cDNAs encoding inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels were isolated from Drosophila melanogaster. The protein sequences of Drosophila KirI (dKirI) and dKirII are moderately (<44%) and dKirIII sequence is weakly (<27%) identical to human Kir channel subunits. During fly development, five dKir channel transcripts derived from three genes are differentially expressed. Whole mount in situ hybridizations revealed dKirI transcripts absent from embryos, but dKirII and dKirIII are expressed in the embryonic hind gut and in Malpighian tubules, respectively, thus covering the entire osmoregulatory system of the developing fly. In the head of adult flies, predominantly dKirII transcripts were detected. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, dKir channel activity was only observed after amino acid substitutions in their cytosolic tails (e.g. exchange of a unique valine in the NH(2) terminus). In contrast, heterologous expression of wild type dKirI and dKirII in Drosophila S2 cells readily evoked typical inwardly rectifying K(+) currents, which were weakly sensitive to Ba(2+). Thus, the specific milieu of insect cells provides a crucial cellular environment for proper function of dKir channels.

  10. A novel, tissue-specific, Drosophila homeobox gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barad, M; Jack, T; Chadwick, R; McGinnis, W

    1988-01-01

    The homeobox gene family of Drosophila appears to control a variety of position-specific patterning decisions during embryonic and imaginal development. Most of these patterning decisions determine groups of cells on the anterior-posterior axis of the Drosophila germ band. We have isolated a novel homeobox gene from Drosophila, designated H2.0. H2.0 has the most diverged homeobox so far characterized in metazoa, and, in contrast to all previously isolated homeobox genes, H2.0 exhibits a tissue-specific pattern of expression. The cells that accumulate transcripts for this novel gene correspond to the visceral musculature and its anlagen. Images PMID:2901348

  11. Drosophila spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster spermatids undergo dramatic morphological changes as they differentiate from small round cells approximately 12 μm in diameter into highly polarized, 1.8 mm long, motile sperm capable of participating in fertilization. During spermiogenesis, syncytial cysts of 64 haploid spermatids undergo synchronous differentiation. Numerous changes occur at a subcellular level, including remodeling of existing organelles (mitochondria, nuclei), formation of new organelles (flagellar axonemes, acrosomes), polarization of elongating cysts and plasma membrane addition. At the end of spermatid morphogenesis, organelles, mitochondrial DNA and cytoplasmic components not needed in mature sperm are stripped away in a caspase-dependent process called individualization that results in formation of individual sperm. Here, we review the stages of Drosophila spermiogenesis and examine our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in shaping male germ cell-specific organelles and forming mature, fertile sperm. PMID:23087837

  12. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis.

  13. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue.

  14. SUSY GUT Model Building

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Stuart

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I discuss the evolution of SUSY GUT model building as I see it. Starting with 4 dimensional model building, I then consider orbifold GUTs in 5 dimensions and finally orbifold GUTs embedded into the E{sub 8}xE{sub 8} heterotic string.

  15. From Embryo to Adult: Hematopoiesis along the Drosophila Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ramond, Elodie; Meister, Marie; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2015-05-26

    Studies on Drosophila hematopoiesis have thus far focused on the embryonic and larval origin of hemocytes, the fly blood cells. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Ghosh et al. (2015) identify adult hematopoietic hubs containing progenitors that can differentiate into different blood cell types.

  16. Drosophila chem mutations disrupt epithelial polarity in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio-Arroyo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila embryogenesis has proven to be an extremely powerful system for developmental gene discovery and characterization. We isolated five new EMS-induced alleles that do not complement the l(3R)5G83 lethal line isolated in the Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus screens. We have named this locus chem. Lethality of the new alleles as homozygous zygotic mutants is not completely penetrant, and they have an extended phenocritical period. Like the original allele, a fraction of mutant embryos die with cuticular defects, notably head involution and dorsal closure defects. Embryonic defects are much more extreme in germline clones, where the majority of mutant embryos die during embryogenesis and do not form cuticle, implying a strong chem maternal contribution. chem mutations genetically interact with mutations in cytoskeletal genes (arm) and with mutations in the epithelial polarity genes coracle, crumbs, and yurt. chem mutants dorsal open defects are similar to those present in yurt mutants, and, likewise, they have epithelial polarity defects. chem1 and chem3 mutations suppress yurt3, and chem3 mutants suppress crumbs1 mutations. In contrast, chem1 and coracle2 mutations enhance each other. Compared to controls, in chem mutants in embryonic lateral epithelia Crumbs expression is mislocalized and reduced, Coracle is increased and mislocalized basally at embryonic stages 13–14, then reduced at stage 16. Arm expression has a similar pattern but levels are reduced. PMID:27920954

  17. Graded Dorsal and Differential Gene Regulation in the Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Gregory T.; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2009-01-01

    A gradient of Dorsal activity patterns the dorsoventral (DV) axis of the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo by controlling the expression of genes that delineate presumptive mesoderm, neuroectoderm, and dorsal ectoderm. The availability of the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence has accelerated the study of embryonic DV patterning, enabling the use of systems-level approaches. As a result, our understanding of Dorsal-dependent gene regulation has expanded to encompass a collection of more than 50 genes and 30 cis-regulatory sequences. This information, which has been integrated into a spatiotemporal atlas of gene regulatory interactions, comprises one of the best-understood networks controlling any developmental process to date. In this article, we focus on how Dorsal controls differential gene expression and how recent studies have expanded our understanding of Drosophila embryonic development from the cis-regulatory level to that controlling morphogenesis of the embryo. PMID:20066095

  18. Class I myosins have overlapping and specialized functions in left-right asymmetric development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    The class I myosin genes are conserved in diverse organisms, and their gene products are involved in actin dynamics, endocytosis, and signal transduction. Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively. Previous loss-of-function analyses of Myo31DF and Myo61F revealed important roles in left-right (LR) asymmetric development and enterocyte maintenance, respectively. However, it was difficult to elucidate their roles in vivo, because of potential redundant activities. Here we generated class I myosin double and triple mutants to address this issue. We found that the triple mutant was viable and fertile, indicating that all three class I myosins were dispensable for survival. A loss-of-function analysis revealed further that Myo31DF and Myo61F, but not Myo95E, had redundant functions in promoting the dextral LR asymmetric development of the male genitalia. Myo61F overexpression is known to antagonize the dextral activity of Myo31DF in various Drosophila organs. Thus, the LR-reversing activity of overexpressed Myo61F may not reflect its physiological function. The endogenous activity of Myo61F in promoting dextral LR asymmetric development was observed in the male genitalia, but not the embryonic gut, another LR asymmetric organ. Thus, Myo61F and Myo31DF, but not Myo95E, play tissue-specific, redundant roles in LR asymmetric development. Our studies also revealed differential colocalization of the class I myosins with filamentous (F)-actin in the brush border of intestinal enterocytes. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Class I Myosins Have Overlapping and Specialized Functions in Left-Right Asymmetric Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The class I myosin genes are conserved in diverse organisms, and their gene products are involved in actin dynamics, endocytosis, and signal transduction. Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively. Previous loss-of-function analyses of Myo31DF and Myo61F revealed important roles in left–right (LR) asymmetric development and enterocyte maintenance, respectively. However, it was difficult to elucidate their roles in vivo, because of potential redundant activities. Here we generated class I myosin double and triple mutants to address this issue. We found that the triple mutant was viable and fertile, indicating that all three class I myosins were dispensable for survival. A loss-of-function analysis revealed further that Myo31DF and Myo61F, but not Myo95E, had redundant functions in promoting the dextral LR asymmetric development of the male genitalia. Myo61F overexpression is known to antagonize the dextral activity of Myo31DF in various Drosophila organs. Thus, the LR-reversing activity of overexpressed Myo61F may not reflect its physiological function. The endogenous activity of Myo61F in promoting dextral LR asymmetric development was observed in the male genitalia, but not the embryonic gut, another LR asymmetric organ. Thus, Myo61F and Myo31DF, but not Myo95E, play tissue-specific, redundant roles in LR asymmetric development. Our studies also revealed differential colocalization of the class I myosins with filamentous (F)-actin in the brush border of intestinal enterocytes. PMID:25659376

  20. Male Killing Spiroplasma Preferentially Disrupts Neural Development in the Drosophila melanogaster Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer; Chong, Trisha; Ferree, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Male killing bacteria such as Spiroplasma are widespread pathogens of numerous arthropods including Drosophila melanogaster. These maternally transmitted bacteria can bias host sex ratios toward the female sex in order to ‘selfishly’ enhance bacterial transmission. However, little is known about the specific means by which these pathogens disrupt host development in order to kill males. Here we show that a male-killing Spiroplasma strain severely disrupts nervous tissue development in male but not female D. melanogaster embryos. The neuroblasts, or neuron progenitors, form properly and their daughter cells differentiate into neurons of the ventral nerve chord. However, the neurons fail to pack together properly and they produce highly abnormal axons. In contrast, non-neural tissue, such as mesoderm, and body segmentation appear normal during this time, although the entire male embryo becomes highly abnormal during later stages. Finally, we found that Spiroplasma is altogether absent from the neural tissue but localizes within the gut and the epithelium immediately surrounding the neural tissue, suggesting that the bacterium secretes a toxin that affects neural tissue development across tissue boundaries. Together these findings demonstrate the unique ability of this insect pathogen to preferentially affect development of a specific embryonic tissue to induce male killing. PMID:24236124

  1. Gut microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a complex bacterial community called the gut microbiota. This microbiota is specific to each individual despite the existence of several bacterial species shared by the majority of adults. The influence of the gut microbiota in human health and disease has been revealed in the recent years. Particularly, the use of germ-free animals and microbiota transplant showed that the gut microbiota may play a causal role in the development of obesity and associated metabolic disorders, and lead to identification of several mechanisms. In humans, differences in microbiota composition, functional genes and metabolic activities are observed between obese and lean individuals suggesting a contribution of the gut microbiota to these phenotypes. Finally, the evidence linking gut bacteria to host metabolism could allow the development of new therapeutic strategies based on gut microbiota modulation to treat or prevent obesity.

  2. Trigeminal ganglion cells cocultured with gut express vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed

    Davis, J P; Epstein, M L

    1987-12-01

    The plasticity of neural crest cells for the expression of adrenergic and cholinergic transmitter phenotypes has been well studied. The object of this study was to determine if cells of a sensory ganglion are capable of neuropeptide transmitter plasticity. We studied whether cells of the trigeminal ganglion, which do not express the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in vivo, would express this peptide when grown with a tissue the gut, that contains large numbers of VIP neurons. Embryonic aneural chick rectum was explanted with the embryonic quail trigeminal ganglion on the chorioallantoic membrane of chick hosts for 7-8 days. The explants were fixed, sectioned, and stained for VIP immunoreactivity (IR), for neurofilament protein immunoreactivity, and for the quail nucleolar marker. In sections of the explants we observed two populations of quail neurons: small (10-13 microns) VIP-IR cells and large (25-32 microns) cells lacking VIP-IR and resembling native trigeminal neurons. Trigeminal ganglia explanted with embryonic heart or trigeminal ganglia explanted alone lacked small VIP-IR cells but contained large VIP-negative neurons. These results show that cells of the trigeminal ganglion grown with the gut can express a neuropeptide they do not express in the absence of the gut or in vivo. Thus the embryonic trigeminal ganglion contains cells that are plastic with respect to neuropeptide expression.

  3. On the mechanics of cardiac function of Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingming; Sato, Thomas N

    2008-01-01

    The heart is a vital organ that provides essential circulation throughout the body. Malfunction of cardiac pumping, thus, leads to serious and most of the times, to fatal diseases. Mechanics of cardiac pumping is a complex process, and many experimental and theoretical approaches have been undertaken to understand this process. We have taken advantage of the simplicity of the embryonic heart of an invertebrate, Drosophila melanogaster, to understand the fundamental mechanics of the beating heart. We applied a live imaging technique to the beating embryonic heart combined with analytical imaging tools to study the dynamic mechanics of the pumping. Furthermore, we have identified one mutant line that exhibits aberrant pumping mechanics. The Drosophila embryonic heart consists of only 104 cardiac cells forming a simple straight tube that can be easily accessed for real-time imaging. Therefore, combined with the wealth of available genetic tools, the embryonic Drosophila heart may serve as a powerful model system for studies of human heart diseases, such as arrhythmia and congenital heart diseases. We, furthermore, believe our mechanistic data provides important information that is useful for our further understanding of the design of biological structure and function and for engineering the pumps for medical uses.

  4. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  5. Frequent Replenishment Sustains the Beneficial Microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jessamina E.; Fischer, Caleb N.; Miles, Jessica; Handelsman, Jo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report that establishment and maintenance of the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome depend on ingestion of bacteria. Frequent transfer of flies to sterile food prevented establishment of the microbiome in newly emerged flies and reduced the predominant members, Acetobacter and Lactobacillus spp., by 10- to 1,000-fold in older flies. Flies with a normal microbiome were less susceptible than germfree flies to infection by Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Augmentation of the normal microbiome with higher populations of Lactobacillus plantarum, a Drosophila commensal and probiotic used in humans, further protected the fly from infection. Replenishment represents an unexplored strategy by which animals can sustain a gut microbial community. Moreover, the population behavior and health benefits of L. plantarum resemble features of certain probiotic bacteria administered to humans. As such, L. plantarum in the fly gut may serve as a simple model for dissecting the population dynamics and mode of action of probiotics in animal hosts. PMID:24194543

  6. Cleaved Slit directs embryonic muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ordan, Elly; Volk, Talila

    2015-01-01

    The formation of functional musculoskeletal system relies on proper connectivity between muscles and their corresponding tendon cells. In Drosophila, larval muscles are born during early embryonic stages, and elongate toward tendons that are embedded within the ectoderm in later. The Slit/Robo signaling pathway had been implicated in the process of muscle elongation toward tendons. Here we discuss our recent findings regarding the critical contribution of Slit cleavage for immobilization and stabilization of the Slit signal on the tendon cells. Slit cleavage produces 2 polypeptides, the N-terminal Slit-N, which is extremely stable, undergoes oligomerization, and associates with the tendon cell surfaces, and the C-terminal Slit-C, which rapidly degrades. Slit cleavage leads to immobilization of Slit signaling on tendons, leading to a short-range repulsion, which eventually arrest further muscle elongation. Robo2, which is co-expressed with Slit by the tendon cells facilitates Slit cleavage. This activity does not require the cytoplasmic signaling domain of Robo2. We suggest that Robo2-dependent Slit cleavage, and the formation of Slit-N oligomers on the tendon cell surfaces direct muscle elongation, and provide a stop signal for the approaching muscle, through binding to Robo and Robo3 receptors expressed by the muscles. PMID:26554435

  7. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, D R; Martin-Morris, L; Luo, L Q; White, K

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development. Images PMID:2494667

  8. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  9. Fluorescent visualization of macromolecules in Drosophila whole mounts.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Ricardo Guelerman Pinheiro; Machado, Luciana Claudia Herculano; Moda, Livia Maria Rosatto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to determine the expression dynamics of individual genes "in situ" by visualizing the precise spatial and temporal distribution of their products in whole mounts by histochemical and immunocytochemical reactions has revolutionized our understanding of cellular processes. Drosophila developmental genetics was one of the fields that benefited most from these technologies, and a variety of fluorescent methods were specifically designed for investigating the localization of developmentally important proteins and cell markers during embryonic and post embryonic stages of this model organism. In this chapter we present detailed protocols for fluorescence immunocytochemistry of whole mount embryos, imaginal discs, pupal retinas, and salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster, as well as methods for fluorescent visualization of specific subcellular structures in these tissues.

  10. Emergence and development of gut motility in the chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N R; Fleury, V; Dufour, S; Proux-Gillardeaux, V; Asnacios, A

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract transports the food bolus by peristalsis. Gut motility starts at an early age in the developing embryo, well before it is required for nutrition of the organism. We present a comprehensive kinematic study of the emergence and physiological development of gut motility in all regions of the lower digestive tract of the chicken embryo from embryonic days E5 through E9. We characterized motility emergence time, propagation patterns, speed, frequency and amplitude of peristalsis waves. We found that the emergence of an uninterrupted circular ring of smooth muscle correlated with the appearance of propagative contractile waves, at E6 in the hindgut and midgut, and at E9 in the caecal appendix. We show that peristalsis at these stages is critically dependent on calcium and is not mediated by neurons as gut motility is insensitive to tetrodotoxin and takes place in the hindgut in the absence of neurons. We further demonstrate that motility also matures in ex-vivo organ culture. We compare our results to existing literature on zebrafish, mouse and human motility development, and discuss their chronological relationship with other major developmental events occurring in the chicken embryonic gut at these stages. Our work sets a baseline for further investigations of motility development in this important animal model.

  11. Emergence and development of gut motility in the chicken embryo

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N. R.; Fleury, V.; Dufour, S.

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract transports the food bolus by peristalsis. Gut motility starts at an early age in the developing embryo, well before it is required for nutrition of the organism. We present a comprehensive kinematic study of the emergence and physiological development of gut motility in all regions of the lower digestive tract of the chicken embryo from embryonic days E5 through E9. We characterized motility emergence time, propagation patterns, speed, frequency and amplitude of peristalsis waves. We found that the emergence of an uninterrupted circular ring of smooth muscle correlated with the appearance of propagative contractile waves, at E6 in the hindgut and midgut, and at E9 in the caecal appendix. We show that peristalsis at these stages is critically dependent on calcium and is not mediated by neurons as gut motility is insensitive to tetrodotoxin and takes place in the hindgut in the absence of neurons. We further demonstrate that motility also matures in ex-vivo organ culture. We compare our results to existing literature on zebrafish, mouse and human motility development, and discuss their chronological relationship with other major developmental events occurring in the chicken embryonic gut at these stages. Our work sets a baseline for further investigations of motility development in this important animal model. PMID:28222167

  12. Control of lipid metabolism by Tachykinin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Veenstra, Jan A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestine is a key organ for lipid uptake and distribution, and abnormal intestinal lipid metabolism is associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia. Although multiple regulatory gut hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) regulate systemic lipid homeostasis, such as appetite control and energy balance in adipose tissue, their respective roles regarding lipid metabolism in the intestine are not well understood. We demonstrate that Tachykinins (TKs), one of the most abundant secreted peptides expressed in midgut EEs, regulate intestinal lipid production and subsequently control systemic lipid homeostasis in Drosophila, and that TKs repress lipogenesis in enterocytes (ECs) associated with the TKR99D receptor and PKA signaling. Interestingly, nutrient deprivation enhances the production of TKs in the midgut. Finally, unlike the physiological roles of TKs produced from the brain, gut-derived TKs do not affect behavior, thus demonstrating that gut TK hormones specifically regulate intestinal lipid metabolism without affecting neuronal functions. PMID:25263556

  13. Drosophila as a model for intestinal dysbiosis and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Ah; Lee, Won-Jae

    2014-01-01

    The association between deregulated intestinal microbial consortia and host diseases has been recognized since the birth of microbiology over a century ago. Intestinal dysbiosis refers to a state where living metazoans harbor harmful intestinal microflora. However, there is still an issue of whether causality arises from the host or the microbe because it is unclear whether deregulation of the gut microbiota community is the consequence or cause of the host disease. Recent studies using Drosophila and its simple microbiota have provided a valuable model system for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of intestinal dysbiosis. In this review, we examine recent exciting observations in Drosophila gut-microbiota interactions, particularly the links among the host immune genotype, the microbial community structure, and the host inflammatory phenotype. Future genetic analyses using Drosophila model system will provide a valuable outcome for understanding the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that underlie intestinal dysbiosis and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  14. Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Wang, Tao; Jin, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most common neurodegenerative disorder, which associates with impaired cognition. Gut microbiota can modulate host brain function and behavior via microbiota-gut-brain axis, including cognitive behavior. Germ-free animals, antibiotics, probiotics intervention and diet can induce alterations of gut microbiota and gut physiology and also host cognitive behavior, increasing or decreasing risks of AD. The increased permeability of intestine and blood-brain barrier induced by gut microbiota disturbance will increase the incidence of neurodegeneration disorders. Gut microbial metabolites and their effects on host neurochemical changes may increase or decrease the risk of AD. Pathogenic microbes infection will also increase the risk of AD, and meanwhile, the onset of AD support the "hygiene hypothesis". All the results suggest that AD may begin in the gut, and is closely related to the imbalance of gut microbiota. Modulation of gut microbiota through personalized diet or beneficial microbiota intervention will probably become a new treatment for AD.

  15. Hox genes and brain development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Heinrich; Bello, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Hox genes are prominently expressed in the developing brain and ventral ganglia of Drosophila. In the embryonic brain, the Hox genes labial and Deformed are essential for the establishment of regionalized neuronal identity; in their absence cells are generated in the brain but fail to acquire appropriate neuronal features. Genetic analyses reveal that Hox proteins are largely equivalent in their action in embryonic brain development and that their expression is under the control of cross-regulatory interactions among Hox genes that are similar to those found in embryogenesis of trunk segments. Hox genes have a different role in postembryonic brain development. During the larval phase of CNS development, reactivation of specific Hox genes terminates neural proliferation by induction of apoptotic cell death in neural stem cell-like progenitors called neuroblasts. This reactivation process is tightly controlled by epigenetic mechanisms requiring the Polycomb group of genes. Many features of Hox gene action in Drosophila brain development are evolutionarily conserved and are manifest in brain development of vertebrates.

  16. Embryonic development of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Donoughe, Seth; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-03-01

    Extensive research into Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis has improved our understanding of insect developmental mechanisms. However, Drosophila development is thought to be highly divergent from that of the ancestral insect and arthropod in many respects. We therefore need alternative models for arthopod development that are likely to be more representative of basally-branching clades. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is such a model, and currently has the most sophisticated functional genetic toolkit of any hemimetabolous insect. The existing cricket embryonic staging system is fragmentary, and it is based on morphological landmarks that are not easily visible on a live, undissected egg. To address this problem, here we present a complementary set of "egg stages" that serve as a guide for identifying the developmental progress of a cricket embryo from fertilization to hatching, based solely on the external appearance of the egg. These stages were characterized using a combination of brightfield timelapse microscopy, timed brightfield micrographs, confocal microscopy, and measurements of egg dimensions. These egg stages are particularly useful in experiments that involve egg injection (including RNA interference, targeted genome modification, and transgenesis), as injection can alter the speed of development, even in control treatments. We also use 3D reconstructions of fixed embryo preparations to provide a comprehensive description of the morphogenesis and anatomy of the cricket embryo during embryonic rudiment assembly, germ band formation, elongation, segmentation, and appendage formation. Finally, we aggregate and schematize a variety of published developmental gene expression patterns. This work will facilitate further studies on G. bimaculatus development, and serve as a useful point of reference for other studies of wild type and experimentally manipulated insect development in fields from evo-devo to disease vector and pest management. Copyright

  17. Gut Microbiota-brain Axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xing; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. Data Sources: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of “gut microbiota”, “gut-brain axis”, and “neuroscience”. Study Selection: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of study design. Results: It is well-recognized that gut microbiota affects the brain's physiological, behavioral, and cognitive functions although its precise mechanism has not yet been fully understood. Gut microbiota-brain axis may include gut microbiota and their metabolic products, enteric nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic branches within the autonomic nervous system, neural-immune system, neuroendocrine system, and central nervous system. Moreover, there may be five communication routes between gut microbiota and brain, including the gut-brain's neural network, neuroendocrine-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, gut immune system, some neurotransmitters and neural regulators synthesized by gut bacteria, and barrier paths including intestinal mucosal barrier and blood-brain barrier. The microbiome is used to define the composition and functional characteristics of gut microbiota, and metagenomics is an appropriate technique to characterize gut microbiota. Conclusions: Gut microbiota-brain axis refers to a bidirectional information network between the gut microbiota and the brain, which may provide a new way to protect the brain in the near future. PMID:27647198

  18. Healthy human gut phageome

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20–50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  19. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-04-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells.

  20. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells. Images PMID:6546970

  1. Ferritin Is Required in Multiple Tissues during Drosophila melanogaster Development

    PubMed Central

    Blowes, Liisa M.; Missirlis, Fanis; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, iron is stored in the cellular endomembrane system inside a protein cage formed by 24 ferritin subunits of two types (Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH) in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In larvae, ferritin accumulates in the midgut, hemolymph, garland, pericardial cells and in the nervous system. Here we present analyses of embryonic phenotypes for mutations in Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH and in both genes simultaneously. Mutations in either gene or deletion of both genes results in a similar set of cuticular embryonic phenotypes, ranging from non-deposition of cuticle to defects associated with germ band retraction, dorsal closure and head involution. A fraction of ferritin mutants have embryonic nervous systems with ventral nerve cord disruptions, misguided axonal projections and brain malformations. Ferritin mutants die with ectopic apoptotic events. Furthermore, we show that ferritin maternal contribution, which varies reflecting the mother’s iron stores, is used in early development. We also evaluated phenotypes arising from the blockage of COPII transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, feeding the secretory pathway, plus analysis of ectopically expressed and fluorescently marked Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH. Overall, our results are consistent with insect ferritin combining three functions: iron storage, intercellular iron transport, and protection from iron-induced oxidative stress. These functions are required in multiple tissues during Drosophila embryonic development. PMID:26192321

  2. Villification of the gut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Shyer, Amy E.; Tabin, Clifford J.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-03-01

    The villi of the human and chick gut are formed in similar stepwise progressions, wherein the mesenchyme and attached epithelium first fold into longitudinal ridges, then a zigzag pattern, and lastly individual villi. We combine biological manipulations and quantitative modeling to show that these steps of villification depend on the sequential differentiation of the distinct smooth muscle layers of the gut, which restrict the expansion of the growing endoderm and mesenchyme, generating compressive stresses that lead to their buckling and folding. Our computational model incorporates measured elastic properties and growth rates in the developing gut, recapitulating the morphological patterns seen during villification in a variety of species. Our study provides a mechanical basis for the genesis of these epithelial protrusions that are essential for providing sufficient surface area for nutrient absorption.

  3. Gut feeling is electric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Familoni, Jide

    2011-06-01

    Although "gut feeling" is a cliché in English parlance, there are neuro-physiological basis for registration of emotions in the gut. Control of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is by an integration of neuro-hormonal factors from the local myogenic to the central nervous system. Gastric contractile activity, which is responsible for the motor properties of the stomach, is regulated by this integrated complex. Signatures of the activity include gastric electrical activity (GEA) and bowel sounds. GEA has two distinct components: a high-frequency spike activity or post depolarization potential termed the electrical response activity superimposed on a lower frequency, rhythmic depolarization termed the control activity. These signatures are measured in the clinic with contact sensors and well understood for diagnosis of gut dysmotility. Can these signatures be measured at standoff and employed for purposes of biometrics, malintent and wellness assessment?

  4. Molecular mechanism and functional significance of acid generation in the Drosophila midgut

    PubMed Central

    Overend, Gayle; Luo, Yuan; Henderson, Louise; Douglas, Angela E.; Davies, Shireen A.; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2016-01-01

    The gut of Drosophila melanogaster includes a proximal acidic region (~pH 2), however the genome lacks the H+/K+ ATPase characteristic of the mammalian gastric parietal cell, and the molecular mechanisms of acid generation are poorly understood. Here, we show that maintenance of the low pH of the acidic region is dependent on H+ V-ATPase, together with carbonic anhydrase and five further transporters or channels that mediate K+, Cl− and HCO3− transport. Abrogation of the low pH did not influence larval survival under standard laboratory conditions, but was deleterious for insects subjected to high Na+ or K+ load. Insects with elevated pH in the acidic region displayed increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas pathogens and increased abundance of key members of the gut microbiota (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus), suggesting that the acidic region has bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal activity. Conversely, the pH of the acidic region was significantly reduced in germ-free Drosophila, indicative of a role of the gut bacteria in shaping the pH conditions of the gut. These results demonstrate that the acidic gut region protects the insect and gut microbiome from pathological disruption, and shed light on the mechanisms by which low pH can be maintained in the absence of H+, K+ ATPase. PMID:27250760

  5. Gut chemosensing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Psichas, Arianna; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    The enteroendocrine system is the primary sensor of ingested nutrients and is responsible for secreting an array of gut hormones, which modulate multiple physiological responses including gastrointestinal motility and secretion, glucose homeostasis, and appetite. This Review provides an up-to-date synopsis of the molecular mechanisms underlying enteroendocrine nutrient sensing and highlights our current understanding of the neuro-hormonal regulation of gut hormone secretion, including the interaction between the enteroendocrine system and the enteric nervous system. It is hoped that a deeper understanding of how these systems collectively regulate postprandial physiology will further facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25664852

  6. Molecular control of gut formation in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Natália Martins; Pechmann, Matthias; Schwager, Evelyn E; Tobias-Santos, Vitória; McGregor, Alistair P; Damen, Wim G M; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo

    2017-05-01

    The development of a digestive system is an essential feature of bilaterians. Studies of the molecular control of gut formation in arthropods have been studied in detail in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, little is known in other arthropods, especially in noninsect arthropods. To better understand the evolution of arthropod alimentary system, we investigate the molecular control of gut development in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum (Pt), the primary chelicerate model species for developmental studies. Orthologs of the ectodermal genes Pt-wingless (Pt-wg) and Pt-hedgehog (Pt-hh), of the endodermal genes, Pt-serpent (Pt-srp) and Pt-hepatocyte-nuclear factor-4 (Pt-hnf4) and of the mesodermal gene Pt-twist (Pt-twi) are expressed in the same germ layers during spider gut development as in D. melanogaster. Thus, our expression data suggest that the downstream molecular components involved in gut development in arthropods are conserved. However, Pt-forkhead (Pt-fkh) expression and function in spiders is considerably different from its D. melanogaster ortholog. Pt-fkh is expressed before gastrulation in a cell population that gives rise to endodermal and mesodermal precursors, suggesting a possible role for this factor in specification of both germ layers. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down Pt-fkh via RNA interference. Pt-fkh RNAi embryos not only fail to develop a proper gut, but also lack the mesodermal Pt-twi expressing cells. Thus, in spiders Pt-fkh specifies endodermal and mesodermal germ layers. We discuss the implications of these findings for the evolution and development of gut formation in Ecdysozoans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Diet, gut microbiota and cognition.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Cicely; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-02-01

    The consumption of a diet high in fat and sugar can lead to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. In the human gut, the trillions of harmless microorganisms harboured in the host's gastrointestinal tract are called the 'gut microbiota'. Consumption of a diet high in fat and sugar changes the healthy microbiota composition which leads to an imbalanced microbial population in the gut, a phenomenon known as "gut dysbiosis". It has been shown that certain types of gut microbiota are linked to the pathogenesis of obesity. In addition, long-term consumption of a high fat diet is associated with cognitive decline. It has recently been proposed that the gut microbiota is part of a mechanistic link between the consumption of a high fat diet and the impaired cognition of an individual, termed "microbiota-gut-brain axis". In this complex relationship between the gut, the brain and the gut microbiota, there are several types of gut microbiota and host mechanisms involved. Most of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, this review comprehensively summarizes the current evidence from mainly in vivo (rodent and human) studies of the relationship between diet, gut microbiota and cognition. The possible mechanisms that the diet and the gut microbiota have on cognition are also presented and discussed.

  8. The Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    A compact genome and a tiny brain make Drosophila the prime model to understand the neural substrate of behavior. The neurogenetic efforts to reveal neural circuits underlying Drosophila vision started about half a century ago, and now the field is booming with sophisticated genetic tools, rich behavioral assays, and importantly, a greater number of scientists joining from different backgrounds. This review will briefly cover the structural anatomy of the Drosophila visual system, the animal’s visual behaviors, the genes involved in assembling these circuits, the new and powerful techniques, and the challenges ahead for ultimately identifying the general principles of biological computation in the brain.   A typical brain utilizes a great many compact neural circuits to collect and process information from the internal biological and external environmental worlds and generates motor commands for observable behaviors. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, despite of its miniature body and tiny brain, can survive in almost any corner of the world.1 It can find food, court mate, fight rival conspecific, avoid predators, and amazingly fly without crashing into trees. Drosophila vision and its underlying neuronal machinery has been a key research model for at least half century for neurogeneticists.2 Given the efforts invested on the visual system, this animal model is likely to offer the first full understanding of how visual information is computed by a multi-cellular organism. Furthermore, research in Drosophila has revealed many genes that play crucial roles in the formation of functional brains across species. The architectural similarities between the visual systems of Drosophila and vertebrate at the molecular, cellular, and network levels suggest new principles discovered at the circuit level on the relationship between neurons and behavior in Drosophila shall also contribute greatly to our understanding of the general principles for how bigger brains work.3

  9. Emergence of embryonic pattern through contact inhibition of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Davis, John R; Huang, Chieh-Yin; Zanet, Jennifer; Harrison, Sam; Rosten, Edward; Cox, Susan; Soong, Daniel Y; Dunn, Graham A; Stramer, Brian M

    2012-12-01

    The pioneering cell biologist Michael Abercrombie first described the process of contact inhibition of locomotion more than 50 years ago when migrating fibroblasts were observed to rapidly change direction and migrate away upon collision. Since then, we have gleaned little understanding of how contact inhibition is regulated and only lately observed its occurrence in vivo. We recently revealed that Drosophila macrophages (haemocytes) require contact inhibition for their uniform embryonic dispersal. Here, to investigate the role that contact inhibition plays in the patterning of haemocyte movements, we have mathematically analysed and simulated their contact repulsion dynamics. Our data reveal that the final pattern of haemocyte distribution, and the details and timing of its formation, can be explained by contact inhibition dynamics within the geometry of the Drosophila embryo. This has implications for morphogenesis in general as it suggests that patterns can emerge, irrespective of external cues, when cells interact through simple rules of contact repulsion.

  10. Isolation of Enteric Nervous System Progenitor Cells from the Aganglionic Gut of Patients with Hirschsprung's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David J; Bethell, George S; Shukla, Rajeev; Kenny, Simon E; Edgar, David H

    2015-01-01

    Enteric nervous system progenitor cells isolated from postnatal human gut and cultured as neurospheres can then be transplanted into aganglionic gut to restore normal patterns of contractility. These progenitor cells may be of future use to treat patients with Hirschprung's disease, a congenital condition characterized by hindgut dysmotility due to the lack of enteric nervous system ganglia. Here we demonstrate that progenitor cells can also be isolated from aganglionic gut removed during corrective surgery for Hirschsprung's disease. Although the enteric nervous system marker calretinin is not expressed in the aganglionic gut region, de novo expression is initiated in cultured neurosphere cells isolated from aganglionic Hirschsprung bowel. Furthermore, expression of the neural markers NOS, VIP and GFAP also increased during culture of aganglionic gut neurospheres which we show can be transplantation into cultured embryonic mouse gut explants to restore a normal frequency of contractility. To determine the origin of the progenitor cells in aganglionic region, we used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to demonstrate that only p75-positive neural crest-derived cells present in the thickened nerve trunks characteristic of the aganglionic region of Hirschsprung gut gave rise to neurons in culture. The derivation of enteric nervous system progenitors in the aganglionic gut region of Hirschprung's patients not only means that this tissue is a potential source of cells for future autologous transplantation, but it also raises the possibility of inducing the differentiation of these endogenous cells in situ to compensate for the aganglionosis.

  11. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levels at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64

  12. A Mesh-Duox pathway regulates homeostasis in the insect gut.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaoping; Yang, Lijuan; Pang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rudian; Zhu, Yibin; Wang, Penghua; Gao, Guanjun; Cheng, Gong

    2017-03-01

    The metazoan gut harbours complex communities of commensal and symbiotic bacterial microorganisms. The quantity and quality of these microorganisms fluctuate dynamically in response to physiological changes. The mechanisms that hosts have developed to respond to and manage such dynamic changes and maintain homeostasis remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a dual oxidase (Duox)-regulating pathway that contributes to maintaining homeostasis in the gut of both Aedes aegypti and Drosophila melanogaster. We show that a gut-membrane-associated protein, named Mesh, plays an important role in controlling the proliferation of gut bacteria by regulating Duox expression through an Arrestin-mediated MAPK JNK/ERK phosphorylation cascade. Expression of both Mesh and Duox is correlated with the gut bacterial microbiome, which, in mosquitoes, increases dramatically soon after a blood meal. Ablation of Mesh abolishes Duox induction, leading to an increase of the gut microbiome load. Our study reveals that the Mesh-mediated signalling pathway is a central homeostatic mechanism of the insect gut.

  13. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal-ventral body axis.

    PubMed

    Stein, David S; Stevens, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) that is expressed by the follicular epithelium cells that envelop the oocyte. Follicle cells that are not exposed to Gurken follow a ventral fate and express Pipe, a sulfotransferase that enzymatically modifies components of the inner vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell, thereby transferring DV spatial information from the follicle to the egg. These ventrally sulfated eggshell proteins comprise a localized cue that directs the ventrally restricted formation of the active Spätzle ligand within the perivitelline space between the eggshell and the embryonic membrane. Spätzle activates Toll, a transmembrane receptor in the embryonic membrane. Transmission of the Toll signal into the embryo leads to the formation of a ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the transcription factor Dorsal within the nuclei of the syncytial blastoderm stage embryo. Dorsal controls the spatially specific expression of a large constellation of zygotic target genes, the Dorsal gene regulatory network, along the embryonic DV circumference. This article reviews classic studies and integrates them with the details of more recent work that has advanced our understanding of the complex pathway that establishes Drosophila embryo DV polarity. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal–ventral body axis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David S.; Stevens, Leslie M.

    2016-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal–ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) that is expressed by the follicular epithelium cells that envelop the oocyte. Follicle cells that are not exposed to Gurken follow a ventral fate and express Pipe, a sulfotransferase that enzymatically modifies components of the inner vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell, thereby transferring DV spatial information from the follicle to the egg. These ventrally sulfated eggshell proteins comprise a localized cue that directs the ventrally restricted formation of the active Spätzle ligand within the perivitelline space between the eggshell and the embryonic membrane. Spätzle activates Toll, a transmembrane receptor in the embryonic membrane. Transmission of the Toll signal into the embryo leads to the formation of a ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the transcription factor Dorsal within the nuclei of the syncytial blastoderm stage embryo. Dorsal controls the spatially specific expression of a large constellation of zygotic target genes, the Dorsal gene regulatory network, along the embryonic DV circumference. This article reviews classic studies and integrates them with the details of more recent work that has advanced our understanding of the complex pathway that establishes Drosophila embryo DV polarity. PMID:25124754

  15. Gut Microbiota and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Daniel Y; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-08-25

    Studies in microbiota-mediated health risks have gained traction in recent years since the compilation of the Human Microbiome Project. No longer do we believe that our gut microbiota is an inert set of microorganisms that reside in the body without consequence. In this review, we discuss the recent findings which further our understanding of the connection between the gut microbiota and the atherosclerosis. We evaluate studies which illustrate the current understanding of the relationship between infection, immunity, altered metabolism, and bacterial products such as immune activators or dietary metabolites and their contributions to the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, we critically examine rec ent clinical and mechanistic findings for the novel microbiota-dependent dietary metabolite, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which has been implicated in atherosclerosis. These discoveries are now becoming integrated with advances in microbiota profiling which enhance our ability to interrogate the functional role of the gut microbiome and develop strategies for targeted therapeutics. The gut microbiota is a multi-faceted system that is unraveling novel contributors to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss historic and novel contributors while highlighting the TMAO story mainly as an example of the various paths taken beyond deciphering microbial composition to elucidate downstream mechanisms that promote (or protect from) atherogenesis in the hopes of translating these findings from bench to bedside.

  16. Gut health in poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although the gastrointestinal tract is frequently described simply as "the gut," it is actually made up of (1) an epithelium; (2) a diverse and robust immune arm, which contains most of the immune cells in the body; and (3) the commensal bacteria, which contain more cells than are present in the ent...

  17. Philosophy with Guts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Western philosophy, from Plato on, has had the tendency to separate feeling and thought, affect and cognition. This article argues that a strong philosophy (metaphorically, with "guts") utilizes both in its work. In fact, a "complete act of thought" also will include action. Feeling motivates thought, which formulates ideas,…

  18. Embryonal cancers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Gemma; Ferrari, Andrea; Stiller, Charles A; Pastore, Guido; Bisogno, Gianni; Trama, Annalisa; Capocaccia, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Embryonal cancers are a heterogeneous group of rare cancers which mainly occur in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to estimate the burden (incidence, prevalence, survival and proportion of cured) for the principal embryonal cancers in Europe (EU27), using population-based data from cancer registries (CRs) participating in RARECARE. We identified 3322 cases diagnosed from 1995 to 2002 (latest period for which data are available): 44% neuroblastoma, 35% nephroblastoma, 13% retinoblastoma and 6% hepatoblastoma. Very few cases of pulmonary blastoma (43 cases) and pancreatoblastoma (seven cases) were diagnosed. About 2000 new embryonal cancers were estimated every year in EU27, for an annual incidence rate of 4 per million (1.8 neuroblastoma, 1.4 nephroblastoma, and 0.5 retinoblastoma); 91% of cases occurred in patients under 15 years. Five-year relative survival for all embryonal cancers was 80% (99% retinoblastoma, 90% nephroblastoma, 71% hepatoblastoma and 68% neuroblastoma). Overall survival was lower in adolescents and adults than in those under 15 years. The cure rate was estimated at 80%. Slightly less than 40,000 persons were estimated alive in EU27 with a diagnosis of embryonal cancer in 2008. Nephroblastoma was the most prevalent (18,150 cases in EU27), followed by neuroblastoma (12,100), retinoblastoma (5200), hepatoblastoma (2700) and pulmonary blastoma (614). This is the first study to delineate the embryonal cancer burden in Europe by age, sex and European region. Survival/cure rate is generally high, but there are considerable gaps in our understanding of the natural histories of these rare diseases particularly in adults.

  19. Maternal diet programs embryonic kidney gene expression.

    PubMed

    Welham, Simon J M; Riley, Paul R; Wade, Angie; Hubank, Mike; Woolf, Adrian S

    2005-06-16

    Human epidemiological data associating birth weight with adult disease suggest that organogenesis is "programmed" by maternal diet. In rats, protein restriction in pregnancy produces offspring with fewer renal glomeruli and higher systemic blood pressures than controls. We tested the hypothesis that maternal diet alters gene expression in the metanephros, the precursor of the definitive mammalian kidney. We demonstrated that maternal low-protein diet initiated when pregnancy starts and maintained to embryonic day 13, when the metanephros consists of mesenchyme surrounding a once-branched ureteric bud, is sufficient to significantly reduce glomerular numbers in offspring by about 20%. As assessed by representational difference analyses and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reactions, low-protein diet modulated gene expression in embryonic day 13 metanephroi. In particular, levels of prox-1, the ortholog of Drosophila transcription factor prospero, and cofilin-1, a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, were reduced. During normal metanephrogenesis, prox-1 protein was first detected in mesenchymal cells around the ureteric tree and thereafter in nascent nephron epithelia, whereas cofilin-1 immunolocalized to bud derivatives and condensing mesenchyme. Previously, we reported that low-protein diets increased mesenchymal apoptosis cells when metanephrogenesis began and thereafter reduced numbers of precursor cells. Collectively, these studies prove that the maternal diet programs the embryonic kidney, altering cell turnover and gene expression at a time when nephrons and glomeruli have yet to form. The human implication is that the maternal diet ingested between conception and 5- 6-wk gestation contributes to the variation in glomerular numbers that are known to occur between healthy and hypertensive populations.

  20. Meiosis in male Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Bruce D.; Yan, Rihui; Tsai, Jui-He

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis entails sorting and separating both homologous and sister chromatids. The mechanisms for connecting sister chromatids and homologs during meiosis are highly conserved and include specialized forms of the cohesin complex and a tightly regulated homolog synapsis/recombination pathway designed to yield regular crossovers between homologous chromatids. Drosophila male meiosis is of special interest because it dispenses with large segments of the standard meiotic script, particularly recombination, synapsis and the associated structures. Instead, Drosophila relies on a unique protein complex composed of at least two novel proteins, SNM and MNM, to provide stable connections between homologs during meiosis I. Sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila is mediated by cohesins, ring-shaped complexes that entrap sister chromatids. However, unlike other eukaryotes Drosophila does not rely on the highly conserved Rec8 cohesin in meiosis, but instead utilizes two novel cohesion proteins, ORD and SOLO, which interact with the SMC1/3 cohesin components in providing meiotic cohesion. PMID:23087836

  1. Functional analysis of Scr during embryonic and post-embryonic development in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Hrycaj, Steven; Chesebro, John; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2010-05-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana represents a basal insect lineage that undergoes the ancestral hemimetabolous mode of development. Here, we examine the embryonic and post-embryonic functions of the hox gene Scr in Periplaneta as a way of better understanding the roles of this gene in the evolution of insect body plans. During embryogenesis, Scr function is strictly limited to the head with no role in the prothorax. This indicates that the ancestral embryonic function of Scr was likely restricted to the head, and that the posterior expansion of expression in the T1 legs may have preceded any apparent gain of function during evolution. In addition, Scr plays a pivotal role in the formation of the dorsal ridge, a structure that separates the head and thorax in all insects. This is evidenced by the presence of a supernumerary segment that occurs between the labial and T1 segments of RNAiScr first nymphs and is attributed to an alteration in engrailed (en) expression. The fact that similar Scr phenotypes are observed in Tribolium but not in Drosophila or Oncopeltus reveals the presence of lineage-specific variation in the genetic architecture that controls the formation of the dorsal ridge. In direct contrast to the embryonic roles, Scr has no function in the head region during post-embryogenesis in Periplaneta, and instead, strictly acts to provide identity to the T1 segment. Furthermore, the strongest Periplaneta RNAiScr phenotypes develop ectopic wing-like tissue that originates from the posterior region of the prothoracic segment. This finding provides a novel insight into the current debate on the morphological origin of insect wings.

  2. Drosophila as a Model for Human Diseases-Focus on Innate Immunity in Barrier Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, P; Seyedoleslami Esfahani, S; Engström, Y

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial immunity protects the host from harmful microbial invaders but also controls the beneficial microbiota on epithelial surfaces. When this delicate balance between pathogen and symbiont is disturbed, clinical disease often occurs, such as in inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, or atopic dermatitis, which all can be in part linked to impairment of barrier epithelia. Many innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and effector molecules are evolutionarily conserved between human and Drosophila. This review describes the current knowledge on Drosophila as a model for human diseases, with a special focus on innate immune-related disorders of the gut, lung, and skin. The discovery of antimicrobial peptides, the crucial role of Toll and Toll-like receptors, and the evolutionary conservation of signaling to the immune systems of both human and Drosophila are described in a historical perspective. Similarities and differences between human and Drosophila are discussed; current knowledge on receptors, signaling pathways, and effectors are reviewed, including antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen species, as well as autophagy. We also give examples of human diseases for which Drosophila appears to be a useful model. In addition, the limitations of the Drosophila model are mentioned. Finally, we propose areas for future research, which include using the Drosophila model for drug screening, as a validation tool for novel genetic mutations in humans and for exploratory research of microbiota-host interactions, with relevance for infection, wound healing, and cancer. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Drosophila Genotype Influences Commensal Bacterial Levels

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugarajah, Niroshan; Buchon, Nicolas; Clark, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    Host genotype can influence the composition of the commensal bacterial community in some organisms. Composition, however, is only one parameter describing a microbial community. Here, we test whether a second parameter—abundance of bacteria—is a heritable trait by quantifying the presence of four commensal bacterial strains within 36 gnotobiotic inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that D. melanogaster genotype exerts a significant effect on microbial levels within the fly. When introduced as monocultures into axenic flies, three of the four bacterial strains were reliably detected within the fly. The amounts of these different strains are strongly correlated, suggesting that the host regulates commensal bacteria through general, not bacteria-specific, means. While the correlation does not appear to be driven by simple variation in overall gut dimensions, a genetic association study suggests that variation in commensal bacterial load may largely be attributed to physical aspects of host cell growth and development. PMID:28095502

  4. In focus: spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, across perspectives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An effective response to the invasion of spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, requires proper taxonomic identification at the initial phase, understanding its basic biology and phenology, developing management tools, transferring information and technology quickly to user groups, and e...

  5. Expression and role of Roundabout-1 in embryonic Xenopus forebrain.

    PubMed

    Connor, R M; Key, B

    2002-09-01

    The receptor Roundabout-1 (Robo1) and its ligand Slit are known to influence axon guidance and central nervous system (CNS) patterning in both vertebrate and nonvertebrate systems. Although Robo-Slit interactions mediate axon guidance in the Drosophila CNS, their role in establishing the early axon scaffold in the embryonic vertebrate brain remains unclear. We report here the identification and expression of a Xenopus Robo1 orthologue that is highly homologous to mammalian Robo1. By using overexpression studies and immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques, we have investigated the role of Robo1 in the development of a subset of neurons and axon tracts in the Xenopus forebrain. Robo1 is expressed in forebrain nuclei and in neuroepithelial cells underlying the main axon tracts. Misexpression of Robo1 led to aberrant development of axon tracts as well as the ectopic differentiation of forebrain neurons. These results implicate Robo1 in both neuronal differentiation and axon guidance in embryonic vertebrate forebrain.

  6. Obesity and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Flint, Harry J

    2011-11-01

    Gut microorganisms have the potential to influence weight gain and fat deposition through a variety of mechanisms. One factor is the ability of microorganisms in the large intestine to release energy by fermenting otherwise indigestible components of the diet ("energy harvest"). This energy becomes available to the host indirectly through the absorption of microbially produced short-chain fatty acids. Energy recovery from fiber will be largely determined by dietary intake and gut transit, but can also depend on the makeup of the gut microbiota. The species composition of the gut microbiota changes with diet composition, as has been shown in studies with obese individuals after reduced carbohydrate weight loss diets, or diets containing different nondigestible carbohydrates. There is conflicting evidence, however, on the extent to which gut microbiota composition differs between obese and nonobese humans. In contrast, there is increasing evidence to suggest that gut microorganisms and their metabolic products can influence gut hormones, inflammation, and gut motility. Any changes in gut microbiota composition that influence energy expenditure, satiety, and food intake have the potential to alter weight gain and weight loss, but a better understanding of the impact of different members of the gut microbial community upon host physiology is needed to establish these relationships.

  7. Identification of a Drosophila activin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, S R; Wrana, J L; Arora, K; Attisano, L; O'Connor, M B; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    Activins are cytokines of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily that control various events during vertebrate embryo development and cell differentiation in the adult, and act through transmembrane receptors that contain a cytoplasmic protein-serine/threonine kinase domain. We describe the identification, deduced primary structure, and expression pattern of Atr-II, a receptor serine/threonine kinase found in Drosophila. With the exception of the spacing of 10 cysteine residues, the extracellular domain of Atr-II is very dissimilar from those of vertebrate activin receptors, yet it binds activin with high affinity and specificity. The kinase domain sequence of Atr-II is 60% identical to those of activin receptors from vertebrates, suggesting similarities in their signaling mechanisms. Maternal Atr-II transcript and its product are abundant in the oocyte. During development, the highest levels of Atr-II transcript and protein are observed in the mesoderm and gut. The possible role of an activin signaling system in Drosophila development is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415726

  8. Erythromycin and the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Catnach, S M; Fairclough, P D

    1992-01-01

    The commonly reported gastrointestinal side effects that occur with erythromycin are related to its prokinetic action on the gut, mediated, at least in part, by its motilin receptor stimulating activity. This action may be of clinical use in conditions associated with gastrointestinal hypomotility such as diabetic gastroparesis and intestinal pseudo-obstruction, although further work needs to be done to establish the long term therapeutic uses of erythromycin in these disorders. Macrolide compounds with no antibacterial properties but which have a pronounced prokinetic action on the gut have already been synthesised and are currently being developed for future use in man. These 'motilides' should provide a useful addition to our rather limited armamentarium of effective gastrointestinal prokinetic agents. PMID:1568663

  9. The gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Mayenaaz; van der Poorten, David

    2017-01-01

    More than a trillion, mostly good, microbes live within our gastrointestinal tract and are responsible for vital metabolic, immune and nutritional functions. Dysbiosis, meaning a maladaptive imbalance of the microbiome, is associated with many common diseases and is a target for therapy. This article provides an overview of the gut microbiome in health and disease, highlighting conditions such as Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with which dysbiosis is associated. Information about treatments that affect the gut microbiome, including probiotics and faecal microbiota transplant, are discussed. As our knowledge of the microbiome increases, we are likely to better understand the complex interactions that cause disease, and develop new and more effective treatments for many common conditions.

  10. Gut microbiota and aging.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Paul W; Jeffery, Ian B

    2015-12-04

    The potential for the gut microbiota to affect health has a particular relevance for older individuals. This is because the microbiota may modulate aging-related changes in innate immunity, sarcopaenia, and cognitive function, all of which are elements of frailty. Both cell culture-dependent and -independent studies show that the gut microbiota of older people differs from that of younger adults. There is no chronological threshold or age at which the composition of the microbiota suddenly alters; rather, changes occur gradually with time. Our detailed analyses have separated the microbiota into groups associated with age, long-term residential care, habitual diet, and degree of retention of a core microbiome. We are beginning to understand how these groups change with aging and how they relate to clinical phenotypes. These data provide a framework for analyzing microbiota-health associations, distinguishing correlation from causation, identifying microbiota interaction with physiological aging processes, and developing microbiota-based health surveillance for older adults.

  11. [Brain-gut interactions].

    PubMed

    Bonaz, B

    2010-08-01

    Our digestive tract has an autonomous functioning but also has a bidirectional relation with our brain known as brain-gut interactions. This communication is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, i.e., the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, with a mixed afferent and efferent component, and the circumventricular organs located outside the blood-brain barrier. The vagus nerve, known as the principal component of the parasympathetic nervous system, is a mixed nerve composed of 90% afferent fibers, which has physiological roles due to its putative vegetative functions. The vagus nerve has also anti-inflammatory properties both through the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (through its afferents) and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (through its efferents). The sympathetic nervous system has a classical antagonist effect on the parasympathetic nervous system at the origin of an equilibrated sympathovagal balance in normal conditions. The brain is able to integrate inputs coming from the digestive tract inside a central autonomic network organized around the hypothalamus, limbic system and cerebral cortex (insula, prefrontal, cingulate) and in return to modify the autonomic nervous system and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis in the frame of physiological loops. A dysfunction of these brain-gut interactions, favoured by stress, is most likely involved in the pathophysiology of digestive diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A better knowledge of these brain-gut interactions has therapeutic implications in the domain of pharmacology, neurophysiology, behavioural and cognitive management.

  12. Endocannabinoids in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been used medicinally for centuries to treat a variety of disorders, including those associated with the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery of our bodies’ own “cannabis-like molecules” and associated receptors and metabolic machinery – collectively called the endocannabinoid system – enabled investigations into the physiological relevance for the system, and provided the field with evidence of a critical function for this endogenous signaling pathway in health and disease. Recent investigations yield insight into a significant participation for the endocannabinoid system in the normal physiology of gastrointestinal function, and its possible dysfunction in gastrointestinal pathology. Many gaps, however, remain in our understanding of the precise neural and molecular mechanisms across tissue departments that are under the regulatory control of the endocannabinoid system. This review highlights research that reveals an important – and at times surprising – role for the endocannabinoid system in the control of a variety of gastrointestinal functions, including motility, gut-brain mediated fat intake and hunger signaling, inflammation and gut permeability, and dynamic interactions with gut microbiota. PMID:27413788

  13. New insights into Drosophila vision.

    PubMed

    Dolph, Patrick

    2008-01-10

    Studies of the Drosophila visual system have provided valuable insights into the function and regulation of phototransduction signaling pathways. Much of this work has stemmed from or relied upon the genetic tools offered by the Drosophila system. In this issue of Neuron, Wang and colleagues and Acharya and colleagues have further exploited the Drosophila genetic system to characterize two new phototransduction players.

  14. Characterization of the DNA in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Petrovic, J.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    DNA has been quantitatively extracted from Drosophila melanogaster at various stages of embryonic development and analyzed by isopycnic centrifugation in CsCl and by fractionation on methylated albumin columns. The DNA is composed of three main classes of DNA, as defined by their buoyant density, ρ, in CsCl: a bulk DNA, ρ = 1.699 g cm-3, and two satellite DNAs, ρ = 1.685 g cm-3 and ρ = 1.669 g cm-3. These three types of DNA persist throughout the development of the insect. In the unfertilized egg, 80% of the total DNA consists of the satellite DNAs; this amount decreases to 18% during the first three hours after fertilization and then remains constant through embryogenesis. There is a concomitant increase of the satellite DNA's with the bulk DNA after blastoderm formation. PMID:4630028

  15. Gut microbiota and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases. PMID:25684933

  16. Diabetes, obesity and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Everard, Amandine; Cani, Patrice D

    2013-02-01

    The gut microbiota composition has been associated with several hallmarks of metabolic syndrome (e.g., obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis). Growing evidence suggests that gut microbes contribute to the onset of the low-grade inflammation characterising these metabolic disorders via mechanisms associated with gut barrier dysfunctions. Recently, enteroendocrine cells and the endocannabinoid system have been shown to control gut permeability and metabolic endotoxaemia. Moreover, targeted nutritional interventions using non-digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties have shown promising results in pre-clinical studies in this context, although human intervention studies warrant further investigations. Thus, in this review, we discuss putative mechanisms linking gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes. These data underline the advantage of investigating and changing the gut microbiota as a therapeutic target in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  18. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  19. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  20. Gut microbiome and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shinji; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and obesity-related disorders is increasing worldwide. In the last decade, the gut microbiota has emerged as an important factor in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome, through its interactions with dietary, environmental, and host genetic factors. Various studies have shown that alteration of the gut microbiota, shifting it toward increased energy harvest, is associated with an obese phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the gut microbiota affects host metabolism are still obscure. In this review, we discuss the complexity of the gut microbiota and its relationship to obesity and obesity-related diseases. Furthermore, we discuss the anti-obesity potential of probiotics and prebiotics.

  1. Hormonal Signaling in the Gut*

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Clémence D.; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A.; Duca, Frank A.; Lam, Tony K. T.

    2014-01-01

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes. PMID:24577102

  2. Hormonal signaling in the gut.

    PubMed

    Côté, Clémence D; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A; Duca, Frank A; Lam, Tony K T

    2014-04-25

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes.

  3. Gut microbiota signatures of longevity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanli; Hua, Yutong; Zeng, Bo; Ning, Ruihong; Li, Ying; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2016-09-26

    An aging global population poses substantial challenges to society [1]. Centenarians are a model for healthy aging because they have reached the extreme limit of life by escaping, surviving, or delaying chronic diseases [2]. The genetics of centenarians have been extensively examined [3], but less is known about their gut microbiotas. Recently, Biagi et al.[4] characterized the gut microbiota in Italian centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. Here, we compare the gut microbiota of Chinese long-living people with younger age groups, and with the results from the Italian population [4], to identify gut-microbial signatures of healthy aging.

  4. Parents Without Partners: Drosophila as a Model for Understanding the Mechanisms and Evolution of Parthenogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Markow, Therese Ann

    2013-01-01

    Of 40 Drosophila species screened to date, a majority have shown some ability to at least initiate parthenogenetic development. In one case, Drosophila mangebeirai, natural populations are entirely female, making it the only obligate parthenogenetic species of Drosophila. Only a few of the species that exhibit the ability to undergo early embryonic development of unfertilized eggs successfully respond to selection for parthenogenetic production of adult flies. Laboratory strains of parthenogenetic Drosophila mercatorum have been created by artificial selection on multiple occasions, but the proportion of eggs undergoing development to adulthood has never exceeded 8%. Selection produces gains in the number of unfertilized eggs undergoing early development, but the majority arrest at the embryonic or first larval instar stages. Four components to successful parthenogenesis include (1) a female’s propensity to lay unfertilized eggs, (2) the ability of the eggs to restore diploidy, (3) the ability of the parthenogenetically produced diploid embryo to complete larval development and pupation, and (4) the existence of genetic variability within and among Drosophila species in the frequency of parthenogenesis suggests the existence of multiple steps in its evolution and offers a way to explore the genetics of this unusual reproductive strategy. PMID:23550124

  5. Cuticle morphogenesis in crustacean embryonic and postembryonic stages.

    PubMed

    Mrak, Polona; Bogataj, Urban; Štrus, Jasna; Žnidaršič, Nada

    2017-01-01

    The crustacean cuticle is a chitin-based extracellular matrix, produced in general by epidermal cells and ectodermally derived epithelial cells of the digestive tract. Cuticle morphogenesis is an integrative part of embryonic and postembryonic development and it was studied in several groups of crustaceans, but mainly with a focus on one selected aspect of morphogenesis. Early studies were focused mainly on in vivo or histological observations of embryonic or larval molt cycles and more recently, some ultrastructural studies of the cuticle differentiation during development were performed. The aim of this paper is to review data on exoskeletal and gut cuticle formation during embryonic and postembryonic development in crustaceans, obtained in different developmental stages of different species and to bring together and discuss different aspects of cuticle morphogenesis, namely data on the morphology, ultrastructure, composition, connections to muscles and molt cycles in relation to cuticle differentiation. Based on the comparative evaluation of microscopic analyses of cuticle in crustacean embryonic and postembryonic stages, common principles of cuticle morphogenesis during development are discussed. Additional studies are suggested to further clarify this topic and to connect the new knowledge to related fields.

  6. Alternative Splicing within and between Drosophila Species, Sexes, Tissues, and Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Gibilisco, Lauren; Zhou, Qi; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (“AS”) greatly expands proteome diversity, but little is known about the evolutionary landscape of AS in Drosophila and how it differs between embryonic and adult stages or males and females. Here we study the transcriptomes from several tissues and developmental stages in males and females from four species across the Drosophila genus. We find that 20–37% of multi-exon genes are alternatively spliced. While males generally express a larger number of genes, AS is more prevalent in females, suggesting that the sexes adopt different expression strategies for their specialized function. While the number of total genes expressed increases during early embryonic development, the proportion of expressed genes that are alternatively spliced is highest in the very early embryo, before the onset of zygotic transcription. This indicates that females deposit a diversity of isoforms into the egg, consistent with abundant AS found in ovary. Cluster analysis by gene expression (“GE”) levels shows mostly stage-specific clustering in embryonic samples, and tissue-specific clustering in adult tissues. Clustering embryonic stages and adult tissues based on AS profiles results in stronger species-specific clustering, suggesting that diversification of splicing contributes to lineage-specific evolution in Drosophila. Most sex-biased AS found in flies is due to AS in gonads, with little sex-specific splicing in somatic tissues. PMID:27935948

  7. Alternative Splicing within and between Drosophila Species, Sexes, Tissues, and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Gibilisco, Lauren; Zhou, Qi; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2016-12-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing ("AS") greatly expands proteome diversity, but little is known about the evolutionary landscape of AS in Drosophila and how it differs between embryonic and adult stages or males and females. Here we study the transcriptomes from several tissues and developmental stages in males and females from four species across the Drosophila genus. We find that 20-37% of multi-exon genes are alternatively spliced. While males generally express a larger number of genes, AS is more prevalent in females, suggesting that the sexes adopt different expression strategies for their specialized function. While the number of total genes expressed increases during early embryonic development, the proportion of expressed genes that are alternatively spliced is highest in the very early embryo, before the onset of zygotic transcription. This indicates that females deposit a diversity of isoforms into the egg, consistent with abundant AS found in ovary. Cluster analysis by gene expression ("GE") levels shows mostly stage-specific clustering in embryonic samples, and tissue-specific clustering in adult tissues. Clustering embryonic stages and adult tissues based on AS profiles results in stronger species-specific clustering, suggesting that diversification of splicing contributes to lineage-specific evolution in Drosophila. Most sex-biased AS found in flies is due to AS in gonads, with little sex-specific splicing in somatic tissues.

  8. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression

    PubMed Central

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C.; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly’s auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level. PMID:28115690

  9. Sterile Inflammation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Zeeshan; Liu, Dawei; Gregory, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The study of immune responses in Drosophila has already yielded significant results with impacts on our understanding of vertebrate immunity, such as the characterization of the Toll receptor. Several recent papers have focused on the humoral response to damage signals rather than pathogens, particularly damage signals from tumour-like tissues generated by loss of cell polarity or chromosomal instability. Both the triggers that generate this sterile inflammation and the systemic and local effects of it are only just beginning to be characterized in Drosophila. Here we review the molecular mechanisms that are known that give rise to the recruitment of Drosophila phagocytes, called hemocytes, as well as the signals, such as TNFα, that stimulated hemocytes emit at sites of perceived damage. The signalling consequences of inflammation, such as the activation of JNK, and the potential for modifying this response are also discussed. PMID:25948885

  10. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  11. Cycling vrille expression is required for a functional Drosophila clock.

    PubMed

    Blau, J; Young, M W

    1999-12-10

    We identified a novel regulatory loop within Drosophila's circadian clock. A screen for clock-controlled genes recovered vrille (vri), a transcription factor essential for embryonic development. vri is expressed in circadian pacemaker cells in larval and adult brains. vri RNA levels oscillate with a circadian rhythm. Cycling is directly regulated by the transcription factors dCLOCK and CYCLE, which are also required for oscillations of period and timeless RNA. Eliminating the normal vri cycle suppresses period and timeless expression and causes long-period behavioral rhythms and arrhythmicity, indicating that cycling vri is required for a functional Drosophila clock. We also show that dCLOCK and VRI independently regulate levels of a neuropeptide, pigment dispersing factor, which appears to regulate overt behavior.

  12. Comparative gut physiology symposium: The microbe-gut-brain axis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Comparative Gut Physiology Symposium titled “The Microbe-Gut-Brain Axis” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science and the American Dairy Science Association on Thursday, July 21, 2016, in Salt Lake City Utah. The goal of the symposium was to present basic r...

  13. Characterization of the Cultivable Gut Microflora in Wild-Caught 
Mediterranean Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Ahmad; Bariche, Michel; zu Dohna, Heinrich; Kambris, Zakaria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Microflora of the gastrointestinal tract plays important roles in food digestion, nutrient absorption and in host defense against ingested pathogens. Several studies have focused on the microflora of farmed fishes, but the gut flora of wild fishes remains poorly characterized. The aim of this work was to provide an overview of the bacteria colonizing the gut of wild-caught fishes and to determine whether some bacterial species can be pathogenic. Results: We isolated cultivable bacteria from fifteen wild-caught Mediterranean fish species corresponding to different habitat, diet and origin. Bacterial species identity was determined by 16s rRNA gene sequencing for the 61 isolates. The potential pathogenicity of isolated bacteria was investigated using fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) as model organisms. Two bacterial strains (Serratia sp. and Aeromonas salmonicida) were lethal when microinjected to Drosophila, while zebrafish did not develop any disease when exposed to any of 34 isolated bacterial strains. However, it was interesting to note that two bacterial strains (Shewanella and Arthrobacter) isolated from marine fishes were able to colonize the guts of freshwater zebrafish. Conclusion: The results of this study give an overview of the bacterial species found in the guts of wild fishes living off Beirut seashore. It shows that some parameters believed to be limiting factors to host-gut colonization by bacteria can be overcome by some species. This pilot study could be extended by sampling a larger number of fish species with several specimens per fish species, and by identifying uncultivable bacteria that reside in the fish guts. Our results may have implications for the utilization of certain bacterial species in fish farming or their use as bio-indicators for water and/or food quality. PMID:28553195

  14. The scoop on the fly brain: glial engulfment functions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Logan, Mary A; Freeman, Marc R

    2007-02-01

    Glial cells provide support and protection for neurons in the embryonic and adult brain, mediated in part through the phagocytic activity of glia. Glial cells engulf apoptotic cells and pruned neurites from the developing nervous system, and also clear degenerating neuronal debris from the adult brain after neural trauma. Studies indicate that Drosophila melanogaster is an ideal model system to elucidate the mechanisms of engulfment by glia. The recent studies reviewed here show that many features of glial engulfment are conserved across species and argue that work in Drosophila will provide valuable cellular and molecular insight into glial engulfment activity in mammals.

  15. Visualization of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in live Drosophila egg chambers

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anupma; Traub, Linton M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In oviparous animals, clathrin-dependent endocytosis is often critical to stockpile a necessary supply of yolk within the maturing oocyte, which enables subsequent embryonic development. In the physically linked chains of maturing egg chambers within the Drosophila melanogaster ovary, a distinct, morphologically discernable, subset undergoes a massive burst clathrin-mediated endocytosis to accumulate yolk in a process termed vitellogenesis. Here, we describe how to prepare isolated ovaries to follow endocytosis, and detail approaches to follow live uptake of soluble reporters into vitellogenic Drosophila egg chambers. PMID:24947394

  16. Studying aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    Drosophila melanogaster represents one of the most important genetically accessible model organisms for aging research. Studies in flies have identified single gene mutations that influence lifespan and have characterized endocrine signaling interactions that control homeostasis systemically. Recent studies have focused on the effects of aging on specific tissues and physiological processes, providing a comprehensive picture of age-related tissue dysfunction and the loss of systemic homeostasis. Here we review methodological aspects of this work and highlight technical considerations when using Drosophila to study aging and age-related diseases.

  17. Chemical sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard

    2008-08-01

    Chemical sensing begins when peripheral receptor proteins recognise specific environmental stimuli and translate them into spatial and temporal patterns of sensory neuron activity. The chemosensory system of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has become a dominant model to understand this process, through its accessibility to a powerful combination of molecular, genetic and electrophysiological analysis. Recent results have revealed many surprises in the biology of peripheral chemosensation in Drosophila, including novel structural and signalling properties of the insect odorant receptors (ORs), combinatorial mechanisms of chemical recognition by the gustatory receptors (GRs), and the implication of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels as a novel class of chemosensory receptors.

  18. GUTs and TOEs

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-01-20

    Albert Einstein said that what he wanted to know was “God’s thoughts,” which is a metaphor for the ultimate and most basic rules of the universe. Once known, all other phenomena would then be a consequence of these simple rules. While modern science is far from that goal, we have some thoughts on how this inquiry might unfold. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln tells what we know about GUTs (grand unified theories) and TOEs (theories of everything).

  19. GUTs and TOEs

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Albert Einstein said that what he wanted to know was “God’s thoughts,” which is a metaphor for the ultimate and most basic rules of the universe. Once known, all other phenomena would then be a consequence of these simple rules. While modern science is far from that goal, we have some thoughts on how this inquiry might unfold. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln tells what we know about GUTs (grand unified theories) and TOEs (theories of everything).

  20. Comparative evaluation of the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Petkau, Kristina; Fast, David; Duggal, Aashna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to explore the molecular exchanges that occur between an animal intestine and associated microbes. Previous studies in Drosophila uncovered a sophisticated web of host responses to intestinal bacteria. The outcomes of these responses define critical events in the host, such as the establishment of immune responses, access to nutrients, and the rate of larval development. Despite our steady march towards illuminating the host machinery that responds to bacterial presence in the gut, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbial products that influence bacterial association with a fly host. We sequenced and characterized the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated microbes: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Acetobacter pasteurianus. For each species, we compared the genomes of Drosophila-associated strains to the genomes of strains isolated from alternative sources. We found that environmental Lactobacillus strains readily associated with adult Drosophila and were similar to fly isolates in terms of genome organization. In contrast, we identified a strain of A. pasteurianus that apparently fails to associate with adult Drosophila due to an inability to grow on fly nutrient food. Comparisons between association competent and incompetent A. pasteurianus strains identified a short list of candidate genes that may contribute to survival on fly medium. Many of the gene products unique to fly-associated strains have established roles in the stabilization of host-microbe interactions. These data add to a growing body of literature that examines the microbial perspective of host-microbe relationships. PMID:27493201

  1. Symmetry Breaking During Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Siegfried; Lynch, Jeremy A.

    2009-01-01

    The orthogonal axes of Drosophila are established during oogenesis through a hierarchical series of symmetry-breaking steps, most of which can be traced back to asymmetries inherent in the architecture of the ovary. Oogenesis begins with the formation of a germline cyst of 16 cells connected by ring canals. Two of these 16 cells have four ring canals, whereas the others have fewer. The first symmetry-breaking step is the selection of one of these two cells to become the oocyte. Subsequently, the germline cyst becomes surrounded by somatic follicle cells to generate individual egg chambers. The second symmetry-breaking step is the posterior positioning of the oocyte within the egg chamber, a process mediated by adhesive interactions with a special group of somatic cells. Posterior oocyte positioning is accompanied by a par gene-dependent repolarization of the microtubule network, which establishes the posterior cortex of the oocyte. The next two steps of symmetry breaking occur during midoogenesis after the volume of the oocyte has increased about 10-fold. First, a signal from the oocyte specifies posterior follicle cells, polarizing a symmetric prepattern present within the follicular epithelium. Second, the posterior follicle cells send a signal back to the oocyte, which leads to a second repolarization of the oocyte microtubule network and the asymmetric migration of the oocyte nucleus. This process again requires the par genes. The repolarization of the microtubule network results in the transport of bicoid and oskar mRNAs, the anterior and posterior determinants, respectively, of the embryonic axis, to opposite poles of the oocyte. The asymmetric positioning of the oocyte nucleus defines a cortical region of the oocyte where gurken mRNA is localized, thus breaking the dorsal–ventral symmetry of the egg and embryo. PMID:20066085

  2. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  3. Metagenomic Surveys of Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Saha, Sudipto; Das, Santasabuj

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota of higher vertebrates is host-specific. The number and diversity of the organisms residing within the gut ecosystem are defined by physiological and environmental factors, such as host genotype, habitat, and diet. Recently, culture-independent sequencing techniques have added a new dimension to the study of gut microbiota and the challenge to analyze the large volume of sequencing data is increasingly addressed by the development of novel computational tools and methods. Interestingly, gut microbiota maintains a constant relative abundance at operational taxonomic unit (OTU) levels and altered bacterial abundance has been associated with complex diseases such as symptomatic atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the study of gut microbial population has emerged as an important field of research in order to ultimately achieve better health. In addition, there is a spontaneous, non-linear, and dynamic interaction among different bacterial species residing in the gut. Thus, predicting the influence of perturbed microbe–microbe interaction network on health can aid in developing novel therapeutics. Here, we summarize the population abundance of gut microbiota and its variation in different clinical states, computational tools available to analyze the pyrosequencing data, and gut microbe–microbe interaction networks. PMID:26184859

  4. Drosophila neurotactin mediates heterophilic cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Barthalay, Y; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R; de la Escalera, S; Jiménez, F; Piovant, M

    1990-01-01

    Neurotactin is a 135 kd membrane glycoprotein which consists of a core protein, with an apparent molecular weight of 120 kd, and of N-linked oligosaccharides. In vivo, the protein can be phosphorylated in presence of radioactive orthophosphate. Neurotactin expression in the larval CNS and in primary embryonic cell cultures suggests that it behaves as a contact molecule between neurons or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy studies reveal that neurotactin is uniformly expressed along the areas of contacts between cells, without, however, being restricted to a particular type of junction. It putative adhesive properties have been tested by transfecting non adhesive Drosophila S2 cells with neurotactin cDNA. Heat shocked transfected cells do not aggregate, suggesting that neurotactin does not mediate homophilic cell adhesion. However, these transfected cells bind to a subpopulation of embryonic cells which probably possess a related ligand. The location at cellular junctions between specific neurons or epithelial cells, the heterophilic binding to a putative ligand and the ability to be phosphorylated are consistent with the suggestion that neurotactin functions as an adhesion molecule. Images Fig.1 Fig.2 Fig.3 Fig.4 Fig.5 PMID:2120048

  5. Collective synchronization of divisions in Drosophila development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergassola, Massimo

    Mitoses in the early development of most metazoans are rapid and synchronized across the entire embryo. While diffusion is too slow, in vitro experiments have shown that waves of the cell-cycle regulator Cdk1 can transfer information rapidly across hundreds of microns. However, the signaling dynamics and the physical properties of chemical waves during embryonic development remain unclear. We develop FRET biosensors for the activity of Cdk1 and the checkpoint kinase Chk1 in Drosophila embryos and exploit them to measure waves in vivo. We demonstrate that Cdk1 chemical waves control mitotic waves and that their speed is regulated by the activity of Cdk1 during the S-phase (and not mitosis). We quantify the progressive slowdown of the waves with developmental cycles and identify its underlying control mechanism by the DNA replication checkpoint through the Chk1/Wee1 pathway. The global dynamics of the mitotic signaling network illustrates a novel control principle: the S-phase activity of Cdk1 regulates the speed of the mitotic wave, while the Cdk1 positive feedback ensures an invariantly rapid onset of mitosis. Mathematical modeling captures the speed of the waves and predicts a fundamental distinction between the S-phase Cdk1 trigger waves and the mitotic phase waves, which is illustrated by embryonic ablation experiments. In collaboration with Victoria Deneke1, Anna Melbinger2, and Stefano Di Talia1 1 Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center 2 Department of Physics, University of California San Diego.

  6. Axon-glial interactions at the Drosophila CNS midline.

    PubMed

    Crews, Stephen T

    2010-01-01

    The glia that reside at the midline of the Drosophila CNS are an important embryonic signaling center and also wrap the axons that cross the CNS. The development of the midline glia (MG) is characterized by migration, ensheathment, subdivision of axon commissures, apoptosis, and the extension of glial processes. All of these events are characterized by cell-cell contact between MG and adjacent neurons. Cell adhesion and signaling proteins that mediate different aspects of MG development and MG-neuron interactions have been identified. This provides a foundation for ultimately obtaining an integrated picture of how the MG assemble into a characteristic axonal support structure in the CNS.

  7. Gut Microbiota: The Brain Peacekeeper.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chunlong; Yang, Yuxiang; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulates intestinal and extraintestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may also regulate brain function and behavior. Results from animal models indicate that disturbances in the composition and functionality of some microbiota members are associated with neurophysiological disorders, strengthening the idea of a microbiota-gut-brain axis and the role of microbiota as a "peacekeeper" in the brain health. Here, we review recent discoveries on the role of the gut microbiota in central nervous system-related diseases. We also discuss the emerging concept of the bidirectional regulation by the circadian rhythm and gut microbiota, and the potential role of the epigenetic regulation in neuronal cell function. Microbiome studies are also highlighted as crucial in the development of targeted therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  8. Yogurt and gut function.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Oskar; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Russell, Robert M

    2004-08-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have been published on the health effects of yogurt and the bacterial cultures used in the production of yogurt. In the United States, these lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) include Lactobacillus and Streptococcus species. The benefits of yogurt and LAB on gastrointestinal health have been investigated in animal models and, occasionally, in human subjects. Some studies using yogurt, individual LAB species, or both showed promising health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, diarrheal diseases, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Patients with any of these conditions could possibly benefit from the consumption of yogurt. The benefits of yogurt consumption to gastrointestinal function are most likely due to effects mediated through the gut microflora, bowel transit, and enhancement of gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune responses. Although substantial evidence currently exists to support a beneficial effect of yogurt consumption on gastrointestinal health, there is inconsistency in reported results, which may be due to differences in the strains of LAB used, in routes of administration, or in investigational procedures or to the lack of objective definition of "gut health." Further well-designed, controlled human studies of adequate duration are needed to confirm or extend these findings.

  9. Heritable Endosymbionts of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, Mariana; Castrezana, Sergio J.; Nankivell, Becky J.; Estes, Anne M.; Markow, Therese A.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    Although heritable microorganisms are increasingly recognized as widespread in insects, no systematic screens for such symbionts have been conducted in Drosophila species (the primary insect genetic models for studies of evolution, development, and innate immunity). Previous efforts screened relatively few Drosophila lineages, mainly for Wolbachia. We conducted an extensive survey of potentially heritable endosymbionts from any bacterial lineage via PCR screens of mature ovaries in 181 recently collected fly strains representing 35 species from 11 species groups. Due to our fly sampling methods, however, we are likely to have missed fly strains infected with sex ratio-distorting endosymbionts. Only Wolbachia and Spiroplasma, both widespread in insects, were confirmed as symbionts. These findings indicate that in contrast to some other insect groups, other heritable symbionts are uncommon in Drosophila species, possibly reflecting a robust innate immune response that eliminates many bacteria. A more extensive survey targeted these two symbiont types through diagnostic PCR in 1225 strains representing 225 species from 32 species groups. Of these, 19 species were infected by Wolbachia while only 3 species had Spiroplasma. Several new strains of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were discovered, including ones divergent from any reported to date. The phylogenetic distribution of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:16783009

  10. The role of gut microbiota in the gut-brain axis: current challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; D'Souza, Roshan; Hong, Seong-Tshool

    2013-06-01

    Brain and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are intimately connected to form a bidirectional neurohumoral communication system. The communication between gut and brain, knows as the gut-brain axis, is so well established that the functional status of gut is always related to the condition of brain. The researches on the gut-brain axis were traditionally focused on the psychological status affecting the function of the GI tract. However, recent evidences showed that gut microbiota communicates with the brain via the gut-brain axis to modulate brain development and behavioral phenotypes. These recent findings on the new role of gut microbiota in the gut-brain axis implicate that gut microbiota could associate with brain functions as well as neurological diseases via the gut-brain axis. To elucidate the role of gut microbiota in the gut-brain axis, precise identification of the composition of microbes constituting gut microbiota is an essential step. However, identification of microbes constituting gut microbiota has been the main technological challenge currently due to massive amount of intestinal microbes and the difficulties in culture of gut microbes. Current methods for identification of microbes constituting gut microbiota are dependent on omics analysis methods by using advanced high tech equipment. Here, we review the association of gut microbiota with the gut-brain axis, including the pros and cons of the current high throughput methods for identification of microbes constituting gut microbiota to elucidate the role of gut microbiota in the gut-brain axis.

  11. Drosophila type IV collagen mutation associates with immune system activation and intestinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Márton; Kiss, András A; Radics, Monika; Popovics, Nikoletta; Hermesz, Edit; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-01-01

    The basal lamina (BM) contains numerous components with a predominance of type IV collagens. Clinical manifestations associated with mutations of the human COL4A1 gene include perinatal cerebral hemorrhage and porencephaly, hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps (HANAC), ocular dysgenesis, myopathy, Walker–Warburg syndrome and systemic tissue degeneration. In Drosophila, the phenotype associated with dominant temperature sensitive mutations of col4a1 include severe myopathy resulting from massive degradation of striated muscle fibers, and in the gut, degeneration of circular visceral muscle cells and epithelial cells following detachment from the BM. In order to determine the consequences of altered BMfunctions due to aberrant COL4A1 protein, we have carried out a series of tests using Drosophila DTS-L3 mutants from our allelic series of col4a1 mutations with confirmed degeneration of various cell types and lowest survival rate among the col4a1 mutant lines at restrictive temperature. Results demonstrated epithelial cell degeneration in the gut, shortened gut, enlarged midgut with multiple diverticulae, intestinal dysfunction and shortened life span. Midgut immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed altered expression and distribution of BM components integrin PSI and PSII alpha subunits, laminin gamma 1, and COL4A1 both in larvae and adults. Global gene expression analysis revealed activation of the effector AMP genes of the primary innate immune system including Metchnikowin, Diptericin, Diptericin B, and edin that preceded morphological changes. Attacin::GFP midgut expression pattern further supported these changes. An increase in ROS production and changes in gut bacterial flora were also noted and may have further enhanced an immune response. The phenotypic features of Drosophila col4a1 mutants confirmed an essential role for type IV collagen in maintaining epithelial integrity, gut morphology and intestinal function and suggest that

  12. Biases in Drosophila melanogaster protein trap screens

    PubMed Central

    Aleksic, Jelena; Lazic, Ranko; Müller, Ilka; Russell, Steven R; Adryan, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Background The ability to localise or follow endogenous proteins in real time in vivo is of tremendous utility for cell biology or systems biology studies. Protein trap screens utilise the random genomic insertion of a transposon-borne artificial reporter exon (e.g. encoding the green fluorescent protein, GFP) into an intron of an endogenous gene to generate a fluorescent fusion protein. Despite recent efforts aimed at achieving comprehensive coverage of the genes encoded in the Drosophila genome, the repertoire of genes that yield protein traps is still small. Results We analysed the collection of available protein trap lines in Drosophila melanogaster and identified potential biases that are likely to restrict genome coverage in protein trap screens. The protein trap screens investigated here primarily used P-element vectors and thus exhibit some of the same positional biases associated with this transposon that are evident from the comprehensive Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. We further found that protein trap target genes usually exhibit broad and persistent expression during embryonic development, which is likely to facilitate better detection. In addition, we investigated the likely influence of the GFP exon on host protein structure and found that protein trap insertions have a significant bias for exon-exon boundaries that encode disordered protein regions. 38.8% of GFP insertions land in disordered protein regions compared with only 23.4% in the case of non-trapping P-element insertions landing in coding sequence introns (p < 10-4). Interestingly, even in cases where protein domains are predicted, protein trap insertions frequently occur in regions encoding surface exposed areas that are likely to be functionally neutral. Considering the various biases observed, we predict that less than one third of intron-containing genes are likely to be amenable to trapping by the existing methods. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that the utility of P

  13. Biases in Drosophila melanogaster protein trap screens.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Jelena; Lazic, Ranko; Müller, Ilka; Russell, Steven R; Adryan, Boris

    2009-05-28

    The ability to localise or follow endogenous proteins in real time in vivo is of tremendous utility for cell biology or systems biology studies. Protein trap screens utilise the random genomic insertion of a transposon-borne artificial reporter exon (e.g. encoding the green fluorescent protein, GFP) into an intron of an endogenous gene to generate a fluorescent fusion protein. Despite recent efforts aimed at achieving comprehensive coverage of the genes encoded in the Drosophila genome, the repertoire of genes that yield protein traps is still small. We analysed the collection of available protein trap lines in Drosophila melanogaster and identified potential biases that are likely to restrict genome coverage in protein trap screens. The protein trap screens investigated here primarily used P-element vectors and thus exhibit some of the same positional biases associated with this transposon that are evident from the comprehensive Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. We further found that protein trap target genes usually exhibit broad and persistent expression during embryonic development, which is likely to facilitate better detection. In addition, we investigated the likely influence of the GFP exon on host protein structure and found that protein trap insertions have a significant bias for exon-exon boundaries that encode disordered protein regions. 38.8% of GFP insertions land in disordered protein regions compared with only 23.4% in the case of non-trapping P-element insertions landing in coding sequence introns (p < 10(-4)). Interestingly, even in cases where protein domains are predicted, protein trap insertions frequently occur in regions encoding surface exposed areas that are likely to be functionally neutral. Considering the various biases observed, we predict that less than one third of intron-containing genes are likely to be amenable to trapping by the existing methods. Our analyses suggest that the utility of P-element vectors for protein trap screens

  14. Microinjection wound assay and in vivo localization of epidermal wound response reporters in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Michelle T; Patterson, Rachel A; Li, Wilson; McGinnis, William

    2013-11-01

    The Drosophila embryo develops a robust epidermal layer that serves both to protect the internal cells from a harsh external environment as well as to maintain cellular homeostasis. Puncture injury with glass needles provides a direct method to trigger a rapid epidermal wound response that activates wound transcriptional reporters, which can be visualized by a localized reporter signal in living embryos or larvae. Puncture or laser injury also provides signals that promote the recruitment of hemocytes to the wound site. Surprisingly, severe (through and through) puncture injury in late stage embryos only rarely disrupts normal embryonic development, as greater than 90% of such wounded embryos survive to adulthood when embryos are injected in an oil medium that minimizes immediate leakage of hemolymph from puncture sites. The wound procedure does require micromanipulation of the Drosophila embryos, including manual alignment of the embryos on agar plates and transfer of the aligned embryos to microscope slides. The Drosophila epidermal wound response assay provides a quick system to test the genetic requirements of a variety of biological functions that promote wound healing, as well as a way to screen for potential chemical compounds that promote wound healing. The short life cycle and easy culturing routine make Drosophila a powerful model organism. Drosophila clean wound healing appears to coordinate the epidermal regenerative response, with the innate immune response, in ways that are still under investigation, which provides an excellent system to find conserved regulatory mechanisms common to Drosophila and mammalian epidermal wounding.

  15. Automated multidimensional image analysis reveals a role for Abl in embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Tamada, Masako; Lee, Eun J; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2014-07-01

    The embryonic epidermis displays a remarkable ability to repair wounds rapidly. Embryonic wound repair is driven by the evolutionary conserved redistribution of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins around the wound. Drosophila has emerged as a model to screen for factors implicated in wound closure. However, genetic screens have been limited by the use of manual analysis methods. We introduce MEDUSA, a novel image-analysis tool for the automated quantification of multicellular and molecular dynamics from time-lapse confocal microscopy data. We validate MEDUSA by quantifying wound closure in Drosophila embryos, and we show that the results of our automated analysis are comparable to analysis by manual delineation and tracking of the wounds, while significantly reducing the processing time. We demonstrate that MEDUSA can also be applied to the investigation of cellular behaviors in three and four dimensions. Using MEDUSA, we find that the conserved nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Abelson (Abl) contributes to rapid embryonic wound closure. We demonstrate that Abl plays a role in the organization of filamentous actin and the redistribution of the junctional protein β-catenin at the wound margin during embryonic wound repair. Finally, we discuss different models for the role of Abl in the regulation of actin architecture and adhesion dynamics at the wound margin.

  16. BMP signaling controls buckling forces to modulate looping morphogenesis of the gut.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Nandan L; Mahadevan, L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2017-02-28

    Looping of the initially straight embryonic gut tube is an essential aspect of intestinal morphogenesis, permitting proper placement of the lengthy small intestine within the confines of the body cavity. The formation of intestinal loops is highly stereotyped within a given species and results from differential-growth-driven mechanical buckling of the gut tube as it elongates against the constraint of a thin, elastic membranous tissue, the dorsal mesentery. Although the physics of this process has been studied, the underlying biology has not. Here, we show that BMP signaling plays a critical role in looping morphogenesis of the avian small intestine. We first exploited differences between chicken and zebra finch gut morphology to identify the BMP pathway as a promising candidate to regulate differential growth in the gut. Next, focusing on the developing chick small intestine, we determined that Bmp2 expressed in the dorsal mesentery establishes differential elongation rates between the gut tube and mesentery, thereby regulating the compressive forces that buckle the gut tube into loops. Consequently, the number and tightness of loops in the chick small intestine can be increased or decreased directly by modulation of BMP activity in the small intestine. In addition to providing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal development, our findings provide an example of how biochemical signals act on tissue-level mechanics to drive organogenesis, and suggest a possible mechanism by which they can be modulated to achieve distinct morphologies through evolution.

  17. Modeling Human Cancers in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sonoshita, M; Cagan, R L

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that affects multiple organs. Whole-body animal models provide important insights into oncology that can lead to clinical impact. Here, we review novel concepts that Drosophila studies have established for cancer biology, drug discovery, and patient therapy. Genetic studies using Drosophila have explored the roles of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that when dysregulated promote cancer formation, making Drosophila a useful model to study multiple aspects of transformation. Not limited to mechanism analyses, Drosophila has recently been showing its value in facilitating drug development. Flies offer rapid, efficient platforms by which novel classes of drugs can be identified as candidate anticancer leads. Further, we discuss the use of Drosophila as a platform to develop therapies for individual patients by modeling the tumor's genetic complexity. Drosophila provides both a classical and a novel tool to identify new therapeutics, complementing other more traditional cancer tools. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal “superorganism” seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host’s immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of “metabolic endotoxemia”, leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use. PMID:25473159

  19. The human gut mobile metagenome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Using the culture independent TRACA system in conjunction with a comparative metagenomic approach, we have recently explored the pool of plasmids associated with the human gut mobile metagenome. This revealed that some plasmids or plasmid families are present in the gut microbiomes of geographically isolated human hosts with a broad global distribution (America, Japan and Europe), and are potentially unique to the human gut microbiome. Functions encoded by the most widely distributed plasmid (pTRACA22) were found to be enriched in the human gut microbiome when compared to microbial communities from other environments, and of particular interest was the increased prevalence of a putative RelBE toxin-antitoxin (TA) addiction module. Subsequent analysis revealed that this was most closely related to putative TA modules from gut associated bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, but homologues of the RelE toxin were associated with all major bacterial divisions comprising the human gut microbiota. In this addendum, functions of the gut mobile metagenome are considered from the perspective of the human host, and within the context of the hologenome theory of human evolution. In doing so, our original analysis is also extended to include the gut metagenomes of a further 124 individuals comprising the METAHIT dataset. Differences in the incidence and relative abundance of pTRACA22 and associated TA modules between healthy individuals and those with inflammatory bowel diseases are explored, and potential functions of pTRACA22 type RelBE modules in the human gut microbiome are discussed. PMID:21468227

  20. Aging studies in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Wang, Cecilia; Spangler, Edward; Zhan, Ming; Zou, Sige

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila is a genetically tractable system ideal for investigating the mechanisms of aging and developing interventions for promoting healthy aging. Here we describe methods commonly used in Drosophila aging research. These include basic approaches for preparation of diets and measurements of lifespan, food intake, and reproductive output. We also describe some commonly used assays to measure changes in physiological and behavioral functions of Drosophila in aging, such as stress resistance and locomotor activity.

  1. Aging Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Wang, Cecilia; Spangler, Edward; Zhan, Ming; Zou, Sige

    2015-01-01

    Summary Drosophila is a genetically tractable system ideal for investigating the mechanisms of aging and developing interventions for promoting healthy aging. Here we describe methods commonly used in Drosophila aging research. These include basic approaches for preparation of diets and measurements of lifespan, food intake and reproductive output. We also describe some commonly used assays to measure changes in physiological and behavioral functions of Drosophila in aging, such as stress resistance and locomotor activity. PMID:23929099

  2. Active Hematopoietic Hubs in Drosophila Adults Generate Hemocytes and Contribute to Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Saikat; Singh, Arashdeep; Mandal, Sudip; Mandal, Lolitika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Blood cell development in Drosophila shares significant similarities with vertebrate. The conservation ranges from biphasic mode of hematopoiesis to signaling molecules crucial for progenitor cell formation, maintenance, and differentiation. Primitive hematopoiesis in Drosophila ensues in embryonic head mesoderm, whereas definitive hematopoiesis happens in larval hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland. This organ, with the onset of pupation, ruptures to release hemocytes into circulation. It is believed that the adult lacks a hematopoietic organ and survives on the contribution of both embryonic and larval hematopoiesis. However, our studies revealed a surge of blood cell development in the dorsal abdominal hemocyte clusters of adult fly. These active hematopoietic hubs are capable of blood cell specification and can respond to bacterial challenges. The presence of progenitors and differentiated hemocytes embedded in a functional network of Laminin A and Pericardin within this hematopoietic hub projects it as a simple version of the vertebrate bone marrow. PMID:25959225

  3. Zygotic expression of the pebble locus is required for cytokinesis during the postblastoderm mitoses of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hime, G; Saint, R

    1992-01-01

    Mutations at the pebble locus of Drosophila melanogaster result in embryonic lethality. Examination of homozygous mutant embryos at the end of embryogenesis revealed the presence of fewer and larger cells which contained enlarged nuclei. Characterization of the embryonic cell cycles using DAPI, propidium iodide, anti-tubulin and anti-spectrin staining showed that the first thirteen rapid syncytial nuclear divisions proceeded normally in pebble mutant embryos. Following cellularization, the postblastoderm nuclear divisions occurred (mitoses 14, 15 and 16), but cytokinesis was never observed. Multinucleate cells and duplicate mitotic figures were seen within single cells at the time of the cycle 15 mitoses. We conclude that zygotic expression of the pebble gene is required for cytokinesis following cellularization during Drosophila embryogenesis. We postulate that developmental regulation of zygotic transcription of the pebble gene is a consequence of the transition from syncytial to cellular mitoses during cycle 14 of embryogenesis.

  4. A fatty gut feeling.

    PubMed

    Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    The absorptive epithelium of the proximal small intestine converts oleic acid released during fat digestion into oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endogenous high-affinity agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α). OEA interacts with this receptor to cause a state of satiety characterized by prolonged inter-meal intervals and reduced feeding frequency. The two main branches of the autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, contribute to this effect: the former by enabling OEA mobilization in the gut and the latter by relaying the OEA signal to brain structures, such as the hypothalamus, that are involved in feeding regulation. OEA signaling may be a key component of the physiological system devoted to the monitoring of dietary fat intake, and its dysfunction might contribute to overweight and obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gut pain & visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain is a highly complex entity whose experience is variable in health and disease. It can occur in patients with organic disease and also in those without any readily identifiable structural or biochemical abnormality such as in the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the culpable underlying mechanisms significant knowledge gaps remain, representing a significant unmet need in gastroenterology. A key, but not universal, pathological feature is that patients with FGID often display heightened sensitivity to experimental gut stimulation, termed visceral hypersensitivity. A plethora of factors have been proposed to account for this epiphenomenon including peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, aberrant central processing, genetic, psychological and abnormalities within the stress responsive systems. Further research is needed, bringing together complementary research themes from a diverse array of academic disciplines ranging from gastroenterology to nociceptive physiology to functional neuro-imaging, to address this unmet need. PMID:26516496

  6. Gut feelings about diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Laferrère, Blandine

    2013-01-01

    Studies of patients going into diabetes remission after gastric bypass surgery have demonstrated the important role of the gut in glucose control. The improvement of type 2 diabetes after gastric bypass surgery occurs via weight dependent and weight independent mechanisms. The rapid improvement of glucose levels within days after the surgery, in relation to change of meal pattern, rapid nutrient transit, enhanced incretin release and improved incretin effect on insulin secretion, suggest mechanisms independent of weight loss. Alternatively, insulin sensitivity improves over time as a function of weight loss. The role of bile acids and microbiome in the metabolic improvement after bariatric surgery remains to be determined. While most patients after bariatric surgery experienced sustained weight loss and improved metabolism, small scale studies have shown weight regain and diabetes relapse, the mechanisms of which remain unknown. PMID:22386248

  7. Flipped GUT inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Gonzalo, Tomás E.; Harz, Julia; Huang, Wei-Chih

    2015-03-23

    We analyse the prospects for constructing hybrid models of inflation that provide a dynamical realisation of the apparent closeness between the supersymmetric GUT scale and the possible scale of cosmological inflation. In the first place, we consider models based on the flipped SU(5)×U(1) gauge group, which has no magnetic monopoles. In one model, the inflaton is identified with a sneutrino field, and in the other model it is a gauge singlet. In both cases we find regions of the model parameter spaces that are compatible with the experimental magnitudes of the scalar perturbations, A{sub s}, and the tilt in the scalar perturbation spectrum, n{sub s}, as well as with an indicative upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar perturbation ratio, r. We also discuss embeddings of these models into SO(10), which is broken at a higher scale so that its monopoles are inflated away.

  8. A fatty gut feeling

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The absorptive epithelium of the proximal small intestine converts oleic acid released during fat digestion into oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endogenous high-affinity agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α). OEA interacts with this receptor to cause a state of satiety characterized by prolonged inter-meal intervals and reduced feeding frequency. The two main branches of the autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, contribute to this effect: the former by enabling OEA mobilization in the gut and the latter by relaying the OEA signal to brain structures, such as the hypothalamus, that are involved in feeding regulation. OEA signaling may be a key component of the physiological system devoted to the monitoring of dietary fat intake, and its dysfunction might contribute to overweight and obesity. PMID:23567058

  9. The gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Actis, Giovanni C

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery and use of the microscope in the 17(th) century, we know that we host trillions of micro-organisms mostly in the form of bacteria indwelling the "barrier organs" skin, gut, and airways. They exert regulatory functions, are in a continuous dialogue with the intestinal epithelia, influence energy handling, produce nutrients, and may cause diabetes and obesity. The human microbiome has developed by modulating or avoiding inflammatory responses; the host senses bacterial presence through cell surface sensors (the Toll-like receptors) as well as by refining mucous barriers as passive defense mechanisms. The cell density and composition of the microbiome are variable and multifactored. The way of delivery establishes the type of initial flora; use of antibiotics is another factor; diet composition after weaning will shape the adult's microbiome composition, depending on the subject's life-style. Short-chain fatty acids participate in the favoring action exerted by microbiome in the pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes and obesity. Clinical observation has pinpointed a sharp rise of various dysimmune conditions in the last decades, including IBD and rheumatoid arthritis, changes that outweigh the input of simple heritability. It is nowadays proposed that the microbiome, incapable to keep up with the changes of our life-style and feeding sources in the past few decades might have contributed to these immune imbalances, finding itself inadequate to handle the changed gut environment. Another pathway to pathology is the rise of directly pathogenic phyla within a given microbiome: growth of adherent E. coli, of C. concisus, and of C. jejuni, might be examples of causes of local enteropathy, whereas the genus Prevotella copri is now suspected to be linked to rise of arthritic disorders. Inflammasomes are required to shape a non colitogenic flora. Treatment of IBD and infectious enteritides by the use of fecal transplant is warranted by this knowledge.

  10. Gut Protozoa: Friends or Foes of the Human Gut Microbiota?

    PubMed

    Chabé, Magali; Lokmer, Ana; Ségurel, Laure

    2017-09-01

    The importance of the gut microbiota for human health has sparked a strong interest in the study of the factors that shape its composition and diversity. Despite the growing evidence suggesting that helminths and protozoa significantly interact with gut bacteria, gut microbiome studies remain mostly focused on prokaryotes and on populations living in industrialized countries that typically have a low parasite burden. We argue that protozoa, like helminths, represent an important factor to take into account when studying the gut microbiome, and that their presence - especially considering their long coevolutionary history with humans - may be beneficial. From this perspective, we examine the relationship between the protozoa and their hosts, as well as their relevance for public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Studying host-microbiota mutualism in Drosophila: Harnessing the power of gnotobiotic flies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dali; Storelli, Gilles; Mitchell, Mélanie; Leulier, François

    2015-01-01

    The complex interaction between the metazoan host and its commensal gut microbiota is one of the essential features of symbiosis in the animal kingdom. As there is a burgeoning interest to decipher the molecular dialog that shapes host-microbiota mutualism, the use of gnotobiotic model organism becomes an imperative approach to unambiguously parse the specific contributions to such interaction from the microbiome. In this review, we focus on several remarkable gnotobiotic studies in Drosophila that functionally depicted how the gut microbes can alter host physiology and behavior through transcriptomic regulation, hormonal control, and diet modification. These results in concert illustrate that the gnotobiotic flies mono- or poly-associated with members of its gut microbiota deliver a versatile and powerful model that is amenable to different types of studies ranging from classic genetics to large-scale systems approaches.

  12. Ion and solute transport by Prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P; Linser, Paul; Cabrero, Pablo; Thompson, James; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2012-04-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO(3)(-) transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (Prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl(-)/nHCO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-)/oxalate(2-)) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes.

  13. Ion and solute transport by prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren R.; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P.; Linser, Paul J.; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A. T.; Romero, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO3− transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl−/nHCO3−, Cl−/SO42− and Cl−/oxalate2−) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes. PMID:22321763

  14. Functional Evolution of cis-Regulatory Modules at a Homeotic Gene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Benjamin J.; Bae, Esther; Tran, Diana A.; Shur, Andrey S.; Allen, John M.; Rau, Christoph; Bender, Welcome; Fisher, William W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Drewell, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    It is a long-held belief in evolutionary biology that the rate of molecular evolution for a given DNA sequence is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. This belief holds true for the protein-coding homeotic (Hox) genes originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the Hox genes in Drosophila embryos is essential for body patterning and is controlled by an extensive array of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). How the regulatory modules functionally evolve in different species is not clear. A comparison of the CRMs for the Abdominal-B gene from different Drosophila species reveals relatively low levels of overall sequence conservation. However, embryonic enhancer CRMs from other Drosophila species direct transgenic reporter gene expression in the same spatial and temporal patterns during development as their D. melanogaster orthologs. Bioinformatic analysis reveals the presence of short conserved sequences within defined CRMs, representing gap and pair-rule transcription factor binding sites. One predicted binding site for the gap transcription factor KRUPPEL in the IAB5 CRM was found to be altered in Superabdominal (Sab) mutations. In Sab mutant flies, the third abdominal segment is transformed into a copy of the fifth abdominal segment. A model for KRUPPEL-mediated repression at this binding site is presented. These findings challenge our current understanding of the relationship between sequence evolution at the molecular level and functional activity of a CRM. While the overall sequence conservation at Drosophila CRMs is not distinctive from neighboring genomic regions, functionally critical transcription factor binding sites within embryonic enhancer CRMs are highly conserved. These results have implications for understanding mechanisms of gene expression during embryonic development, enhancer function, and the molecular evolution of eukaryotic regulatory modules. PMID:19893611

  15. Identification of Drosophila Mutants Affecting Defense to an Entomopathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-Ling; Wang, Jonathan B.; Brown, Markus A.; Euerle, Christopher; St. Leger, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi cause the majority of insect disease. However, to date attempts to model host–fungal interactions with Drosophila have focused on opportunistic human pathogens. Here, we performed a screen of 2,613 mutant Drosophila lines to identify host genes affecting susceptibility to the natural insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae (Ma549). Overall, 241 (9.22%) mutant lines had altered resistance to Ma549. Life spans ranged from 3.0 to 6.2 days, with females being more susceptible than males in all lines. Speed of kill correlated with within-host growth and onset of sporulation, but total spore production is decoupled from host genotypes. Results showed that mutations affected the ability of Drosophila to restrain rather than tolerate infections and suggested trade-offs between antifungal and antibacterial genes affecting cuticle and gut structural barriers. Approximately, 13% of mutations where in genes previously associated with host pathogen interactions. These encoded fast-acting immune responses including coagulation, phagocytosis, encapsulation and melanization but not the slow-response induction of anti-fungal peptides. The non-immune genes impact a wide variety of biological functions, including behavioral traits. Many have human orthologs already implicated in human disorders; while others were mutations in protein and non-protein coding genes for which disease resistance was the first biological annotation. PMID:26202798

  16. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Early Embryonic Transcriptome of the Horseshoe Crab Tachypleus tridentatus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingliang; Wang, Chenying; Wang, Wei; Ji, Gubiao; Hu, Bin; Du, Mi; Liu, Guosheng; Li, Zengpeng; Wang, Weiyi; Lin, Xiangzhi; Zheng, Weibing; Chen, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is a unique marine species and a potential model for marine invertebrate. Limited genomic and transcriptional data are currently available to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the embryonic development of T. tridentatus. Here, we reported for the first time the de novo transcriptome assembly for T. tridentatus at embryonic developmental stage using Illumina RNA-seq platform. Approximate 38 million reads were obtained and further assembled into 133,212 unigenes. Sequence homology analysis against public databases revealed that 33,796 unigenes could be annotated with gene descriptions. Of the annotated unigenes, we identified a number of key components of several conserved metazoan signaling pathways (Hedgehog, Wnt, TGF-beta and Notch pathways) and other important regulatory genes involved in embryonic development. Targeted searching of Pax family genes which play critical roles in the formation of tissue and organ during embryonic development identified a complete set of Pax family genes. Moreover, the full length T. tridentatus Pax1/9a (TtPax1/9a) and Pax1/9b (TtPax1/9b) cDNA sequences were determined based on the transcriptome, demonstrating the immediate application of our database. Using quantitative real time PCR, we analyzed the expression patterns of TtPax1/9a and TtPax1/9b in different tissues of horseshoe crab. Taking advantage of Drosophila model, we further found that TtPax1/9b, but not TtPax1/9a, can partly rescue the Drosophila homolog Poxm dysfunction-caused lethality at the larval stage. Our study provides the embryonic transcriptome of T. tridentatus which could be immediately used for gene discovery and characterization, functional genomics studies in T. tridentatus. This transcriptome database will also facilitate the investigations of molecular mechanisms underlying embryonic development of T. tridentatus and other marine arthropods as well.

  17. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Early Embryonic Transcriptome of the Horseshoe Crab Tachypleus tridentatus

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Gubiao; Hu, Bin; Du, Mi; Liu, Guosheng; Li, Zengpeng; Wang, Weiyi; Lin, Xiangzhi; Zheng, Weibing; Chen, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is a unique marine species and a potential model for marine invertebrate. Limited genomic and transcriptional data are currently available to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the embryonic development of T. tridentatus. Here, we reported for the first time the de novo transcriptome assembly for T. tridentatus at embryonic developmental stage using Illumina RNA-seq platform. Approximate 38 million reads were obtained and further assembled into 133,212 unigenes. Sequence homology analysis against public databases revealed that 33,796 unigenes could be annotated with gene descriptions. Of the annotated unigenes, we identified a number of key components of several conserved metazoan signaling pathways (Hedgehog, Wnt, TGF-beta and Notch pathways) and other important regulatory genes involved in embryonic development. Targeted searching of Pax family genes which play critical roles in the formation of tissue and organ during embryonic development identified a complete set of Pax family genes. Moreover, the full length T. tridentatus Pax1/9a (TtPax1/9a) and Pax1/9b (TtPax1/9b) cDNA sequences were determined based on the transcriptome, demonstrating the immediate application of our database. Using quantitative real time PCR, we analyzed the expression patterns of TtPax1/9a and TtPax1/9b in different tissues of horseshoe crab. Taking advantage of Drosophila model, we further found that TtPax1/9b, but not TtPax1/9a, can partly rescue the Drosophila homolog Poxm dysfunction-caused lethality at the larval stage. Our study provides the embryonic transcriptome of T. tridentatus which could be immediately used for gene discovery and characterization, functional genomics studies in T. tridentatus. This transcriptome database will also facilitate the investigations of molecular mechanisms underlying embryonic development of T. tridentatus and other marine arthropods as well. PMID:26731763

  18. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xianxu; Tate, Rebecca E.; McKee, Mary L.; Capen, Diane E.; Zhang, Zhan; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry) is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold) in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR) and cardiac activity period (CAP) of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time) OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays an essential

  19. Beyond gut feelings: how the gut microbiota regulates blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Marques, Francine Z; Mackay, Charles R; Kaye, David M

    2017-08-24

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, and is estimated to cause 9.4 million deaths globally every year. The pathogenesis of hypertension is complex, but lifestyle factors such as diet are important contributors to the disease. High dietary intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with reduced blood pressure and lower cardiovascular mortality. A critical relationship between dietary intake and the composition of the gut microbiota has been described in the literature, and a growing body of evidence supports the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of blood pressure. In this Review, we describe the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota and its metabolites, including short-chain fatty acids, trimethylamine N-oxide, and lipopolysaccharides, act on downstream cellular targets to prevent or contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension. These effects have a direct influence on tissues such as the kidney, the endothelium, and the heart. Finally, we consider the role of the gut microbiota in resistant hypertension, the possible intergenerational effect of the gut microbiota on blood pressure regulation, and the promising therapeutic potential of gut microbiota modification to improve health and prevent disease.

  20. GUTs and supersymmetric GUTs in the very early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1982-10-01

    This talk is intended as background material for many of the other talks treating the possible applications of GUTs to the very early universe. I start with a review of the present theoretical and phenomenological status of GUTs before going on to raise some new issues for their prospective cosmological applications which arise in supersymmetric (susy) GUTs. The first section is an update on conventional GUTs, which is followed by a reminder of some of the motivations for going supersymmetric. There then follows a simple primer on susy and a discussion of the structure and phenomenology of simple sysy GUTs. Finally we come to the cosmological issues, including problems arising from the degeneracy of susy minima, baryosynthesis and supersymmetric inflation, the possibility that gravity is an essential complication in constructing susy GUTs and discussing their cosmology, and the related question of what mass range is allowed for the gravitino. Several parts of this write-up contain new material which has emerged either during the Workshop or subsequently. They are included here for completeness and the convenience of the prospective reader. Wherever possible, these anachronisms will be flagged so as to keep straight the historical record.

  1. An alternative domain near the nucleotide-binding site of Drosophila muscle myosin affects ATPase kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Becky M; Zhang, Shuxing; Suggs, Jennifer A; Swank, Douglas M; Littlefield, Kimberly P; Knowles, Aileen F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2005-10-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster expression of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms occurs by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The exon 7 domain is one of four variable regions in the catalytic head and is located near the nucleotide-binding site. To ascribe a functional role to this domain, we created two chimeric myosin isoforms (indirect flight isoform-exon 7a and embryonic-exon 7d) that differ from the native indirect flight muscle and embryonic body-wall muscle isoforms only in the exon 7 region. Germline transformation and subsequent expression of the chimeric myosins in the indirect flight muscle of myosin-null Drosophila allowed us to purify the myosin for in vitro studies and to assess in vivo structure and function of transgenic muscles. Intriguingly, in vitro experiments show the exon 7 domain modulates myosin ATPase activity but has no effect on actin filament velocity, a novel result compared to similar studies with other Drosophila variable exons. Transgenic flies expressing the indirect flight isoform-exon 7a have normal indirect flight muscle structure, and flight and jump ability. However, expression of the embryonic-exon 7d chimeric isoform yields flightless flies that show improvements in both the structural stability of the indirect flight muscle and in locomotor abilities as compared to flies expressing the embryonic isoform. Overall, our results suggest the exon 7 domain participates in the regulation of the attachment of myosin to actin in order to fine-tune the physiological properties of Drosophila myosin isoforms.

  2. Distinct populations of endoderm cells converge to generate the embryonic liver bud and ventral foregut tissues.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Kimberly D; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2005-04-01

    The location and movement of mammalian gut tissue progenitors, prior to the expression of tissue-specific genes, has been unknown, but this knowledge is essential to identify transitions that lead to cell type specification. To address this, we used vital dyes to label exposed anterior endoderm cells of early somite stage mouse embryos, cultured the embryos into the tissue bud phase of development, and determined the tissue fate of the dye labeled cells. This approach was performed at three embryonic stages that are prior to, or coincident with, foregut tissue patterning (1-3 somites, 4-6 somites, and 7-10 somites). Short-term labeling experiments tracked the movement of tissue progenitor cells during foregut closure. Surprisingly, we found that two distinct types of endoderm-progenitor cells, lateral and medial, arising from three spatially separated embryonic domains, converge to generate the epithelial cells of the liver bud. Whereas the lateral endoderm-progenitors give rise to descendants that are constrained in tissue fate and position along the anterior-posterior axis of the gut, the medial gut endoderm-progenitors give rise to descendants that stream along the anterior-posterior axis at the ventral midline and contribute to multiple gut tissues. The fate map reveals extensive morphogenetic movement of progenitors prior to tissue specification, it permits a detailed analysis of endoderm tissue patterning, and it illustrates that diverse progenitor domains can give rise to individual tissue cell types.

  3. Temperature sensation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Belinda; Garrity, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Animals use thermosensory systems to achieve optimal temperatures for growth and reproduction and to avoid damaging extremes. Thermoregulation is particularly challenging for small animals like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose body temperature rapidly changes in response to environmental temperature fluctuation. Recent work has uncovered some of the key molecules mediating fly thermosensation, including the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels TRPA1 and Painless, and the Gustatory Receptor Gr28b, an unanticipated thermosensory regulator normally associated with a different sensory modality. There is also evidence the Drosophila phototransduction cascade may have some role in thermosensory responses. Together, the fly's diverse thermosensory molecules act in an array of functionally distinct thermosensory neurons to drive a suite of complex, and often exceptionally thermosensitive, behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Drosophila by the dozen

    SciTech Connect

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  5. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  6. Gut Microbiota: The Brain Peacekeeper

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Chunlong; Yang, Yuxiang; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulates intestinal and extraintestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may also regulate brain function and behavior. Results from animal models indicate that disturbances in the composition and functionality of some microbiota members are associated with neurophysiological disorders, strengthening the idea of a microbiota–gut–brain axis and the role of microbiota as a “peacekeeper” in the brain health. Here, we review recent discoveries on the role of the gut microbiota in central nervous system-related diseases. We also discuss the emerging concept of the bidirectional regulation by the circadian rhythm and gut microbiota, and the potential role of the epigenetic regulation in neuronal cell function. Microbiome studies are also highlighted as crucial in the development of targeted therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27014255

  7. Sexual circuitry in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Auer, Thomas O; Benton, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The sexual behavior of Drosophila melanogaster is an outstanding paradigm to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of sophisticated animal actions. We discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the genetic hardwiring of the underlying neuronal circuitry, and how pertinent sensory cues are differentially detected and integrated in the male and female brain. We also consider how experience influences these circuits over short timescales, and the evolution of these pathways over longer timescales to endow species-specific sexual displays and responses.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila melanogaster muscle myosin heavy-chain gene

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Norbert K.; Singer, Phillip A.; Trinh, Kien; Nikkhoy, Massoud; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2007-01-01

    We show that a 2.6 kb fragment of the muscle myosin heavy-chain gene (Mhc) of Drosophila melanogaster (containing 458 base pairs of upstream sequence, the first exon, the first intron and the beginning of the second exon) drives expression in all muscles. Comparison of the minimal promoter to Mhc genes of ten Drosophila species identified putative regulatory elements in the upstream region and in the first intron. The first intron is required for expression in four small cells of the tergal depressor of the trochanter (jump) muscle and in the indirect flight muscle. The 3′ end of this intron is important for Mhc transcription in embryonic body wall muscle and contains AT–rich elements that are protected from DNase I digestion by nuclear proteins of Drosophila embryos. Sequences responsible for expression in embryonic, adult body wall and adult head muscles are present both within and outside the intron. Elements important for expression in leg muscles and in the large cells of the jump muscle flank the intron. We conclude that multiple transcriptional regulatory elements are responsible for Mhc expression in specific sets of Drosophila muscles. PMID:17194628

  9. Expression of the Drosophila homeobox gene, Distal-less supports an ancestral role in neural development

    PubMed Central

    Plavicki, Jessica S.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Boekhoff-Falk, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal-less (Dll) encodes a homeodomain transcription factor expressed in developing appendages of organisms throughout metazoan phylogeny. Based on earlier observations in the limbless nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the primitive chordate amphioxus, it was proposed that Dll had an ancestral function in nervous system development. Consistent with this hypothesis, Dll is necessary for the development of both peripheral and central components of the Drosophila olfactory system. Furthermore, vertebrate homologs of Dll, the Dlx genes, play critical roles in mammalian brain development. Results Using fluorescent immunohistochemistry of fixed samples and multiphoton microscopy of living Drosophila embryos we show that Dll is expressed in the embryonic, larval and adult CNS and PNS in embryonic and larval neurons, brain and ventral nerve cord (VNC) glia, as well as in PNS structures associated with chemosensation. In adult flies, Dll expression is expressed in the optic lobes, central brain regions and the antennal lobes. Conclusions Characterization of Dll expression in the developing nervous system supports a role of Dll in neural development and function and establishes an important basis for determining the specific functional roles of Dll in Drosophila development and for comparative studies of Drosophila Dll functions with those of its vertebrate counterparts. PMID:26472170

  10. A mutant O-GlcNAcase enriches Drosophila developmental regulators.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Nithya; Williamson, Ritchie; Mariappa, Daniel; Campbell, David G; Gourlay, Robert; Ferenbach, Andrew T; Aristotelous, Tonia; Hopkins-Navratilova, Iva; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2017-08-01

    Protein O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification of serines and threonines on nucleocytoplasmic proteins. It is cycled by the enzymes O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAc hydrolase (O-GlcNAcase or OGA). Genetic approaches in model organisms have revealed that protein O-GlcNAcylation is essential for early embryogenesis. The Drosophila melanogaster gene supersex combs (sxc), which encodes OGT, is a polycomb gene, whose null mutants display homeotic transformations and die at the pharate adult stage. However, the identities of the O-GlcNAcylated proteins involved and the underlying mechanisms linking these phenotypes to embryonic development are poorly understood. Identification of O-GlcNAcylated proteins from biological samples is hampered by the low stoichiometry of this modification and by limited enrichment tools. Using a catalytically inactive bacterial O-GlcNAcase mutant as a substrate trap, we have enriched the O-GlcNAc proteome of the developing Drosophila embryo, identifying, among others, known regulators of Hox genes as candidate conveyors of OGT function during embryonic development.

  11. Gut microbiome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mobarhan, Majid Ghayour; Ferns, Gordon A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome contributes approximately 2kg of the whole body weight, and recent studies suggest that gut microbiota has a profound effect on human metabolism, potentially contributing to several features of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of metabolic disorders that include central adiposity with visceral fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia and non-optimal blood pressure levels. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that around 20-25 percent of the world's adult population has metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the existing data linking gut microbiome with metabolic syndrome. Existing evidence from studies both in animals and humans support a link between gut microbiome and various components of metabolic syndrome. Possible pathways include involvement with energy homeostasis and metabolic processes, modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, interferences with the immune system, and interference with the renin-angiotensin system. Modification of gut microbiota via prebiotics, probiotics or other dietary interventions has provided evidence to support a possible beneficial effect of interventions targeting gut microbiota modulation to treat components or complications of metabolic syndrome.

  12. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  13. Gut Microbes, Diet, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hullar, Meredith A. J.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.

    2014-01-01

    An expanding body of evidence supports a role for gut microbes in the etiology of cancer. Previously, the focus was on identifying individual bacterial species that directly initiate or promote gastrointestinal malignancies; however, the capacity of gut microbes to influence systemic inflammation and other downstream pathways suggests that the gut microbial community may also affect risk of cancer in tissues outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Functional contributions of the gut microbiota that may influence cancer susceptibility in the broad sense include (1) harvesting otherwise inaccessible nutrients and/or sources of energy from the diet (i.e., fermentation of dietary fibers and resistant starch); (2) metabolism of xenobiotics, both potentially beneficial or detrimental (i.e., dietary constituents, drugs, carcinogens, etc.); (3) renewal of gut epithelial cells and maintenance of mucosal integrity; and (4) affecting immune system development and activity. Understanding the complex and dynamic interplay between the gut microbiome, host immune system, and dietary exposures may help elucidate mechanisms for carcinogenesis and guide future cancer prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:24114492

  14. Probiotics, gut microbiota and health.

    PubMed

    Butel, M-J

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is a huge complex ecosystem where microbiota, nutrients, and host cells interact extensively, a process crucial for the gut homeostasis and host development with a real partnership. The various bacterial communities that make up the gut microbiota have many functions including metabolic, barrier effect, and trophic functions. Hence, any dysbiosis could have negative consequences in terms of health and many diseases have been associated to impairment of the gut microbiota. These close relationships between gut microbiota, health, and disease, have led to great interest in using probiotics (i.e. live micro-organisms), or prebiotics (i.e. non-digestible substrates) to positively modulate the gut microbiota to prevent or treat some diseases. This review focuses on probiotics, their mechanisms of action, safety, and major health benefits. Health benefits remain to be proven in some indications, and further studies on the best strain(s), dose, and algorithm of administration to be used are needed. Nevertheless, probiotic administration seems to have a great potential in terms of health that justifies more research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Hybrid Lethal Systems in the Drosophila Melanogaster Species Complex. I. the Maternal Hybrid Rescue (Mhr) Gene of Drosophila Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, K.; Taira, T.; Watanabe, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid females from Drosophila simulans females X Drosophila melanogaster males die as embryos while hybrid males from the reciprocal cross die as late larvae. The other two classes are sterile adults. Letting C, X, and Y designate egg cytoplasm, X, and Y chromosomes, respectively, and subscripts m and s stand for melanogaster and simulans, C(m)X(m)Y(s) males are lethal in the larval stage and are rescued by the previously reported genes, Lhr (Lethal hybrid rescue) in simulans or Hmr (Hybrid male rescue) in melanogaster. We report here another rescue gene located on the second chromosome of simulans, mhr (maternal hybrid rescue) that, when present in the mother, rescues C(s)X(m)X(s) females from embryonic lethality. It has been postulated that the hybrids not carrying the X(s) like C(m)X(m)Y(s) males are larval lethal and that the hybrids carrying both the C(s) and the X(m) like C(s)X(m)X(s) females are embryonic lethal. According to these postulates C(s)X(m)Y(s) males (obtained by mating attached-X simulans females to melanogaster males) should be doubly lethal, at both embryo and larval stages. When both rescuing genes are present, Hmr in the father and mhr in the mother, males of this genotype are fully viable, as predicted. PMID:8436276

  16. Mechanisms and functions of Nrf2 signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pitoniak, Andrew; Bohmann, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    The Nrf2 transcription factor belongs to the Cap'n'collar family, named after the founding member of this group, the product of the Drosophila Cap'n'collar gene. The encoded protein, Cap'n'collar, abbreviated Cnc, offers a convenient and accessible model to study the structure, function, and biology of Nrf2 transcription factors at the organismic, tissular, cellular, and molecular levels, using the powerful genetic, genomic, and biochemical tools available in Drosophila. In this review we provide an account of the original identification of Cnc as a regulator of embryonic development. We then describe the discovery of Nrf2-like functions of Cnc and its role in acute stress signaling and aging. The establishment of Drosophila as a model organism in which the mechanisms and functions of Nrf2 signaling can be studied has led to several discoveries: the regulation of stem cell activity by an Nrf2-mediated redox mechanism, the interaction of Nrf2 with p62 and Myc in the control of tissue growth and the unfolded protein response, and more. Several of these more recent lines of investigation are highlighted. Model organisms such as the fly and the worm remain powerful experimental platforms that can help to unravel the many remaining puzzles regarding the role of Nrf2 and its relatives in controlling the physiology and maintaining the health of multicellular organisms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Phagocytosis Assay for Apoptotic Cells in Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Saori; Hori, Aki; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu; Kuraishi, Takayuki

    2017-08-03

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells need to be elucidated in more detail because of its role in immune and inflammatory intractable diseases. We herein developed an experimental method to investigate phagocytosis quantitatively using the fruit fly Drosophila, in which the gene network controlling engulfment reactions is evolutionally conserved from mammals. In order to accurately detect and count engulfing and un-engulfing phagocytes using whole animals, Drosophila embryos were homogenized to obtain dispersed cells including phagocytes and apoptotic cells. The use of dispersed embryonic cells enables us to measure in vivo phagocytosis levels as if we performed an in vitro phagocytosis assay in which it is possible to observe all phagocytes and apoptotic cells in whole embryos and precisely quantify the level of phagocytosis. We confirmed that this method reproduces those of previous studies that identified the genes required for the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. This method allows the engulfment of dead cells to be analyzed, and when combined with the powerful genetics of Drosophila, will reveal the complex phagocytic reactions comprised of the migration, recognition, engulfment, and degradation of apoptotic cells by phagocytes.

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    PubMed Central

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  19. C. elegans RNA-dependent RNA polymerases rrf-1 and ego-1 silence Drosophila transgenes by differing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guowen; Saint, Robert B; Helliwell, Chris A; Behm, Carolyn A; Wang, Ming-Bo; Waterhouse, Peter M; Gordon, Karl H J

    2013-04-01

    Drosophila possesses the core gene silencing machinery but, like all insects, lacks the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) that in C. elegans either trigger or enhance two major small RNA-dependent gene silencing pathways. Introduction of two different nematode RdRps into Drosophila showed them to be functional, resulting in differing silencing activities. While RRF-1 enhanced transitive dsRNA-dependent silencing, EGO-1 triggered dsRNA-independent silencing, specifically of transgenes. The strain w; da-Gal4; UAST-ego-1, constitutively expressing ego-1, is capable of silencing transgene including dsRNA hairpin upon a single cross, which created a powerful tool for research in Drosophila. In C. elegans, EGO-1 is involved in transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of chromosome regions that are unpaired during meiosis. There was no opportunity for meiotic interactions involving EGO-1 in Drosophila that would explain the observed transgene silencing. Transgene DNA is, however, unpaired during the pairing of chromosomes in embryonic mitosis that is an unusual characteristic of Diptera, suggesting that in Drosophila, EGO-1 triggers transcriptional silencing of unpaired DNA during embryonic mitosis.

  20. Gut chemosensing: interactions between gut endocrine cells and visceral afferents.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Helen E

    2010-02-16

    Chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract is less well understood than many aspects of gut mechanosensitivity; however, it is important in the overall function of the GI tract and indeed the organism as a whole. Chemosensing in the gut represents a complex interplay between the function of enteroendocrine (EEC) cells and visceral (primarily vagal) afferent neurons. In this brief review, I will concentrate on a new data on endocrine cells in chemosensing in the GI tract, in particular on new findings on glucose-sensing by gut EEC cells and the importance of incretin peptides and vagal afferents in glucose homeostasis, on the role of G protein coupled receptors in gut chemosensing, and on the possibility that gut endocrine cells may be involved in the detection of a luminal constituent other than nutrients, the microbiota. The role of vagal afferent pathways as a downstream target of EEC cell products will be considered and, in particular, exciting new data on the plasticity of the vagal afferent pathway with respect to expression of receptors for GI hormones and how this may play a role in energy homeostasis will also be discussed.

  1. Obesity, Diabetes, and Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Giovanni; Gambino, Roberto; Cassader, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    The connection between gut microbiota and energy homeostasis and inflammation and its role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders are increasingly recognized. Animals models of obesity connect an altered microbiota composition to the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes in the host through several mechanisms: increased energy harvest from the diet, altered fatty acid metabolism and composition in adipose tissue and liver, modulation of gut peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 secretion, activation of the lipopolysaccharide toll-like receptor-4 axis, and modulation of intestinal barrier integrity by GLP-2. Instrumental for gut microbiota manipulation is the understanding of mechanisms regulating gut microbiota composition. Several factors shape the gut microflora during infancy: mode of delivery, type of infant feeding, hospitalization, and prematurity. Furthermore, the key importance of antibiotic use and dietary nutrient composition are increasingly recognized. The role of the Western diet in promoting an obesogenic gut microbiota is being confirmation in subjects. Following encouraging results in animals, several short-term randomized controlled trials showed the benefit of prebiotics and probiotics on insulin sensitivity, inflammatory markers, postprandial incretins, and glucose tolerance. Future research is needed to unravel the hormonal, immunomodulatory, and metabolic mechanisms underlying microbe-microbe and microbiota-host interactions and the specific genes that determine the health benefit derived from probiotics. While awaiting further randomized trials assessing long-term safety and benefits on clinical end points, a healthy lifestyle—including breast lactation, appropriate antibiotic use, and the avoidance of excessive dietary fat intake—may ensure a friendly gut microbiota and positively affect prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:20876708

  2. First Foods and Gut Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Martin F.; Bahl, Martin I.; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Licht, Tine R.

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of the human gut microbiota in early life has been associated with later health and disease. During the 1st months after birth, the microbial composition in the gut is known to be affected by the mode of delivery, use of antibiotics, geographical location and type of feeding (breast/formula). Consequently, the neonatal period and early infancy has attracted much attention. However, after this first period the gut microbial composition continues to develop until the age of 3 years, and these 1st years have been designated “a window of opportunity” for microbial modulation. The beginning and end of this window is currently debated, but it likely coincides with the complementary feeding period, marking the gradual transition from milk-based infant feeding to family diet usually occurring between 6 and 24 months. Furthermore, the ‘first 1000 days,’ i.e., the period from conception until age 2 years, are generally recognized to be of particular importance for the healthy development of children. While dietary changes are known to affect the adult gut microbiota, there is a gap in our knowledge on how the introduction of new dietary components into the diet of infants/young children affects the gut microbiota development. This perspective paper summarizes the currently very few studies addressing the effects of complementary diet on gut microbiota, and highlights the recent finding that transition to family foods greatly impacts the development of gut microbial diversity. Further, we discuss potential impacts on child health and the need for further studies on this important topic. PMID:28321211

  3. Metamorphosis of the Drosophila visceral musculature and its role in intestinal morphogenesis and stem cell formation.

    PubMed

    Aghajanian, Patrick; Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-12-01

    The visceral musculature of the Drosophila intestine plays important roles in digestion as well as development. Detailed studies investigating the embryonic development of the visceral muscle exist; comparatively little is known about postembryonic development and metamorphosis of this tissue. In this study we have combined the use of specific markers with electron microscopy to follow the formation of the adult visceral musculature and its involvement in gut development during metamorphosis. Unlike the adult somatic musculature, which is derived from a pool of undifferentiated myoblasts, the visceral musculature of the adult is a direct descendant of the larval fibers, as shown by activating a lineage tracing construct in the larval muscle and obtaining labeled visceral fibers in the adult. However, visceral muscles undergo a phase of remodeling that coincides with the metamorphosis of the intestinal epithelium. During the first day following puparium formation, both circular and longitudinal syncytial fibers dedifferentiate, losing their myofibrils and extracellular matrix, and dissociating into mononuclear cells ("secondary myoblasts"). Towards the end of the second day, this process is reversed, and between 48 and 72h after puparium formation, a structurally fully differentiated adult muscle layer has formed. We could not obtain evidence that cells apart from the dedifferentiated larval visceral muscle contributed to the adult muscle, nor does it appear that the number of adult fibers (or nuclei per fiber) is increased over that of the larva by proliferation. In contrast to the musculature, the intestinal epithelium is completely renewed during metamorphosis. The adult midgut epithelium rapidly expands over the larval layer during the first few hours after puparium formation; in case of the hindgut, replacement takes longer, and proceeds by the gradual caudad extension of a proliferating growth zone, the hindgut proliferation zone (HPZ). The subsequent

  4. Is Drosophila-microbe association species-specific or region specific? A study undertaken involving six Indian Drosophila species.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kopal; Khanna, Radhika; Mohanty, Sujata

    2017-06-01

    The present work aims to identify the microbial diversity associated with six Indian Drosophila species using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology and to discover the nature of their distribution across species and eco-geographic regions. Whole fly gDNA of six Drosophila species were used to generate sequences in an Illumina platform using NGS technology. De novo based assembled raw reads were blasted against the NR database of NCBI using BLASTn for identification of their bacterial loads. We have tried to include Drosophila species from different taxonomical groups and subgroups and from three different eco-climatic regions India; four species belong to Central India, while the rest two, D. melanogaster and D. ananassae, belong to West and South India to determine both their species-wise and region-wide distribution. We detected the presence of 33 bacterial genera across all six study species, predominated by the class Proteobacteria. Amongst all, D. melanogaster was found to be the most diverse by carrying around 85% of the bacterial diversity. Our findings infer both species-specific and environment-specific nature of the bacterial species inhabiting the Drosophila host. Though the present results are consistent with most of the earlier studies, they also remain incoherent with some. The present study outcome on the host-bacteria association and their species specific adaptation may provide some insight to understand the host-microbial interactions and the phenotypic implications of microbes on the host physiology. The knowledge gained may be importantly applied into the recent insect and pest population control strategy going to implement through gut microflora in India and abroad.

  5. Age-associated loss of lamin-B leads to systemic inflammation and gut hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2014-01-01

    Aging of immune organs, termed as immunosenescence, is suspected to promote systemic inflammation and age-associated disease. The cause of immunosenescence and how it promotes disease, however, has remained unexplored. We report that the Drosophila fat body, a major immune organ, undergoes immunosenescence and mounts strong systemic inflammation that leads to de-regulation of immune deficiency (IMD) signaling in the midgut of old animals. Inflamed old fat bodies secrete circulating peptidoglycan recognition proteins that repress IMD activity in the midgut, thereby promoting gut hyperplasia. Further, fat body immunosenecence is caused by age-associated lamin-B reduction specifically in fat body cells, which then contributes to heterochromatin loss and de-repression of genes involved in immune responses. As lamin-associated heterochromatin domains are enriched for genes involved in immune response in both Drosophila and mammalian cells, our findings may provide insights into the cause and consequence of immunosenescence during aging. PMID:25417159

  6. Molecular characterization of the insect immune protein hemolin and its high induction during embryonic diapause in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar

    Treesearch

    K.-Y. Lee; F. M. Horodyski; A. P. Valaitis; D. L. Denlinger

    2002-01-01

    During the embryonic (pharate first instar) diapause of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, a 55 kDa protein is highly up-regulated in the gut. We now identify that protein as hemolin, an immune protein in the immunoglobulin superfamily. We isolated a gypsy moth hemolin cDNA and demonstrated a high degree of similarity with hemolins from three other...

  7. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  8. The heart and the gut.

    PubMed

    Rogler, Gerhard; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    The heart and the gut seem to be two organs that do not have much in common. However, there is an obvious and clinically relevant impact of gut functions on the absorption of drugs and oral therapies on the one hand. On the other hand, the gut determines the quantity of nutrient uptake and plays a central role in metabolic diseases. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases appear to have a higher risk for coronary heart disease despite a lower prevalence of 'classical' risk factors, indicating additional links between the gut and the heart. However, they certainly have a 'leaky' intestinal barrier associated with increased permeability for bacterial wall products. An impaired intestinal barrier function will be followed by bacterial translocation and presence of bacterial products in the circulation, which can contribute to atherosclerosis and chronic heart failure (CHF) as recent data indicate. Impaired cardiac function in CHF vice versa impacts intestinal microcirculation leading to a barrier defect of the intestinal mucosa and increased bacterial translocation. These pathways and the most recent insights into the impact of the gut on acute and chronic heart disease will be discussed in this review.

  9. Neuronal control of locomotor handedness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Sean M.; Kain, Jamey S.; de Bivort, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically identical individuals display variability in their physiology, morphology, and behaviors, even when reared in essentially identical environments, but there is little mechanistic understanding of the basis of such variation. Here, we investigated whether Drosophila melanogaster displays individual-to-individual variation in locomotor behaviors. We developed a new high-throughout platform capable of measuring the exploratory behavior of hundreds of individual flies simultaneously. With this approach, we find that, during exploratory walking, individual flies exhibit significant bias in their left vs. right locomotor choices, with some flies being strongly left biased or right biased. This idiosyncrasy was present in all genotypes examined, including wild-derived populations and inbred isogenic laboratory strains. The biases of individual flies persist for their lifetime and are nonheritable: i.e., mating two left-biased individuals does not yield left-biased progeny. This locomotor handedness is uncorrelated with other asymmetries, such as the handedness of gut twisting, leg-length asymmetry, and wing-folding preference. Using transgenics and mutants, we find that the magnitude of locomotor handedness is under the control of columnar neurons within the central complex, a brain region implicated in motor planning and execution. When these neurons are silenced, exploratory laterality increases, with more extreme leftiness and rightiness. This observation intriguingly implies that the brain may be able to dynamically regulate behavioral individuality. PMID:25953337

  10. Neuronal control of locomotor handedness in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Sean M; Kain, Jamey S; de Bivort, Benjamin L

    2015-05-26

    Genetically identical individuals display variability in their physiology, morphology, and behaviors, even when reared in essentially identical environments, but there is little mechanistic understanding of the basis of such variation. Here, we investigated whether Drosophila melanogaster displays individual-to-individual variation in locomotor behaviors. We developed a new high-throughout platform capable of measuring the exploratory behavior of hundreds of individual flies simultaneously. With this approach, we find that, during exploratory walking, individual flies exhibit significant bias in their left vs. right locomotor choices, with some flies being strongly left biased or right biased. This idiosyncrasy was present in all genotypes examined, including wild-derived populations and inbred isogenic laboratory strains. The biases of individual flies persist for their lifetime and are nonheritable: i.e., mating two left-biased individuals does not yield left-biased progeny. This locomotor handedness is uncorrelated with other asymmetries, such as the handedness of gut twisting, leg-length asymmetry, and wing-folding preference. Using transgenics and mutants, we find that the magnitude of locomotor handedness is under the control of columnar neurons within the central complex, a brain region implicated in motor planning and execution. When these neurons are silenced, exploratory laterality increases, with more extreme leftiness and rightiness. This observation intriguingly implies that the brain may be able to dynamically regulate behavioral individuality.

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum favors the early emergence of fit and fertile adult Drosophila upon chronic undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Téfit, Mélisandre A; Leulier, François

    2017-03-01

    Animals are naturally surrounded by a variety of microorganisms with which they constantly interact. Among these microbes, some live in close association with a host and form its microbiota. These communities are being extensively studied, owing to their contributions to shaping various aspects of animal physiology. One of these commensal species, Lactobacillus plantarum, and in particular the L.p.(WJL) strain, has been shown to promote the growth of Drosophila larvae upon nutrient scarcity, allowing earlier metamorphosis and adult emergence compared with axenic individuals. As for many insects, conditions surrounding the post-embryonic development dictate key adult life history traits in Drosophila, and adjusting developmental timing according to the environment is essential for adult fitness. Thus, we wondered whether the growth acceleration induced by L.p.(WJL) in a context of poor nutrition could adversely impact the fitness of Drosophila adults. Here, we show that the L.p.(WJL) -mediated acceleration of growth is not deleterious; adults emerging after an accelerated development are as fit as their axenic siblings. Additionally, the presence of L.p.(WJL) even leads to a lifespan extension in nutritionally challenged males. These results demonstrate that L.p.(WJL) is a beneficial partner for Drosophila melanogaster through its entire life cycle. Thus, commensal bacteria allow the earlier emergence and longer survival of fit and fertile individuals and might represent one of the factors contributing to the ecological success of Drosophila. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum favors the early emergence of fit and fertile adult Drosophila upon chronic undernutrition

    PubMed Central

    Téfit, Mélisandre A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animals are naturally surrounded by a variety of microorganisms with which they constantly interact. Among these microbes, some live in close association with a host and form its microbiota. These communities are being extensively studied, owing to their contributions to shaping various aspects of animal physiology. One of these commensal species, Lactobacillus plantarum, and in particular the L.p.WJL strain, has been shown to promote the growth of Drosophila larvae upon nutrient scarcity, allowing earlier metamorphosis and adult emergence compared with axenic individuals. As for many insects, conditions surrounding the post-embryonic development dictate key adult life history traits in Drosophila, and adjusting developmental timing according to the environment is essential for adult fitness. Thus, we wondered whether the growth acceleration induced by L.p.WJL in a context of poor nutrition could adversely impact the fitness of Drosophila adults. Here, we show that the L.p.WJL-mediated acceleration of growth is not deleterious; adults emerging after an accelerated development are as fit as their axenic siblings. Additionally, the presence of L.p.WJL even leads to a lifespan extension in nutritionally challenged males. These results demonstrate that L.p.WJL is a beneficial partner for Drosophila melanogaster through its entire life cycle. Thus, commensal bacteria allow the earlier emergence and longer survival of fit and fertile individuals and might represent one of the factors contributing to the ecological success of Drosophila. PMID:28062579

  13. Feeding regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Allan-Hermann; Scott, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulators play a key role in adjusting animal behavior based on environmental cues and internal needs. Here, we review the regulation of Drosophila feeding behavior to illustrate how neuromodulators achieve behavioral plasticity. Recent studies have made rapid progress in determining molecular and cellular mechanisms that translate the metabolic needs of the fly into changes in neuroendocrine and neuromodulatory states. These neuromodulators in turn promote or inhibit discrete feeding behavioral subprograms. This review highlights the links between physiological needs, neuromodulatory states, and feeding decisions. PMID:24937262

  14. Myc Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila contains a single MYC gene. Like its vertebrate homologs, it encodes a transcription factor that activates many targets, including prominently genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and translation. This activity makes Myc a central regulator of growth and/or proliferation of many cell types, such as imaginal disc cells, polyploid cells, stem cells, and blood cells. Importantly, not only does Myc act cell autonomously but it also affects the fate of adjacent cells and tissues. This potential of Myc is harnessed by many different signaling pathways, involving, among others, Wg, Dpp, Hpo, ecdysone, insulin, and mTOR. PMID:24086064

  15. Confusing or Ambiguous Upper Gut Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diarrhea Relaxation to Treat Digestive Disorders Medications SAFER Medicine Managing Medications Avoiding Drug Adverse Effects Medications that can Affect Colonic Function Gut Microbiota and Brain-Gut Interactions in Functional GI Disorders Tips & Daily Living Personal Relationships Holiday ...

  16. Carbohydrates and the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Chassard, Christophe; Lacroix, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Due to its scale and its important role in maintaining health, the gut microbiota can be considered as a 'new organ' inside the human body. Many complex carbohydrates are degraded and fermented by the human gut microbiota in the large intestine to both yield basic energy salvage and impact gut health through produced metabolites. This review will focus on the gut microbes and microbial mechanisms responsible for polysaccharides degradation and fermentation in the large intestine. Gut microbes and bacterial metabolites impact the host at many levels, including modulation of inflammation, and glucose and lipid metabolisms. A complex relationship occurs in the intestine between the human gut microbiota, diet and the host. Research on carbohydrates and gut microbiota composition and functionality is fast developing and will open opportunities for prevention and treatment of obesity, diabetes and other related metabolic disorders through manipulation of the gut ecosystem.

  17. Preventing age-related decline of gut compartmentalization limits microbiota dysbiosis and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Summary Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  18. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan.

  19. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  20. Global F-theory GUTs

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Grimm, Thomas W.; Jurke, Benjamin; Weigand, Timo; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We construct global F-theory GUT models on del Pezzo surfaces in compact Calabi-Yau fourfolds realized as complete intersections of two hypersurface constraints. The intersections of the GUT brane and the flavour branes as well as the gauge flux are described by the spectral cover construction. We consider a split S[U(4) x U(1){sub X}] spectral cover, which allows for the phenomenologically relevant Yukawa couplings and GUT breaking to the MSSM via hypercharge flux while preventing dimension-4 proton decay. General expressions for the massless spectrum, consistency conditions and a new method for the computation of curvature-induced tadpoles are presented. We also provide a geometric toolkit for further model searches in the framework of toric geometry. Finally, an explicit global model with three chiral generations and all required Yukawa couplings is defined on a Calabi-Yau fourfold which is fibered over the del Pezzo transition of the Fano threefold P{sup 4}.

  1. Neuroendocrine disorders of the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, L F; Mulvihill, S J

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of gastrointestinal function is known to involve elements of the enteric nervous system. Processes such as secretion, motility, blood flow, and immune function are all influenced by a complex network of neurons whose cell bodies lie in the gut. These neurons use a wide spectrum of substances as neurotransmitters, although the majority use peptides once thought to function only as gut hormones. It has been increasingly recognized that abnormalities of this neuroendocrine regulatory system underlie many gastrointestinal disorders. The most obvious are states of peptide excess found in patients with gut endocrine tumors such as carcinoid, gastrinoma, and somatostatinoma. Conversely, other disorders appear to be related to deficiency states. Examples include both achalasia and Hirschsprung's disease (congenital megacolon), where the loss of inhibitory neural action leads to abnormalities of peristalsis and sphincter function. Evidence for abnormal neuroendocrine regulation leading to disease states is increasing for many other gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:8533409

  2. The Gut Microbiome and Obesity.

    PubMed

    John, George Kunnackal; Mullin, Gerard E

    2016-07-01

    The gut microbiome consists of trillions of bacteria which play an important role in human metabolism. Animal and human studies have implicated distortion of the normal microbial balance in obesity and metabolic syndrome. Bacteria causing weight gain are thought to induce the expression of genes related to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism thereby leading to greater energy harvest from the diet. There is a large body of evidence demonstrating that alteration in the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes leads to the development of obesity, but this has been recently challenged. It is likely that the influence of gut microbiome on obesity is much more complex than simply an imbalance in the proportion of these phyla of bacteria. Modulation of the gut microbiome through diet, pre- and probiotics, antibiotics, surgery, and fecal transplantation has the potential to majorly impact the obesity epidemic.

  3. Rheology of embryonic avian blood.

    PubMed

    Al-Roubaie, Sarah; Jahnsen, Espen D; Mohammed, Masud; Henderson-Toth, Caitlin; Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2011-12-01

    Shear stress, a mechanical force created by blood flow, is known to affect the developing cardiovascular system. Shear stress is a function of both shear rate and viscosity. While established techniques for measuring shear rate in embryos have been developed, the viscosity of embryonic blood has never been known but always assumed to be like adult blood. Blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, where the relationship between shear rate and shear stress is nonlinear. In this work, we analyzed the non-Newtonian behavior of embryonic chicken blood using a microviscometer and present the apparent viscosity at different hematocrits, different shear rates, and at different stages during development from 4 days (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 22) to 8 days (about Hamburger-Hamilton stage 34) of incubation. We chose the chicken embryo since it has become a common animal model for studying hemodynamics in the developing cardiovascular system. We found that the hematocrit increases with the stage of development. The viscosity of embryonic avian blood in all developmental stages studied was shear rate dependent and behaved in a non-Newtonian manner similar to that of adult blood. The range of shear rates and hematocrits at which non-Newtonian behavior was observed is, however, outside the physiological range for the larger vessels of the embryo. Under low shear stress conditions, the spherical nucleated blood cells that make up embryonic blood formed into small aggregates of cells. We found that the apparent blood viscosity decreases at a given hematocrit during embryonic development, not due to changes in protein composition of the plasma but possibly due to the changes in cellular composition of embryonic blood. This decrease in apparent viscosity was only visible at high hematocrit. At physiological values of hematocrit, embryonic blood viscosity did not change significantly with the stage of development.

  4. Oral intake of zirconia nanoparticle alters neuronal development and behaviour of Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Monalisa; Sabat, Debabrat; Ekka, Basanti; Sahu, Swetapadma; P, Unnikannan; Dash, Priyabrat

    2017-08-01

    Zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) have been extensively used in teeth and bone implants and thus get a chance to interact with the physiological system. The current study investigated the oral administration of various concentrations of ZrO2 NPs synthesized by the hydrothermal method (0.25 to 5.0 mg L-1) on Drosophila physiology and behaviour. The size of the currently studied nanoparticle varies from 10 to 12 nm. ZrO2 NPs accumulated within the gut in a concentration-dependent manner and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) only at 2.5 and 5.0 mg L-1 concentrations. ROS was detected by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20370560 (H2DCF) staining. The ROS toxicity alters the larval gut structure as revealed by DAPI staining. The NP stress of larvae affects the Drosophila development by distressing pupa count and varying the phenotypic changes in sensory organs (eye, thorax bristle, wings). Besides phenotypic changes, flawed climbing behaviour against gravity was seen in ZrO2 NP-treated flies. All together, for the first time, we have reported that a ROS-mediated ZrO2 NP toxicity alters neuronal development and functioning using Drosophila as a model organism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Deconstructing Memory in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Margulies, Carla; Tully, Tim; Dubnau, Josh

    2011-01-01

    Unlike most organ systems, which have evolved to maintain homeostasis, the brain has been selected to sense and adapt to environmental stimuli by constantly altering interactions in a gene network that functions within a larger neural network. This unique feature of the central nervous system provides a remarkable plasticity of behavior, but also makes experimental investigations challenging. Each experimental intervention ramifies through both gene and neural networks, resulting in unpredicted and sometimes confusing phenotypic adaptations. Experimental dissection of mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity ultimately must accomplish an integration across many levels of biological organization, including genetic pathways acting within individual neurons, neural network interactions which feed back to gene function, and phenotypic observations at the behavioral level. This dissection will be more easily accomplished for model systems such as Drosophila, which, compared with mammals, have relatively simple and manipulable nervous systems and genomes. The evolutionary conservation of behavioral phenotype and the underlying gene function ensures that much of what we learn in such model systems will be relevant to human cognition. In this essay, we have not attempted to review the entire Drosophila memory field. Instead, we have tried to discuss particular findings that provide some level of intellectual synthesis across three levels of biological organization: behavior, neural circuitry and biochemical pathways. We have attempted to use this integrative approach to evaluate distinct mechanistic hypotheses, and to propose critical experiments that will advance this field. PMID:16139203

  6. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  7. Drosophila pupal abdomen immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yoder, John H

    2011-10-02

    The Drosophila pupal abdomen is an established model system for the study of epithelial morphogenesis and the development of sexually dimorphic morphologies. During pupation, which spans approximately 96 hours (at 25 °C), proliferating populations of imaginal cells replace the larval epidermis to generate the adult abdominal segments. These imaginal cells, born during embryogenesis, exist as lateral pairs of histoblast nests in each abdominal segment of the larvae. Four pairs of histoblast nests give rise to the adult dorsal cuticle (anterior and posterior dorsal nests), the ventral cuticle (ventral nests) and the spiracles associated with each segment (spiracle nests). Upon puparation, these diploid cells (distinguishable by size from the larger polyploid larval epidermal cells- LECs) begin a stereotypical process of proliferation, migration and replacement of the LECs. Various molecular and genetic tools can be employed to investigate the contributions of genetic pathways involved in morphogenesis of the adult abdomen. Ultimate adult phenotypes are typically analyzed following dissection of adult abdominal cuticles. However, investigation of the underlying molecular processes requires immunohistochemical analyses of the pupal epithelium, which present unique challenges. Temporally dynamic morphogenesis and the interactions of two distinct epithelial populations (larval and imaginal) generate a fragile tissue prone to excessive cell loss during dissection and subsequent processing. We have developed methods of dissection, fixation, mounting and imaging of the Drosophila pupal abdominem epithelium for immunohistochemical studies that generate consistent high quality samples suitable for confocal or standard fluorescent microscopy.

  8. Epigenetic regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lyko, F; Beisel, C; Marhold, J; Paro, R

    2006-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene transcription relies on molecular marks like DNA methylation or histone modifications. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of epigenetic regulation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In the past, DNA methylation research has primarily utilized mammalian model systems. However, several recent landmark discoveries have been made in other organisms. For example, the interaction between DNA methylation and histone methylation was first described in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Another example is provided by the interaction between epigenetic modifications and the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery that was first reported in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Another organism with great experimental power is the fruit fly Drosophila. Epigenetic regulation by chromatin has been extensively analyzed in the fly and several of the key components have been discovered in this organism. In this chapter, we will focus on three aspects that represent the complexity of epigenetic gene regulation. (1) We will discuss the available data about the DNA methylation system, (2) we will illuminate the interaction between DNA methylation and chromatin regulation, and (3) we will provide an overview over the Polycomb system of epigenetic chromatin modifiers that has proved to be an important paradigm for a chromatin system regulating epigenetic programming.

  9. Gut microbiota in 2015: Prevotella in the gut: choose carefully.

    PubMed

    Ley, Ruth E

    2016-02-01

    Gut microbial communities often contain many Bacteroides or their close relatives, Prevotella, but not both. Prevotella strains are associated with plant-rich diets but are also linked with chronic inflammatory conditions. In 2015, papers probed the genomic diversity of Prevotella strains and interactions of Prevotella copri with its host and other bacteria.

  10. Mechanotransduction in Embryonic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Beth L.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of biochemical signals provides spatial and temporal cues that carefully orchestrate the complex process of vertebrate embryonic development. The embryonic vasculature develops not only in the context of these biochemical cues, but also in the context of the biomechanical forces imparted by blood flow. In the mature vasculature, different blood flow regimes induce distinct genetic programs, and significant progress has been made toward understanding how these forces are perceived by endothelial cells and transduced into biochemical signals. However, it cannot be assumed that paradigms that govern the mature vasculature are pertinent to the developing embryonic vasculature. The embryonic vasculature can respond to the mechanical forces of blood flow, and these responses are critical in vascular remodeling, certain aspects of sprouting angiogenesis, and maintenance of arterial-venous identity. Here, we review data regarding mechanistic aspects of endothelial cell mechanotransduction, with a focus on the response to shear stress, and elaborate upon the multifarious effects of shear stress on the embryonic vasculature. In addition, we discuss emerging predictive vascular growth models and highlight the prospect of combining signaling pathway information with computational modeling. We assert that correlation of precise measurements of hemodynamic parameters with effects on endothelial cell gene expression and cell behavior is required for fully understanding how blood flow-induced loading governs normal vascular development and shapes congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:22744845

  11. Epithelial delamination and migration: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Federica; Vidal, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis is the most deadly phase of cancer progression, during which cells detach from their original niche to invade distant tissues, yet the biological processes underlying the spread of cancer are still poorly understood. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides important insights in our understanding of how epithelial cells migrate from their original location and find their way into surrounding and distant tissues in the metastatic process. Here we review recent studies on the mechanisms of migration of embryonic haemocytes, the macrophage-like immuno-surveillance cells, during normal development and wound healing. We highlight the interesting finding that hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been identified as the driving force for haemocyte chemotaxis. We also give a special emphasis to studies suggesting the concept that haemocytes, together with the tumor microenvironment, act as potential inducers of the epithelial de-lamination required for tumor invasion. We propose that cell delamination and migration could be uncoupled from loss of cell polarity via a tumor-related inflammatory response.

  12. Embryonic death and the creation of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Landry, Donald W; Zucker, Howard A

    2004-11-01

    The creation of human embryonic stem cells through the destruction of a human embryo pits the value of a potential therapeutic tool against that of an early human life. This contest of values has resulted in a polarized debate that neglects areas of common interest and perspective. We suggest that a common ground for pursuing research on human embryonic stem cells can be found by reconsidering the death of the human embryo and by applying to this research the ethical norms of essential organ donation.

  13. Transcriptional regulation during Drosophila spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Cindy; Tarayrah, Lama; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila spermatogenesis has become a paradigmatic system for the study of mechanisms that regulate adult stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. The dramatic cellular differentiation process from germline stem cell (GSC) to mature sperm is accompanied by dynamic changes in gene expression, which are regulated at transcriptional, post-transcriptional (including translational) and post-translational levels. Post-transcriptional regulation has been proposed as a unique feature of germ cells. However, recent studies have provided new insights into transcriptional regulation during Drosophila spermatogenesis. Both signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms act to orchestrate the transcriptional regulation of distinct genes at different germ cell differentiation stages. Many of the regulatory pathways that control male gamete differentiation in Drosophila are conserved in mammals. Therefore, studies using Drosophila spermatogenesis will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate mammalian germ cell differentiation pathways. PMID:23087835

  14. Safeguarding genetic information in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Su, Tin Tin

    2011-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells employ a plethora of conserved proteins and mechanisms to ensure genome integrity. In metazoa, these mechanisms must operate in the context of organism development. This mini-review highlights two emerging features of DNA damage responses in Drosophila: a crosstalk between DNA damage responses and components of the spindle assembly checkpoint, and increasing evidence for the effect of DNA damage on the developmental program at multiple points during the Drosophila life cycle.

  15. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild. PMID:20161211

  16. Cytoplasmic myosin from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Myosin is identified and purified from three different established Drosophila melanogaster cell lines (Schneider's lines 2 and 3 and Kc). Purification entails lysis in a low salt, sucrose buffer that contains ATP, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, precipitation with actin in the absence of ATP, gel filtration in a discontinuous KI-KCl buffer system, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Yield of pure cytoplasmic myosin is 5-10%. This protein is identified as myosin by its cross-reactivity with two monoclonal antibodies against human platelet myosin, the molecular weight of its heavy chain, its two light chains, its behavior on gel filtration, its ATP-dependent affinity for actin, its characteristic ATPase activity, its molecular morphology as demonstrated by platinum shadowing, and its ability to form bipolar filaments. The molecular weight of the cytoplasmic myosin's light chains and peptide mapping and immunochemical analysis of its heavy chains demonstrate that this myosin, purified from Drosophila cell lines, is distinct from Drosophila muscle myosin. Two-dimensional thin layer maps of complete proteolytic digests of iodinated muscle and cytoplasmic myosin heavy chains demonstrate that, while the two myosins have some tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic peptides in common, most peptides migrate with unique mobility. One-dimensional peptide maps of SDS PAGE purified myosin heavy chain confirm these structural data. Polyclonal antiserum raised and reacted against Drosophila myosin isolated from cell lines cross-reacts only weakly with Drosophila muscle myosin isolated from the thoraces of adult Drosophila. Polyclonal antiserum raised against Drosophila muscle myosin behaves in a reciprocal fashion. Taken together our data suggest that the myosin purified from Drosophila cell lines is a bona fide cytoplasmic myosin and is very likely the product of a different myosin gene than the muscle myosin heavy chain gene that has been previously identified and characterized. PMID

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Transcription Factor Expression during Metazoan Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Schep, Alicia N.; Adryan, Boris

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, a complex organism is formed from a single starting cell. These processes of growth and differentiation are driven by large transcriptional changes, which are following the expression and activity of transcription factors (TFs). This study sought to compare TF expression during embryonic development in a diverse group of metazoan animals: representatives of vertebrates (Danio rerio, Xenopus tropicalis), a chordate (Ciona intestinalis) and invertebrate phyla such as insects (Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae) and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) were sampled, The different species showed overall very similar TF expression patterns, with TF expression increasing during the initial stages of development. C2H2 zinc finger TFs were over-represented and Homeobox TFs were under-represented in the early stages in all species. We further clustered TFs for each species based on their quantitative temporal expression profiles. This showed very similar TF expression trends in development in vertebrate and insect species. However, analysis of the expression of orthologous pairs between more closely related species showed that expression of most individual TFs is not conserved, following the general model of duplication and diversification. The degree of similarity between TF expression between Xenopus tropicalis and Danio rerio followed the hourglass model, with the greatest similarity occuring during the early tailbud stage in Xenopus tropicalis and the late segmentation stage in Danio rerio. However, for Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae there were two periods of high TF transcriptome similarity, one during the Arthropod phylotypic stage at 8–10 hours into Drosophila development and the other later at 16–18 hours into Drosophila development. PMID:23799133

  18. A comparative analysis of transcription factor expression during metazoan embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Schep, Alicia N; Adryan, Boris

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, a complex organism is formed from a single starting cell. These processes of growth and differentiation are driven by large transcriptional changes, which are following the expression and activity of transcription factors (TFs). This study sought to compare TF expression during embryonic development in a diverse group of metazoan animals: representatives of vertebrates (Danio rerio, Xenopus tropicalis), a chordate (Ciona intestinalis) and invertebrate phyla such as insects (Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae) and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) were sampled, The different species showed overall very similar TF expression patterns, with TF expression increasing during the initial stages of development. C2H2 zinc finger TFs were over-represented and Homeobox TFs were under-represented in the early stages in all species. We further clustered TFs for each species based on their quantitative temporal expression profiles. This showed very similar TF expression trends in development in vertebrate and insect species. However, analysis of the expression of orthologous pairs between more closely related species showed that expression of most individual TFs is not conserved, following the general model of duplication and diversification. The degree of similarity between TF expression between Xenopus tropicalis and Danio rerio followed the hourglass model, with the greatest similarity occuring during the early tailbud stage in Xenopus tropicalis and the late segmentation stage in Danio rerio. However, for Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae there were two periods of high TF transcriptome similarity, one during the Arthropod phylotypic stage at 8-10 hours into Drosophila development and the other later at 16-18 hours into Drosophila development.

  19. [Current view on gut microbiota].

    PubMed

    Bourlioux, P

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota is more and more important since metagenomic research have brought new knowledge on this topic especially for human health. Firstly, gut microbiota is a key element for our organism he lives in symbiosis with. Secondly, it interacts favorably with many physiological functions of our organism. Thirdly, at the opposite, it can be an active participant in intestinal pathologies linked to a dysbiosis mainly in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis but also in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and more prudently in autism and behavioral disorders. In order to keep a good health, it is essential to protect our gut microbiota as soon as our young age and maintain it healthy. Face to a more and more important number of publications for treating certain digestive diseases with fecal microbial transplantation, it needs to be very careful and recommend further studies in order to assess risks and define standardized protocols. Gut microbiota metabolic capacities towards xenobiotics need to be developed, and we must take an interest in the modifications they induce on medicinal molecules. On the other hand, it is essential to study the potent effects of pesticides and other pollutants on microbiota functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anubhav; Srinivasan, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome) in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs) also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends. PMID:27695034

  1. Neuroimmune modulation of gut function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is considerable interest in the mechanisms and pathways involved in the neuro-immune regulation of gut function. The number of cell types and possible interactions is staggering and there are a number of recent reviews detailing various aspects of these interactions, many of which focus on ...

  2. Effects of environmental pollutants on gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wu, Sisheng; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2017-03-01

    Environmental pollutants have become an increasingly common health hazard in the last several decades. Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the profound relationship between gut microbiota and our health. Gut microbiota are very sensitive to drugs, diet, and even environmental pollutants. In this review, we discuss the possible effects of environmental pollutants including antibiotics, heavy metals, persistent organic pollutants, pesticides, nanomaterials, and food additives on gut microbiota and their subsequent effects on health. We emphasize that gut microbiota are also essential for the toxicity evaluation of environmental pollution. In the future, more studies should focus on the relationship between environmental pollution, gut microbiota, and human health.

  3. Gut Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier plays an important role in maintaining a delicate immune homeostasis. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to involve a defective mucosal immunity along with a genetic predisposition. Recent views have suggested an excessive response to components of the gut microbiota in IBD. A condition of "dysbiosis", with alterations of the gut microbial composition, has been observed in patients with IBD. In this article, the author review recent studies of gut microbiota in IBD, particularly the importance of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of pediatric IBD. PMID:24010101

  4. A Computational Approach towards a Gene Regulatory Network for the Developing Nematostella vectensis Gut

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Daniel; Röttinger, Eric; Martindale, Mark Q.; de Jong, Johann; Kaandorp, Jaap A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a diploblastic cnidarian that expresses a set of conserved genes for gut formation during its early development. During the last decade, the spatial distribution of many of these genes has been visualized with RNA hybridization or protein immunolocalization techniques. However, due to N. vectensis' curved and changing morphology, quantification of these spatial data is problematic. A method is developed for two-dimensional gene expression quantification, which enables a numerical analysis and dynamic modeling of these spatial patterns. Methods/Result In this work, first standardized gene expression profiles are generated from publicly available N. vectensis embryo images that display mRNA and/or protein distributions. Then, genes expressed during gut formation are clustered based on their expression profiles, and further grouped based on temporal appearance of their gene products in embryonic development. Representative expression profiles are manually selected from these clusters, and used as input for a simulation-based optimization scheme. This scheme iteratively fits simulated profiles to the selected profiles, leading to an optimized estimation of the model parameters. Finally, a preliminary gene regulatory network is derived from the optimized model parameters. Outlook While the focus of this study is N. vectensis, the approach outlined here is suitable for inferring gene regulatory networks in the embryonic development of any animal, thus allowing to comparatively study gene regulation of gut formation in silico across various species. PMID:25076223

  5. A subset of neurons controls the permeability of the peritrophic matrix and midgut structure in Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Kenmoku, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Ote, Manabu; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2016-08-01

    The metazoan gut performs multiple physiological functions, including digestion and absorption of nutrients, and also serves as a physical and chemical barrier against ingested pathogens and abrasive particles. Maintenance of these functions and structures is partly controlled by the nervous system, yet the precise roles and mechanisms of the neural control of gut integrity remain to be clarified in Drosophila Here, we screened for GAL4 enhancer-trap strains and labeled a specific subsets of neurons, using Kir2.1 to inhibit their activity. We identified an NP3253 line that is susceptible to oral infection by Gram-negative bacteria. The subset of neurons driven by the NP3253 line includes some of the enteric neurons innervating the anterior midgut, and these flies have a disorganized proventricular structure with high permeability of the peritrophic matrix and epithelial barrier. The findings of the present study indicate that neural control is crucial for maintaining the barrier function of the gut, and provide a route for genetic dissection of the complex brain-gut axis in adults of the model organism Drosophila.

  6. Embryonic occurrence of ionocytes in the sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Sucré, Elliott; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille; Grousset, Evelyse; Charmantier, Guy; Cucchi-Mouillot, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    Because of the permeability of the chorion, sea bass embryos are exposed to seawater before hatching and hence require precocious osmoregulatory processes. Several studies of other species have demonstrated the existence of ion-transporting cells located on the yolk sac membrane of embryos. In these cells, called ionocytes, ion movements are controlled by a pool of transmembrane proteins. Among them, the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, an abundant driving enzyme, has been used to reveal the presence or absence of ionocytes. We have immunostained the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in sea-bass embryos and shown the presence of the first ionocytes on the yolk sac membrane at stage 12 somites and the occurrence of ionocytes at other sites before hatching. Ionocytes located on the first gill slits have been identified at stage 14 somites. Primitive enteric ionocytes have also been detected at stage 14 somites in the mid and posterior gut. The presence of these cells might be related to the early opening of the gut to perivitelline fluids, both anteriorly by the gill slits and posteriorly by the anus. The role of embryonic ionocytes in osmoregulation before hatching is discussed.

  7. Interaction between gut immunity and polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojun; Nie, Shaoping; Xie, Mingyong

    2017-09-22

    The human gut is colonized with a vast and diverse microbial ecosystem, and these bacteria play fundamental roles in the well being of our bodies. Gut-associated lymphoid tissues, the largest mucosal immune system, should never be overlooked for their profound effect in maintaining the host immunity. Therefore, we discussed the relationship between gut immunity and host health, primarily from two aspects: the homeostasis of gut microbiota, and the function of gut-associated lymphoid tissues. Polysaccharides, widely concerned as bioactive macromolecules in recent centuries, have been proved to benefit the intestinal health. Dietary polysaccharides can improve the ratio of probiotics, regulate the intestinal microenvironment like decreasing the gut pH, and stimulate the macrophages or lymphocytes in gut tissues to fight against diseases like cancer. Based on various experimental and clinical evidence, the impacts of dietary polysaccharides on intestinal health are summarized, in order to reveal the possible immunomodulatory mechanisms of polysaccharides.

  8. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transposable elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McCullers, Tabitha J.; Steiniger, Mindy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic elements that can mobilize within host genomes. As TEs comprise more than 40% of the human genome and are linked to numerous diseases, understanding their mechanisms of mobilization and regulation is important. Drosophila melanogaster is an ideal model organism for the study of eukaryotic TEs as its genome contains a diverse array of active TEs. TEs universally impact host genome size via transposition and deletion events, but may also adopt unique functional roles in host organisms. There are 2 main classes of TEs: DNA transposons and retrotransposons. These classes are further divided into subgroups of TEs with unique structural and functional characteristics, demonstrating the significant variability among these elements. Despite this variability, D. melanogaster and other eukaryotic organisms utilize conserved mechanisms to regulate TEs. This review focuses on the transposition mechanisms and regulatory pathways of TEs, and their functional roles in D. melanogaster. PMID:28580197

  10. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory.

  11. Role of Homothorax in region specific regulation of Deformed in embryonic neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raviranjan; Chotaliya, Maheshvari; Vuppala, Sruthakeerthi; Auradkar, Ankush; Palasamudrum, Kalyani; Joshi, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    The expression and regulation of Hox genes in developing central nervous system (CNS) lack important details like specific cell types where Hox genes are expressed and the transcriptional regulatory players involved in these cells. In this study we have investigated the expression and regulation of Drosophila Hox gene Deformed (Dfd) in specific cell types of embryonic CNS. Using Dfd neural autoregulatory enhancer we find that Dfd autoregulates itself in cells of mandibular neuromere. We have also investigated the role of a Hox cofactor Homothorax (Hth) for its role in regulating Dfd expression in CNS. We find that Hth exhibits a region specific role in controlling the expression of Dfd, but has no direct role in mandibular Dfd neural autoregulatory circuit. Our results also suggest that homeodomain of Hth is not required for regulating Dfd expression in embryonic CNS. PMID:26409112

  12. Role of Homothorax in region specific regulation of Deformed in embryonic neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raviranjan; Chotaliya, Maheshvari; Vuppala, Sruthakeerthi; Auradkar, Ankush; Palasamudrum, Kalyani; Joshi, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    The expression and regulation of Hox genes in developing central nervous system (CNS) lack important details like specific cell types where Hox genes are expressed and the transcriptional regulatory players involved in these cells. In this study we have investigated the expression and regulation of Drosophila Hox gene Deformed (Dfd) in specific cell types of embryonic CNS. Using Dfd neural autoregulatory enhancer we find that Dfd autoregulates itself in cells of mandibular neuromere. We have also investigated the role of a Hox cofactor Homothorax (Hth) for its role in regulating Dfd expression in CNS. We find that Hth exhibits a region specific role in controlling the expression of Dfd, but has no direct role in mandibular Dfd neural autoregulatory circuit. Our results also suggest that homeodomain of Hth is not required for regulating Dfd expression in embryonic CNS. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Generation of stomach tissue from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Taka-aki K; Ninomiya, Naoto; Sekine, Mari; Komazaki, Shinji; Wang, Pi-Chao; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Successful pluripotent stem cell differentiation methods have been developed for several endoderm-derived cells, including hepatocytes, β-cells and intestinal cells. However, stomach lineage commitment from pluripotent stem cells has remained a challenge, and only antrum specification has been demonstrated. We established a method for stomach differentiation from embryonic stem cells by inducing mesenchymal Barx1, an essential gene for in vivo stomach specification from gut endoderm. Barx1-inducing culture conditions generated stomach primordium-like spheroids, which differentiated into mature stomach tissue cells in both the corpus and antrum by three-dimensional culture. This embryonic stem cell-derived stomach tissue (e-ST) shared a similar gene expression profile with adult stomach, and secreted pepsinogen as well as gastric acid. Furthermore, TGFA overexpression in e-ST caused hypertrophic mucus and gastric anacidity, which mimicked Ménétrier disease in vitro. Thus, in vitro stomach tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells mimics in vivo development and can be used for stomach disease models.

  14. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiota Mediates the Drosophila Nutritional Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chaston, John M; Dobson, Adam J; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E

    2015-11-13

    A wealth of studies has demonstrated that resident microorganisms (microbiota) influence the pattern of nutrient allocation to animal protein and energy stores, but it is unclear how the effects of the microbiota interact with other determinants of animal nutrition, including animal genetic factors and diet. Here, we demonstrate that members of the gut microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster mediate the effect of certain animal genetic determinants on an important nutritional trait, triglyceride (lipid) content. Parallel analysis of the taxonomic composition of the associated bacterial community and host nutritional indices (glucose, glycogen, triglyceride, and protein contents) in multiple Drosophila genotypes revealed significant associations between the abundance of certain microbial taxa, especially Acetobacteraceae and Xanthamonadaceae, and host nutritional phenotype. By a genome-wide association study of Drosophila lines colonized with a defined microbiota, multiple host genes were statistically associated with the abundance of one bacterium, Acetobacter tropicalis. Experiments using mutant Drosophila validated the genetic association evidence and reveal that host genetic control of microbiota abundance affects the nutritional status of the flies. These data indicate that the abundance of the resident microbiota is influenced by host genotype, with consequent effects on nutrient allocation patterns, demonstrating that host genetic control of the microbiome contributes to the genotype-phenotype relationship of the animal host.

  15. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiota Mediates the Drosophila Nutritional Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chaston, John M.; Dobson, Adam J.; Newell, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of studies has demonstrated that resident microorganisms (microbiota) influence the pattern of nutrient allocation to animal protein and energy stores, but it is unclear how the effects of the microbiota interact with other determinants of animal nutrition, including animal genetic factors and diet. Here, we demonstrate that members of the gut microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster mediate the effect of certain animal genetic determinants on an important nutritional trait, triglyceride (lipid) content. Parallel analysis of the taxonomic composition of the associated bacterial community and host nutritional indices (glucose, glycogen, triglyceride, and protein contents) in multiple Drosophila genotypes revealed significant associations between the abundance of certain microbial taxa, especially Acetobacteraceae and Xanthamonadaceae, and host nutritional phenotype. By a genome-wide association study of Drosophila lines colonized with a defined microbiota, multiple host genes were statistically associated with the abundance of one bacterium, Acetobacter tropicalis. Experiments using mutant Drosophila validated the genetic association evidence and reveal that host genetic control of microbiota abundance affects the nutritional status of the flies. These data indicate that the abundance of the resident microbiota is influenced by host genotype, with consequent effects on nutrient allocation patterns, demonstrating that host genetic control of the microbiome contributes to the genotype-phenotype relationship of the animal host. PMID:26567306

  16. Identification of motor neurons and a mechanosensitive sensory neuron in the defecation circuitry of Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Bingxue; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2014-10-30

    Defecation allows the body to eliminate waste, an essential step in food processing for animal survival. In contrast to the extensive studies of feeding, its obligate counterpart, defecation, has received much less attention until recently. In this study, we report our characterizations of the defecation behavior of Drosophila larvae and its neural basis. Drosophila larvae display defecation cycles of stereotypic frequency, involving sequential contraction of hindgut and anal sphincter. The defecation behavior requires two groups of motor neurons that innervate hindgut and anal sphincter, respectively, and can excite gut muscles directly. These two groups of motor neurons fire sequentially with the same periodicity as the defecation behavior, as revealed by in vivo Ca(2+) imaging. Moreover, we identified a single mechanosensitive sensory neuron that innervates the anal slit and senses the opening of the intestine terminus. This anus sensory neuron relies on the TRP channel NOMPC but not on INACTIVE, NANCHUNG, or PIEZO for mechanotransduction.

  17. Identification of secreted and cytosolic gelsolin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned the gene for Drosophila gelsolin. Two mRNAs are produced from this gene by differential splicing. The protein encoded by the longer mRNA has a signal peptide and its electrophoretic mobility when translated in vitro in the presence of microsomes is higher than when it is translated without microsomes. The protein translated from the shorter mRNA does not show this difference. This indicates that Drosophila like vertebrates has two forms of gelsolin, one secreted, the other cytoplasmic. The mRNA for both is present ubiquitously in the early embryo. Later, the cytoplasmic form is expressed in parts of the gut. The RNA for the secreted form is expressed in the fat body, and the secreted protein is abundant in extracellular fluid (hemolymph). The cytoplasmic form of gelsolin co-localizes with F-actin in the cortex of the cells in the embryo and in larval epithelia. However, during cellularization of the blastoderm it is reduced at the base of the cleavage furrow, a structure similar to the contractile ring in dividing cells. PMID:8175883

  18. Gut microbiome, gut function, and probiotics: Implications for health.

    PubMed

    Hajela, Neerja; Ramakrishna, B S; Nair, G Balakrish; Abraham, Philip; Gopalan, Sarath; Ganguly, Nirmal K

    2015-03-01

    New insights from a rapidly developing field of research have ushered in a new era of understanding of the complexity of host-microbe interactions within the human body. The paradigm shift from culturing to metagenomics has provided an insight into the complex diversity of the microbial species that we harbor, revealing the fact that we are in fact more microbes than human cells. The largest consortium of these microbes resides in the gut and is called the gut microbiota. This new science has expanded the ability to document shifts in microbial populations to an unparalleled degree. It is now understood that signals from the microbiota provide trophic, nutritional, metabolic, and protective effects for the development and maintenance of the host digestive, immune, and neuroendocrine system. Evidence linking changes in the gut microbiota to gastrointestinal and extraintestinal disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, diabetes, and celiac disease have begun to emerge recently. Probiotics act through diverse mechanisms positively affecting the composition and/or function of the commensal microbiota and alter host immunological responses. Well-controlled intervention trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis provide convincing evidence for the benefit of probiotics in prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal as well as extraintestinal disorders.

  19. Lineage mapping identifies molecular and architectural similarities between the larval and adult Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Truman, James W

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in Drosophila occurs in two phases, embryonic and post-embryonic, in which the same set of neuroblasts give rise to the distinct larval and adult nervous systems, respectively. Here, we identified the embryonic neuroblast origin of the adult neuronal lineages in the ventral nervous system via lineage-specific GAL4 lines and molecular markers. Our lineage mapping revealed that neurons born late in the embryonic phase show axonal morphology and transcription factor profiles that are similar to the neurons born post-embryonically from the same neuroblast. Moreover, we identified three thorax-specific neuroblasts not previously characterized and show that HOX genes confine them to the thoracic segments. Two of these, NB2-3 and NB3-4, generate leg motor neurons. The other neuroblast is novel and appears to have arisen recently during insect evolution. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of neurogenesis and show how proliferation of individual neuroblasts is dictated by temporal and spatial cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13399.001 PMID:26975248

  20. Differential expression of two scribble isoforms during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Marhold, J; Gatos, A; Török, I; Mechler, B M

    2001-10-01

    The tumour suppressor gene scribble (scrib) is required for epithelial polarity and growth control in Drosophila. Here, we report the identification and embryonic expression pattern of two Scrib protein isoforms resulting from alternative splicing during scrib transcription. Both proteins are first ubiquitously expressed during early embryogenesis. Then, during morphogenesis each Scrib protein displays a specific pattern of expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems, CNS and PNS, respectively. During germ band extension, the expression of the longer form Scrib1 occurs predominantly in the neuroblasts derived from the neuro-ectoderm and becomes later restricted to CNS neurones as well as to the pole cells in the gonads. By contrast, the shorter form Scrib2 is strongly expressed in the PNS and a subset of CNS neurones.

  1. Dissecting Nck/Dock signaling pathways in Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yong

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of neuronal connections during embryonic development requires the precise guidance and targeting of the neuronal growth cone, an expanded cellular structure at the leading tip of a growing axon. The growth cone contains sophisticated signaling systems that allow the rapid communication between guidance receptors and the actin cytoskeleton in generating directed motility. Previous studies demonstrated a specific role for the Nck/Dock SH2/SH3 adapter protein in photoreceptor (R cell) axon guidance and target recognition in the Drosophila visual system, suggesting strongly that Nck/Dock is one of the long-sought missing links between cell surface receptors and the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, I discuss the recent progress on dissecting the Nck/Dock signaling pathways in R-cell growth cones. These studies have identified additional key components of the Nck/Dock signaling pathways for linking the receptor signaling to the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling growth-cone motility.

  2. A role for the Drosophila neurogenic genes in mesoderm differentiation.

    PubMed

    Corbin, V; Michelson, A M; Abmayr, S M; Neel, V; Alcamo, E; Maniatis, T; Young, M W

    1991-10-18

    The neurogenic genes of Drosophila have long been known to regulate cell fate decisions in the developing ectoderm. In this paper we show that these genes also control mesoderm development. Embryonic cells that express the muscle-specific gene nautilus are overproduced in each of seven neurogenic mutants (Notch, Delta, Enhancer of split, big brain, mastermind, neuralized, and almondex), at the apparent expense of neighboring, nonexpressing mesodermal cells. The mesodermal defect does not appear to be a simple consequence of associated neural hypertrophy, suggesting that the neurogenic genes may function similarly and independently in establishing cell fates in both ectoderm and mesoderm. Altered patterns of beta 3-tubulin and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the mutants indicate a role for the neurogenic genes in development of most visceral and somatic muscles. We propose that the signal produced by the neurogenic genes is a general one, effective in both ectoderm and mesoderm.

  3. Epigenetic stability increases extensively during Drosophila follicle stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Skora, Andrew D; Spradling, Allan C

    2010-04-20

    Stem and embryonic cells facilitate programming toward multiple daughter cell fates, whereas differentiated cells resist reprogramming and oncogenic transformation. How alterations in the chromatin-based machinery of epigenetic inheritance contribute to these differences remains poorly known. We observed random, heritable changes in GAL4/UAS transgene programming during Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cell differentiation and used them to measure the stage-specific epigenetic stability of gene programming. The frequency of GAL4/UAS reprogramming declines more than 100-fold over the nine divisions comprising this stem cell lineage. Stabilization acts in cis, suggesting that it is chromatin-based, and correlates with increased S phase length. Our results suggest that stem/early progenitor cells cannot accurately transmit nongenetic information to their progeny; full epigenetic competence is acquired only gradually during early differentiation. Modulating epigenetic inheritance may be a critical process controlling transitions between the pleuripotent and differentiated states.

  4. The embryo as a laboratory: quantifying transcription in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, Thomas; Garcia, Hernan G.; Little, Shawn C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression is fundamental to most cellular processes, including determination of cellular fates. Quantitative studies of transcription in cultured cells have led to significant advances in identifying mechanisms underlying transcriptional control. Recent progress allowed implementation of these same quantitative methods in multicellular organisms to ask how transcriptional regulation unfolds both in vivo and at the single molecule level in the context of embryonic development. Here we review some of these advances in early Drosophila development, which bring the embryo on par with its single-celled counterparts. In particular, we discuss progress in methods to measure mRNA and protein distributions in fixed and living embryos, and we highlight some initial applications that lead to fundamental new insights about molecular transcription processes. We end with an outlook on how to further exploit the unique advantages that come with investigating transcriptional control in the developmental context of the embryo. PMID:25005921

  5. Ontogeny of Drosophila melanogaster in a system of dysgenic crosses

    SciTech Connect

    Grishaeva, T.M.; Ivashchenko, N.I.

    1995-09-01

    Three families of mobile elements that induce P-M, H-E, and I-R hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster were activated by crossing flies of different cytotypes. Manifestation of gonadal sterility in F{sub 1} hybrid progeny was dependent on the temperature of development. The systems differed significantly in lethality of F{sub 2} hybrids at various stages of ontogeny (embyros, larvae, pupae, and adult flies). The highest embryo lethality was found in the P-M system at the cleavage stage. In the I-R and H-E systems, the peak of embryonic death corresponded to the stages of blastoderm and organogenesis, respectively. Experimental results are discussed in view of molecular and cytological characteristics of interacting strains and existing hypotheses for regulation of transposition of P, hobo, and I mobile elements. 44 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Tuning of RNA editing by ADAR is required in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Liam P; Brindle, James; Gallo, Angela; Leroy, Anne; Reenan, Robert A; O'Connell, Mary A

    2005-01-01

    RNA editing increases during development in more than 20 transcripts encoding proteins involved in rapid synaptic neurotransmission in Drosophila central nervous system and muscle. Adar (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) mutant flies expressing only genome-encoded, unedited isoforms of ion-channel subunits are viable but show severe locomotion defects. The Adar transcript itself is edited in adult wild-type flies to generate an isoform with a serine to glycine substitution close to the ADAR active site. We show that editing restricts ADAR function since the edited isoform of ADAR is less active in vitro and in vivo than the genome-encoded, unedited isoform. Ubiquitous expression in embryos and larvae of an Adar transcript that is resistant to editing is lethal. Expression of this transcript in embryonic muscle is also lethal, with above-normal, adult-like levels of editing at sites in a transcript encoding a muscle voltage-gated calcium channel. PMID:15920480

  7. Drosophila MOF controls Checkpoint protein2 and regulates genomic stability during early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Drosophila embryos, checkpoints maintain genome stability by delaying cell cycle progression that allows time for damage repair or to complete DNA synthesis. Drosophila MOF, a member of MYST histone acetyl transferase is an essential component of male X hyperactivation process. Until recently its involvement in G2/M cell cycle arrest and defects in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage pathways was not well established. Results Drosophila MOF is highly expressed during early embryogenesis. In the present study we show that haplo-insufficiency of maternal MOF leads to spontaneous mitotic defects like mitotic asynchrony, mitotic catastrophe and chromatid bridges in the syncytial embryos. Such abnormal nuclei are eliminated and digested in the yolk tissues by nuclear fall out mechanism. MOF negatively regulates Drosophila checkpoint kinase 2 tumor suppressor homologue. In response to DNA damage the checkpoint gene Chk2 (Drosophila mnk) is activated in the mof mutants, there by causing centrosomal inactivation suggesting its role in response to genotoxic stress. A drastic decrease in the fall out nuclei in the syncytial embryos derived from mof1/+; mnkp6/+ females further confirms the role of DNA damage response gene Chk2 to ensure the removal of abnormal nuclei from the embryonic precursor pool and maintain genome stability. The fact that mof mutants undergo DNA damage has been further elucidated by the increased number of single and double stranded DNA breaks. Conclusion mof mutants exhibited genomic instability as evidenced by the occurance of frequent mitotic bridges in anaphase, asynchronous nuclear divisions, disruption of cytoskeleton, inactivation of centrosomes finally leading to DNA damage. Our findings are consistent to what has been reported earlier in mammals that; reduced levels of MOF resulted in increased genomic instability while total loss resulted in lethality. The study can be further extended using Drosophila as model system and carry

  8. Drosophila MOF controls Checkpoint protein2 and regulates genomic stability during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pushpavalli, Sreerangam N C V L; Sarkar, Arpita; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Chowdhury, Debabani Roy; Bhadra, Utpal; Pal-Bhadra, Manika

    2013-01-24

    In Drosophila embryos, checkpoints maintain genome stability by delaying cell cycle progression that allows time for damage repair or to complete DNA synthesis. Drosophila MOF, a member of MYST histone acetyl transferase is an essential component of male X hyperactivation process. Until recently its involvement in G2/M cell cycle arrest and defects in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage pathways was not well established. Drosophila MOF is highly expressed during early embryogenesis. In the present study we show that haplo-insufficiency of maternal MOF leads to spontaneous mitotic defects like mitotic asynchrony, mitotic catastrophe and chromatid bridges in the syncytial embryos. Such abnormal nuclei are eliminated and digested in the yolk tissues by nuclear fall out mechanism. MOF negatively regulates Drosophila checkpoint kinase 2 tumor suppressor homologue. In response to DNA damage the checkpoint gene Chk2 (Drosophila mnk) is activated in the mof mutants, there by causing centrosomal inactivation suggesting its role in response to genotoxic stress. A drastic decrease in the fall out nuclei in the syncytial embryos derived from mof¹/+; mnkp⁶/+ females further confirms the role of DNA damage response gene Chk2 to ensure the removal of abnormal nuclei from the embryonic precursor pool and maintain genome stability. The fact that mof mutants undergo DNA damage has been further elucidated by the increased number of single and double stranded DNA breaks. mof mutants exhibited genomic instability as evidenced by the occurance of frequent mitotic bridges in anaphase, asynchronous nuclear divisions, disruption of cytoskeleton, inactivation of centrosomes finally leading to DNA damage. Our findings are consistent to what has been reported earlier in mammals that; reduced levels of MOF resulted in increased genomic instability while total loss resulted in lethality. The study can be further extended using Drosophila as model system and carry out the interaction of MOF

  9. Expression of the Drosophila Secreted Cuticle Protein 73 (dsc73) Requires Shavenbaby

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Deborah J.; Baker, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Low stringency genomic library screens with genomic fragments from the sex determination gene doublesex identified the Drosophila secreted cuticle protein 73 (dsc73) gene, which encodes an 852-residue protein with an N-terminal signal sequence. In embryos, dsc73 RNA and protein are expressed to high levels in the epidermal cells that secrete the larval cuticle as well as in other cuticle-secreting tissues such as the trachea and salivary duct. Embryonic expression of dsc73 requires Shavenbaby, a transcription factor regulating cuticle formation. Double-labeling experiments with αCrb and αSAS reveal that, as with chitin and other known cuticle proteins, Dsc73 is secreted apically. Zygotic loss of dsc73 results in larval lethality but loss does not result in overt patterning defects or overt morphological defects in the embryonic tissues in which it is expressed. Thus, dsc73 encodes a novel secreted protein, and it is conserved within the Drosophila group. dsc73 may serve as a useful embryonic marker for cuticular patterning. PMID:18351665

  10. Steroid hormone induction of temporal gene expression in Drosophila brain neuroblasts generates neuronal and glial diversity.

    PubMed

    Syed, Mubarak Hussain; Mark, Brandon; Doe, Chris Q

    2017-04-10

    An important question in neuroscience is how stem cells generate neuronal diversity. During Drosophila embryonic development, neural stem cells (neuroblasts) sequentially express transcription factors that generate neuronal diversity; regulation of the embryonic temporal transcription factor cascade is lineage-intrinsic. In contrast, larval neuroblasts generate longer ~50 division lineages, and currently only one mid-larval molecular transition is known: Chinmo/Imp/Lin-28+ neuroblasts transition to Syncrip+ neuroblasts. Here we show that the hormone ecdysone is required to down-regulate Chinmo/Imp and activate Syncrip, plus two late neuroblast factors, Broad and E93. We show that Seven-up triggers Chinmo/Imp to Syncrip/Broad/E93 transition by inducing expression of the Ecdysone receptor in mid-larval neuroblasts, rendering them competent to respond to the systemic hormone ecdysone. Importantly, late temporal gene expression is essential for proper neuronal and glial cell type specification. This is the first example of hormonal regulation of temporal factor expression in Drosophila embryonic or larval neural progenitors.

  11. Symbiotic bacteria are responsible for diet-induced mating preference in Drosophila melanogaster, providing support for the hologenome concept of evolution.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Gil; Segal, Daniel; Zilber-Rosenberg, Ilana; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Diet-induced mating preference in Drosophila melanogaster results from amplification of the commensal bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum, providing a new role for gut microbiota and support for the hologenome concept of evolution. When the flies were treated with antibiotics prior to changing their diet, mating preference did not occur. These data also indicate that other potentially beneficial bacteria could be irreversibly lost by antibiotic treatment and that their replacement could provide a health benefit. We suggest that D. melanogaster can be a useful model organism to study the activities of gut microbiota and their interaction with the immune system.

  12. Arabinoxylans, gut microbiota and immunity.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Mihiri; Leclerc, Estelle; Simsek, Senay

    2016-03-30

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is a non-starch polysaccharide found in many cereal grains and is considered as a dietary fiber. Despite their general structure, there is structural heterogeneity among AX originating from different botanical sources. Furthermore, the extraction procedure and hydrolysis by xylolytic enzymes can further render differences to theses AX. The aim of this review was to address the effects of AX on the gut bacteria and their immunomodulatory properties. Given the complex structure of AX, we also aimed to discuss how the structural heterogeneity of AX affects its role in bacterial growth and immunomodulation. The existing literature indicates the role of fine structural details of AX on its potential as polysaccharides that can impact the gut associated microbial growth and immune system.

  13. Training the gut for competition.

    PubMed

    Murray, Robert

    2006-05-01

    The gut is an important athletic organ because it mediates water and nutrient uptake during exercise. But upper- and lower-gastrointestinal complaints, common to many athletes during exercise, can negatively impact performance, and in severe cases put health at risk. The gut is sensitive to water and nutrient intake during exercise and to hypovolemia, hyperthermia, hypoglycemia, hypoxia, and ischemia. Most gastrointestinal complaints during exercise are mild and of no risk to health, but hemorrhagic gastritis, hematochezia, and ischemic bowel can present medical challenges. Proper training and nutrition minimize the risk of gastrointestinal discomfort during exercise by assuring rapid gastric emptying and absorption of water and nutrients and by maintaining adequate perfusion of the splanchnic vasculature.

  14. Physiological responses of insects to microbial fermentation products: Insights from the interactions between Drosophila and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geonho; Huang, Jia Hsin; McMullen, John G; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E

    2017-05-15

    Acetic acid is a fermentation product of many microorganisms, including some that inhabit the food and guts of Drosophila. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary acetic acid on oviposition and larval performance of Drosophila. At all concentrations tested (0.34-3.4%), acetic acid promoted egg deposition by mated females in no-choice assays; and females preferred to oviposit on diet with acetic acid relative to acetic acid-free diet. However, acetic acid depressed larval performance, particularly extending the development time of both larvae colonized with the bacterium Acetobacter pomorum and axenic (microbe-free) larvae. The larvae may incur an energetic cost associated with dissipating the high acid load on acetic acid-supplemented diets. This effect was compounded by suppressed population growth of A. pomorum on the 3.4% acetic acid diet, such that the gnotobiotic Drosophila on this diet displayed traits characteristic of axenic Drosophila, specifically reduced developmental rate and elevated lipid content. It is concluded that acetic acid is deleterious to larval Drosophila, and hypothesized that acetic acid may function as a reliable cue for females to oviposit in substrates bearing microbial communities that promote larval nutrition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gut microbiome and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Cani, Patrice D; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-12-01

    The gut microbiota has recently evolved as a new important player in the pathophysiology of many intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. The liver is the organ which is in closest contact with the intestinal tract, and is exposed to a substantial amount of bacterial components and metabolites. Various liver disorders such as alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic liver disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis have been associated with an altered microbiome. This dysbiosis may influence the degree of hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis through multiple interactions with the host's immune system and other cell types. Whereas few results from clinical metagenomic studies in liver disease are available, evidence is accumulating that in liver cirrhosis an oral microbiome is overrepresented in the lower intestinal tract, potentially contributing to disease process and severity. A major role for the gut microbiota in liver disorders is also supported by the accumulating evidence that several complications of severe liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy are efficiently treated by various prebiotics, probiotics and antibiotics. A better understanding of the gut microbiota and its components in liver diseases might provide a more complete picture of these complex disorders and also form the basis for novel therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Gut microbiota-bone axis.

    PubMed

    Villa, Christopher R; Ward, Wendy E; Comelli, Elena M

    2017-05-24

    The gut microbiota (GM) is an important regulator of body homeostasis, including intestinal and extra-intestinal effects. This review focuses on the GM-bone axis, which we define as the effect of the gut-associated microbial community or the molecules they synthesize, on bone health. While research in this field is limited, findings from preclinical studies support that gut microbes positively impact bone mineral density and strength parameters. Moreover, administration of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) in preclinical models has demonstrated higher bone mineralization and greater bone strength. The preferential bacterial genus that has shown these beneficial effects in bone is Lactobacillus and thus lactobacilli are among the best candidates for future clinical intervention trials. However, their effectiveness is dependent on stage of development, as early life constitutes an important time for impacting bone health, perhaps via modulation of the GM. In addition, sex-specific difference also impacts the efficacy of the probiotics. Although auspicious, many questions regarding the GM-bone axis require consideration of potential mechanisms; sex-specific efficacy; effective dose of probiotics; and timing and duration of treatment.

  17. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  18. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the Spotted Wing Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanna C.; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A.; Cridland, Julie M.; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A.; Lee, Ernest K.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G.; Walton, Vaughn M.; Begun, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access. PMID:24142924

  19. The structure-function relationships in Drosophila neurotactin show that cholinesterasic domains may have adhesive properties.

    PubMed Central

    Darboux, I; Barthalay, Y; Piovant, M; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R

    1996-01-01

    Neurotactin (Nrt), a Drosophila transmembrane glycoprotein which is expressed in neuronal and epithelial tissues during embryonic and larval stages, exhibits heterophilic adhesive properties. The extracellular domain is composed of a catalytically inactive cholinesterase-like domain. A three-dimensional model deduced from the crystal structure of Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been constructed for Nrt and suggests that its extracellular domain is composed of two sub-domains organized around a gorge: an N-terminal region, whose three-dimensional structure is almost identical to that of Torpedo AChE, and a less conserved C-terminal region. By using truncated Nrt molecules and a homotypic cell aggregation assay which involves a soluble ligand activity, it has been possible to show that the adhesive function is localized in the N-terminal region of the extracellular domain comprised between His347 and His482. The C-terminal region of the protein can be removed without impairing Nrt adhesive properties, suggesting that the two sub-domains are structurally independent. Chimeric molecules in which the Nrt cholinesterase-like domain has been replaced by homologous domains from Drosophila AChE, Torpedo AChE or Drosophila glutactin (Glt), share similar adhesive properties. These properties may require the presence of Nrt cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains since authentic Drosophila AChE does not behave as an adhesive molecule when transfected in S2 cells. Images PMID:8890157

  20. Drosophila as a model for the two myeloid blood cell systems in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Katrina S.; Brückner, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Fish, mice and men rely on two coexisting myeloid blood cell systems. One is sustained by hematopoietic progenitor cells, which reside in specialized microenvironments in hematopoietic organs and give rise to cells of the monocyte lineage. The other system corresponds to the independent lineage of self-renewing tissue macrophages, which colonize organs during embryonic development and are maintained during later life by proliferation in local tissue microenvironments. However, little is known about the nature of these microenvironments and their regulation. Moreover, many vertebrate tissues contain a mix of both tissue-resident and monocyte-derived macrophages, posing a challenge to the study of lineage-specific regulatory mechanisms and function. This review highlights how research in the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster can address many of these outstanding questions in the field. Drawing parallels between hematopoiesis in Drosophila and vertebrates, we illustrate the evolutionary conservation of the two myeloid systems across animal phyla. Much like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses a lineage of self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages, as well as a ‘definitive’ lineage of macrophages that derive from hematopoiesis in the progenitor-based lymph gland. We summarize key findings from Drosophila hematopoiesis that illustrate how local microenvironments, systemic signals, immune challenges and nervous inputs regulate adaptive responses of tissue-resident macrophages and progenitor-based hematopoiesis to achieve optimal fitness of the animal. PMID:24946019

  1. The Tolkin Gene Is a Tolloid/Bmp-1 Homologue That Is Essential for Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, A. L.; Xie, T.; Bossie, C. A.; Blackman, R. K.; Padgett, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, a member of the tranforming growth factor β superfamily of growth factors, is critical for specification of the embryonic dorsal-ventral axis, for proper formation of the midgut, and for formation of Drosophila adult structures. The Drosophila tolloid gene has been shown to genetically interact with dpp. The genetic interaction between tolloid and dpp suggests a model in which the tolloid protein participates in a complex containing the DPP ligand, its protease serving to activate DPP, either directly or indirectly. We report here the identification and cloning of another Drosophila member of the tolloid/bone morphogenic protein (BMP) 1 family, tolkin, which is located 700 bp 5' to tolloid. Its overall structure is like tolloid, with an N-terminal metalloprotease domain, five complement subcomponents C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1 (CUB) repeats and two epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats. Its expression pattern overlaps that of tolloid and dpp in early embryos and diverges in later stages. In larval tissues, both tolloid and tolkin are expressed uniformly in the imaginal disks. In the brain, both tolloid and tolkin are expressed in the outer proliferation center, whereas tolkin has another stripe of expression near the outer proliferation center. Analysis of lethal mutations in tolkin indicate it is vital during larval and pupal stages. Analysis of its mutant phenotypes and expression patterns suggests that its functions may be mostly independent of tolloid and dpp. PMID:8536976

  2. Oral magnetite nanoparticles disturb the development of Drosophila melanogaster from oogenesis to adult emergence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanqing; Wang, Bing; Feng, Weiyue; Du, Wei; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhifang; Bi, Xiaolin

    2015-05-01

    The potential impacts of nanomaterials (NMs) on fetal development have attracted great concerns because of the increased potential exposure to NMs during pregnancy. Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis and developmental transitions may provide an attractive system to study the biological and environmental effects of NMs on the embryonic development. In this study, the effects of three types of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs): UN-MNPs (pristine), CA-MNPs (citric acid modified) and APTS-MNPs (3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane coated) on the development of Drosophila at 300 and 600 μg/g dosage were studied. The uptake of MNPs by female and male flies caused obvious reduction in the female fecundity, and the developmental delay at the egg-pupae and pupae-adult transitions, especially in those treated by the positive APTS-MNPs. Further investigation demonstrates that the parental uptake of MNPs disturbs the oogenesis period, induces ovarian defect, reduces the length of eggs, decreases the number of nurse cells and delays egg chamber development, which may contribute to the decrease of fecundity of female Drosophila and the development delay of their offspring. Using the synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF), the dyshomeostasis of trace elements such as Fe, Ca and Cu along the anterior-posterior axis of the fertilized eggs was found, which may be an important reason for the development delay of Drosophila.

  3. Embryonic markers of cone differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Helen M.; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Sokolov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor cells are born in two distinct phases of vertebrate retinogenesis. In the mouse retina, cones are born primarily during embryogenesis, while rod formation occurs later in embryogenesis and early postnatal ages. Despite this dichotomy in photoreceptor birthdates, the visual pigments and phototransduction machinery are not reactive to visual stimulus in either type of photoreceptor cell until the second postnatal week. Several markers of early cone formation have been identified, including Otx2, Crx, Blimp1, NeuroD, Trβ2, Rorβ, and Rxrγ, and all are thought to be involved in cellular determination. However, little is known about the expression of proteins involved in cone visual transduction during early retinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to characterize visual transduction proteins that are expressed specifically in photoreceptors during mouse embryogenesis. Methods Eye tissue was collected from control and phosducin-null mice at embryonic and early postnatal ages. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) were used to measure the spatial and temporal expression patterns of phosducin (Pdc) and cone transducin γ (Gngt2) proteins and transcripts in the embryonic and early postnatal mouse retina. Results We identified the embryonic expression of phosducin (Pdc) and cone transducin γ (Gngt2) that coincides temporally and spatially with the earliest stages of cone histogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry, the phosducin protein was first detected in the retina at embryonic day (E)12.5, and cone transducin γ was observed at E13.5. The phosducin and cone transducin γ proteins were seen only in the outer neuroblastic layer, consistent with their expression in photoreceptors. At the embryonic ages, phosducin was coexpressed with Rxrγ, a known cone marker, and with Otx2, a marker of photoreceptors. Pdc and Gngt2 mRNAs were detected as early as E10.5 with qPCR, although at low levels. Conclusions Visual transduction

  4. Control of directional change after mechanical stimulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proper adjustment of moving direction after external mechanical stimulation is essential for animals to avoid danger (e.g. predators), and thus is vital for survival. This process involves sensory inputs, central processing and motor outputs. Recent studies have made considerable progress in identifying mechanosensitive neurons and mechanosensation receptor proteins. Our understandings of molecular and cellular mechanisms that link mechanosensation with the changes in moving direction, however, remain limited. Results In this study, we investigate the control of movement adjustment in Drosophila. In response to gentle touch at the anterior segments, Drosophila larvae reorient and select a new direction for forward movement. The extent of change in moving direction is correlated with the intensity of tactile stimuli. Sensation of gentle touch requires chordotonal organs and class IV da neurons. Genetic analysis indicates an important role for the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily protein Turtle (Tutl) to regulate touch-initiated directional change. Tutl is required specifically in post-mitotic neurons at larval stage after the completion of embryonic development. Circuit breaking analysis identified a small subset of Tutl-positive neurons that are involved in the adjustment of moving direction. Conclusion We identify Tutl and a small subset of CNS neurons in modulating directional change in response to gentle touch. This study presents an excellent starting point for further dissection of molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling directional adjustment after mechanical stimulation. PMID:23107101

  5. Roles of receptor tyrosine kinases in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Shilo, B Z

    1992-08-01

    Communication between cells is a fundamental component of development and morphogenesis. Identification of the molecules mediating cell-cell communication is crucial for elucidation of the molecular basis of these processes. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) appear to play a central role in this context by transmitting into cells information dictating their fate. The functions of RTKs in Drosophila are extremely diverse, and include maternal determination of embryonic polarity (torso and torpedo), determination of neuroblast identity (faint little ball), and guidance of tracheal cell migration in the embryo (breathless). During compound eye development, RTKs affect the number of photoreceptor clusters (Ellipse) and the determination of photoreceptor R7 identity (sevenless). The phenotypes of mutations in RTK loci serve as a starting point for understanding processes dictating cell identity at the level of the whole organism. Recently, they have also begun to provide a basis for selection of second-site suppressor mutations, encoding additional elements in their signal transduction pathway. Common themes between the functions, regulation, and signal transduction pathways of Drosophila RTKs are drawn.

  6. The developmental expression dynamics of Drosophila melanogaster transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Adryan, Boris; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific transcription factors (TFs) are coordinators of developmental and physiological gene expression programs. Their binding to cis-regulatory modules of target genes mediates the precise cell- and context-specific activation and repression of genes. The expression of TFs should therefore reflect the core expression program of each cell. We studied the expression dynamics of about 750 TFs using the available genomics resources in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that 95% of these TFs are expressed at some point during embryonic development, with a peak roughly between 10 and 12 hours after egg laying, the core stages of organogenesis. We address the differential utilization of DNA-binding domains in different developmental programs systematically in a spatio-temporal context, and show that the zinc finger class of TFs is predominantly early expressed, while Homeobox TFs exhibit later expression in embryogenesis. Previous work, dissecting cis-regulatory modules during Drosophila development, suggests that TFs are deployed in groups acting in a cooperative manner. In contrast, we find that there is rapid exchange of co-expressed partners amongst the fly TFs, at rates similar to the genome-wide dynamics of co-expression clusters. This suggests there may also be a high level of combinatorial complexity of TFs at cis-regulatory modules.

  7. The developmental expression dynamics of Drosophila melanogaster transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Site-specific transcription factors (TFs) are coordinators of developmental and physiological gene expression programs. Their binding to cis-regulatory modules of target genes mediates the precise cell- and context-specific activation and repression of genes. The expression of TFs should therefore reflect the core expression program of each cell. Results We studied the expression dynamics of about 750 TFs using the available genomics resources in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that 95% of these TFs are expressed at some point during embryonic development, with a peak roughly between 10 and 12 hours after egg laying, the core stages of organogenesis. We address the differential utilization of DNA-binding domains in different developmental programs systematically in a spatio-temporal context, and show that the zinc finger class of TFs is predominantly early expressed, while Homeobox TFs exhibit later expression in embryogenesis. Conclusions Previous work, dissecting cis-regulatory modules during Drosophila development, suggests that TFs are deployed in groups acting in a cooperative manner. In contrast, we find that there is rapid exchange of co-expressed partners amongst the fly TFs, at rates similar to the genome-wide dynamics of co-expression clusters. This suggests there may also be a high level of combinatorial complexity of TFs at cis-regulatory modules. PMID:20384991

  8. Cindr interacts with anillin to control cytokinesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Kaisa; Nezis, Ioannis P; Lemus, Dafne; Grabbe, Caroline; Wesche, Jørgen; Liestøl, Knut; Dikic, Ivan; Palmer, Ruth; Stenmark, Harald

    2010-05-25

    Cytokinesis, the final step of cell division, conventionally proceeds to cell separation by abscission, or complete cytokinesis, but may in certain tissues be incomplete, yielding daughter cells that are interconnected in syncytia by stable intercellular bridges. The mechanisms that determine complete versus incomplete cytokinesis are not known. Here we report a novel in vivo role of the Drosophila CD2AP/CIN85 ortholog Cindr in both complete and incomplete cytokinesis. We also show evidence for the presence of persistent intercellular bridges in the major larval imaginal disc epithelia. During conventional division of both cultured and embryonic cells, Cindr localizes to cleavage furrows, intercellular bridges, and midbodies. Moreover, in cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis in the female germline and the somatic ovarian follicle cell and larval imaginal disc epithelia, Cindr localizes to arrested cleavage furrows and stable intercellular bridges, respectively. In these structures, Cindr colocalizes with the essential cytokinesis regulator Anillin. We show that Cindr interacts with Anillin and that depletion of either Cindr or Anillin gives rise to binucleate cells and fewer intercellular bridges in vivo. We propose that Cindr and Anillin cooperate to promote intercellular bridge stability during incomplete cytokinesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cospeciation of gut microbiota with hominids.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Andrew H; Caro-Quintero, Alejandro; Mjungu, Deus; Georgiev, Alexander V; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Muller, Martin N; Pusey, Anne E; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2016-07-22

    The evolutionary origins of the bacterial lineages that populate the human gut are unknown. Here we show that multiple lineages of the predominant bacterial taxa in the gut arose via cospeciation with humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas over the past 15 million years. Analyses of strain-level bacterial diversity within hominid gut microbiomes revealed that clades of Bacteroidaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae have been maintained exclusively within host lineages across hundreds of thousands of host generations. Divergence times of these cospeciating gut bacteria are congruent with those of hominids, indicating that nuclear, mitochondrial, and gut bacterial genomes diversified in concert during hominid evolution. This study identifies human gut bacteria descended from ancient symbionts that speciated simultaneously with humans and the African apes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Cospeciation of gut microbiota with hominids

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Andrew H.; Caro-Quintero, Alejandro; Mjungu, Deus; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Muller, Martin N.; Pusey, Anne E.; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ochman, Howard

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the bacterial lineages that populate the human gut are unknown. Here we show that multiple lineages of the predominant bacterial taxa in the gut arose via cospeciation with humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas over the past 15 million years. Analyses of strain-level bacterial diversity within hominid gut microbiomes revealed that clades of Bacteroidaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae have been maintained exclusively within host lineages across hundreds of thousands of host generations. Divergence times of these cospeciating gut bacteria are congruent with those of hominids, indicating that nuclear, mitochondrial, and gut bacterial genomes diversified in concert during hominid evolution. This study identifies human gut bacteria descended from ancient symbionts that speciated simultaneously with humans and the African apes. PMID:27463672

  11. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Bodmer, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-α), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  12. An unconventional myosin heavy chain gene from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, K A; Miller, K G

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study of cytoskeletal proteins involved in Drosophila embryonic development, we have undertaken the molecular analysis of a 140-kD ATP-sensitive actin-binding protein (Miller, K. G., C. M. Field, and B. M. Alberts. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2963-2975). Analysis of cDNA clones encoding this protein revealed that it represents a new class of unconventional myosin heavy chains. The amino-terminal two thirds of the protein comprises a head domain that is 29-33% identical (60-65% similar) to other myosin heads, and contains ATP-binding, actin-binding and calmodulin/myosin light chain-binding motifs. The carboxy-terminal tail has no significant similarity to other known myosin tails, but does contain a approximately 100-amino acid region that is predicted to form an alpha-helical coiled-coil. Since the unique gene that encodes this protein maps to the polytene map position 95F, we have named the new gene Drosophila 95F myosin heavy chain (95F MHC). The expression profile of the 95F MHC gene is complex. Examination of multiple cDNAs reveals that transcripts are alternatively spliced and encode at least three protein isoforms; in addition, a fourth isoform is detected on Western blots. Developmental Northern and Western blots show that transcripts and protein are present throughout the life cycle, with peak expression occurring during mid-embryogenesis and adulthood. Immunolocalization in early embryos demonstrates that the protein is primarily located in a punctate pattern throughout the peripheral cytoplasm. Most cells maintain a low level of protein expression throughout embryogenesis, but specific tissues appear to contain more protein. We speculate that the 95F MHC protein isoforms are involved in multiple dynamic processes during Drosophila development.

  13. Cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Belloni, Giorgio; Piergentili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinesis separates the cytoplasm and the duplicated genome into two daughter cells at the end of cell division. This process must be finely regulated to maintain ploidy and prevent tumor formation. Drosophila male meiosis provides an excellent cell system for investigating cytokinesis. Mutants affecting this process can be easily identified and spermatocytes are large cells particularly suitable for cytological analysis of cytokinetic structures. Over the past decade, the powerful tools of Drosophila genetics and the unique characteristics of this cell system have led researchers to identify molecular players of the cell cleavage machinery and to address important open questions. Although spermatocyte cytokinesis is incomplete, resulting in formation of stable intercellular bridges, the molecular mechanisms are largely conserved in somatic cells. Thus, studies of Drosophila male meiosis will shed new light on the complex cell circuits regulating furrow ingression and substantially further our knowledge of cancer and other human diseases. PMID:23094234

  14. Why Drosophila to Study Phototransduction?

    PubMed Central

    Pak, William L.

    2010-01-01

    This review recounts the early history of Drosophila phototransduction genetics, covering the period between approximately 1966 to 1979. Early in this period, the author felt that there was an urgent need for a new approach in phototransduction research. Through inputs from a number of colleagues, he was led to consider isolating Drosophila mutants that are defective in the electroretinogram. Thanks to the efforts of dedicated associates and technical staff, by the end of this period, he was able to accumulate a large number of such mutants. Particularly important in this effort was the use of the mutant assay protocol based on the “prolonged depolarizing afterpotential.” This collection of mutants formed the basis of the subsequent intensive investigations of the Drosophila phototransduction cascade by many investigators. PMID:20536286

  15. Micromechanics of Drosophila Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2003-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the auditory micromechanics of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this animal, the distal part of the antenna constitutes a resonantly tuned sound receiver, the vibrations of which are transduced by a chordotonal sense organ in the antenna's base. Analyzing the mechanical behavior of the antennal receiver by means of microscanning laser Doppler vibrometry, we show that the auditory system of wild-type flies exhibits a hardening stiffness nonlinearity and spontaneously generates oscillations in the absence of external stimuli. According to the deprivation of these mechanical properties in mechanosensory mutants, the receiver's nonlinearity and oscillation activity are introduced by chordotonal auditory neurons. Requiring the mechanoreceptor-specific extracellular linker protein No-mechanoreceptor-potential-A (NompA), NompC mechanosensory transduction channels, Beethoven (Btv), and Touch-insensitive-larva-B (TilB), nonlinearity and oscillation activity of the fly's antennal receiver depend on prominent components of the auditory transduction machinery and seem to originate from motility of auditory receptor cilia.

  16. Modelling the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Johannes

    2009-12-01

    I provide a historical overview on the use of mathematical models to gain insight into pattern formation during early development of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. It is my intention to illustrate how the aims and methodology of modelling have changed from the early beginnings of a theoretical developmental biology in the 1960s to modern-day systems biology. I show that even early modelling attempts addressed interesting and relevant questions, which were not tractable by experimental approaches. Unfortunately, their validation was severely hampered by a lack of specificity and appropriate experimental evidence. There is a simple lesson to be learned from this: we cannot deduce general rules for pattern formation from first principles or spurious reproduction of developmental phenomena. Instead, we must infer such rules (if any) from detailed and accurate studies of specific developmental systems. To achieve this, mathematical modelling must be closely integrated with experimental approaches. I report on progress that has been made in this direction in the past few years and illustrate the kind of novel insights that can be gained from such combined approaches. These insights demonstrate the great potential (and some pitfalls) of an integrative, systems-level investigation of pattern formation.

  17. The GOCE User Toolbox (GUT) and Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R. J.; Benveniste, J.; Knudsen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox (GUT) is an integrated suite of tools for the analysis and use of GOCE Level 2 gravity products. GUT supports applications in geodesy, oceanography and solid earth physics. The accompanying GUT tutorial provides information and guidance on how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications within each of these domains. An important motivation for the development of GUT has been the desire that users should be able to exploit the GOCE gravity products to calculate derived products relevant to their particular domains without necessarily needing to understand the technicalities of particular geodetic concepts and algorithms. As such, GUT is also suitable for use as an aid to the teaching of geophysics. A comprehensive and up-to-date set of a-priori data and models are supplied with the toolbox, together with a range of pre-defined workflows, allowing the user to immediately calculate useful geophysical quantities. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. GUT is cross-platform and may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux workstations and Macs. GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and, besides some bug-fixes, the capability to calculate the simple Bouguer anomaly was added. Recently, GUT version 3 has been released. Through a collaborative effort between the relevant scientific communities, this version has built on earlier releases by further extending the functionality of the toolbox within the fields of geodesy, oceanography and solid earth physics. Additions include the ability to work directly with gravity gradients, anisotropic diffusive filtering, and the computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies. The interface between the user and the toolbox has also been greatly improved and GUT version 3 now includes an attractive and intuitive Graphical User Interface. An associated GUT VCM tool for analysing the GOCE variance covariance matrices is also available.

  18. The effect of space environment on the development and aging of Drosophila Melanogaster (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marco, Roberto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment involves the study of the development of eggs of the fly, Drosophila, exposed to microgravity. It is presumed that oogenesis, rather than further states of embryonic development, is sensitive to gravity. This hypothesis will be tested by collecting eggs layered at specific times inflight and postflight from flies exposed to 0 and 1 g. This portion of the experiment is a repetition of an earlier experiment flown in Biorack during the Spacelab D1 Mission. An added feature of the experiment for the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) Mission is to study the effect of microgravity on the life span of Drosophila male flies. Various aspects of the investigation are discussed.

  19. An ABC transporter controls export of a Drosophila germ cell attractant.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Sara; Lehmann, Ruth

    2009-02-13

    Directed cell migration, which is critical for embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking, and cell metastasis, depends on chemoattraction. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase regulates the production of an attractant for Drosophila germ cells that may itself be geranylated. Chemoattractants are commonly secreted through a classical, signal peptide-dependent pathway, but a geranyl-modified attractant would require an alternative pathway. In budding yeast, pheromones produced by a-cells are farnesylated and secreted in a signal peptide-independent manner, requiring the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Ste6p. Here we show that Drosophila germ cell migration uses a similar pathway, demonstrating that invertebrate germ cells, like yeast cells, are attracted to lipid-modified peptides. Components of this unconventional export pathway are highly conserved, suggesting that this pathway may control the production of similarly modified chemoattractants in organisms ranging from yeast to humans.

  20. Establishing and maintaining cell polarity with mRNA localization in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Barr, Justinn; Yakovlev, Konstantin V; Shidlovskii, Yulii; Schedl, Paul

    2016-03-01

    How cell polarity is established and maintained is an important question in diverse biological contexts. Molecular mechanisms used to localize polarity proteins to distinct domains are likely context-dependent and provide a feedback loop in order to maintain polarity. One such mechanism is the localized translation of mRNAs encoding polarity proteins, which will be the focus of this review and may play a more important role in the establishment and maintenance of polarity than is currently known. Localized translation of mRNAs encoding polarity proteins can be used to establish polarity in response to an external signal, and to maintain polarity by local production of polarity determinants. The importance of this mechanism is illustrated by recent findings, including orb2-dependent localized translation of aPKC mRNA at the apical end of elongating spermatid tails in the Drosophila testis, and the apical localization of stardust A mRNA in Drosophila follicle and embryonic epithelia.

  1. [Role of GAGA Factor in Drosophila Primordial Germ Cell Migration and Gonad Development].

    PubMed

    Dorogova, N V; Khrushcheva, A S; Fedorova, E V; Ogienko, A A; Baricheva, E M

    2016-01-01

    The GAGA protein of drosophila is a factor involved in epigenetic transcription regulation of a large gene group controlling developmental processes. In this paper, the role of GAGA factor in germ cell migration is demonstrated as well as its effect on the gonad development in drosophila embryogenesis. Mutations in the Trl gene, encoding GAGA factor, prematurely induces the active migration program and relocation of the primordial cells inward the embryo before the beginning of gastrulation. The germ cells that prematurely separated from the main group migrate ectopically, lose orientation, and stay out of gonad development. Expression pattern of the Trl gene suggests its activity in epithelial cells of the embryonic blastoderm, part of which contact primordial cells. Thus, GAGA factor influences migration of these cells in an indirect manner via their somatic environment.

  2. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  3. Embryonic development during chronic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments carried out on chicken eggs indicate that the embryo is affected during very early development, especially over the first four days, and during hatching. In the first four days, the brain develops as well as the anlage for all other organs. In addition, the heart commences to function and the extraembryonic membranes that compartmentalize the egg contents form. The latter require an appreciable extension and folding of tissue which may be disrupted by the mechanical load. Observations of embryonic abnormalities that occur during chronic acceleration suggest an inhibition of development of the axial skeleton, which is rarely seen otherwise, a general retardation of embryonic growth, and circulatory problems. The final stages of development (after 18 days) involve the uptake of fluids, the transition to aerial respiration, and the reorientation of the embryo into a normal hatching position. At 4 G mortality is very high during this period, with a majority of embryos failing to reorient into the normal hatching position.

  4. Embryonic development during chronic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments carried out on chicken eggs indicate that the embryo is affected during very early development, especially over the first four days, and during hatching. In the first four days, the brain develops as well as the anlage for all other organs. In addition, the heart commences to function and the extraembryonic membranes that compartmentalize the egg contents form. The latter require an appreciable extension and folding of tissue which may be disrupted by the mechanical load. Observations of embryonic abnormalities that occur during chronic acceleration suggest an inhibition of development of the axial skeleton, which is rarely seen otherwise, a general retardation of embryonic growth, and circulatory problems. The final stages of development (after 18 days) involve the uptake of fluids, the transition to aerial respiration, and the reorientation of the embryo into a normal hatching position. At 4 G mortality is very high during this period, with a majority of embryos failing to reorient into the normal hatching position.

  5. Electroporation of Embryonic Kidney Explants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Nicholas; Houle, Daniel; Gupta, Indra R.

    Metanephric kidney development in the mouse begins at embryonic day (E) 10.5, when the ureteric bud (UB), an outgrowth of the epithelial nephric duct, invades the neighboring metanephric mesenchyme (MM). The ureteric bud then undergoes a series of branching events to form the collecting duct network of the adult kidney (Fig. 19.1). As each ureteric bud tip forms, the adjacent undifferentiated mesenchyme is induced to epithelialize and form a nephron, the functional unit of the adult kidney that filters waste. Rodent embryonic kidneys can be dissected and cultured as explants such that branching morphogenesis and nephrogenesis can be observed ex vivo (Rothenpieler and Dressler, 1993; Vega et al., 1996; Piscione et al., 1997; Gupta et al., 2003).

  6. BEST: a novel computational approach for comparing gene expression patterns from early stages of Drosophila melanogaster development.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Jayaraman, Karthik; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Gurunathan, Rajalakshmi; Marti-Subirana, Ana; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2002-01-01

    Embryonic gene expression patterns are an indispensable part of modern developmental biology. Currently, investigators must visually inspect numerous images containing embryonic expression patterns to identify spatially similar patterns for inferring potential genetic interactions. The lack of a computational approach to identify pattern similarities is an impediment to advancement in developmental biology research because of the rapidly increasing amount of available embryonic gene expression data. Therefore, we have developed computational approaches to automate the comparison of gene expression patterns contained in images of early stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos (prior to the beginning of germ-band elongation); similarities and differences in gene expression patterns in these early stages have extensive developmental effects. Here we describe a basic expression search tool (BEST) to retrieve best matching expression patterns for a given query expression pattern and a computational device for gene interaction inference using gene expression pattern images and information on the associated genotypes and probes. Analysis of a prototype collection of Drosophila gene expression pattern images is presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods in identifying biologically meaningful matches and inferring gene interactions by direct image content analysis. In particular, the use of BEST searches for gene expression patterns is akin to that of BLAST searches for finding similar sequences. These computational developmental biology methodologies are likely to make the great wealth of embryonic gene expression pattern data easily accessible and to accelerate the discovery of developmental networks. PMID:12524369

  7. Gut inflammation and microbiome in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Sandhya, Pulukool; Danda, Debashish

    2016-04-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is chronic inflammatory disease involving joints and the spine. Bowel inflammation is common in SpA, which may be classified as acute or chronic. Chronic gut inflammation is most common in SpA patients with axial involvement as compared to those presenting with peripheral involvement alone. The pathogenesis of gut inflammation in SpA could be explained by two factors-over-activation of immunological cells and altered gut microbiome. This is exemplified by SpA animal models, namely HLA-B27-expressing transgenic animals and SKG mice models. Immunological mechanisms include homing of activated T cells from gut into synovium, excess pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion by immune cells such as IL-23 and genetic variations in immunological genes. The evidence for role of gut microbiome in SpA is gradually emerging. Recently, metagenomic study of gut microbiome by sequencing of microbial nucleic acids has enabled identification of new microbial taxa and their functions in gut of patients with SpA. In SpA, the gut microbiome could emerge as diagnostic and prognostic marker of disease. Modulation of gut microbiome is slated to have therapeutic potential as well.

  8. Role of the normal gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jandhyala, Sai Manasa; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Subramanyam, Chivkula; Vuyyuru, Harish; Sasikala, Mitnala; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2015-08-07

    Relation between the gut microbiota and human health is being increasingly recognised. It is now well established that a healthy gut flora is largely responsible for overall health of the host. The normal human gut microbiota comprises of two major phyla, namely Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Though the gut microbiota in an infant appears haphazard, it starts resembling the adult flora by the age of 3 years. Nevertheless, there exist temporal and spatial variations in the microbial distribution from esophagus to the rectum all along the individual's life span. Developments in genome sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have now enabled scientists to study these microorganisms and their function and microbe-host interactions in an elaborate manner both in health and disease. The normal gut microbiota imparts specific function in host nutrient metabolism, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, maintenance of structural integrity of the gut mucosal barrier, immunomodulation, and protection against pathogens. Several factors play a role in shaping the normal gut microbiota. They include (1) the mode of delivery (vaginal or caesarean); (2) diet during infancy (breast milk or formula feeds) and adulthood (vegan based or meat based); and (3) use of antibiotics or antibiotic like molecules that are derived from the environment or the gut commensal community. A major concern of antibiotic use is the long-term alteration of the normal healthy gut microbiota and horizontal transfer of resistance genes that could result in reservoir of organisms with a multidrug resistant gene pool.

  9. Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vaarala, Outi

    2012-01-01

    The gut immune system has a key role in the development of autoimmune diabetes, and factors that control the gut immune system are also regulators of beta-cell autoimmunity. Gut microbiota modulate the function of the gut immune system by their effect on the innate immune system, such as the intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells, and on the adaptive immune system, in particular intestinal T cells. Due to the immunological link between gut and pancreas, e.g. the shared lymphocyte homing receptors, the immunological changes in the gut are reflected in the pancreas. According to animal studies, changes in gut microbiota alter the development of autoimmune diabetes. This has been demonstrated by antibiotics that induce changes in the gut microbiota. Furthermore, gut-colonizing microbes may modify the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in animal models. Deficient toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, mediating microbial stimulus in immune cells, prevents autoimmune diabetes, which appears to be dependent on alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Although few studies have been conducted in humans, recent studies suggest that the abundance of Bacteroides and lack of butyrate-producing bacteria in fecal microbiota are associated with beta-cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. It is possible that altered gut microbiota are associated with immunological aberrancies in type 1 diabetes. The changes in gut microbiota could lead to alterations in the gut immune system, such as increased gut permeability, small intestinal inflammation, and impaired tolerance to food antigens, all of which are observed in type 1 diabetes. Poor fitness of gut microbiota could explain why children who develop type 1 diabetes are prone to enterovirus infections, and do not develop tolerance to cow milk antigens. These candidate risk factors of type 1 diabetes may imply an increased risk of type 1 diabetes due to the presence of gut microbiota that do not support health. Despite the complex

  10. Role of the normal gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Jandhyala, Sai Manasa; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Subramanyam, Chivkula; Vuyyuru, Harish; Sasikala, Mitnala; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2015-01-01

    Relation between the gut microbiota and human health is being increasingly recognised. It is now well established that a healthy gut flora is largely responsible for overall health of the host. The normal human gut microbiota comprises of two major phyla, namely Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Though the gut microbiota in an infant appears haphazard, it starts resembling the adult flora by the age of 3 years. Nevertheless, there exist temporal and spatial variations in the microbial distribution from esophagus to the rectum all along the individual’s life span. Developments in genome sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have now enabled scientists to study these microorganisms and their function and microbe-host interactions in an elaborate manner both in health and disease. The normal gut microbiota imparts specific function in host nutrient metabolism, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, maintenance of structural integrity of the gut mucosal barrier, immunomodulation, and protection against pathogens. Several factors play a role in shaping the normal gut microbiota. They include (1) the mode of delivery (vaginal or caesarean); (2) diet during infancy (breast milk or formula feeds) and adulthood (vegan based or meat based); and (3) use of antibiotics or antibiotic like molecules that are derived from the environment or the gut commensal community. A major concern of antibiotic use is the long-term alteration of the normal healthy gut microbiota and horizontal transfer of resistance genes that could result in reservoir of organisms with a multidrug resistant gene pool. PMID:26269668

  11. Gut biogeography of the bacterial microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Gregory P.; Lee, S. Melanie; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2016-01-01

    PREFACE Animals assemble and maintain a diverse, yet host-specific gut microbial community. In addition to characteristic microbial compositions along the longitudinal axis of the intestines, discrete bacterial communities form in microhabitats, such as the gut lumen, colon mucus layers and colon crypts. In this Review, we examine how spatial distribution of symbiotic bacteria among physical niches in the gut impacts the development and maintenance of a resilient microbial ecosystem. We consider novel hypotheses for how nutrient selection, immune activation and other mechanisms control the biogeography of bacteria in the gut and discuss the relevance of this spatial heterogeneity to health and disease. PMID:26499895

  12. Host-gut microbiota metabolic interactions.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine; Kinross, James; Burcelin, Remy; Gibson, Glenn; Jia, Wei; Pettersson, Sven

    2012-06-08

    The composition and activity of the gut microbiota codevelop with the host from birth and is subject to a complex interplay that depends on the host genome, nutrition, and life-style. The gut microbiota is involved in the regulation of multiple host metabolic pathways, giving rise to interactive host-microbiota metabolic, signaling, and immune-inflammatory axes that physiologically connect the gut, liver, muscle, and brain. A deeper understanding of these axes is a prerequisite for optimizing therapeutic strategies to manipulate the gut microbiota to combat disease and improve health.

  13. The role of gut peptides in the gut-brain-axis of livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gut peptides are small hormones produced within the gut that are involved in many biological processes including, but not limited to, appetite regulation, mucosal growth, and metabolism regulation. Some peptides, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and xenin-25 may affect appetite by altering gut motilit...

  14. The Human Bcl-2 Family Member Bcl-rambo Localizes to Mitochondria and Induces Apoptosis and Morphological Aberrations in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Yuka; Watanabe, Megumi; Vo, Nicole; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins play a central role in regulating apoptosis. We previously reported that human Bcl-rambo, also termed BCL2L13, localized to mitochondria and induced apoptosis when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. However, the physiological function of Bcl-rambo currently remains unclear. In the present study, human Bcl-rambo was ectopically expressed in Drosophila melanogaster. Bcl-rambo mainly localized to the mitochondria of Drosophila Schneider 2 (S2) cells. The overexpression of Bcl-rambo, but not Bcl-rambo lacking a C-terminal transmembrane domain, induced apoptosis in S2 cells. Moreover, the ectopic expression of Bcl-rambo by a GAL4-UAS system induced aberrant morphological changes characterized by atrophied wing, split thorax, and rough eye phenotypes. Bcl-rambo induced the activation of effector caspases in eye imaginal discs. The rough eye phenotype induced by Bcl-rambo was partly rescued by the co-expression of p35, Diap1, and Diap2. By using this Drosophila model, we showed that human Bcl-rambo interacted genetically with Drosophila homologues of adenine nucleotide translocators and the autophagy-related 8 protein. The results of the present study demonstrated that human Bcl-rambo localized to mitochondria and at least regulated an apoptosis signaling pathway in Drosophila. PMID:27348811

  15. Egg and fourth instar larvae gut of Aedes aegypti as a source of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mario, Lara C; Borghesi, Jéssica; Crivellari-Damasceno, Wilson T; Favaron, Phelipe O; Carreira, Ana Claudia O; Will, Sonia E A L; Maria, Durvanei A; Miglino, Maria A

    2016-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 2015 registered more than 1.206.172 cases of Dengue in the Americas. Recently, the Aedes aegypti has been not only related to Dengue, but also with cases of Zika virus and Chikungunya. Due to its epidemiological importance, this study characterized the morphology of the embryonated eggs of A. aegypti and provided a protocol to culture stem cells from eggs and digestive tract of fourth instar larvae in order to examine cell biology and expression of markers in these vectors. Cells were isolated and cultured in DMEM-High at 28°C, and their morphology, cell cycle and immunophenotyping were examined. Morphologically, embryos were at the end of the embryonic period and showed: head, thorax, and abdomen with eight abdominal segments. The embryonic tissues expressed markers related to cell proliferation (PCNA), pluripotency (Sox2 and OCT3/4), neural cells (Nestin), mesenchymal cells (Vimentin and Stro-1), and endosomal cells (GM130 and RAB5). In culture, cells from both tissues (eggs and larvae gut) were composed by a heterogeneous population. The cells had a globoid shape and small size. Cell cycle analysis on passage 1 (P1) showed 27.5%±2.0% of cell debris, 68% of cells on G0-G1 phase, 30.2% on S phase, 1.9%±0.5% on G2-M phase. In addition, cells on passage 2 showed: 10% of cell debris, 92.4% of cells on G0-G1 phase, 6.8% on S phase, 0.6% on G2-M phase. Embryonated eggs expressed markers involved with pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct 3/4), mesenchymal cells (vimentin and Stro-1), neural cells (Nestin), and cellular death by apoptosis (Caspase 3). Specific endosomal markers for insect cells (GM130 and RAB5) were also highly expressed. In cell culture of A. aegypti larvae gut the same labeling pattern was observed, with a small decrease in the expression of mesenchymal (vimentin and Stro-1) and neural (Nestin) markers. In summary, we were able to establish a protocol to culture embryonated eggs and larvae gut of A. aegypti

  16. Requirement for Pangolin/dTCF in Drosophila Wingless signaling.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Liang; Nellen, Denise; Basler, Konrad

    2003-05-13

    The Wingless (Wg) protein is a secreted glycoprotein involved in intercellular signaling. On activation of the Wg signaling pathway, Armadillo is stabilized, causing target genes to be activated by the transcription factor Pangolin (Pan). This study investigated the roles of Pan in the developing wing of Drosophila by clonal analysis. Three different aspects of wing development were examined: cell proliferation, wing margin specification, and wg self-refinement. Our results indicate that Pan function is critically required for all three of these processes. Consequently, lack of pan causes a severe reduction in the activity of the Wg target genes Distalless and vestigial within their normal domain of expression. Loss of pan function does not, however, lead to a derepression of these genes outside this domain. Thus, although Pan is positively required for the induction of Wg targets in the wing imaginal disk, it does not appear to play a default repressor function in the absence of Wg input. In contrast, lack of zygotic pan function causes a milder phenotype than that caused by the lack of wg function in the embryo. We show that this difference cannot be attributed to maternally provided pan product, indicating that a Pan repressor function usually prevents the expression of embryonic Wg targets. Together, our results suggest that for embryonic patterning the activator as well as repressor forms of Pan play important roles, while for wing development Pan operates primarily in the activator mode.

  17. Requirement for Pangolin/dTCF in Drosophila Wingless signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Liang; Nellen, Denise; Basler, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    The Wingless (Wg) protein is a secreted glycoprotein involved in intercellular signaling. On activation of the Wg signaling pathway, Armadillo is stabilized, causing target genes to be activated by the transcription factor Pangolin (Pan). This study investigated the roles of Pan in the developing wing of Drosophila by clonal analysis. Three different aspects of wing development were examined: cell proliferation, wing margin specification, and wg self-refinement. Our results indicate that Pan function is critically required for all three of these processes. Consequently, lack of pan causes a severe reduction in the activity of the Wg target genes Distalless and vestigial within their normal domain of expression. Loss of pan function does not, however, lead to a derepression of these genes outside this domain. Thus, although Pan is positively required for the induction of Wg targets in the wing imaginal disk, it does not appear to play a default repressor function in the absence of Wg input. In contrast, lack of zygotic pan function causes a milder phenotype than that caused by the lack of wg function in the embryo. We show that this difference cannot be attributed to maternally provided pan product, indicating that a Pan repressor function usually prevents the expression of embryonic Wg targets. Together, our results suggest that for embryonic patterning the activator as well as repressor forms of Pan play important roles, while for wing development Pan operates primarily in the activator mode. PMID:12730381

  18. Complex Function and Expression of Delta during Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bender, L. B.; Kooh, P. J.; Muskavitch, MAT.

    1993-01-01

    Delta (Dl) encodes a cell surface protein that mediates cell-cell interactions central to the specification of a variety of cell fates during embryonic and postembryonic development of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that the Delta protein is expressed intermittently in follicle cells and in germ-line cells during stages 1-10 of oogenesis. Furthermore, Delta expression during oogenesis can be correlated with a number of morphogenetic defects associated with sterility observed in Dl mutant females, including failure of stalk formation within the germarium and subsequent fusion of egg chambers, necrosis in germ-line cells, and multiphasic embryonic arrest of fertilized eggs. We have also identified a Dl mutation that leads to context-dependent defects in Dl function during oogenesis. Direct comparison of Delta protein expression with that of the Notch protein in the ovary reveals substantial, but incomplete, coincidence of expression patterns in space and time. We discuss possible roles for the Delta protein in cell-cell interactions required for cell fate specification processes during oogenesis in light of available developmental and histochemical data. PMID:8462854

  19. Postmitotic Specification of Drosophila Insulinergic Neurons from Pioneer Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Thor, Stefan; Gould, Alex P

    2008-01-01

    Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7) and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic β-cells. PMID:18336071

  20. Leg regeneration in Drosophila abridges the normal developmental program

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Manel; Bishop, Sarah Anne; Baguña, Jaume; Couso, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of lost body parts has traditionally been seen as a redeployment of embryonic development. However, whether regeneration and embryonic development are controlled by identical, similar or different genetic programmes has not been fully tested. Here, we analyse proximal-distal regeneration in Drosophila leg imaginal discs using the expression of positional markers, and by cell-lineage experiments, and we compare it with the pattern already known in normal development. During regeneration, the first proximal-distal positional markers reappear in overlapping patterns. As the regenerate expands they segregate, and further markers appear until the normal pattern is produced, following a proximal to distal sequence that is in fact the reverse of normal leg imaginal disc development. The results of lineage tracing support this interpretation, and show that regenerated structures derive from cells near the wound edge. Although leg development and leg regeneration are served by a set of identical genes, the ways their proximal-distal patterns are achieved are distinct from each other. Such differences can result from similar developmental gene interactions acting under different starting conditions. PMID:20563988

  1. Resistance to Innate Immunity Contributes to Colonization of the Insect Gut by Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Earl, Shaun C; Rogers, Miles T; Keen, Jennifer; Bland, David M; Houppert, Andrew S; Miller, Caitlynn; Temple, Ian; Anderson, Deborah M; Marketon, Melanie M

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, is typically a zoonotic vector-borne disease of wild rodents. Bacterial biofilm formation in the proventriculus of the flea contributes to chronic infection of fleas and facilitates efficient disease transmission. However prior to biofilm formation, ingested bacteria must survive within the flea midgut, and yet little is known about vector-pathogen interactions that are required for flea gut colonization. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model system to gain insight into Y. pestis colonization of the insect vector. We show that Y. pestis establishes a stable infection in the anterior midgut of fly larvae, and we used this model system to study the roles of genes involved in biofilm production and/or resistance to gut immunity stressors. We find that PhoP and GmhA both contribute to colonization and resistance to antimicrobial peptides in flies, and furthermore, the data suggest biofilm formation may afford protection against antimicrobial peptides. Production of reactive oxygen species in the fly gut, as in fleas, also serves to limit bacterial infection, and OxyR mediates Y. pestis survival in both insect models. Overall, our data establish the fruit fly as an informative model to elucidate the relationship between Y. pestis and its flea vector.

  2. Crosslinking of a Peritrophic Matrix Protein Protects Gut Epithelia from Bacterial Exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Toshio; Maki, Kouki; Hadano, Jinki; Fujikawa, Takumi; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyzes protein-protein crosslinking, which has important and diverse roles in vertebrates and invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila TG crosslinks drosocrystallin, a peritrophic matrix protein, to form a stable fiber structure on the gut peritrophic matrix. RNA interference (RNAi) of the TG gene was highly lethal in flies and induced apoptosis of gut epithelial cells after oral infection with Pseudomonas entomophila. Moreover, AprA, a metalloprotease secreted by P. entomophila, digested non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, but not drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG. In vitro experiments using recombinant drosocrystallin and monalysin proteins demonstrated that monalysin, a pore-forming exotoxin of P. entomophila, was adsorbed on the crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers in the presence of P. entomophila culture supernatant. In addition, gut-specific TG-RNAi flies had a shorter lifespan than control flies after ingesting P. entomophila, whereas the lifespan after ingesting AprA-knockout P. entomophila was at control levels. We conclude that drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG, but not non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, form an important physical barrier against exotoxins of invading pathogenic microbes. PMID:26506243

  3. Honor thy gut symbionts redux.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2012-06-08

    Exploring our gut microbial communities with new tools is allowing us to revisit old questions; to develop new concepts about our evolution, postnatal development, systems physiology, individuality, and definitions of health; and to further delineate the impact of our changing life-styles. It is also allowing us to envision exciting new ways for addressing global health problems. This area is inherently interdisciplinary, offering a wealth of opportunities to create new fields, partnerships, and educational initiatives. It is captivating to the public and carries substantial expectations. As such, participating scientists need to sponsor proactive, solution-focused discussions of its societal implications.

  4. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  5. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-17

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  6. Control of dendritic field formation in Drosophila: the roles of flamingo and competition between homologous neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, F B; Kohwi, M; Brenman, J E; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2000-10-01

    Neurons elaborate dendrites with stereotypic branching patterns, thereby defining their receptive fields. These branching patterns may arise from properties intrinsic to the neurons or competition between neighboring neurons. Genetic and laser ablation studies reported here reveal that different multiple dendritic neurons in the same dorsal cluster in the Drosophila embryonic PNS do not compete with one another for dendritic fields. In contrast, when dendrites from homologous neurons in the two hemisegments meet at the dorsal midline in larval stages, they appear to repel each other. The formation of normal dendritic fields and the competition between dendrites of homologous neurons require the proper expression level of Flamingo, a G protein-coupled receptor-like protein, in embryonic neurons. Whereas Flamingo functions downstream of Frizzled in specifying planar polarity, Flamingo-dependent dendritic outgrowth is independent of Frizzled.

  7. atonal regulates neurite arborization but does not act as a proneural gene in the Drosophila brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; He, Y.; Sun, Y.; Jan, Y. N.; Zoghbi, H. Y.; Bellen, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila atonal (ato) is the proneural gene of the chordotonal organs (CHOs) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the larval and adult photoreceptor organs. Here, we show that ato is expressed at multiple stages during the development of a lineage of central brain neurons that innervate the optic lobes and are required for eclosion. A novel fate mapping approach shows that ato is expressed in the embryonic precursors of these neurons and that its expression is reactivated in third instar larvae (L3). In contrast to its function in the PNS, ato does not act as a proneural gene in the embryonic brain. Instead, ato performs a novel function, regulating arborization during larval and pupal development by interacting with Notch.

  8. SWATH-MS data of Drosophila melanogaster proteome dynamics during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bertrand; Korona, Dagmara; Nightingale, Daniel J H; Russell, Steven; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2016-12-01

    Embryogenesis is one of the most important processes in the life of an animal. During this dynamic process, progressive cell division and cellular differentiation are accompanied by significant changes in protein expression at the level of the proteome. However, very few studies to date have described the dynamics of the proteome during the early development of an embryo in any organism. In this dataset, we monitor changes in protein expression across a timecourse of more than 20 h of Drosophila melanogaster embryonic development. Mass-spectrometry data were produced using a SWATH acquisition mode on a Sciex Triple-TOF 6600. A spectral library built in-house was used to analyse these data and more than 1950 proteins were quantified at each embryonic timepoint. The files presented here are a permanent digital map and can be reanalysed to test against new hypotheses. The data have been deposited with the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD0031078.

  9. Identification of FGF-dependent genes in the Drosophila tracheal system.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Markus; Schuh, Reinhard; Adryan, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The embryonic development of the tracheal system of the fruit fly Drosophila provides a paradigm for genetic studies of branching morphogenesis. Efforts of many laboratories have identified Branchless (Bnl, a fibroblast growth factor homologue) and Breathless (Btl, the receptor homologue) as crucial factors at many stages of tracheal system development. The downstream targets of the Bnl/Btl signalling cascade, however, remain mostly unknown. Misexpression of the bnl gene results in specific tracheal phenotypes that lead to larval death. We characterised the transcriptional profiles of targeted over-expression of bnl in the embryonic trachea and of loss-of-function bnl(P1) mutant embryos. Gene expression data was mapped to high-throughput in situ hybridisation based ImaGO-annotation. Thus, we identified and confirmed by quantitative PCR 13 Bnl-dependent genes that are expressed in cells within and outside of the tracheal system.

  10. atonal regulates neurite arborization but does not act as a proneural gene in the Drosophila brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; He, Y.; Sun, Y.; Jan, Y. N.; Zoghbi, H. Y.; Bellen, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila atonal (ato) is the proneural gene of the chordotonal organs (CHOs) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the larval and adult photoreceptor organs. Here, we show that ato is expressed at multiple stages during the development of a lineage of central brain neurons that innervate the optic lobes and are required for eclosion. A novel fate mapping approach shows that ato is expressed in the embryonic precursors of these neurons and that its expression is reactivated in third instar larvae (L3). In contrast to its function in the PNS, ato does not act as a proneural gene in the embryonic brain. Instead, ato performs a novel function, regulating arborization during larval and pupal development by interacting with Notch.

  11. A cellular memory module conveys epigenetic inheritance of hedgehog expression during Drosophila wing imaginal disc development.

    PubMed

    Maurange, Cédric; Paro, Renato

    2002-10-15

    In Drosophila, the Trithorax-group (trxG) and Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins interact with chromosomal elements, termed Cellular Memory Modules (CMMs). By modifying chromatin, this ensures a stable heritable maintenance of the transcriptional state of developmental regulators, like the homeotic genes, that is defined embryonically. We asked whether such CMMs could also control expression of genes involved in patterning imaginal discs during larval development. Our results demonstrate that expression of the hedgehog gene, once activated, is maintained by a CMM. In addition, our experiments indicate that the switching of such CMMs to an active state during larval stages, in contrast to embryonic stages, may require specific trans-activators. Our results suggest that the patterning of cells in particular developmental fields in the imaginal discs does not only rely on external cues from morphogens, but also depends on the previous history of the cells, as the control by CMMs ensures a preformatted gene expression pattern.

  12. The Gut Microbiota and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunmei; Li, Guangning; Huang, Pengru; Liu, Zhou; Zhao, Bin

    2017-03-29

    The gut microbiota comprises a complex community of microorganism species that resides in our gastrointestinal ecosystem and whose alterations influence not only various gut disorders but also central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD, the most common form of dementia, is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired cognition and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ). Most notably, the microbiota-gut-brain axis is a bidirectional communication system that is not fully understood, but includes neural, immune, endocrine, and metabolic pathways. Studies in germ-free animals and in animals exposed to pathogenic microbial infections, antibiotics, probiotics, or fecal microbiota transplantation suggest a role for the gut microbiota in host cognition or AD-related pathogenesis. The increased permeability of the gut and blood-brain barrier induced by microbiota dysbiosis may mediate or affect AD pathogenesis and other neurodegenerative disorders, especially those associated with aging. In addition, bacteria populating the gut microbiota can secrete large amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might contribute to the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Moreover, imbalances in the gut microbiota can induce inflammation that is associated with the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and AD. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the current findings that may elucidate the role of the gut microbiota in the development of AD. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide new insights into novel therapeutic strategies for AD.

  13. Gut Microbiota and Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomoya; Emoto, Takuo; Sasaki, Naoto; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2016-12-02

    Gut microbiota have been attracting increased attention in many fields of medicine recently. We can perform a comprehensive analysis of gut microbiota using next-generation sequencing techniques together with bioinformatics technology, which expands our knowledge of a large ecosystem consisting of a host and gut microbiota. We summarize some reports about the correlations between gut microbiota and metabolic disorders, particularly atherosclerosis, and discuss future directions for the diagnostic or therapeutic potential of gut microbiota. To take simple examples, we demonstrated that the order Lactobacillales was significantly increased; while the phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients compared with controls or healthy volunteers. The characteristics of gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia have been reported. However, these studies have limitations, and the biological significance of gut microbiota and the causal relationships are still controversial. We hope the reports listed in this review article might lead to the development of a novel therapy to prevent CAD via modulating gut microbiota or their metabolites.

  14. [Gut microbiota: Description, role and pathophysiologic implications].

    PubMed

    Landman, C; Quévrain, E

    2016-06-01

    The human gut contains 10(14) bacteria and many other micro-organisms such as Archaea, viruses and fungi. Studying the gut microbiota showed how this entity participates to gut physiology and beyond this to human health, as a real "hidden organ". In this review, we aimed to bring information about gut microbiota, its structure, its roles and its implication in human pathology. After bacterial colonization in infant, intestinal microbial composition is unique for each individual although more than 95% can be assigned to four major phyla. The use of culture independent methods and more recently the development of high throughput sequencing allowed to depict precisely gut microbiota structure and diversity as well as its alteration in diseases. Gut microbiota is implicated in the maturation of the host immune system and in many fundamental metabolic pathways including sugars and proteins fermentation and metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. Imbalance of gut microbial populations or dysbiosis has important functional consequences and is implicated in many digestive diseases (inflammatory bowel diseases, colorectal cancer, etc.) but also in obesity and autism. These observations have led to a surge of studies exploring therapeutics which aims to restore gut microbiota equilibrium such as probiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation. But recent research also investigates biological activity of microbial products which could lead to interesting therapeutics leads. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Gut dysbiosis is linked to hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Santisteban, Monica M; Rodriguez, Vermali; Li, Eric; Ahmari, Niousha; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Zadeh, Mojgan; Gong, Minghao; Qi, Yanfei; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Sahay, Bikash; Pepine, Carl J; Raizada, Mohan K; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbiota is critical in the maintenance of physiological homeostasis. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysbiosis in gut microbiota is associated with hypertension because genetic, environmental, and dietary factors profoundly influence both gut microbiota and blood pressure. Bacterial DNA from fecal samples of 2 rat models of hypertension and a small cohort of patients was used for bacterial genomic analysis. We observed a significant decrease in microbial richness, diversity, and evenness in the spontaneously hypertensive rat, in addition to an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. These changes were accompanied by decreases in acetate- and butyrate-producing bacteria. In addition, the microbiota of a small cohort of human hypertensive patients was found to follow a similar dysbiotic pattern, as it was less rich and diverse than that of control subjects. Similar changes in gut microbiota were observed in the chronic angiotensin II infusion rat model, most notably decreased microbial richness and an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. In this model, we evaluated the efficacy of oral minocycline in restoring gut microbiota. In addition to attenuating high blood pressure, minocycline was able to rebalance the dysbiotic hypertension gut microbiota by reducing the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. These observations demonstrate that high blood pressure is associated with gut microbiota dysbiosis, both in animal and human hypertension. They suggest that dietary intervention to correct gut microbiota could be an innovative nutritional therapeutic strategy for hypertension.

  16. Selected aspects of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Marco; O'Toole, Paul W; de Vos, Willem M; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-10-06

    The gut microbiota represents a highly complex assembly of microbes, which interact with each other and with their host. These interactions have various implications in terms of health and disease, and this multi-author review issue will address a number of selected aspects pertaining to gut microbiota research.

  17. Nutrition, gut microbiota and child health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Videhult, Frida Karlsson; West, Christina E

    2016-05-01

    Diet is one of the main drivers of the composition and function of the gut microbiota. The scope of this review is to summarize recent studies assessing the role of gut microbiota in clinical pediatric conditions and to review studies using nutritional approaches to favorably modify the gut microbiota to improve health outcomes in children. New studies underscore that breastfeeding and infant diet impact the gut microbiome and metagenome. A comprehensive study using metagenomic shotgun sequencing, suggests that the cessation of breastfeeding rather than the introduction of solid foods, drives the functional maturation of the infant gut microbiome toward an adult-like state. There is further support for the view that a disturbed early gut microbiota is implicated in allergic and autoimmune diseases. New studies using prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics in various pediatric disorders have yielded promising results, yet the evidence for specific guidelines on their use is still low. Intestinal dysbiosis is associated with several pediatric disorders but a cause-effect relationship remains to be clearly demonstrated in most conditions. Future studies using new systems biology approaches are anticipated to provide further insight into the functional capacities of the gut microbiome and its establishment in childhood. This may then lay the ground for improved treatment and prevention strategies targeting the gut microbiota.

  18. Plant phenolics are detoxified by prophenoloxidase in the insect gut

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kai; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qiaoli; Zhu, Shoulin; Shao, Qimiao; Clark, Kevin D.; Liu, Yining; Ling, Erjun

    2015-01-01

    Plant phenolics are a group of important secondary metabolites that are toxic to many animals and insects if ingested at high concentrations. Because most insects consume plant phenolics daily, they have likely evolved the capacity to detoxify these compounds. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster, Bombyx mori and Helicoverpa armigera as models to study the metabolism of plant phenolics by prophenoloxidases. We found that insect foreguts release prophenoloxidases into the lumen, and that the survival of prophenoloxidase-deletion mutants was impaired when fed several plant phenolics and tea extracts. Using l-DOPA as a model substrate, biochemical assays in large Lepidopteran insects demonstrated that low levels of l-DOPA are rapidly metabolized into intermediates by phenoloxidases. Feeding with excess l-DOPA showed that the metabolic intermediate 5,6-dihydroxyindole reached the hindgut either by passing directly through the midgut, or by transport through the hemolymph. In the hindgut, 5,6-dihydroxyindole was further oxidized by prophenoloxidases. Intermediates exerted no toxicity in the hemocoel or midgut. These results show that plant phenolics are not toxic to insects unless prophenoloxidase genes are lost or the levels of phenolics exceed the catalytic activity of the gut prophenoloxidases. PMID:26592948

  19. Methods to assay Drosophila behavior.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Becnel, Jaime; Pandey, Udai B

    2012-03-07

    Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, has been used to study molecular mechanisms of a wide range of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and various neurological diseases(1). We have optimized simple and robust behavioral assays for determining larval locomotion, adult climbing ability (RING assay), and courtship behaviors of Drosophila. These behavioral assays are widely applicable for studying the role of genetic and environmental factors on fly behavior. Larval crawling ability can be reliably used for determining early stage changes in the crawling abilities of Drosophila larvae and also for examining effect of drugs or human disease genes (in transgenic flies) on their locomotion. The larval crawling assay becomes more applicable if expression or abolition of a gene causes lethality in pupal or adult stages, as these flies do not survive to adulthood where they otherwise could be assessed. This basic assay can also be used in conjunction with bright light or stress to examine additional behavioral responses in Drosophila larvae. Courtship behavior has been widely used to investigate genetic basis of sexual behavior, and can also be used to examine activity and coordination, as well as learning and memory. Drosophila courtship behavior involves the exchange of various sensory stimuli including visual, auditory, and chemosensory signals between males and females that lead to a complex series of well characterized motor behaviors culminating in successful copulation. Traditional adult climbing assays (negative geotaxis) are tedious, labor intensive, and time consuming, with significant variation between different trials(2-4). The rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay(5) has many advantages over more widely employed protocols, providing a reproducible, sensitive, and high throughput approach to quantify adult locomotor and negative geotaxis behaviors. In the RING assay, several genotypes or drug treatments can be tested simultaneously

  20. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 Receptor Agonist-induced Actions and Enteric Neurogenesis in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Kei; Kawahara, Isao

    2014-01-01

    We explored a novel effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor (5-HT4R) agonists in vivo to reconstruct the enteric neural circuitry that mediates a fundamental distal gut reflex. The neural circuit insult was performed in guinea pigs and rats by rectal transection and anastomosis. A 5-HT4R-agonist, mosapride citrate (MOS) applied orally and locally at the anastomotic site for 2 weeks promoted the regeneration of the impaired neural circuit or the recovery of the distal gut reflex. MOS generated neurofilament-, 5-HT4R- and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells and formed neural network in the granulation tissue at the anastomosis. Possible neural stem cell markers increased during the same time period. These novel actions by MOS were inhibited by specific 5-HT4R-antagonist such as GR113808 (GR) or SB-207266. The activation of enteric neural 5-HT4R promotes reconstruction of an enteric neural circuit that involves possibly neural stem cells. We also succeeded in forming dense enteric neural networks by MOS in a gut differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells. GR abolished the formation of enteric neural networks. MOS up-regulated the expression of mRNA of 5-HT4R, and GR abolished this upregulation, suggesting MOS differentiated enteric neural networks, mediated via activation of 5-HT4R. In the small intestine in H-line: Thy1 promoter green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice, we obtained clear 3-dimensional imaging of enteric neurons that were newly generated by oral application of MOS after gut transection and anastomosis. All findings indicate that treatment with 5-HT4R-agonists could be a novel therapy for generating new enteric neurons to rescue aganglionic disorders in the whole gut. PMID:24466442

  1. The Gut Microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinrui; Han, Ying; Dy, Angel Belle C.; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are a common comorbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Many studies have shown alterations in the composition of the fecal flora and metabolic products of the gut microbiome in patients with ASD. The gut microbiota influences brain development and behaviors through the neuroendocrine, neuroimmune and autonomic nervous systems. In addition, an abnormal gut microbiota is associated with several diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ASD and mood disorders. Here, we review the bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract (brain-gut axis) and the role of the gut microbiota in the central nervous system (CNS) and ASD. Microbiome-mediated therapies might be a safe and effective treatment for ASD. PMID:28503135

  2. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  3. The gut microbiome: scourge, sentinel or spectator?

    PubMed Central

    Korecka, Agata; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan

    2012-01-01

    The gut microbiota consists of trillions of prokaryotes that reside in the intestinal mucosa. This long-established commensalism indicates that these microbes are an integral part of the eukaryotic host. Recent research findings have implicated the dynamics of microbial function in setting thresholds for many physiological parameters. Conversely, it has been convincingly argued that dysbiosis, representing microbial imbalance, may be an important underlying factor that contributes to a variety of diseases, inside and outside the gut. This review discusses the latest findings, including enterotype classification, changes brought on by dysbiosis, gut inflammation, and metabolic mediators in an attempt to underscore the importance of the gut microbiota for human health. A cautiously optimistic idea is taking hold, invoking the gut microbiota as a medium to track, target and treat a plethora of diseases. PMID:22368769

  4. Metagenomic analysis reveals changes of the Drosophila suzukii microbiota in the newly colonised regions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Simonato, Mauro; Squartini, Andrea; Mori, Nicola; Marri, Laura; Mazzon, Luca

    2017-03-21

    The spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a highly polyphagous pest of a wide variety of wild or cultivated berry and stone fruit. Originating from Southeast Asia, it has recently invaded a wide range of regions in Europe and North-America. It is well known that insect microbiotas may significantly influence several aspects of the host biology and play an important role in invasive species introduction into new areas. However, in spite of the great economic importance of D. suzukii, a limited attention has been given so far to its microbiota. In this study, we present the first in-depth characterization of gut bacterial diversity from field (native and invasive range) and lab-reared populations of this insect. The gut bacterial communities of field insects were dominated, regardless of their origin, by two families of the phylum Proteobacteria: Acetobacteraceae and Enterobacteriaceae, while Firmicutes, mainly represented by the family Staphylococcaceae, prevailed in lab-reared population. Locality was the most significant factor in shaping the microbiota of wild flies. Moreover, a negative correlation between diversity and abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and the time elapsed since the establishment of D. suzukii in a new region was observed. Altogether our results indicate that habitat, food resources as well as the colonization phase of a new region contribute to shape the bacterial communities of the invasive species which, in turn, by evolving more quickly, could influence host adaptation in a new environment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster—Assembly, Function, and Influence on Tissue Lipid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Wilhelm; Sampaio, Julio L.; Brankatschk, Marko; Carvalho, Maria; Mahmoud, Ali; Shevchenko, Andrej; Eaton, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Interorgan lipid transport occurs via lipoproteins, and altered lipoprotein levels correlate with metabolic disease. However, precisely how lipoproteins affect tissue lipid composition has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we identify the major lipoproteins of Drosophila melanogaster and use genetics and mass spectrometry to study their assembly, interorgan trafficking, and influence on tissue lipids. The apoB-family lipoprotein Lipophorin (Lpp) is the major hemolymph lipid carrier. It is produced as a phospholipid-rich particle by the fat body, and its secretion requires Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTP). Lpp acquires sterols and most diacylglycerol (DAG) at the gut via Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP), another fat body-derived apoB-family lipoprotein. The gut, like the fat body, is a lipogenic organ, incorporating both de novo–synthesized and dietary fatty acids into DAG for export. We identify distinct requirements for LTP and Lpp-dependent lipid mobilization in contributing to the neutral and polar lipid composition of the brain and wing imaginal disc. These studies define major routes of interorgan lipid transport in Drosophila and uncover surprising tissue-specific differences in lipoprotein lipid utilization. PMID:22844248

  6. Modulation of gut mucosal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kleessen, Brigitta; Blaut, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Non-digestible inulin-type fructans, such as oligofructose and high-molecular-weight inulin, have been shown to have the ability to alter the intestinal microbiota composition in such a way that members of the microbial community, generally considered as health-promoting, are stimulated. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequently targeted organisms. Less information exists on effects of inulin-type fructans on the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria at or near the mucosa surface or in the mucus layer forming mucosa-associated biofilms. Using rats inoculated with a human faecal flora as an experimental model we have found that inulin-type fructans in the diet modulated the gut microbiota by stimulation of mucosa-associated bifidobacteria as well as by partial reduction of pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and thereby benefit health. In addition to changes in mucosal biofilms, inulin-type fructans also induced changes in the colonic mucosa stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the release of mucins, and altering the profile of mucin components in the goblet cells and epithelial mucus layer. These results indicate that inulin-type fructans may stabilise the gut mucosal barrier. Dietary supplementation with these prebiotics could offer a new approach to supporting the barrier function of the mucosa.

  7. Antibiotics and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sheetal R; Collins, James J; Relman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics have been a cornerstone of innovation in the fields of public health, agriculture, and medicine. However, recent studies have shed new light on the collateral damage they impart on the indigenous host-associated communities. These drugs have been found to alter the taxonomic, genomic, and functional capacity of the human gut microbiota, with effects that are rapid and sometimes persistent. Broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce bacterial diversity while expanding and collapsing membership of specific indigenous taxa. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment selects for resistant bacteria, increases opportunities for horizontal gene transfer, and enables intrusion of pathogenic organisms through depletion of occupied natural niches, with profound implications for the emergence of resistance. Because these pervasive alterations can be viewed as an uncoupling of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, it is valuable to reconsider antimicrobial therapies in the context of an ecological framework. Understanding the biology of competitive exclusion, interspecies protection, and gene flow of adaptive functions in the gut environment may inform the design of new strategies that treat infections while preserving the ecology of our beneficial constituents.

  8. Antibiotics and the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Sheetal R.; Collins, James J.; Relman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics have been a cornerstone of innovation in the fields of public health, agriculture, and medicine. However, recent studies have shed new light on the collateral damage they impart on the indigenous host-associated communities. These drugs have been found to alter the taxonomic, genomic, and functional capacity of the human gut microbiota, with effects that are rapid and sometimes persistent. Broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce bacterial diversity while expanding and collapsing membership of specific indigenous taxa. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment selects for resistant bacteria, increases opportunities for horizontal gene transfer, and enables intrusion of pathogenic organisms through depletion of occupied natural niches, with profound implications for the emergence of resistance. Because these pervasive alterations can be viewed as an uncoupling of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, it is valuable to reconsider antimicrobial therapies in the context of an ecological framework. Understanding the biology of competitive exclusion, interspecies protection, and gene flow of adaptive functions in the gut environment may inform the design of new strategies that treat infections while preserving the ecology of our beneficial constituents. PMID:25271726

  9. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  10. Influence of gut microbiota on neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Cenit, María Carmen; Sanz, Yolanda; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar

    2017-08-14

    The last decade has witnessed a growing appreciation of the fundamental role played by an early assembly of a diverse and balanced gut microbiota and its subsequent maintenance for future health of the host. Gut microbiota is currently viewed as a key regulator of a fluent bidirectional dialogue between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). A number of preclinical studies have suggested that the microbiota and its genome (microbiome) may play a key role in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, alterations in the gut microbiota composition in humans have also been linked to a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions, including depression, autism and Parkinson's disease. However, it is not yet clear whether these changes in the microbiome are causally related to such diseases or are secondary effects thereof. In this respect, recent studies in animals have indicated that gut microbiota transplantation can transfer a behavioral phenotype, suggesting that the gut microbiota may be a modifiable factor modulating the development or pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric conditions. Further studies are warranted to establish whether or not the findings of preclinical animal experiments can be generalized to humans. Moreover, although different communication routes between the microbiota and brain have been identified, further studies must elucidate all the underlying mechanisms involved. Such research is expected to contribute to the design of strategies to modulate the gut microbiota and its functions with a view to improving mental health, and thus provide opportunities to improve the management of psychiatric diseases. Here, we review the evidence supporting a role of the gut microbiota in neuropsychiatric disorders and the state of the art regarding the mechanisms underlying its contribution to mental illness and health. We also consider the stages of life where the gut microbiota is more susceptible to the effects of environmental stressors, and

  11. Influence of gut microbiota on neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cenit, María Carmen; Sanz, Yolanda; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a growing appreciation of the fundamental role played by an early assembly of a diverse and balanced gut microbiota and its subsequent maintenance for future health of the host. Gut microbiota is currently viewed as a key regulator of a fluent bidirectional dialogue between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). A number of preclinical studies have suggested that the microbiota and its genome (microbiome) may play a key role in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, alterations in the gut microbiota composition in humans have also been linked to a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions, including depression, autism and Parkinson’s disease. However, it is not yet clear whether these changes in the microbiome are causally related to such diseases or are secondary effects thereof. In this respect, recent studies in animals have indicated that gut microbiota transplantation can transfer a behavioral phenotype, suggesting that the gut microbiota may be a modifiable factor modulating the development or pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric conditions. Further studies are warranted to establish whether or not the findings of preclinical animal experiments can be generalized to humans. Moreover, although different communication routes between the microbiota and brain have been identified, further studies must elucidate all the underlying mechanisms involved. Such research is expected to contribute to the design of strategies to modulate the gut microbiota and its functions with a view to improving mental health, and thus provide opportunities to improve the management of psychiatric diseases. Here, we review the evidence supporting a role of the gut microbiota in neuropsychiatric disorders and the state of the art regarding the mechanisms underlying its contribution to mental illness and health. We also consider the stages of life where the gut microbiota is more susceptible to the effects of environmental stressors

  12. Characterization of msim, a murine homologue of the Drosophila sim transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, P.; Reece, M.; Pelletier, J.

    1996-07-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene result in loss of precursor cells that give rise to midline cells of the embryonic central nervous system. During the course of an exon-trapping strategy aimed at identifying transcripts that contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome critical region showing significantly homology to the Drosophila sim gene. Using a cross-hybridization approach, we have isolated a murine homolog of Drosophila sim gene, which we designated msim. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence analyses of msim cDNA clones indicate the this gene encodes a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix class of transcription factors. The murine and Drosophila proteins share 88% residues within the basic-helix-loop helix domain, with an overall homology of 92%. In addition, the N-terminal domain of MSIM contains two PAS dimerization motifs also featured in the Drosophila sim gene product, as well as a small number of other transcription factors. Northern blot analysis of adult murine tissues revealed that the msim gene produces a single mRNA species of {approximately}4 kb expressed in a small number of tissues, with the highest levels in the kidneys and lower levels present in skeletal muscle, lung, testis, brain, and heart. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that msim is also expressed in early fetal development in the central nervous system and in cartilage primordia. The characteristics of the msim gene are consistent with its putative function as a transcriptional regulator. 51 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Time-lapse imaging reveals stereotypical patterns of Drosophila midline glial migration.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Scott R; Pearson, Joseph C; Crews, Stephen T

    2012-01-15

    The Drosophila CNS midline glia (MG) are multifunctional cells that ensheath and provide trophic support to commissural axons, and direct embryonic development by employing a variety of signaling molecules. These glia consist of two functionally distinct populations: the anterior MG (AMG) and posterior MG (PMG). Only the AMG ensheath axon commissures, whereas the function of the non-ensheathing PMG is unknown. The Drosophila MG have proven to be an excellent system for studying glial proliferation, cell fate, apoptosis, and axon-glial interactions. However, insight into how AMG migrate and acquire their specific positions within the axon-glial scaffold has been lacking. In this paper, we use time-lapse imaging, single-cell analysis, and embryo staining to comprehensively describe the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the Drosophila MG. We identified 3 groups of MG that differed in the trajectories of their initial inward migration: AMG that migrate inward and to the anterior before undergoing apoptosis, AMG that migrate inward and to the posterior to ensheath commissural axons, and PMG that migrate inward and to the anterior to contact the commissural axons before undergoing apoptosis. In a second phase of their migration, the surviving AMG stereotypically migrated posteriorly to specific positions surrounding the commissures, and their final position was correlated with their location prior to migration. Most noteworthy are AMG that migrated between the commissures from a ventral to a dorsal position. Single-cell analysis indicated that individual AMG possessed wide-ranging and elaborate membrane extensions that partially ensheathed both commissures. These results provide a strong foundation for future genetic experiments to identify mutants affecting MG development, particularly in guidance cues that may direct migration. Drosophila MG are homologous in structure and function to the glial-like cells that populate the vertebrate CNS floorplate, and study

  14. Time-lapse Imaging Reveals Stereotypical Patterns of Drosophila Midline Glial Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Scott R.; Pearson, Joseph C.; Crews, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila CNS midline glia (MG) are multifunctional cells that ensheath and provide trophic support to commissural axons, and direct embryonic development by employing a variety of signaling molecules. These glia consist of two functionally distinct populations: the anterior MG (AMG) and posterior MG (PMG). Only the AMG ensheath axon commissures, whereas the function of the non-ensheathing PMG is unknown. The Drosophila MG have proven to be an excellent system for studying glial proliferation, cell fate, apoptosis, and axon-glial interactions. However, insight into how AMG migrate and acquire their specific positions within the axon-glial scaffold has been lacking. In this paper, we use time-lapse imaging, single-cell analysis, and embryo staining to comprehensively describe the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the Drosophila MG. We identified 3 groups of MG that differed in the trajectories of their initial inward migration: AMG that migrate inward and to the anterior before undergoing apoptosis, AMG that migrate inward and to the posterior to ensheath commissural axons, and PMG that migrate inward and to the anterior to contact the commissural axons before undergoing apoptosis. In a second phase of their migration, the surviving AMG stereotypically migrated posteriorly to specific positions surrounding the commissures, and their final position was correlated with their location prior to migration. Most noteworthy are AMG that migrated between the commissures from a ventral to a dorsal position. Single-cell analysis indicated that individual AMG possessed wide-ranging and elaborate membrane extensions that partially ensheathed both commissures. These results provide a strong foundation for future genetic experiments to identify mutants affecting MG development, particularly in guidance cues that may direct migration. Drosophila MG are homologous in structure and function to the glial-like cells that populate the vertebrate CNS floorplate, and study

  15. A Drosophila model for developmental nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Ulloa, Norma Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Despite the known health risks of tobacco smoking, many people including pregnant women continue smoking. The effects of developmental nicotine exposure are known, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Drosophila melanogaster is a model organism that can be used for uncovering genetic and molecular mechanisms for drugs of abuse. Here I show that Drosophila can be a model to elucidate the mechanisms for nicotine's effects on a developing organism. Drosophila reared on nicotine food display developmental and behavioral effects similar to those in mammals including decreased survival and weight, increased developmental time, and decreased sensitivity to acute nicotine and ethanol. The Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha 7 (Dα7) mediates some of these effects. A novel role for Dα7 on ethanol sedation in Drosophila is also shown. Future research taking advantage of the genetic and molecular tools for Drosophila will allow additional discovery of the mechanisms behind the effects of nicotine during development.

  16. Stepwise Progression of Embryonic Patterning.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Jeremy E; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-07-01

    It is long established that the graded distribution of Dorsal transcription factor influences spatial domains of gene expression along the dorsoventral (DV) axis of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. However, the more recent realization that Dorsal levels also change with time raises the question of whether these dynamics are instructive. An overview of DV axis patterning is provided, focusing on new insights identified through quantitative analysis of temporal changes in Dorsal target gene expression from one nuclear cycle to the next ('steps'). Possible roles for the stepwise progression of this patterning program are discussed including (i) tight temporal regulation of signaling pathway activation, (ii) control of gene expression cohorts, and (iii) ensuring the irreversibility of the patterning and cell fate specification process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stepwise progression of embryonic patterning

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Jeremy; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-01-01

    It is long established that the graded distribution of Dorsal transcription factor influences spatial domains of gene expression along the dorsoventral axis of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. However, the more recent realization that Dorsal levels also change in time raises the question of whether these dynamics are instructive. Here, an overview of dorsoventral axis patterning is provided focusing on new insights identified through quantitative analysis of temporal changes in Dorsal target gene expression from one nuclear cycle to the next (‘steps’). Possible roles for the step-wise progression of this patterning program are discussed including (i) tight, temporal regulation of signaling pathway activation, (ii) control of gene expression cohorts, and (iii) to ensure irreversibility of the patterning and cell fate specification process. PMID:27230753

  18. Homeotic functions of the Teashirt transcription factor during adult Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Tindell, Neil; Yan, Shun; Yoder, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary During Drosophila development region-specific regulation of target genes by Hox proteins is modulated by genetic interactions with various cofactors and genetic collaborators. During embryogenesis one such modulator of Hox target specificity is the zinc-finger transcription factor Teashirt (Tsh) that is expressed in the developing trunk and cooperatively functions with trunk-specific Hox proteins to promote appropriate segment fate. This embryonic function of Tsh is characterized as homeotic since loss of embryonic Tsh activity leads to transformation of trunk segments toward head identity. In addition to this embryonic homeotic role, Tsh also performs vital Hox-independent functions through patterning numerous embryonic, larval and adult structures. Here we address whether the homeotic function of Tsh is maintained throughout development by investigating its contribution to patterning the adult abdomen. We show that Tsh is expressed throughout the developing abdomen and that this expression is dependent on the three Bithorax Hox proteins Ultrabithorax, Abdominal-A and Abdominal-B. Conditional reduction of Tsh activity during pupation reveals broad homeotic roles for this transcription factor throughout the adult abdomen. Additionally we show that, as during embryogenesis, the tsh paralog tiptop (tio) plays a partially redundant role in this homeotic activity. PMID:23336073

  19. Homeotic functions of the Teashirt transcription factor during adult Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tindell, Neil; Yan, Shun; Yoder, John H

    2013-01-15

    During Drosophila development region-specific regulation of target genes by Hox proteins is modulated by genetic interactions with various cofactors and genetic collaborators. During embryogenesis one such modulator of Hox target specificity is the zinc-finger transcription factor Teashirt (Tsh) that is expressed in the developing trunk and cooperatively functions with trunk-specific Hox proteins to promote appropriate segment fate. This embryonic function of Tsh is characterized as homeotic since loss of embryonic Tsh activity leads to transformation of trunk segments toward head identity. In addition to this embryonic homeotic role, Tsh also performs vital Hox-independent functions through patterning numerous embryonic, larval and adult structures. Here we address whether the homeotic function of Tsh is maintained throughout development by investigating its contribution to patterning the adult abdomen. We show that Tsh is expressed throughout the developing abdomen and that this expression is dependent on the three Bithorax Hox proteins Ultrabithorax, Abdominal-A and Abdominal-B. Conditional reduction of Tsh activity during pupation reveals broad homeotic roles for this transcription factor throughout the adult abdomen. Additionally we show that, as during embryogenesis, the tsh paralog tiptop (tio) plays a partially redundant role in this homeotic activity.

  20. Alterations of gut barrier and gut microbiota in food restriction, food deprivation and protein-energy wasting.

    PubMed

    Genton, L; Cani, P D; Schrenzel, J

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence shows that gut microbiota composition is related to changes of gut barrier function including gut permeability and immune function. Gut microbiota is different in obese compared to lean subjects, suggesting that gut microbes are also involved in energy metabolism and subsequent nutritional state. While research on gut microbiota and gut barrier has presently mostly focused on intestinal inflammatory bowel diseases and more recently on obesity and type 2 diabetes, this review aims at summarizing the present knowledge regarding the impact, in vivo, of depleted nutritional states on structure and function of the gut epithelium, the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the gut microbiota and the enteric nervous system. It highlights the complex interactions between the components of gut barrier in depleted states due to food deprivation, food restriction and protein energy wasting and shows that these interactions are multidirectional, implying the existence of feedbacks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Beyond the gut bacterial microbiota: The gut virome.

    PubMed

    Columpsi, Paola; Sacchi, Paolo; Zuccaro, Valentina; Cima, Serena; Sarda, Cristina; Mariani, Marcello; Gori, Andrea; Bruno, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is colonized with a highly different population of bacterial, viral, ad fungal species; viruses are reported to be dominant. The composition of gut virome is closely related to dietary habits and surrounding environment. Host and their intestinal microbes live in a dynamic equilibrium and viruses stimulate a low degree of immune responses without causing symptoms (host tolerance). However, intestinal phages could lead to a rupture of eubiosis and may contribute to the shift from health to disease in humans and animals. Viral nucleic acids and other products of lysis of bacteria serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and could trigger specific inflammatory modulations. At the same time, phages could elicit innate antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) operated as innate antiviral immune sensors and their activation triggers signaling cascades that lead to inflammatory response. J. Med. Virol. 88:1467-1472, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Vertebrate Embryonic Cleavage Pattern Determination.

    PubMed

    Hasley, Andrew; Chavez, Shawn; Danilchik, Michael; Wühr, Martin; Pelegri, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The pattern of the earliest cell divisions in a vertebrate embryo lays the groundwork for later developmental events such as gastrulation, organogenesis, and overall body plan establishment. Understanding these early cleavage patterns and the mechanisms that create them is thus crucial for the study of vertebrate development. This chapter describes the early cleavage stages for species representing ray-finned fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles, mammals, and proto-vertebrate ascidians and summarizes current understanding of the mechanisms that govern these patterns. The nearly universal influence of cell shape on orientation and positioning of spindles and cleavage furrows and the mechanisms that mediate this influence are discussed. We discuss in particular models of aster and spindle centering and orientation in large embryonic blastomeres that rely on asymmetric internal pulling forces generated by the cleavage furrow for the previous cell cycle. Also explored are mechanisms that integrate cell division given the limited supply of cellular building blocks in the egg and several-fold changes of cell size during early development, as well as cytoskeletal specializations specific to early blastomeres including processes leading to blastomere cohesion. Finally, we discuss evolutionary conclusions beginning to emerge from the contemporary analysis of the phylogenetic distributions of cleavage patterns. In sum, this chapter seeks to summarize our current understanding of vertebrate early embryonic cleavage patterns and their control and evolution.

  3. The enigma of embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Fenelon, Jane C

    2017-09-15

    Embryonic diapause - a period of embryonic suspension at the blastocyst stage - is a fascinating phenomenon that occurs in over 130 species of mammals, ranging from bears and badgers to mice and marsupials. It might even occur in humans. During diapause, there is minimal cell division and greatly reduced metabolism, and development is put on hold. Yet there are no ill effects for the pregnancy when it eventually continues. Multiple factors can induce diapause, including seasonal supplies of food, temperature, photoperiod and lactation. The successful reactivation and continuation of pregnancy then requires a viable embryo, a receptive uterus and effective molecular communication between the two. But how do the blastocysts survive and remain viable during this period of time, which can be up to a year in some cases? And what are the signals that bring it out of suspended animation? Here, we provide an overview of the process of diapause and address these questions, focussing on recent molecular data. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Human embryonic stem cell derivation and directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Trounson, A

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are produced from normal, chromosomally aneuploid and mutant human embryos, which are available from in vitro fertilisation (IVF) for infertility or preimplantation diagnosis. These hESC lines are an important resource for functional genomics, drug screening and eventually cell and gene therapy. The methods for deriving hESCs are well established and repeatable, and are relatively successful, with a ratio of 1:10 to 1:2 hESC lines established to embryos used. hESCs can be formed from morula and blastocyst-stage embryos and from isolated inner cell mass cell (ICM) clusters. The hESCs can be formed and maintained on mouse or human somatic cells in serum-free conditions, and for several passages in cell-free cultures. The hESCs can be transfected with DNA constructs. Their gene expression profiles are being described and immunological characteristics determined. They may be grown indefinitely in culture while maintaining their original karyotype but this must be confirmed from time to time. hESCs spontaneously differentiate in the absence of the appropriate cell feeder layer, when overgrown in culture and when isolated from the ESC colony. All three major embryonic lineages are produced in differentiating attachment cultures and in unattached embryoid bodies. Cell progenitors of interest can be identified by markers, expression of reporter genes and characteristic morphology, and the culture thereafter enriched for further culture to more mature cell types. The most advanced directed differentiation pathways have been developed for neural cells and cardiac muscle cells, but many other cell types including haematopoietic progenitors, endothelial cells, lung alveoli, keratinocytes, pigmented retinal epithelium, neural crest cells and motor neurones, hepatic progenitors and cells that have some markers of gut tissue and pancreatic cells have been produced. The prospects for regenerative medicine are significant and there is much

  5. Generative models: Human embryonic stem cells and multiple modeling relations.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    Model organisms are at once scientific models and concrete living things. It is widely assumed by philosophers of science that (1) model organisms function much like other kinds of models, and (2) that insofar as their scientific role is distinctive, it is in virtue of representing a wide range of biological species and providing a basis for generalizations about those targets. This paper uses the case of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to challenge both assumptions. I first argue that hESC can be considered model organisms, analogous to classic examples such as Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster. I then discuss four contrasts between the epistemic role of hESC in practice, and the assumptions about model organisms noted above. These contrasts motivate an alternative view of model organisms as a network of systems related constructively and developmentally to one another. I conclude by relating this result to other accounts of model organisms in recent philosophy of science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights r