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Sample records for drosophila lineage specific

  1. Neuroblast lineage identification and lineage-specific Hox gene action during postembryonic development of the subesophageal ganglion in the Drosophila central brain.

    PubMed

    Kuert, Philipp A; Hartenstein, Volker; Bello, Bruno C; Lovick, Jennifer K; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    The central brain of Drosophila consists of the supraesophageal ganglion (SPG) and the subesophageal ganglion (SEG), both of which are generated by neural stem cell-like neuroblasts during embryonic and postembryonic development. Considerable information has been obtained on postembryonic development of the neuroblasts and their lineages in the SPG. In contrast, very little is known about neuroblasts, neural lineages, or any other aspect of the postembryonic development in the SEG. Here we characterize the neuroanatomy of the larval SEG in terms of tracts, commissures, and other landmark features as compared to a thoracic ganglion. We then use clonal MARCM labeling to identify all adult-specific neuroblast lineages in the late larval SEG and find a surprisingly small number of neuroblast lineages, 13 paired and one unpaired. The Hox genes Dfd, Scr, and Antp are expressed in a lineage-specific manner in these lineages during postembryonic development. Hox gene loss-of-function causes lineage-specific defects in axonal targeting and reduction in neural cell numbers. Moreover, it results in the formation of novel ectopic neuroblast lineages. Apoptosis block also results in ectopic lineages suggesting that Hox genes are required for lineage-specific termination of proliferation through programmed cell death. Taken together, our findings show that postembryonic development in the SEG is mediated by a surprisingly small set of identified lineages and requires lineage-specific Hox gene action to ensure the correct formation of adult-specific neurons in the Drosophila brain.

  2. Transcriptomes of lineage-specific Drosophila neuroblasts profiled by genetic targeting and robotic sorting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Po; Fu, Chi-Cheng; Sugino, Ken; Liu, Zhiyong; Ren, Qingzhong; Liu, Ling-Yu; Yao, Xiaohao; Lee, Luke P.; Lee, Tzumin

    2016-01-01

    A brain consists of numerous distinct neurons arising from a limited number of progenitors, called neuroblasts in Drosophila. Each neuroblast produces a specific neuronal lineage. To unravel the transcriptional networks that underlie the development of distinct neuroblast lineages, we marked and isolated lineage-specific neuroblasts for RNA sequencing. We labeled particular neuroblasts throughout neurogenesis by activating a conditional neuroblast driver in specific lineages using various intersection strategies. The targeted neuroblasts were efficiently recovered using a custom-built device for robotic single-cell picking. Transcriptome analysis of mushroom body, antennal lobe and type II neuroblasts compared with non-selective neuroblasts, neurons and glia revealed a rich repertoire of transcription factors expressed among neuroblasts in diverse patterns. Besides transcription factors that are likely to be pan-neuroblast, many transcription factors exist that are selectively enriched or repressed in certain neuroblasts. The unique combinations of transcription factors present in different neuroblasts may govern the diverse lineage-specific neuron fates. PMID:26700685

  3. Cell lineage-specific expression of modulo, a dose-dependent modifier of variegation in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Garzino, V; Pereira, A; Laurenti, P; Graba, Y; Levis, R W; Le Parco, Y; Pradel, J

    1992-01-01

    Variegation in Drosophila is a manifest illustration of the important role played by chromatin structure in gene expression. We have isolated mutants of modulo (mod) and shown that this gene is a dominant suppressor of variegation. Null mutants are recessive lethal with a melanotic tumour phenotype. The mod protein directly binds DNA, which indicates that it may serve to anchor multimeric complexes promoting chromatin compaction and silencing. Using a specific monoclonal antibody we examined by immunocytochemistry the accumulation pattern of mod protein during embryogenesis. The protein is first detected before the blastoderm cellularization in all somatic nuclei, precisely when pericentromeric heterochromatin becomes visible. After the first cell division, mod protein is expressed in lineages of specific embryonic primordia. Based on its dominant phenotype, expression pattern and DNA-binding activity of its product, we propose that mod regulates chromatin structure and activity in specific cell lineages. Images PMID:1425581

  4. Neuroblast lineage-specific origin of the neurons of the Drosophila larval olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Das, Abhijit; Gupta, Tripti; Davla, Sejal; Godino, Laura Lucia Prieto; Diegelmann, Sören; Reddy, O. Venkateswara; VijayRaghavan, K.; Reichert, Heinrich; Lovick, Jennifer; Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The complete neuronal repertoire of the central brain of Drosophila originates from only approximately 100 pairs of neural stem cells, or neuroblasts. Each neuroblast produces a highly stereotyped lineage of neurons which innervate specific compartments of the brain. Neuroblasts undergo two rounds of mitotic activity: embryonic divisions produce lineages of primary neurons that build the larval nervous system; after a brief quiescence, the neuroblasts go through a second round of divisions in larval stage to produce secondary neurons which are integrated into the adult nervous system. Here we investigate the lineages that are associated with the larval antennal lobe, one of the most widely studied neuronal systems in fly. We find that the same five neuroblasts responsible for the adult antennal lobe also produce the antennal lobe of the larval brain. However, there are notable differences in the composition of larval (primary) lineages and their adult (secondary) counterparts. Significantly, in the adult, two lineages (lNB/BAlc and adNB/BAmv3) produce uniglomerular projection neurons connecting the antennal lobe with the mushroom body and lateral horn; another lineage, vNB/BAla1, generates multiglomerular neurons reaching the lateral horn directly. lNB/BAlc, as well as a fourth lineage, vlNB/BAla2, generate a diversity of local interneurons. We describe a fifth, previously unknown lineage, BAlp4, which connects the posterior part of the antennal lobe and the neighboring tritocerebrum (gustatory center) with a higher brain center located adjacent to the mushroom body. In the larva, only one of these lineages, adNB/BAmv3, generates all uniglomerular projection neurons. Also as in the adult, lNB/BAlc and vlNB/BAla2 produce local interneurons which, in terms of diversity in architecture and transmitter expression, resemble their adult counterparts. In addition, lineages lNB/BAlc and vNB/BAla1, as well as the newly described BAlp4, form numerous types of projection

  5. Lineage-specific effects of Notch/Numb signaling in post-embryonic development of the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Suewei; Lai, Sen-Lin; Yu, Huang-Hsiang; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun; Lee, Tzumin

    2010-01-01

    Numb can antagonize Notch signaling to diversify the fates of sister cells. We report here that paired sister cells acquire different fates in all three Drosophila neuronal lineages that make diverse types of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs). Only one in each pair of postmitotic neurons survives into the adult stage in both anterodorsal (ad) and ventral (v) PN lineages. Notably, Notch signaling specifies the PN fate in the vPN lineage but promotes programmed cell death in the missing siblings in the adPN lineage. In addition, Notch/Numb-mediated binary sibling fates underlie the production of PNs and local interneurons from common precursors in the lAL lineage. Furthermore, Numb is needed in the lateral but not adPN or vPN lineages to prevent the appearance of ectopic neuroblasts and to ensure proper self-renewal of neural progenitors. These lineage-specific outputs of Notch/Numb signaling show that a universal mechanism of binary fate decision can be utilized to govern diverse neural sibling differentiations. PMID:20023159

  6. Lineage-specific effects of Notch/Numb signaling in post-embryonic development of the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suewei; Lai, Sen-Lin; Yu, Huang-Hsiang; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun; Lee, Tzumin

    2010-01-01

    Numb can antagonize Notch signaling to diversify the fates of sister cells. We report here that paired sister cells acquire different fates in all three Drosophila neuronal lineages that make diverse types of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs). Only one in each pair of postmitotic neurons survives into the adult stage in both anterodorsal (ad) and ventral (v) PN lineages. Notably, Notch signaling specifies the PN fate in the vPN lineage but promotes programmed cell death in the missing siblings in the adPN lineage. In addition, Notch/Numb-mediated binary sibling fates underlie the production of PNs and local interneurons from common precursors in the lAL lineage. Furthermore, Numb is needed in the lateral but not adPN or vPN lineages to prevent the appearance of ectopic neuroblasts and to ensure proper self-renewal of neural progenitors. These lineage-specific outputs of Notch/Numb signaling show that a universal mechanism of binary fate decision can be utilized to govern diverse neural sibling differentiations.

  7. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The Drosophila cyst stem cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Zoller, Richard; Schulz, Cordula

    2012-01-01

    In all animals, germline cells differentiate in intimate contact with somatic cells and interactions between germline and soma are particularly important for germline development and function. In the male gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, the developing germline cells are enclosed by somatic cyst cells. The cyst cells are derived from cyst stem cells (CySCs) of somatic origin and codifferentiate with the germline cells. The fast generation cycle and the genetic tractability of Drosophila has made the Drosophila testis an excellent model for studying both the roles of somatic cells in guiding germline development and the interdependence of two separate stem cell lineages. This review focuses on our current understanding of CySC specification, CySC self-renewing divisions, cyst cell differentiation, and soma-germline interactions. Many of the mechanisms guiding these processes in Drosophila testes are similarly essential for the development and function of tissues in other organisms, most importantly for gametogenesis in mammals. PMID:23087834

  9. Development of the Drosophila entero-endocrine lineage and its specification by the Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L.; Ortiz, Paola A.; Ying, Chong T.; Moridzadeh, Rameen; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the developmental-genetic steps that shape the entero-endocrine system of Drosophila melanogaster from the embryo to the adult. The process starts in the endoderm of the early embryo where precursors of endocrine cells and enterocytes of the larval midgut, as well as progenitors of the adult midgut, are specified by a Notch signaling-dependent mechanism. In a second step that occurs during the late larval period, enterocytes and endocrine cells of a transient pupal midgut are selected from within the clusters of adult midgut progenitors. As in the embryo, activation of the Notch pathway triggers enterocyte differentiation, and inhibits cells from further proliferation or choosing the endocrine fate. The third step of entero-endocrine cell development takes place at a mid-pupal stage. Before this time point, the epithelial layer destined to become the adult midgut is devoid of endocrine cells. However, precursors of the intestinal midgut stem cells (pISCs) are already present. After an initial phase of symmetric divisions which causes an increase in their own population size, pISCs start to spin off cells that become postmitotic and express the endocrine fate marker, Prospero. Activation of Notch in pISCs forces these cells into an enterocyte fate. Loss of Notch function causes an increase in the proliferatory activity of pISCs, as well as a higher ratio of Prospero-positive cells. PMID:21382366

  10. Blood cells of Drosophila: cell lineages and role in host defence.

    PubMed

    Meister, Marie

    2004-02-01

    Drosophila haemopoiesis gives rise to three independent cell lineages: plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes. The regulation of Drosophila stem cell proliferation and lineage specification involves transactivators and signalling pathways, many of which have mammalian counterparts that control haemopoietic processes. Drosophila plasmatocytes are professional phagocytes that resemble the monocyte/macrophage lineage, crystal cells play a critical role in defence-related melanisation, and lamellocytes encapsulate large invaders. Crystal cells and lamellocytes have no clear mammalian homologues. Research into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the various immune functions of Drosophila blood cells, such as non-self recognition, is now taking wing.

  11. Historical Selection, Amino Acid Polymorphism and Lineage-Specific Divergence at the G6pd Locus in Drosophila Melanogaster and D. Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Eanes, W. F.; Kirchner, M.; Yoon, J.; Biermann, C. H.; Wang, I. N.; McCartney, M. A.; Verrelli, B. C.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide diversity across 1705 bp of the G6pd gene is studied in 50 Drosophila melanogaster and 12 D. simulans lines. Our earlier report contrasted intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific differences at silent and replacement sites in these species. This report expands the number of European and African lines and examines the pattern of polymorphism with respect to the common A/B allozymes. In D. melanogaster the silent nucleotide diversity varies 2.8-fold across localities. The B allele sequences are two- to fourfold more variable than the derived A allele, and differences between allozymes are twice as among B alleles. There is strong linkage disequilibrium across the G6pd region. In both species the level of silent polymorphism increases from the 5' to 3' ends, while there is no comparable pattern in level of silent site divergence or fixation. The neutral model is not rejected in either species. Using D. yakuba as an outgroup, the D. melanogaster lineage shows a twofold greater rate of silent fixation, but less than half the rate of amino acid replacement. Lineage-specific differences in mutation fixation are inconsistent with neutral expectations and suggest the interaction of species-specific population size differences with both weakly advantageous and deleterious selection. PMID:8913747

  12. Misregulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila hybrids is lineage-specific and driven by the combined effects of sterility and fast male regulatory divergence.

    PubMed

    Gomes, S; Civetta, A

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid male sterility is a common outcome of crosses between different species. Gene expression studies have found that a number of spermatogenesis genes are differentially expressed in sterile hybrid males, compared with parental species. Late-stage sperm development genes are particularly likely to be misexpressed, with fewer early-stage genes affected. Thus, a link has been posited between misexpression and sterility. A more recent alternative explanation for hybrid gene misexpression has been that it is independent of sterility and driven by divergent evolution of male-specific regulatory elements between species (faster male hypothesis). The faster male hypothesis predicts that misregulation of spermatogenesis genes should be independent of sterility and approximately the same in both hybrids, whereas sterility should only affect gene expression in sterile hybrids. To test the faster male hypothesis vs. the effect of sterility on gene misexpression, we analyse spermatogenesis gene expression in different species pairs of the Drosophila phylogeny, where hybrid male sterility occurs in only one direction of the interspecies cross (i.e. unidirectional sterility). We find significant differences among genes in misexpression with effects that are lineage-specific and caused by sterility or fast male regulatory divergence. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Lineage-Specific Evolution of the Complex Nup160 Hybrid Incompatibility Between Drosophila melanogaster and Its Sister Species

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shanwu; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2015-01-01

    Two genes encoding protein components of the nuclear pore complex Nup160 and Nup96 cause lethality in F2-like hybrid genotypes between Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster. In particular, D. simulans Nup160 and Nup96 each cause inviability when hemizygous or homozygous in species hybrids that are also hemizygous (or homozygous) for the D. melanogaster X chromosome. The hybrid lethality of Nup160, however, is genetically complex, depending on one or more unknown additional factors in the autosomal background. Here we study the genetics and evolution of Nup160-mediated hybrid lethality in three ways. First, we test for variability in Nup160-mediated hybrid lethality within and among the three species of the D. simulans clade— D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. We show that the hybrid lethality of Nup160 is fixed in D. simulans and D. sechellia but absent in D. mauritiana. Second, we explore how the hybrid lethality of Nup160 depends on other loci in the autosomal background. We find that D. simulans Nup160-mediated hybrid lethality does not depend on the presence of D. melanogaster Nup96, and we find that D. simulans and D. mauritiana are functionally differentiated at Nup160 as well as at other autosomal factor(s). Finally, we use population genetics data to show that Nup160 has experienced histories of recurrent positive selection both before and after the split of the three D. simulans clade species ∼240,000 years ago. Our genetic results suggest that a hybrid lethal Nup160 allele evolved before the split of the three D. simulans clade species, whereas the other autosomal factor(s) evolved more recently. PMID:26022241

  14. Genetics and Lineage-Specific Evolution of a Lethal Hybrid Incompatibility Between Drosophila mauritiana and Its Sibling Species

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, M. Victoria; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2009-01-01

    The Dobzhansky–Muller model posits that intrinsic postzygotic reproductive isolation—the sterility or lethality of species hybrids—results from the evolution of incompatible epistatic interactions between species: favorable or neutral alleles that become fixed in the genetic background of one species can cause sterility or lethality in the genetic background of another species. The kind of hybrid incompatibility that evolves between two species, however, depends on the particular evolutionary history of the causative substitutions. An allele that is functionally derived in one species can be incompatible with an allele that is functionally derived in the other species (a derived-derived hybrid incompatibility). But an allele that is functionally derived in one species can also be incompatible with an allele that has retained the ancestral state in the other species (a derived-ancestral hybrid incompatibility). The relative abundance of such derived-derived vs. derived-ancestral hybrid incompatibilities is unknown. Here, we characterize the genetics and evolutionary history of a lethal hybrid incompatibility between Drosophila mauritiana and its two sibling species, D. sechellia and D. simulans. We show that a hybrid lethality factor(s) in the pericentric heterochromatin of the D. mauritiana X chromosome, hybrid lethal on the X (hlx), is incompatible with a factor(s) in the same small autosomal region from both D. sechellia and D. simulans, Suppressor of hlx [Su(hlx)]. By combining genetic and phylogenetic information, we infer that hlx-Su(hlx) hybrid lethality is likely caused by a derived-ancestral incompatibility, a hypothesis that can be tested directly when the genes are identified. PMID:19189951

  15. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-26

    In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage.

  16. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Darren C.; Lovick, Jennifer K.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Borisuthirattana, Wichanee; Omoto, Jaison J.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is largely composed of lineages, units of sibling neurons derived from a single progenitor cell or neuroblast. During the early embryonic period neuroblast generate the primary neurons that constitute the larval brain. Neuroblasts reactivate in the larva, adding to their lineages a large number of secondary neurons which, according to previous studies in which selected lineages were labeled by stably expressed markers, differentiate during metamorphosis, sending terminal axonal and dendritic branches into defined volumes of the brain neuropil. We call the overall projection pattern of neurons forming a given lineage the “projection envelope” of that lineage. By inducing MARCM clones at the early larval stage, we labeled the secondary progeny of each neuroblast. For the supraesophageal ganglion excluding mushroom body (the part of the brain investigated in the present work) we obtained 81 different types of clones, Based on the trajectory of their secondary axon tracts (described in the accompanying paper), we assigned these clones to specific lineages defined in the larva. Since a labeled clone reveals all aspects (cell bodies, axon tracts, terminal arborization) of a lineage, we were able to describe projection envelopes for all secondary lineages of the supraesophageal ganglion. This work provides a framework by which the secondary neurons (forming the vast majority of adult brain neurons) can be assigned to genetically and developmentally defined groups. It also represents a step towards the goal to establish, for each lineage, the link between its mature anatomical and functional phenotype, and the genetic make-up of the neuroblast it descends from. PMID:23872236

  17. The phylogenetic distribution of non-CTCF insulator proteins is limited to insects and reveals that BEAF-32 is Drosophila lineage specific.

    PubMed

    Schoborg, Todd A; Labrador, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA sequences found in eukaryotes that may organize genomes into chromatin domains by blocking enhancer-promoter interactions and preventing heterochromatin spreading. Considering that insulators play important roles in organizing higher order chromatin structure and modulating gene expression, very little is known about their phylogenetic distribution. To date, six insulators and their associated proteins have been characterized, including Su(Hw), Zw5, CTCF, GAF, Mod(mdg4), and BEAF-32. However, all insulator proteins, with the exception of CTCF, which has also been identified in vertebrates and worms, have been exclusively described in Drosophila melanogaster. In this work, we have performed database searches utilizing each D. melanogaster insulator protein as a query to find orthologs in other organisms, revealing that except for CTCF all known insulator proteins are restricted to insects. In particular, the boundary element-associated factor of 32 kDa (BEAF-32), which binds to thousands of sites throughout the genome, was only found in the Drosophila lineage. Accordingly, we also found a significant bias of BEAF-32 binding sites in relation to transcription start sites (TSSs) in D. melanogaster but not in Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, or Tribolium castaneum. These data suggest that DNA binding proteins such as BEAF-32 may have a dramatic impact in the genome of single evolutionary lineages. A more thorough evaluation of the phylogenetic distribution of insulator proteins will allow for a better understanding of whether the mechanism by which these proteins exert their function is conserved across phyla and their impact in genome evolution.

  18. Lineage-associated tracts defining the anatomy of the Drosophila first instar larval brain

    PubMed Central

    Hartenstein, Volker; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Lovick, Jennifer; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison; Ngo, Kathy; Viktorin, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Fixed lineages derived from unique, genetically specified neuroblasts form the anatomical building blocks of the Drosophila brain. Neurons belonging to the same lineage project their axons in a common tract, which is labeled by neuronal markers. In this paper, we present a detailed atlas of the lineage-associated tracts forming the brain of the early Drosophila larva, based on the use of global markers (anti-Neuroglian, anti-Neurotactin, Inscuteable-Gal4>UAS-chRFP-Tub) and lineage-specific reporters. We describe 68 discrete fiber bundles that contain axons of one lineage or pairs/small sets of adjacent lineages. Bundles enter the neuropil at invariant locations, the lineage tract entry portals. Within the neuropil, these fiber bundles form larger fascicles that can be classified, by their main orientation, into longitudinal, transverse, and vertical (ascending/descending) fascicles. We present 3D digital models of lineage tract entry portals and neuropil fascicles, set into relationship to commonly used, easily recognizable reference structures such as the mushroom body, the antennal lobe, the optic lobe, and the Fasciclin II-positive fiber bundles that connect the brain and ventral nerve cord. Correspondences and differences between early larval tract anatomy and the previously described late larval and adult lineage patterns are highlighted. Our L1 neuro-anatomical atlas of lineages constitutes an essential step towards following morphologically defined lineages to the neuroblasts of the early embryo, which will ultimately make it possible to link the structure and connectivity of a lineage to the expression of genes in the particular neuroblast that gives rise to that lineage. Furthermore, the L1 atlas will be important for a host of ongoing work that attempts to reconstruct neuronal connectivity at the level of resolution of single neurons and their synapses. PMID:26141956

  19. Lineage-associated tracts defining the anatomy of the Drosophila first instar larval brain.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Lovick, Jennifer K; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J; Ngo, Kathy T; Viktorin, Gudrun

    2015-10-01

    Fixed lineages derived from unique, genetically specified neuroblasts form the anatomical building blocks of the Drosophila brain. Neurons belonging to the same lineage project their axons in a common tract, which is labeled by neuronal markers. In this paper, we present a detailed atlas of the lineage-associated tracts forming the brain of the early Drosophila larva, based on the use of global markers (anti-Neuroglian, anti-Neurotactin, inscuteable-Gal4>UAS-chRFP-Tub) and lineage-specific reporters. We describe 68 discrete fiber bundles that contain axons of one lineage or pairs/small sets of adjacent lineages. Bundles enter the neuropil at invariant locations, the lineage tract entry portals. Within the neuropil, these fiber bundles form larger fascicles that can be classified, by their main orientation, into longitudinal, transverse, and vertical (ascending/descending) fascicles. We present 3D digital models of lineage tract entry portals and neuropil fascicles, set into relationship to commonly used, easily recognizable reference structures such as the mushroom body, the antennal lobe, the optic lobe, and the Fasciclin II-positive fiber bundles that connect the brain and ventral nerve cord. Correspondences and differences between early larval tract anatomy and the previously described late larval and adult lineage patterns are highlighted. Our L1 neuro-anatomical atlas of lineages constitutes an essential step towards following morphologically defined lineages to the neuroblasts of the early embryo, which will ultimately make it possible to link the structure and connectivity of a lineage to the expression of genes in the particular neuroblast that gives rise to that lineage. Furthermore, the L1 atlas will be important for a host of ongoing work that attempts to reconstruct neuronal connectivity at the level of resolution of single neurons and their synapses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extremes of lineage plasticity in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suewei; Marin, Elizabeth C; Yang, Ching-Po; Kao, Chih-Fei; Apenteng, Bettye A; Huang, Yaling; O'Connor, Michael B; Truman, James W; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-10-07

    An often-overlooked aspect of neural plasticity is the plasticity of neuronal composition, in which the numbers of neurons of particular classes are altered in response to environment and experience. The Drosophila brain features several well-characterized lineages in which a single neuroblast gives rise to multiple neuronal classes in a stereotyped sequence during development. We find that in the intrinsic mushroom body neuron lineage, the numbers for each class are highly plastic, depending on the timing of temporal fate transitions and the rate of neuroblast proliferation. For example, mushroom body neuroblast cycling can continue under starvation conditions, uncoupled from temporal fate transitions that depend on extrinsic cues reflecting organismal growth and development. In contrast, the proliferation rates of antennal lobe lineages are closely associated with organismal development, and their temporal fate changes appear to be cell cycle-dependent, such that the same numbers and types of uniglomerular projection neurons innervate the antennal lobe following various perturbations. We propose that this surprising difference in plasticity for these brain lineages is adaptive, given their respective roles as parallel processors versus discrete carriers of olfactory information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R.; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi -Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100–150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death removes an average of 30–40% of primary neurons around the time of hatching. Secondary neurons generated during the larval period form secondary axon tracts (SATs) that typically fasciculate with their corresponding primary axon tract. SATs develop into the long fascicles that interconnect the different compartments of the adult brain. Structurally, we distinguish between three types of lineages: PD lineages, characterized by distinct, spatially separate proximal and distal arborizations; C lineages with arborizations distributed continuously along the entire length of their tract; D lineages that lack proximal arborizations. Arborizations of many lineages, in particular those of the PD type, are restricted to distinct neuropile compartments. We propose that compartments are ‘scaffolded” by individual lineages, or small groups thereof. Thereby, the relatively small number of primary neurons of each primary lineage set up the compartment map in the late embryo. Compartments grow during the larval period simply by an increase in arbor volume of primary neurons. Arbors of secondary neurons form within or adjacent to the larval compartments, resulting in smaller compartment subdivisions and additional, adult specific compartments. PMID:19538956

  2. Transcription factor expression uniquely identifies most postembryonic neuronal lineages in the Drosophila thoracic central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Zhu, Yi; Wilson, Beth A.; Skeath, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Most neurons of the adult Drosophila ventral nerve cord arise from a burst of neurogenesis during the third larval instar stage. Most of this growth occurs in thoracic neuromeres, which contain 25 individually identifiable postembryonic neuronal lineages. Initially, each lineage consists of two hemilineages - ‘A’ (NotchOn) and ‘B’ (NotchOff) - that exhibit distinct axonal trajectories or fates. No reliable method presently exists to identify these lineages or hemilineages unambiguously other than labor-intensive lineage-tracing methods. By combining mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) analysis with gene expression studies, we constructed a gene expression map that enables the rapid, unambiguous identification of 23 of the 25 postembryonic lineages based on the expression of 15 transcription factors. Pilot genetic studies reveal that these transcription factors regulate the specification and differentiation of postembryonic neurons: for example, Nkx6 is necessary and sufficient to direct axonal pathway selection in lineage 3. The gene expression map thus provides a descriptive foundation for the genetic and molecular dissection of adult-specific neurogenesis and identifies many transcription factors that are likely to regulate the development and differentiation of discrete subsets of postembryonic neurons. PMID:24550109

  3. The Drosophila neural lineages: a model system to study brain development and circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Shana R.

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, neurons of the central nervous system are grouped into units called lineages. Each lineage contains cells derived from a single neuroblast. Due to its clonal nature, the Drosophila brain is a valuable model system to study neuron development and circuit formation. To better understand the mechanisms underlying brain development, genetic manipulation tools can be utilized within lineages to visualize, knock down, or over-express proteins. Here, we will introduce the formation and development of lineages, discuss how one can utilize this model system, offer a comprehensive list of known lineages and their respective markers, and then briefly review studies that have utilized Drosophila neural lineages with a look at how this model system can benefit future endeavors. PMID:20306203

  4. Making Drosophila lineage-restricted drivers via patterned recombination in neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Awasaki, Takeshi; Kao, Chih-Fei; Lee, Ying-Jou; Yang, Ching-Po; Huang, Yaling; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Luan, Haojiang; Jing, Xiaotang; Huang, Yu-Fen; He, Yisheng; Schroeder, Mark David; Kuzin, Alexander; Brody, Thomas; Zugates, Christopher T; Odenwald, Ward F; Lee, Tzumin

    2014-04-01

    The Drosophila cerebrum originates from about 100 neuroblasts per hemisphere, with each neuroblast producing a characteristic set of neurons. Neurons from a neuroblast are often so diverse that many neuron types remain unexplored. We developed new genetic tools that target neuroblasts and their diverse descendants, increasing our ability to study fly brain structure and development. Common enhancer-based drivers label neurons on the basis of terminal identities rather than origins, which provides limited labeling in the heterogeneous neuronal lineages. We successfully converted conventional drivers that are temporarily expressed in neuroblasts, into drivers expressed in all subsequent neuroblast progeny. One technique involves immortalizing GAL4 expression in neuroblasts and their descendants. Another depends on loss of the GAL4 repressor, GAL80, from neuroblasts during early neurogenesis. Furthermore, we expanded the diversity of MARCM-based reagents and established another site-specific mitotic recombination system. Our transgenic tools can be combined to map individual neurons in specific lineages of various genotypes.

  5. EGFR and Notch signaling respectively regulate proliferative activity and multiple cell lineage differentiation of Drosophila gastric stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Xi, Rongwen

    2014-05-01

    Quiescent, multipotent gastric stem cells (GSSCs) in the copper cell region of adult Drosophila midgut can produce all epithelial cell lineages found in the region, including acid-secreting copper cells, interstitial cells and enteroendocrine cells, but mechanisms controlling their quiescence and the ternary lineage differentiation are unknown. By using cell ablation or damage-induced regeneration assays combined with cell lineage tracing and genetic analysis, here we demonstrate that Delta (Dl)-expressing cells in the copper cell region are the authentic GSSCs that can self-renew and continuously regenerate the gastric epithelium after a sustained damage. Lineage tracing analysis reveals that the committed GSSC daughter with activated Notch will invariably differentiate into either a copper cell or an interstitial cell, but not the enteroendocrine cell lineage, and loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies revealed that Notch signaling is both necessary and sufficient for copper cell/interstitial cell differentiation. We also demonstrate that elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, which is achieved by the activation of ligand Vein from the surrounding muscle cells and ligand Spitz from progenitor cells, mediates the regenerative proliferation of GSSCs following damage. Taken together, we demonstrate that Dl is a specific marker for Drosophila GSSCs, whose cell cycle status is dependent on the levels of EGFR signaling activity, and the Notch signaling has a central role in controlling cell lineage differentiation from GSSCs by separating copper/interstitial cell lineage from enteroendocrine cell lineage.

  6. Temporal and spatial expression of homeotic genes is important for segment-specific neuroblast 6-4 lineage formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sun-Young; Kim, Su-Na; Kim, Sang Hee; Jeon, Sang-Hak

    2006-06-30

    Different proliferation of neuroblast 6-4 (NB6-4) in the thorax and abdomen produces segmental specific expression pattern of several neuroblast marker genes. NB6-4 is divided to form four medialmost cell body glia (MM-CBG) per segment in thorax and two MM-CBG per segment in abdomen. As homeotic genes determine the identities of embryonic segments along theA/P axis, we investigated if temporal and specific expression of homeotic genes affects MM-CBG patterns in thorax and abdomen. A Ubx loss-of-function mutation was found to hardly affect MM-CBG formation, whereas abd-A and Abd-B caused the transformation of abdominal MM-CBG to their thoracic counterparts. On the other hand, gain-of-function mutants of Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B genes reduced the number of thoracic MM-CBG, indicating that thoracic MM-CBG resembled abdominal MM-CBG. However, mutations in Polycomb group (PcG) genes, which are negative transregulators of homeotic genes, did not cause the thoracic to abdominal MM-CBG pattern transformation although the number of MM-CBG in a few per-cent of embryos were partially reduced or abnormally patterned. Our results indicate that temporal and spa-tial expression of the homeotic genes is important to determine segmental-specificity of NB6-4 daughter cells along the anterior-posterior (A/P) axis.

  7. Adipocyte Metabolic Pathways Regulated by Diet Control the Female Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shinya; Armstrong, Alissa R; Sampson, Leesa L; Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    Nutrients affect adult stem cells through complex mechanisms involving multiple organs. Adipocytes are highly sensitive to diet and have key metabolic roles, and obesity increases the risk for many cancers. How diet-regulated adipocyte metabolic pathways influence normal stem cell lineages, however, remains unclear. Drosophila melanogaster has highly conserved adipocyte metabolism and a well-characterized female germline stem cell (GSC) lineage response to diet. Here, we conducted an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to identify diet-regulated adipocyte metabolic pathways that control the female GSC lineage. On a rich (relative to poor) diet, adipocyte Hexokinase-C and metabolic enzymes involved in pyruvate/acetyl-CoA production are upregulated, promoting a shift of glucose metabolism toward macromolecule biosynthesis. Adipocyte-specific knockdown shows that these enzymes support early GSC progeny survival. Further, enzymes catalyzing fatty acid oxidation and phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis in adipocytes promote GSC maintenance, whereas lipid and iron transport from adipocytes controls vitellogenesis and GSC number, respectively. These results show a functional relationship between specific metabolic pathways in adipocytes and distinct processes in the GSC lineage, suggesting the adipocyte metabolism-stem cell link as an important area of investigation in other stem cell systems. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Pox neuro control of cell lineages that give rise to larval poly-innervated external sensory organs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanrui; Boll, Werner; Noll, Markus

    2015-01-15

    The Pox neuro (Poxn) gene of Drosophila plays a crucial role in the development of poly-innervated external sensory (p-es) organs. However, how Poxn exerts this role has remained elusive. In this study, we have analyzed the cell lineages of all larval p-es organs, namely of the kölbchen, papilla 6, and hair 3. Surprisingly, these lineages are distinct from any previously reported cell lineages of sensory organs. Unlike the well-established lineage of mono-innervated external sensory (m-es) organs and a previously proposed model of the p-es lineage, we demonstrate that all wild-type p-es lineages exhibit the following features: the secondary precursor, pIIa, gives rise to all three support cells-socket, shaft, and sheath, whereas the other secondary precursor, pIIb, is neuronal and gives rise to all neurons. We further show that in one of the p-es lineages, that of papilla 6, one cell undergoes apoptosis. By contrast in Poxn null mutants, all p-es lineages have a reduced number of cells and their pattern of cell divisions is changed to that of an m-es organ, with the exception of a lineage in a minority of mutant kölbchen that retains a second bipolar neuron. Indeed, the role of Poxn in p-es lineages is consistent with the specification of the developmental potential of secondary precursors and the regulation of cell division but not apoptosis.

  9. Programmed cell death in type II neuroblast lineages is required for central complex development in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2012-01-18

    The number of neurons generated by neural stem cells is dependent upon the regulation of cell proliferation and by programmed cell death. Recently, novel neural stem cells that amplify neural proliferation through intermediate neural progenitors, called type II neuroblasts, have been discovered, which are active during brain development in Drosophila. We investigated programmed cell death in the dorsomedial (DM) amplifying type II lineages that contribute neurons to the development of the central complex in Drosophila, using clonal mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) and lineage-tracing techniques. A significant number of the adult-specific neurons generated in these DM lineages were eliminated by programmed cell death. Programmed cell death occurred during both larval and pupal stages. During larval development, approximately one-quarter of the neuronal (but not glial) cells in the lineages were eliminated by apoptosis before the formation of synaptic connectivity during pupal stages. Lineage-tracing experiments documented the extensive contribution of intermediate neural progenitor-containing DM lineages to all of the major modular substructures of the adult central complex. Moreover, blockage of apoptotic cell death specifically in these lineages led to prominent innervation defects of DM-derived neural progeny in the major neuropile substructures of the adult central complex. Our findings indicate that significant neural overproliferation occurs normally in type II DM lineage development, and that elimination of excess neurons in these lineages through programmed cell death is required for the formation of correct neuropile innervation in the developing central complex. Thus, amplification of neuronal proliferation through intermediate progenitors and reduction of neuronal number through programmed cell death operate in concert in type II neural stem-cell lineages during brain development.

  10. Bridging the gap between postembryonic cell lineages and identified embryonic neuroblasts in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Oliver; Rickert, Christof; Nowak, Julia; Coban, Ivo C.; Technau, Gerhard M.

    2015-01-01

    The clarification of complete cell lineages, which are produced by specific stem cells, is fundamental for understanding mechanisms, controlling the generation of cell diversity and patterning in an emerging tissue. In the developing Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila, neural stem cells (neuroblasts) exhibit two periods of proliferation: During embryogenesis they produce primary lineages, which form the larval CNS. After a phase of mitotic quiescence, a subpopulation of them resumes proliferation in the larva to give rise to secondary lineages that build up the CNS of the adult fly. Within the ventral nerve cord (VNC) detailed descriptions exist for both primary and secondary lineages. However, while primary lineages have been linked to identified neuroblasts, the assignment of secondary lineages has so far been hampered by technical limitations. Therefore, primary and secondary neural lineages co-existed as isolated model systems. Here we provide the missing link between the two systems for all lineages in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres. Using the Flybow technique, embryonic neuroblasts were identified by their characteristic and unique lineages in the living embryo and their further development was traced into the late larval stage. This comprehensive analysis provides the first complete view of which embryonic neuroblasts are postembryonically reactivated along the anterior/posterior-axis of the VNC, and reveals the relationship between projection patterns of primary and secondary sublineages. PMID:25819843

  11. Lineage mapping identifies molecular and architectural similarities between the larval and adult Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Truman, James W

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in Drosophila occurs in two phases, embryonic and post-embryonic, in which the same set of neuroblasts give rise to the distinct larval and adult nervous systems, respectively. Here, we identified the embryonic neuroblast origin of the adult neuronal lineages in the ventral nervous system via lineage-specific GAL4 lines and molecular markers. Our lineage mapping revealed that neurons born late in the embryonic phase show axonal morphology and transcription factor profiles that are similar to the neurons born post-embryonically from the same neuroblast. Moreover, we identified three thorax-specific neuroblasts not previously characterized and show that HOX genes confine them to the thoracic segments. Two of these, NB2-3 and NB3-4, generate leg motor neurons. The other neuroblast is novel and appears to have arisen recently during insect evolution. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of neurogenesis and show how proliferation of individual neuroblasts is dictated by temporal and spatial cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13399.001 PMID:26975248

  12. Diverse neuronal lineages make stereotyped contributions to the Drosophila locomotor control center, the central complex

    PubMed Central

    He, Yisheng; Ding, Peng; Kao, Jui-Chun; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts. Each neuroblast makes a clone of neurons that exhibit common trajectories. Here we identified 15 distinct clones that carry larval-born neurons innervating the Drosophila central complex (CX), which consists of four midline structures including the protocerebral bridge (PB), fan-shape body (FB), ellipsoid body (EB), and noduli (NO). Clonal analysis revealed that the small-field CX neurons, which establish intricate projections across different CX substructures, exist in four isomorphic groups that respectively derive from four complex posterior asense-negative lineages. About the region-characteristic large-field CX neurons, we found that two lineages make PB neurons, ten lineages produce FB neurons, three lineages generate EB neurons, and two lineages yield NO neurons. The diverse FB developmental origins reflect the discrete input pathways for different FB subcompartments. Clonal analysis enlightens both development and anatomy of the insect locomotor control center. PMID:23696496

  13. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of stem cells - like most cells - is not just a membrane phenomenon. Most tissue cells need to adhere to a ``solid'' for viability, and over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that the physical ``elasticity'' of that solid is literally ``felt'' by cells. Here we show that Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) specify lineage and commit to phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to the elasticity typical of tissues [1]. In serum only media, soft matrices that mimic brain appear neurogenic, stiffer matrices that mimic muscle are myogenic, and comparatively rigid matrices that mimic collagenous bone prove osteogenic. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activity blocks all elasticity directed lineage specification, which indicates that the cytoskeleton pulls on matrix through adhesive attachments. Results have significant implications for `therapeutic' stem cells and have motivated development of a proteomic-scale method to identify mechano-responsive protein structures [2] as well as deeper physical studies of matrix physics [3] and growth factor pathways [4]. [4pt] [1] A. Engler, et al. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell (2006).[0pt] [2] C.P. Johnson, et al. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells. Science (2007).[0pt] [3] A.E.X. Brown, et al. Multiscale mechanics of fibrin polymer: Gel stretching with protein unfolding and loss of water. Science (2009).[0pt] [4] D.E. Discher, et al. Growth factors, matrices, and forces combine and control stem cells. Science (2009).

  14. Long-Term Live Cell Imaging and Automated 4D Analysis of Drosophila Neuroblast Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Christian; Lendl, Thomas; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    The developing Drosophila brain is a well-studied model system for neurogenesis and stem cell biology. In the Drosophila central brain, around 200 neural stem cells called neuroblasts undergo repeated rounds of asymmetric cell division. These divisions typically generate a larger self-renewing neuroblast and a smaller ganglion mother cell that undergoes one terminal division to create two differentiating neurons. Although single mitotic divisions of neuroblasts can easily be imaged in real time, the lack of long term imaging procedures has limited the use of neuroblast live imaging for lineage analysis. Here we describe a method that allows live imaging of cultured Drosophila neuroblasts over multiple cell cycles for up to 24 hours. We describe a 4D image analysis protocol that can be used to extract cell cycle times and growth rates from the resulting movies in an automated manner. We use it to perform lineage analysis in type II neuroblasts where clonal analysis has indicated the presence of a transit-amplifying population that potentiates the number of neurons. Indeed, our experiments verify type II lineages and provide quantitative parameters for all cell types in those lineages. As defects in type II neuroblast lineages can result in brain tumor formation, our lineage analysis method will allow more detailed and quantitative analysis of tumorigenesis and asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila brain. PMID:24260257

  15. Drosophila intermediate neural progenitors produce lineage-dependent related series of diverse neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Yang, Jacob S.; Johnston, Rebecca; Ren, Qingzhong; Lee, Ying-Jou; Luan, Haojiang; Brody, Thomas; Odenwald, Ward F.; Lee, Tzumin

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila type II neuroblasts (NBs), like mammalian neural stem cells, deposit neurons through intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) that can each produce a series of neurons. Both type II NBs and INPs exhibit age-dependent expression of various transcription factors, potentially specifying an array of diverse neurons by combinatorial temporal patterning. Not knowing which mature neurons are made by specific INPs, however, conceals the actual variety of neuron types and limits further molecular studies. Here we mapped neurons derived from specific type II NB lineages and found that sibling INPs produced a morphologically similar but temporally regulated series of distinct neuron types. This suggests a common fate diversification program operating within each INP that is modulated by NB age to generate slightly different sets of diverse neurons based on the INP birth order. Analogous mechanisms might underlie the expansion of neuron diversity via INPs in mammalian brain. PMID:24306106

  16. Identification of Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages containing transit amplifying ganglion mother cells.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jason Q; Doe, Chris Q

    2008-08-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells generate transit amplifying progenitors that expand the neuronal population, but these type of progenitors have not been studied in Drosophila. The Drosophila larval brain contains approximately 100 neural stem cells (neuroblasts) per brain lobe, which are thought to bud off smaller ganglion mother cells (GMCs) that each produce two post-mitotic neurons. Here, we use molecular markers and clonal analysis to identify a novel neuroblast cell lineage containing "transit amplifying GMCs" (TA-GMCs). TA-GMCs differ from canonical GMCs in several ways: each TA-GMC has nuclear Deadpan, cytoplasmic Prospero, forms Prospero crescents at mitosis, and generates up to 10 neurons; canonical GMCs lack Deadpan, have nuclear Prospero, lack Prospero crescents at mitosis, and generate two neurons. We conclude that there are at least two types of neuroblast lineages: a Type I lineage where GMCs generate two neurons, and a type II lineage where TA-GMCs have longer lineages. Type II lineages allow more neurons to be produced faster than Type I lineages, which may be advantageous in a rapidly developing organism like Drosophila. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol, 2008.

  17. Identification of Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages containing transit amplifying ganglion mother cells

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Jason Q.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells generate transit amplifying progenitors that expand the neuronal population, but these type of progenitors have not been studied in Drosophila. The Drosophila larval brain contains ~100 neural stem cells (neuroblasts) per brain lobe, which are thought to bud off smaller ganglion mother cells (GMCs) that each produce two post-mitotic neurons. Here we use molecular markers and clonal analysis to identify a novel neuroblast cell lineage containing "transit amplifying GMCs" (TA-GMCs). TA-GMCs differ from canonical GMCs in several ways: each TA-GMC has nuclear Deadpan, cytoplasmic Prospero, forms Prospero crescents at mitosis, and generates up to 10 neurons; canonical GMCs lack Deadpan, have nuclear Prospero, lack Prospero crescents at mitosis, and generate two neurons. We conclude that there are at least two types of neuroblast lineages: a type I lineage where GMCs generate two neurons, and a type II lineage where TA-GMCs have longer lineages. Type II lineages allow more neurons to be produced faster than type I lineages, which may be advantageous in a rapidly developing organism like Drosophila. PMID:18548484

  18. Identifying neuronal lineages of Drosophila by sequence analysis of axon tracts

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Albert; Saalfeld, Stephan; Arganda, Ignacio; Pereanu, Wayne; Schindelin, Johannes; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is formed by an invariant set of lineages, each of which is derived from a unique neural stem cell (neuroblast) and forms a genetic and structural unit of the brain. The task of reconstructing brain circuitry at the level of individual neurons can be made significantly easier by assigning neurons to their respective lineages. In this paper we address the automatization of neuron and lineage identification. We focused on the Drosophila brain lineages at the larval stage when they form easily recognizable secondary axon tracts (SATs) that were previously partially characterized. We now generated an annotated digital database containing all lineage tracts reconstructed from five registered wild-type brains, at higher resolution and including some that were previously not characterized. We developed a method for SAT structural comparisons based on a dynamic programming approach akin to nucleotide sequence alignment, and a machine learning classifier trained on the annotated database of reference SATs. We quantified the stereotypy of SATs by measuring the residual variability of aligned wild-type SATs. Next, we employed our method for the identification of SATs within wild-type larval brains, and found it highly accurate (93–99 %). The method proved highly robust for the identification of lineages in mutant brains, and in brains that differed in developmental time or labeling. We describe for the first time an algorithm that quantifies neuronal projection stereotypy in the Drosophila brain, and use the algorithm for automatic neuron and lineage recognition. PMID:20519528

  19. Genetic and molecular analysis of region 88E9;88F2 in Drosophila melanogaster, including the ear gene related to human factors involved in lineage-specific leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Zraly, Claudia B; Feng, Yun; Dingwall, Andrew K

    2002-01-01

    We identified and characterized the Drosophila gene ear (ENL/AF9-related), which is closely related to mammalian genes that have been implicated in the onset of acute lymphoblastic and myelogenous leukemias when their products are fused as chimeras with those of human HRX, a homolog of Drosophila trithorax. The ear gene product is present in all early embryonic cells, but becomes restricted to specific tissues in late embryogenesis. We mapped the ear gene to cytological region 88E11-13, near easter, and showed that it is deleted by Df(3R)ea(5022rx1), a small, cytologically invisible deletion. Annotation of the completed Drosophila genome sequence suggests that this region might contain as many as 26 genes, most of which, including ear, are not represented by mutant alleles. We carried out a large-scale noncomplementation screen using Df(3R)ea(5022rx1) and chemical (EMS) mutagenesis from which we identified seven novel multi-allele recessive lethal complementation groups in this region. An overlapping deficiency, Df(3R)Po(4), allowed us to map several of these groups to either the proximal or the distal regions of Df(3R)ea(5022rx1). One of these complementation groups likely corresponds to the ear gene as judged by map location, terminal phenotype, and reduction of EAR protein levels. PMID:11901121

  20. The Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation in Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koe, Chwee Tat; Li, Song; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Keng; Aw, Sherry Shiying; Richardson, Helena E; Robson, Paul; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The control of self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells is a crucial issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages are prone to developing impaired neuroblast homeostasis if the limited self-renewing potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) is unrestrained. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling Brahma (Brm) complex functions cooperatively with another chromatin remodeling factor, Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to suppress the formation of ectopic type II neuroblasts. We show that multiple components of the Brm complex and HDAC3 physically associate with Earmuff (Erm), a type II-specific transcription factor that prevents dedifferentiation of INPs into neuroblasts. Consistently, the predicted Erm-binding motif is present in most of known binding loci of Brm. Furthermore, brm and hdac3 genetically interact with erm to prevent type II neuroblast overgrowth. Thus, the Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation of INPs back into type II neuroblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01906.001 PMID:24618901

  1. [Advances in lineage-specific genes].

    PubMed

    Huanping, Zhang; Tongming, Yin

    2015-06-01

    Lineage-specific genes (LSGs) are defined as genes found in one particular taxonomic group but have no significant sequence similarity with genes from other lineages, which compose about 10%?20% of the total genes in the genome of a focal organism. LSGs were first uncovered in the yeast genome in 1996. The development of the whole genome sequencing leads to the emergence of studies on LSGs as a hot topic in comparative genomics. LSGs have been extensively studied on microbial species, lower marine organisms, plant (such as Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Populus), insects, primate, etc; the biological functions of LSGs are important to clarify the evolution and adaptability of a species. In this review, we summarize the progress of LSGs studies, including LSGs identification, gene characterization, origin and evolution of LSGs, biological function, and expression analysis of LSGs. In addition, we discuss the existing problems and future directions for studies in this area. Our purpose is to provide some unique insights into the researches of LSGs.

  2. Expression of the Hsp23 chaperone during Drosophila embryogenesis: association to distinct neural and glial lineages

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Sébastien; Tanguay, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    Background In addition to their strong induction following stress, small heat shock proteins (Hsp) are also expressed during development in a wide variety of organisms. However, the precise identity of cell(s) expressing these proteins and the functional contribution of small heat shock proteins in such developmental context remain to be determined. The present study provides a detailed description of the Drosophila small heat shock protein Hsp23 expression pattern during embryogenesis and evaluates its functional contribution to central nervous system development. Results Throughout embryogenesis, Hsp23 is expressed in a stage-specific manner by a restricted number of neuronal and glial lineages of the central nervous system. Hsp23 is also detected in the amnioserosa and within a single lateral chordotonal organ. Its expression within the MP2 lineage does not require the presence of a functional midline nor the activity of the Notch signaling pathway. Transactivation assays demonstrate that transcription factors implicated in the differentiation of the midline also regulate hsp23 promoter activity. Phenotypic analysis of a transgenic line exhibiting loss of Hsp23 expression in the central nervous system suggests that Hsp23 is not required for development and function of this tissue. Likewise, its overexpression does not cause deleterious effects, as development remains unaffected. Conclusions Based on the presented data, we suggest that the tightly regulated developmental expression of Hsp23 is not actively involved in cell differentiation and central nervous system development per se but rather reflects a putative role in preventive "pre-stress" neuroprotection or in non-vital process(es) common to the identified cell lineages. PMID:14617383

  3. Genetic Mosaic Analysis of Stem Cell Lineages in the Drosophila Ovary.

    PubMed

    Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mosaic analyses represent an invaluable approach for the study of stem cell lineages in the Drosophila ovary. The generation of readily identifiable, homozygous mutant cells in the context of wild-type ovarian tissues within intact organisms allows the pinpointing of cellular requirements for gene function, which is particularly important for understanding the physiological control of stem cells and their progeny. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to the generation and analysis of genetically mosaic ovaries using flippase (FLP)/FLP recognition target (FRT)-mediated recombination in adult Drosophila melanogaster, with a focus on the processes of oogenesis that are controlled by diet-dependent factors.

  4. The Drosophila female germline stem cell lineage acts to spatially restrict DPP function within the niche.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Lim, Tit Meng; Cai, Yu

    2010-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cells requires spatially restricted, niche-associated signals. In the Drosophila female germline stem cell (GSC) niche, Decapentaplegic (DPP) is the primary niche-associated factor and functions over a short range to promote GSC self-renewal rather than differentiation. Here, we show that the GSC lineage and, more specifically, the stem cells themselves participate in the spatial restriction of DPP function by activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the surrounding somatic cells. EGFR-MAPK signaling in somatic cells repressed the expression of dally, which encodes a glypican required for DPP movement and stability. Consequently, only GSCs close to the DPP source (the somatic cells in the niche) showed high signal activation and were maintained as stem cells, whereas cystoblasts outside the niche showed low signal activation and initiated differentiation. Thus, our data reveal that the reciprocal crosstalk between the GSCs and the somatic cells defines the spatial limits of DPP action and therefore the extent of the GSC niche.

  5. Connecting temporal identity to mitosis: the regulation of Hunchback in Drosophila neuroblast lineages.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joachim; Mettler, Ulrike

    2006-05-01

    Both in vertebrates and invertebrates, neural stem cells generate different cell types at different times during development. It has been suggested that this process depends on temporal identity transitions of neural progenitors, but the underlying mechanism has not been resolved, yet. Recently, Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs) have been shown to be an excellent model system to investigate this subject. Here, changes in temporal identity are regulated by sequential and transient expression of transcription factors in the NB, such as Hunchback (Hb) and Krüppel (Kr). The temporal expression profile is maintained in the progeny. Hb is expressed first and thus defines the earliest identity in a given lineage. Transition to Kr requires the termination of hb expression, which occurs in response to mitosis, and is mediated by Seven-up (Svp). Recent results provided evidence that the dependency of Svp activity on mitosis could be due to an inhibition of the nuclear export of svp mRNA. Furthermore, the maintenance of hb expression in the GMC is regulated by the activity of Prospero (Pros), a transcription factor which asymmetrically segregates into the GMC during mitosis and inhibits Svp activity on both, the transcriptional and posttranscriptional level. These results give first insights as to how temporal cell fate specification can be correlated with mitosis.

  6. Hydroxyurea-mediated neuroblast ablation establishes birthdates of secondary lineages and addresses neuronal interactions in the developing Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Lovick, Jennifer K.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is comprised of neurons formed by approximately 100 lineages, each of which is derived from a stereotyped, asymmetrically dividing neuroblast. Lineages serve as structural and developmental units of Drosophila brain anatomy and reconstruction of lineage projection patterns represents a suitable map of Drosophila brain circuitry at the level of neuron populations (“macro-circuitry”). Two phases of neuroblast proliferation, the first in the embryo and the second during the larval phase (following a period of mitotic quiescence), produce primary and secondary lineages, respectively. Using temporally controlled pulses of hydroxyurea (HU) to ablate neuroblasts and their corresponding secondary lineages during the larval phase, we analyzed the effect on development of primary and secondary lineages in the late larval and adult brain. Our findings indicate that timing of neuroblast re-activation is highly stereotyped, allowing us to establish “birth dates” for all secondary lineages. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that, whereas the trajectory and projection pattern of primary and secondary lineages is established in a largely independent manner, the final branching pattern of secondary neurons is dependent upon the presence of appropriate neuronal targets. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the degree of neuronal plasticity during Drosophila brain development. PMID:25773365

  7. Hydroxyurea-mediated neuroblast ablation establishes birth dates of secondary lineages and addresses neuronal interactions in the developing Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Lovick, Jennifer K; Hartenstein, Volker

    2015-06-01

    The Drosophila brain is comprised of neurons formed by approximately 100 lineages, each of which is derived from a stereotyped, asymmetrically dividing neuroblast. Lineages serve as structural and developmental units of Drosophila brain anatomy and reconstruction of lineage projection patterns represents a suitable map of Drosophila brain circuitry at the level of neuron populations ("macro-circuitry"). Two phases of neuroblast proliferation, the first in the embryo and the second during the larval phase (following a period of mitotic quiescence), produce primary and secondary lineages, respectively. Using temporally controlled pulses of hydroxyurea (HU) to ablate neuroblasts and their corresponding secondary lineages during the larval phase, we analyzed the effect on development of primary and secondary lineages in the late larval and adult brain. Our findings indicate that timing of neuroblast re-activation is highly stereotyped, allowing us to establish "birth dates" for all secondary lineages. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that, whereas the trajectory and projection pattern of primary and secondary lineages is established in a largely independent manner, the final branching pattern of secondary neurons is dependent upon the presence of appropriate neuronal targets. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the degree of neuronal plasticity during Drosophila brain development.

  8. Piwi is required in multiple cell types to control germline stem cell lineage development in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Su; Do, Trieu; Song, Xiaoqing; Inaba, Mayu; Nishimoto, Yoshiya; Liu, Lu-ping; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Ying; Li, Hui; McDowell, William; Park, Jungeun; Malanowski, Kate; Peak, Allison; Perera, Anoja; Li, Hua; Gaudenz, Karin; Haug, Jeff; Yamashita, Yukiko; Lin, Haifan; Ni, Jian-quan; Xie, Ting

    2014-01-01

    The piRNA pathway plays an important role in maintaining genome stability in the germ line by silencing transposable elements (TEs) from fly to mammals. As a highly conserved piRNA pathway component, Piwi is widely expressed in both germ cells and somatic cells in the Drosophila ovary and is required for piRNA production in both cell types. In addition to its known role in somatic cap cells to maintain germline stem cells (GSCs), this study has demonstrated that Piwi has novel functions in somatic cells and germ cells of the Drosophila ovary to promote germ cell differentiation. Piwi knockdown in escort cells causes a reduction in escort cell (EC) number and accumulation of undifferentiated germ cells, some of which show active BMP signaling, indicating that Piwi is required to maintain ECs and promote germ cell differentiation. Simultaneous knockdown of dpp, encoding a BMP, in ECs can partially rescue the germ cell differentiation defect, indicating that Piwi is required in ECs to repress dpp. Consistent with its key role in piRNA production, TE transcripts increase significantly and DNA damage is also elevated in the piwi knockdown somatic cells. Germ cell-specific knockdown of piwi surprisingly causes depletion of germ cells before adulthood, suggesting that Piwi might control primordial germ cell maintenance or GSC establishment. Finally, Piwi inactivation in the germ line of the adult ovary leads to gradual GSC loss and germ cell differentiation defects, indicating the intrinsic role of Piwi in adult GSC maintenance and differentiation. This study has revealed new germline requirement of Piwi in controlling GSC maintenance and lineage differentiation as well as its new somatic function in promoting germ cell differentiation. Therefore, Piwi is required in multiple cell types to control GSC lineage development in the Drosophila ovary.

  9. Piwi Is Required in Multiple Cell Types to Control Germline Stem Cell Lineage Development in the Drosophila Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Su; Do, Trieu; Song, Xiaoqing; Inaba, Mayu; Nishimoto, Yoshiya; Liu, Lu-ping; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Ying; Li, Hui; McDowell, William; Park, Jungeun; Malanowski, Kate; Peak, Allison; Perera, Anoja; Li, Hua; Gaudenz, Karin; Haug, Jeff; Yamashita, Yukiko; Lin, Haifan; Ni, Jian-quan; Xie, Ting

    2014-01-01

    The piRNA pathway plays an important role in maintaining genome stability in the germ line by silencing transposable elements (TEs) from fly to mammals. As a highly conserved piRNA pathway component, Piwi is widely expressed in both germ cells and somatic cells in the Drosophila ovary and is required for piRNA production in both cell types. In addition to its known role in somatic cap cells to maintain germline stem cells (GSCs), this study has demonstrated that Piwi has novel functions in somatic cells and germ cells of the Drosophila ovary to promote germ cell differentiation. Piwi knockdown in escort cells causes a reduction in escort cell (EC) number and accumulation of undifferentiated germ cells, some of which show active BMP signaling, indicating that Piwi is required to maintain ECs and promote germ cell differentiation. Simultaneous knockdown of dpp, encoding a BMP, in ECs can partially rescue the germ cell differentiation defect, indicating that Piwi is required in ECs to repress dpp. Consistent with its key role in piRNA production, TE transcripts increase significantly and DNA damage is also elevated in the piwi knockdown somatic cells. Germ cell-specific knockdown of piwi surprisingly causes depletion of germ cells before adulthood, suggesting that Piwi might control primordial germ cell maintenance or GSC establishment. Finally, Piwi inactivation in the germ line of the adult ovary leads to gradual GSC loss and germ cell differentiation defects, indicating the intrinsic role of Piwi in adult GSC maintenance and differentiation. This study has revealed new germline requirement of Piwi in controlling GSC maintenance and lineage differentiation as well as its new somatic function in promoting germ cell differentiation. Therefore, Piwi is required in multiple cell types to control GSC lineage development in the Drosophila ovary. PMID:24658126

  10. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of T-helper lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Subhash K; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Combined with TCR stimuli, extracellular cytokine signals initiate the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into specialized effector T-helper (Th) and regulatory T (Treg) cell subsets. The lineage specification and commitment process occurs through the combinatorial action of multiple transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic mechanisms that drive lineage-specific gene expression programs. In this article, we review recent studies on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of distinct Th cell lineages. Moreover, we review current study linking immune disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms with distal regulatory elements and their potential role in the disease etiology. PMID:25123277

  11. Lineage-specific mapping of quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C; Ritland, K

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, termed as ‘lineage-specific QTL mapping', for inferring allelic changes of QTL evolution along with branches in a phylogeny. We describe and analyze the simplest case: by adding a third taxon into the normal procedure of QTL mapping between pairs of taxa, such inferences can be made along lineages to a presumed common ancestor. Although comparisons of QTL maps among species can identify homology of QTLs by apparent co-location, lineage-specific mapping of QTL can classify homology into (1) orthology (shared origin of QTL) versus (2) paralogy (independent origin of QTL within resolution of map distance). In this light, we present a graphical method that identifies six modes of QTL evolution in a three taxon comparison. We then apply our model to map lineage-specific QTLs for inbreeding among three taxa of yellow monkey-flower: Mimulus guttatus and two inbreeders M. platycalyx and M. micranthus, but critically assuming outcrossing was the ancestral state. The two most common modes of homology across traits were orthologous (shared ancestry of mutation for QTL alleles). The outbreeder M. guttatus had the fewest lineage-specific QTL, in accordance with the presumed ancestry of outbreeding. Extensions of lineage-specific QTL mapping to other types of data and crosses, and to inference of ancestral QTL state, are discussed. PMID:23612690

  12. Eye specification in Drosophila: perspectives and implications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J P; Moses, K

    2001-12-01

    The discovery that Drosophila eyeless is homologous to vertebrate Pax6 produced enormous interest in eye specification and a reappraisal of eye evolution. While the transcription factor Eyeless/Pax6 is necessary and in some circumstances sufficient to induce eye development the simple story of eye specification has become more epic than haiku. At least seven other nuclear proteins act with Eyeless/Pax6 to induce the eye and, furthermore, extrinsic developmental signals are required. Some striking similarities between later events of retinal patterning in vertebrates and insects have led to a deeper debate on the evolutionary path to these apparently quite different organs.

  13. Phylogenetic plant community structure along elevation is lineage specific

    PubMed Central

    Ndiribe, Charlotte; Pellissier, Loïc; Antonelli, Silvia; Dubuis, Anne; Pottier, Julien; Vittoz, Pascal; Guisan, Antoine; Salamin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The trend of closely related taxa to retain similar environmental preferences mediated by inherited traits suggests that several patterns observed at the community scale originate from longer evolutionary processes. While the effects of phylogenetic relatedness have been previously studied within a single genus or family, lineage-specific effects on the ecological processes governing community assembly have rarely been studied for entire communities or flora. Here, we measured how community phylogenetic structure varies across a wide elevation gradient for plant lineages represented by 35 families, using a co-occurrence index and net relatedness index (NRI). We propose a framework that analyses each lineage separately and reveals the trend of ecological assembly at tree nodes. We found prevailing phylogenetic clustering for more ancient nodes and overdispersion in more recent tree nodes. Closely related species may thus rapidly evolve new environmental tolerances to radiate into distinct communities, while older lineages likely retain inherent environmental tolerances to occupy communities in similar environments, either through efficient dispersal mechanisms or the exclusion of older lineages with more divergent environmental tolerances. Our study illustrates the importance of disentangling the patterns of community assembly among lineages to better interpret the ecological role of traits. It also sheds light on studies reporting absence of phylogenetic signal, and opens new perspectives on the analysis of niche and trait conservatism across lineages. PMID:24455126

  14. Sensitivity and specificity in Drosophila pheromone perception.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard

    2007-10-01

    How the brain perceives volatile chemicals in the environment to evoke the appropriate behaviour is a fundamental question in sensory neuroscience. The olfactory system of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a powerful model system to address this problem. Recent analysis of the molecular, neuroanatomical and physiological properties of the olfactory circuits that detect the sex and social aggregation pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate now provides one of the most comprehensive outlines for the neural basis of odour perception. This review describes these latest advances, discusses what they reveal about where stimulus sensitivity and specificity is encoded in olfactory circuits, and considers future questions.

  15. Widespread Discordance of Gene Trees with Species Tree inDrosophila: Evidence for Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Moses, Alan M.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-28

    The phylogenetic relationship of the now fully sequencedspecies Drosophila erecta and D. yakuba with respect to the D.melanogaster species complex has been a subject of controversy. All threepossible groupings of the species have been reported in the past, thoughrecent multi-gene studies suggest that D. erecta and D. yakuba are sisterspecies. Using the whole genomes of each of these species as well as thefour other fully sequenced species in the subgenus Sophophora, we set outto investigate the placement of D. erecta and D. yakuba in the D.melanogaster species group and to understand the cause of the pastincongruence. Though we find that the phylogeny grouping D. erecta and D.yakuba together is the best supported, we also find widespreadincongruence in nucleotide and amino acid substitutions, insertions anddeletions, and gene trees. The time inferred to span the two keyspeciation events is short enough that under the coalescent model, theincongruence could be the result of incomplete lineage sorting.Consistent with the lineage-sorting hypothesis, substitutions supportingthe same tree were spatially clustered. Support for the different treeswas found to be linked to recombination such that adjacent genes supportthe same tree most often in regions of low recombination andsubstitutions supporting the same tree are most enriched roughly on thesame scale as linkage disequilibrium, also consistent with lineagesorting. The incongruence was found to be statistically significant androbust to model and species choice. No systematic biases were found. Weconclude that phylogenetic incongruence in the D. melanogaster speciescomplex is the result, at least in part, of incomplete lineage sorting.Incomplete lineage sorting will likely cause phylogenetic incongruence inmany comparative genomics datasets. Methods to infer the correct speciestree, the history of every base in the genome, and comparative methodsthat control for and/or utilize this information will be

  16. Lineage tracing quantification reveals symmetric stem cell division in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Viktoria; Inaba, Mayu; Cheng, Jun; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2013-12-01

    In the homeostatic state, adult stem cells divide either symmetrically to increase the stem cell number to compensate stem cell loss, or asymmetrically to maintain the population while producing differentiated cells. We have investigated the mode of stem cell division in the testes of Drosophila melanogaster by lineage tracing and confirm the presence of symmetric stem cell division in this system. We found that the rate of symmetric division is limited to 1-2% of total germline stem cell (GSC) divisions, but it increases with expression of a cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, or a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, Moesin, which may modulate adhesiveness of germ cells to the stem cell niche. Our results indicate that the decision regarding asymmetric vs. symmetric division is a dynamically regulated process that contributes to tissue homeostasis, responding to the needs of the tissue.

  17. Evolutionary origins of the vertebrate heart: Specification of the cardiac lineage in Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Brad; Levine, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Here we exploit the extensive cell lineage information and streamlined genome of the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, to investigate heart development in a basal chordate. Several cardiac genes were analyzed, including the sole Ciona ortholog of the Drosophila tinman gene, and tissue-specific enhancers were isolated for some of the genes. Conserved sequence motifs within these enhancers facilitated the isolation of a heart enhancer for the Ciona Hand-like gene. Altogether, these studies provide a regulatory framework for the differentiation of the cardiac mesoderm, beginning at the 110-cell stage, and extending through the fusion of cardiac progenitors during tail elongation. The cardiac lineage shares a common origin with the germ line, and zygotic transcription is first detected in the heart progenitors only after its separation from the germ line at the 64-cell stage. We propose that germ-line determinants influence the specification of the cardiac mesoderm, both by inhibiting inductive signals required for the development of noncardiac mesoderm lineages, and by providing a localized source of Wnt-5 and other signals required for heart development. We discuss the possibility that the germ line also influences the specification of the vertebrate heart. PMID:14500781

  18. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We show that the rates of gene family evolution vary both between gene families and between species. We are also able to identify those families that have experienced rapid lineage specific expansion/contraction and show that these families are enriched for specific functions. Moreover, we find that families with specific functions are repeatedly expanded in multiple species, suggesting the presence of common adaptations and that these family expansions/contractions are not random. Additionally, we identify potential specialisations, unique to specific species, in the functions of lineage specific expanded families. These results suggest that an important mechanism in the evolution of genome content is the presence of lineage-specific gene family changes. PMID:24921666

  19. Drosophila maelstrom ensures proper germline stem cell lineage differentiation by repressing microRNA-7.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Lim, Ai Khim; Kai, Toshie

    2009-09-01

    Nuage is a germline-unique perinuclear structure conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Maelstrom (Mael) is an unusual nuage component, as it is also found in the nucleus. Mael contains a High Mobility Group box, known to mediate DNA binding. We show that Mael nuclear function is required for proper differentiation in the Drosophila germline stem cell (GSC) lineage. In mael mutant testes, transit-amplifying cysts fail to differentiate into primary spermatocytes, instead breaking down into ectopic GSCs and smaller cysts, due to a depletion of Bag-of-marbles (Bam) protein. Mael regulates Bam via repression of miR-7. Mael binds the miR-7 promoter and is required for the local accumulation of HP1 and H3K9me3. miR-7 targets bam directly at its 3'UTR, and a reduction in miR-7 expression can rescue germline differentiation defects found in mael mutants by alleviating Bam repression. We propose that Mael ensures proper differentiation in the GSC lineage by repressing miR-7.

  20. Transdifferentiation and Proliferation in Two Distinct Hemocyte Lineages in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae after Wasp Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Vanha-aho, Leena-Maija; Andó, István; Rämet, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Cellular immune responses require the generation and recruitment of diverse blood cell types that recognize and kill pathogens. In Drosophila melanogaster larvae, immune-inducible lamellocytes participate in recognizing and killing parasitoid wasp eggs. However, the sequence of events required for lamellocyte generation remains controversial. To study the cellular immune system, we developed a flow cytometry approach using in vivo reporters for lamellocytes as well as for plasmatocytes, the main hemocyte type in healthy larvae. We found that two different blood cell lineages, the plasmatocyte and lamellocyte lineages, contribute to the generation of lamellocytes in a demand-adapted hematopoietic process. Plasmatocytes transdifferentiate into lamellocyte-like cells in situ directly on the wasp egg. In parallel, a novel population of infection-induced cells, which we named lamelloblasts, appears in the circulation. Lamelloblasts proliferate vigorously and develop into the major class of circulating lamellocytes. Our data indicate that lamellocyte differentiation upon wasp parasitism is a plastic and dynamic process. Flow cytometry with in vivo hemocyte reporters can be used to study this phenomenon in detail. PMID:27414410

  1. LineageSpecificSeqgen: generating sequence data with lineage-specific variation in the proportion of variable sites

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Commonly used phylogenetic models assume a homogeneous evolutionary process throughout the tree. It is known that these homogeneous models are often too simplistic, and that with time some properties of the evolutionary process can change (due to selection or drift). In particular, as constraints on sequences evolve, the proportion of variable sites can vary between lineages. This affects the ability of phylogenetic methods to correctly estimate phylogenetic trees, especially for long timescales. To date there is no phylogenetic model that allows for change in the proportion of variable sites, and the degree to which this affects phylogenetic reconstruction is unknown. Results We present LineageSpecificSeqgen, an extension to the seq-gen program that allows generation of sequences with both changes in the proportion of variable sites and changes in the rate at which sites switch between being variable and invariable. In contrast to seq-gen and its derivatives to date, we interpret branch lengths as the mean number of substitutions per variable site, as opposed to the mean number of substitutions per site (which is averaged over all sites, including invariable sites). This allows specification of the substitution rates of variable sites, independently of the proportion of invariable sites. Conclusion LineageSpecificSeqgen allows simulation of DNA and amino acid sequence alignments under a lineage-specific evolutionary process. The program can be used to test current models of evolution on sequences that have undergone lineage-specific evolution. It facilitates the development of both new methods to identify such processes in real data, and means to account for such processes. The program is available at: http://awcmee.massey.ac.nz/downloads.htm. PMID:19021917

  2. Lineage-Specific Restraint of Pituitary Gonadotroph Cell Adenoma Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Toledano, Yoel; Tong, Yunguang; Kovacs, Kalman; Scheithauer, Bernd; Melmed, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Although pituitary adenomas are usually benign, unique trophic mechanisms restraining cell proliferation are unclear. As GH-secreting adenomas are associated with p53/p21-dependent senescence, we tested mechanisms constraining non-functioning pituitary adenoma growth. Thirty six gonadotroph-derived non-functioning pituitary adenomas all exhibited DNA damage, but undetectable p21 expression. However, these adenomas all expressed p16, and >90% abundantly expressed cytoplasmic clusterin associated with induction of the Cdk inhibitor p15 in 70% of gonadotroph and in 26% of somatotroph lineage adenomas (p = 0.006). Murine LβT2 and αT3 gonadotroph pituitary cells, and αGSU.PTTG transgenic mice with targeted gonadotroph cell adenomas also abundantly expressed clusterin and exhibited features of oncogene-induced senescence as evidenced by C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ induction. In turn, C/EBPs activated the clusterin promoter ∼5 fold, and elevated clusterin subsequently elicited p15 and p16 expression, acting to arrest murine gonadotroph cell proliferation. In contrast, specific clusterin suppression by RNAis enhanced gonadotroph proliferation. FOXL2, a tissue-specific gonadotroph lineage factor, also induced the clusterin promoter ∼3 fold in αT3 pituitary cells. As nine of 12 pituitary carcinomas were devoid of clusterin expression, this protein may limit proliferation of benign adenomatous pituitary cells. These results point to lineage-specific pathways restricting uncontrolled murine and human pituitary gonadotroph adenoma cell growth. PMID:21464964

  3. Principles Governing DNA Methylation during Neuronal Lineage and Subtype Specification

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ali; Klein, Shifra S.; Barboza, Luendreo; Lohdi, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    Although comprehensively described during early neuronal development, the role of DNA methylation/demethylation in neuronal lineage and subtype specification is not well understood. By studying two distinct neuronal progenitors as they differentiate to principal neurons in mouse hippocampus and striatum, we uncovered several principles governing neuronal DNA methylation during brain development. (1) The program consists of three stages: an initial genome-wide methylation during progenitor proliferation is followed by loss of methylation during the transition of regional progenitors to “young” hippocampal/striatal neurons, which is then reversed by gain in methylation during maturation to subtype-specific neurons. (2) At the first two stages, gain and loss of methylation are limited to CpGs, whereas during the third maturation stage, methylation also occurs at non-CpG sites in both lineages. (3) Methylation/demethylation, similar to transcription, are initially highly similar in the two lineages, whereas diversification in methylation and transcription during maturation creates subtype-specific methylation differences. (4) Initially, methylation targets all genomic locations, whereas later, during early and late differentiation, the preferred targets are intronic/intergenic sequences with enhancer-like activity. (5) Differentially methylated genes are enriched in sequential neurodevelopmental functions (such as progenitor proliferation, migration, neuritogenesis, and synaptic transmission); upregulated genes represent current and consecutive stage-specific functions, and downregulated genes represent preceding functions that are no longer required. The main conclusion of our work is that the neuronal methylation/demethylation program is predominantly developmental with minimal lineage specificity, except in the final stage of development when neuron subtype-specific differences also emerge. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our work is the first to describe a set of

  4. Mapping the route from naive pluripotency to lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Kalkan, Tüzer; Smith, Austin

    2014-01-01

    In the mouse blastocyst, epiblast cells are newly formed shortly before implantation. They possess a unique developmental plasticity, termed naive pluripotency. For development to proceed, this naive state must be subsumed by multi-lineage differentiation within 72 h following implantation. In vitro differentiation of naive embryonic stem cells (ESCs) cultured in controlled conditions provides a tractable system to dissect and understand the process of exit from naive pluripotency and entry into lineage specification. Exploitation of this system in recent large-scale RNAi and mutagenesis screens has uncovered multiple new factors and modules that drive or facilitate progression out of the naive state. Notably, these studies show that the transcription factor network that governs the naive state is rapidly dismantled prior to upregulation of lineage specification markers, creating an intermediate state that we term formative pluripotency. Here, we summarize these findings and propose a road map for state transitions in ESC differentiation that reflects the orderly dynamics of epiblast progression in the embryo. PMID:25349449

  5. A novel, tissue-specific, Drosophila homeobox gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barad, M; Jack, T; Chadwick, R; McGinnis, W

    1988-01-01

    The homeobox gene family of Drosophila appears to control a variety of position-specific patterning decisions during embryonic and imaginal development. Most of these patterning decisions determine groups of cells on the anterior-posterior axis of the Drosophila germ band. We have isolated a novel homeobox gene from Drosophila, designated H2.0. H2.0 has the most diverged homeobox so far characterized in metazoa, and, in contrast to all previously isolated homeobox genes, H2.0 exhibits a tissue-specific pattern of expression. The cells that accumulate transcripts for this novel gene correspond to the visceral musculature and its anlagen. Images PMID:2901348

  6. Timing of identity: spatiotemporal regulation of hunchback in neuroblast lineages of Drosophila by Seven-up and Prospero.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Ulrike; Vogler, Georg; Urban, Joachim

    2006-02-01

    Neural stem cells often generate different cell types in a fixed birth order as a result of temporal specification of the progenitors. In Drosophila, the first temporal identity of most neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in the embryonic ventral nerve cord is specified by the transient expression of the transcription factor Hunchback. When reaching the next temporal identity, this expression is switched off in the neuroblasts by seven up (svp) in a mitosis-dependent manner, but is maintained in their progeny (ganglion mother cells). We show that svp mRNA is already expressed in the neuroblasts before this division. After mitosis, Svp protein accumulates in both cells, but the downregulation of hunchback (hb) occurs only in the neuroblast. In the ganglion mother cell, svp is repressed by Prospero, a transcription factor asymmetrically localised to this cell during mitosis. Thus, the differential regulation of hb between the neuroblasts and the ganglion mother cells is achieved by a mechanism that integrates information created by the asymmetric distribution of a cell-fate determinant upon mitosis (Prospero) and a transcriptional repressor present in both cells (Seven-up). Strikingly, although the complete downregulation of hb is mitosis dependent, the lineage-specific timing of svp upregulation is not.

  7. Patterns of growth and tract formation during the early development of secondary lineages in the Drosophila larval brain.

    PubMed

    Lovick, Jennifer K; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J; Ngo, Kathy T; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The Drosophila brain consists of a relatively small number of invariant, genetically determined lineages which provide a model to study the relationship between gene function and neuronal architecture. In following this long-term goal, we reconstruct the morphology (projection pattern and connectivity) and gene expression patterns of brain lineages throughout development. In this article, we focus on the secondary phase of lineage morphogenesis, from the reactivation of neuroblast proliferation in the first larval instar to the time when proliferation ends and secondary axon tracts have fully extended in the late third larval instar. We have reconstructed the location and projection of secondary lineages at close (4 h) intervals and produced a detailed map in the form of confocal z-projections and digital three-dimensional models of all lineages at successive larval stages. Based on these reconstructions, we could compare the spatio-temporal pattern of axon formation and morphogenetic movements of different lineages in normal brain development. In addition to wild type, we reconstructed lineage morphology in two mutant conditions. (1) Expressing the construct UAS-p35 which rescues programmed cell death we could systematically determine which lineages normally lose hemilineages to apoptosis. (2) so-Gal4-driven expression of dominant-negative EGFR ablated the optic lobe, which allowed us to conclude that the global centrifugal movement normally affecting the cell bodies of lateral lineages in the late larva is causally related to the expansion of the optic lobe, and that the central pattern of axonal projections of these lineages is independent of the presence or absence of the optic lobe. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Patterns of growth and tract formation during the early development of secondary lineages in the Drosophila larval brain

    PubMed Central

    Lovick, Jennifer K.; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila brain consists of a relatively small number of invariant, genetically determined lineages which provide a model to study the relationship between gene function and neuronal architecture. In following this long-term goal we reconstruct the morphology (projection pattern and connectivity) and gene expression patterns of brain lineages throughout development. In the present paper, we focus on the secondary phase of lineage morphogenesis, from the reactivation of neuroblast proliferation in the first larval instar to the time when proliferation ends and secondary axon tracts have fully extended in the late third larval instar. We have reconstructed the location and projection of secondary lineages at close (4h) intervals and produced a detailed map in the form of confocal z-projections and digital 3D models of all lineages at successive larval stages. Based on these reconstructions we could compare the spatio-temporal pattern of axon formation and morphogenetic movements of different lineages in normal brain development. In addition to wild type, we reconstructed lineage morphology in two mutant conditions. (1) Expressing the construct UAS-p35 which rescues programmed cell death we could systematically determine which lineages normally lose hemilineages to apoptosis. (2) so-Gal4-driven expression of dominant-negative EGFR ablated the optic lobe, which allowed us to conclude that the global centrifugal movement normally affecting the cell bodies of lateral lineages in the late larva is causally related to the expansion of the optic lobe, and that the central pattern of axonal projections of these lineages is independent of the presence or absence of the optic lobe. PMID:26178322

  9. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila ventral nervous system: Neuroglian expression reveals the adult hemilineage associated fiber tracts in the adult thoracic neuromeres

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robin; Williams, Darren W.; Truman, James W.

    2016-01-01

    During larval life most of the thoracic neuroblasts (NBs) in Drosophila undergo a second phase of neurogenesis to generate adult‐specific neurons that remain in an immature, developmentally stalled state until pupation. Using a combination of MARCM and immunostaining with a neurotactin antibody, Truman et al. (2004; Development 131:5167–5184) identified 24 adult‐specific NB lineages within each thoracic hemineuromere of the larval ventral nervous system (VNS), but because of the neurotactin labeling of lineage tracts disappearing early in metamorphosis, they were unable extend the identification of these lineages into the adult. Here we show that immunostaining with an antibody against the cell adhesion molecule neuroglian reveals the same larval secondary lineage projections through metamorphosis and bfy identifying each neuroglian‐positive tract at selected stages we have traced the larval hemilineage tracts for all three thoracic neuromeres through metamorphosis into the adult. To validate tract identifications we used the genetic toolkit developed by Harris et al. (2015; Elife 4) to preserve hemilineage‐specific GAL4 expression patterns from larval into the adult stage. The immortalized expression proved a powerful confirmation of the analysis of the neuroglian scaffold. This work has enabled us to directly link the secondary, larval NB lineages to their adult counterparts. The data provide an anatomical framework that 1) makes it possible to assign most neurons to their parent lineage and 2) allows more precise definitions of the neuronal organization of the adult VNS based in developmental units/rules. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2677–2695, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878258

  10. Identification of Transcription Factors for Lineage-Specific ESC Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Piao, Yulan; Sharov, Alexei A.; Zsiros, Veronika; Yu, Hong; Nakazawa, Kazu; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A network of transcription factors (TFs) determines cell identity, but identity can be altered by overexpressing a combination of TFs. However, choosing and verifying combinations of TFs for specific cell differentiation have been daunting due to the large number of possible combinations of ∼2,000 TFs. Here, we report the identification of individual TFs for lineage-specific cell differentiation based on the correlation matrix of global gene expression profiles. The overexpression of identified TFs—Myod1, Mef2c, Esx1, Foxa1, Hnf4a, Gata2, Gata3, Myc, Elf5, Irf2, Elf1, Sfpi1, Ets1, Smad7, Nr2f1, Sox11, Dmrt1, Sox9, Foxg1, Sox2, or Ascl1—can direct efficient, specific, and rapid differentiation into myocytes, hepatocytes, blood cells, and neurons. Furthermore, transfection of synthetic mRNAs of TFs generates their appropriate target cells. These results demonstrate both the utility of this approach to identify potent TFs for cell differentiation, and the unanticipated capacity of single TFs directly guides differentiation to specific lineage fates. PMID:24371809

  11. Persistence of RNAi-Mediated Knockdown in Drosophila Complicates Mosaic Analysis Yet Enables Highly Sensitive Lineage Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Justin A.; Sumabat, Taryn M.; Hariharan, Iswar K.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful way of reducing gene function in Drosophila melanogaster tissues. By expressing synthetic short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) using the Gal4/UAS system, knockdown is efficiently achieved in specific tissues or in clones of marked cells. Here we show that knockdown by shRNAs is so potent and persistent that even transient exposure of cells to shRNAs can reduce gene function in their descendants. When using the FLP-out Gal4 method, in some instances we observed unmarked “shadow RNAi” clones adjacent to Gal4-expressing clones, which may have resulted from brief Gal4 expression following recombination but prior to cell division. Similarly, Gal4 driver lines with dynamic expression patterns can generate shadow RNAi cells after their activity has ceased in those cells. Importantly, these effects can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the cell autonomy of knockdown phenotypes. We have investigated the basis of this phenomenon and suggested experimental designs for eliminating ambiguities in interpretation. We have also exploited the persistence of shRNA-mediated knockdown to design a sensitive lineage-tracing method, i-TRACE, which is capable of detecting even low levels of past reporter expression. Using i-TRACE, we demonstrate transient infidelities in the expression of some cell-identity markers near compartment boundaries in the wing imaginal disc. PMID:26984059

  12. Persistence of RNAi-Mediated Knockdown in Drosophila Complicates Mosaic Analysis Yet Enables Highly Sensitive Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Justin A; Sumabat, Taryn M; Hariharan, Iswar K

    2016-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful way of reducing gene function in Drosophila melanogaster tissues. By expressing synthetic short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) using the Gal4/UAS system, knockdown is efficiently achieved in specific tissues or in clones of marked cells. Here we show that knockdown by shRNAs is so potent and persistent that even transient exposure of cells to shRNAs can reduce gene function in their descendants. When using the FLP-out Gal4 method, in some instances we observed unmarked "shadow RNAi" clones adjacent to Gal4-expressing clones, which may have resulted from brief Gal4 expression following recombination but prior to cell division. Similarly, Gal4 driver lines with dynamic expression patterns can generate shadow RNAi cells after their activity has ceased in those cells. Importantly, these effects can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the cell autonomy of knockdown phenotypes. We have investigated the basis of this phenomenon and suggested experimental designs for eliminating ambiguities in interpretation. We have also exploited the persistence of shRNA-mediated knockdown to design a sensitive lineage-tracing method, i-TRACE, which is capable of detecting even low levels of past reporter expression. Using i-TRACE, we demonstrate transient infidelities in the expression of some cell-identity markers near compartment boundaries in the wing imaginal disc.

  13. Specific detection of GII-1 lineage of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Domanska-Blicharz, K; Lisowska, A; Pikuła, A; Sajewicz-Krukowska, J

    2017-08-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a worldwide prevalent RNA virus that causes highly contagious and economically devastating disease in chicken. The virus exists in many different genetic forms which made the disease control very difficult. The present study describes the development and validation of TaqMan probe-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) targeting the S1 coding region of S gene characteristic for the GII-1 lineage (formerly the D1466-like variant) of IBV. These strains are quite different from other European IBV belonging to different lineages of the GI genotype. The developed method was 30-fold more sensitive than used so far for standard nested RT-PCR with detection limit of 56 RNA copies per reaction. The specificity of the assay was also evaluated with a panel of different poultry pathogens. Repeatability and reproducibility of the method was very high with coefficients of variation lower than 4%. One hundred and twenty-seven IBV-positive samples were tested by this method and GII-1 strains were detected in four of them (3·15%) which indicate a decrease in the GII-1 IBV prevalence in Poland. The assay was proven to be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of GII-1 lineage of IBV strains and moreover it enabled the monitoring of viral loads which can be used to assess disease progression. This study reports a TaqMan probe-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) for rapid and accurate identification of GII-1 lineage (formerly D1466-like variant) of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). The assay revealed to be more sensitive than standard nested RT-PCR assay, previously used for this purpose. The developed assay has been tested on numerous field samples and revealed 3·15% prevalence of this lineage of IBV in Polish chicken population. Moreover, this new assay enables the assessment of viral load measurement which might be useful for epidemiology and pathogenesis

  14. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  15. Lineage-specific proteins essential for endocytosis in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Paul T; Obado, Samson O; Boehm, Cordula; Gadelha, Catarina; Sali, Andrej; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2017-04-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the most evolutionarily ancient endocytic mechanism known, and in many lineages the sole mechanism for internalisation. Significantly, in mammalian cells CME is responsible for the vast bulk of endocytic flux and has likely undergone multiple adaptations to accommodate specific requirements by individual species. In African trypanosomes, we previously demonstrated that CME is independent of the AP-2 adaptor protein complex, that orthologues to many of the animal and fungal CME protein cohort are absent, and that a novel, trypanosome-restricted protein cohort interacts with clathrin and drives CME. Here, we used a novel cryomilling affinity isolation strategy to preserve transient low-affinity interactions, giving the most comprehensive trypanosome clathrin interactome to date. We identified the trypanosome AP-1 complex, Trypanosoma brucei (Tb)EpsinR, several endosomal SNAREs plus orthologues of SMAP and the AP-2 associated kinase AAK1 as interacting with clathrin. Novel lineage-specific proteins were identified, which we designate TbCAP80 and TbCAP141. Their depletion produced extensive defects in endocytosis and endomembrane system organisation, revealing a novel molecular pathway subtending an early-branching and highly divergent form of CME, which is conserved and likely functionally important across the kinetoplastid parasites. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. CycA is involved in the control of endoreplication dynamics in the Drosophila bristle lineage.

    PubMed

    Sallé, Jérémy; Campbell, Shelagh D; Gho, Michel; Audibert, Agnès

    2012-02-01

    Endocycles, which are characterised by repeated rounds of DNA replication without intervening mitosis, are involved in developmental processes associated with an increase in metabolic cell activity and are part of terminal differentiation. Endocycles are currently viewed as a restriction of the canonical cell cycle. As such, mitotic cyclins have been omitted from the endocycle mechanism and their role in this process has not been specifically analysed. In order to study such a role, we focused on CycA, which has been described to function exclusively during mitosis in Drosophila. Using developing mechanosensory organs as model system and PCNA::GFP to follow endocycle dynamics, we show that (1) CycA proteins accumulate during the last period of endoreplication, (2) both CycA loss and gain of function induce changes in endoreplication dynamics and reduce the number of endocycles, and (3) heterochromatin localisation of ORC2, a member of the Pre-RC complex, depends on CycA. These results show for the first time that CycA is involved in endocycle dynamics in Drosophila. As such, CycA controls the final ploidy that cells reached during terminal differentiation. Furthermore, our data suggest that the control of endocycles by CycA involves the subnuclear relocalisation of pre-RC complex members. Our work therefore sheds new light on the mechanism underlying endocycles, implicating a process that involves remodelling of the entire cell cycle network rather than simply a restriction of the canonical cell cycle.

  17. Expression of a set of glial cell-specific markers in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hui Jeong; Jeon, Sang-Hak; Kim, Sang Hee

    2014-06-01

    The types of glia in the central nervous system (CNS) of the Drosophila embryo include longitudinal glia (LG), cell body glia (CBG), and peripheral glia (PG). Transcription factors, such as glial cell missing and reverse polarity, are well-established general glial cell markers. Only a few glial cell-specific markers have been identified in the Drosophila embryonic CNS, thus far. In the present study, we employed the glial cell-specific markers for LG (vir-1/CG5453 and CG31235), CBG (fabp/CG6783 and CG11902), and PG (CG2310 and moody/CG4322), and comprehensively analyzed their expression patterns, during the embryonic CNS development. Our study validated the specificity of a set of glial markers, and further revealed their spatio-temporal expression patterns, which will aid in the understanding of the developmental lineage, and investigating their role in the development and homeostasis of the Drosophila CNS in vivo.

  18. Lineage specific recombination rates and microevolution in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a saprotroph as well as an opportunistic human foodborne pathogen, which has previously been shown to consist of at least two widespread lineages (termed lineages I and II) and an uncommon lineage (lineage III). While some L. monocytogenes strains show evidence for considerable diversification by homologous recombination, our understanding of the contribution of recombination to L. monocytogenes evolution is still limited. We therefore used STRUCTURE and ClonalFrame, two programs that model the effect of recombination, to make inferences about the population structure and different aspects of the recombination process in L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed using sequences for seven loci (including the house-keeping genes gap, prs, purM and ribC, the stress response gene sigB, and the virulence genes actA and inlA) for 195 L. monocytogenes isolates. Results Sequence analyses with ClonalFrame and the Sawyer's test showed that recombination is more prevalent in lineage II than lineage I and is most frequent in two house-keeping genes (ribC and purM) and the two virulence genes (actA and inlA). The relative occurrence of recombination versus point mutation is about six times higher in lineage II than in lineage I, which causes a higher genetic variability in lineage II. Unlike lineage I, lineage II represents a genetically heterogeneous population with a relatively high proportion (30% average) of genetic material imported from external sources. Phylograms, constructed with correcting for recombination, as well as Tajima's D data suggest that both lineages I and II have suffered a population bottleneck. Conclusion Our study shows that evolutionary lineages within a single bacterial species can differ considerably in the relative contributions of recombination to genetic diversification. Accounting for recombination in phylogenetic studies is critical, and new evolutionary models that account for the possibility

  19. Lineage specific recombination rates and microevolution in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, Henk C; Didelot, Xavier; Fortes, Esther D; Nightingale, Kendra K; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-10-08

    The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a saprotroph as well as an opportunistic human foodborne pathogen, which has previously been shown to consist of at least two widespread lineages (termed lineages I and II) and an uncommon lineage (lineage III). While some L. monocytogenes strains show evidence for considerable diversification by homologous recombination, our understanding of the contribution of recombination to L. monocytogenes evolution is still limited. We therefore used STRUCTURE and ClonalFrame, two programs that model the effect of recombination, to make inferences about the population structure and different aspects of the recombination process in L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed using sequences for seven loci (including the house-keeping genes gap, prs, purM and ribC, the stress response gene sigB, and the virulence genes actA and inlA) for 195 L. monocytogenes isolates. Sequence analyses with ClonalFrame and the Sawyer's test showed that recombination is more prevalent in lineage II than lineage I and is most frequent in two house-keeping genes (ribC and purM) and the two virulence genes (actA and inlA). The relative occurrence of recombination versus point mutation is about six times higher in lineage II than in lineage I, which causes a higher genetic variability in lineage II. Unlike lineage I, lineage II represents a genetically heterogeneous population with a relatively high proportion (30% average) of genetic material imported from external sources. Phylograms, constructed with correcting for recombination, as well as Tajima's D data suggest that both lineages I and II have suffered a population bottleneck. Our study shows that evolutionary lineages within a single bacterial species can differ considerably in the relative contributions of recombination to genetic diversification. Accounting for recombination in phylogenetic studies is critical, and new evolutionary models that account for the possibility of changes in the rate of

  20. Stage-specific inductive signals in the Drosophila neuroectoderm control the temporal sequence of neuroblast specification.

    PubMed

    Berger, C; Urban, J; Technau, G M

    2001-09-01

    One of the initial steps of neurogenesis in the Drosophila embryo is the delamination of a stereotype set of neural progenitor cells (neuroblasts) from the neuroectoderm. The time window of neuroblast segregation has been divided into five successive waves (S1-S5) in which subsets of neuroblasts with specific identities are formed. To test when identity specification of the various neuroblasts takes place and whether extrinsic signals are involved, we have performed heterochronic transplantation experiments. Single neuroectodermal cells from stage 10 donor embryos (after S2) were transplanted into the neuroectoderm of host embryos at stage 7 (before S1) and vice versa. The fate of these cells was uncovered by their lineages at stage 16/17. Transplanted cells adjusted their fate to the new temporal situation. Late neuroectodermal cells were able to take over the fate of early (S1/S2) neuroblasts. The early neuroectodermal cells preferentially generated late (S4/S5) neuroblasts, despite their reduced time of exposure to the neuroectoderm. Furthermore, neuroblast fates are independent from divisions of neuroectodermal progenitor cells. We conclude from these experiments that neuroblast specification occurs sequentially under the control of non-cell-autonomous and stage-specific inductive signals that act in the neuroectoderm.

  1. Inscuteable maintains type I neuroblast lineage identity via Numb/Notch signaling in the Drosophila larval brain.

    PubMed

    An, Huanping; Ge, Wanzhong; Xi, Yongmei; Yang, Xiaohang

    2017-03-20

    In the Drosophila larval brain, type I and type II neuroblasts (NBs) undergo a series of asymmetric divisions which give rise to distinct progeny lineages. The intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) exist only in type II NB lineages. In this study, we reveal a novel function of Inscuteable (Insc) that acts to maintain type I NB lineage identity. In insc type I NB clones of mosaic analyses with a repressible cell marker (MARCM), the formation of extra Deadpan (Dpn)(+) NB-like and GMC-like cells is observed. The lack of Insc leads to the defective localization and segregation of Numb during asymmetric cell division. By the end of cytokinesis, this results in insufficient Numb in ganglion mother cells (GMCs). The formation of extra Deadpan (Dpn)(+) cells in insc clones is prevented by the attenuation of Notch activity. This suggests that Insc functions through the Numb/Notch signaling pathway. We also show that in the absence of Insc in type I NB lineages, the cellular identity of GMCs is altered where they adopt an INP-like cell fate as indicated by the initiation of Dpn expression accompanied by a transient presence of Earmuff (Erm). These INP-like cells have the capacity to divide multiple times. We conclude that Insc is necessary for the maintenance of type I NB lineage identity. Genetic manipulations to eliminate most type I NBs with overproliferating type II NBs in the larval brain lead to altered circadian rhythms and defective phototaxis in adult flies. This indicates that the homeogenesis of NB lineages is important for the adult's brain function.

  2. Biological characteristics of megakaryocytes: specific lineage commitment and associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Hwang, William Ying Khee; Aw, Swee Eng

    2006-01-01

    Megakayocytes (Megakaryocytes) are among the rarest type of haematopoietic cells and highly specialized precursors for platelets. Normal mature megakaryocytes are, perhaps, the largest cells in the marrow. In contrast, their annucleated platelets progeny are the smallest subcellular fragments in the circulation, which in spite of their size, play crucial roles in thrombostasis and haemostasis. Megakaryopoiesis involves complicated and multi-step biological processes. Research over the last decade has resulted in certain important new discoveries, such as the specific megakaryocyte-forming haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subpopulation, thrombopoietin (Tpo), formation and release of platelets, etc. Substantial understanding of the specific lineage commitment, differentiation, and the molecular regulatory mechanisms of megakaryopoiesis has also been achieved. Despite existing controversies and questions, megakaryopoiesis remains an exciting field in biomedical research. Certain recent biological findings as well as future research in megakaryopoiesis are summarised in this article. Certain pathological changes associated with megakaryocytes, such as immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), acute megakayoblastic leukaemia, etc., are also discussed in this article.

  3. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  4. The human VASA gene is specifically expressed in the germ cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Castrillon, Diego H.; Quade, Bradley J.; Wang, T. Y.; Quigley, Catherine; Crum, Christopher P.

    2000-01-01

    To understand the origins and function of the human germ cell lineage and to identify germ cell-specific markers we have isolated a human ortholog of the Drosophila gene vasa. The gene was mapped to human chromosome 5q (near the centromere) by radiation hybrid mapping. We show by Northern analysis of fetal and adult tissues that expression of the human VASA gene is restricted to the ovary and testis and is undetectable in somatic tissues. We generated polyclonal antibodies that bind to the VASA protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and characterized VASA protein expression in human germ cells at various stages of development. The VASA protein is cytoplasmic and expressed in migratory primordial germ cells in the region of the gonadal ridge. VASA protein is present in fetal and adult gonadal germ cells in both males and females and is most abundant in spermatocytes and mature oocytes. The gene we have isolated is thus a highly specific marker of germ cells and should be useful for studies of human germ cell determination and function. PMID:10920202

  5. Three RNA binding proteins form a complex to promote differentiation of germline stem cell lineage in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Chan; Zhao, Shaowei; Geng, Qing; Gao, Yu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-11-01

    In regenerative tissues, one of the strategies to protect stem cells from genetic aberrations, potentially caused by frequent cell division, is to transiently expand the stem cell daughters before further differentiation. However, failure to exit the transit amplification may lead to overgrowth, and the molecular mechanism governing this regulation remains vague. In a Drosophila mutagenesis screen for factors involved in the regulation of germline stem cell (GSC) lineage, we isolated a mutation in the gene CG32364, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein (RBP) and is designated as tumorous testis (tut). In tut mutant, spermatogonia fail to differentiate and over-amplify, a phenotype similar to that in mei-P26 mutant. Mei-P26 is a TRIM-NHL tumor suppressor homolog required for the differentiation of GSC lineage. We found that Tut binds preferentially a long isoform of mei-P26 3'UTR, and is essential for the translational repression of mei-P26 reporter. Bam and Bgcn are both RBPs that have also been shown to repress mei-P26 expression. Our genetic analyses indicate that tut, bam, or bgcn is required to repress mei-P26 and to promote the differentiation of GSCs. Biochemically, we demonstrate that Tut, Bam, and Bgcn can form a physical complex in which Bam holds Tut on its N-terminus and Bgcn on its C-terminus. Our in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrate that Tut acts with Bam, Bgcn to accurately coordinate proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila germline stem cell lineage.

  6. Three RNA Binding Proteins Form a Complex to Promote Differentiation of Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shaowei; Geng, Qing; Gao, Yu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    In regenerative tissues, one of the strategies to protect stem cells from genetic aberrations, potentially caused by frequent cell division, is to transiently expand the stem cell daughters before further differentiation. However, failure to exit the transit amplification may lead to overgrowth, and the molecular mechanism governing this regulation remains vague. In a Drosophila mutagenesis screen for factors involved in the regulation of germline stem cell (GSC) lineage, we isolated a mutation in the gene CG32364, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein (RBP) and is designated as tumorous testis (tut). In tut mutant, spermatogonia fail to differentiate and over-amplify, a phenotype similar to that in mei-P26 mutant. Mei-P26 is a TRIM-NHL tumor suppressor homolog required for the differentiation of GSC lineage. We found that Tut binds preferentially a long isoform of mei-P26 3′UTR, and is essential for the translational repression of mei-P26 reporter. Bam and Bgcn are both RBPs that have also been shown to repress mei-P26 expression. Our genetic analyses indicate that tut, bam, or bgcn is required to repress mei-P26 and to promote the differentiation of GSCs. Biochemically, we demonstrate that Tut, Bam, and Bgcn can form a physical complex in which Bam holds Tut on its N-terminus and Bgcn on its C-terminus. Our in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrate that Tut acts with Bam, Bgcn to accurately coordinate proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila germline stem cell lineage. PMID:25412508

  7. Org-1, the Drosophila ortholog of Tbx1, is a direct activator of known identity genes during muscle specification

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Christoph; Nagaso, Hideyuki; Jin, Hong; Frasch, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Members of the T-Box gene family of transcription factors are important players in regulatory circuits that generate myogenic and cardiogenic lineage diversities in vertebrates. We show that during somatic myogenesis in Drosophila, the single ortholog of vertebrate Tbx1, optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1), is expressed in a small subset of muscle progenitors, founder cells and adult muscle precursors, where it overlaps with the products of the muscle identity genes ladybird (lb) and slouch (slou). In addition, org-1 is expressed in the lineage of the heart-associated alary muscles. org-1 null mutant embryos lack Lb and Slou expression within the muscle lineages that normally co-express org-1. As a consequence, the respective muscle fibers and adult muscle precursors are either severely malformed or missing, as are the alary muscles. To address the mechanisms that mediate these regulatory interactions between Org-1, Lb and Slou, we characterized distinct enhancers associated with somatic muscle expression of lb and slou. We demonstrate that these lineage- and stage-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) bind Org-1 in vivo, respond to org-1 genetically and require T-box domain binding sites for their activation. In summary, we propose that org-1 is a common and direct upstream regulator of slou and lb in the developmental pathway of these two neighboring muscle lineages. Cross-repression between slou and lb and combinatorial activation of lineage-specific targets by Org-1–Slou and Org-1–Lb, respectively, then leads to the distinction between the two lineages. These findings provide new insights into the regulatory circuits that control the proper pattering of the larval somatic musculature in Drosophila. PMID:22318630

  8. Computational identification of site-specific transcription factors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Adryan, Boris; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific transcription factors (TFs) recognise their target genes in a sequence- or conformation-dependent manor. In contrast to the basal TFs that are the general facilitators of gene expression, their site-specific interaction partners are tissue- or condition-specific. Thus, site-specific TFs constitute the major prerequisite for the modular expression programmes that drive metazoan development. This article deals with the computational identification of TFs (how to find them in genomes) and with online resources such as the FlyTF database of Drosophila site-specific TFs (how to find them online).

  9. The Drosophila immune system detects bacteria through specific peptidoglycan recognition.

    PubMed

    Leulier, François; Parquet, Claudine; Pili-Floury, Sebastien; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Caroff, Martine; Lee, Won-Jae; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    The Drosophila immune system discriminates between different classes of infectious microbes and responds with pathogen-specific defense reactions through selective activation of the Toll and the immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathways. The Toll pathway mediates most defenses against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi, whereas the Imd pathway is required to resist infection by Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial components recognized by these pathways remain to be defined. Here we report that Gram-negative diaminopimelic acid-type peptidoglycan is the most potent inducer of the Imd pathway and that the Toll pathway is predominantly activated by Gram-positive lysine-type peptidoglycan. Thus, the ability of Drosophila to discriminate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria relies on the recognition of specific forms of peptidoglycan.

  10. Lineage-Specific Genes Are Prominent DNA Damage Hotspots during Leukemic Transformation of B Cell Precursors.

    PubMed

    Boulianne, Bryant; Robinson, Mark E; May, Philippa C; Castellano, Leandro; Blighe, Kevin; Thomas, Jennifer; Reid, Alistair; Müschen, Markus; Apperley, Jane F; Stebbing, Justin; Feldhahn, Niklas

    2017-02-14

    In human leukemia, lineage-specific genes represent predominant targets of deletion, with lymphoid-specific genes frequently affected in lymphoid leukemia and myeloid-specific genes in myeloid leukemia. To investigate the basis of lineage-specific alterations, we analyzed global DNA damage in primary B cell precursors expressing leukemia-inducing oncogenes by ChIP-seq. We identified more than 1,000 sensitive regions, of which B lineage-specific genes constitute the most prominent targets. Identified hotspots at B lineage genes relate to DNA-DSBs, affect genes that harbor genomic lesions in human leukemia, and associate with ectopic deletion in successfully transformed cells. Furthermore, we show that most identified regions overlap with gene bodies of highly expressed genes and that induction of a myeloid lineage phenotype in transformed B cell precursors promotes de novo DNA damage at myeloid loci. Hence, we demonstrate that lineage-specific transcription predisposes lineage-specific genes in transformed B cell precursors to DNA damage, which is likely to promote the frequent alteration of lineage-specific genes in human leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. dbx mediates neuronal specification and differentiation through cross-repressive, lineage-specific interactions with eve and hb9.

    PubMed

    Lacin, Haluk; Zhu, Yi; Wilson, Beth A; Skeath, James B

    2009-10-01

    Individual neurons adopt and maintain defined morphological and physiological phenotypes as a result of the expression of specific combinations of transcription factors. In particular, homeodomain-containing transcription factors play key roles in determining neuronal subtype identity in flies and vertebrates. dbx belongs to the highly divergent H2.0 family of homeobox genes. In vertebrates, Dbx1 and Dbx2 promote the development of a subset of interneurons, some of which help mediate left-right coordination of locomotor activity. Here, we identify and show that the single Drosophila ortholog of Dbx1/2 contributes to the development of specific subsets of interneurons via cross-repressive, lineage-specific interactions with the motoneuron-promoting factors eve and hb9 (exex). dbx is expressed primarily in interneurons of the embryonic, larval and adult central nervous system, and these interneurons tend to extend short axons and be GABAergic. Interestingly, many Dbx(+) interneurons share a sibling relationship with Eve(+) or Hb9(+) motoneurons. The non-overlapping expression of dbx and eve, or dbx and hb9, within pairs of sibling neurons is initially established as a result of Notch/Numb-mediated asymmetric divisions. Cross-repressive interactions between dbx and eve, and dbx and hb9, then help maintain the distinct expression profiles of these genes in their respective pairs of sibling neurons. Strict maintenance of the mutually exclusive expression of dbx relative to that of eve and hb9 in sibling neurons is crucial for proper neuronal specification, as misexpression of dbx in motoneurons dramatically hinders motor axon outgrowth.

  12. A vertex specific dorsal selector Dve represses the ventral appendage identity in Drosophila head.

    PubMed

    Kiritooshi, Naruto; Yorimitsu, Takeshi; Shirai, Tetsuya; Puli, Oorvashi Roy; Singh, Amit; Nakagoshi, Hideki

    2014-08-01

    Developmental fields are subdivided into lineage-restricted cell populations, known as compartments. In the eye imaginal disc of Drosophila, dorso-ventral (DV) lineage restriction is the primary event, whereas antero-posterior compartment boundary is the first lineage restriction in other imaginal discs. The Iroquois complex (Iro-C) genes function as dorsal selectors and repress the default, ventral, identity in the eye-head primordium. In Iro-C mutant clones, change of the dorsal identity to default ventral fate leads to generation of ectopic DV boundary, which results in dorsal eye enlargement, and duplication of ventral appendages like antenna and maxillary palp. Similar phenotypes were observed in heads with defective proventriculus (dve) mutant clones. Here, we show that the homeobox gene dve is a downstream effector of Iro-C in the dorsal head capsule (vertex) specification and represses the ventral (antennal) identity. Two homeodomain proteins Distal-less (Dll) and Homothorax (Hth) are known to be determinants of the antennal identity. Ectopic antenna formation in heads with dve mutant clones was associated with ectopic Dll expression and endogenous Hth expression in the vertex region. Interestingly, dve Dll double mutant clones could also induce ectopic antennae lacking the distal structures, suggesting that the Dve activity is crucial for repressing inappropriate antenna-forming potential in the vertex region. Our results clearly indicate that not only the activation of effector genes to execute developmental program but also the repression of inappropriate program is crucial for establishment of the organ identity.

  13. Specific calcineurin isoforms are involved in Drosophila toll immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Xian; Dijkers, Pascale F

    2015-01-01

    Because excessive or inadequate responses can be detrimental, immune responses to infection require appropriate regulation. Networks of signaling pathways establish versatility of immune responses. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for dissecting conserved innate immune responses to infection. For example, the Toll pathway, which promotes activation of NF-κB transcription factors Dorsal/Dorsal-related immune factor (Dif), was first identified in Drosophila. Together with the IMD pathway, acting upstream of NF-κB transcription factor Relish, these pathways constitute a central immune signaling network. Inputs in these pathways contribute to specific and appropriate responses to microbial insults. Relish activity during infection is modulated by Ca(2+)-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, an important target of immunosuppressants in transplantation biology. Only one of the three Drosophila calcineurin isoforms, calcineurin A1, acts on Relish during infection. However, it is not known whether there is a role for calcineurin in Dorsal/Dif immune signaling. In this article, we demonstrate involvement of specific calcineurin isoforms, protein phosphatase at 14D (Pp2B-14D)/calcineurin A at 14F (CanA-14F), in Toll-mediated immune signaling. These isoforms do not affect IMD signaling. In cell culture, pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin or RNA interference against homologous calcineurin isoforms Pp2B-14D/CanA-14F, but not against isoform calcineurin A1, decreased Toll-dependent Dorsal/Dif activity. A Pp2B-14D gain-of-function transgene promoted Dorsal nuclear translocation and Dorsal/Dif activity. In vivo, Pp2B-14D/CanA-14F RNA interference attenuated the Dorsal/Dif-dependent response to infection without affecting the Relish-dependent response. Altogether, these data identify a novel input, calcineurin, in Toll immune signaling and demonstrate involvement of specific calcineurin isoforms in Drosophila NF-κB signaling. Copyright

  14. Lineage-specific reprogramming as a strategy for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2008-06-15

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are endowed with extensive ability for self renewal and differentiation. These features make them a promising candidate for cell therapy. However, despite the enthusiasm and hype surrounding the potential therapeutic use of human ES cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, to date few reports have documented successful therapeutic outcome with ES-derived cell populations. This is probably due to two main caveats associated with ES cells, their capacity to form teratomas and the challenge of isolating the appropriate therapeutic cell population from differentiating ES cells. We have focused our efforts on the derivation of skeletal muscle progenitors from ES cells and here we will discuss the strategy of reprogramming lineage choices by overexpression of a master regulator, which has proven successful for the generation of the skeletal myogenic lineage from mouse ES cells.

  15. Pax genes: regulators of lineage specification and progenitor cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Blake, Judith A; Ziman, Melanie R

    2014-02-01

    Pax genes encode a family of transcription factors that orchestrate complex processes of lineage determination in the developing embryo. Their key role is to specify and maintain progenitor cells through use of complex molecular mechanisms such as alternate RNA splice forms and gene activation or inhibition in conjunction with protein co-factors. The significance of Pax genes in development is highlighted by abnormalities that arise from the expression of mutant Pax genes. Here, we review the molecular functions of Pax genes during development and detail the regulatory mechanisms by which they specify and maintain progenitor cells across various tissue lineages. We also discuss mechanistic insights into the roles of Pax genes in regeneration and in adult diseases, including cancer.

  16. SWI/SNF-directed stem cell lineage specification: dynamic composition regulates specific stages of skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Toto, Paula Coutinho; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Albini, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are key regulators of the epigenetic modifications that determine whether stem cells maintain pluripotency or commit toward specific lineages through development and during postnatal life. Dynamic combinatorial assembly of multiple variants of SWI/SNF subunits is emerging as the major determinant of the functional versatility of SWI/SNF. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of the alternative SWI/SNF complexes that direct stem cell fate toward skeletal muscle lineage and control distinct stages of skeletal myogenesis. In particular, we will refer to recent evidence pointing to the essential role of two SWI/SNF components not expressed in embryonic stem cells—the catalytic subunit BRM and the structural component BAF60C—whose induction in muscle progenitors coincides with the expansion of their transcriptional repertoire. PMID:27207468

  17. On the roles of Notch, Delta, kuzbanian, and inscuteable during the development of Drosophila embryonic neuroblast lineages.

    PubMed

    Udolph, Gerald; Rath, Priyadarshini; Tio, Murni; Toh, Joanne; Fang, Wanru; Pandey, Rahul; Technau, Gerhard M; Chia, William

    2009-12-15

    The generation of cellular diversity in the nervous system involves the mechanism of asymmetric cell division. Besides an array of molecules, including the Par protein cassette, a heterotrimeric G protein signalling complex, Inscuteable plays a major role in controlling asymmetric cell division, which ultimately leads to differential activation of the Notch signalling pathway and correct specification of the two daughter cells. In this context, Notch is required to be active in one sibling and inactive in the other. Here, we investigated the requirement of genes previously known to play key roles in sibling cell fate specification such as members of the Notch signalling pathway, e.g., Notch (N), Delta (Dl), and kuzbanian (kuz) and a crucial regulator of asymmetric cell division, inscuteable (insc) throughout lineage progression of 4 neuroblasts (NB1-1, MP2, NB4-2, and NB7-1). Notch-mediated cell fate specification defects were cell-autonomous and were observed in all neuroblast lineages even in cells born from late ganglion mother cells (GMC) within the lineages. We also show that Dl functions non-autonomously during NB lineage progression and clonal cells do not require Dl from within the clone. This suggests that within a NB lineage Dl is dispensable for sibling cell fate specification. Furthermore, we provide evidence that kuz is involved in sibling cell fate specification in the central nervous system. It is cell-autonomously required in the same postmitotic cells which also depend on Notch function. This indicates that KUZ is required to facilitate a functional Notch signal in the Notch-dependent cell for correct cell fate specification. Finally, we show that three neuroblast lineages (NB1-1, NB4-2, and NB7-1) require insc function for sibling cell fate specification in cells born from early GMCs whereas insc is not required in cells born from later GMCs of the same lineages. Thus, there is differential requirement for insc for cell fate specification

  18. Genetic and epigenetic variation in the lineage specification of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvey, Aaron; van der Veeken, Joris; Plitas, George; Rich, Stephen S; Concannon, Patrick; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoimmunity and other inflammatory states, are characterized by a distinct set of genetic elements controlling their gene expression. However, the extent of genetic and associated epigenetic variation in the Treg cell lineage and its possible relation to disease states in humans remain unknown. We explored evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements and natural human inter-individual epigenetic variation in Treg cells to identify the core transcriptional control program of lineage specification. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in core lineage-specific enhancers revealed disease associations, which were further corroborated by high-resolution genotyping to fine map causal polymorphisms in lineage-specific enhancers. Our findings suggest that a small set of regulatory elements specify the Treg lineage and that genetic variation in Treg cell-specific enhancers may alter Treg cell function contributing to polygenic disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07571.001 PMID:26510014

  19. Is Drosophila-microbe association species-specific or region specific? A study undertaken involving six Indian Drosophila species.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kopal; Khanna, Radhika; Mohanty, Sujata

    2017-06-01

    The present work aims to identify the microbial diversity associated with six Indian Drosophila species using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology and to discover the nature of their distribution across species and eco-geographic regions. Whole fly gDNA of six Drosophila species were used to generate sequences in an Illumina platform using NGS technology. De novo based assembled raw reads were blasted against the NR database of NCBI using BLASTn for identification of their bacterial loads. We have tried to include Drosophila species from different taxonomical groups and subgroups and from three different eco-climatic regions India; four species belong to Central India, while the rest two, D. melanogaster and D. ananassae, belong to West and South India to determine both their species-wise and region-wide distribution. We detected the presence of 33 bacterial genera across all six study species, predominated by the class Proteobacteria. Amongst all, D. melanogaster was found to be the most diverse by carrying around 85% of the bacterial diversity. Our findings infer both species-specific and environment-specific nature of the bacterial species inhabiting the Drosophila host. Though the present results are consistent with most of the earlier studies, they also remain incoherent with some. The present study outcome on the host-bacteria association and their species specific adaptation may provide some insight to understand the host-microbial interactions and the phenotypic implications of microbes on the host physiology. The knowledge gained may be importantly applied into the recent insect and pest population control strategy going to implement through gut microflora in India and abroad.

  20. Directional DNA methylation changes and complex intermediate states accompany lineage specificity in the adult hematopoietic compartment.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Emily; Molaro, Antoine; Dos Santos, Camila O; Thekkat, Pramod; Song, Qiang; Uren, Philip J; Park, Jin; Butler, Jason; Rafii, Shahin; McCombie, W Richard; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J

    2011-10-07

    DNA methylation has been implicated as an epigenetic component of mechanisms that stabilize cell-fate decisions. Here, we have characterized the methylomes of human female hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mature cells from the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Hypomethylated regions (HMRs) associated with lineage-specific genes were often methylated in the opposing lineage. In HSPCs, these sites tended to show intermediate, complex patterns that resolve to uniformity upon differentiation, by increased or decreased methylation. Promoter HMRs shared across diverse cell types typically display a constitutive core that expands and contracts in a lineage-specific manner to fine-tune the expression of associated genes. Many newly identified intergenic HMRs, both constitutive and lineage specific, were enriched for factor binding sites with an implied role in genome organization and regulation of gene expression, respectively. Overall, our studies represent an important reference data set and provide insights into directional changes in DNA methylation as cells adopt terminal fates.

  1. Prospero distinguishes sibling cell fate without asymmetric localization in the Drosophila adult external sense organ lineage.

    PubMed

    Manning, L; Doe, C Q

    1999-05-01

    The adult external sense organ precursor (SOP) lineage is a model system for studying asymmetric cell division. Adult SOPs divide asymmetrically to produce IIa and IIb daughter cells; IIa generates the external socket (tormogen) and hair (trichogen) cells, while IIb generates the internal neuron and sheath (thecogen) cells. Here we investigate the expression and function of prospero in the adult SOP lineage. Although Prospero is asymmetrically localized in embryonic SOP lineage, this is not observed in the adult SOP lineage: Prospero is first detected in the IIb nucleus and, during IIb division, it is cytoplasmic and inherited by both neuron and sheath cells. Subsequently, Prospero is downregulated in the neuron but maintained in the sheath cell. Loss of prospero function leads to 'double bristle' sense organs (reflecting a IIb-to-IIa transformation) or 'single bristle' sense organs with abnormal neuronal differentiation (reflecting defective IIb development). Conversely, ectopic prospero expression results in duplicate neurons and sheath cells and a complete absence of hair/socket cells (reflecting a IIa-to-IIb transformation). We conclude that (1) despite the absence of asymmetric protein localization, prospero expression is restricted to the IIb cell but not its IIa sibling, (2) prospero promotes IIb cell fate and inhibits IIa cell fate, and (3) prospero is required for proper axon and dendrite morphology of the neuron derived from the IIb cell. Thus, prospero plays a fundamental role in establishing binary IIa/IIb sibling cell fates without being asymmetrically localized during SOP division. Finally, in contrast to previous studies, we find that the IIb cell divides prior to the IIa cell in the SOP lineage.

  2. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-06-15

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1-4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Po(lpo)) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1(n1)) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Po(lpo)-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Po(lpo) allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1(n1) phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays.

  3. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L.; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1–4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Polpo) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1n1) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Polpo-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Polpo allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1n1 phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays. PMID:24737760

  4. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    PubMed Central

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  5. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability.

  6. Cooperativity, specificity, and evolutionary stability of Polycomb targeting in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Oded Elkayam, Noa; Sexton, Tom; Entrevan, Marianne; Stern, Shani; Thomas, Aubin; Yaffe, Eitan; Parrinello, Hugues; Tanay, Amos; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2014-10-09

    Metazoan genomes are partitioned into modular chromosomal domains containing active or repressive chromatin. In flies, Polycomb group (PcG) response elements (PREs) recruit PHO and other DNA-binding factors and act as nucleation sites for the formation of Polycomb repressive domains. The sequence specificity of PREs is not well understood. Here, we use comparative epigenomics and transgenic assays to show that Drosophila domain organization and PRE specification are evolutionarily conserved despite significant cis-element divergence within Polycomb domains, whereas cis-element evolution is strongly correlated with transcription factor binding divergence outside of Polycomb domains. Cooperative interactions of PcG complexes and their recruiting factor PHO stabilize PHO recruitment to low-specificity sequences. Consistently, PHO recruitment to sites within Polycomb domains is stabilized by PRC1. These data suggest that cooperative rather than hierarchical interactions among low-affinity sequences, DNA-binding factors, and the Polycomb machinery are giving rise to specific and strongly conserved 3D structures in Drosophila.

  7. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling.

    PubMed

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches.

  8. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:28248965

  9. Postmitotic Specification of Drosophila Insulinergic Neurons from Pioneer Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Thor, Stefan; Gould, Alex P

    2008-01-01

    Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7) and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic β-cells. PMID:18336071

  10. Origin and dynamic lineage characteristics of the developing Drosophila midgut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-08-15

    Proliferating intestinal stem cells (ISCs) generate all cell types of the Drosophila midgut, including enterocytes, endocrine cells, and gland cells (e.g., copper cells), throughout the lifetime of the animal. Among the signaling mechanisms controlling the balance between ISC self-renewal and the production of different cell types, Notch (N) plays a pivotal role. In this paper we investigated the emergence of ISCs during metamorphosis and the role of N in this process. Precursors of the Drosophila adult intestinal stem cells (pISCs) can be first detected within the pupal midgut during the first hours after onset of metamorphosis as motile mesenchymal cells. pISCs perform 2-3 rounds of parasynchronous divisions. The first mitosis yields only an increase in pISC number. During the following rounds of mitosis, dividing pISCs give rise to more pISCs, as well as the endocrine cells that populate the midgut of the eclosing fly. Enterocytes do not appear among the pISC progeny until around the time of eclosion. The "proendocrine" gene prospero (pros), expressed from mid-pupal stages onward in pISCs, is responsible to advance the endocrine fate in these cells; following removal of pros, pISCs continue to proliferate, but endocrine cells do not form. Conversely, the onset of N activity that occurs around the stage when pros comes on restricts pros expression among pISCs. Loss of N abrogates proliferation and switches on an endocrine fate among all pISCs. Our results suggest that a switch depending on the activity of N and pros acts at the level of the pISC to decide between continued proliferation and endocrine differentiation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Mapping cell type-specific transcriptional enhancers using high affinity, lineage-specific Ep300 bioChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Zhang, Lina; Akerberg, Brynn N; Ma, Qing; Li, Kai; He, Aibin; Lin, Zhiqiang; Stevens, Sean M; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell type-specific transcriptional programs requires developing a lexicon of their genomic regulatory elements. We developed a lineage-selective method to map transcriptional enhancers, regulatory genomic regions that activate transcription, in mice. Since most tissue-specific enhancers are bound by the transcriptional co-activator Ep300, we used Cre-directed, lineage-specific Ep300 biotinylation and pulldown on immobilized streptavidin followed by next generation sequencing of co-precipitated DNA to identify lineage-specific enhancers. By driving this system with lineage-specific Cre transgenes, we mapped enhancers active in embryonic endothelial cells/blood or skeletal muscle. Analysis of these enhancers identified new transcription factor heterodimer motifs that likely regulate transcription in these lineages. Furthermore, we identified candidate enhancers that regulate adult heart- or lung- specific endothelial cell specialization. Our strategy for tissue-specific protein biotinylation opens new avenues for studying lineage-specific protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22039.001 PMID:28121289

  12. Fate map and cell lineage relationships of thoracic and abdominal mesodermal anlagen in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Klapper, R; Holz, A; Janning, W

    1998-02-01

    We have examined the cell lineage of larval and imaginal precursors of the mesodermal anlage between 10% and 60% egg length (EL) by homotopic single-cell transplantations at the blastoderm stage. Clones in the larval somatic muscles and in the fat body were derived from transplantations everywhere between 10% and 60% EL along the ventral side of the embryo. Clones frequently overlap these tissues and can extend over a maximum of four segments in the larval somatic muscles or over two morphologically-distinct parts in the fat body. Clones in the gonadal mesoderm overlap with other mesodermal derivatives and exhibit different mitotic behaviour in the two sexes. We present a blastoderm fate map for the fat body, the larval somatic muscles and the gonadal mesoderm. Clones in the imaginal muscle precursors of the abdomen, as well as of the thorax, always show a common cell lineage with larval somatic muscles and partly with other mesodermal tissues. These clones of imaginal derivatives are always found within a single segment, while the overlapping clone parts in the larval somatic muscles can label up to three segments.

  13. Genome-wide identification, characterization, and expression analysis of lineage-specific genes within zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genomic basis of teleost phenotypic complexity remains obscure, despite increasing availability of genome and transcriptome sequence data. Fish-specific genome duplication cannot provide sufficient explanation for the morphological complexity of teleosts, considering the relatively large number of extinct basal ray-finned fishes. Results In this study, we performed comparative genomic analysis to discover the Conserved Teleost-Specific Genes (CTSGs) and orphan genes within zebrafish and found that these two sets of lineage-specific genes may have played important roles during zebrafish embryogenesis. Lineage-specific genes within zebrafish share many of the characteristics of their counterparts in other species: shorter length, fewer exon numbers, higher GC content, and fewer of them have transcript support. Chromosomal location analysis indicated that neither the CTSGs nor the orphan genes were distributed evenly in the chromosomes of zebrafish. The significant enrichment of immunity proteins in CTSGs annotated by gene ontology (GO) or predicted ab initio may imply that defense against pathogens may be an important reason for the diversification of teleosts. The evolutionary origin of the lineage-specific genes was determined and a very high percentage of lineage-specific genes were generated via gene duplications. The temporal and spatial expression profile of lineage-specific genes obtained by expressed sequence tags (EST) and RNA-seq data revealed two novel properties: in addition to being highly tissue-preferred expression, lineage-specific genes are also highly temporally restricted, namely they are expressed in narrower time windows than evolutionarily conserved genes and are specifically enriched in later-stage embryos and early larval stages. Conclusions Our study provides the first systematic identification of two different sets of lineage-specific genes within zebrafish and provides valuable information leading towards a better

  14. Genome-wide identification of Drosophila Hb9 targets reveals a pivotal role in directing the transcriptome within eight neuronal lineages, including activation of Nitric Oxide Synthase and Fd59a/Fox-D

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Rusch, Jannette; Yeh, Raymond T.; Fujioka, Miki; Wilson, Beth A.; Zhu, Yi; Robie, Alice A.; Mistry, Hemlata; Wang, Ting; Jaynes, James B.; Skeath, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Hb9 is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that acts in combination with Nkx6, Lim3, and Tail-up (Islet) to guide the stereotyped differentiation, connectivity, and function of a subset of neurons in Drosophila. The role of Hb9 in directing neuronal differentiation is well documented, but the lineage of Hb9+ neurons is only partly characterized, its regulation is poorly understood, and most of the downstream genes through which it acts remain at large. Here, we complete the lineage tracing of all embryonic Hb9+ neurons (to eight neuronal lineages) and provide evidence that hb9, lim3, and tail-up are coordinately regulated by a common set of upstream factors. Through the parallel use of micro-array gene expression profiling and the Dam-ID method, we searched for Hb9-regulated genes, uncovering transcription factors as the most over-represented class of genes regulated by Hb9 (and Nkx6) in the CNS. By a nearly ten-to-one ratio, Hb9 represses rather than activates transcription factors, highlighting transcriptional repression of other transcription factors as a core mechanism by which Hb9 governs neuronal determination. From the small set of genes activated by Hb9, we characterized the expression and function of two – fd59a/foxd, which encodes a transcription factor, and Nitric oxide synthase. Under standard lab conditions, both genes are dispensable for Drosophila development, but Nos appears to inhibit hyper-active behavior and fd59a appears to act in octopaminergic neurons to control egg-laying behavior. Together our data clarify the mechanisms through which Hb9 governs neuronal specification and differentiation and provide an initial characterization of the expression and function of Nos and fd59a in the Drosophila CNS. PMID:24512689

  15. Sex-specific regulation of Lgr3 in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Geoffrey W.; Luo, Shengzhan D.; Dias, Brian G.; Texada, Michael J.; Baker, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of sexually dimorphic morphology and the potential for sexually dimorphic behavior in Drosophila are regulated by the Fruitless (Fru) and Doublesex (Dsx) transcription factors. Several direct targets of Dsx have been identified, but direct Fru targets have not been definitively identified. We show that Drosophila leucine-rich repeat G protein-coupled receptor 3 (Lgr3) is regulated by Fru and Dsx in separate populations of neurons. Lgr3 is a member of the relaxin-receptor family and a receptor for Dilp8, necessary for control of organ growth. Lgr3 expression in the anterior central brain of males is inhibited by the B isoform of Fru, whose DNA binding domain interacts with a short region of an Lgr3 intron. Fru A and C isoform mutants had no observed effect on Lgr3 expression. The female form of Dsx (DsxF) separately up- and down-regulates Lgr3 expression in distinct neurons in the abdominal ganglion through female- and male-specific Lgr3 enhancers. Excitation of neural activity in the DsxF–up-regulated abdominal ganglion neurons inhibits female receptivity, indicating the importance of these neurons for sexual behavior. Coordinated regulation of Lgr3 by Fru and Dsx marks a point of convergence of the two branches of the sex-determination hierarchy. PMID:26884206

  16. Global Patterns of Tissue-Specific Alternative Polyadenylation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Smibert, Peter; Miura, Pedro; Westholm, Jakub O.; Shenker, Sol; May, Gemma; Duff, Michael O.; Zhang, Dayu; Eads, Brian D.; Carlson, Joe; Brown, James B.; Eisman, Robert C.; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas; Cherbas, Peter; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lai, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We analyzed the usage and consequences of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in Drosophila melanogaster by using >1 billion reads of stranded mRNA-seq across a variety of dissected tissues. Beyond demonstrating that a majority of fly transcripts are subject to APA, we observed broad trends for 3′ untranslated region (UTR) shortening in the testis and lengthening in the central nervous system (CNS); the latter included hundreds of unannotated extensions ranging up to 18 kb. Extensive northern analyses validated the accumulation of full-length neural extended transcripts, and in situ hybridization indicated their spatial restriction to the CNS. Genes encoding RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and transcription factors were preferentially subject to 3′ UTR extensions. Motif analysis indicated enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites in the neural extensions, and their termini were enriched in canonical cis elements that promote cleavage and polyadenylation. Altogether, we reveal broad tissue-specific patterns of APA in Drosophila and transcripts with unprecedented 3′ UTR length in the nervous system. PMID:22685694

  17. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs), spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages. PMID:26624996

  18. Notch3 activation is sufficient but not required for inducing human T-lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Waegemans, Els; Van de Walle, Inge; De Medts, Jelle; De Smedt, Magda; Kerre, Tessa; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Leclercq, Georges; Wang, Tao; Plum, Jean; Taghon, Tom

    2014-12-15

    Although the role for the individual Notch receptors in early hematopoiesis have been thoroughly investigated in mouse, studies in human have been mostly limited to the use of pan-Notch inhibitors. However, such studies in human are important to predict potential side effects of specific Notch receptor blocking reagents because these are currently being considered as therapeutic tools to treat various Notch-dependent diseases. In this study, we studied the individual roles of Notch1 and Notch3 in early human hematopoietic lineage decisions, particularly during T-lineage specification. Although this process in mice is solely dependent on Notch1 activation, we recently reported Notch3 expression in human uncommitted thymocytes, raising the possibility that Notch3 mediates human T-lineage specification. Although expression of a constitutive activated form of Notch3 (ICN3) results in the induction of T-lineage specification in human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, similar to ICN1 overexpression, loss-of-function studies using blocking Abs reveal that only Notch1, but not Notch3, is critical in this process. Blocking of Notch1 activation in OP9-DLL4 cocultures resulted in a complete block in T-lineage specification and induced monocytic and plasmacytoid dendritic cell differentiation instead. In fetal thymus organ cultures, impeded Notch1 activation resulted in B and dendritic cell development. In contrast, Notch3 blocking Abs only marginally affected T-lineage specification and hematopoietic differentiation with a slight increase in monocyte development. No induction of B or dendritic cell development was observed. Thus, our results unambiguously reveal a nonredundant role for Notch1 in human T-lineage specification, despite the expression of other Notch receptors. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Crosstalk between NOTCH and AKT signaling during murine megakaryocyte lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Melanie G; Mabialah, Vinciane; Sykes, Stephen M; Khandan, Tulasi; Lo Celso, Cristina; Lopez, Cécile K; Rivera-Muñoz, Paola; Rameau, Philippe; Tothova, Zuzana; Aster, Jon C; DePinho, Ronald A; Scadden, David T; Gilliland, D Gary; Mercher, Thomas

    2011-08-04

    The NOTCH signaling pathway is implicated in a broad range of developmental processes, including cell fate decisions. However, the molecular basis for its role at the different steps of stem cell lineage commitment is unclear. We recently identified the NOTCH signaling pathway as a positive regulator of megakaryocyte lineage specification during hematopoiesis, but the developmental pathways that allow hematopoietic stem cell differentiation into the erythro-megakaryocytic lineages remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of downstream mediators of NOTCH during megakaryopoiesis and report crosstalk between the NOTCH and PI3K/AKT pathways. We demonstrate the inhibitory role of phosphatase with tensin homolog and Forkhead Box class O factors on megakaryopoiesis in vivo. Finally, our data annotate developmental mechanisms in the hematopoietic system that enable a decision to be made either at the hematopoietic stem cell or the committed progenitor level to commit to the megakaryocyte lineage, supporting the existence of 2 distinct developmental pathways.

  20. Crosstalk between NOTCH and AKT signaling during murine megakaryocyte lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Melanie G.; Mabialah, Vinciane; Sykes, Stephen M.; Khandan, Tulasi; Lo Celso, Cristina; Lopez, Cécile K.; Rivera-Muñoz, Paola; Rameau, Philippe; Tothova, Zuzana; Aster, Jon C.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Scadden, David T.; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2011-01-01

    The NOTCH signaling pathway is implicated in a broad range of developmental processes, including cell fate decisions. However, the molecular basis for its role at the different steps of stem cell lineage commitment is unclear. We recently identified the NOTCH signaling pathway as a positive regulator of megakaryocyte lineage specification during hematopoiesis, but the developmental pathways that allow hematopoietic stem cell differentiation into the erythro-megakaryocytic lineages remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of downstream mediators of NOTCH during megakaryopoiesis and report crosstalk between the NOTCH and PI3K/AKT pathways. We demonstrate the inhibitory role of phosphatase with tensin homolog and Forkhead Box class O factors on megakaryopoiesis in vivo. Finally, our data annotate developmental mechanisms in the hematopoietic system that enable a decision to be made either at the hematopoietic stem cell or the committed progenitor level to commit to the megakaryocyte lineage, supporting the existence of 2 distinct developmental pathways. PMID:21653327

  1. Cell type–specific genomics of Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Gilbert L.; Davis, Fred P.; Picard, Serge; Eddy, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    Many tools are available to analyse genomes but are often challenging to use in a cell type–specific context. We have developed a method similar to the isolation of nuclei tagged in a specific cell type (INTACT) technique [Deal,R.B. and Henikoff,S. (2010) A simple method for gene expression and chromatin profiling of individual cell types within a tissue. Dev. Cell, 18, 1030–1040; Steiner,F.A., Talbert,P.B., Kasinathan,S., Deal,R.B. and Henikoff,S. (2012) Cell-type-specific nuclei purification from whole animals for genome-wide expression and chromatin profiling. Genome Res., doi:10.1101/gr.131748.111], first developed in plants, for use in Drosophila neurons. We profile gene expression and histone modifications in Kenyon cells and octopaminergic neurons in the adult brain. In addition to recovering known gene expression differences, we also observe significant cell type–specific chromatin modifications. In particular, a small subset of differentially expressed genes exhibits a striking anti-correlation between repressive and activating histone modifications. These genes are enriched for transcription factors, recovering those known to regulate mushroom body identity and predicting analogous regulators of octopaminergic neurons. Our results suggest that applying INTACT to specific neuronal populations can illuminate the transcriptional regulatory networks that underlie neuronal cell identity. PMID:22855560

  2. Parallel and lineage-specific molecular adaptation to climate in boreal black spruce.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Julien; Gérardi, Sébastien; Laroche, Jérôme; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2012-09-01

    In response to selective pressure, adaptation may follow different genetic pathways throughout the natural range of a species due to historical differentiation in standing genetic variation. Using 41 populations of black spruce (Picea mariana), the objectives of this study were to identify adaptive genetic polymorphisms related to temperature and precipitation variation across the transcontinental range of the species, and to evaluate the potential influence of historical events on their geographic distribution. Population structure was first inferred using 50 control nuclear markers. Then, 47 candidate gene SNPs identified in previous genome scans were tested for relationship with climatic factors using an F(ST) -based outlier method and regressions between allele frequencies and climatic variations. Two main intraspecific lineages related to glacial vicariance were detected at the transcontinental scale. Within-lineage analyses of allele frequencies allowed the identification of 23 candidate SNPs significantly related to precipitation and/or temperature variation, among which seven were common to both lineages, eight were specific to the eastern lineage and eight were specific to the western lineage. The implication of these candidate SNPs in adaptive processes was further supported by gene functional annotations. Multiple evidences indicated that the occurrence of lineage-specific adaptive SNPs was better explained by selection acting on historically differentiated gene pools rather than differential selection due to heterogeneity of interacting environmental factors and pleiotropic effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that standing genetic variation of potentially adaptive nature has been modified by historical events, hence affecting the outcome of recent selection and leading to different adaptive routes between intraspecific lineages. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Microgrooved topographical surface directs tenogenic lineage specific differentiation of mouse tendon derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan; Zhou, Kaili; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2017-01-10

    Tendon derived stem cells (TDSCs) are the endogenous cell source for tenocyte turnover and tendon functional maintenance. They are also the important cell source for tendon engineering and regeneration. In addition, TDSCs also play an important role in tendinopathy via their non-tenogenic lineage differentiation. It has been well demonstrated that cell shape could determine mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lineage differentiation. In this study, a parallel microgrooved polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane (10 µm groove width and 3 µm depth) was employed to investigate the role of cell elongation via this particular topographic surface in directing murine TDSC (mTDSC) lineage differentiation. The results showed that elongated mTDSCs exhibited significantly enhanced the gene expression of tenogenic markers when compared to the spread cells that grew on smooth PDMS membrane including tenomodulin, scleraxis, collagens I, III, and VI, decorin and tenascin (p  <  0.05). Meanwhile, stemness related genes such as Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 were significantly inhibited for their expression in elongated mTDSCs (p  <  0.05). When under tri-lineage induced differentiation, cell elongation significantly inhibited mTDSC differentiation towards chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages (p  <  0.05). Furthermore, cell elongation could significantly inhibit mTDSC osteogenic lineage differentiation (p  <  0.05) induced by BMP-2, a tendinopathy mimicking stimulant. In conclusion, simulation of native tendon structure via using parallel microgrooved topography can promote mTDSC differentiation specifically towards tenogenic lineage and prevent non-tenogenic lineage differentiation, providing an insight into the design of tendon regenerative materials.

  4. Constraint of gene expression by the chromatin remodelling protein CHD4 facilitates lineage specification.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy-Kirwan, Aoife; Signolet, Jason; Costello, Ita; Gharbi, Sarah; Hendrich, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Chromatin remodelling proteins are essential for different aspects of metazoan biology, yet functional details of why these proteins are important are lacking. Although it is possible to describe the biochemistry of how they remodel chromatin, their chromatin-binding profiles in cell lines, and gene expression changes upon loss of a given protein, in very few cases can this easily translate into an understanding of how the function of that protein actually influences a developmental process. Here, we investigate how the chromatin remodelling protein CHD4 facilitates the first lineage decision in mammalian embryogenesis. Embryos lacking CHD4 can form a morphologically normal early blastocyst, but are unable to successfully complete the first lineage decision and form functional trophectoderm (TE). In the absence of a functional TE, Chd4 mutant blastocysts do not implant and are hence not viable. By measuring transcript levels in single cells from early embryos, we show that CHD4 influences the frequency at which unspecified cells in preimplantation stage embryos express lineage markers prior to the execution of this first lineage decision. In the absence of CHD4, this frequency is increased in 16-cell embryos, and by the blastocyst stage cells fail to properly adopt a TE gene expression programme. We propose that CHD4 allows cells to undertake lineage commitment in vivo by modulating the frequency with which lineage-specification genes are expressed. This provides novel insight into both how lineage decisions are made in mammalian cells, and how a chromatin remodelling protein functions to facilitate lineage commitment. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Context-specific comparison of sleep acquisition systems in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, David S.; Bollinger, Wesley L.; Vigderman, Abigail; Masek, Pavel; Gertowski, Jill; Sehgal, Amita; Keene, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sleep is conserved across phyla and can be measured through electrophysiological or behavioral characteristics. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent model for investigating the genetic and neural mechanisms that regulate sleep. Multiple systems exist for measuring fly activity, including video analysis and single-beam (SB) or multi-beam (MB) infrared (IR)-based monitoring. In this study, we compare multiple sleep parameters of individual flies using a custom-built video-based acquisition system, and commercially available SB- or MB-IR acquisition systems. We report that all three monitoring systems appear sufficiently sensitive to detect changes in sleep duration associated with diet, age, and mating status. Our data also demonstrate that MB-IR detection appeared more sensitive than the SB-IR for detecting baseline nuances in sleep architecture, while architectural changes associated with varying life-history and environment were generally detected across all acquisition types. Finally, video recording of flies in an arena allowed us to measure the effect of ambient environment on sleep. These experiments demonstrate a robust effect of arena shape and size as well as light levels on sleep duration and architecture, and highlighting the versatility of tracking-based sleep acquisition. These findings provide insight into the context-specific basis for choosing between Drosophila sleep acquisition systems, describe a novel cost-effective system for video tracking, and characterize sleep analysis using the MB-IR sleep analysis. Further, we describe a modified dark-place preference sleep assay using video tracking, confirming that flies prefer to sleep in dark locations. PMID:26519516

  6. Rewiring mesenchymal stem cell lineage specification by switching the biophysical microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2014-06-01

    The propensity of stem cells to specify and commit to a particular lineage program is guided by dynamic biophysical and biochemical signals that are temporally regulated. However, most in vitro studies rely on ``snapshots'' of cell state under static conditions. Here we asked whether changing the biophysical aspects of the substrate could modulate the degree of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lineage specification. We chose to explore two diverse differentiation outcomes: MSC osteogenesis and trans-differentiation to neuron-like cells. MSCs were cultured on soft (~0.5 kPa) or stiff (~40 kPa) hydrogels followed by transfer to gels of the opposite stiffness. MSCs on soft gels express elevated neurogenesis markers while MSCs on stiff substrates express elevated osteogenesis markers. Transfer of MSCs from soft to stiff or stiff to soft substrates led to a switch in lineage specification. However, MSCs transferred from stiff to soft substrates maintained elevated osteogenesis markers, suggesting a degree of irreversible activation. Transferring MSCs to micropatterned substrates reveal geometric cues that further modulate lineage reversal. Taken together, this study demonstrates that MSCs remain susceptible to the biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix--even after several weeks of culture--and can redirect lineage specification in response to changes in the microenvironment.

  7. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling critically regulates early lineage specification in mouse embryonic stem cells and embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zhu, Lili; Yang, Acong; Lin, Jiangwei; Tang, Fan; Jin, Shibo; Wei, Zhe; Li, Jinsong; Jin, Ying

    2011-01-07

    Self-renewal and pluripotency are hallmarks of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, the signaling pathways that trigger their transition from self-renewal to differentiation remain elusive. Here, we report that calcineurin-NFAT signaling is both necessary and sufficient to switch ESCs from an undifferentiated state to lineage-specific cells and that the inhibition of this pathway can maintain long-term ESC self-renewal independent of leukemia inhibitory factor. Mechanistically, this pathway converges with the Erk1/2 pathway to regulate Src expression and promote the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process required for lineage specification in response to differentiation stimuli. Furthermore, calcineurin-NFAT signaling is activated when the earliest differentiation event occurs in mouse embryos, and its inhibition disrupts extraembryonic lineage development. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the NFAT and Erk1/2 cascades form a signaling switch for early lineage segregation in mouse ESCs and provide significant insights into the regulation of the balance between ESC self-renewal and early lineage specification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leukaemia lineage specification caused by cell-specific Mll-Enl translocations.

    PubMed

    Cano, F; Drynan, L F; Pannell, R; Rabbitts, T H

    2008-03-20

    Chromosomal translocations involving the Mixed-Lineage Leukaemia (MLL) gene underlie many human leukaemias and MLL rearrangements are found in both acute myelogenous and acute lymphoblastic leukaemias. To assess the functionally relevant haematopoietic cell contexts for MLL fusions to be tumorigenic, we have generated different lines of mice in which de novo Mll-associated translocations occur. In these models, reciprocal chromosomal translocations occur by means of Cre-loxP-mediated recombination (translocator mice) in different cells of the haematopoietic system (namely haematopoietic stem cells, semi-committed progenitors or committed T or B cells). Translocations between Mll and Enl cause myeloid neoplasias, initiating in stem cells or progenitors while no tumours arose when the translocation was restricted to the B-cell compartment. Despite the absence of tumorigenesis, Mll-Enl translocations did occur and Mll-Enl fusion mRNA was expressed in B-cell-restricted translocators. A permissive cellular environment is therefore required for oncogenicity of Mll-associated translocations since the occurrence of Mll-Enl does not promote unrestricted proliferation in all haematopoietic cellular contexts, consistent with a specific instructive role of the MLL-fusion proteins in leukaemogenesis.

  9. Subtype-specific neuronal remodeling during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Veverytsa, Lyubov; Allan, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    During metamorphosis in holometabolous insects, the nervous system undergoes dramatic remodeling as it transitions from its larval to its adult form. Many neurons are generated through post-embryonic neurogenesis to have adult-specific roles, but perhaps more striking is the dramatic remodeling that occurs to transition neurons from functioning in the larval to the adult nervous system. These neurons exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity during this transition; many subsets undergo programmed cell death, others remodel their axonal and dendritic arbors extensively, whereas others undergo trans-differentiation to alter their terminal differentiation gene expression profiles. Yet other neurons appear to be developmentally frozen in an immature state throughout larval life, to be awakened at metamorphosis by a process we term temporally-tuned differentiation. These multiple forms of remodeling arise from subtype-specific responses to a single metamorphic trigger, ecdysone. Here, we discuss recent progress in Drosophila melanogaster that is shedding light on how subtype-specific programs of neuronal remodeling are generated during metamorphosis.

  10. Promoter-specific co-activation by Drosophila Mastermind

    PubMed Central

    Caudy, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Mastermind (Mam) is a co-activator protein of binary complexes consisting of Suppressor of Hairless (Su(H)) and Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) proteins assembled on cis-regulatory regions of target genes activated by Notch signaling. Current evidence indicates that Mastermind is necessary and sufficient for the formation of a functional Su(H)/NICD/Mam ternary complex on at least one specific architecture of Su(H) binding sites, called the SPS element (Su(H) Paired Sites). However, using transcription assays with a combination of native and synthetic Notch target gene promoters in Drosophila cultured cells, we show here that co-activation of Su(H)/NICD complexes on SPS elements by Mam is promoter-specific. Our novel results suggest this promoter specificity is mediated by additional unknown cis-regulatory elements present in the native promoters that are required for the recruitment of Mam and formation of functional Su(H)/NICD/Mam complexes on SPS elements. Together, the findings in this study suggest Mam is not always necessary and sufficient for co-activation of binary Su(H)/NICD complexes on SPS elements. PMID:18930034

  11. Lineage-specific molecular probing reveals novel diversity and ecological partitioning of haplosporidians

    PubMed Central

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Ashford, Oliver S; Berney, Cédric; Okamura, Beth; Feist, Stephen W; Baker-Austin, Craig; Stentiford, Grant D; Bass, David

    2014-01-01

    Haplosporidians are rhizarian parasites of mostly marine invertebrates. They include the causative agents of diseases of commercially important molluscs, including MSX disease in oysters. Despite their importance for food security, their diversity and distributions are poorly known. We used a combination of group-specific PCR primers to probe environmental DNA samples from planktonic and benthic environments in Europe, South Africa and Panama. This revealed several highly distinct novel clades, novel lineages within known clades and seasonal (spring vs autumn) and habitat-related (brackish vs littoral) variation in assemblage composition. High frequencies of haplosporidian lineages in the water column provide the first evidence for life cycles involving planktonic hosts, host-free stages or both. The general absence of haplosporidian lineages from all large online sequence data sets emphasises the importance of lineage-specific approaches for studying these highly divergent and diverse lineages. Combined with host-based field surveys, environmental sampling for pathogens will enhance future detection of known and novel pathogens and the assessment of disease risk. PMID:23966100

  12. Asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila bristle lineage: from the polarization of sensory organ precursor cells to Notch-mediated binary fate decision.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, François

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a simple and evolutionary conserved process whereby a mother divides to generate two daughter cells with distinct developmental potentials. This process can generate cell fate diversity during development. Fate asymmetry may result from the unequal segregation of molecules and/or organelles between the two daughter cells. Here, I will review how fate asymmetry is regulated in the sensory bristle lineage in Drosophila and focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying ACD of the sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs). For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Early cell lineage specification in a marsupial: a case for diverse mechanisms among mammals.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen; Shaw, Geoff; Freyer, Claudia; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2013-03-01

    Early cell lineage specification in eutherian mammals results in the formation of a pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) and trophoblast. By contrast, marsupials have no ICM. Here, we present the first molecular analysis of mechanisms of early cell lineage specification in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby. There was no overt differential localisation of key lineage-specific transcription factors in cleavage and early unilaminar blastocyst stages. Pluriblast cells (equivalent to the ICM) became distinguishable from trophoblast cells by differential expression of POU5F1 and, to a greater extent, POU2, a paralogue of POU5F1. Unlike in the mouse, pluriblast-trophoblast differentiation coincided with a global nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transition of CDX2 localisation. Also unlike in the mouse, Hippo pathway factors YAP and WWTR1 showed mutually distinct localisation patterns that suggest non-redundant roles. NANOG and GATA6 were conserved as markers of epiblast and hypoblast, respectively, but some differences to the mouse were found in their mode of differentiation. Our results suggest that there is considerable evolutionary plasticity in the mechanisms regulating early lineage specification in mammals.

  14. Spatial protein quality control and the evolution of lineage-specific ageing

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of a species requires periodic cell renewal to avoid clonal extinction. Sexual reproduction and the separation of germ cells from the soma provide a mechanism for such renewal, but are accompanied by an apparently mandatory ageing of the soma. Data obtained during the last decade suggest that a division of labour exists also between cells of vegetatively reproducing unicellular organisms, leading to the establishment of a soma-like and germ-like lineage with distinct fitness and longevity characteristics. This division of labour in both bacteria and yeast entails segregation of damaged and aggregated proteins such that the germ-like lineage is kept free of damage to the detriment of the soma-like lineage. In yeast, this spatial protein quality control (SQC) encompasses a CCT-chaperonin-dependent translocation and merging of cytotoxic protein aggregates. This process is regulated by Sir2, a protein deacetylase that modulates the rate of ageing in organisms ranging from yeast to worms and flies. Recent data also demonstrate that SQC is intimately integrated with the machinery establishing proper cell polarity and that this machinery is required for generating a soma-like and germ-like lineage in yeast. Deciphering the details of the SQC network may increase our understanding of the development of age-related protein folding disorders and shed light on the selective forces that paved the way for polarity and lineage-specific ageing to evolve. PMID:21115532

  15. Digital development: a database of cell lineage differentiation in C. elegans with lineage phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions and a multiscale model.

    PubMed

    Santella, Anthony; Kovacevic, Ismar; Herndon, Laura A; Hall, David H; Du, Zhuo; Bao, Zhirong

    2016-01-04

    Developmental systems biology is poised to exploit large-scale data from two approaches: genomics and live imaging. The combination of the two offers the opportunity to map gene functions and gene networks in vivo at single-cell resolution using cell tracking and quantification of cellular phenotypes. Here we present Digital Development (http://www.digital-development.org), a database of cell lineage differentiation with curated phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions and a multiscale model. The database stores data from recent systematic studies of cell lineage differentiation in the C. elegans embryo containing ∼ 200 conserved genes, 1400 perturbed cell lineages and 600,000 digitized single cells. Users can conveniently browse, search and download four categories of phenotypic and functional information from an intuitive web interface. This information includes lineage differentiation phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions, differentiation landscapes and fate choices, and a multiscale model of lineage differentiation. Digital Development provides a comprehensive, curated, multidimensional database for developmental biology. The scale, resolution and richness of biological information presented here facilitate exploration of gene-specific and systems-level mechanisms of lineage differentiation in Metazoans. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Digital development: a database of cell lineage differentiation in C. elegans with lineage phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions and a multiscale model

    PubMed Central

    Santella, Anthony; Kovacevic, Ismar; Herndon, Laura A.; Hall, David H.; Du, Zhuo; Bao, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental systems biology is poised to exploit large-scale data from two approaches: genomics and live imaging. The combination of the two offers the opportunity to map gene functions and gene networks in vivo at single-cell resolution using cell tracking and quantification of cellular phenotypes. Here we present Digital Development (http://www.digital-development.org), a database of cell lineage differentiation with curated phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions and a multiscale model. The database stores data from recent systematic studies of cell lineage differentiation in the C. elegans embryo containing ∼200 conserved genes, 1400 perturbed cell lineages and 600 000 digitized single cells. Users can conveniently browse, search and download four categories of phenotypic and functional information from an intuitive web interface. This information includes lineage differentiation phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions, differentiation landscapes and fate choices, and a multiscale model of lineage differentiation. Digital Development provides a comprehensive, curated, multidimensional database for developmental biology. The scale, resolution and richness of biological information presented here facilitate exploration of gene-specific and systems-level mechanisms of lineage differentiation in Metazoans. PMID:26503254

  17. Specification of regional intestinal stem cell identity during Drosophila metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Ian; Ohlstein, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In the adult Drosophila midgut the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway is required to specify and maintain the acid-secreting region of the midgut known as the copper cell region (CCR). BMP signaling is also involved in the modulation of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in response to injury. How ISCs are able to respond to the same signaling pathway in a regionally different manner is currently unknown. Here, we show that dual use of the BMP signaling pathway in the midgut is possible because BMP signals are only capable of transforming ISC and enterocyte identity during a defined window of metamorphosis. ISC heterogeneity is established prior to adulthood and then maintained in cooperation with regional signals from surrounding tissue. Our data provide a conceptual framework for how other tissues maintained by regional stem cells might be patterned and establishes the pupal and adult midgut as a novel genetic platform for identifying genes necessary for regional stem cell specification and maintenance. PMID:24700821

  18. Population specific fitness response of Drosophila subobscura to lead pollution.

    PubMed

    Kenig, Bojan; Stamenković-Radak, Marina; Andelković, Marko

    2013-04-01

    Differences in heavy metal tolerance among separate populations of the same species have often been interpreted as local adaptation. Persistence of differences after removing the stressor indicates that mechanisms responsible for the increased tolerance were genetically determined. Drosophila subobscura Collin (Diptera: Drosophilidae) populations were sampled from two localities with different history of heavy metal pollution, and reared for eight generations in the laboratory on a standard medium and on media with different concentrations of lead (Pb). To determine whether flies from different natural populations exposed to the Pb-contaminated media in the laboratory show population specific variability in fitness components over generations, experimental groups with different concentrations of lead were assayed in three generations (F2 , F5 , and F8 ) for fecundity, developmental time, and egg-to-adult viability. On the contaminated medium, fecundity was reduced in later generations and viability was increased, irrespective of the environmental origin of populations. For both populations, developmental time showed a tendency of slowing down on media with lead. Faster development was observed in later generations. Preadaptation to contamination, meaning higher fecundity, higher viability, and faster egg to adult development in all studied generations, was found in D. subobscura originating from the locality with a higher level of heavy metal pollution. © 2012 The Authors Insect Science © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. CGRP neurons mediate sleep-specific circadian output in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E.; Raccuglia, Davide; Felix, Mario; Li, Michael; Barnett, Gregory; Duah, Janelle; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Imbalances in amount and timing of sleep are harmful to physical and mental health. Therefore, the study of the underlying mechanisms is of great biological importance. Proper timing and amount of sleep is regulated by both the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive. However, very little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates sleep. In this study we describe a novel role for DIURETIC HORMONE 31 (DH31), the fly homologue of the vertebrate neuropeptide CALCITONIN GENE RELATED PEPTIDE (CGRP), as a circadian wake-promoting signal that awakens the fly in anticipation of dawn. Results Analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function Drosophila mutants demonstrates that DH31 suppresses sleep late at night. DH31 is expressed by a subset of dorsal circadian clock neurons that also express the receptor for the circadian neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF). PDF secreted by the ventral pacemaker subset of circadian clock neurons acts on PDF receptors in the DH31-expressing dorsal clock neurons to increase DH31 secretion before dawn. Activation of PDFR in DH31 positive DN1 specifically affects sleep and has no effect on circadian rhythms, thus constituting a dedicated locus for circadian regulation of sleep. Conclusions We identified a novel signaling molecule (DH31) as part of a neuropeptide relay mechanism for circadian control of sleep. Our results indicate that outputs of the clock controlling sleep and locomotor rhythms are mediated via distinct neuronal/cellular channels. PMID:25455031

  20. Sex-Specific Routes To Immune Senescence In Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Marco; Tinsley, Matthew C

    2017-09-05

    Animal immune systems change dramatically during the ageing process, often accompanied by major increases in pathogen susceptibility. However, the extent to which senescent elevations in infection mortality are causally driven by deteriorations in canonical systemic immune processes is unclear. We studied Drosophila melanogaster and compared the relative contributions of impaired systemic immune defences and deteriorating barrier defences to increased pathogen susceptibility in aged flies. To assess senescent changes in systemic immune response efficacy we injected one and four-week old flies with the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and studied subsequent mortality; whereas to include the role of barrier defences we infected flies by dusting the cuticle with fungal spores. We show that the processes underlying pathogen defence senescence differ between males and females. Both sexes became more susceptible to infection as they aged. However, we conclude that for males, this was principally due to deterioration in barrier defences, whereas for females systemic immune defence senescence was mainly responsible. We discuss the potential roles of sex-specific selection on the immune system and behavioural variation between males and females in driving these different senescent trends.

  1. Functional annotation of novel lineage-specific genes using co-expression and promoter analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The diversity of placental architectures within and among mammalian orders is believed to be the result of adaptive evolution. Although, the genetic basis for these differences is unknown, some may arise from rapidly diverging and lineage-specific genes. Previously, we identified 91 novel lineage-specific transcripts (LSTs) from a cow term-placenta cDNA library, which are excellent candidates for adaptive placental functions acquired by the ruminant lineage. The aim of the present study was to infer functions of previously uncharacterized lineage-specific genes (LSGs) using co-expression, promoter, pathway and network analysis. Results Clusters of co-expressed genes preferentially expressed in liver, placenta and thymus were found using 49 previously uncharacterized LSTs as seeds. Over-represented composite transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoters of clustered LSGs and known genes were then identified computationally. Functions were inferred for nine previously uncharacterized LSGs using co-expression analysis and pathway analysis tools. Our results predict that these LSGs may function in cell signaling, glycerophospholipid/fatty acid metabolism, protein trafficking, regulatory processes in the nucleus, and processes that initiate parturition and immune system development. Conclusions The placenta is a rich source of lineage-specific genes that function in the adaptive evolution of placental architecture and functions. We have shown that co-expression, promoter, and gene network analyses are useful methods to infer functions of LSGs with heretofore unknown functions. Our results indicate that many LSGs are involved in cellular recognition and developmental processes. Furthermore, they provide guidance for experimental approaches to validate the functions of LSGs and to study their evolution. PMID:20214810

  2. Functional annotation of novel lineage-specific genes using co-expression and promoter analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Charu G; Everts, Robin E; Loor, Juan J; Lewin, Harris A

    2010-03-09

    The diversity of placental architectures within and among mammalian orders is believed to be the result of adaptive evolution. Although, the genetic basis for these differences is unknown, some may arise from rapidly diverging and lineage-specific genes. Previously, we identified 91 novel lineage-specific transcripts (LSTs) from a cow term-placenta cDNA library, which are excellent candidates for adaptive placental functions acquired by the ruminant lineage. The aim of the present study was to infer functions of previously uncharacterized lineage-specific genes (LSGs) using co-expression, promoter, pathway and network analysis. Clusters of co-expressed genes preferentially expressed in liver, placenta and thymus were found using 49 previously uncharacterized LSTs as seeds. Over-represented composite transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoters of clustered LSGs and known genes were then identified computationally. Functions were inferred for nine previously uncharacterized LSGs using co-expression analysis and pathway analysis tools. Our results predict that these LSGs may function in cell signaling, glycerophospholipid/fatty acid metabolism, protein trafficking, regulatory processes in the nucleus, and processes that initiate parturition and immune system development. The placenta is a rich source of lineage-specific genes that function in the adaptive evolution of placental architecture and functions. We have shown that co-expression, promoter, and gene network analyses are useful methods to infer functions of LSGs with heretofore unknown functions. Our results indicate that many LSGs are involved in cellular recognition and developmental processes. Furthermore, they provide guidance for experimental approaches to validate the functions of LSGs and to study their evolution.

  3. Regulation of Drosophila yolk protein genes by an ovary-specific GATA factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lossky, M.; Wensink, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the expression of the genes for yolk protein of Drosophila melanogaster and the tissue specific function of the regulatory element which activates transcription in vivo. 70 refs., 8 figs.

  4. FoxA1 translates epigenetic signatures into enhancer driven lineage-specific transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lupien, Mathieu; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Meyer, Clifford A.; Wang, Qianben; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wei; Carroll, Jason S.; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles

    2008-01-01

    Summary Complex organisms require tissue-specific transcriptional programs, yet little is known about how these are established. The transcription factor FoxA1 is thought to contribute to gene regulation though its ability to act as a pioneer factor binding to nucleosomal DNA. Through genome-wide positional analyses, we demonstrate that FoxA1 cell type-specific functions rely primarily on differential recruitment to chromatin predominantly at distant enhancers rather than proximal promoters. This differential recruitment leads to cell-type specific changes in chromatin structure and functional collaboration with lineage-specific transcription factors. Despite the ability of FoxA1 to bind nucleosomes, its differential binding to chromatin sites is dependent on the distribution of histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation. Together, our results suggest that methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 is part of the epigenetic signature that defines lineage-specific FoxA1 recruitment sites in chromatin. FoxA1 translates this epigenetic signature into changes in chromatin structure thereby establishing lineage-specific transcriptional enhancers and programs. PMID:18358809

  5. Lineage- and developmental stage-specific mechanomodulation of induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maricela; Luu, Rebeccah J; Ico, Gerardo; Ospina, Alex; Myung, Danielle; Shih, Hung Ping; Nam, Jin

    2017-09-29

    To maximize the translational utility of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the ability to precisely modulate the differentiation of iPSCs to target phenotypes is critical. Although the effects of the physical cell niche on stem cell differentiation are well documented, current approaches to direct step-wise differentiation of iPSCs have been typically limited to the optimization of soluble factors. In this regard, we investigated how temporally varied substrate stiffness affects the step-wise differentiation of iPSCs towards various lineages/phenotypes. Electrospun nanofibrous substrates with different reduced Young's modulus were utilized to subject cells to different mechanical environments during the differentiation process towards representative phenotypes from each of three germ layer derivatives including motor neuron, pancreatic endoderm, and chondrocyte. Phenotype-specific markers of each lineage/stage were utilized to determine differentiation efficiency by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence imaging for gene and protein expression analysis, respectively. The results presented in this proof-of-concept study are the first to systematically demonstrate the significant role of the temporally varied mechanical microenvironment on the differentiation of stem cells. Our results demonstrate that the process of differentiation from pluripotent cells to functional end-phenotypes is mechanoresponsive in a lineage- and differentiation stage-specific manner. Lineage/developmental stage-dependent optimization of electrospun substrate stiffness provides a unique opportunity to enhance differentiation efficiency of iPSCs for their facilitated therapeutic applications.

  6. PHF6 regulates phenotypic plasticity through chromatin organization within lineage-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M; Bartlebaugh, Jordan M E; Liu, Yunpeng; Sánchez-Rivera, Francisco J; Bhutkar, Arjun; Weintraub, Abraham S; Buenrostro, Jason D; Cheng, Christine S; Regev, Aviv; Jacks, Tyler E; Young, Richard A; Hemann, Michael T

    2017-05-15

    Developmental and lineage plasticity have been observed in numerous malignancies and have been correlated with tumor progression and drug resistance. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that enable such plasticity to occur. Here, we describe the function of the plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) in leukemia and define its role in regulating chromatin accessibility to lineage-specific transcription factors. We show that loss of Phf6 in B-cell leukemia results in systematic changes in gene expression via alteration of the chromatin landscape at the transcriptional start sites of B-cell- and T-cell-specific factors. Additionally, Phf6(KO) cells show significant down-regulation of genes involved in the development and function of normal B cells, show up-regulation of genes involved in T-cell signaling, and give rise to mixed-lineage lymphoma in vivo. Engagement of divergent transcriptional programs results in phenotypic plasticity that leads to altered disease presentation in vivo, tolerance of aberrant oncogenic signaling, and differential sensitivity to frontline and targeted therapies. These findings suggest that active maintenance of a precise chromatin landscape is essential for sustaining proper leukemia cell identity and that loss of a single factor (PHF6) can cause focal changes in chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning that render cells susceptible to lineage transition. © 2017 Soto-Feliciano et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Sex-Specific Pattern Formation During Early Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Manu; Ludwig, Michael Z.; Kreitman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The deleterious effects of different X-chromosome dosage in males and females are buffered by a process called dosage compensation, which in Drosophila is achieved through a doubling of X-linked transcription in males. The male-specific lethal complex mediates this process, but is known to act only after gastrulation. Recent work has shown that the transcription of X-linked genes is also upregulated in males prior to gastrulation; whether it results in functional dosage compensation is not known. Absent or partial early dosage compensation raises the possibility of sex-biased expression of key developmental genes, such as the segmentation genes controlling anteroposterior patterning. We assess the functional output of early dosage compensation by measuring the expression of even-skipped (eve) with high spatiotemporal resolution in male and female embryos. We show that eve has a sexually dimorphic pattern, suggesting an interaction with either X-chromosome dose or the sex determination system. By manipulating the gene copy number of an X-linked transcription factor, giant (gt), we traced sex-biased eve patterning to gt dose, indicating that early dosage compensation is functionally incomplete. Despite sex-biased eve expression, the gene networks downstream of eve are able to produce sex-independent segmentation, a point that we establish by measuring the proportions of segments in elongated germ-band embryos. Finally, we use a whole-locus eve transgene with modified cis regulation to demonstrate that segment proportions have a sex-dependent sensitivity to subtle changes in Eve expression. The sex independence of downstream segmentation despite this sensitivity to Eve expression implies that additional autosomal gene- or pathway-specific mechanisms are required to ameliorate the effects of partial early dosage compensation. PMID:23410834

  8. Dominant-negative mutation in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome subunit genes affect alternative cell fate decisions in the Drosophila sense organ lineage.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, F

    1999-09-28

    In Drosophila, dominant-negative mutations in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome catalytic subunit genes have been identified as dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) mutations. At restrictive temperature, beta2 and beta6 DTS mutations confer lethality at the pupal stage. I investigate here the role of proteasome activity in regulating cell fate decisions in the sense organ lineage at the early pupal stage. Temperature-shift experiments in beta2 and beta6 DTS mutant pupae occasionally resulted in external sense organs with two sockets and no shaft. This double-socket phenotype was strongly enhanced in conditions in which Notch signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, conditional overexpression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to shaft-to-socket and to neuron-to-sheath cell fate transformations, which are both usually associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Finally, expression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to the stabilization of an ectopically expressed nuclear form of Notch in imaginal wing discs. This study demonstrates that mutations affecting two distinct proteasome catalytic subunits affect two alternative cell fate decisions and enhance Notch signaling activity in the sense organ lineage. These findings raise the possibility that the proteasome targets an active form of the Notch receptor for degradation in Drosophila.

  9. A misexpression screen reveals effects of bag-of-marbles and TGF beta class signaling on the Drosophila male germ-line stem cell lineage.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Cordula; Kiger, Amy A; Tazuke, Salli I; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Pantalena-Filho, Luiz C; Jones, D Leanne; Wood, Cricket G; Fuller, Margaret T

    2004-01-01

    Male gametes are produced throughout reproductive life by a classic stem cell mechanism. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms for lineage production that maintain male germ-line stem cell (GSC) populations, regulate mitotic amplification divisions, and ensure germ cell differentiation. Here we utilize the Drosophila system to identify genes that cause defects in the male GSC lineage when forcibly expressed. We conducted a gain-of-function screen using a collection of 2050 EP lines and found 55 EP lines that caused defects at early stages of spermatogenesis upon forced expression either in germ cells or in surrounding somatic support cells. Most strikingly, our analysis of forced expression indicated that repression of bag-of-marbles (bam) expression in male GSC is important for male GSC survival, while activity of the TGF beta signal transduction pathway may play a permissive role in maintenance of GSCs in Drosophila testes. In addition, forced activation of the TGF beta signal transduction pathway in germ cells inhibits the transition from the spermatogonial mitotic amplification program to spermatocyte differentiation. PMID:15238523

  10. Tcf7l1 prepares epiblast cells in the gastrulating mouse embryo for lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jackson A.; Wu, Chun-I; Merrill, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    The core gene regulatory network (GRN) in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) integrates activities of the pro-self-renewal factors Oct4 (Pou5f1), Sox2 and Nanog with that of an inhibitor of self-renewal, Tcf7l1 (Tcf3). The inhibitor function of Tcf7l1 causes dependence on extracellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, making its embryonic role within the ESC GRN unclear. By analyzing intact mouse embryos, we demonstrate that the function of Tcf7l1 is necessary for specification of cell lineages to occur concomitantly with the elaboration of a three-dimensional body plan during gastrulation. In Tcf7l1-/- embryos, specification of mesoderm is delayed, effectively uncoupling it from the induction of the primitive streak. Tcf7l1 repressor activity is necessary for a rapid switch in the response of pluripotent cells to Wnt/β-catenin stimulation, from one of self-renewal to a mesoderm specification response. These results identify Tcf7l1 as a unique factor that is necessary in pluripotent cells to prepare them for lineage specification. We suggest that the role of Tcf7l1 in mammals is to inhibit the GRN to ensure the coordination of lineage specification with the dynamic cellular events occurring during gastrulation. PMID:23487311

  11. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  12. Lineage-Specific Gene Duplication and Loss in Human and Great Ape Evolution

    PubMed Central

    MacLaren, Erik; Marshall, Kriste; Hahn, Gretchen; Meltesen, Lynne; Brenton, Matthew; Hink, Raquel; Burgers, Sonya; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Glueck, Deborah; McGavran, Loris; Berry, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Given that gene duplication is a major driving force of evolutionary change and the key mechanism underlying the emergence of new genes and biological processes, this study sought to use a novel genome-wide approach to identify genes that have undergone lineage-specific duplications or contractions among several hominoid lineages. Interspecies cDNA array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used to individually compare copy number variation for 39,711 cDNAs, representing 29,619 human genes, across five hominoid species, including human. We identified 1,005 genes, either as isolated genes or in clusters positionally biased toward rearrangement-prone genomic regions, that produced relative hybridization signals unique to one or more of the hominoid lineages. Measured as a function of the evolutionary age of each lineage, genes showing copy number expansions were most pronounced in human (134) and include a number of genes thought to be involved in the structure and function of the brain. This work represents, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide gene-based survey of gene duplication across hominoid species. The genes identified here likely represent a significant majority of the major gene copy number changes that have occurred over the past 15 million years of human and great ape evolution and are likely to underlie some of the key phenotypic characteristics that distinguish these species. PMID:15252450

  13. Evolutionary impact of transposable elements on genomic diversity and lineage-specific innovation in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ian A; Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Levin, Perrine; Berger, Chloé Suzanne; Galiana, Delphine; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery, a growing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that transposable elements are important drivers of species diversity. These mobile elements exhibit a great variety in structure, size and mechanisms of transposition, making them important putative actors in organism evolution. The vertebrates represent a highly diverse and successful lineage that has adapted to a wide range of different environments. These animals also possess a rich repertoire of transposable elements, with highly diverse content between lineages and even between species. Here, we review how transposable elements are driving genomic diversity and lineage-specific innovation within vertebrates. We discuss the large differences in TE content between different vertebrate groups and then go on to look at how they affect organisms at a variety of levels: from the structure of chromosomes to their involvement in the regulation of gene expression, as well as in the formation and evolution of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes. In the process of doing this, we highlight how transposable elements have been involved in the evolution of some of the key innovations observed within the vertebrate lineage, driving the group's diversity and success.

  14. Lineage specification of Flk-1+ progenitors is associated with divergent Sox7 expression in cardiopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Timothy J; Chiriac, Anca; Faustino, Randolph S; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Embryonic stem cell differentiation recapitulates the diverse phenotypes of a developing embryo, traceable according to markers of lineage specification. At gastrulation, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, Flk-1 (KDR), identifies a mesoderm-restricted potential of embryonic stem cells. The multi-lineage propensity of Flk-1+ progenitors mandates the mapping of fate-modifying co-factors in order to stratify differentiating cytotypes and predict lineage competency. Here, Flk-1 based selection of early embryonic stem cell progeny separated a population depleted of pluripotent (Oct4, Sox2) and endoderm (Sox17) markers. The gene expression profile of the Flk-1+ population was notable for a significant upregulation in the vasculogenic Sox7 transcription factor, which overlapped with the emergence of primordial cardiac transcription factors GATA-4, Myocardin and Nkx2.5. Sorting the parental Flk-1+ pool with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 to enrich the cardiopoietic subpopulation uncovered divergent Sox7 expression, with a 7-fold induction in non-cardiac compared to cardiac progenitors. Bioinformatic resolution sequestered a framework gene expression relationships between Sox transcription factor family members and the Flk-1/CXCR4 axes with significant integration of β-catenin signaling. Thus, differential Sox7 gene expression presents a novel biomarker profile, and possible regulatory switch, to distinguish cardiovascular pedigrees within Flk-1+ multi-lineage progenitors. PMID:19272523

  15. Lineage-specific variation in slow- and fast-X evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Oh, Sohee; Park, Taesung; Presgraves, Daven C; Yi, Soojin V

    2012-06-01

    Theories predict that the evolutionary rates of X-linked regions can differ from those of autosomal regions. The male-biased mutation theory predicts a slower rate of neutral substitution on the X chromosome (slow-X evolution), as the X spends less time in male germlines, where more mutations originate per generation than in female germlines. The fast-X theory, however, predicts a faster rate of adaptive substitution on the X chromosome when newly arising beneficial mutations are, on average, partially recessive (fast-X evolution), as the X enjoys a greater efficacy of positive selection. The slow- and fast-X processes are expected to interact as the degree of male-biased mutation can in turn influence the relative rate of adaptive evolution on the X. Here, we investigate lineage-specific variation in, and the interaction of, slow- and fast-X processes using genomic data from four primates. We find consistent evidence for slow-X evolution in all lineages. In contrast, evidence for fast-X evolution exists in only a subset of lineages. In particular, the marmoset lineage, which shows the strongest evidence of fast-X, exhibits the lowest male mutation bias. We discuss the possible interaction between slow- and fast-X evolution and other factors that influence the degrees of slow- and fast-X evolution. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution © 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Formation and specification of a Drosophila dopaminergic precursor cell.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joseph D; Crews, Stephen T

    2012-09-01

    Dopaminergic neurons play important roles in animal behavior, including motivation, reward and locomotion. The Drosophila dopaminergic H-cell interneuron is an attractive system for studying the genetics of neural development because analysis is focused on a single neuronal cell type. Here we provide a mechanistic understanding of how MP3, the precursor to the H-cell, forms and acquires its identity. We show that the gooseberry/gooseberry-neuro (gsb/gsb-n) transcription factor genes act to specify MP3 cell fate. It is proposed that single-minded commits neuroectodermal cells to a midline fate, followed by a series of signaling events that result in the formation of a single gsb(+)/gsb-n(+) MP3 cell per segment. The wingless signaling pathway establishes a midline anterior domain by activating expression of the forkhead transcription factors sloppy paired 1 and sloppy paired 2. This is followed by hedgehog signaling that activates gsb/gsb-n expression in a subgroup of anterior cells. Finally, Notch signaling results in the selection of a single MP3, with the remaining cells becoming midline glia. In MP3, gsb/gsb-n direct H-cell development, in large part by activating expression of the lethal of scute and tailup H-cell regulatory genes. Thus, a series of signaling and transcriptional events result in the specification of a unique dopaminergic precursor cell. Additional genetic experiments indicate that the molecular mechanisms that govern MP3/H-cell development might also direct the development of non-midline dopaminergic neurons.

  17. Formation and specification of a Drosophila dopaminergic precursor cell

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joseph D.; Crews, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons play important roles in animal behavior, including motivation, reward and locomotion. The Drosophila dopaminergic H-cell interneuron is an attractive system for studying the genetics of neural development because analysis is focused on a single neuronal cell type. Here we provide a mechanistic understanding of how MP3, the precursor to the H-cell, forms and acquires its identity. We show that the gooseberry/gooseberry-neuro (gsb/gsb-n) transcription factor genes act to specify MP3 cell fate. It is proposed that single-minded commits neuroectodermal cells to a midline fate, followed by a series of signaling events that result in the formation of a single gsb+/gsb-n+ MP3 cell per segment. The wingless signaling pathway establishes a midline anterior domain by activating expression of the forkhead transcription factors sloppy paired 1 and sloppy paired 2. This is followed by hedgehog signaling that activates gsb/gsb-n expression in a subgroup of anterior cells. Finally, Notch signaling results in the selection of a single MP3, with the remaining cells becoming midline glia. In MP3, gsb/gsb-n direct H-cell development, in large part by activating expression of the lethal of scute and tailup H-cell regulatory genes. Thus, a series of signaling and transcriptional events result in the specification of a unique dopaminergic precursor cell. Additional genetic experiments indicate that the molecular mechanisms that govern MP3/H-cell development might also direct the development of non-midline dopaminergic neurons. PMID:22874915

  18. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  19. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  20. Lineage-specific expansion of DNA-binding transcription factor families

    PubMed Central

    Charoensawan, Varodom; Wilson, Derek; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-binding domains (DBDs) are essential components of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). We have investigated the distribution of all known DBDs in more than 500 completely sequenced genomes from the three major superkingdoms (Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota) and documented conserved and specific DBD occurrence in diverse taxonomic lineages. By combining DBD occurrence in different species with taxonomic information, we have developed an automatic method for inferring the origins of DBD families and their specific combinations with other protein families in TFs. We found only three out of 131 (2%) DBD families shared by the three superkingdoms. PMID:20675012

  1. GLADX: An Automated Approach to Analyze the Lineage-Specific Loss and Pseudogenization of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dainat, Jacques; Paganini, Julien; Pontarotti, Pierre; Gouret, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    A well-established ancestral gene can usually be found, in one or multiple copies, in different descendant species. Sometimes during the course of evolution, all the representatives of a well-established ancestral gene disappear in specific lineages; such gene losses may occur in the genome by deletion of a DNA fragment or by pseudogenization. The loss of an entire gene family in a given lineage may reflect an important phenomenon, and could be due either to adaptation, or to a relaxation of selection that leads to neutral evolution. Therefore, the lineage-specific gene loss analyses are important to improve the understanding of the evolutionary history of genes and genomes. In order to perform this kind of study from the increasing number of complete genome sequences available, we developed a unique new software module called GLADX in the DAGOBAH framework, based on a comparative genomic approach. The software is able to automatically detect, for all the species of a phylum, the presence/absence of a representative of a well-established ancestral gene, and by systematic steps of re-annotation, confirm losses, detect and analyze pseudogenes and find novel genes. The approach is based on the use of highly reliable gene phylogenies, of protein predictions and on the analysis of genomic mutations. All the evidence associated to evolutionary approach provides accurate information for building an overall view of the evolution of a given gene in a selected phylum. The reliability of GLADX has been successfully tested on a benchmark analysis of 14 reported cases. It is the first tool that is able to fully automatically study the lineage-specific losses and pseudogenizations. GLADX is available at http://ioda.univ-provence.fr/IodaSite/gladx/. PMID:22723889

  2. Pharmacogenomic identification of small molecules for lineage specific manipulation of subventricular zone germinal activity

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Guillaume; Pieropan, Francesca; Rivera, Andrea; Donega, Vanessa; Cantù, Claudio; Williams, Gareth; Berninger, Benedikt; Butt, Arthur M.; Raineteau, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Strategies for promoting neural regeneration are hindered by the difficulty of manipulating desired neural fates in the brain without complex genetic methods. The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest germinal zone of the forebrain and is responsible for the lifelong generation of interneuron subtypes and oligodendrocytes. Here, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome of dorsal and lateral SVZ in early postnatal mice, including neural stem cells (NSCs) and their immediate progenies, which generate distinct neural lineages. We identified multiple signaling pathways that trigger distinct downstream transcriptional networks to regulate the diversity of neural cells originating from the SVZ. Next, we used a novel in silico genomic analysis, searchable platform-independent expression database/connectivity map (SPIED/CMAP), to generate a catalogue of small molecules that can be used to manipulate SVZ microdomain-specific lineages. Finally, we demonstrate that compounds identified in this analysis promote the generation of specific cell lineages from NSCs in vivo, during postnatal life and adulthood, as well as in regenerative contexts. This study unravels new strategies for using small bioactive molecules to direct germinal activity in the SVZ, which has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28350803

  3. Lineage-specific gene radiations underlie the evolution of novel betalain pigmentation in Caryophyllales

    PubMed Central

    Brockington, Samuel F; Yang, Ya; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane K S; Moore, Michael J; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Betalain pigments are unique to the Caryophyllales and structurally and biosynthetically distinct from anthocyanins. Two key enzymes within the betalain synthesis pathway have been identified: 4,5-dioxygenase (DODA) that catalyzes the formation of betalamic acid and CYP76AD1, a cytochrome P450 gene that catalyzes the formation of cyclo-DOPA. We performed phylogenetic analyses to reveal the evolutionary history of the DODA and CYP76AD1 lineages and in the context of an ancestral reconstruction of pigment states we explored the evolution of these genes in relation to the complex evolution of pigments in Caryophylalles. Duplications within the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages arose just before the origin of betalain pigmentation in the core Caryophyllales. The duplications gave rise to DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α isoforms that appear specific to betalain synthesis. Both betalain-specific isoforms were then lost or downregulated in the anthocyanic Molluginaceae and Caryophyllaceae. Our findings suggest a single origin of the betalain synthesis pathway, with neofunctionalization following gene duplications in the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages. Loss of DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α in anthocyanic taxa suggests that betalain pigmentation has been lost twice in Caryophyllales, and exclusion of betalain pigments from anthocyanic taxa is mediated through gene loss or downregulation. [Correction added after online publication 13 May 2015: in the last two paragraphs of the Summary the gene name CYP761A was changed to CYP76AD1.] PMID:25966996

  4. Lineage-specific gene radiations underlie the evolution of novel betalain pigmentation in Caryophyllales.

    PubMed

    Brockington, Samuel F; Yang, Ya; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane K S; Moore, Michael J; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-09-01

    Betalain pigments are unique to the Caryophyllales and structurally and biosynthetically distinct from anthocyanins. Two key enzymes within the betalain synthesis pathway have been identified: 4,5-dioxygenase (DODA) that catalyzes the formation of betalamic acid and CYP76AD1, a cytochrome P450 gene that catalyzes the formation of cyclo-DOPA. We performed phylogenetic analyses to reveal the evolutionary history of the DODA and CYP76AD1 lineages and in the context of an ancestral reconstruction of pigment states we explored the evolution of these genes in relation to the complex evolution of pigments in Caryophylalles. Duplications within the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages arose just before the origin of betalain pigmentation in the core Caryophyllales. The duplications gave rise to DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α isoforms that appear specific to betalain synthesis. Both betalain-specific isoforms were then lost or downregulated in the anthocyanic Molluginaceae and Caryophyllaceae. Our findings suggest a single origin of the betalain synthesis pathway, with neofunctionalization following gene duplications in the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages. Loss of DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α in anthocyanic taxa suggests that betalain pigmentation has been lost twice in Caryophyllales, and exclusion of betalain pigments from anthocyanic taxa is mediated through gene loss or downregulation. [Correction added after online publication 13 May 2015: in the last two paragraphs of the Summary the gene name CYP761A was changed to CYP76AD1.].

  5. Dnmt1 regulates the myogenic lineage specification of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renjing; Kim, Kun-Yong; Jung, Yong-Wook; Park, In-Hyun

    2016-10-18

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark that regulates gene expression. Dnmt1 plays an important role in maintaining DNA methylation patterns on daughter DNA strands. Studies have shed light into the functional role of Dnmt1 regulation in the hematopoietic and epidermal systems. Here we show that Dnmt1 is required for myogenesis. Loss of Dnmt1 results in reduced expression of myogenic genes and defects in myogenic differentiation. We have utilized a conditional knockout mouse approach to examine the functional consequences of Dnmt1 depletion specifically in the developing muscle. These mice were born runted, with smaller body weights, and reduced ability to form myotubes in vitro. We show that expression of Id-1, a negative regulator of myogenesis, is enhanced in Dnmt1-deficient cultures, leading to enhanced transdifferentiation of myoblasts toward the osteogenic lineage. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Dnmt1 influences cellular identity and determines lineage fidelity.

  6. Chromatin Dynamics Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage Specification and Differentiation to Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai; Gordon, Jonathan A.R.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Tai, Phillip W.L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are critical for regeneration of multiple tissues. Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental regulators of lineage specification and cell fate, and as such, we addressed the question of which epigenetic modifications characterize the transition of nascent MSCs to a tissue specific MSC-derived phenotype. By profiling the temporal changes of seven histone marks correlated to gene expression during proliferation, early commitment, matrix deposition, and mineralization stages, we identified distinct epigenetic mechanisms that regulate transcriptional programs necessary for tissue-specific phenotype development. Patterns of stage-specific enrichment of histone modifications revealed distinct modes of repression and activation of gene expression that would not be detected using single endpoint analysis. We discovered that at commitment, H3K27me3 is removed from genes that are upregulated and is not acquired on downregulated genes. Additionally, we found that the absence of H3K4me3 modification at promoters defined a subset of osteoblast-specific upregulated genes, indicating acquisition of acetyl modifications drive activation of these genes. Significantly, loss or gain of H3K36me3 was the primary predictor of dynamic changes in temporal gene expression. Using unsupervised pattern discovery analysis the signature of osteogenic-related histone modifications identified novel functional cis regulatory modules associated with enhancer regions that control tissue-specific genes. Our work provides a cornerstone to understand the epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs that are important for MSC lineage commitment and lineage, as well as insights to facilitate MSC-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:28077316

  7. Modeling pathogenesis of primary liver cancer in lineage-specific mouse cell types.

    PubMed

    Holczbauer, Agnes; Factor, Valentina M; Andersen, Jesper B; Marquardt, Jens U; Kleiner, David E; Raggi, Chiara; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Seo, Daekwan; Akita, Hirofumi; Durkin, Marian E; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2013-07-01

    Human primary liver cancer is classified into biologically distinct subgroups based on cellular origin. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently described. We investigated the ability of distinct lineages of hepatic cells to become liver CSCs and the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of primary liver cancer. We transduced mouse primary hepatic progenitor cells, lineage-committed hepatoblasts, and differentiated adult hepatocytes with transgenes encoding oncogenic H-Ras and SV40LT. The CSC properties of transduced cells and their ability to form tumors were tested by standard in vitro and in vivo assays and transcriptome profiling. Irrespective of origin, all transduced cells acquired markers of CSC/progenitor cells, side populations, and self-renewal capacity in vitro. They also formed a broad spectrum of liver tumors, ranging from cholangiocarcinoma to hepatocellular carcinoma, which resembled human liver tumors, based on genomic and histologic analyses. The tumor cells coexpressed hepatocyte (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α), progenitor/biliary (keratin 19, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, A6), and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers and showed dysregulation of genes that control the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Gene expression analyses could distinguish tumors of different cellular origin, indicating the contribution of lineage stage-dependent genetic changes to malignant transformation. Activation of c-Myc and its target genes was required to reprogram adult hepatocytes into CSCs and for tumors to develop. Stable knockdown of c-Myc in transformed adult hepatocytes reduced their CSC properties in vitro and suppressed growth of tumors in immunodeficient mice. Any cell type in the mouse hepatic lineage can undergo oncogenic reprogramming into a CSC by activating different cell type-specific pathways. Identification of common and cell of origin-specific phenotypic and genetic changes could provide new therapeutic targets for liver cancer. Copyright

  8. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  9. Heixuedian (heix), a potential melanotic tumor suppressor gene, exhibits specific spatial and temporal expression pattern during Drosophila hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Midoun, Samira Zohra; Xu, Zhiliang; Hong, Ling

    2015-02-15

    The Drosophila heixuedian (heix) is the ortholog of human UBIAD1 gene (a.k.a TERE1). The protein product of UBIAD1/heix has multiple enzymatic activities, including the vitamin K2 and the non-mitochondrial CoQ10 biosynthesis. However, the expression pattern of UBIAD1/Heix during metazoan development has not been systematically studied. In this paper, we found that loss of function of heix resulted in pathological changes of larval hematopoietic system, including lymph gland hypertrophy, hemocyte overproliferation and aberrant differentiation, and melanin mass formation. Overexpression of heix cDNA under the tubulin Gal4 driver rescued the above hematopoietic defects. Interestingly, Heix was specifically expressed in plasmatocyte/macrophage lineage in srp driven EGFP positive cells on the head mesoderm during embryogenesis, while it was highly expressed in crystal cells in the primary lobes of the third instar larval lymph gland. Using qRT-PCR analysis, loss of function of heix caused aberrant activation of multiple hemocyte proliferation-related as well as immune-related pathways, including JAK/STAT pathway, Ras/MAPK pathway, IMD pathway and Toll pathway. These data suggested that heix is a potential melanotic tumor suppressor gene and plays a pivotal role in both hemocytes proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila.

  10. ATTED-II in 2016: A Plant Coexpression Database Towards Lineage-Specific Coexpression.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuichi; Okamura, Yasunobu; Tadaka, Shu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Obayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    ATTED-II (http://atted.jp) is a coexpression database for plant species with parallel views of multiple coexpression data sets and network analysis tools. The user can efficiently find functional gene relationships and design experiments to identify gene functions by reverse genetics and general molecular biology techniques. Here, we report updates to ATTED-II (version 8.0), including new and updated coexpression data and analysis tools. ATTED-II now includes eight microarray- and six RNA sequencing-based coexpression data sets for seven dicot species (Arabidopsis, field mustard, soybean, barrel medick, poplar, tomato and grape) and two monocot species (rice and maize). Stand-alone coexpression analyses tend to have low reliability. Therefore, examining evolutionarily conserved coexpression is a more effective approach from the viewpoints of reliability and evolutionary importance. In contrast, the reliability of species-specific coexpression data remains poor. Our assessment scores for individual coexpression data sets indicated that the quality of the new coexpression data sets in ATTED-II is higher than for any previous coexpression data set. In addition, five species (Arabidopsis, soybean, tomato, rice and maize) in ATTED-II are now supported by both microarray- and RNA sequencing-based coexpression data, which has increased the reliability. Consequently, ATTED-II can now provide lineage-specific coexpression information. As an example of the use of ATTED-II to explore lineage-specific coexpression, we demonstrate monocot- and dicot-specific coexpression of cell wall genes. With the expanded coexpression data for multilevel evaluation, ATTED-II provides new opportunities to investigate lineage-specific evolution in plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  11. Learning the specific quality of taste reinforcement in larval Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, Michael; Miura, Daisuke; Tanimura, Teiichi; Gerber, Bertram

    2015-01-27

    The only property of reinforcement insects are commonly thought to learn about is its value. We show that larval Drosophila not only remember the value of reinforcement (How much?), but also its quality (What?). This is demonstrated both within the appetitive domain by using sugar vs amino acid as different reward qualities, and within the aversive domain by using bitter vs high-concentration salt as different qualities of punishment. From the available literature, such nuanced memories for the quality of reinforcement are unexpected and pose a challenge to present models of how insect memory is organized. Given that animals as simple as larval Drosophila, endowed with but 10,000 neurons, operate with both reinforcement value and quality, we suggest that both are fundamental aspects of mnemonic processing-in any brain.

  12. Lineage-Specific and Non-specific Cytokine-Sensing Genes Respond Differentially to the Master Regulator STAT5.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianke; Willi, Michaela; Shin, Ha Youn; Hennighausen, Lothar; Wang, Chaochen

    2016-12-20

    STAT5, a member of the family of signal transducers and activators of transcription, senses cytokines and controls the biology of cell lineages, including mammary, liver, and T cells. Here, we show that STAT5 activates lineage-specific and widely expressed genes through different mechanisms. STAT5 preferentially binds to promoter sequences of cytokine-responsive genes expressed across cell types and to putative enhancers of lineage-specific genes. While chromatin accessibility of STAT5-based enhancers was dependent on cytokine exposure, STAT5-responsive promoters of widely expressed target genes were generally constitutively accessible. While the contribution of STAT5 to enhancers is well established, its role on promoters is poorly understood. To address this, we focused on Socs2, a widely expressed cytokine-sensing gene. Upon deletion of the STAT5 response elements from the Socs2 promoter in mice, cytokine induction was abrogated, while basal activity remained intact. Our data suggest that promoter-bound STAT5 modulates cytokine responses and enhancer-bound STAT5 is mandatory for gene activation.

  13. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Miller, Tyler E.; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.; Bredel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  14. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Huang, Beibei; Zou, Ming; Lu, Dandan; He, Shunping; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid growth of sequencing technology, a number of genomes and transcriptomes of various species have been sequenced, contributing to the study of lineage-specific genes (LSGs). We identified two sets of LSGs using BLAST: one included Caenorhabditis elegans species-specific genes (1423, SSGs), and the other consisted of Caenorhabditis genus-specific genes (4539, GSGs). The subsequent characterization and analysis of the SSGs and GSGs showed that they have significant differences in evolution and that most LSGs were generated by gene duplication and integration of transposable elements (TEs). We then performed temporal expression profiling and protein function prediction and observed that many SSGs and GSGs are expressed and that genes involved with sex determination, specific stress, immune response, and morphogenesis are over-represented, suggesting that these specific genes may be related to the Caenorhabditis nematodes' special ability to survive in severe and extreme environments.

  15. Characterisation of monotreme caseins reveals lineage-specific expansion of an ancestral casein locus in mammals.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Using a milk-cell cDNA sequencing approach we characterised milk-protein sequences from two monotreme species, platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and found a full set of caseins and casein variants. The genomic organisation of the platypus casein locus is compared with other mammalian genomes, including the marsupial opossum and several eutherians. Physical linkage of casein genes has been seen in the casein loci of all mammalian genomes examined and we confirm that this is also observed in platypus. However, we show that a recent duplication of beta-casein occurred in the monotreme lineage, as opposed to more ancient duplications of alpha-casein in the eutherian lineage, while marsupials possess only single copies of alpha- and beta-caseins. Despite this variability, the close proximity of the main alpha- and beta-casein genes in an inverted tail-tail orientation and the relative orientation of the more distant kappa-casein genes are similar in all mammalian genome sequences so far available. Overall, the conservation of the genomic organisation of the caseins indicates the early, pre-monotreme development of the fundamental role of caseins during lactation. In contrast, the lineage-specific gene duplications that have occurred within the casein locus of monotremes and eutherians but not marsupials, which may have lost part of the ancestral casein locus, emphasises the independent selection on milk provision strategies to the young, most likely linked to different developmental strategies. The monotremes therefore provide insight into the ancestral drivers for lactation and how these have adapted in different lineages.

  16. Lineage-specific regulation of epigenetic modifier genes in human liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Weng, Matthias K; Natarajan, Karthick; Scholz, Diana; Ivanova, Violeta N; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hengstler, Jan G; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Despite an abundance of studies on chromatin states and dynamics, there is an astonishing dearth of information on the expression of genes responsible for regulating histone and DNA modifications. We used here a set of 156 defined epigenetic modifier genes (EMG) and profiled their expression pattern in cells of different lineages. As reference value, expression data from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) were used. Hepatocyte-like cells were generated from hESC, and their EMG expression was compared to primary human liver cells. In parallel, we generated postmitotic human neurons (Lu d6), and compared their relative EMG expression to human cortex (Ctx). Clustering analysis of all cell types showed that neuronal lineage samples grouped together (94 similarly regulated EMG), as did liver cells (61 similarly-regulated), while the two lineages were clearly distinct. The general classification was followed by detailed comparison of the major EMG groups; genes that were higher expressed in differentiated cells than in hESC included the acetyltransferase KAT2B and the methyltransferase SETD7. Neuro-specific EMGs were the histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and the arginine-methyltransferase PRMT8. Comparison of young (Lu d6) and more aged (Ctx) neuronal samples suggested a maturation-dependent switch in the expression of functionally homologous proteins. For instance, the ratio of the histone H3 K27 methyltransfereases, EZH1 to EZH2, was high in Ctx and low in Lu d6. The same was observed for the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) subunits CBX7 and CBX8. A large proportion of EMGs in differentiated cells was very differently expressed than in hESC, and absolute levels were significantly higher in neuronal samples than in hepatic cells. Thus, there seem to be distinct qualitative and quantitative differences in EMG expression between cell lineages.

  17. C. elegans BED domain transcription factor BED-3 controls lineage-specific cell proliferation during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takao; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The control of cell division is critical to organogenesis, but how this control is achieved is not fully understood. We found that mutations in bed-3, encoding a BED Zn-finger domain transcription factor, confer a phenotype where a specific set of cell divisions during vulval organogenesis is lost. Unlike general cell cycle regulators in C. elegans, the function of bed-3 is restricted to specific lineages. Transcriptional reporters suggest that bed-3 is expressed in a limited number of cell types including vulval cells whose divisions are affected in bed-3 mutants. A bed-3 mutation also affects the expression pattern of the cdh-3 cadherin gene in the vulva. The phenotype of bed-3 mutants is similar to the phenotype caused by mutations in cog-1 (Nkx6), a component of a gene regulatory network controlling cell type specific gene expression in the vulval lineage. These results suggest that bed-3 is a key component linking the gene regulatory network controlling cell-type specification to control of cell division during vulval organogenesis. PMID:20005870

  18. The Lineage-Specific Transcription Factor PU.1 Prevents Polycomb-Mediated Heterochromatin Formation at Macrophage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tagore, Mohita; McAndrew, Michael J.; Gjidoda, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important determinants of cellular identity, but their exact mode of action has remained unclear. Here we show using a macrophage differentiation system that the lineage-specific TF PU.1 keeps macrophage-specific genes accessible during differentiation by preventing Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding to transcriptional regulatory elements. We demonstrate that the distal enhancer of a gene becomes bound by PRC2 as cells differentiate in the absence of PU.1 binding and that the gene is wrapped into heterochromatin, which is characterized by increased nucleosome occupancy and H3K27 trimethylation. This renders the gene inaccessible to the transcriptional machinery and prevents induction of the gene in response to an external signal in mature cells. In contrast, if PU.1 is bound at the transcriptional regulatory region of a gene during differentiation, PRC2 is not recruited, nucleosome occupancy is kept low, and the gene can be induced in mature macrophages. Similar results were obtained at the enhancers of other macrophage-specific genes that fail to bind PU.1 as an estrogen receptor fusion (PUER) in this system. These results show that one role of PU.1 is to exclude PRC2 and to prevent heterochromatin formation at macrophage-specific genes. PMID:26012552

  19. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage. PMID:27994606

  20. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening.

    PubMed

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage.

  1. Modifiers of muscle and heart cell fate specification identified by gain-of-function screen in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Yannick; Jagla, Teresa; Da Ponte, Jean-Philippe; Dastugue, Bernard; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2003-09-01

    The homeobox genes ladybird in Drosophila and their vertebrate counterparts Lbx1 genes display restricted expression patterns in a subset of muscle precursors and are both implicated in diversification of muscle cell fates. In order to gain new insights into mechanisms controlling conserved aspects of cell fate specification, we have performed a gain-of-function (GOF) screen for modifiers of the mesodermal expression of ladybird genes using a collection of EP element carrying Drosophila lines. Amongst the identified genes, several have been previously implicated in cell fate specification processes, thus validating the strategy of our screen. Observed GOF phenotypes have led us to identification of an important number of candidate genes, whose myogenic and/or cardiogenic functions remain to be investigated. Amongst them, the EP insertions close to rhomboid, yan and rac2 suggest new roles for these genes in diversification of muscle and/or heart cell lineages. The analysis of loss and GOF of rhomboid and yan reveals their new roles in specification of ladybird-expressing precursors of adult muscles (LaPs) and ladybird/tinman-positive pericardial cells. Observed phenotypes strongly suggest that rhomboid and yan act at the level of progenitor and founder cells and contribute to the diversification of mesodermal fates. Our analysis of rac2 phenotypes clearly demonstrates that the altered mesodermal level of Rho-GTPase Rac2 can influence specification of a number of cardiac and muscular cell types including those expressing ladybird. Finding that in rac2 mutants ladybird and even skipped-positive muscle founders are overproduced, indicate a new early function for this gene during segregation of muscle progenitors and/or specification of founder cells. Intriguingly, rhomboid, yan and rac2 act as conserved components of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) signalling pathways, suggesting that RTK signalling constitutes a part of a conserved regulatory network governing

  2. Specification of motoneuron fate in Drosophila: integration of positive and negative transcription factor inputs by a minimal eve enhancer.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jocelyn A; Fujioka, Miki; Odden, Joanne P; Jaynes, James B; Doe, Chris Q

    2003-11-01

    We are interested in the mechanisms that generate neuronal diversity within the Drosophila central nervous system (CNS), and in particular in the development of a single identified motoneuron called RP2. Expression of the homeodomain transcription factor Even-skipped (Eve) is required for RP2 to establish proper connectivity with its muscle target. Here we investigate the mechanisms by which eve is specifically expressed within the RP2 motoneuron lineage. Within the NB4-2 lineage, expression of eve first occurs in the precursor of RP2, called GMC4-2a. We identify a small 500 base pair eve enhancer that mediates eve expression in GMC4-2a. We show that four different transcription factors (Prospero, Huckebein, Fushi tarazu, and Pdm1) are all expressed in GMC4-2a, and are required to activate eve via this minimal enhancer, and that one transcription factor (Klumpfuss) represses eve expression via this element. All four positively acting transcription factors act independently, regulating eve but not each other. Thus, the eve enhancer integrates multiple positive and negative transcription factor inputs to restrict eve expression to a single precursor cell (GMC4-2a) and its RP2 motoneuron progeny. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Lineage-Specific Changes in Biomarkers in Great Apes and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ronke, Claudius; Dannemann, Michael; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Brügel, Mathias; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Scholz, Markus; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Pääbo, Svante; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Although human biomedical and physiological information is readily available, such information for great apes is limited. We analyzed clinical chemical biomarkers in serum samples from 277 wild- and captive-born great apes and from 312 healthy human volunteers as well as from 20 rhesus macaques. For each individual, we determined a maximum of 33 markers of heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and pancreas function, hemoglobin and lipid metabolism and one marker of inflammation. We identified biomarkers that show differences between humans and the great apes in their average level or activity. Using the rhesus macaques as an outgroup, we identified human-specific differences in the levels of bilirubin, cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase, and bonobo-specific differences in the level of apolipoprotein A-I. For the remaining twenty-nine biomarkers there was no evidence for lineage-specific differences. In fact, we find that many biomarkers show differences between individuals of the same species in different environments. Of the four lineage-specific biomarkers, only bilirubin showed no differences between wild- and captive-born great apes. We show that the major factor explaining the human-specific difference in bilirubin levels may be genetic. There are human-specific changes in the sequence of the promoter and the protein-coding sequence of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1A1), the enzyme that transforms bilirubin and toxic plant compounds into water-soluble, excretable metabolites. Experimental evidence that UGT1A1 is down-regulated in the human liver suggests that changes in the promoter may be responsible for the human-specific increase in bilirubin. We speculate that since cooking reduces toxic plant compounds, consumption of cooked foods, which is specific to humans, may have resulted in relaxed constraint on UGT1A1 which has in turn led to higher serum levels of bilirubin in humans. PMID:26247603

  4. Lineage-Specific Changes in Biomarkers in Great Apes and Humans.

    PubMed

    Ronke, Claudius; Dannemann, Michael; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Brügel, Mathias; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Scholz, Markus; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Pääbo, Svante; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Although human biomedical and physiological information is readily available, such information for great apes is limited. We analyzed clinical chemical biomarkers in serum samples from 277 wild- and captive-born great apes and from 312 healthy human volunteers as well as from 20 rhesus macaques. For each individual, we determined a maximum of 33 markers of heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and pancreas function, hemoglobin and lipid metabolism and one marker of inflammation. We identified biomarkers that show differences between humans and the great apes in their average level or activity. Using the rhesus macaques as an outgroup, we identified human-specific differences in the levels of bilirubin, cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase, and bonobo-specific differences in the level of apolipoprotein A-I. For the remaining twenty-nine biomarkers there was no evidence for lineage-specific differences. In fact, we find that many biomarkers show differences between individuals of the same species in different environments. Of the four lineage-specific biomarkers, only bilirubin showed no differences between wild- and captive-born great apes. We show that the major factor explaining the human-specific difference in bilirubin levels may be genetic. There are human-specific changes in the sequence of the promoter and the protein-coding sequence of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1A1), the enzyme that transforms bilirubin and toxic plant compounds into water-soluble, excretable metabolites. Experimental evidence that UGT1A1 is down-regulated in the human liver suggests that changes in the promoter may be responsible for the human-specific increase in bilirubin. We speculate that since cooking reduces toxic plant compounds, consumption of cooked foods, which is specific to humans, may have resulted in relaxed constraint on UGT1A1 which has in turn led to higher serum levels of bilirubin in humans.

  5. Functional analysis of an eye specific enhancer of the eyeless gene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Bernd; Gehring, Walter J.; Walldorf, Uwe

    1999-01-01

    The development of the Drosophila compound eye requires the function of a set of evolutionarily conserved genes. Among these, the Drosophila Pax-6 gene eyeless (ey) plays a major role. ey has been considered a master control gene of eye development in the animal kingdom because targeted expression of ey and vertebrate as well as invertebrate homologs lead to the formation of ectopic eyes in Drosophila. We demonstrate that an intron of the ey gene contains an enhancer that regulates the eye specific expression of the gene in the eye disc primordia of embryos and in the eye imaginal discs of third instar larvae. Moreover, a 212-bp enhancer element is necessary and sufficient for the enhancer function. It is partially conserved in Drosophila hydei and contains putative Pax-6 Paired domain binding sites. We show that several binding sites are required for the eye specific expression, and, therefore, we propose a Pax-6-like molecule to be a positive transactivator for the eye specific ey expression. This transactivator recently has been identified as twin of eyeless, the second Pax-6 gene in Drosophila. PMID:9892673

  6. Domain-specific functions of Stardust in Drosophila embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Leonie; Feicht, Sabine; Sun, Rui; Sen, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, the adaptor protein Stardust is essential for the stabilization of the polarity determinant Crumbs in various epithelial tissues, including the embryonic epidermis, the follicular epithelium and photoreceptor cells of the compound eye. In turn, Stardust recruits another adaptor protein, PATJ, to the subapical region to support adherens junction formation and morphogenetic events. Moreover, Stardust binds to Lin-7, which is dispensable in epithelial cells but functions in postsynaptic vesicle fusion. Finally, Stardust has been reported to bind directly to PAR-6, thereby linking the Crumbs–Stardust–PATJ complex to the PAR-6/aPKC complex. PAR-6 and aPKC are also capable of directly binding Bazooka (the Drosophila homologue of PAR-3) to form the PAR/aPKC complex, which is essential for apical–basal polarity and cell–cell contact formation in most epithelia. However, little is known about the physiological relevance of these interactions in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila in vivo. Thus, we performed a structure–function analysis of the annotated domains with GFP-tagged Stardust and evaluated the localization and function of the mutant proteins in epithelial cells of the embryonic epidermis. The data presented here confirm a crucial role of the PDZ domain in binding Crumbs and recruiting the protein to the subapical region. However, the isolated PDZ domain is not capable of being recruited to the cortex, and the SH3 domain is essential to support the binding to Crumbs. Notably, the conserved N-terminal regions (ECR1 and ECR2) are not crucial for epithelial polarity. Finally, the GUK domain plays an important role for the protein's function, which is not directly linked to Crumbs stabilization, and the L27N domain is essential for epithelial polarization independently of recruiting PATJ. PMID:28018665

  7. A single lineage of r2 retrotransposable elements is an active, evolutionarily stable component of the Drosophila rDNA locus.

    PubMed

    Lathe, W C; Eickbush, T H

    1997-12-01

    R2 elements are non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons that insert specifically in the 28S rRNA genes of many insects. Previous reports concerning this element in the genus Drosophila have suggested that R2 elements are absent from many species of this genus, particularly those species from the subgenus Drosophila. In this report, we present an extensive study of the distribution and evolution of R2 elements in Drosophila. A PCR survey of 59 species from 23 species groups of the two major Drosophila subgenera found that R2 elements are present in all but two species of the melanogaster species subgroup. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial nucleotide sequences of R2 elements from 23 species demonstrates that the relationships of R2 elements are congruent with those of the Drosophila species phylogeny, suggesting that these elements have been vertically inherited since the divergence of this genus some 60 MYA. Sequence variation between different copies of R2 elements within each species was less than 0.16%, indicating that these elements are undergoing concerted evolution similar to that of the 28S genes. Several properties of the R2 sequences suggest that these elements depend on retrotransposition in addition to simple recombination to remain within the rDNA locus: the rates of synonymous substitutions averaged 4.8 times the rate of replacement substitutions, 82 of 83 R2 copies partially sequenced contained intact open reading frames, and, finally, length variation associated with the poly(A) 3' tails indicated that many R2 copies are the direct result of retrotransposition.

  8. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Soucie, Erinn L.; Weng, Ziming; Geirsdóttir, Laufey; Molawi, Kaaweh; Maurizio, Julien; Fenouil, Romain; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Gimenez, Gregory; VanHille, Laurent; Beniazza, Meryam; Favret, Jeremy; Berruyer, Carole; Perrin, Pierre; Hacohen, Nir; Andrau, J.-C.; Ferrier, Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sidow, Arend; Sieweke, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long-term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network controlling self-renewal. Single cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down-regulation of Maf transcription factors. The network also controls embryonic stem cell self-renewal but is associated with distinct embryonic stem cell-specific enhancers. This indicates that distinct lineage-specific enhancer platforms regulate a shared network of genes that control self-renewal potential in both stem and mature cells. PMID:26797145

  9. An LTR Retrotransposon-Derived Gene Displays Lineage-Specific Structural and Putative Species-Specific Functional Variations in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Koga, Akihiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the 11 eutherian-specific genes acquired from a sushi-ichi retrotransposon is the CCHC type zinc-finger protein-encoding gene SIRH11/ZCCHC16. Its contribution to eutherian brain evolution is implied because of its involvement in cognitive function in mice, possibly via the noradrenergic system. Although, the possibility that Sirh11/Zcchc16 functions as a non-coding RNA still remains, dN/dS ratios in pairwise comparisons between its orthologs have provided supportive evidence that it acts as a protein. It became a pseudogene in armadillos (Cingulata) and sloths (Pilosa), the only two extant orders of xenarthra, which prompted us to examine the lineage-specific variations of SIRH11/ZCCHC16 in eutherians. We examined the predicted SIRH11/ZCCHC16 open reading frame (ORF) in 95 eutherian species based on the genomic DNA information in GenBank. A large variation in the SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORF was detected in several lineages. These include a lack of a CCHC RNA-binding domain in its C-terminus, observed in gibbons (Hylobatidae: Primates) and megabats (Megachiroptera: Chiroptera). A lack of the N-terminal half, on the other hand, was observed in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini: Primates) and species belonging to New World and African Hystricognaths (Caviomorpha and Bathyergidae: Rodents) along with Cetacea and Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla). Among the hominoids, interestingly, three out of four genera of gibbons have lost normal SIRH11/ZCCHC16 function by deletion or the lack of the CCHC RNA-binding domain. Our extensive dN/dS analysis suggests that such truncated SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORFs are functionally diversified even within lineages. Combined, our results show that SIRH11/ZCCHC16 may contribute to the diversification of eutherians by lineage-specific structural changes after its domestication in the common eutherian ancestor, followed by putative species-specific functional changes that enhanced fitness and occurred as a consequence of complex natural selection events

  10. Cell surface control of the layer specific targeting in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Hakeda-Suzuki, Satoko; Suzuki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the precise wiring of axons in the brain required to form a fine architecture, a molecular level interaction between axons and their targets is necessary. The Drosophila visual system has a layered and columnar structure which is often found in the brain of vertebrates. With powerful genetic tools for its analysis, the Drosophila visual system provides a useful framework to examine the molecular mechanisms of axon targeting specificity. The medulla is the second optic ganglion in the Drosophila optic lobe, and is subdivided into ten layers. Among the eight photoreceptor types, R7 and R8 pass through the first optic ganglion lamina and innervate the medulla. In the medulla, R7 and R8 axons grow in a distinct manner to reach their final target layers: M6 and M3, respectively. The axons from R7 and R8 take characteristic steps to extend toward their target layer. In this review, we discuss the formation of the Drosophila optic lobe and the molecular mechanisms of layer specific targeting of R8 axons in the medulla. Fundamental and comprehensive understanding of the crosstalk of growing axons and target regions in the Drosophila optic lobe will elucidate the general principles applicable to more complex nervous systems.

  11. Use of pan-genome analysis for the identification of lineage-specific genes of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2017-01-01

    The human bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a highly variable genome, with significant allelic and sequence diversity between isolates and even within well-characterised strains, hampering comparative genomics of H. pylori In this study, pan-genome analysis has been used to identify lineage-specific genes of H. pylori A total of 346 H. pylori genomes spanning the hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, hpAsia2, hpEurope, hspAmerind and hspEAsia multilocus sequence typing (MLST) lineages were searched for genes specifically overrepresented or underrepresented in MLST lineages or associated with the cag pathogenicity island. The only genes overrepresented in cag-positive genomes were the cag pathogenicity island genes themselves. In contrast, a total of 125 genes were either overrepresented or underrepresented in one or more MLST lineages. Of these 125 genes, alcohol/aldehyde-reducing enzymes linked with acid resistance and production of toxic aldehydes were found to be overrepresented in African lineages. Conversely, the FecA2 ferric citrate receptor was missing from hspAmerind genomes, but present in all other lineages. This work shows the applicability of pan-genome analysis for identification of lineage-specific genes of H. pylori, facilitating further investigation to allow linkage of differential distribution of genes with disease outcome or virulence of H. pylori. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Genotyping of Salmonella with lineage-specific genes: correlation with serotyping.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qing-Hua; Li, Ren-Qing; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-08-01

    The bacterial genus Salmonella encompasses a large number of serotypes that are genetically very similar but biologically quite different, especially in pathogenic properties and host specificity. Serotyping has been used for the classification, identification, and epidemiological investigation due to its excellent discriminating power, but it cannot distinguish the different pathogenic lineages within a polyphyletic serotype. Additionally, very few institutions have the comprehensive set of antisera for typing. Therefore various studies have been performed to explore alternative assays to differentiate Salmonella isolates, such as the search for genes that can be used as potential molecular substitutes for serotyping. However, the genes tested so far have often given inconsistent results. In this study, the discriminating power of seven genes to differentiate 309 Salmonella strains representing 26 serotypes was evaluated and the results were compared with those of other methods. The seven newly selected genes have a good power to differentiate different serovars. The tree based on the concatenated sequences of these genes revealed phylogenetic relationships of the bacteria consistent with that of the whole genome tree. Individual Salmonella lineages each have specific genes that can be used to differentiate Salmonella isolates on a phylogenetic basis. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Lineage-specific regulation of imprinted X inactivation in extraembryonic endoderm stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Silencing of the paternal X chromosome (Xp), a phenomenon known as imprinted X-chromosome inactivation (I-XCI), characterises, amongst mouse extraembryonic lineages, the primitive endoderm and the extraembryonic endoderm (XEN) stem cells derived from it. Results Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation characterisation of histone modifications and single-cell expression studies, we show that whilst the Xp in XEN cells, like the inactive X chromosome in other cell types, globally accumulates the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, a large number of Xp genes locally lack H3K27me3 and escape from I-XCI. In most cases this escape is specific to the XEN cell lineage. Importantly, the degree of escape and the genes concerned remain unchanged upon XEN conversion into visceral endoderm, suggesting stringent control of I-XCI in XEN derivatives. Surprisingly, chemical inhibition of EZH2, a member of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and subsequent loss of H3K27me3 on the Xp, do not drastically perturb the pattern of silencing of Xp genes in XEN cells. Conclusions The observations that we report here suggest that the maintenance of gene expression profiles of the inactive Xp in XEN cells involves a tissue-specific mechanism that acts partly independently of PRC2 catalytic activity. PMID:25053977

  14. FOXA1 potentiates lineage-specific enhancer activation through modulating TET1 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeqing A.; Zhao, Jonathan C.; Fong, Ka-wing; Kim, Jung; Li, Shangze; Song, Chunxiao; Song, Bing; Zheng, Bin; He, Chuan; Yu, Jindan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) is an FKHD family protein that plays pioneering roles in lineage-specific enhancer activation and gene transcription. Through genome-wide location analyses, here we show that FOXA1 expression and occupancy are, in turn, required for the maintenance of these epigenetic signatures, namely DNA hypomethylation and histone 3 lysine 4 methylation. Mechanistically, this involves TET1, a 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. We found that FOXA1 induces TET1 expression via direct binding to its cis-regulatory elements. Further, FOXA1 physically interacts with the TET1 protein through its CXXC domain. TET1 thus co-occupies FOXA1-dependent enhancers and mediates local DNA demethylation and concomitant histone 3 lysine 4 methylation, further potentiating FOXA1 recruitment. Consequently, FOXA1 binding events are markedly reduced following TET1 depletion. Together, our results suggest that FOXA1 is not only able to recognize but also remodel the epigenetic signatures at lineage-specific enhancers, which is mediated, at least in part, by a feed-forward regulatory loop between FOXA1 and TET1. PMID:27257062

  15. Two different lineages of bedbug (Cimex lectularius) reflected in host specificity.

    PubMed

    Wawrocka, Kamila; Bartonička, Tomáš

    2013-11-01

    Co-speciation between host-parasite species is generally thought to result in mirror-image congruent phylogenies. For the last several centuries, many bat species have been turning synanthropic, especially those that are hosted by bedbugs in Europe. There is evidence of only limited gene flow from the population of people to the population of bats. This study was focused on comparison of survival, development, and the reproduction rate based on cross-feeding experiments. In our research, we used two bedbugs groups of Cimex lectularius-bat- and human-associated and respectively as specific/non-specific host bat and commercial human blood. Both lineages show different behavior according to their host preferences. During the bat blood experiment, we found significant differences between both human- and bat-associated bedbugs (Log rank test fourth χ(2) = 9.93, p > 0.05; fifth χ(2) = 11.33, p < 0.05), while no differences occurred with the human blood experiment between the survival levels. In molting, differences between both groups were significant particularly in the case of the bat blood experiment (fourth χ(2)  = 5.91, p < 0.05). In the case of the bat blood experiment, we found a higher probability of molting in bat-associated groups than in human-associated groups. In the case of the human blood experiment, molting probability was stable in both specific and non-specific, showing similar pattern in both cases for all stages. Our results indicate an occurrence of two ecotypes within the one species C. lectularius. These findings support earlier data about morphological and mitochondrial DNA differences. The differentiation of both lineages fits the concept of specific host choice.

  16. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Protein sequences were compared among Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus to identify differential gene (DG) sets that are in one but not the other two genomes. The DG sets were screened against a plant transcript database, the NR protein database and six newly-sequenced genomes (Carica, Glycine, Medicago, Sorghum, Vitis and Zea) to identify a set of species-specific genes (SS). Gene expression, protein motif and intron number were examined. 192, 641 and 109 SS genes were identified in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus, respectively. Some SS genes were preferentially expressed in flowers, roots, xylem and cambium or up-regulated by stress. Six conserved motifs in Arabidopsis and Oryza SS proteins were found in other distant lineages. The SS gene sets were enriched with intronless genes. The results reflect functional and/or anatomical differences between monocots and eudicots or between herbaceous and woody plants. The Populus-specific genes are candidates for carbon sequestration and biofuel research.

  17. Stage-specific differentiation of iPSCs toward retinal ganglion cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fei; Chen, Mengfei; Liu, Ying; Hu, Huiling; Xiong, Yunfan; Xu, Chaochao; Liu, Yuchun; Li, Kangjun; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose As an alternative and desirable approach for regenerative medicine, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology raises the possibility of developing patient-tailored cell therapies to treat intractable degenerative diseases in the future. This study was undertaken to guide human Tenon’s capsule fibroblasts-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) to differentiate along the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) lineage, aiming at producing appropriate cellular material for RGC regeneration. Methods By mimicking RGC genesis, we deliberately administered the whole differentiation process and directed the stage-specific differentiation of human TiPSCs toward an RGC fate via manipulation of the retinal inducers (DKK1+Noggin+Lefty A) alongside master gene (Atoh7) sequentially. Throughout this stepwise differentiation process, changes in primitive neuroectodermal, eye field, and RGC marker expression were monitored with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunocytochemistry, and/or flow cytometry. Results Upon retinal differentiation, a large fraction of the cells developed characteristics of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in response to simulated environment signaling (DKK1+Noggin+Lefty A), which was selectively recovered with manual isolation approaches and then maintained in the presence of mitogen for multiple passages. Thereafter, overexpression of ATOH7 further promoted RGC specification in TiPSC-derived RPCs. A subset of transfected cells displayed RGC-specific expression patterns, including Brn3b, iSlet1, calretinin, and Tuj, and approximately 23% of Brn3b-positive RGC-like cells were obtained finally. Conclusions Our DKK1+Noggin+Lefty A/Atoh7-based RGC-induction regime could efficiently direct TiPSCs to differentiate along RGC lineage in a stage-specific manner, which may provide a benefit to develop possible cell therapies to treat retinal degenerative diseases such as glaucoma. PMID:27293372

  18. Identification of a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematically identified possible TKs across the fungal kingdom by using the profile hidden Markov Models searches and phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed that fungi lack the orthologs of animal TKs. We identified a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases (FslK) that appears to be a sister group closely related to TKs. Sequence analysis revealed that members of the FslK clade contain all the conserved protein kinase sub-domains and thus are likely enzymatically active. However, they lack key amino acid residues that determine TK-specific activities, indicating that they are not true TKs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the last common ancestor of fungi may have possessed numerous members of FslK. The ancestral FslK genes were lost in Ascomycota and Ustilaginomycotina and Pucciniomycotina of Basidiomycota during evolution. Most of these ancestral genes, however, were retained and expanded in Agaricomycetes. The discovery of the fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to TKs helps shed light on the origin and evolution of TKs and also has potential implications for the importance of these kinases in mushroom fungi.

  19. Lineage-specific dynamic and pre-established enhancer-promoter contacts cooperate in terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Adam J; Barajas, Brook C; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Lopez-Pajares, Vanessa; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Howard, Imani; Kim, Daniel S; Boxer, Lisa D; Cairns, Jonathan; Spivakov, Mikhail; Wingett, Steven W; Shi, Minyi; Zhao, Zhixin; Greenleaf, William J; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael; Chang, Howard Y; Fraser, Peter; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-10-01

    Chromosome conformation is an important feature of metazoan gene regulation; however, enhancer-promoter contact remodeling during cellular differentiation remains poorly understood. To address this, genome-wide promoter capture Hi-C (CHi-C) was performed during epidermal differentiation. Two classes of enhancer-promoter contacts associated with differentiation-induced genes were identified. The first class ('gained') increased in contact strength during differentiation in concert with enhancer acquisition of the H3K27ac activation mark. The second class ('stable') were pre-established in undifferentiated cells, with enhancers constitutively marked by H3K27ac. The stable class was associated with the canonical conformation regulator cohesin, whereas the gained class was not, implying distinct mechanisms of contact formation and regulation. Analysis of stable enhancers identified a new, essential role for a constitutively expressed, lineage-restricted ETS-family transcription factor, EHF, in epidermal differentiation. Furthermore, neither class of contacts was observed in pluripotent cells, suggesting that lineage-specific chromatin structure is established in tissue progenitor cells and is further remodeled in terminal differentiation.

  20. Brain-specific-homeobox is required for the specification of neuronal types in the Drosophila optic lobe.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eri; Kaido, Masako; Takayama, Rie; Sato, Makoto

    2013-05-01

    The Drosophila optic lobe comprises a wide variety of neurons forming laminar and columnar structures similar to the mammalian brain. The Drosophila optic lobe may provide an excellent model to investigate various processes of brain development. However, it is poorly understood how neuronal specification is regulated in the optic lobe to form a complicated structure. Here we show that the Brain-specific-homeobox (Bsh) protein, which is expressed in the lamina and medulla ganglia, is involved in specifying neuronal identity. Bsh is expressed in L4 and L5 lamina neurons and in Mi1 medulla neurons. Analyses of loss-of-function and gain-of-function clones suggest that Bsh is required and largely sufficient for Mi1 specification in the medulla and L4 specification in the lamina. Additionally, Bsh is at least required for L5 specification. In the absence of Bsh, L5 is transformed into glial cells.

  1. Quantitative lineage tracing strategies to resolve multipotency in tissue-specific stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Rulands, Steffen; Simons, Benjamin D.; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Lineage tracing has become the method of choice to study the fate and dynamics of stem cells (SCs) during development, homeostasis, and regeneration. However, transgenic and knock-in Cre drivers used to perform lineage tracing experiments are often dynamically, temporally, and heterogeneously expressed, leading to the initial labeling of different cell types and thereby complicating their interpretation. Here, we developed two methods: the first one based on statistical analysis of multicolor lineage tracing, allowing the definition of multipotency potential to be achieved with high confidence, and the second one based on lineage tracing at saturation to assess the fate of all SCs within a given lineage and the “flux” of cells between different lineages. Our analysis clearly shows that, whereas the prostate develops from multipotent SCs, only unipotent SCs mediate mammary gland (MG) development and adult tissue remodeling. These methods offer a rigorous framework to assess the lineage relationship and SC fate in different organs and tissues. PMID:27284162

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Exhibits Lineage-Specific Variations Affecting Protein Ductility and Epitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yruela, Inmaculada; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Magalhães, Carlos; Osório, Nuno S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of whole-genome sequencing has provided an unprecedented detail about the evolution and genetic significance of species-specific variations across the whole Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex. However, little attention has been focused on understanding the functional roles of these variations in the protein coding sequences. In this work, we compare the coding sequences from 74 sequenced mycobacterial species including M. africanum, M. bovis, M. canettii, M. caprae, M. orygis, and M. tuberculosis. Results show that albeit protein variations affect all functional classes, those proteins involved in lipid and intermediary metabolism and respiration have accumulated mutations during evolution. To understand the impact of these mutations on protein functionality, we explored their implications on protein ductility/disorder, a yet unexplored feature of mycobacterial proteomes. In agreement with previous studies, we found that a Gly71Ile substitution in the PhoPR virulence system severely affects the ductility of its nearby region in M. africanum and animal-adapted species. In the same line of evidence, the SmtB transcriptional regulator shows amino acid variations specific to the Beijing lineage, which affects the flexibility of the N-terminal trans-activation domain. Furthermore, despite the fact that MTBC epitopes are evolutionary hyperconserved, we identify strain- and lineage-specific amino acid mutations affecting previously known T-cell epitopes such as EsxH and FbpA (Ag85A). Interestingly, in silico studies reveal that these variations result in differential interaction of epitopes with the main HLA haplogroups. PMID:28062754

  3. Alu-Derived Alternative Splicing Events Specific to Macaca Lineages in CTSF Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Cho, Hyeon-Mu; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Kang, Philyong; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin F, which is encoded by CTSF, is a cysteine proteinase ubiquitously expressed in several tissues. In a previous study, novel transcripts of the CTSF gene were identified in the crab-eating monkey deriving from the integration of an Alu element–AluYRa1. The occurrence of AluYRa1-derived alternative transcripts and the mechanism of exonization events in the CTSF gene of human, rhesus monkey, and crab-eating monkey were investigated using PCR and reverse transcription PCR on the genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from several tissues. Results demonstrated that AluYRa1 was only integrated into the genome of Macaca species and this lineage-specific integration led to exonization events by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Six transcript variants (V1–V6) were generated by alternative splicing (AS) events, including intron retention and alternative 5′ splice sites in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions of CTSF_AluYRa1. Among them, V3–V5 transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues of rhesus monkey and crab-eating monkey, whereas AluYRa1-exonized V1 was dominantly expressed in the testis of the crab-eating monkey, and V2 was only expressed in the testis of the two monkeys. These five transcript variants also had different amino acid sequences in the C-terminal region of CTSF, as compared to reference sequences. Thus, species-specific Alu-derived exonization by lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and AS events seems to have played an important role during primate evolution by producing transcript variants and gene diversification. PMID:28196413

  4. The lineage-specific evolution of aquaporin gene clusters facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Hlidberg, Jón Baldur; Cutler, Christopher P; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16). The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

  5. The Lineage-Specific Evolution of Aquaporin Gene Clusters Facilitated Tetrapod Terrestrial Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Hlidberg, Jón Baldur; Cutler, Christopher P.; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16). The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation. PMID:25426855

  6. Sleep Deprivation Specifically Impairs Short-term Olfactory Memory in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinjian; Yu, Feng; Guo, Aike

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is crucial to memory consolidation in humans and other animals; however, the effect of insufficient sleep on subsequent learning and memory remains largely elusive. Design: Learning and memory after 1-day sleep deprivation (slpD) was evaluated using Pavlovian olfactory conditioning in Drosophila, and locomotor activity was measured using the Drosophila Activity Monitoring System in a 12:12 light-dark cycle. Results: We found that slpD specifically impaired 1-h memory in wild type Canton-S flies, and this effect could persist for at least 2 h. However, alternative stresses (heat stress, oxidative stress, starvation, and rotation stress) did not result in a similar effect and left the flies’ memory intact. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that flies with either silenced transmission of the mushroom body (MB) during slpD or down-regulated cAMP levels in the MB demonstrated no slpD-induced 1-h memory impairment. Conclusion: We found that slpD specifically impaired 1-h memory in Drosophila, and either silencing of MB transmission during slpD or down-regulation of the cAMP level in the MB protected the flies from slpD-induced impairment. Citation: Li X; Yu F; Guo A. Sleep deprivation specifically impairs short-term olfactory memory in drosophila. SLEEP 2009;32(11):1417-1424. PMID:19928381

  7. Lineage-specific and single cell chromatin accessibility charts human hematopoiesis and leukemia evolution

    PubMed Central

    Corces, M. Ryan; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Wu, Beijing; Greenside, Peyton G.; Chan, Steven M.; Koenig, Julie L.; Snyder, Michael P.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Kundaje, Anshul; Greenleaf, William J.; Majeti, Ravindra; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    We define the chromatin accessibility and transcriptional landscapes in thirteen human primary blood cell types that traverse the hematopoietic hierarchy. Exploiting the finding that the enhancer landscape better reflects cell identity than mRNA levels, we enable “enhancer cytometry” for enumeration of pure cell types from complex populations. We identify regulators governing hematopoietic differentiation and further reveal the lineage ontogeny of genetic elements linked to diverse human diseases. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chromatin accessibility reveals unique regulatory evolution in cancer cells with progressive mutation burden. Single AML cells exhibit distinctive mixed regulome profiles of disparate developmental stages. A method to account for this regulatory heterogeneity identified cancer-specific deviations and implicated HOX factors as key regulators of pre-leukemic HSC characteristics. Thus, regulome dynamics can provide diverse insights into hematopoietic development and disease. PMID:27526324

  8. Lineage-specific RUNX3 hypomethylation marks the preneoplastic immune component of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurklu, B; Whitehead, R H; Ong, E K; Minamoto, T; Fox, J G; Mann, J R; Judd, L M; Giraud, A S; Menheniott, T R

    2015-05-28

    Runt domain transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is widely regarded as a tumour-suppressor gene inactivated by DNA hypermethylation of its canonical CpG (cytidine-phosphate-guanidine) island (CGI) promoter in gastric cancer (GC). Absence of RUNX3 expression from normal gastric epithelial cells (GECs), the progenitors to GC, coupled with frequent RUNX3 overexpression in GC progression, challenge this longstanding paradigm. However, epigenetic models to better describe RUNX3 deregulation in GC have not emerged. Here, we identify lineage-specific DNA methylation at an alternate, non-CGI promoter (P1) as a new mechanism of RUNX3 epigenetic control. In normal GECs, P1 was hypermethylated and repressed, whereas in immune lineages P1 was hypomethylated and widely expressed. In human GC development, we detected aberrant P1 hypomethylation signatures associated with the early inflammatory, preneoplastic and tumour stages. Aberrant P1 hypomethylation was fully recapitulated in mouse models of gastric inflammation and tumorigenesis. Cell sorting showed that P1 hypomethylation reflects altered cell-type composition of the gastric epithelium/tumour microenvironment caused by immune cell recruitment, not methylation loss. Finally, via long-term culture of gastric tumour epithelium, we revealed that de novo methylation of the RUNX3 canonical CGI promoter is a bystander effect of oncogenic immortalization and not likely causal in GC pathogenesis as previously argued. We propose a new model of RUNX3 epigenetic control in cancer, based on immune-specific, non-CGI promoter hypomethylation. This novel epigenetic signature may have utility in early detection of GC and possibly other epithelial cancers with premalignant immune involvement.

  9. Lineage-specific biology revealed by a finished genome assembly of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, Deanna M; Goodstadt, Leo; Hillier, Ladeana W; Zody, Michael C; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E; Ponting, Chris P

    2009-05-05

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non-protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not.

  10. Lineage-specific BCL11A knockdown circumvents toxicities and reverses sickle phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Christian; Guda, Swaroopa; Renella, Raffaele; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Kim, Young-Jo; Heeney, Matthew M; Klatt, Denise; Fogel, Jonathan; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2016-10-03

    Reducing expression of the fetal hemoglobin (HbF) repressor BCL11A leads to a simultaneous increase in γ-globin expression and reduction in β-globin expression. Thus, there is interest in targeting BCL11A as a treatment for β-hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Here, we found that using optimized shRNAs embedded within an miRNA (shRNAmiR) architecture to achieve ubiquitous knockdown of BCL11A profoundly impaired long-term engraftment of both human and mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) despite a reduction in nonspecific cellular toxicities. BCL11A knockdown was associated with a substantial increase in S/G2-phase human HSCs after engraftment into immunodeficient (NSG) mice, a phenotype that is associated with HSC exhaustion. Lineage-specific, shRNAmiR-mediated suppression of BCL11A in erythroid cells led to stable long-term engraftment of gene-modified cells. Transduced primary normal or SCD human HSCs expressing the lineage-specific BCL11A shRNAmiR gave rise to erythroid cells with up to 90% reduction of BCL11A protein. These erythrocytes demonstrated 60%-70% γ-chain expression (vs. < 10% for negative control) and a corresponding increase in HbF. Transplantation of gene-modified murine HSCs from Berkeley sickle cell mice led to a substantial improvement of sickle-associated hemolytic anemia and reticulocytosis, key pathophysiological biomarkers of SCD. These data form the basis for a clinical trial application for treating sickle cell disease.

  11. Lineage-specific BCL11A knockdown circumvents toxicities and reverses sickle phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, Christian; Guda, Swaroopa; Renella, Raffaele; Bauer, Daniel E.; Canver, Matthew C.; Kim, Young-Jo; Heeney, Matthew M.; Klatt, Denise; Fogel, Jonathan; Milsom, Michael D.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing expression of the fetal hemoglobin (HbF) repressor BCL11A leads to a simultaneous increase in γ-globin expression and reduction in β-globin expression. Thus, there is interest in targeting BCL11A as a treatment for β-hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Here, we found that using optimized shRNAs embedded within an miRNA (shRNAmiR) architecture to achieve ubiquitous knockdown of BCL11A profoundly impaired long-term engraftment of both human and mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) despite a reduction in nonspecific cellular toxicities. BCL11A knockdown was associated with a substantial increase in S/G2-phase human HSCs after engraftment into immunodeficient (NSG) mice, a phenotype that is associated with HSC exhaustion. Lineage-specific, shRNAmiR-mediated suppression of BCL11A in erythroid cells led to stable long-term engraftment of gene-modified cells. Transduced primary normal or SCD human HSCs expressing the lineage-specific BCL11A shRNAmiR gave rise to erythroid cells with up to 90% reduction of BCL11A protein. These erythrocytes demonstrated 60%–70% γ-chain expression (vs. < 10% for negative control) and a corresponding increase in HbF. Transplantation of gene-modified murine HSCs from Berkeley sickle cell mice led to a substantial improvement of sickle-associated hemolytic anemia and reticulocytosis, key pathophysiological biomarkers of SCD. These data form the basis for a clinical trial application for treating sickle cell disease. PMID:27599293

  12. Lineage-Specific Biology Revealed by a Finished Genome Assembly of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, LaDeana W.; Zody, Michael C.; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J.; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L.; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C.; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C.; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non–protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not. PMID:19468303

  13. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1) in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP) family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH) subtype 1G (Ush1g), both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s) of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways. PMID:21261979

  14. Lineage-specific distribution of high levels of genomic 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Ruzov, Alexey; Tsenkina, Yanina; Serio, Andrea; Dudnakova, Tatiana; Fletcher, Judy; Bai, Yu; Chebotareva, Tatiana; Pells, Steve; Hannoun, Zara; Sullivan, Gareth; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hay, David C; Bradley, Mark; Wilmut, Ian; De Sousa, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine is a DNA modification associated with gene repression. Recently, a novel cytosine modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) has been discovered. Here we examine 5-hmC distribution during mammalian development and in cellular systems, and show that the developmental dynamics of 5-hmC are different from those of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC); in particular 5-hmC is enriched in embryonic contexts compared to adult tissues. A detectable 5-hmC signal appears in pre-implantation development starting at the zygote stage, where the paternal genome is subjected to a genome-wide hydroxylation of 5-mC, which precisely coincides with the loss of the 5-mC signal in the paternal pronucleus. Levels of 5-hmC are high in cells of the inner cell mass in blastocysts, and the modification colocalises with nestin-expressing cell populations in mouse post-implantation embryos. Compared to other adult mammalian organs, 5-hmC is strongly enriched in bone marrow and brain, wherein high 5-hmC content is a feature of both neuronal progenitors and post-mitotic neurons. We show that high levels of 5-hmC are not only present in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and lost during differentiation, as has been reported previously, but also reappear during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells; thus 5-hmC enrichment correlates with a pluripotent cell state. Our findings suggest that apart from the cells of neuronal lineages, high levels of genomic 5-hmC are an epigenetic feature of embryonic cell populations and cellular pluri- and multi-lineage potency. To our knowledge, 5-hmC represents the first epigenetic modification of DNA discovered whose enrichment is so cell-type specific. PMID:21747414

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis Indicates Lineage-Specific Gene Loss during Papilionoideae Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yongzhe; Xing, Shilai; He, Chaoying

    2016-01-01

    Gene loss is the driving force for changes in genome and morphology; however, this particular evolutionary event has been poorly investigated in leguminous plants. Legumes (Fabaceae) have some lineage-specific and diagnostic characteristics that are distinct from other angiosperms. To understand the potential role of gene loss in the evolution of legumes, we compared six genome-sequenced legume species of Papilionoideae, the largest representative clade of Fabaceae, such as Glycine max, with 34 nonlegume plant species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed that the putative orthologs of the 34 Arabidopsis genes belonging to 29 gene families were absent in these legume species but these were conserved in the sequenced nonlegume angiosperm lineages. Further evolutionary analyses indicated that the orthologs of these genes were almost completely lost in the Papillionoideae ancestors, thus designated as the legume lost genes (LLGs), and these underwent purifying selection in nonlegume plants. Most LLGs were functionally unknown. In Arabidopsis, two LLGs were well-known genes that played a role in plant immunity such as HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER 1 and HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1, and 16 additional LLGs were predicted to participate in plant–pathogen interactions in in silico expression and protein–protein interaction network analyses. Most of these LLGs’ orthologs in various plants were also found to be associated with biotic stress response, indicating the conserved role of these genes in plant defense. The evolutionary implication of LLGs during the development of the ability of symbiotic nitrogen fixation involving plant and bacterial interactions, which is a well-known characteristic of most legumes, is also discussed. Our work sheds light on the evolutionary implication of gene loss events in Papilionoideae evolution, as well as provides new insights into crop design to improve nitrogen fixation capacity. PMID:26868598

  16. The roles of ERAS during cell lineage specification of mouse early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-Ao; Yu, Yang; Ma, Huai-Xiao; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Lu, Xukun; Zhai, Yanhua; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Wang, Haibin; Li, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Eras encodes a Ras-like GTPase protein that was originally identified as an embryonic stem cell-specific Ras. ERAS has been known to be required for the growth of embryonic stem cells and stimulates somatic cell reprogramming, suggesting its roles on mouse early embryonic development. We now report a dynamic expression pattern of Eras during mouse peri-implantation development: its expression increases at the blastocyst stage, and specifically decreases in E7.5 mesoderm. In accordance with its expression pattern, the increased expression of Eras promotes cell proliferation through controlling AKT activation and the commitment from ground to primed state through ERK activation in mouse embryonic stem cells; and the reduced expression of Eras facilitates primitive streak and mesoderm formation through AKT inhibition during gastrulation. The expression of Eras is finely regulated to match its roles in mouse early embryonic development during which Eras expression is negatively regulated by the β-catenin pathway. Thus, beyond its well-known role on cell proliferation, ERAS may also play important roles in cell lineage specification during mouse early embryonic development. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Comparative genomics of rhizobia nodulating soybean suggests extensive recruitment of lineage-specific genes in adaptations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang Fu; Zhou, Yuan Jie; Zhang, Yan Ming; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Li, Dong Fang; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, Luz B; Li, Ying Rui; Chen, Wen Xin

    2012-05-29

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been widely studied as the model of mutualistic evolution and the essential component of sustainable agriculture. Extensive genetic and recent genomic studies have led to the hypothesis that many distinct strategies, regardless of rhizobial phylogeny, contributed to the varied rhizobium-legume symbiosis. We sequenced 26 genomes of Sinorhizobium and Bradyrhizobium nodulating soybean to test this hypothesis. The Bradyrhizobium core genome is disproportionally enriched in lipid and secondary metabolism, whereas several gene clusters known to be involved in osmoprotection and adaptation to alkaline pH are specific to the Sinorhizobium core genome. These features are consistent with biogeographic patterns of these bacteria. Surprisingly, no genes are specifically shared by these soybean microsymbionts compared with other legume microsymbionts. On the other hand, phyletic patterns of 561 known symbiosis genes of rhizobia reflected the species phylogeny of these soybean microsymbionts and other rhizobia. Similar analyses with 887 known functional genes or the whole pan genome of rhizobia revealed that only the phyletic distribution of functional genes was consistent with the species tree of rhizobia. Further evolutionary genetics revealed that recombination dominated the evolution of core genome. Taken together, our results suggested that faithfully vertical genes were rare compared with those with history of recombination including lateral gene transfer, although rhizobial adaptations to symbiotic interactions and other environmental conditions extensively recruited lineage-specific shell genes under direct or indirect control through the speciation process.

  18. Identification, characterization and expression analysis of lineage-specific genes within sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuantao; Wu, Guizhi; Hao, Baohai; Chen, Lingling; Deng, Xiuxin; Xu, Qiang

    2015-11-23

    With the availability of rapidly increasing number of genome and transcriptome sequences, lineage-specific genes (LSGs) can be identified and characterized. Like other conserved functional genes, LSGs play important roles in biological evolution and functions. Two set of citrus LSGs, 296 citrus-specific genes (CSGs) and 1039 orphan genes specific to sweet orange, were identified by comparative analysis between the sweet orange genome sequences and 41 genomes and 273 transcriptomes. With the two sets of genes, gene structure and gene expression pattern were investigated. On average, both the CSGs and orphan genes have fewer exons, shorter gene length and higher GC content when compared with those evolutionarily conserved genes (ECs). Expression profiling indicated that most of the LSGs expressed in various tissues of sweet orange and some of them exhibited distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns. Particularly, the orphan genes were preferentially expressed in callus, which is an important pluripotent tissue of citrus. Besides, part of the CSGs and orphan genes expressed responsive to abiotic stress, indicating their potential functions during interaction with environment. This study identified and characterized two sets of LSGs in citrus, dissected their sequence features and expression patterns, and provided valuable clues for future functional analysis of the LSGs in sweet orange.

  19. Mei-P26 Mediates Tissue-Specific Responses to the Brat Tumor Suppressor and the dMyc Proto-Oncogene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana; Boulan, Laura; Perez, Lidia; Milán, Marco

    2014-01-01

    TRIM-NHL proteins are a family of translational regulators that control cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation during development. Drosophila Brat and Mei-P26 TRIM-NHL proteins serve as tumor suppressors in stem cell lineages and have been proposed to exert this action, in part, via the repression of the protooncogene dMyc. Here we analyze the role of Brat, Mei-P26, and dMyc in regulating growth in Drosophila imaginal discs. As in stem cell lineages, Brat and Mei-P26 repress dMyc in epithelial cells by acting at the post-transcriptional and protein level, respectively. Analysis of cell and organ size unravel that Mei-P26 mediates tissue-specific responses to Brat and dMyc activities. Loss-of-function of brat and overexpression of dMyc induce overgrowth in stem cell lineages and eventually can participate in tumor formation. In contrast, an increase in Mei-P26 levels inhibits growth of epithelial cells in these two conditions. Upon depletion of Brat, Mei-P26 up-regulation prevents an increase in dMyc protein levels and leads to tissue undergrowth. This mechanism appears to be tissue-specific since Mei-P26 is not upregulated in brain tumors resulting from brat loss-of-function. Driving Mei-P26 expression in these tumors —mimicking the situation in epithelial cells— is sufficient to prevent dMyc accumulation, thus rescuing the overgrowth. Finally, we show that Mei-P26 upregulation mediates dMyc-induced apoptosis and limits dMyc growth potential in epithelial cells. These findings shed light on the tumor suppressor roles of TRIM-NHL proteins and underscore a new mechanism that maintains tissue homeostasis upon dMyc deregulation. PMID:24990993

  20. Modern Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Exhibit Lineage-Specific Patterns of Growth and Cytokine Induction in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rajesh; Lenders, Laura; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Nicol, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence. Strains that have caused outbreaks in the United States and United Kingdom have been shown to subvert the innate immune response as a potential immune evasion mechanism. There is, however, little information available as to whether these patterns of immune subversion are features of individual strains or characteristic of broad clonal lineages of M. tuberculosis. Methods Strains from two major modern lineages (lineage 2 [East-Asian] and lineage 4 [Euro-American]) circulating in the Western Cape in South Africa as well as a comparator modern lineage (lineage 3 [CAS/Delhi]) were identified. We assessed two virulence associated characteristics: mycobacterial growth (in liquid broth and monocyte derived macrophages) and early pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Results In liquid culture, Lineage 4 strains grew more rapidly and reached higher plateau levels than other strains (lineage 4 vs. lineage 2 p = 0.0024; lineage 4 vs. lineage 3 p = 0.0005). Lineage 3 strains were characterized by low and early plateau levels, while lineage 2 strains showed an intermediate growth phenotype. In monocyte-derived macrophages, lineage 2 strains grew faster than lineage 3 strains (p<0.01) with lineage 4 strains having an intermediate phenotype. Lineage 2 strains induced the lowest levels of pro-inflammatory TNF and IL-12p40 as compared to other lineages (lineage 2: median TNF 362 pg/ml, IL-12p40 91 pg/ml; lineage 3: median TNF 1818 pg/ml, IL-12p40 123 pg/ml; lineage 4: median TNF 1207 pg/ml, IL-12p40 205 pg/ml;). In contrast, lineage 4 strains induced high levels of IL-12p40 and intermediate level of TNF. Lineage 3 strains induced high levels of TNF and intermediate levels of IL-12p40. Conclusions Strains of M. tuberculosis from the three major modern strain lineages possess distinct patterns of growth and cytokine induction. Rapid growth and immune subversion may be key characteristics to the success of

  1. Drosophila FIT is a protein-specific satiety hormone essential for feeding control

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinghan; Liu, Chang; Bai, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaoting; Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Zhiping; Zhang, Yunpeng; Guo, Jing; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Protein homeostasis is critical for health and lifespan of animals. However, the mechanisms for controlling protein feeding remain poorly understood. Here we report that in Drosophila, protein intake-induced feeding inhibition (PIFI) is specific to protein-containing food, and this effect is mediated by a fat body (FB) peptide named female-specific independent of transformer (FIT). Upon consumption of protein food, FIT expression is greatly elevated. Secreted FIT peptide in the fly haemolymph conveys this metabolic message to the brain, thereby promoting the release of Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (DILP2) and suppressing further protein intake. Interestingly, Fit is a sexually dimorphic gene, and consequently protein consumption-induced insulin release, as well as protein feeding behaviour, are also dimorphic between sexes. Thus, our findings reveal a protein-specific satiety hormone, providing important insights into the complex regulation of feeding decision, as well as the sexual dimorphism in feeding behaviour. PMID:28102207

  2. Atypical Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4b strains harboring a lineage II-specific gene cassette

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Listeria monocytogenes is the etiological agent of listeriosis, a severe foodborne illness. The population of L. monocytogenes is divided into four lineages (I-IV) and serotype 4b in lineage I has been involved in numerous outbreaks. Several serotype 4b epidemic-associated clonal groups (ECI, II, an...

  3. Potential merger of ancient lineages in a passerine bird discovered based on evidence from host-specific ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Block, Nicholas L; Goodman, Steven M; Hackett, Shannon J; Bates, John M; Raherilalao, Marie J

    2015-01-01

    The merger of formerly isolated lineages is hypothesized to occur in vertebrates under certain conditions. However, despite many demonstrated instances of introgression between taxa in secondary contact, examples of lineage mergers are rare. Preliminary mtDNA sequencing of a Malagasy passerine, Xanthomixis zosterops (Passeriformes: Bernieridae), indicated a possible instance of merging lineages. We tested the hypothesis that X. zosterops lineages are merging by comparing mtDNA sequence and microsatellite data, as well as mtDNA sequence data from host-specific feather lice in the genus Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae). Xanthomixis zosterops comprises four deeply divergent, broadly sympatric, cryptic mtDNA clades that likely began diverging approximately 3.6 million years ago. Despite this level of divergence, the microsatellite data indicate that the X. zosterops mtDNA clades are virtually panmictic. Three major phylogroups of Myrsidea were found, supporting previous allopatry of the X. zosterops clades. In combination, the datasets from X. zosterops and its Myrsidea document a potential merger of previously allopatric lineages that likely date to the Pliocene. This represents the first report of sympatric apparent hybridization among more than two terrestrial vertebrate lineages. Further, the mtDNA phylogeographic pattern of X. zosterops, namely the syntopy of more than two deeply divergent cryptic clades, appears to be a novel scenario among vertebrates. We highlight the value of gathering multiple types of data in phylogeographic studies to contribute to the study of vertebrate speciation. PMID:26380702

  4. Potential merger of ancient lineages in a passerine bird discovered based on evidence from host-specific ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Block, Nicholas L; Goodman, Steven M; Hackett, Shannon J; Bates, John M; Raherilalao, Marie J

    2015-09-01

    The merger of formerly isolated lineages is hypothesized to occur in vertebrates under certain conditions. However, despite many demonstrated instances of introgression between taxa in secondary contact, examples of lineage mergers are rare. Preliminary mtDNA sequencing of a Malagasy passerine, Xanthomixis zosterops (Passeriformes: Bernieridae), indicated a possible instance of merging lineages. We tested the hypothesis that X. zosterops lineages are merging by comparing mtDNA sequence and microsatellite data, as well as mtDNA sequence data from host-specific feather lice in the genus Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae). Xanthomixis zosterops comprises four deeply divergent, broadly sympatric, cryptic mtDNA clades that likely began diverging approximately 3.6 million years ago. Despite this level of divergence, the microsatellite data indicate that the X. zosterops mtDNA clades are virtually panmictic. Three major phylogroups of Myrsidea were found, supporting previous allopatry of the X. zosterops clades. In combination, the datasets from X. zosterops and its Myrsidea document a potential merger of previously allopatric lineages that likely date to the Pliocene. This represents the first report of sympatric apparent hybridization among more than two terrestrial vertebrate lineages. Further, the mtDNA phylogeographic pattern of X. zosterops, namely the syntopy of more than two deeply divergent cryptic clades, appears to be a novel scenario among vertebrates. We highlight the value of gathering multiple types of data in phylogeographic studies to contribute to the study of vertebrate speciation.

  5. Somatic cell lineage is required for differentiation and not maintenance of germline stem cells in Drosophila testes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jaclyn G Y; Fuller, Margaret T

    2012-11-06

    Adult stem cells are believed to be maintained by a specialized microenvironment, the niche, which provides short-range signals that either instruct stem cells to self-renew or inhibit execution of preprogrammed differentiation pathways. In Drosophila testes, somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs) and the apical hub form the niche for neighboring germline stem cells (GSCs), with CySCs as the proposed source of instructive self-renewal signals [Leatherman JL, Dinardo S (2010) Nat Cell Biol 12(8):806-811]. In contrast to this model, we show that early germ cells with GSC characteristics can be maintained over time after ablation of CySCs and their cyst cell progeny. Without CySCs and cyst cells, early germ cells away from the hub failed to initiate differentiation. Our results suggest that CySCs do not have a necessary instructive role in specifying GSC self-renewal and that the differentiated progeny of CySCs provide an environment necessary to trigger GSC differentiation. This work highlights the complex interaction between different stem cell populations in the same niche and how the state of one stem cell population can influence the fate of the other.

  6. Dendritic space-filling requires a neuronal type-specific extracellular permissive signal in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Poe, Amy R; Tang, Lingfeng; Wang, Bei; Li, Yun; Sapar, Maria L; Han, Chun

    2017-09-19

    Neurons sometimes completely fill available space in their receptive fields with evenly spaced dendrites to uniformly sample sensory or synaptic information. The mechanisms that enable neurons to sense and innervate all space in their target tissues are poorly understood. Using Drosophila somatosensory neurons as a model, we show that heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) Dally and Syndecan on the surface of epidermal cells act as local permissive signals for the dendritic growth and maintenance of space-filling nociceptive C4da neurons, allowing them to innervate the entire skin. Using long-term time-lapse imaging with intact Drosophila larvae, we found that dendrites grow into HSPG-deficient areas but fail to stay there. HSPGs are necessary to stabilize microtubules in newly formed high-order dendrites. In contrast to C4da neurons, non-space-filling sensory neurons that develop in the same microenvironment do not rely on HSPGs for their dendritic growth. Furthermore, HSPGs do not act by transporting extracellular diffusible ligands or require leukocyte antigen-related (Lar), a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) and the only known Drosophila HSPG receptor, for promoting dendritic growth of space-filling neurons. Interestingly, another RPTP, Ptp69D, promotes dendritic growth of C4da neurons in parallel to HSPGs. Together, our data reveal an HSPG-dependent pathway that specifically allows dendrites of space-filling neurons to innervate all target tissues in Drosophila.

  7. Small Cajal body-specific RNAs of Drosophila function in the absence of Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G

    2009-12-01

    During their biogenesis small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) undergo multiple covalent modifications that require guide RNAs to direct methylase and pseudouridylase enzymes to the appropriate nucleotides. Because of their localization in the nuclear Cajal body (CB), these guide RNAs are known as small CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). Using a fluorescent primer extension technique, we mapped the modified nucleotides in Drosophila U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNAs. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) we showed that seven Drosophila scaRNAs are concentrated in easily detectable CBs. We used two assays based on Xenopus oocyte nuclei to demonstrate that three of these Drosophila scaRNAs do, in fact, function as guide RNAs. In flies null for the CB marker protein coilin, CBs are absent and there are no localized FISH signals for the scaRNAs. Nevertheless, biochemical experiments show that scaRNAs are present at normal levels and snRNAs are properly modified. Our experiments demonstrate that several scaRNAs are concentrated as expected in the CBs of wild-type Drosophila, but they function equally well in the nucleoplasm of mutant flies that lack CBs. We propose that the snRNA modification machinery is not limited to CBs, but is dispersed throughout the nucleoplasm of cells in general.

  8. Turnover and lineage-specific broadening of the transcription start site in a testis-specific retrogene

    PubMed Central

    Sorourian, Mehran; Betrán, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomes are large multisubunit complexes responsible for regulated protein degradation. Made of a core particle (20S) and regulatory caps (19S), proteasomal proteins are encoded by at least 33 genes, of which 12 have been shown to have testis-specific isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. Pros28.1A (also known as Prosα4T1), a young retroduplicate copy of Pros28.1 (also known as Prosα4), is one of these isoforms. It is present in the D. melanogaster subgroup and was previously shown to be testis-specific in D. melanogaster. Here, we show its testis-specific transcription in all D. melanogaster subgroup species. Due to this conserved pattern of expression in the species harboring this insertion, we initially expected that a regulatory region common to these species evolved prior to the speciation event. We determined that the region driving testis expression in D. melanogaster is not far from the coding region (within 272 bp upstream of the ATG). However, different Transcription Start Sites (TSSs) are used in D. melanogaster and D. simulans, and a “broad” transcription start site is used in D. yakuba. These results suggest one of the following scenarios: 1) there is a conserved motif in the 5′ region of the gene that can be used as an upstream or downstream element or at different distance depending on the species; 2) different species evolved diverse regulatory sequences for the same pattern of expression (i.e., “TSS turnover”); or 3) the transcription start site can be broad or narrow depending on the species. This work reveals the difficulties of studying gene regulation in one species and extrapolating those findings to close relatives. PMID:20160503

  9. Identifying recurrent mutations in cancer reveals widespread lineage diversity and mutational specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Matthew T.; Asthana, Saurabh; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Lee, Byron H.; Chapman, Jocelyn S.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Gao, JianJiong; Socci, Nicholas D.; Solit, David B.; Olshen, Adam B.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Taylor, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutational hotspots indicate selective pressure across a population of tumor samples, but their prevalence within and across cancer types is incompletely characterized. An approach to detect significantly mutated residues, rather than methods that identify recurrently mutated genes, may uncover new biologically and therapeutically relevant driver mutations. Here we developed a statistical algorithm to identify recurrently mutated residues in tumour samples. We applied the algorithm to 11,119 human tumors, spanning 41 cancer types, and identified 470 hotspot somatic substitutions in 275 genes. We find that half of all human tumors possess one or more mutational hotspots with widespread lineage-, position-, and mutant allele-specific differences, many of which are likely functional. In total, 243 hotspots were novel and appeared to affect a broad spectrum of molecular function, including hotspots at paralogous residues of Ras-related small GTPases RAC1 and RRAS2. Redefining hotspots at mutant amino acid resolution will help elucidate the allele-specific differences in their function and could have important therapeutic implications. PMID:26619011

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate CXC chemokines reveals novel lineage specific groups in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Qiaoqing; Wang, Tiehui; Collet, Bertrand; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Bird, Steve; Xie, Ping; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Zou, Jun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we have identified 421 molecules across the vertebrate spectrum and propose a unified nomenclature for CXC chemokines in fish, amphibians and reptiles based on phylogenetic analysis. Expanding on earlier studies in teleost fish, lineage specific CXC chemokines that have no apparent homologues in mammals were confirmed. Furthermore, in addition to the two subgroups of the CXCL8 homologues known in teleost fish, a third group was identified (termed CXCL8_L3), as was a further subgroup of the fish CXC genes related to CXCL11. Expression of the CXC chemokines found in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, was studied in response to stimulation with inflammatory and antiviral cytokines, and bacterial. Tissue distribution analysis revealed distinct expression profiles for these trout CXC chemokines. Lastly three of the trout chemokines, including two novel fish specific CXC chemokines containing three pairs of cysteines, were produced as recombinant proteins and their effect on trout leucocyte migration studied. These molecules increased the relative expression of CD4 and MCSFR in migrated cells in an in vitro chemotaxis assay.

  11. Enteroviruses infect human enteroids and induce antiviral signaling in a cell lineage-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Coyne G; Bolock, Alexa M; Ma, Congrong; Luke, Cliff J; Good, Misty; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2017-02-14

    Enteroviruses are among the most common viral infectious agents of humans and are primarily transmitted by the fecal-oral route. However, the events associated with enterovirus infections of the human gastrointestinal tract remain largely unknown. Here, we used stem cell-derived enteroids from human small intestines to study enterovirus infections of the intestinal epithelium. We found that enteroids were susceptible to infection by diverse enteroviruses, including echovirus 11 (E11), coxsackievirus B (CVB), and enterovirus 71 (EV71), and that contrary to an immortalized intestinal cell line, enteroids induced antiviral and inflammatory signaling pathways in response to infection in a virus-specific manner. Furthermore, using the Notch inhibitor dibenzazepine (DBZ) to drive cellular differentiation into secretory cell lineages, we show that although goblet cells resist E11 infection, enteroendocrine cells are permissive, suggesting that enteroviruses infect specific cell populations in the human intestine. Taken together, our studies provide insights into enterovirus infections of the human intestine, which could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and/or strategies to prevent or treat infections by these highly clinically relevant viruses.

  12. Lineage-Specific Expansion of IFIT Gene Family: An Insight into Coevolution with IFN Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ting-Kai; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, IFIT (Interferon [IFN]-induced proteins with Tetratricopeptide Repeat [TPR] motifs) family genes are involved in many cellular and viral processes, which are tightly related to mammalian IFN response. However, little is known about non-mammalian IFIT genes. In the present study, IFIT genes are identified in the genome databases from the jawed vertebrates including the cartilaginous elephant shark but not from non-vertebrates such as lancelet, sea squirt and acorn worm, suggesting that IFIT gene family originates from a vertebrate ancestor about 450 million years ago. IFIT family genes show conserved gene structure and gene arrangements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that this gene family has expanded through lineage-specific and species-specific gene duplication. Interestingly, IFN gene family seem to share a common ancestor and a similar evolutionary mechanism; the function link of IFIT genes to IFN response is present early since the origin of both gene families, as evidenced by the finding that zebrafish IFIT genes are upregulated by fish IFNs, poly(I:C) and two transcription factors IRF3/IRF7, likely via the IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) within the promoters of vertebrate IFIT family genes. These coevolution features creates functional association of both family genes to fulfill a common biological process, which is likely selected by viral infection during evolution of vertebrates. Our results are helpful for understanding of evolution of vertebrate IFN system. PMID:23818968

  13. Comparative phylogeography of two sympatric beeches in subtropical China: Species-specific geographic mosaic of lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Rong; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; López-Pujol, Jordi; Fan, Deng-Mei; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In subtropical China, large-scale phylogeographic comparisons among multiple sympatric plants with similar ecological preferences are scarce, making generalizations about common response to historical events necessarily tentative. A phylogeographic comparison of two sympatric Chinese beeches (Fagus lucida and F. longipetiolata, 21 and 28 populations, respectively) was conducted to test whether they have responded to historical events in a concerted fashion and to determine whether their phylogeographic structure is exclusively due to Quaternary events or it is also associated with pre-Quaternary events. Twenty-three haplotypes were recovered for F. lucida and F. longipetiolata (14 each one and five shared). Both species exhibited a species-specific mosaic distribution of haplotypes, with many of them being range-restricted and even private to populations. The two beeches had comparable total haplotype diversity but F. lucida had much higher within-population diversity than F. longipetiolata. Molecular dating showed that the time to most recent common ancestor of all haplotypes was 6.36 Ma, with most haplotypes differentiating during the Quaternary. [Correction added on 14 October 2013, after first online publication: the timeunit has been corrected to ‘6.36’.] Our results support a late Miocene origin and southwards colonization of Chinese beeches when the aridity in Central Asia intensified and the monsoon climate began to dominate the East Asia. During the Quaternary, long-term isolation in subtropical mountains of China coupled with limited gene flow would have lead to the current species-specific mosaic distribution of lineages. PMID:24340187

  14. Development of peptide-based lineage-specific serology for chronic Chagas disease: geographical and clinical distribution of epitope recognition.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Falconar, Andrew K; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Costales, Jaime A; Grijalva, Mario J; Lewis, Michael D; Messenger, Louisa A; Tran, Trang T; Ramirez, Juan-David; Guhl, Felipe; Carrasco, Hernan J; Diosque, Patricio; Garcia, Lineth; Litvinov, Sergey V; Miles, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America. Genetically diverse, the species is sub-divided into six lineages, known as TcI-TcVI, which have disparate geographical and ecological distributions. TcII, TcV, and TcVI are associated with severe human disease in the Southern Cone countries, whereas TcI is associated with cardiomyopathy north of the Amazon. T. cruzi persists as a chronic infection, with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal symptoms developing years or decades after initial infection. Identifying an individual's history of T. cruzi lineage infection directly by genotyping of the parasite is complicated by the low parasitaemia and sequestration in the host tissues. We have applied here serology against lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface antigen TSSA, as an indirect approach to allow identification of infecting lineage. Chagasic sera from chronic patients from a range of endemic countries were tested by ELISA against synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific TSSA epitopes bound to avidin-coated ELISA plates via a biotin labelled polyethylene glycol-glycine spacer to increase rotation and ensure each amino acid side chain could freely interact with their antibodies. 79/113 (70%) of samples from Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina recognised the TSSA epitope common to lineages TcII/TcV/TcVI. Comparison with clinical information showed that a higher proportion of Brazilian TSSApep-II/V/VI responders had ECG abnormalities than non-responders (38% vs 17%; p<0.0001). Among northern chagasic sera 4/20 (20%) from Ecuador reacted with this peptide; 1/12 Venezuelan and 1/34 Colombian samples reacted with TSSApep-IV. In addition, a proposed TcI-specific epitope, described elsewhere, was demonstrated here to be highly conserved across lineages and therefore not applicable to lineage-specific serology. These results demonstrate the considerable potential for synthetic

  15. Development of Peptide-Based Lineage-Specific Serology for Chronic Chagas Disease: Geographical and Clinical Distribution of Epitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Falconar, Andrew K.; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Costales, Jaime A.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Lewis, Michael D.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Tran, Trang T.; Ramirez, Juan-David; Guhl, Felipe; Carrasco, Hernan J.; Diosque, Patricio; Garcia, Lineth; Litvinov, Sergey V.; Miles, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America. Genetically diverse, the species is sub-divided into six lineages, known as TcI–TcVI, which have disparate geographical and ecological distributions. TcII, TcV, and TcVI are associated with severe human disease in the Southern Cone countries, whereas TcI is associated with cardiomyopathy north of the Amazon. T. cruzi persists as a chronic infection, with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal symptoms developing years or decades after initial infection. Identifying an individual's history of T. cruzi lineage infection directly by genotyping of the parasite is complicated by the low parasitaemia and sequestration in the host tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings We have applied here serology against lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface antigen TSSA, as an indirect approach to allow identification of infecting lineage. Chagasic sera from chronic patients from a range of endemic countries were tested by ELISA against synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific TSSA epitopes bound to avidin-coated ELISA plates via a biotin labelled polyethylene glycol-glycine spacer to increase rotation and ensure each amino acid side chain could freely interact with their antibodies. 79/113 (70%) of samples from Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina recognised the TSSA epitope common to lineages TcII/TcV/TcVI. Comparison with clinical information showed that a higher proportion of Brazilian TSSApep-II/V/VI responders had ECG abnormalities than non-responders (38% vs 17%; p<0.0001). Among northern chagasic sera 4/20 (20%) from Ecuador reacted with this peptide; 1/12 Venezuelan and 1/34 Colombian samples reacted with TSSApep-IV. In addition, a proposed TcI-specific epitope, described elsewhere, was demonstrated here to be highly conserved across lineages and therefore not applicable to lineage-specific serology. Conclusions

  16. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  17. Identification and characterization of lineage-specific genes within the Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew A; Zhu, Wei; Jiang, Ning; Lin, Haining; Ouyang, Shu; Childs, Kevin L; Haas, Brian J; Hamilton, John P; Buell, C Robin

    2007-12-01

    Using the rice (Oryza sativa) sp. japonica genome annotation, along with genomic sequence and clustered transcript assemblies from 184 species in the plant kingdom, we have identified a set of 861 rice genes that are evolutionarily conserved among six diverse species within the Poaceae yet lack significant sequence similarity with plant species outside the Poaceae. This set of evolutionarily conserved and lineage-specific rice genes is termed conserved Poaceae-specific genes (CPSGs) to reflect the presence of significant sequence similarity across three separate Poaceae subfamilies. The vast majority of rice CPSGs (86.6%) encode proteins with no putative function or functionally characterized protein domain. For the remaining CPSGs, 8.8% encode an F-box domain-containing protein and 4.5% encode a protein with a putative function. On average, the CPSGs have fewer exons, shorter total gene length, and elevated GC content when compared with genes annotated as either transposable elements (TEs) or those genes having significant sequence similarity in a species outside the Poaceae. Multiple sequence alignments of the CPSGs with sequences from other Poaceae species show conservation across a putative domain, a novel domain, or the entire coding length of the protein. At the genome level, syntenic alignments between sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and 103 of the 861 rice CPSGs (12.0%) could be made, demonstrating an additional level of conservation for this set of genes within the Poaceae. The extensive sequence similarity in evolutionarily distinct species within the Poaceae family and an additional screen for TE-related structural characteristics and sequence discounts these CPSGs as being misannotated TEs. Collectively, these data confirm that we have identified a specific set of genes that are highly conserved within, as well as specific to, the Poaceae.

  18. Identification and Characterization of Lineage-Specific Genes within the Poaceae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Matthew A.; Zhu, Wei; Jiang, Ning; Lin, Haining; Ouyang, Shu; Childs, Kevin L.; Haas, Brian J.; Hamilton, John P.; Buell, C. Robin

    2007-01-01

    Using the rice (Oryza sativa) sp. japonica genome annotation, along with genomic sequence and clustered transcript assemblies from 184 species in the plant kingdom, we have identified a set of 861 rice genes that are evolutionarily conserved among six diverse species within the Poaceae yet lack significant sequence similarity with plant species outside the Poaceae. This set of evolutionarily conserved and lineage-specific rice genes is termed conserved Poaceae-specific genes (CPSGs) to reflect the presence of significant sequence similarity across three separate Poaceae subfamilies. The vast majority of rice CPSGs (86.6%) encode proteins with no putative function or functionally characterized protein domain. For the remaining CPSGs, 8.8% encode an F-box domain-containing protein and 4.5% encode a protein with a putative function. On average, the CPSGs have fewer exons, shorter total gene length, and elevated GC content when compared with genes annotated as either transposable elements (TEs) or those genes having significant sequence similarity in a species outside the Poaceae. Multiple sequence alignments of the CPSGs with sequences from other Poaceae species show conservation across a putative domain, a novel domain, or the entire coding length of the protein. At the genome level, syntenic alignments between sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and 103 of the 861 rice CPSGs (12.0%) could be made, demonstrating an additional level of conservation for this set of genes within the Poaceae. The extensive sequence similarity in evolutionarily distinct species within the Poaceae family and an additional screen for TE-related structural characteristics and sequence discounts these CPSGs as being misannotated TEs. Collectively, these data confirm that we have identified a specific set of genes that are highly conserved within, as well as specific to, the Poaceae. PMID:17951464

  19. Population-Based Pediatric Hospitalization Burden of Lineage-Specific Influenza B in Hong Kong, 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Cowling, Benjamin J; Wu, Peng; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chan, Eunice L Y; Fang, Vicky J; So, Lok-Yee; Peiris, J S Malik; Chiu, Susan S

    2017-07-15

    Influenza B virus has been perceived to cause less disease burden and milder disease compared with influenza A, but recent studies suggest that influenza B does have a significant impact. We aimed to estimate the burden of influenza B virus infections on hospitalizations in Hong Kong, in the context of virus lineage changes over time. The pediatric age-specific rates of influenza B hospitalization in Hong Kong for 2004-2014 were estimated based on admissions to 2 hospitals that together catered for 72.5% of all pediatric admissions on Hong Kong Island. Influenza B virus was detected by immunofluorescence and culture on nasopharyngeal aspirates. Lineage typing was performed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. A total of 5085 children were recruited on 1 designated day each week, year-round during the 11 years, and 221 (4.3%) tested positive for influenza B. Hospitalization rates were highest in children aged 2 to <5 years with year-to-year variation. Victoria-lineage viruses appeared to be associated with a greater fraction of influenza B hospitalizations in children than of influenza B infections in the general community. Influenza B did not cause significant hospitalization in infants <1 year of age. We report one of the first population-based, age- and lineage-specific studies of pediatric hospitalization for influenza B. We found that changes in lineage were associated with higher hospitalization rates and documented that Victoria lineage viruses were associated with greater pediatric hospitalization burden compared with Yamagata lineage viruses.

  20. Aging-like Phenotype and Defective Lineage Specification in SIRT1-Deleted Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L.; Liang, Raymond; Izac, Brigitte; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Barbet, Gaetan; Donovan, Michael; Brugnara, Carlo; Blander, Julie M.; Sinclair, David A.; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT)1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging. PMID:25068121

  1. Aging-like phenotype and defective lineage specification in SIRT1-deleted hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L; Liang, Raymond; Izac, Brigitte; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Barbet, Gaetan; Donovan, Michael; Brugnara, Carlo; Blander, Julie M; Sinclair, David A; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-07-08

    Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT)1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging.

  2. Quantitative lineage tracing strategies to resolve multipotency in tissue-specific stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Rulands, Steffen; Simons, Benjamin D; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-06-01

    Lineage tracing has become the method of choice to study the fate and dynamics of stem cells (SCs) during development, homeostasis, and regeneration. However, transgenic and knock-in Cre drivers used to perform lineage tracing experiments are often dynamically, temporally, and heterogeneously expressed, leading to the initial labeling of different cell types and thereby complicating their interpretation. Here, we developed two methods: the first one based on statistical analysis of multicolor lineage tracing, allowing the definition of multipotency potential to be achieved with high confidence, and the second one based on lineage tracing at saturation to assess the fate of all SCs within a given lineage and the "flux" of cells between different lineages. Our analysis clearly shows that, whereas the prostate develops from multipotent SCs, only unipotent SCs mediate mammary gland (MG) development and adult tissue remodeling. These methods offer a rigorous framework to assess the lineage relationship and SC fate in different organs and tissues. © 2016 Wuidart et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Concise review: chemical approaches for modulating lineage-specific stem cells and progenitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Mingliang; Laurent, Timothy; Xie, Min; Ding, Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Generation and manipulation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vitro and/or in vivo are critical for the development of stem cell-based clinical therapeutics. Lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells have many advantageous qualities, including being able to efficiently engraft and differentiate into desirable cell types in vivo after transplantation, and they are much less tumorigenic than pluripotent cells. Generation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells can be achieved by directed differentiation from pluripotent stem cells or lineage conversion from easily obtained somatic cells. Small molecules can be very helpful in these processes since they offer several important benefits. For example, the risk of tumorigenesis is greatly reduced when small molecules are used to replace integrated transcription factors, which are widely used in cell fate conversion. Furthermore, small molecules are relatively easy to apply, optimize, and manufacture, and they can more readily be developed into conventional pharmaceuticals. Alternatively, small molecules can be used to expand or selectively control the differentiation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells for desirable therapeutics purposes in vitro or in vivo. Here we summarize recent progress in the use of small molecules for the expansion and generation of desirable lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vitro and for selectively controlling cell fate of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vivo, thereby facilitating stem cell-based clinical applications.

  4. Single-cell analysis of early B-lymphocyte development suggests independent regulation of lineage specification and commitment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Sasan; Åhsberg, Josefine; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Stjernberg, Jenny; Qian, Hong; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the process of B-lymphocyte lineage restriction, we have investigated molecular and functional properties in early B-lineage cells from Pax-5–deficient animals crossed to a B-lineage–restricted reporter mouse, allowing us to identify B-lineage–specified progenitors independently of conventional surface markers. Pax-5 deficiency resulted in a dramatic increase in the frequency of specified progenitor B-cells marked by expression of a λ5 (Igll1) promoter-controlled reporter gene. Gene expression analysis of ex vivo isolated progenitor cells revealed that Pax-5 deficiency has a minor impact on B-cell specification. However, single-cell in vitro differentiation analysis of ex vivo isolated cells revealed that specified B-lineage progenitors still displayed a high degree of plasticity for development into NK or T lineage cells. In contrast, we were unable to detect any major changes in myeloid lineage potential in specified Pax-5–deficient cells. By comparison of gene expression patterns in ex vivo isolated Pax-5– and Ebf-1–deficient progenitors, it was possible to identify a set of B-cell–restricted genes dependent on Ebf-1 but not Pax-5, supporting the idea that B-cell specification and commitment is controlled by distinct regulatory networks. PMID:23019372

  5. Identification of a lineage specific zinc responsive genomic island in Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Eckelt, Elke; Jarek, Michael; Frömke, Cornelia; Meens, Jochen; Goethe, Ralph

    2014-12-06

    Maintenance of metal homeostasis is crucial in bacterial pathogenicity as metal starvation is the most important mechanism in the nutritional immunity strategy of host cells. Thus, pathogenic bacteria have evolved sensitive metal scavenging systems to overcome this particular host defence mechanism. The ruminant pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) displays a unique gut tropism and causes a chronic progressive intestinal inflammation. MAP possesses eight conserved lineage specific large sequence polymorphisms (LSP), which distinguish MAP from its ancestral M. avium ssp. hominissuis or other M. avium subspecies. LSP14 and LSP15 harbour many genes proposed to be involved in metal homeostasis and have been suggested to substitute for a MAP specific, impaired mycobactin synthesis. In the present study, we found that a LSP14 located putative IrtAB-like iron transporter encoded by mptABC was induced by zinc but not by iron starvation. Heterologous reporter gene assays with the lacZ gene under control of the mptABC promoter in M. smegmatis (MSMEG) and in a MSMEG∆furB deletion mutant revealed a zinc dependent, metalloregulator FurB mediated expression of mptABC via a conserved mycobacterial FurB recognition site. Deep sequencing of RNA from MAP cultures treated with the zinc chelator TPEN revealed that 70 genes responded to zinc limitation. Remarkably, 45 of these genes were located on a large genomic island of approximately 90 kb which harboured LSP14 and LSP15. Thirty-five of these genes were predicted to be controlled by FurB, due to the presence of putative binding sites. This clustering of zinc responsive genes was exclusively found in MAP and not in other mycobacteria. Our data revealed a particular genomic signature for MAP given by a unique zinc specific locus, thereby suggesting an exceptional relevance of zinc for the metabolism of MAP. MAP seems to be well adapted to maintain zinc homeostasis which might contribute to the peculiarity of MAP

  6. Lineage-specific evolutionary rate in plants: Contributions of a screening for Cereus (Cactaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Romeiro-Brito, Monique; Moraes, Evandro M.; Taylor, Nigel P.; Zappi, Daniela C.; Franco, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Predictable chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences have been listed for the shallowest taxonomic studies in plants. We investigated whether plastid regions that vary between closely allied species could be applied for intraspecific studies and compared the variation of these plastid segments with two nuclear regions. Methods: We screened 16 plastid and two nuclear intronic regions for species of the genus Cereus (Cactaceae) at three hierarchical levels (species from different clades, species of the same clade, and allopatric populations). Results: Ten plastid regions presented interspecific variation, and six of them showed variation at the intraspecific level. The two nuclear regions showed both inter- and intraspecific variation, and in general they showed higher levels of variability in almost all hierarchical levels than the plastid segments. Discussion: Our data suggest no correspondence between variation of plastid regions at the interspecific and intraspecific level, probably due to lineage-specific variation in cpDNA, which appears to have less effect in nuclear data. Despite the heterogeneity in evolutionary rates of cpDNA, we highlight three plastid segments that may be considered in initial screenings in plant phylogeographic studies. PMID:26819857

  7. Wt1 directs the lineage specification of sertoli and granulosa cells by repressing Sf1 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Zhang, Lianjun; Cui, Xiuhong; Lin, Xiwen; Li, Yaqiong; Wang, Yaqing; Wang, Yanbo; Qin, Yan; Chen, Dahua; Han, Chunsheng; Zhou, Bin; Huff, Vicki; Gao, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Supporting cells (Sertoli and granulosa) and steroidogenic cells (Leydig and theca-interstitium) are two major somatic cell types in mammalian gonads, but the mechanisms that control their differentiation during gonad development remain elusive. In this study, we found that deletion of Wt1 in the ovary after sex determination caused ectopic development of steroidogenic cells at the embryonic stage. Furthermore, differentiation of both Sertoli and granulosa cells was blocked when Wt1 was deleted before sex determination and most genital ridge somatic cells differentiated into steroidogenic cells in both male and female gonads. Further studies revealed that WT1 repressed Sf1 expression by directly binding to the Sf1 promoter region, and the repressive function was completely abolished when WT1 binding sites were mutated. This study demonstrates that Wt1 is required for the lineage specification of both Sertoli and granulosa cells by repressing Sf1 expression. Without Wt1, the expression of Sf1 was upregulated and the somatic cells differentiated into steroidogenic cells instead of supporting cells. Our study uncovers a novel mechanism of somatic cell differentiation during gonad development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Divergent expression patterns of Sox9 duplicates in teleosts indicate a lineage specific subfunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Kondo, Mariko; Herpin, Amaury; Mitani, Hiroshi; Schartl, Manfred

    2005-06-01

    Sry-related HMG-box genes are key regulators of several developmental processes. Sox9 encodes a transcription factor required for cartilage formation and testis determination in mammals. In zebrafish (Danio rerio) and stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) two co-orthologs of Sox9 are present. To date, only one Sox9 had been identified in medaka (Oryzias latipes). We have now isolated the second Sox9 gene. Sequence analysis, phylogenetic data, linkage mapping as well as expression pattern all together suggest that the medaka Sox9a and Sox9b are co-orthologs. During embryogenesis, the expression pattern of Sox9a and Sox9b are distinct but overlap considerably in craniofacial cartilage elements. Comparing the zebrafish Sox9a and Sox9b expression patterns with medaka Sox9a and Sox9b expression domains revealed that some are identical but others are clearly different. We conclude that Sox9 regulatory subfunctions were not partitioned before divergence of the teleosts and evolved to lineage-specific expression domains.

  9. FoxA1 as a lineage-specific oncogene in luminal type breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Ito, Emi; Azuma, Sakura; Honma, Reiko; Yanagisawa, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mika; Imai, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-25

    The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 is thought to be involved in mammary tumorigenesis. However, the precise role of FoxA1 in breast cancer development is controversial. We examined expression of FoxA1 in 35 human breast cancer cell lines and compared it with that of ErbB2, a marker of poor prognosis in breast cancer. We found that FoxA1 is expressed at high levels in all ErbB2-positive cell lines and a subset of ErbB2-negative cell lines. Down-regulation of FoxA1 by RNA interference significantly suppressed proliferation of ErbB2-negative and FoxA1-positive breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of FoxA1 also enhanced the toxic effect of Herceptin on ErbB2-positive cell lines through induction of apoptosis. Taken together with previous data that FoxA1 is a marker of luminal cells in mammary gland, our present results suggest that FoxA1 plays an important role as a lineage-specific oncogene in proliferation of cancer cells derived from mammary luminal cells.

  10. Evolution of lineage-specific functions in ancient cis-regulatory modules

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Stefan; Goode, Debbie K.; Petrone, Libero; Oliveri, Paola; Elgar, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Morphological evolution is driven both by coding sequence variation and by changes in regulatory sequences. However, how cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) evolve to generate entirely novel expression domains is largely unknown. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of a lens enhancer located within a CRM that not only predates the lens, a vertebrate innovation, but bilaterian animals in general. Alignments of orthologous sequences from different deuterostomes sub-divide the CRM into a deeply conserved core and a more divergent flanking region. We demonstrate that all deuterostome flanking regions, including invertebrate sequences, activate gene expression in the zebrafish lens through the same ancient cluster of activator sites. However, levels of gene expression vary between species due to the presence of repressor motifs in flanking region and core. These repressor motifs are responsible for the relatively weak enhancer activity of tetrapod flanking regions. Ray-finned fish, however, have gained two additional lineage-specific activator motifs which in combination with the ancient cluster of activators and the core constitute a potent lens enhancer. The exploitation and modification of existing regulatory potential in flanking regions but not in the highly conserved core might represent a more general model for the emergence of novel regulatory functions in complex CRMs. PMID:26538567

  11. The evolution of lineage-specific regulatory activities in the human embryonic limb.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; Leng, Jing; Yin, Jun; Reilly, Steven K; DeMare, Laura E; Emera, Deena; Ayoub, Albert E; Rakic, Pasko; Noonan, James P

    2013-07-03

    The evolution of human anatomical features likely involved changes in gene regulation during development. However, the nature and extent of human-specific developmental regulatory functions remain unknown. We obtained a genome-wide view of cis-regulatory evolution in human embryonic tissues by comparing the histone modification H3K27ac, which provides a quantitative readout of promoter and enhancer activity, during human, rhesus, and mouse limb development. Based on increased H3K27ac, we find that 13% of promoters and 11% of enhancers have gained activity on the human lineage since the human-rhesus divergence. These gains largely arose by modification of ancestral regulatory activities in the limb or potential co-option from other tissues and are likely to have heterogeneous genetic causes. Most enhancers that exhibit gain of activity in humans originated in mammals. Gains at promoters and enhancers in the human limb are associated with increased gene expression, suggesting they include molecular drivers of human morphological evolution.

  12. The lineage-specific gene ponzr1 is essential for zebrafish pronephric and pharyngeal arch development.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Victoria M; Person, Anthony D; Larson, Jon D; McLoon, Anna; Balciunas, Darius; Clark, Karl J; Neff, Kevin I; Nelson, Katie E; Bill, Brent R; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Beiraghi, Soraya; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-02-01

    The Homeobox (Hox) and Paired box (Pax) gene families are key determinants of animal body plans and organ structure. In particular, they function within regulatory networks that control organogenesis. How these conserved genes elicit differences in organ form and function in response to evolutionary pressures is incompletely understood. We molecularly and functionally characterized one member of an evolutionarily dynamic gene family, plac8 onzin related protein 1 (ponzr1), in the zebrafish. ponzr1 mRNA is expressed early in the developing kidney and pharyngeal arches. Using ponzr1-targeting morpholinos, we show that ponzr1 is required for formation of the glomerulus. Loss of ponzr1 results in a nonfunctional glomerulus but retention of a functional pronephros, an arrangement similar to the aglomerular kidneys found in a subset of marine fish. ponzr1 is integrated into the pax2a pathway, with ponzr1 expression requiring pax2a gene function, and proper pax2a expression requiring normal ponzr1 expression. In addition to pronephric function, ponzr1 is required for pharyngeal arch formation. We functionally demonstrate that ponzr1 can act as a transcription factor or co-factor, providing the first molecular mode of action for this newly described gene family. Together, this work provides experimental evidence of an additional mechanism that incorporates evolutionarily dynamic, lineage-specific gene families into conserved regulatory gene networks to create functional organ diversity.

  13. Environmental physical cues determine the lineage specification of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Dai, Jingxing; Zhang, Xin A

    2015-06-01

    Physical cues of cellular environment affect cell fate and differentiation. For example, an environment with high stiffness drives mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to undergo osteogenic differentiation, while low stiffness leads to lipogenic differentiation. Such effects could be independent of chemical/biochemical inducers. Stiffness and/or topography of cellular environment can control MSC differentiation and fate determination. In addition, physical factors such as tension, which resulted from profound cytoskeleton reorganization during MSC differentiation, affect the gene expression essential for the differentiation. Although physical cues control MSC lineage specification probably by reorganizing and tuning cytoskeleton, the full mechanism is largely unclear. It also remains elusive how physical signals are sensed by cells and transformed into biochemical and biological signals. More importantly, it becomes pivotal to define explicitly the physical cue(s) essential for cell differentiation and fate decision. With a focus on MSC, we present herein current understanding of the interplay between i) physical cue and factors and ii) MSC differentiation and fate determination. Biophysical cues can initiate or strengthen the biochemical signaling for MSC fate determination and differentiation. Physical properties of cellular environment direct the structural adaptation and functional coupling of the cells to their environment. These observations not only open a simple avenue to engineer cell fate in vitro, but also start to reveal the physical elements that regulate and determine cell fate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative analysis of mammalian Y chromosomes illuminates ancestral structure and lineage-specific evolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Davis, Brian W.; Raudsepp, Terje; Pearks Wilkerson, Alison J.; Mason, Victor C.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; O'Brien, Patricia C.; Waters, Paul D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Although more than thirty mammalian genomes have been sequenced to draft quality, very few of these include the Y chromosome. This has limited our understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of gene persistence and loss, our ability to identify conserved regulatory elements, as well our knowledge of the extent to which different types of selection act to maintain genes within this unique genomic environment. Here, we present the first MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) sequences from two carnivores, the domestic dog and cat. By combining these with other available MSY data, our multiordinal comparison allows for the first accounting of levels of selection constraining the evolution of eutherian Y chromosomes. Despite gene gain and loss across the phylogeny, we show the eutherian ancestor retained a core set of 17 MSY genes, most being constrained by negative selection for nearly 100 million years. The X-degenerate and ampliconic gene classes are partitioned into distinct chromosomal domains in most mammals, but were radically restructured on the human lineage. We identified multiple conserved noncoding elements that potentially regulate eutherian MSY genes. The acquisition of novel ampliconic gene families was accompanied by signatures of positive selection and has differentially impacted the degeneration and expansion of MSY gene repertoires in different species. PMID:23788650

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Protein Expression to Study Lineage Specification in Mouse Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Nestor; Kang, Minjung; Schrode, Nadine; Lou, Xinghua; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    This protocol presents a method to perform quantitative, single-cell in situ analyses of protein expression to study lineage specificationin mouse preimplantation embryos. The procedures necessary for embryo collection, immunofluorescence, imaging on a confocal microscope, and image segmentation and analysis are described. This method allows quantitation of the expression of multiple nuclear markers and the spatial (XYZ) coordinates of all cells in the embryo. It takes advantage of MINS, an image segmentation software tool specifically developed for the analysis of confocal images of preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies. MINS carries out unsupervised nuclear segmentation across the X, Y and Z dimensions, and produces information on cell position in three-dimensional space, as well as nuclear fluorescence levels for all channels with minimal user input. While this protocol has been optimized for the analysis of images of preimplantation stage mouse embryos, it can easily be adapted to the analysis of any other samples exhibiting a good signal-to-noise ratio and where high nuclear density poses a hurdle to image segmentation (e.g., expression analysis of embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies, differentiating cells in culture, embryos of other species or stages, etc.). PMID:26967230

  16. Intelligent bioengineering in vitiligo treatment: transdermal protein transduction of melanocyte-lineage-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Jiang, Xian; Du, Yu; Xue, Li

    2012-12-01

    Vitiligo is a common, incurable skin disease with a prevalence of about 1%. Although many vitiligo therapies are available in clinics, there is almost no one method that causes significant improvement in all vitiligo patients. Some have hypothesized that melanocyte dysfunction or deficiency underlies the loss of skin pigmentation observed in vitiligo. The autoimmune-mediated apoptosis of melanocytes might be an important part of the etiology of vitiligo, which prevents the formation of melanocytes in the skin. Here we propose a novel hypothesis for vitiligo treatment using in situ melanocyte regeneration induced by melanocyte-lineage-specific genes (MLSGs). This may serve as an intelligent bioengineering prototype. The hypothesis is based on the fact that MLSGs regulate melanocyte differentiation through epigenetic reprogramming, which includes microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), paired box 3 (PAX3), and Notch signaling. MITF directs the terminal differentiation of melanocytes, and PAX3 helps to establish the properties of the melanocyte stem cells. Notch signaling promotes adult stem cell proliferation and self-renewal. This process could be mimicked by Notch intracellular domain (NICD). MLSGs could also stimulate anti-apoptotic gene expression. Recent improvements in relevant biotechniques allow the transdermal delivery of MLSG proteins into the patient, where they enter cells through protein transduction. This process may promote melanocyte regeneration in situ with little impact on the hair follicular cycle or on carcinogenesis. This simple and efficient treatment may have significant impact on the treatment of vitiligo patients.

  17. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex is required for maintenance of lineage specific enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Alver, Burak H.; Kim, Kimberly H.; Lu, Ping; Wang, Xiaofeng; Manchester, Haley E.; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Park, Peter J.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Genes encoding subunits of SWI/SNF (BAF) chromatin remodelling complexes are collectively altered in over 20% of human malignancies, but the mechanisms by which these complexes alter chromatin to modulate transcription and cell fate are poorly understood. Utilizing mouse embryonic fibroblast and cancer cell line models, here we show via ChIP-seq and biochemical assays that SWI/SNF complexes are preferentially targeted to distal lineage specific enhancers and interact with p300 to modulate histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation. We identify a greater requirement for SWI/SNF at typical enhancers than at most super-enhancers and at enhancers in untranscribed regions than in transcribed regions. Our data further demonstrate that SWI/SNF-dependent distal enhancers are essential for controlling expression of genes linked to developmental processes. Our findings thus establish SWI/SNF complexes as regulators of the enhancer landscape and provide insight into the roles of SWI/SNF in cellular fate control. PMID:28262751

  18. Evolution of lineage-specific functions in ancient cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Stefan; Goode, Debbie K; Petrone, Libero; Oliveri, Paola; Elgar, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Morphological evolution is driven both by coding sequence variation and by changes in regulatory sequences. However, how cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) evolve to generate entirely novel expression domains is largely unknown. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of a lens enhancer located within a CRM that not only predates the lens, a vertebrate innovation, but bilaterian animals in general. Alignments of orthologous sequences from different deuterostomes sub-divide the CRM into a deeply conserved core and a more divergent flanking region. We demonstrate that all deuterostome flanking regions, including invertebrate sequences, activate gene expression in the zebrafish lens through the same ancient cluster of activator sites. However, levels of gene expression vary between species due to the presence of repressor motifs in flanking region and core. These repressor motifs are responsible for the relatively weak enhancer activity of tetrapod flanking regions. Ray-finned fish, however, have gained two additional lineage-specific activator motifs which in combination with the ancient cluster of activators and the core constitute a potent lens enhancer. The exploitation and modification of existing regulatory potential in flanking regions but not in the highly conserved core might represent a more general model for the emergence of novel regulatory functions in complex CRMs.

  19. Environmental Physical Cues Determine the Lineage Specification of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Dai, Jingxing; Zhang, Xin A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical cues of cellular environment affect cell fate and differentiation. For example, an environment with high stiffness drives mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to undergo osteogenic differentiation, while low stiffness leads to lipogenic differentiation. Such effects could be independent of chemical/biochemical inducers. Scope of review Stiffness and/or topography of cellular environment can control MSC differentiation and fate determination. In addition, physical factors such as tension, resulted from profound cytoskeleton reorganization during MSC differentiation, affect the gene expression essential for the differentiation. Although physical cues control MSC lineage specification probably by reorganizing and tuning cytoskeleton, the full mechanism is largely unclear. It also remains elusive how physical signals are sensed by cells and transformed into biochemical and biological signals. More importantly, it becomes pivotal to define explicitly the physical cue(s) essential for cell differentiation and fate decision. With a focus on MSC, we present herein current understanding of the interplay between i) physical cue and factors and ii) MSC differentiation and fate determination. Major conclusions Biophysical cues can initiate or strengthen the biochemical signaling for MSC fate determination and differentiation. Physical properties of cellular environment direct the structural adaptation and functional coupling of the cells to their environment. General significance These observations not only open a simple avenue to engineer cell fate in vitro, but also start to reveal the physical elements that regulate and determine cell fate. PMID:25727396

  20. Evolved structure of language shows lineage-specific trends in word-order universals.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Michael; Greenhill, Simon J; Levinson, Stephen C; Gray, Russell D

    2011-05-05

    Languages vary widely but not without limit. The central goal of linguistics is to describe the diversity of human languages and explain the constraints on that diversity. Generative linguists following Chomsky have claimed that linguistic diversity must be constrained by innate parameters that are set as a child learns a language. In contrast, other linguists following Greenberg have claimed that there are statistical tendencies for co-occurrence of traits reflecting universal systems biases, rather than absolute constraints or parametric variation. Here we use computational phylogenetic methods to address the nature of constraints on linguistic diversity in an evolutionary framework. First, contrary to the generative account of parameter setting, we show that the evolution of only a few word-order features of languages are strongly correlated. Second, contrary to the Greenbergian generalizations, we show that most observed functional dependencies between traits are lineage-specific rather than universal tendencies. These findings support the view that-at least with respect to word order-cultural evolution is the primary factor that determines linguistic structure, with the current state of a linguistic system shaping and constraining future states.

  1. A novel method for tissue-specific RNAi rescue in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Joachim G; David, Guido; Hassan, Bassem A

    2009-07-01

    Targeted gene silencing by RNA interference allows the study of gene function in plants and animals. In cell culture and small animal models, genetic screens can be performed--even tissue-specifically in Drosophila--with genome-wide RNAi libraries. However, a major problem with the use of RNAi approaches is the unavoidable false-positive error caused by off-target effects. Until now, this is minimized by computational RNAi design, comparing RNAi to the mutant phenotype if known, and rescue with a presumed ortholog. The ultimate proof of specificity would be to restore expression of the same gene product in vivo. Here, we present a simple and efficient method to rescue the RNAi-mediated knockdown of two independent genes in Drosophila. By exploiting the degenerate genetic code, we generated Drosophila RNAi Escape Strategy Construct (RESC) rescue proteins containing frequent silent mismatches in the complete RNAi target sequence. RESC products were no longer efficiently silenced by RNAi in cell culture and in vivo. As a proof of principle, we rescue the RNAi-induced loss of function phenotype of the eye color gene white and tracheal defects caused by the knockdown of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan. Our data suggest that RESC is widely applicable to rescue and validate ubiquitous or tissue-specific RNAi and to perform protein structure-function analysis.

  2. The sex of specific neurons controls female body growth in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sawala, Annick; Gould, Alex P

    2017-10-01

    Sexual dimorphisms in body size are widespread throughout the animal kingdom but their underlying mechanisms are not well characterized. Most models for how sex chromosome genes specify size dimorphism have emphasized the importance of gonadal hormones and cell-autonomous influences in mammals versus strictly cell-autonomous mechanisms in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we use tissue-specific genetics to investigate how sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is established in Drosophila. We find that the larger body size characteristic of Drosophila females is established very early in larval development via an increase in the growth rate per unit of body mass. We demonstrate that the female sex determination gene, Sex-lethal (Sxl), functions in central nervous system (CNS) neurons as part of a relay that specifies the early sex-specific growth trajectories of larval but not imaginal tissues. Neuronal Sxl acts additively in 2 neuronal subpopulations, one of which corresponds to 7 median neurosecretory cells: the insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Surprisingly, however, male-female differences in the production of insulin-like peptides (Ilps) from the IPCs do not appear to be involved in establishing SSD in early larvae, although they may play a later role. These findings support a relay model in which Sxl in neurons and Sxl in local tissues act together to specify the female-specific growth of the larval body. They also reveal that, even though the sex determination pathways in Drosophila and mammals are different, they both modulate body growth via a combination of tissue-autonomous and nonautonomous inputs.

  3. Isolation and characterization of an olfactory mutant in Drosophila with a chemically specific defect.

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, S L; Carlson, J R

    1989-01-01

    A Drosophila mutant was isolated and shown to exhibit defective response to the chemical odorant benzaldehyde in two distinctly different behavioral assays. The defect exhibited chemical specificity: response to three other chemicals was normal. The mutant also showed abnormalities in pigmentation and fertility. Genetic mapping and complementation analysis provide evidence that the olfactory, pigmentation, and fertility defects arise as a result of a lesion at the pentagon locus. The specificity of the olfactory defect suggests the possibility that the mutation may define a molecule required in reception, transduction, or processing of a specific subset of chemical information in the olfactory system. Images PMID:2495539

  4. Genomics of Ecological Adaptation in Cactophilic Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G.; Dias, Guilherme B.; Ruiz, Jeronimo C.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G.; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P.; Kuhn, Gustavo C.S.; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G.; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene–environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  5. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Cabello, Ana M; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-22

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages.

  6. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M.; Cabello, Ana M.; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Gasol, Josep M.; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages. PMID:27002549

  7. Mislocalization of the Drosophila centromere-specific histone CIDpromotes formation of functional ectopic kinetochores

    SciTech Connect

    Heun, Patrick; Erhardt, Sylvia; Blower, Michael D.; Weiss,Samara; Skora, Andrew D.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-01-30

    The centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation. Here, we show that overexpressed CID is mislocalized into normally non-centromeric regions in Drosophila tissue culture cells and animals. Analysis of mitoses in living and fixed cells reveals that mitotic delays, anaphase bridges, chromosome fragmentation, and cell and organismal lethality are all direct consequences of CID mislocalization. In addition, proteins that are normally restricted to endogenous kinetochores assemble at a subset of ectopic CID incorporation regions. The presence of microtubule motors and binding proteins, spindle attachments, and aberrant chromosome morphologies demonstrate that these ectopic kinetochores are functional. We conclude that CID mislocalization promotes formation of ectopic centromeres and multicentric chromosomes, which causes chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and growth defects. Thus, CENP-A mislocalization is one possible mechanism for genome instability during cancer progression, as well as centromere plasticity during evolution.

  8. Evaluation of Customised Lineage-Specific Sets of MIRU-VNTR Loci for Genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Nyaho, Michael Selasi; Borrell, Sonia; Comas, Iñaki; Gagneux, Sebastien; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Background Different combinations of variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci have been proposed for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Existing VNTR schemes show different discriminatory capacity among the six human MTBC lineages. Here, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a “customized MIRU12” loci format proposed previously by Comas et al. based on the standard 24 loci defined by Supply et al. for VNTR-typing of MTBC in Ghana. Method One hundred and fifty-eight MTBC isolates classified into Lineage 4 and Lineage 5 were used to compare a customized lineage-specific panel of 12 MIRU-VNTR loci (“customized MIRU-12″) to the standard MIRU-15 genotyping scheme. The resolution power of each typing method was determined based on the Hunter-Gaston- Discriminatory Index (HGDI). A minimal set of customized MIRU-VNTR loci for typing Lineages 4 (Euro-American) and 5 (M. africanum West African 1) strains from Ghana was defined based on the cumulative HGDI. Results and Conclusion Among the 106 Lineage 4 strains, the customized MIRU-12 identified a total of 104 distinct genotypes consisting of 2 clusters of 2 isolates each (clustering rate 1.8%), and 102 unique strains while standard MIRU-15 yielded a total of 105 different genotypes, including 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9%) and 104 singletons. Among, 52 Lineage 5 isolates, customized MIRU-12 genotyping defined 51 patterns with 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9%) and 50 unique strains whereas MIRU-15 classified all 52 strains as unique. Cumulative HGDI values for customized MIRU-12 for Lineages 4 and 5 were 0.98 respectively whilst that of standard MIRU-15 was 0.99. A union of loci from the customised MIRU-12 and standard MIRU-15 revealed a set of customized eight highly discriminatory loci: 4052, 2163B, 40, 4165, 2165, 10,16 and 26 with a cumulative HGDI of 0.99 for genotyping Lineage 4 and 5 strains from Ghana. PMID:24667333

  9. Lineage-specific rediploidization is a mechanism to explain time-lags between genome duplication and evolutionary diversification.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fiona M; Gundappa, Manu Kumar; Grammes, Fabian; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; Redmond, Anthony K; Lien, Sigbjørn; Martin, Samuel A M; Holland, Peter W H; Sandve, Simen R; Macqueen, Daniel J

    2017-06-14

    The functional divergence of duplicate genes (ohnologues) retained from whole genome duplication (WGD) is thought to promote evolutionary diversification. However, species radiation and phenotypic diversification are often temporally separated from WGD. Salmonid fish, whose ancestor underwent WGD by autotetraploidization ~95 million years ago, fit such a 'time-lag' model of post-WGD radiation, which occurred alongside a major delay in the rediploidization process. Here we propose a model, 'lineage-specific ohnologue resolution' (LORe), to address the consequences of delayed rediploidization. Under LORe, speciation precedes rediploidization, allowing independent ohnologue divergence in sister lineages sharing an ancestral WGD event. Using cross-species sequence capture, phylogenomics and genome-wide analyses of ohnologue expression divergence, we demonstrate the major impact of LORe on salmonid evolution. One-quarter of each salmonid genome, harbouring at least 4550 ohnologues, has evolved under LORe, with rediploidization and functional divergence occurring on multiple independent occasions >50 million years post-WGD. We demonstrate the existence and regulatory divergence of many LORe ohnologues with functions in lineage-specific physiological adaptations that potentially facilitated salmonid species radiation. We show that LORe ohnologues are enriched for different functions than 'older' ohnologues that began diverging in the salmonid ancestor. LORe has unappreciated significance as a nested component of post-WGD divergence that impacts the functional properties of genes, whilst providing ohnologues available solely for lineage-specific adaptation. Under LORe, which is predicted following many WGD events, the functional outcomes of WGD need not appear 'explosively', but can arise gradually over tens of millions of years, promoting lineage-specific diversification regimes under prevailing ecological pressures.

  10. 3-Dimensional Examination of the Adult Mouse Subventricular Zone Reveals Lineage-Specific Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Kasum; Fiorelli, Roberto; Zweifel, Stefan; Hurtado-Chong, Anahi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Slomianka, Lutz; Raineteau, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle is populated by heterogeneous populations of stem and progenitor cells that, depending on their exact location, are biased to acquire specific neuronal fates. This newly described heterogeneity of SVZ stem and progenitor cells underlines the necessity to develop methods for the accurate quantification of SVZ stem and progenitor subpopulations. In this study, we provide 3-dimensional topographical maps of slow cycling “stem” cells and progenitors based on their unique cell cycle properties. These maps revealed that both cell populations are present throughout the lateral ventricle wall as well as in discrete regions of the dorsal wall. Immunodetection of transcription factors expressed in defined progenitor populations further reveals that divergent lineages have clear regional enrichments in the rostro-caudal as well as in the dorso-ventral span of the lateral ventricle. Thus, progenitors expressing Tbr2 and Dlx2 were confined to dorsal and dorso-lateral regions of the lateral ventricle, respectively, while Mash1+ progenitors were more homogeneously distributed. All cell populations were enriched in the rostral-most region of the lateral ventricle. This diversity and uneven distribution greatly impede the accurate quantification of SVZ progenitor populations. This is illustrated by measuring the coefficient of error of estimates obtained by using increasing section sampling interval. Based on our empirical data, we provide such estimates for all progenitor populations investigated in this study. These can be used in future studies as guidelines to judge if the precision obtained with a sampling scheme is sufficient to detect statistically significant differences between experimental groups if a biological effect is present. Altogether, our study underlines the need to consider the SVZ of the lateral ventricle as a complex 3D structure and define methods to accurately assess

  11. Drosophila astrocytes cover specific territories of the CNS neuropil and are instructed to differentiate by Prospero, a key effector of Notch.

    PubMed

    Peco, Emilie; Davla, Sejal; Camp, Darius; Stacey, Stephanie M; Landgraf, Matthias; van Meyel, Don J

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes are crucial in the formation, fine-tuning, function and plasticity of neural circuits in the central nervous system. However, important questions remain about the mechanisms instructing astrocyte cell fate. We have studied astrogenesis in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila larvae, where astrocytes exhibit remarkable morphological and molecular similarities to those in mammals. We reveal the births of larval astrocytes from a multipotent glial lineage, their allocation to reproducible positions, and their deployment of ramified arbors to cover specific neuropil territories to form a stereotyped astroglial map. Finally, we unraveled a molecular pathway for astrocyte differentiation in which the Ets protein Pointed and the Notch signaling pathway are required for astrogenesis; however, only Notch is sufficient to direct non-astrocytic progenitors toward astrocytic fate. We found that Prospero is a key effector of Notch in this process. Our data identify an instructive astrogenic program that acts as a binary switch to distinguish astrocytes from other glial cells.

  12. Combined lineage mapping and fate specification profiling with NLOM-OCM using sub-10-fs pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, H. C.; Dodson, C. R.; Bai, Y.; Lekven, A. C.; Yeh, A. T.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a combined NLOM-OCM method using ultrashort sub-10-fs pulses to study cell lineages and their gene expression profiles in zebrafish. First, time-lapse NLOM is used to capture embryo morphology (broadly excited autofluorescence) and cell lineage dynamics (eGFP reporter). The embryo is then fixed and an in situ hybridization performed, depositing NBT/BCIP precipitate where a gene of interest is actively expressed. Combined NLOM-OCM is then used to capture the gene expression pattern with 3-D resolution and these two data sets acquired from the same embryo are merged using morphological landmarks. We have used this approach to study the dynamics of the wnt1 lineage at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) in normal and in fgf8a(ace) morphant embryos. We show that with fgf8a knock-down, the MHB constriction begins to form but subsequent failure of the constriction causes the incorporation of a transient cerebellar structure into caudal tectum. Concomitantly, this morphological distortion in the dorsal MHB causes anterior displacement in a ventral subpopulation of the wnt1 lineage at the MHB. NLOM-OCM confirms the displaced wnt1 MHB lineage stops expressing the wnt1 reporter, and with further experiments we can investigate markers such as wnt4 or ascl1a, which have been shown to be expanded caudally in ace mutants, to understand the transformed molecular fate of this displaced tissue. We conclude this approach of co-registering dynamic lineage tracing and in situ hybridization data sets using morphological context will help shed light on developmental mechanisms by integrating established analysis techniques at the morphological, cellular, and molecular levels.

  13. Altering the sex determination pathway in Drosophila fat body modifies sex-specific stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Neckameyer, Wendi S.

    2014-01-01

    The stress response in Drosophila melanogaster reveals sex differences in behavior, similar to what has been observed in mammals. However, unlike mammals, the sex determination pathway in Drosophila is well established, making this an ideal system to identify factors involved in the modulation of sex-specific responses to stress. In this study, we show that the Drosophila fat body, which has been shown to be important for energy homeostasis and sex determination, is a dynamic tissue that is altered in response to stress in a sex and time-dependent manner. We manipulated the sex determination pathway in the fat body via targeted expression of transformer and transformer-2 and analyzed these animals for changes in their response to stress. In the majority of cases, manipulation of transformer or transformer-2 was able to change the physiological output in response to starvation and oxidative stress to that of the opposite sex. Our data also uncover the possibility of additional downstream targets for transformer and transformer-2 that are separate from the sex determination pathway and can influence behavioral and physiological responses. PMID:24789992

  14. Gene regulation and species-specific evolution of free-flight odor-tracking in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Houot, Benjamin; Cazalé-Debat, Laurie; Fraichard, Stéphane; Everaerts, Claude; Saxena, Nitesh; Sane, Sanjay P; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2017-09-12

    The flight ability of insects has coevolved with the development of organs necessary for takeoff from the ground, and to generate and modulate lift while flying in complex environments. Flight orientation to the appropriate food source and mating partner depends on the perception and integration of multiple chemical signals. We used a wind tunnel-based assay to investigate the natural and molecular evolution of free-flight odor-tracking behavior in Drosophila. First, the comparison of female and male flies of several populations and species revealed substantial sex-related, inter- and intra-specific variations for distinct flight features. In these flies, we compared the molecular structure of desat1, a fast-evolving gene involved in multiple aspects of pheromonal communication in Drosophila. We manipulated desat1 regulation and found that both neural and non-neural tissues influence distinct flight features. Together, our data suggest that desat1 is involved in the evolution of free-flight odor-tracking behaviors in Drosophila. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Male specific expression of a cytochrome P450 (Cyp312a1) in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Shinji; Tomita, Takashi

    2003-01-24

    Using cDNA array techniques, the transcriptional levels of Drosophila cytochrome P450 (P450) genes were compared between male and female flies. Of the 86 P450s, 15 isoforms were picked up and the levels of transcription were confirmed by the real time quantitative RT-PCR. Cyp315a1 and Cyp302a1, which had been reported as P450s involved in the ecdysteroid biosynthesis, were included in the 15 isoforms and expression of these P450s was 8.6- and 7.9-fold higher in females than in males, respectively. In addition, we confirmed that expression of Cyp312a1 was 82-fold higher in adult males than females. This gene expression was observed mostly in the abdomen and its transcription level gradually increased from pupal stage and peaked in the 5-day-old adult. Furthermore, the male specific expression of Cyp312a1 was universally observed in three Drosophila strains originated from the USA (Oregon R), China (Canton S), and Japan (HKJ), suggesting possible involvement of this P450 in significant endogenous catalytic reaction(s). This is the first report of a P450 enzyme being predominantly expressed in male Drosophila.

  16. Comparative host specificity of human- and pig- associated Staphylococcus aureus clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Arshnee; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Nielsen, Søren S; McCarthy, Alex J; Lindsay, Jodi A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8), ST22 (CC22) and ST36(CC30)] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398) and ST433(CC30)] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1) human and porcine ST398; mix 2) human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3) human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001). In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs.

  17. Lineage-Specific Patterns of Functional Diversification in the α- and β-Globin Gene Families of Tetrapod Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.; Opazo, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    The α- and β-globin gene families of jawed vertebrates have diversified with respect to both gene function and the developmental timing of gene expression. Phylogenetic reconstructions of globin gene family evolution have provided suggestive evidence that the developmental regulation of hemoglobin synthesis has evolved independently in multiple vertebrate lineages. For example, the embryonic β-like globin genes of birds and placental mammals are not 1:1 orthologs. Despite the similarity in developmental expression profiles, the genes are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a β-globin pro-ortholog. This suggests the possibility that other vertebrate taxa may also possess distinct repertoires of globin genes that were produced by repeated rounds of lineage-specific gene duplication and divergence. Until recently, investigations into this possibility have been hindered by the dearth of genomic sequence data from nonmammalian vertebrates. Here, we report new insights into globin gene family evolution that were provided by a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate globins combined with a comparative genomic analysis of three key sauropsid taxa: a squamate reptile (anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis), a passeriform bird (zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata), and a galliform bird (chicken, Gallus gallus). The main objectives of this study were 1) to characterize evolutionary changes in the size and membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families of tetrapod vertebrates and 2) to test whether functional diversification of the globin gene clusters occurred independently in different tetrapod lineages. Results of our comparative genomic analysis revealed several intriguing patterns of gene turnover in the globin gene clusters of different taxa. Lineage-specific differences in gene content were especially pronounced in the β-globin gene family, as phylogenetic reconstructions revealed that amphibians, lepidosaurs (as represented by anole

  18. Development stage-specific proteomic profiling uncovers small, lineage specific proteins most abundant in the Aspergillus Fumigatus conidial proteome.

    PubMed

    Suh, Moo-Jin; Fedorova, Natalie D; Cagas, Steven E; Hastings, Susan; Fleischmann, Robert D; Peterson, Scott N; Perlin, David S; Nierman, William C; Pieper, Rembert; Momany, Michelle

    2012-04-30

    , respiratory metabolism, amino acid and carbohydrate biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The observed temporal expression patterns suggest that the A. fumigatus conidia are dominated by small, lineage-specific proteins. Some of them may play key roles in host-pathogen interactions, signal transduction during conidial germination, or survival in hostile environments.

  19. BMP-mediated specification of the erythroid lineage suppresses endothelial development in blood island precursors

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Candace T.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental relationship between the blood and endothelial cell (EC) lineages remains unclear. In the extra-embryonic blood islands of birds and mammals, ECs and blood cells are closely intermixed, and blood island precursor cells in the primitive streak express many of the same molecular markers, leading to the suggestion that both lineages arise from a common precursor, called the hemangioblast. Cells within the blood island of Xenopus also coexpress predifferentiation markers of the blood and EC lineages. However, using multiple assays, we find that precursor cells in the Xenopus blood island do not normally differentiate into ECs, suggesting that classic hemangioblasts are rare or nonexistent in Xenopus. What prevents these precursor cells from developing into mature ECs? We have found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is essential for erythroid differentiation, and in the absence of BMP signaling, precursor cells adopt an EC fate. Furthermore, inhibition of the erythroid transcription pathway leads to endothelial differentiation. Our results indicate that bipotential endothelial/erythroid precursor cells do indeed exist in the Xenopus blood island, but BMP signaling normally acts to constrain EC fate. More generally, these results provide evidence that commitment to the erythroid lineage limits development of bipotential precursors toward an endothelial fate. PMID:24100450

  20. Evolutionary convergence of cell-specific gene expression in independent lineages of C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    John, Christopher R; Smith-Unna, Richard D; Woodfield, Helen; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M

    2014-05-01

    Leaves of almost all C4 lineages separate the reactions of photosynthesis into the mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The extent to which messenger RNA profiles of M and BS cells from independent C4 lineages resemble each other is not known. To address this, we conducted deep sequencing of RNA isolated from the M and BS of Setaria viridis and compared these data with publicly available information from maize (Zea mays). This revealed a high correlation (r=0.89) between the relative abundance of transcripts encoding proteins of the core C4 pathway in M and BS cells in these species, indicating significant convergence in transcript accumulation in these evolutionarily independent C4 lineages. We also found that the vast majority of genes encoding proteins of the C4 cycle in S. viridis are syntenic to homologs used by maize. In both lineages, 122 and 212 homologous transcription factors were preferentially expressed in the M and BS, respectively. Sixteen shared regulators of chloroplast biogenesis were identified, 14 of which were syntenic homologs in maize and S. viridis. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a third C4 grass, we found that 82% of these trans-factors were also differentially expressed in either M or BS cells. Taken together, these data provide, to our knowledge, the first quantification of convergence in transcript abundance in the M and BS cells from independent lineages of C4 grasses. Furthermore, the repeated recruitment of syntenic homologs from large gene families strongly implies that parallel evolution of both structural genes and trans-factors underpins the polyphyletic evolution of this highly complex trait in the monocotyledons.

  1. A reporter mouse reveals lineage-specific and heterogeneous expression of IRF8 during lymphoid and myeloid cell differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongsheng; Yan, Ming; Sun, Jiafang; Jain, Shweta; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Abolfath, Sanaz Momben; Ozato, Keiko; Coleman, William G.; Ng, Ashley P.; Metcalf, Donald; DiRago, Ladina; Nutt, Stephen L.; Morse, Herbert C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor family member 8 (IRF8) regulates differentiation of lymphoid and myeloid lineage cells by promoting or suppressing lineage-specific genes. How IRF8 promotes hematopoietic progenitors to commit to one lineage while preventing the development of alternative lineages is not known. Here we report an IRF8-EGFP fusion protein reporter mouse that revealed previously unrecognized patterns of IRF8 expression. Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into oligopotent progenitors is associated with progressive increases in IRF8-EGFP expression. However, significant induction of IRF8-EGFP is found in granulocyte-myeloid progenitors (GMPs) and the common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) but not the megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitors. Surprisingly, IRF8-EGFP identifies three subsets of the seemingly homogeneous GMPs with an intermediate level of expression of EGFP defining bipotent progenitors that differentiation into either EGFPhi monocytic progenitors or EGFPlo granulocytic progenitors. Also surprisingly, IRF8-EGFP revealed a highly heterogeneous pre-pro-B population with a fluorescence intensity ranging from background to 4 orders above background. Interestingly, IRF8-EGFP readily distinguishes true B cell-committed (EGFPint) from those that are non-committed. Moreover, dendritic cell progenitors expressed extremely high levels of IRF8-EGFP. Taken together, the IRF8-EGFP reporter revealed previously unrecognized subsets with distinct developmental potentials in phenotypically well-defined oligopotent progenitors, providing new insights into the dynamic heterogeneity of developing hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:25024380

  2. Topologically associated domains enriched for lineage-specific genes reveal expression-dependent nuclear topologies during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neems, Daniel S.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Smith, Erica D.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The linear distribution of genes across chromosomes and the spatial localization of genes within the nucleus are related to their transcriptional regulation. The mechanistic consequences of linear gene order, and how it may relate to the functional output of genome organization, remain to be fully resolved, however. Here we tested the relationship between linear and 3D organization of gene regulation during myogenesis. Our analysis has identified a subset of topologically associated domains (TADs) that are significantly enriched for muscle-specific genes. These lineage-enriched TADs demonstrate an expression-dependent pattern of nuclear organization that influences the positioning of adjacent nonenriched TADs. Therefore, lineage-enriched TADs inform cell-specific genome organization during myogenesis. The reduction of allelic spatial distance of one of these domains, which contains Myogenin, correlates with reduced transcriptional variability, identifying a potential role for lineage-specific nuclear topology. Using a fusion-based strategy to decouple mitosis and myotube formation, we demonstrate that the cell-specific topology of syncytial nuclei is dependent on cell division. We propose that the effects of linear and spatial organization of gene loci on gene regulation are linked through TAD architecture, and that mitosis is critical for establishing nuclear topologies during cellular differentiation. PMID:26957603

  3. PINK1 is required for timely cell-type specific mitochondrial clearance during Drosophila midgut metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Minjie; Chen, Kai; Yang, Shengxi; Wang, Qun; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Zhou, Yongjian; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Fei; Yang, Yufeng

    2016-11-15

    Mitophagy is the selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy, which is an important mitochondrial quality and quantity control process. During Drosophila metamorphosis, the degradation of midgut involves a large change in length and organization, which is mediated by autophagy. Here we noticed a cell-type specific mitochondrial clearance process that occurs in enterocytes (ECs), while most mitochondria remain in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) during metamorphosis. Although PINK1/PARKIN represent the canonical pathway for the elimination of impaired mitochondria in varied pathological conditions, their roles in developmental processes or normal physiological conditions have been less studied. To examine the potential contribution of PINK1 in developmental processes, we monitored the dynamic expression pattern of PINK1 in the midgut development by taking advantage of a newly CRISPR/Cas9 generated knock-in fly strain expressing PINK1-mCherry fusion protein that presumably recapitulates the endogenous expression pattern of PINK1. We disclosed a spatiotemporal correlation between the expression pattern of PINK1 and the mitochondrial clearance or persistence in ECs or ISCs respectively. By mosaic genetic analysis, we then demonstrated that PINK1 and PARKIN function epistatically to mediate the specific timely removal of mitochondria, and are involved in global autophagy in ECs during Drosophila midgut metamorphosis, with kinase-dead PINK1 exerting dominant negative effects. Taken together, our studies concluded that the PINK1/PARKIN is crucial for timely cell-type specific mitophagy under physiological conditions and demonstrated again that Drosophila midgut metamorphosis might serve as an elegant in vivo model to study autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uracil-Containing DNA in Drosophila: Stability, Stage-Specific Accumulation, and Developmental Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Békési, Angéla; Pukáncsik, Mária; Hodoscsek, Barbara; Merényi, Gábor; Róna, Gergely; Batki, Júlia; Kiss, István; Jankovics, Ferenc; Vilmos, Péter; Erdélyi, Miklós; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2012-01-01

    Base-excision repair and control of nucleotide pools safe-guard against permanent uracil accumulation in DNA relying on two key enzymes: uracil–DNA glycosylase and dUTPase. Lack of the major uracil–DNA glycosylase UNG gene from the fruit fly genome and dUTPase from fruit fly larvae prompted the hypotheses that i) uracil may accumulate in Drosophila genomic DNA where it may be well tolerated, and ii) this accumulation may affect development. Here we show that i) Drosophila melanogaster tolerates high levels of uracil in DNA; ii) such DNA is correctly interpreted in cell culture and embryo; and iii) under physiological spatio-temporal control, DNA from fruit fly larvae, pupae, and imago contain greatly elevated levels of uracil (200–2,000 uracil/million bases, quantified using a novel real-time PCR–based assay). Uracil is accumulated in genomic DNA of larval tissues during larval development, whereas DNA from imaginal tissues contains much less uracil. Upon pupation and metamorphosis, uracil content in DNA is significantly decreased. We propose that the observed developmental pattern of uracil–DNA is due to the lack of the key repair enzyme UNG from the Drosophila genome together with down-regulation of dUTPase in larval tissues. In agreement, we show that dUTPase silencing increases the uracil content in DNA of imaginal tissues and induces strong lethality at the early pupal stages, indicating that tolerance of highly uracil-substituted DNA is also stage-specific. Silencing of dUTPase perturbs the physiological pattern of uracil–DNA accumulation in Drosophila and leads to a strongly lethal phenotype in early pupal stages. These findings suggest a novel role of uracil-containing DNA in Drosophila development and metamorphosis and present a novel example for developmental effects of dUTPase silencing in multicellular eukaryotes. Importantly, we also show lack of the UNG gene in all available genomes of other Holometabola insects, indicating a potentially

  5. Lineage-specific chimaerism quantification after T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Buño, I; Anta, B; Moreno-López, E; Balsalobre, P; Balas, A; García-Sánchez, F; Serrano, D; Carrión, R; Gómez-Pineda, A; Díez-Martín, J L

    2003-04-01

    Patients that receive a T-cell depleted (TCD) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) show higher risk of graft failure/rejection and of disease relapse than those that receive unmanipulated grafts. The purpose of the present investigation was to analyze the usefulness of chimaerism quantification in bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB), and leukocyte lineages such as T lymphocytes (CD3+,both CD4+ and CD8+), B lymphocytes (CD19+) and myeloid cells (CD15+), for the early detection of graft failure/rejection episodes and disease relapse after TCD-PBSCT. Two of the ten (2/10) patients included in the study showed stable complete chimaerism (CC). The other 8/10 patients showed decreasing mixed chimaerism (MC) and 7 of them had either graft failure (n = 1)/rejection (n = 3) or disease relapse (n = 3). In two patients relapsed from chronic myeloid leukemia, MC was observed in BM and PB, with higher percentages of autologous cells in BM, as well as in leukocyte lineages, with higher percentages of recipient cells in the myeloid lineage than in lymphocytes. Combined analysis of chimaerism and minimal residual disease allowed early diagnosis of relapse and successful rescue therapy with donor leukocyte infusions (DLI), before the onset of hematological relapse. Chimaerism analysis allowed early diagnosis of incipient graft rejection in 3 patients. These patients showed MC both in BM and PB, with greater percentages of recipient cells in PB. Analysis of leukocyte lineages showed higher percentages of autologous cells in T lymphocytes (mainly CD8+) than in B or myeloid cells. Two of these patients were successfully treated with DLI and recovered normal PB counts and BM cellularity, as well as CC. The graft versus recipient hemopoiesis effect harbored by the donor immunocompetent cells infused seems useful forthe treatment of graft rejection, provided that an early diagnosis is made.

  6. A simplified and efficient germline-specific CRISPR/Cas9 system for Drosophila genomic engineering.

    PubMed

    Sebo, Zachary L; Lee, Han B; Peng, Ying; Guo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) has recently emerged as an efficient and simple tool for site-specific engineering of eukaryotic genomes. To improve its applications in Drosophila genome engineering, we simplified the standard two-component CRISPR/Cas9 system by generating a stable transgenic fly line expressing the Cas9 endonuclease in the germline (Vasa-Cas9 line). By injecting vectors expressing engineered target-specific guide RNAs into Vasa-Cas9 fly embryos, mutations were generated from site-specific DNA cleavages and efficiently transmitted into progenies. Because Cas9 endonuclease is the universal component of the type II CRISPR/Cas9 system, site-specific genomic engineering based on this improved platform can be achieved with lower complexity and toxicity, greater consistency, and excellent versatility.

  7. The Drosophila Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Ouija Board Controls Ecdysteroid Biosynthesis through Specific Regulation of spookier

    PubMed Central

    Komura-Kawa, Tatsuya; Hirota, Keiko; Shimada-Niwa, Yuko; Yamauchi, Rieko; Shimell, MaryJane; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; O’Connor, Michael B.; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are crucial for many biological events in multicellular organisms. In insects, the principal steroid hormones are ecdysteroids, which play essential roles in regulating molting and metamorphosis. During larval and pupal development, ecdysteroids are synthesized in the prothoracic gland (PG) from dietary cholesterol via a series of hydroxylation and oxidation steps. The expression of all but one of the known ecdysteroid biosynthetic enzymes is restricted to the PG, but the transcriptional regulatory networks responsible for generating such exquisite tissue-specific regulation is only beginning to be elucidated. Here, we report identification and characterization of the C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factor Ouija board (Ouib) necessary for ecdysteroid production in the PG in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of ouib is predominantly limited to the PG, and genetic null mutants of ouib result in larval developmental arrest that can be rescued by administrating an active ecdysteroid. Interestingly, ouib mutant animals exhibit a strong reduction in the expression of one ecdysteroid biosynthetic enzyme, spookier. Using a cell culture-based luciferase reporter assay, Ouib protein stimulates transcription of spok by binding to a specific ~15 bp response element in the spok PG enhancer element. Most remarkable, the developmental arrest phenotype of ouib mutants is rescued by over-expression of a functionally-equivalent paralog of spookier. These observations imply that the main biological function of Ouib is to specifically regulate spookier transcription during Drosophila development. PMID:26658797

  8. Tissue-Specific Activation of a Single Gustatory Receptor Produces Opposing Behavioral Responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Ryan M.; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Understanding sensory systems that perceive environmental inputs and neural circuits that select appropriate motor outputs is essential for studying how organisms modulate behavior and make decisions necessary for survival. Drosophila melanogaster oviposition is one such important behavior, in which females evaluate their environment and choose to lay eggs on substrates they may find aversive in other contexts. We employed neurogenetic techniques to characterize neurons that influence the choice between repulsive positional and attractive egg-laying responses toward the bitter-tasting compound lobeline. Surprisingly, we found that neurons expressing Gr66a, a gustatory receptor normally involved in avoidance behaviors, receive input for both attractive and aversive preferences. We hypothesized that these opposing responses may result from activation of distinct Gr66a-expressing neurons. Using tissue-specific rescue experiments, we found that Gr66a-expressing neurons on the legs mediate positional aversion. In contrast, pharyngeal taste cells mediate the egg-laying attraction to lobeline, as determined by analysis of mosaic flies in which subsets of Gr66a neurons were silenced. Finally, inactivating mushroom body neurons disrupted both aversive and attractive responses, suggesting that this brain structure is a candidate integration center for decision-making during Drosophila oviposition. We thus define sensory and central neurons critical to the process by which flies decide where to lay an egg. Furthermore, our findings provide insights into the complex nature of gustatory perception in Drosophila. We show that tissue-specific activation of bitter-sensing Gr66a neurons provides one mechanism by which the gustatory system differentially encodes aversive and attractive responses, allowing the female fly to modulate her behavior in a context-dependent manner. PMID:22798487

  9. Application of cell-specific isolation to the study of dopamine signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Eswar Prasad R; Iyer, Srividya Chandramouli; Cox, Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission accounts for a number of important brain functions across species including memory formation, the anticipation of reward, cognitive facilities, and drug addiction. Despite this functional significance, relatively little is known of the cellular pathways associated with drug-induced molecular adaptations within individual neurons. Due to its genetic tractability, simplicity, and economy of scale, Drosophila melanogaster has become an important tool in the study of neurological disease states, including drug addiction. To facilitate high-resolution functional analyses of dopamine signaling, it is highly advantageous to obtain genetic material, such as RNA or protein, from a homogeneous cell source. This process can be particularly challenging in most organisms including small model system organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. Magnetic bead-based cell sorting has emerged as a powerful tool that can be used to isolate select populations of cells, from a whole organism or tissue such as the brain, for genomic as well as proteomic expression profiling. Coupled with the temporal and spatial specificity of the GAL4/UAS system, we demonstrate the application of magnetic bead-based cell sorting towards the isolation of dopaminergic neurons from the Drosophila adult nervous system. RNA derived from these neurons is of high quality and suitable for downstream applications such as microarray expression profiling or quantitative rtPCR. The versatility of this methodology stems from the fact that the cell-specific isolation method employed can be used under a variety of experimental conditions designed to survey molecular adaptations in dopamine signaling neurons including in response to drugs of abuse.

  10. Highly specific and efficient CRISPR/Cas9-catalyzed homology-directed repair in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Scott J; Ukken, Fiona P; Rubinstein, C Dustin; Thiede, Gene; Donohue, Laura K; Cummings, Alexander M; O'Connor-Giles, Kate M

    2014-04-01

    We and others recently demonstrated that the readily programmable CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to edit the Drosophila genome. However, most applications to date have relied on aberrant DNA repair to stochastically generate frameshifting indels and adoption has been limited by a lack of tools for efficient identification of targeted events. Here we report optimized tools and techniques for expanded application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Drosophila through homology-directed repair (HDR) with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) donor templates that facilitate complex genome engineering through the precise incorporation of large DNA sequences, including screenable markers. Using these donors, we demonstrate the replacement of a gene with exogenous sequences and the generation of a conditional allele. To optimize efficiency and specificity, we generated transgenic flies that express Cas9 in the germline and directly compared HDR and off-target cleavage rates of different approaches for delivering CRISPR components. We also investigated HDR efficiency in a mutant background previously demonstrated to bias DNA repair toward HDR. Finally, we developed a web-based tool that identifies CRISPR target sites and evaluates their potential for off-target cleavage using empirically rooted rules. Overall, we have found that injection of a dsDNA donor and guide RNA-encoding plasmids into vasa-Cas9 flies yields the highest efficiency HDR and that target sites can be selected to avoid off-target mutations. Efficient and specific CRISPR/Cas9-mediated HDR opens the door to a broad array of complex genome modifications and greatly expands the utility of CRISPR technology for Drosophila research.

  11. Tissue-specific activation of a single gustatory receptor produces opposing behavioral responses in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ryan M; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2012-10-01

    Understanding sensory systems that perceive environmental inputs and neural circuits that select appropriate motor outputs is essential for studying how organisms modulate behavior and make decisions necessary for survival. Drosophila melanogaster oviposition is one such important behavior, in which females evaluate their environment and choose to lay eggs on substrates they may find aversive in other contexts. We employed neurogenetic techniques to characterize neurons that influence the choice between repulsive positional and attractive egg-laying responses toward the bitter-tasting compound lobeline. Surprisingly, we found that neurons expressing Gr66a, a gustatory receptor normally involved in avoidance behaviors, receive input for both attractive and aversive preferences. We hypothesized that these opposing responses may result from activation of distinct Gr66a-expressing neurons. Using tissue-specific rescue experiments, we found that Gr66a-expressing neurons on the legs mediate positional aversion. In contrast, pharyngeal taste cells mediate the egg-laying attraction to lobeline, as determined by analysis of mosaic flies in which subsets of Gr66a neurons were silenced. Finally, inactivating mushroom body neurons disrupted both aversive and attractive responses, suggesting that this brain structure is a candidate integration center for decision-making during Drosophila oviposition. We thus define sensory and central neurons critical to the process by which flies decide where to lay an egg. Furthermore, our findings provide insights into the complex nature of gustatory perception in Drosophila. We show that tissue-specific activation of bitter-sensing Gr66a neurons provides one mechanism by which the gustatory system differentially encodes aversive and attractive responses, allowing the female fly to modulate her behavior in a context-dependent manner.

  12. Lineage-specific detection of influenza B virus using real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Chansaenroj, Jira; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Influenza B viruses comprise two lineages, Victoria (B/Vic) and Yamagata (B/Yam), which co-circulate globally. The surveillance data on influenza B virus lineages in many countries often underestimate the true prevalence due to the lack of a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method for virus detection. We have developed a real-time PCR with melting curve analysis for lineage-specific differential detection of influenza B virus. By amplifying a region of the hemagglutinin gene using real-time PCR with SYBR Green I dye, B/Vic and B/Yam could be differentiated based on their melting temperature peaks. This method was efficient (B/Vic = 93.2 %; B/Yam 97.7 %), sensitive (B/Vic, 94.6 %; B/Yam, 96.3 %), and specific (B/Vic, 97.7 %; B/Yam, 97.1 %). The lower detection limit was 10(2) copies per microliter. The assay was evaluated using 756 respiratory specimens that were positive for influenza B virus, obtained between 2010 and 2015. The incidence of influenza B virus was approximately 18.9 % of all influenza cases, and the percentage was highest among children aged 6-17 years (7.57 %). The overall percentage of mismatched influenza B vaccine was 21.1 %. Our findings suggest that real-time PCR with melting curve analysis can provide a rapid, simple, and sensitive lineage-specific influenza B virus screening method to facilitate influenza surveillance.

  13. Assessment of the purity of isolated cell populations for lineage-specific chimerism monitoring post haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, V; Adams, B; Lord, J; Barker, A; Poulton, K; Lee, H

    2013-10-01

    Following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, monitoring the proportion of donor and recipient haematopoiesis in the patient (chimerism) is an influential tool in directing further treatment choices. Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis is a method of chimerism monitoring using DNA isolated from peripheral blood, bone marrow or specific isolated cell lineages such as CD3+ T cells. For lineage-specific STR analysis on cell populations isolated from peripheral blood, a qualitative estimation of the purity of each isolated population is essential for the correct interpretation of the test data. We describe a rapid, inexpensive method for the determination of purity using a simple flow cytometry method. The method described for assessing the purity of sorted CD3+ cells can be applied to any cell population isolated using the same technology. Data obtained were comparable to results from a commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for the assessment of purity (Non-T Genomic Detection Kit, Accumol, Calgary, AB, Canada) (P = 0.59). Of the 303 samples tested by flow cytometry, 290 (95.7%) exceeded 90% purity, and 215 (70.95%) were over 99% pure. There were some outlying samples, showing diversity between samples and the unpredictability of purity of isolated cell populations. This flow cytometry method can be easily assimilated into routine testing protocols, allowing purity assessment in multiple-sorted cell populations for lineage-specific chimerism monitoring using a single secondary antibody and giving results comparable to a PCR-based method. As purity of isolated cell lineages is affected by time after venepuncture and storage temperature, assessment of each sample is recommended to give a reliable indication of sample quality and confidence in the interpretation of the results. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Domain Specificity of MAP3K Family Members, MLK and Tak1, for JNK Signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Beth; Lennox, Ashley L.; Garlena, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    A highly diverse set of protein kinases functions as early responders in the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase (MAPK/SAPK) signaling pathways. For instance, humans possess 14 MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks) that activate Jun kinase (JNK) signaling downstream. A major challenge is to decipher the selective and redundant functions of these upstream MAP3Ks. Taking advantage of the relative simplicity of Drosophila melanogaster as a model system, we assessed MAP3K signaling specificity in several JNK-dependent processes during development and stress response. Our approach was to generate molecular chimeras between two MAP3K family members, the mixed lineage kinase, Slpr, and the TGF-β activated kinase, Tak1, which share 32% amino acid identity across the kinase domain but otherwise differ in sequence and domain structure, and then test the contributions of various domains for protein localization, complementation of mutants, and activation of signaling. We found that overexpression of the wild-type kinases stimulated JNK signaling in alternate contexts, so cells were capable of responding to both MAP3Ks, but with distinct outcomes. Relative to wild-type, the catalytic domain swaps compensated weakly or not at all, despite having a shared substrate, the JNK kinase Hep. Tak1 C-terminal domain-containing constructs were inhibitory in Tak1 signaling contexts, including tumor necrosis factor-dependent cell death and innate immune signaling; however, depressing antimicrobial gene expression did not necessarily cause phenotypic susceptibility to infection. These same constructs were neutral in the context of Slpr-dependent developmental signaling, reflecting differential subcellular protein localization and by inference, point of activation. Altogether, our findings suggest that the selective deployment of a particular MAP3K can be attributed in part to its inherent sequence differences, cellular localization, and binding partner availability. PMID:24429281

  15. Organ-specific gene expression: the bHLH protein Sage provides tissue specificity to Drosophila FoxA.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebecca M; Vaishnavi, Aria; Maruyama, Rika; Andrew, Deborah J

    2013-05-01

    FoxA transcription factors play major roles in organ-specific gene expression, regulating, for example, glucagon expression in the pancreas, GLUT2 expression in the liver, and tyrosine hydroxylase expression in dopaminergic neurons. Organ-specific gene regulation by FoxA proteins is achieved through cooperative regulation with a broad array of transcription factors with more limited expression domains. Fork head (Fkh), the sole Drosophila FoxA family member, is required for the development of multiple distinct organs, yet little is known regarding how Fkh regulates tissue-specific gene expression. Here, we characterize Sage, a bHLH transcription factor expressed exclusively in the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). We show that Sage is required for late SG survival and normal tube morphology. We find that many Sage targets, identified by microarray analysis, encode SG-specific secreted cargo, transmembrane proteins, and the enzymes that modify these proteins. We show that both Sage and Fkh are required for the expression of Sage target genes, and that co-expression of Sage and Fkh is sufficient to drive target gene expression in multiple cell types. Sage and Fkh drive expression of the bZip transcription factor Senseless (Sens), which boosts expression of Sage-Fkh targets, and Sage, Fkh and Sens colocalize on SG chromosomes. Importantly, expression of Sage-Fkh target genes appears to simply add to the tissue-specific gene expression programs already established in other cell types, and Sage and Fkh cannot alter the fate of most embryonic cell types even when expressed early and continuously.

  16. Organ-specific gene expression: the bHLH protein Sage provides tissue specificity to Drosophila FoxA

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Rebecca M.; Vaishnavi, Aria; Maruyama, Rika; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    FoxA transcription factors play major roles in organ-specific gene expression, regulating, for example, glucagon expression in the pancreas, GLUT2 expression in the liver, and tyrosine hydroxylase expression in dopaminergic neurons. Organ-specific gene regulation by FoxA proteins is achieved through cooperative regulation with a broad array of transcription factors with more limited expression domains. Fork head (Fkh), the sole Drosophila FoxA family member, is required for the development of multiple distinct organs, yet little is known regarding how Fkh regulates tissue-specific gene expression. Here, we characterize Sage, a bHLH transcription factor expressed exclusively in the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). We show that Sage is required for late SG survival and normal tube morphology. We find that many Sage targets, identified by microarray analysis, encode SG-specific secreted cargo, transmembrane proteins, and the enzymes that modify these proteins. We show that both Sage and Fkh are required for the expression of Sage target genes, and that co-expression of Sage and Fkh is sufficient to drive target gene expression in multiple cell types. Sage and Fkh drive expression of the bZip transcription factor Senseless (Sens), which boosts expression of Sage-Fkh targets, and Sage, Fkh and Sens colocalize on SG chromosomes. Importantly, expression of Sage-Fkh target genes appears to simply add to the tissue-specific gene expression programs already established in other cell types, and Sage and Fkh cannot alter the fate of most embryonic cell types even when expressed early and continuously. PMID:23578928

  17. Sex-specific triacylglycerides are widely conserved in Drosophila and mediate mating behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jacqueline SR; Ellis, Shane R; Pham, Huong T; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mori, Kenji; Koh, Qi Ling; Etges, William J; Yew, Joanne Y

    2014-01-01

    Pheromones play an important role in the behavior, ecology, and evolution of many organisms. The structure of many insect pheromones typically consists of a hydrocarbon backbone, occasionally modified with various functional oxygen groups. Here we show that sex-specific triacylclyerides (TAGs) are broadly conserved across the subgenus Drosophila in 11 species and represent a novel class of pheromones that has been largely overlooked. In desert-adapted drosophilids, 13 different TAGs are secreted exclusively by males from the ejaculatory bulb, transferred to females during mating, and function synergistically to inhibit courtship from other males. Sex-specific TAGs are comprised of at least one short branched tiglic acid and a long linear fatty acyl component, an unusual structural motif that has not been reported before in other natural products. The diversification of chemical cues used by desert-adapted Drosophila as pheromones may be related to their specialized diet of fermenting cacti. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01751.001 PMID:24618898

  18. Neuron-specific protein interactions of Drosophila CASK-β are revealed by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Konark; Slawson, Justin B.; Christmann, Bethany L.; Griffith, Leslie C.

    2014-01-01

    Modular scaffolding proteins are designed to have multiple interactors. CASK, a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) superfamily, has been shown to have roles in many tissues, including neurons and epithelia. It is likely that the set of proteins it interacts with is different in each of these diverse tissues. In this study we asked if within the Drosophila central nervous system, there were neuron-specific sets of CASK-interacting proteins. A YFP-tagged CASK-β transgene was expressed in genetically defined subsets of neurons in the Drosophila brain known to be important for CASK function, and proteins present in an anti-GFP immunoprecipitation were identified by mass spectrometry. Each subset of neurons had a distinct set of interacting proteins, suggesting that CASK participates in multiple protein networks and that these networks may be different in different neuronal circuits. One common set of proteins was associated with mitochondria, and we show here that endogenous CASK-β co-purifies with mitochondria. We also determined CASK-β posttranslational modifications for one cell type, supporting the idea that this technique can be used to assess cell- and circuit-specific protein modifications as well as protein interaction networks. PMID:25071438

  19. Mutation in a structural gene for a beta-tubulin specific to testis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Kemphues, K J; Raff, R A; Kaufman, T C; Raff, E C

    1979-01-01

    By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of tubulins prepared from tissues of Drosophila melanogaster we have identified a beta-tubulin subunit that is present only in the testis. Furthermore, we have isolated, as a male sterile, a third chromosome dominant mutation [ms(3)KKD] in the structural gene for this beta-tubulin. Males heterozygous for this mutation produce no motile spermatozoa. Beginning with meiosis, all processes in spermatogenesis are abnormal to some extent. Many microtubules (including both cytoplasmic microtubules and doublet tubules of the axoneme) show aberrant structure in cross section, and the overall morphology of the developing spermatids is disorganized. Testes from these males were shown, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, to contain both the normal testis-specific beta-tubulin and an electrophoretic variant of this tubulin in equal amounts. Both wild-type and mutant testis-specific beta-tubulins were characterized by vinblastine sulfate precipitation, coassembly with purified Drosophila embryo tubulin, and peptide mapping. Images PMID:115008

  20. Regulatory Divergence in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, a Genomewide Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Graze, Rita M.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Main, Bradley J.; Wayne, Marta L.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    Species-specific regulation of gene expression contributes to the development and maintenance of reproductive isolation and to species differences in ecologically important traits. A better understanding of the evolutionary forces that shape regulatory variation and divergence can be developed by comparing expression differences among species and interspecific hybrids. Once expression differences are identified, the underlying genetics of regulatory variation or divergence can be explored. With the goal of associating cis and/or trans components of regulatory divergence with differences in gene expression, overall and allele-specific expression levels were assayed genomewide in female adult heads of Drosophila melanogaster, D. simulans, and their F1 hybrids. A greater proportion of cis differences than trans differences were identified for genes expressed in heads and, in accordance with previous studies, cis differences also explained a larger number of species differences in overall expression level. Regulatory divergence was found to be prevalent among genes associated with defense, olfaction, and among genes downstream of the Drosophila sex determination hierarchy. In addition, two genes, with critical roles in sex determination and micro RNA processing, Sxl and loqs, were identified as misexpressed in hybrid female heads, potentially contributing to hybrid incompatibility. PMID:19667135

  1. Comparison of larval and adult Drosophila astrocytes reveals stage-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmei; Ng, Fanny S; Jackson, F Rob

    2015-02-04

    The analysis of adult astrocyte glial cells has revealed a remarkable heterogeneity with regard to morphology, molecular signature, and physiology. A key question in glial biology is how such heterogeneity arises during brain development. One approach to this question is to identify genes with differential astrocyte expression during development; certain genes expressed later in neural development may contribute to astrocyte differentiation. We have utilized the Drosophila model and Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP)-RNA-seq methods to derive the genome-wide expression profile of Drosophila larval astrocyte-like cells (hereafter referred to as astrocytes) for the first time. These studies identified hundreds of larval astrocyte-enriched genes that encode proteins important for metabolism, energy production, and protein synthesis, consistent with the known role of astrocytes in the metabolic support of neurons. Comparison of the larval profile with that observed for adults has identified genes with astrocyte-enriched expression specific to adulthood. These include genes important for metabolism and energy production, translation, chromatin modification, protein glycosylation, neuropeptide signaling, immune responses, vesicle-mediated trafficking or secretion, and the regulation of behavior. Among these functional classes, the expression of genes important for chromatin modification and vesicle-mediated trafficking or secretion is overrepresented in adult astrocytes based on Gene Ontology analysis. Certain genes with selective adult enrichment may mediate functions specific to this stage or may be important for the differentiation or maintenance of adult astrocytes, with the latter perhaps contributing to population heterogeneity.

  2. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a Drosophila phosphatidylinositol-specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Linassier, C; MacDougall, L K; Domin, J; Waterfield, M D

    1997-02-01

    Molecular, biochemical and genetic characterization of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have identified distinct classes of enzymes involved in processes mediated by activation of cell-surface receptors and in constitutive intracellular protein trafficking events. The latter process appears to involve a PtdIns-specific PI3K first described in yeast as a mutant, vps34, defective in the sorting of newly synthesized proteins from the Golgi to the vacuole. We have identified a representative member of each class of PI3Ks in Drosophila using a PCR-based approach. In the present paper we describe the molecular cloning of a PI3K from Drosophila, P13K_59F, that shows sequence similarity to Vps34. PI3K_59F encodes a protein of 108 kDa co-linear with Vps34 homologues, and with three regions of sequence similarity to other PI3Ks. Biochemical characterization of the enzyme, by expression of the complete coding sequence as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Sf9 cells, demonstrates that PI3K_59F is a PtdIns-specific PI3K that can utilize either Mg2+ or Mn2+. This activity is sensitive to inhibition both by non-ionic detergent (Nonidet P40) and by wortmannin (IC50 10 nM). PI3K_59F, therefore, conserves both the structural and biochemical properties of the Vps34 class of enzymes.

  3. Turtle Functions Downstream of Cut in Differentially Regulating Class Specific Dendrite Morphogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Mikolaj J.; Iyer, Srividya Chandramouli; Kurosawa, Mathieu S.; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R.; Cox, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic morphology largely determines patterns of synaptic connectivity and electrochemical properties of a neuron. Neurons display a myriad diversity of dendritic geometries which serve as a basis for functional classification. Several types of molecules have recently been identified which regulate dendrite morphology by acting at the levels of transcriptional regulation, direct interactions with the cytoskeleton and organelles, and cell surface interactions. Although there has been substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis, the specification of class-specific dendritic arbors remains largely unexplained. Furthermore, the presence of numerous regulators suggests that they must work in concert. However, presently, few genetic pathways regulating dendrite development have been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings The Drosophila gene turtle belongs to an evolutionarily conserved class of immunoglobulin superfamily members found in the nervous systems of diverse organisms. We demonstrate that Turtle is differentially expressed in Drosophila da neurons. Moreover, MARCM analyses reveal Turtle acts cell autonomously to exert class specific effects on dendritic growth and/or branching in da neuron subclasses. Using transgenic overexpression of different Turtle isoforms, we find context-dependent, isoform-specific effects on mediating dendritic branching in class II, III and IV da neurons. Finally, we demonstrate via chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry analyses that Turtle expression is positively regulated by the Cut homeodomain transcription factor and via genetic interaction studies that Turtle is downstream effector of Cut-mediated regulation of da neuron dendrite morphology. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that Turtle proteins differentially regulate the acquisition of class-specific dendrite morphologies. In addition, we have established a transcriptional regulatory

  4. Sex-and lineage-specific inheritance of depression-like behavior in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Leah C.; Baum, Amber E.; Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Li, Renhua; Turek, Fred W.; Churchil, Gary A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Redei, Eva E.

    2013-01-01

    The Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits physiological and behavioral similarities to endophenotypes of human depression. In the forced swim test (FST), a wel-characterized antidepressant-reversible test for behavioral despair in rodents, WKYs express characteristics of behavioral despair; increased immobility, and decreased climbing. To map genetic loci linked to behavior in the FST, we conducted a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the segregating F2 generation of a WKY · Fisher 344 (F344) reciprocal intercross. Using linear-model-based genome scans to include covariate (sex or lineage) by-QTL interaction effects, four significant QTL influencing climbing behavior were identified. In addition, we identified three, seven, and two suggestive QTL for climbing, immobility, and swimming, respectively. One of these loci was pleiotropic, affecting both immobility and climbing. As found in human linkage studies, several of these QTL showed sex-and/or lineage-dependent effects. A simultaneous search strategy identified three epistatic locus pairs for climbing. Multiple regression analysis was employed to characterize the joint contributions of these QTL and to clarify the sex-and lineage-dependent effects. As expected for complex traits, FST behavior is influenced by multiple QTL of smal effect, each contributing 5%–10%, accounting for a total 10%–30% of the phenotypic variance. A number of loci mapped in this study share overlapping candidate regions with previously identified emotionality QTL in mice as wel as with susceptibility loci recognized by linkage or genome scan analyses for major depression or bipolar disorder in humans. The presence of these loci across species suggests that these QTL may represent universal genetic factors contributing to mood disorders. PMID:15457344

  5. Sex- and lineage-specific inheritance of depression-like behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Leah C; Baum, Amber E; Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Li, Renhua; Turek, Fred W; Churchill, Gary A; Takahashi, Joseph S; Redei, Eva E

    2004-08-01

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits physiological and behavioral similarities to endophenotypes of human depression. In the forced swim test (FST), a well-characterized antidepressant-reversible test for behavioral despair in rodents, WKYs express characteristics of behavioral despair; increased immobility, and decreased climbing. To map genetic loci linked to behavior in the FST, we conducted a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the segregating F2 generation of a WKY x Fisher 344 (F344) reciprocal intercross. Using linear-model-based genome scans to include covariate (sex or lineage)-by-QTL interaction effects, four significant QTL influencing climbing behavior were identified. In addition, we identified three, seven, and two suggestive QTL for climbing, immobility, and swimming, respectively. One of these loci was pleiotropic, affecting both immobility and climbing. As found in human linkage studies, several of these QTL showed sex- and/or lineage-dependent effects. A simultaneous search strategy identified three epistatic locus pairs for climbing. Multiple regression analysis was employed to characterize the joint contributions of these QTL and to clarify the sex- and lineage-dependent effects. As expected for complex traits, FST behavior is influenced by multiple QTL of small effect, each contributing 5%-10%, accounting for a total 10%-30% of the phenotypic variance. A number of loci mapped in this study share overlapping candidate regions with previously identified emotionality QTL in mice as well as with susceptibility loci recognized by linkage or genome scan analyses for major depression or bipolar disorder in humans. The presence of these loci across species suggests that these QTL may represent universal genetic factors contributing to mood disorders.

  6. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks.

  7. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks. PMID:25565413

  8. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Landeen, Emily L; Cook, Jodi M; Kingan, Sarah B; Presgraves, Daven C

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females) has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female) germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  9. Rapid evolution and gene-specific patterns of selection for three genes of spermatogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Civetta, Alberto; Rajakumar, Sujeetha A; Brouwers, Barb; Bacik, John P

    2006-03-01

    Hybrid males resulting from crosses between closely related species of Drosophila are sterile. The F1 hybrid sterility phenotype is mainly due to defects occurring during late stages of development that relate to sperm individualization, and so genes controlling sperm development may have been subjected to selective diversification between species. It is also possible that genes of spermatogenesis experience selective constraints given their role in a developmental pathway. We analyzed the molecular evolution of three genes playing a role during the sperm developmental pathway in Drosophila at an early (bam), a mid (aly), and a late (dj) stage. The complete coding region of these genes was sequenced in different strains of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. All three genes showed rapid divergence between species, with larger numbers of nonsynonymous to synonymous differences between species than polymorphisms. Although this could be interpreted as evidence for positive selection at all three genes, formal tests of selection do not support such a conclusion. Departures from neutrality were detected only for dj and bam but not aly. The role played by selection is unique and determined by gene-specific characteristics rather than site of expression. In dj, the departure was due to a high proportion of neutral synonymous polymorphisms in D. simulans, and there was evidence of purifying selection maintaining a high lysine amino acid protein content that is characteristic of other DNA-binding proteins. The earliest spermatogenesis gene surveyed, which plays a role in both male and female gametogenesis, was bam, and its significant departure from neutrality was due to an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions between species. Bam is degraded at the end of mitosis, and rapid evolutionary changes among species might be a characteristic shared with other degradable transient proteins. However, the large number of nonsynonymous changes between D. melanogaster and

  10. Suffix-specific RNAi Leads to Silencing of F Element in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A.; Kretova, Olga V.

    2007-01-01

    Separate conserved copies of suffix, a short interspersed Drosophila retroelement (SINE), and also divergent copies in the 3′ untranslated regions of the three genes, have already been described. Suffix has also been identified on the 3′ end of the Drosophila non-LTR F element, where it forms the last conserved domain of the reverse transcriptase (RT). In our current study, we show that the separate copies of suffix are far more actively transcribed than their counterparts on the F element. Transcripts from both strands of suffix are present in RNA preparations during all stages of Drosophila development, providing the potential for the formation of double-stranded RNA and the initiation of RNA interference (RNAi). Using in situ RNA hybridization analysis, we have detected the expression of both sense and antisense suffix transcripts in germinal cells. These sense and antisense transcripts are colocalized in the primary spermatocytes and in the cytoplasm of the nurse cells, suggesting that they form double-stranded RNA. We performed further analyses of suffix-specific small RNAs using northern blotting and SI nuclease protection assays. Among the total RNA preparations isolated from embryos, larvae, pupae and flies, suffix-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were detected only in pupae. In wild type ovaries, both the siRNAs and longer suffix-specific Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) were observed, whereas in ovaries of the Dicer-2 mutant, only piRNAs were detected. We further found by 3′ RACE that in pupae and ovaries, F element transcripts lacking the suffix sequence are also present. Our data provide direct evidence that suffix-specific RNAi leads to the silencing of the relative LINE (long interspersed element), F element, and suggests that SINE-specific RNA interference could potentially downregulate a set of genes possessing SINE stretches in their 5′ or 3′ non-coding regions. These data also suggest that double stranded RNAs possessing suffix are

  11. Lineage-Specific Methyltransferases Define the Methylome of the Globally Disseminated Escherichia coli ST131 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Ashcroft, Melinda M.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Sarkar, Sohinee; Peters, Kate M.; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Upton, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a clone of uropathogenic E. coli that has emerged rapidly and disseminated globally in both clinical and community settings. Members of the ST131 lineage from across the globe have been comprehensively characterized in terms of antibiotic resistance, virulence potential, and pathogenicity, but to date nothing is known about the methylome of these important human pathogens. Here we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) PacBio sequencing to determine the methylome of E. coli EC958, the most-well-characterized completely sequenced ST131 strain. Our analysis of 52,081 methylated adenines in the genome of EC958 discovered three m6A methylation motifs that have not been described previously. Subsequent SMRT sequencing of isogenic knockout mutants identified the two type I methyltransferases (MTases) and one type IIG MTase responsible for m6A methylation of novel recognition sites. Although both type I sites were rare, the type IIG sites accounted for more than 12% of all methylated adenines in EC958. Analysis of the distribution of MTase genes across 95 ST131 genomes revealed their prevalence is highly conserved within the ST131 lineage, with most variation due to the presence or absence of mobile genetic elements on which individual MTase genes are located. PMID:26578678

  12. Ecological and Lineage-Specific Factors Drive the Molecular Evolution of Rhodopsin in Cichlid Fishes.

    PubMed

    Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Henning, Frederico; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2015-11-01

    The visual system in the colorful cichlid fishes from the African great lakes is believed to be important for their adaptive radiations. However, few studies have attempted to compare the visual system of radiating cichlid lineages with that of cichlids that have not undergone recent radiations. One such study published in this journal (Schott RK, Refvik SP, Hauser FE, López-Fernández H, Chang BSW. 2014. Divergent positive selection in rhodopsin from lake and riverine cichlid fishes. Mol Biol Evol. 31:1149-1165) found divergent selection on rhodopsin between African lacustrine and riverine cichlid species and riverine Neotropical cichlids, concluding that ecology drives the molecular evolution of this opsin. Here, we expand this analysis by incorporating rhodopsin sequences from Neotropical lacustrine cichlids and show that both ecology and phylogeny are important drivers of the molecular evolution of rhodopsin in cichlids. We found little overlap of sites under selection between African and Neotropical lineages and a faster rate of molecular evolution in African compared with Neotropical cichlids. These results support the notion that genetic or population genetic features particular to African cichlids contributed to their radiations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Oscar; Martínez-Climent, José Angel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis.

  14. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Óscar; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis. PMID:24675889

  15. A HRM Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid and Specific Identification of the Emerging Pest Spotted-Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii)

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Manpreet K.; Kumarasinghe, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) is an emerging pest that began spreading in 2008 and its distribution now includes 13 countries across two continents. Countries where it is established have reported significant economic losses of fresh produce, such as cherries due to this species of fly. At larval stages, it is impossible to identify due to its striking similarities with other cosmopolitan and harmless drosophilids. Molecular methods allow identification but the current technique of DNA barcoding is time consuming. We developed and validated a rapid, highly sensitive and specific assay based on real-time PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) analysis using EvaGreen DNA intercalating dye chemistry. Performance characteristics of this qualitative assay, validation and applicability in a New Zealand quarantine framework are discussed. Application of this robust and independently validated assay across the spectrum of key food production and border protection industries will allow us to reduce the further spread of this damaging species worldwide. PMID:24927410

  16. An in vitro adherence assay reveals that Helicobacter pylori exhibits cell lineage-specific tropism in the human gastric epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, P; Roth, K A; Borén, T; Westblom, T U; Gordon, J I; Normark, S

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach of asymptomatic humans as well as patients with acid peptic disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. We have developed an in situ adherence assay to examine the cell lineage-specific nature of binding of this organism and to characterize the nature of cell surface receptors that recognize its adhesin. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled H. pylori strains were bound to surface mucous cells present in the pit region of human and rat gastric units but not to mucous neck, parietal, or chief cell lineages present in the glandular domains of these units. Binding was abolished by proteinase K treatment of tissue sections and by pretreatment of the bacteria with bovine submaxillary gland mucin, a rich source of fucosylated and sialylated carbohydrates. Several lines of evidence suggest that binding to surface mucous cells is not dependent upon terminal nonsubstituted alpha 2,3- and alpha 2,6-linked sialic acids in the adhesin receptor: (i) binding was not inhibited by incubating H. pylori strains with sialylated glycoconjugates such as fetuin and free sialyllactose; (ii) immunohistochemical stainings using the sialic acid-specific Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins and the cholera toxin B subunit did not detect any sialylated glycoconjugates in these epithelial cells; and (iii) binding was not sensitive to metaperiodate under conditions that selectively cleaved carbons 8 and 9 of terminal nonmodified sialic acids. A role for fucosylated epitopes in the glycoprotein(s) that mediate binding of H. pylori to surface mucous cells was suggested by the facts that this lineage coexpresses the adhesin receptor and major fucosylated histo-blood group antigens, that monoclonal antibodies specific for histo-blood group antigens H, B, and Leb block binding, and that the lectin Ulex europaeus type 1 agglutinin, which is specific for alpha-L-fucose, also bound to the same cells that bound the bacteria

  17. Optimized gene editing technology for Drosophila melanogaster using germ line-specific Cas9.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xingjie; Sun, Jin; Housden, Benjamin E; Hu, Yanhui; Roesel, Charles; Lin, Shuailiang; Liu, Lu-Ping; Yang, Zhihao; Mao, Decai; Sun, Lingzhu; Wu, Qujie; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Xi, Jianzhong; Mohr, Stephanie E; Xu, Jiang; Perrimon, Norbert; Ni, Jian-Quan

    2013-11-19

    The ability to engineer genomes in a specific, systematic, and cost-effective way is critical for functional genomic studies. Recent advances using the CRISPR-associated single-guide RNA system (Cas9/sgRNA) illustrate the potential of this simple system for genome engineering in a number of organisms. Here we report an effective and inexpensive method for genome DNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster whereby plasmid DNAs encoding short sgRNAs under the control of the U6b promoter are injected into transgenic flies in which Cas9 is specifically expressed in the germ line via the nanos promoter. We evaluate the off-targets associated with the method and establish a Web-based resource, along with a searchable, genome-wide database of predicted sgRNAs appropriate for genome engineering in flies. Finally, we discuss the advantages of our method in comparison with other recently published approaches.

  18. Sex- and Tissue-specific Functions of Drosophila Doublesex Transcription Factor Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Jimenez, Erin; Kim, Yoo-Ah; Whitworth, Cale; Neville, Megan C.; Hempel, Leonie; Pavlou, Hania J.; Chen, Zhen-Xia; Sturgill, David; Dale, Ryan; Smith, Harold E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Goodwin, Stephen F.; Van Doren, Mark; Oliver, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Primary sex determination “switches” evolve rapidly, but Doublesex (DSX) related transcription factors (DMRTs) act downstream of these switches to control sexual development in most animal species. Drosophila dsx encodes female- and male-specific isoforms (DSXF and DSXM), but little is known about how dsx controls sexual development, whether DSXF and DSXM bind different targets, or how DSX proteins direct different outcomes in diverse tissues. We undertook genome-wide analyses to identify DSX targets using in vivo occupancy, binding site prediction, and evolutionary conservation. We find that DSXF and DSXM bind thousands of the same targets in multiple tissues in both sexes, yet these targets have sex- and tissue-specific functions. Interestingly, DSX targets show considerable overlap with targets identified for mouse DMRT1. DSX targets include transcription factors and signaling pathway components providing for direct and indirect regulation of sex-biased expression. PMID:25535918

  19. Lineage-specific late pleistocene expansion of an endemic subtropical gossamer-wing damselfly, Euphaea formosa, in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Pan; Lin, Chung-Ping

    2011-04-12

    's historical demography is lineage-specific, depending predominantly on its colonization history and geography. It is proposed that the Riss and Würm glaciations in the late Pleistocene period had a greater impact on the evolutionary diversification of subtropical insular species than the last glacial maximum (LGM).

  20. Regional Cell Specific RNA Expression Profiling of FACS Isolated Drosophila Intestinal Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Devanjali; Buchon, Nicolas; Xiang, Jinyi; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-08-03

    The adult Drosophila midgut is built of five distinct cell types, including stem cells, enteroblasts, enterocytes, enteroendocrine cells, and visceral muscles, and is divided into five major regions (R1 to R5), which are morphologically and functionally distinct from each other. This unit describes a protocol for the isolation of Drosophila intestinal cell populations for the purpose of cell type-specific transcriptome profiling from the five different regions. A method to select a cell type of interest labeled with green or yellow fluorescent protein (GFP, YFP) by making use of the GAL4-UAS bipartite system and fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) is presented. Total RNA is isolated from the sorted cells of each region, and linear RNA amplification is used to obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for analysis by microarray, RT-PCR, or RNA sequencing. This method will be useful for quantitative transcriptome comparison across intestinal cell types in the different regions under normal and various experimental conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  2. Genetic dissection of the Transcription Factor code controlling serial specification of muscle identities in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Laurence; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Chanut-Delalande, Hélène; Crozatier, Michèle; Vincent, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Each Drosophila muscle is seeded by one Founder Cell issued from terminal division of a Progenitor Cell (PC). Muscle identity reflects the expression by each PC of a specific combination of identity Transcription Factors (iTFs). Sequential emergence of several PCs at the same position raised the question of how developmental time controlled muscle identity. Here, we identified roles of Anterior Open and ETS domain lacking in controlling PC birth time and Eyes absent, No Ocelli, and Sine oculis in specifying PC identity. The windows of transcription of these and other TFs in wild type and mutant embryos, revealed a cascade of regulation integrating time and space, feed-forward loops and use of alternative transcription start sites. These data provide a dynamic view of the transcriptional control of muscle identity in Drosophila and an extended framework for studying interactions between general myogenic factors and iTFs in evolutionary diversification of muscle shapes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14979.001 PMID:27438571

  3. Specific requirement of NMDA receptors for long-term memory consolidation in Drosophila ellipsoid body

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Lin; Xia, Shouzhen; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wang, Huaien; Chen, Ying-Hsiu; Leong, Daniel; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Tully, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In humans and many other animals, memory consolidation occurs through multiple temporal phases and usually involves more than one neuroanatomical brain system. Genetic dissection of Pavlovian olfactory learning in Drosophila melanogaster has revealed multiple memory phases, but the predominant view holds that all memory phases occur in mushroom body neurons. Here, we demonstrate an acute requirement for NMDA receptors (NMDARs) outside of the mushroom body during long-term memory (LTM) consolidation. Targeted dsRNA-mediated silencing of Nmdar1 and Nmdar2 (also known as dNR1 or dNR2, respectively) in cholinergic R4m-subtype large-field neurons of the ellipsoid body specifically disrupted LTM consolidation, but not retrieval. Similar silencing of functional NMDARs in the mushroom body disrupted an earlier memory phase, leaving LTM intact. Our results clearly establish an anatomical site outside of the mushroom body involved with LTM consolidation, thus revealing both a distributed brain system subserving olfactory memory formation and the existence of a system-level memory consolidation in Drosophila. PMID:17982450

  4. Directing lineage specification of human mesenchymal stem cells by decoupling electrical stimulation and physical patterning on unmodified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikov, Daniel A.; Fang, Brian; Chun, Young Wook; Crowder, Spencer W.; Prasai, Dhiraj; Lee, Jung Bok; Bolotin, Kiril I.; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2016-07-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to impact the propagation of electrical signals in multiple tissue types. To date, many studies with electroactive biomaterial substrates have relied upon passive electrical stimulation of the ionic media to affect cell behavior. However, development of cell culture systems in which stimulation can be directly applied to the material - thereby isolating the signal to the cell-material interface and cell-cell contracts - would provide a more physiologically-relevant paradigm for investigating how electrical cues modulate lineage-specific stem cell differentiation. In the present study, we have employed unmodified, directly-stimulated, (un)patterned graphene as a cell culture substrate to investigate how extrinsic electrical cycling influences the differentiation of naïve human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) without the bias of exogenous biochemicals. We first demonstrated that cyclic stimulation does not deteriorate the cell culture media or result in cytotoxic pH, which are critical experiments for correct interpretation of changes in cell behavior. We then measured how the expression of osteogenic and neurogenic lineage-specific markers were altered simply by exposure to electrical stimulation and/or physical patterns. Expression of the early osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 was increased by electrical stimulation on all graphene substrates, but the mature marker osteopontin was only modulated when stimulation was combined with physical patterns. In contrast, the expression of the neurogenic markers MAP2 and β3-tubulin were enhanced in all electrical stimulation conditions, and were less responsive to the presence of patterns. These data indicate that specific combinations of non-biological inputs - material type, electrical stimulation, physical patterns - can regulate hMSC lineage specification. This study represents a substantial step in understanding how the interplay of

  5. Absence of transitive and systemic pathways allows cell-specific and isoform-specific RNAi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    ROIGNANT, JEAN-YVES; CARRÉ, CLÉMENT; MUGAT, BRUNO; SZYMCZAK, DIMITRI; LEPESANT, JEAN-ANTOINE; ANTONIEWSKI, CHRISTOPHE

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) designates the multistep process by which double-stranded RNA induces the silencing of homologous endogenous genes. Some aspects of RNAi appear to be conserved throughout evolution, including the processing of trigger dsRNAs into small 21–23-bp siRNAs and their use to guide the degradation of complementary mRNAs. Two remarkable features of RNAi were uncovered in plants and Caenorhabditid elegans. First, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities allow the synthesis of siRNA complementary to sequences upstream of or downstream from the initial trigger region in the target mRNA, leading to a transitive RNAi with sequences that had not been initially targeted. Secondly, systemic RNAi may cause the targeting of gene silencing in one tissue to spread to other tissues. Using transgenes expressing dsRNA, we investigated whether transitive and systemic RNAi occur in Drosophila. DsRNA-producing transgenes targeted RNAi to specific regions of alternative mRNA species of one gene without transitive effect directed to sequences downstream from or upstream of the initial trigger region. Moreover, specific expression of a dsRNA, using either cell-specific GAL4 drivers or random clonal activation of a GAL4 driver, mediated a cell-autonomous RNAi. Together, our results provide evidence that transitive and systemic aspects of RNAi are not conserved in Drosophila and demonstrate that dsRNA-producing transgenes allow powerful reverse genetic approaches to be conducted in this model organism, by knocking down gene functions at the resolution of a single-cell type and of a single isoform. PMID:12592004

  6. Tissue, cell type and stage-specific ectopic gene expression and RNAi induction in the Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    White-Cooper, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila testis has numerous advantages for the study of basic cellular processes, as production of sperm requires a highly orchestrated and complex combination of morphological changes and developmentally regulated transitions. Experimental genetics using Drosophila melanogaster has advanced dramatically with the advent of systems for ectopic expression of genetic elements in specific cells. However the genetic tools used in Drosophila research have rarely been generated with the testes in mind, and the utility of relatively few systems has been documented for this tissue. Here I will summarize ectopic expression systems that are known to work for the testis, and provide advice for selection of the most appropriate expression system in specific experimental situations. PMID:22553486

  7. A systematic phenotypic screen of F-box genes through a tissue-specific RNAi-based approach in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dui, Wen; Lu, Wei; Ma, Jun; Jiao, Renjie

    2012-08-20

    F-box proteins are components of the SCF (SkpA-Cullin 1-F-box) E3 ligase complexes, acting as the specificity-determinants in targeting substrate proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. In humans, at least 22 out of 75 F-box proteins have experimentally documented substrates, whereas in Drosophila 12 F-box proteins have been characterized with known substrates. To systematically investigate the genetic and molecular functions of F-box proteins in Drosophila, we performed a survey of the literature and databases. We identified 45 Drosophila genes that encode proteins containing at least one F-box domain. We collected publically available RNAi lines against these genes and used them in a tissue-specific RNAi-based phenotypic screen. Here, we present our systematic phenotypic dataset from the eye, the wing and the notum. This dataset is the first of its kind and represents a useful resource for future studies of the molecular and genetic functions of F-box genes in Drosophila. Our results show that, as expected, F-box genes in Drosophila have regulatory roles in a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, cell growth, signal transduction, and cellular and animal survival.

  8. Lineage-specific roles of the cytoplasmic polyadenylation factor CPEB4 in the regulation of melanoma drivers

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guijarro, Eva; Karras, Panagiotis; Cifdaloz, Metehan; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Cañón, Estela; Graña, Osvaldo; Horcajada-Reales, Celia; Alonso-Curbelo, Direna; Calvo, Tonantzin G.; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Bellora, Nicolas; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Maestre, Lorena; Roncador, Giovanna; de Agustín Asensio, Juan C.; Goding, Colin R.; Eyras, Eduardo; Megías, Diego; Méndez, Raúl; Soengas, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear 3'-end-polyadenylation is essential for the transport, stability and translation of virtually all eukaryotic mRNAs. Poly(A) tail extension can also occur in the cytoplasm, but the transcripts involved are incompletely understood, particularly in cancer. Here we identify a lineage-specific requirement of the cytoplasmic polyadenylation binding protein 4 (CPEB4) in malignant melanoma. CPEB4 is upregulated early in melanoma progression, as defined by computational and histological analyses. Melanoma cells are distinct from other tumour cell types in their dependency on CPEB4, not only to prevent mitotic aberrations, but to progress through G1/S cell cycle checkpoints. RNA immunoprecipitation, sequencing of bound transcripts and poly(A) length tests link the melanoma-specific functions of CPEB4 to signalling hubs specifically enriched in this disease. Essential in these CPEB4-controlled networks are the melanoma drivers MITF and RAB7A, a feature validated in clinical biopsies. These results provide new mechanistic links between cytoplasmic polyadenylation and lineage specification in melanoma. PMID:27857118

  9. Changes in chromosome territory position within the nucleus reflect alternations in gene expression related to embryonic lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Orsztynowicz, Maciej; Lechniak, Dorota; Pawlak, Piotr; Kociucka, Beata; Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Madeja, Zofia Eliza

    2017-01-01

    Loss of totipotentcy in an early embryo is directed by molecular processes responsible for cell fate decisions. Three dimensional genome organisation is an important factor linking chromatin architecture with stage specific gene expression patterns. Little is known about the role of chromosome organisation in gene expression regulation of lineage specific factors in mammalian embryos. Using bovine embryos as a model we have described these interactions at key developmental stages. Three bovine chromosomes (BTA) that differ in size, number of carried genes, and contain loci for key lineage regulators OCT4, NANOG and CDX2, were investigated. The results suggest that large chromosomes regardless of their gene density (BTA12 gene-poor, BTA5 gene-rich) do not significantly change their radial position within the nucleus. Gene loci however, may change its position within the chromosome territory (CT) and relocate its periphery, when stage specific process of gene activation is required. Trophectoderm specific CDX2 and epiblast precursor NANOG loci tend to locate on the surface or outside of the CTs, at stages related with their high expression. We postulate that the observed changes in CT shape reflect global alternations in gene expression related to differentiation.

  10. Parallel Evolution and Lineage-Specific Expansion of RNA Editing in Ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Andrea B; Sanford, Rachel S; Yoshida, Masa-aki; Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-12-01

    RNA editing is a process of targeted alterations of nucleotides in all types of RNA molecules (e.g., rRNA, tRNA, mRNA, and miRNA). As a result, the transcriptional output differs from its genomic DNA template. RNA editing can be defined both by biochemical mechanisms and by enzymes that perform these reactions. There are high levels of RNA editing detected in the mammalian nervous system, suggesting that nervous systems use this mechanism to increase protein diversity, because the post-transcription modifications lead to new gene products with novel functions. By re-annotating the ctenophore genomes, we found that the number of predicted RNA-editing enzymes is comparable to the numbers in mammals, but much greater than in other non-bilaterian basal metazoans. However, the overall molecular diversity of RNA-editing enzymes in ctenophores is lower, suggesting a possible "compensation" by an expansion of the ADAT1-like subfamily in this lineage. In two genera of ctenophores, Pleurobrachia and Mnemiopsis, there are high levels of expression for RNA-editing enzymes in their aboral organs, the integrative center involved in control of locomotion and geotaxis. This finding supports the hypothesis that RNA editing is correlated with the complexity of tissues and behaviors. Smaller numbers of RNA-editing enzymes in Porifera and Placozoa also correlates with the primary absence of neural and muscular systems in these lineages. In ctenophores, the expansion of the RNA-editing machinery can also provide mechanisms that support the remarkable capacity for regeneration in these animals. In summary, despite their compact genomes, a wide variety of epigenomic mechanisms employed by ctenophores and other non-bilaterian basal metazoans can provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of biological novelties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please

  11. Lineage-specific loss of FGF17 within the avian orders Galliformes and Passeriformes

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, John

    2015-01-01

    The genomic and developmental complexity of vertebrates is commonly attributed to two rounds of whole genome duplications which occurred at the base of the vertebrate radiation. These duplications led to the rise of several, multi-gene families of developmental proteins like the Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs); a signaling protein family which functions at various stages of embryonic development. One of the major FGF assemblages arising from these duplications is the FGF8 subfamily, which includes FGF8, FGF17, and FGF18 in tetrapods. While FGF8 and FGF18 are found in all tetrapods and are critical for embryonic survival, genomic analyses suggest putative loss of FGF17 in various lineages ranging from frogs and fish, to the chicken. This study utilizes 27 avian genomes in conjunction with molecular analyses of chicken embryos to confirm the loss of FGF17 in chicken as a true, biological occurrence. FGF17 is also missing in the turkey, black grouse, Japanese quail and the northern bobwhite genomes. These species, along with chicken, form a monophyletic clade in the order Galliformes. Four additional species, members of the clade Passeroidea, within the order Passeriformes, are also missing FGF17. Additionally, analysis of intact FGF17 in other avian lineages reveals that it is still under strong purifying selection, despite being seemingly dispensable. Thus, FGF17 likely represents a molecular spandrel arising from a genome duplication event and due to its high connectivity with FGF8/FGF18, and potential for interference with their function, is retained under strong purifying selection, despite itself not having a strong selective advantage. PMID:25791492

  12. Parallel Evolution and Lineage-Specific Expansion of RNA Editing in Ctenophores

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Andrea B.; Sanford, Rachel S.; Yoshida, Masa-aki; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a process of targeted alterations of nucleotides in all types of RNA molecules (e.g., rRNA, tRNA, mRNA, and miRNA). As a result, the transcriptional output differs from its genomic DNA template. RNA editing can be defined both by biochemical mechanisms and by enzymes that perform these reactions. There are high levels of RNA editing detected in the mammalian nervous system, suggesting that nervous systems use this mechanism to increase protein diversity, because the post-transcription modifications lead to new gene products with novel functions. By re-annotating the ctenophore genomes, we found that the number of predicted RNA-editing enzymes is comparable to the numbers in mammals, but much greater than in other non-bilaterian basal metazoans. However, the overall molecular diversity of RNA-editing enzymes in ctenophores is lower, suggesting a possible “compensation” by an expansion of the ADAT1-like subfamily in this lineage. In two genera of ctenophores, Pleurobrachia and Mnemiopsis, there are high levels of expression for RNA-editing enzymes in their aboral organs, the integrative center involved in control of locomotion and geotaxis. This finding supports the hypothesis that RNA editing is correlated with the complexity of tissues and behaviors. Smaller numbers of RNA-editing enzymes in Porifera and Placozoa also correlates with the primary absence of neural and muscular systems in these lineages. In ctenophores, the expansion of the RNA-editing machinery can also provide mechanisms that support the remarkable capacity for regeneration in these animals. In summary, despite their compact genomes, a wide variety of epigenomic mechanisms employed by ctenophores and other non-bilaterian basal metazoans can provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of biological novelties. PMID:26089435

  13. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species.

  14. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species. PMID:26896851

  15. Pan-genome analyses identify lineage- and niche-specific markers of evolution and adaptation in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of complete bacterial genomes has created new opportunities for reconstructing bacterial evolution, but it has also highlighted the difficulty to fully understand the genomic and functional variations occurring among different lineages. Using the class Epsilonproteobacteria as a case study, we investigated the composition, flexibility, and function of its pan-genomes. Models were constructed to extrapolate the expansion of pan-genomes at three different taxonomic levels. The results show that, for Epsilonproteobacteria the seemingly large genome variations among strains of the same species are less noticeable when compared with groups at higher taxonomic ranks, indicating that genome stability is imposed by the potential existence of taxonomic boundaries. The analyses of pan-genomes has also defined a set of universally conserved core genes, based on which a phylogenetic tree was constructed to confirm that thermophilic species from deep-sea hydrothermal vents represent the most ancient lineages of Epsilonproteobacteria. Moreover, by comparing the flexible genome of a chemoautotrophic deep-sea vent species to (1) genomes of species belonging to the same genus, but inhabiting different environments, and (2) genomes of other vent species, but belonging to different genera, we were able to delineate the relative importance of lineage-specific versus niche-specific genes. This result not only emphasizes the overall importance of phylogenetic proximity in shaping the variable part of the genome, but also highlights the adaptive functions of niche-specific genes. Overall, by modeling the expansion of pan-genomes and analyzing core and flexible genes, this study provides snapshots on how the complex processes of gene acquisition, conservation, and removal affect the evolution of different species, and contribute to the metabolic diversity and versatility of Epsilonproteobacteria. PMID:24678308

  16. Sex-specific divergence for adaptations to dehydration stress in Drosophila kikkawai.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam

    2013-09-01

    Several studies on diverse Drosophila species have reported higher desiccation resistance of females, but the physiological basis of such sex-specific differences has received less attention. We tested whether sex-specific differences in cuticular traits (melanic females and non-melanic males) of Drosophila kikkawai correspond with divergence in their water balance mechanisms. Our results are interesting in several respects. First, positive clinal variation in desiccation resistance was correlated with cuticular melanisation in females but with changes in cuticular lipid mass in males, despite a lack of differences between the sexes for the rate of water loss. Second, a comparative analysis of water budget showed that females of the northern population stored more body water as well as hemolymph content and exhibited greater dehydration tolerance than flies from the southern tropics. In contrast, we found no geographical variation in the males for water content and dehydration tolerance. Third, an ~10-fold increase in the rate of water loss after organic solvent treatment of male D. kikkawai suggested a role of cuticular lipids in cuticular transpiration, but had no effect in the females. Fourth, geographical differences in the storage of carbohydrate content (metabolic fuel) were observed in females but not in males. Interestingly, in females, the rate of utilization of carbohydrates did not vary geographically, but males from drier localities showed a 50% reduction compared with wetter localities. Thus, body melanisation, increased body water, hemolymph, carbohydrate content and greater dehydration tolerance confer greater desiccation resistance in females, but a reduced rate of water loss is the only possible mechanism to cope with drought stress in males. Finally, acclimated females showed a significant increase in drought resistance associated with higher trehalose content as well as dehydration tolerance, while males showed no acclimation response. Thus, sex-specific

  17. Facilitating Neuron-Specific Genetic Manipulations in Drosophila melanogaster Using a Split GAL4 Repressor.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Michael-John; Luan, Haojiang; Shropshire, William C; Sutcliffe, Ben; Cocanougher, Benjamin; Scott, Robert L; Frechter, Shahar; Zlatic, Marta; Jefferis, Gregory S X E; White, Benjamin H

    2017-06-01

    Efforts to map neural circuits have been galvanized by the development of genetic technologies that permit the manipulation of targeted sets of neurons in the brains of freely behaving animals. The success of these efforts relies on the experimenter's ability to target arbitrarily small subsets of neurons for manipulation, but such specificity of targeting cannot routinely be achieved using existing methods. In Drosophila melanogaster, a widely-used technique for refined cell type-specific manipulation is the Split GAL4 system, which augments the targeting specificity of the binary GAL4-UAS (Upstream Activating Sequence) system by making GAL4 transcriptional activity contingent upon two enhancers, rather than one. To permit more refined targeting, we introduce here the "Killer Zipper" (KZip(+)), a suppressor that makes Split GAL4 targeting contingent upon a third enhancer. KZip(+) acts by disrupting both the formation and activity of Split GAL4 heterodimers, and we show how this added layer of control can be used to selectively remove unwanted cells from a Split GAL4 expression pattern or to subtract neurons of interest from a pattern to determine their requirement in generating a given phenotype. To facilitate application of the KZip(+) technology, we have developed a versatile set of LexAop-KZip(+) fly lines that can be used directly with the large number of LexA driver lines with known expression patterns. KZip(+) significantly sharpens the precision of neuronal genetic control available in Drosophila and may be extended to other organisms where Split GAL4-like systems are used. Copyright © 2017 Dolan et al.

  18. Origin, evolution and classification of type-3 copper proteins: lineage-specific gene expansions and losses across the Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Felipe; McDougall, Carmel; Degnan, Bernard M

    2013-05-01

    Tyrosinases, tyrosinase-related proteins, catechol oxidases and hemocyanins comprise the type-3 copper protein family and are involved in a variety of biological processes, including pigment formation, innate immunity and oxygen transport. Although this family is present in the three domains of life, its origin and early evolution are not well understood. Previous analyses of type-3 copper proteins largely have focussed on specific animal and plant phyla. Here, we combine genomic, phylogenetic and structural analyses to show that the original type-3 copper protein possessed a signal peptide and may have been secreted (we designate proteins of this type the α subclass). This ancestral type-3 copper protein gene underwent two duplication events, the first prior to the divergence of the unikont eukaryotic lineages and the second before the diversification of animals. The former duplication gave rise to a cytosolic form (β) and the latter to a membrane-bound form (γ). Structural comparisons reveal that the active site of α and γ forms are covered by aliphatic amino acids, and the β form has a highly conserved aromatic residue in this position. The subsequent evolution of this gene family in modern lineages of multicellular eukaryotes is typified by the loss of one or more of these three subclasses and the lineage-specific expansion of one or both of the remaining subclasses. The diversity of type-3 copper proteins in animals and other eukaryotes is consistent with two ancient gene duplication events leading to α, β and γ subclasses, followed by the differential loss and expansion of one or more of these subclasses in specific kingdoms and phyla. This has led to many lineage-specific type-3 copper protein repertoires and in some cases the independent evolution of functionally-classified tyrosinases and hemocyanins. For example, the oxygen-carrying hemocyanins in arthropods evolved from a β-subclass tyrosinase, whilst hemocyanins in molluscs and urochordates

  19. Influence of lineage-specific amino acid dimorphisms in GyrA on Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Nakajima, Chie; Kim, Youn Uck; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    We conducted in vitro DNA supercoiling assays, utilizing recombinant DNA gyrases, to elucidate the influence of the lineage-specific serine or threonine residue at position 95 of GyrA on fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There was little effect of the GyrA-Ala74Ser amino acid substitution on activity of the GyrA-Ser95 gyrase, while activity of the GyrA-Asp94Gly-Ser95 gyrase was reduced. These findings were in striking contrast to previous reports analyzing GyrA with Thr95 and suggest an important impact of the amino acid in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  20. DNA regions that regulate the ovarian transcriptional specificity of Drosophila yolk protein genes.

    PubMed

    Logan, S K; Garabedian, M J; Wensink, P C

    1989-09-01

    Yolk protein genes 1 and 2 (yp1 and yp2) of Drosophila melanogaster are divergently transcribed neighboring genes. Both are transcribed in only two tissues, the ovarian follicle cells and the fat bodies of adult females. Previous work has identified a yolk protein enhancer between the genes that is sufficient to direct transcription in one of the tissues, female fat bodies. Using germ-line transformation methods, we identify two cis-acting regions with positive effects on transcription in ovaries. One, a 301-bp region located between the genes, influences both genes and is an enhancer determining the stage and cell type specificity of ovarian transcription. The other, a 105-bp region located in the first exon of yp2, acts across the yp2 promoter region to stimulate yp1 transcription in ovaries. Additional observations suggest how a single enhancer influences both promoters.

  1. Delivery of circulating lipoproteins to specific neurons in the Drosophila brain regulates systemic insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Brankatschk, Marko; Dunst, Sebastian; Nemetschke, Linda; Eaton, Suzanne

    2014-10-02

    The Insulin signaling pathway couples growth, development and lifespan to nutritional conditions. Here, we demonstrate a function for the Drosophila lipoprotein LTP in conveying information about dietary lipid composition to the brain to regulate Insulin signaling. When yeast lipids are present in the diet, free calcium levels rise in Blood Brain Barrier glial cells. This induces transport of LTP across the Blood Brain Barrier by two LDL receptor-related proteins: LRP1 and Megalin. LTP accumulates on specific neurons that connect to cells that produce Insulin-like peptides, and induces their release into the circulation. This increases systemic Insulin signaling and the rate of larval development on yeast-containing food compared with a plant-based food of similar nutritional content.

  2. Lineage specific evolution of the VNTR composite retrotransposon central domain and its role in retrotransposition of gibbon LAVA elements.

    PubMed

    Lupan, Iulia; Bulzu, Paul; Popescu, Octavian; Damert, Annette

    2015-05-16

    VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) composite retrotransposons - SVA (SINE-R-VNTR-Alu), LAVA (LINE-1-Alu-VNTR-Alu), PVA (PTGR2-VNTR-Alu) and FVA (FRAM-VNTR-Alu) - are specific to hominoid primates. Their assembly, the evolution of their 5' and 3' domains, and the functional significance of the shared 5' Alu-like region are well understood. The central VNTR domain, by contrast, has long been assumed to represent a more or less random collection of 30-50 bp GC-rich repeats. It is only recently that it attracted attention in the context of regulation of SVA expression. Here we provide evidence that the organization of the VNTR is non-random, with conserved repeat unit (RU) arrays at both the 5' and 3' ends of the VNTRs of human, chimpanzee and orangutan SVA and gibbon LAVA. The younger SVA subfamilies harbour highly organized internal RU arrays. The composition of these arrays is specific to the human/chimpanzee and orangutan lineages, respectively. Tracing the development of the VNTR through evolution we show for the first time how tandem repeats evolve within the constraints set by a functional, non-autonomous non-LTR retrotransposon in two different families - LAVA and SVA - in different hominoid lineages. Our analysis revealed that a microhomology-driven mechanism mediates expansion/contraction of the VNTR domain at the DNA level. Elements of all four VNTR composite families have been shown to be mobilized by the autonomous LINE1 retrotransposon in trans. In case of SVA, key determinants of mobilization are found in the 5' hexameric repeat/Alu-like region. We now demonstrate that in LAVA, by contrast, the VNTR domain determines mobilization efficiency in the context of domain swaps between active and inactive elements. The central domain of VNTR composites evolves in a lineage-specific manner which gives rise to distinct structures in gibbon LAVA, orangutan SVA, and human/chimpanzee SVA. The differences observed between the families and lineages are likely to

  3. How Well Can We Detect Lineage-Specific Diversification-Rate Shifts? A Simulation Study of Sequential AIC Methods

    PubMed Central

    May, Michael R.; Moore, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists have long been fascinated by the extreme differences in species numbers across branches of the Tree of Life. This has motivated the development of statistical methods for detecting shifts in the rate of lineage diversification across the branches of phylogenic trees. One of the most frequently used methods, MEDUSA, explores a set of diversification-rate models, where each model assigns branches of the phylogeny to a set of diversification-rate categories. Each model is first fit to the data, and the Akaike information criterion (AIC) is then used to identify the optimal diversification model. Surprisingly, the statistical behavior of this popular method is uncharacterized, which is a concern in light of: (1) the poor performance of the AIC as a means of choosing among models in other phylogenetic contexts; (2) the ad hoc algorithm used to visit diversification models, and; (3) errors that we reveal in the likelihood function used to fit diversification models to the phylogenetic data. Here, we perform an extensive simulation study demonstrating that MEDUSA (1) has a high false-discovery rate (on average, spurious diversification-rate shifts are identified ≈30% of the time), and (2) provides biased estimates of diversification-rate parameters. Understanding the statistical behavior of MEDUSA is critical both to empirical researchers—in order to clarify whether these methods can make reliable inferences from empirical datasets—and to theoretical biologists—in order to clarify the specific problems that need to be solved in order to develop more reliable approaches for detecting shifts in the rate of lineage diversification. [Akaike information criterion; extinction; lineage-specific diversification rates; phylogenetic model selection; speciation.] PMID:27037081

  4. How Well Can We Detect Lineage-Specific Diversification-Rate Shifts? A Simulation Study of Sequential AIC Methods.

    PubMed

    May, Michael R; Moore, Brian R

    2016-11-01

    Evolutionary biologists have long been fascinated by the extreme differences in species numbers across branches of the Tree of Life. This has motivated the development of statistical methods for detecting shifts in the rate of lineage diversification across the branches of phylogenic trees. One of the most frequently used methods, MEDUSA, explores a set of diversification-rate models, where each model assigns branches of the phylogeny to a set of diversification-rate categories. Each model is first fit to the data, and the Akaike information criterion (AIC) is then used to identify the optimal diversification model. Surprisingly, the statistical behavior of this popular method is uncharacterized, which is a concern in light of: (1) the poor performance of the AIC as a means of choosing among models in other phylogenetic contexts; (2) the ad hoc algorithm used to visit diversification models, and; (3) errors that we reveal in the likelihood function used to fit diversification models to the phylogenetic data. Here, we perform an extensive simulation study demonstrating that MEDUSA (1) has a high false-discovery rate (on average, spurious diversification-rate shifts are identified [Formula: see text] of the time), and (2) provides biased estimates of diversification-rate parameters. Understanding the statistical behavior of MEDUSA is critical both to empirical researchers-in order to clarify whether these methods can make reliable inferences from empirical datasets-and to theoretical biologists-in order to clarify the specific problems that need to be solved in order to develop more reliable approaches for detecting shifts in the rate of lineage diversification. [Akaike information criterion; extinction; lineage-specific diversification rates; phylogenetic model selection; speciation.]. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  5. Navigation-specific neural coding in the visual system of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Alex D M; Wystrach, Antoine; Graham, Paul; Philippides, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila melanogaster are a good system in which to understand the minimal requirements for widespread visually guided behaviours such as navigation, due to their small brains (adults possess only 100,000 neurons) and the availability of neurogenetic techniques which allow the identification of task-specific cell types. Recently published data describe the receptive fields for two classes of visually responsive neurons (R2 and R3/R4d ring neurons in the central complex) that are essential for visual tasks such as orientation memory for salient objects and simple pattern discriminations. What is interesting is that these cells have very large receptive fields and are very small in number, suggesting that each sub-population of cells might be a bottleneck in the processing of visual information for a specific behaviour, as each subset of cells effectively condenses information from approximately 3000 visual receptors in the eye, to fewer than 50 neurons in total. It has recently been shown how R1 ring neurons, which receive input from the same areas as the R2 and R3/R4d cells, are necessary for place learning in Drosophila. However, how R1 neurons enable place learning is unknown. By examining the information provided by different populations of hypothetical visual neurons in simulations of experimental arenas, we show that neurons with ring neuron-like receptive fields are sufficient for defining a location visually. In this way we provide a link between the type of information conveyed by ring neurons and the behaviour they support.

  6. An autonomous CEBPA enhancer specific for myeloid-lineage priming and neutrophilic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Avellino, Roberto; Havermans, Marije; Erpelinck, Claudia; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Hoogenboezem, Remco; van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Rombouts, Elwin; van Lom, Kirsten; van Strien, Paulina M. H.; Gebhard, Claudia; Rehli, Michael; Pimanda, John; Beck, Dominik; Erkeland, Stefan; Kuiken, Thijs; de Looper, Hans; Gröschel, Stefan; Touw, Ivo; Bindels, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophilic differentiation is dependent on CCAAT enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), a transcription factor expressed in multiple organs including the bone marrow. Using functional genomic technologies in combination with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 genome editing and in vivo mouse modeling, we show that CEBPA is located in a 170-kb topological-associated domain that contains 14 potential enhancers. Of these, 1 enhancer located +42 kb from CEBPA is active and engages with the CEBPA promoter in myeloid cells only. Germ line deletion of the homologous enhancer in mice in vivo reduces Cebpa levels exclusively in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid-primed progenitor cells leading to severe defects in the granulocytic lineage, without affecting any other Cebpa-expressing organ studied. The enhancer-deleted progenitor cells lose their myeloid transcription program and are blocked in differentiation. Deletion of the enhancer also causes loss of HSC maintenance. We conclude that a single +42-kb enhancer is essential for CEBPA expression in myeloid cells only. PMID:26966090

  7. Genome-wide identification of lineage and locus specific variation associated with pneumococcal carriage duration

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J; Goldblatt, David; Nosten, François; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive disease in infants, especially in low-income settings. Asymptomatic carriage in the nasopharynx is a prerequisite for disease, but variability in its duration is currently only understood at the serotype level. Here we developed a model to calculate the duration of carriage episodes from longitudinal swab data, and combined these results with whole genome sequence data. We estimated that pneumococcal genomic variation accounted for 63% of the phenotype variation, whereas the host traits considered here (age and previous carriage) accounted for less than 5%. We further partitioned this heritability into both lineage and locus effects, and quantified the amount attributable to the largest sources of variation in carriage duration: serotype (17%), drug-resistance (9%) and other significant locus effects (7%). A pan-genome-wide association study identified prophage sequences as being associated with decreased carriage duration independent of serotype, potentially by disruption of the competence mechanism. These findings support theoretical models of pneumococcal competition and antibiotic resistance. PMID:28742023

  8. An autonomous CEBPA enhancer specific for myeloid-lineage priming and neutrophilic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Avellino, Roberto; Havermans, Marije; Erpelinck, Claudia; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Rombouts, Elwin; van Lom, Kirsten; van Strien, Paulina M H; Gebhard, Claudia; Rehli, Michael; Pimanda, John; Beck, Dominik; Erkeland, Stefan; Kuiken, Thijs; de Looper, Hans; Gröschel, Stefan; Touw, Ivo; Bindels, Eric; Delwel, Ruud

    2016-06-16

    Neutrophilic differentiation is dependent on CCAAT enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), a transcription factor expressed in multiple organs including the bone marrow. Using functional genomic technologies in combination with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 genome editing and in vivo mouse modeling, we show that CEBPA is located in a 170-kb topological-associated domain that contains 14 potential enhancers. Of these, 1 enhancer located +42 kb from CEBPA is active and engages with the CEBPA promoter in myeloid cells only. Germ line deletion of the homologous enhancer in mice in vivo reduces Cebpa levels exclusively in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid-primed progenitor cells leading to severe defects in the granulocytic lineage, without affecting any other Cebpa-expressing organ studied. The enhancer-deleted progenitor cells lose their myeloid transcription program and are blocked in differentiation. Deletion of the enhancer also causes loss of HSC maintenance. We conclude that a single +42-kb enhancer is essential for CEBPA expression in myeloid cells only. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Early preimplantation cells expressing Cdx2 exhibit plasticity of specification to TE and ICM lineages through positional changes.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Yayoi; Oka, Sanae; Fujimori, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    The establishment of the trophectoderm (TE) and the inner cell mass (ICM) is the first cell lineage segregation to occur in mouse preimplantation development. These two cell lineages arise in a position-dependent manner at the blastocyst stage: the outer cells form TE, which will generate the future placenta, while the inner cells give rise to the ICM, from which the epiblast (EPI) and primitive endoderm (PrE) arise. Previous studies have shown that a portion of cells relocate from the outside position to the inside during this preimplantation stage, but few studies have investigated the correlation between cell relocation and the expression of key transcription factors critical for cell differentiation. To monitor cell movement and the status of the TE-specification pathway in living embryos, we established Cdx2-GFP reporter mice allowing us to visualize the expression of Caudal-type transcriptional factor (Cdx2), a key regulator of the initiation of TE differentiation. Observation of Cdx2-GFP preimplantation embryos by live cell imaging revealed that all cells localized in an initial outer position initiated the expression of Cdx2. Subsequently, cells that changed their position from an outer to an inner position downregulated Cdx2 expression and contributed to the ICM. Finally we showed that internalized cells likely contribute to both the EPI and PrE. Our datas indicate that cells expressing even high levels of Cdx2 can internalize, deactivate an activated TE-specification molecular pathway and integrate into the pluripotent cell population.

  10. Reconstruction of cyclooxygenase evolution in animals suggests variable, lineage-specific duplications, and homologs with low sequence identity.

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Kocot, Kevin M; Brannock, Pamela M; Cannon, Johanna T; Waits, Damien S; Weese, David A; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2015-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymatically converts arachidonic acid into prostaglandin G/H in animals and has importance during pregnancy, digestion, and other physiological functions in mammals. COX genes have mainly been described from vertebrates, where gene duplications are common, but few studies have examined COX in invertebrates. Given the increasing ease in generating genomic data, as well as recent, although incomplete descriptions of potential COX sequences in Mollusca, Crustacea, and Insecta, assessing COX evolution across Metazoa is now possible. Here, we recover 40 putative COX orthologs by searching publicly available genomic resources as well as ~250 novel invertebrate transcriptomic datasets. Results suggest the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria possessed a COX homolog similar to those of vertebrates, although such homologs were not found in poriferan and ctenophore genomes. COX was found in most crustaceans and the majority of molluscs examined, but only specific taxa/lineages within Cnidaria and Annelida. For example, all octocorallians appear to have COX, while no COX homologs were found in hexacorallian datasets. Most species examined had a single homolog, although species-specific COX duplications were found in members of Annelida, Mollusca, and Cnidaria. Additionally, COX genes were not found in Hemichordata, Echinodermata, or Platyhelminthes, and the few previously described COX genes in Insecta lacked appreciable sequence homology (although structural analyses suggest these may still be functional COX enzymes). This analysis provides a benchmark for identifying COX homologs in future genomic and transcriptomic datasets, and identifies lineages for future studies of COX.

  11. miRNA-embedded shRNAs for Lineage-specific BCL11A Knockdown and Hemoglobin F Induction

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Swaroopa; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Du, Peng; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Grimson, Andrew W; Kamran, Sophia C; Thornton, James; de Boer, Helen; Root, David E; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) expressed via RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters has been widely exploited to modulate gene expression in a variety of mammalian cell types. For certain applications, such as lineage-specific knockdown, embedding targeting sequences into pol II-driven microRNA (miRNA) architecture is required. Here, using the potential therapeutic target BCL11A, we demonstrate that pol III-driven shRNAs lead to significantly increased knockdown but also increased cytotoxcity in comparison to pol II-driven miRNA adapted shRNAs (shRNAmiR) in multiple hematopoietic cell lines. We show that the two expression systems yield mature guide strand sequences that differ by a 4 bp shift. This results in alternate seed sequences and consequently influences the efficacy of target gene knockdown. Incorporating a corresponding 4 bp shift into the guide strand of shRNAmiRs resulted in improved knockdown efficiency of BCL11A. This was associated with a significant de-repression of the hemoglobin target of BCL11A, human γ-globin or the murine homolog Hbb-y. Our results suggest the requirement for optimization of shRNA sequences upon incorporation into a miRNA backbone. These findings have important implications in future design of shRNAmiRs for RNAi-based therapy in hemoglobinopathies and other diseases requiring lineage-specific expression of gene silencing sequences. PMID:26080908

  12. Dynamics of 5-carboxylcytosine during hepatic differentiation: potential general role for active demethylation by DNA repair in lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lara C; Lo, Peggy Cho Kiu; Foster, Jeremy M; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Durczak, Paulina M; Duncan, Gary; Ramsawhook, Ashley; Aithal, Guruprasad Padur; Denning, Chris; Hannan, Nicholas R F; Ruzov, Alexey

    2017-03-07

    Patterns of DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) are rearranged during differentiation contributing to the regulation of cell type-specific gene expression. TET proteins oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Both 5fC and 5caC can be recognized and excised from DNA by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) followed by the subsequent incorporation of unmodified cytosine into the abasic site via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. We previously demonstrated that 5caC accumulates during lineage specification of neural stem cells (NSCs) suggesting that such active demethylation pathway is operative in this system; however, it is still unknown if TDG/BER-dependent demethylation is utilized during other types of cellular differentiation. Here we analyze dynamics of the global levels of 5hmC and 5caC during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells towards hepatic endoderm. We show that, similar to differentiating NSCs, 5caC transiently accumulates during hepatic differentiation. The levels of 5caC increase during specification of foregut, peak at the stage of hepatic endoderm commitment, and drop in differentiating cells concurrently with the onset of expression of alpha fetoprotein, a marker of committed hepatic progenitors. Moreover, we show that 5caC accumulates at promoter regions of several genes expressed during hepatic specification at differentiation stages corresponding to the beginning of their expression. Our data indicate that transient 5caC accumulation is a common feature of two different types (neural/glial and endoderm/hepatic) of cellular differentiation. This suggests that oxidation of 5mC may represent a general mechanism of rearrangement of 5mC profiles during lineage specification of somatic cells in mammals.

  13. Lineage-specific diversification of killer cell Ig-like receptors in the owl monkey, a New World primate.

    PubMed

    Cadavid, Luis F; Lun, Cheng-Man

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) modulate the cytotoxic effects of natural killer cells. In primates, the KIRs are highly diverse as a consequence of variation in gene content, alternative domain composition, and loci polymorphism. We analyzed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone draft sequence spanning the owl monkey KIR cluster. The draft sequence had seven ordered yet unconnected contigs containing six full-length and two partial gene models, flanked by the LILRB and FcAR framework genes. Gene models were predicted to encode KIRs with inhibitory, activating, or dual functionality. Four gene models encoded three Ig domain receptors, while three others encoded molecules with four Ig domains. The additional domain resulted from an insertion in tandem of a 2,101 bp fragment containing the last 289 bp of intron 2, exon 3, and intron 3, resulting in molecules with two D0 domains. Re-screening of the owl monkey BAC library and sequencing of partial cDNAs from an owl monkey yielded five additional KIRs, four of which encoded receptors with short cytoplasmic domains with premature stop codons due to either a single nucleotide substitution or deletion or the absence of exon 8. Phylogenetic analysis by domains showed that owl monkey KIRs were monophyletic, clustering independently from other primate KIR lineages. Retroelements found in introns, however, were shared by KIRs from different primate lineages. This suggests that the owl monkey inherited a KIR cluster with a rich history of exon shuffling upon which positive selection for ligand binding operated to diversify the receptors in a lineage-specific fashion.

  14. Dynamic changes in replication timing and gene expression during lineage specification of human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Buckley, Quinton; Sasaki, Takayo; Zimmerman, Jared; Didier, Ruth A.; Nazor, Kristopher; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lian, Zheng; Weissman, Sherman; Robins, Allan J.; Schulz, Thomas C.; Menendez, Laura; Kulik, Michael J.; Dalton, Stephen; Gabr, Haitham; Kahveci, Tamer; Gilbert, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the genome in mammalian cells occurs in a defined temporal order referred to as its replication-timing (RT) program. RT changes dynamically during development, regulated in units of 400–800 kb referred to as replication domains (RDs). Changes in RT are generally coordinated with transcriptional competence and changes in subnuclear position. We generated genome-wide RT profiles for 26 distinct human cell types, including embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived, primary cells and established cell lines representing intermediate stages of endoderm, mesoderm, ectoderm, and neural crest (NC) development. We identified clusters of RDs that replicate at unique times in each stage (RT signatures) and confirmed global consolidation of the genome into larger synchronously replicating segments during differentiation. Surprisingly, transcriptome data revealed that the well-accepted correlation between early replication and transcriptional activity was restricted to RT-constitutive genes, whereas two-thirds of the genes that switched RT during differentiation were strongly expressed when late replicating in one or more cell types. Closer inspection revealed that transcription of this class of genes was frequently restricted to the lineage in which the RT switch occurred, but was induced prior to a late-to-early RT switch and/or down-regulated after an early-to-late RT switch. Analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks showed that this class of genes contains strong regulators of genes that were only expressed when early replicating. These results provide intriguing new insight into the complex relationship between transcription and RT regulation during human development. PMID:26055160

  15. Broad RNA interference-mediated antiviral immunity and virus-specific inducible responses in Drosophila1

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Cordula; Mueller, Stefanie; Goto, Akira; Barbier, Vincent; Paro, Simona; Bonnay, François; Dostert, Catherine; Troxler, Laurent; Hetru, Charles; Meignin, Carine; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Imler, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a good model to unravel the molecular mechanisms of innate immunity, and has led to some important discoveries on the sensing and signaling of microbial infections. The response of Drosophila to virus infections remains poorly characterized, and appears to involve two facets. On one hand RNA interference (RNAi) involves the recognition and processing of double stranded (ds) RNA into small interfering (si) RNAs by the host ribonuclease Dicer-2 (Dcr-2), whereas on the other hand an inducible response controlled by the evolutionarily conserved JAK-STAT pathway contributes to the antiviral host defense. In order to clarify the contribution of the siRNA and JAK-STAT pathways to the control of viral infections, we have compared the resistance of flies wild-type and mutant for Dcr-2 or the JAK kinase Hopscotch (Hop) to infections by seven RNA or DNA viruses belonging to different families. Our results reveal a unique susceptibility of hop mutant flies to infection by DCV and CrPV, two members of the Dicistroviridae family, which contrasts with the susceptibility of Dcr-2 mutant flies to many viruses, including the DNA virus IIV-6. Genome-wide microarray analysis confirmed that different sets of genes were induced following infection by DCV or by two unrelated RNA viruses, FHV and SINV. Overall, our data reveal that RNAi is an efficient antiviral mechanism, operating against a large range of viruses, including a DNA virus. By contrast, the antiviral contribution of the JAK-STAT pathway appears to be virus-specific. PMID:23255357

  16. Tissue-specific transcription of the neuronal gene Lim3 affects Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Rybina, Olga Y; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Veselkina, Ekaterina R; Bolschakova, Olga I; Symonenko, Alexander V; Krementsova, Anna V; Ryabova, Elena V; Roshina, Natalia V; Pasyukova, Elena G

    2017-05-02

    The identity of neuronal cell types is established and maintained by the expression of neuronal genes coding for ion channels, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides, among others. Some of these genes have been shown to affect lifespan; however, their role in lifespan control remains largely unclear. The Drosophila melanogaster gene Lim3 encodes a transcription factor involved in complicated motor neuron specification networks. We previously identified Lim3 as a candidate gene affecting lifespan. To obtain direct evidence of the involvement of Lim3 in lifespan control, Lim3 overexpression and RNAi knockdown were induced in the nervous system and muscles of Drosophila using the GAL4-UAS binary system. We demonstrated that Lim3 knockdown in the nervous system increased survival at an early age and that Lim3 knockdown in muscles both increased survival at an early age and extended median lifespan, directly establishing the involvement of Lim3 in lifespan control. Lim3 overexpression in nerves and muscles was deleterious and led to lethality and decreased lifespan, respectively. Lim3 misexpression in both nerves and muscles increased locomotion regardless of changes in lifespan, which indicated that the effects of Lim3 on lifespan and locomotion can be uncoupled. Decreased synaptic activity was observed in the neuromuscular junctions of individuals with Lim3 overexpression in muscles, in association with decreased lifespan. However, no changes in NMJ activity were associated with the positive shift in locomotion observed in all misexpression genotypes. Our data suggested that modifications in the microtubule network may be induced by Lim3 misexpression in muscles and cause an increase in locomotion.

  17. Farm-specific lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 in Danish pig farms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, C; Larsen, J; Moodley, A; Nielsen, J P; Skov, R L; Andreasen, M; Guardabassi, L

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Dust and pigs at five age groups were sampled in six Danish MRSA-positive pig farms. MRSA CC398 was isolated from 284 of the 391 samples tested, including 230 (74%) animal and 54 (68%) environmental samples. PFGE analysis of a subset of 48 isolates, including the six strains previously isolated from farm workers, revealed the existence of farm-specific pulsotypes. With a single exception, human, environmental and porcine isolates originating from the same farm clustered together in the PFGE cluster analysis, indicating that spread of MRSA CC398 in Danish pig farms is mainly due to clonal dissemination of farm-specific lineages that can be discriminated by PFGE. This finding has important implications for planning future epidemiological studies investigating the spread of CC398 in pig farming.

  18. Herbicide paraquat induces sex-specific variation of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Shauryabrota; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-12-01

    There are several reports on herbicide paraquat (PQ)-induced Parkinsonian-like pathology in different animal models, including Drosophila melanogaster. Also, the role of some inflammatory factors, such as nitric oxide is reported in PQ-induced neuroinflammation of Drosophila. Although invertebrate model is valuable to study the conserved inflammatory pathway at the time of neurodegeneration, but neuroinflammation during PQ-mediated neurodegeneration has not been studied explicitly in Drosophila. In this study, the inflammatory response was examined in Drosophila model during PQ-induced neurodegeneration. We found that after exposure to PQ, survivability and locomotion ability were affected in both sexes of Drosophila. Behavioural symptoms indicated similar physiological features of Parkinson's disease (PD) in different animal models, as well as in humans. Our study revealed alteration in proinflamatory factor, TNF-α and Eiger (the Drosophila homologue in TNF superfamily) was changed in PQ-treated Drosophila both at protein and mRNA level during neurodegeneration. To ensure the occurrence of neurodegeneration, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive neuronal cell loss was considered as a hallmark of PD in the fly brain. Thus, our result revealed the conserved inflammatory events in terms of expression of TNF-α and Eiger present during a sublethal dose of PQ-administered neurodegeneration in male and female Drosophila with significant variation in proinflammatory factor level among both the sexes.

  19. BDE-99 impairs differentiation of human and mouse NPCs into the oligodendroglial lineage by species-specific modes of action

    PubMed Central

    Dach, Katharina; Bendt, Farina; Huebenthal, Ulrike; Giersiefer, Susanne; Lein, Pamela J.; Heuer, Heike; Fritsche, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are bioaccumulating flame retardants causing developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) in humans and rodents. Their DNT effects are suspected to involve thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disruption. Here, we tested the hypothesis whether disturbance of neural progenitor cell (NPC) differentiation into the oligodendrocyte lineage (O4+ cells) by BDE-99 involves disruption of TH action in human and mouse (h,m)NPCs. Therefore, we quantified differentiation of NPCs into O4+ cells and measured their maturation via expression of myelin-associated genes (hMBP, mMog) in presence and absence of TH and/or BDE-99. T3 promoted O4+ cell differentiation in mouse, but not hNPCs, and induced hMBP/mMog gene expression in both species. BDE-99 reduced generation of human and mouse O4+ cells, but there is no indication for BDE-99 interfering with cellular TH signaling during O4+ cell formation. BDE-99 reduced hMBP expression due to oligodendrocyte reduction, but concentrations that did not affect the number of mouse O4+ cells inhibited TH-induced mMog transcription by a yet unknown mechanism. In addition, ascorbic acid antagonized only the BDE-99-dependent loss of human, not mouse, O4+ cells by a mechanism probably independent of reactive oxygen species. These data point to species-specific modes of action of BDE-99 on h/mNPC development into the oligodendrocyte lineage. PMID:28317842

  20. BDE-99 impairs differentiation of human and mouse NPCs into the oligodendroglial lineage by species-specific modes of action.

    PubMed

    Dach, Katharina; Bendt, Farina; Huebenthal, Ulrike; Giersiefer, Susanne; Lein, Pamela J; Heuer, Heike; Fritsche, Ellen

    2017-03-20

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are bioaccumulating flame retardants causing developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) in humans and rodents. Their DNT effects are suspected to involve thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disruption. Here, we tested the hypothesis whether disturbance of neural progenitor cell (NPC) differentiation into the oligodendrocyte lineage (O4(+) cells) by BDE-99 involves disruption of TH action in human and mouse (h,m)NPCs. Therefore, we quantified differentiation of NPCs into O4(+) cells and measured their maturation via expression of myelin-associated genes (hMBP, mMog) in presence and absence of TH and/or BDE-99. T3 promoted O4(+) cell differentiation in mouse, but not hNPCs, and induced hMBP/mMog gene expression in both species. BDE-99 reduced generation of human and mouse O4(+) cells, but there is no indication for BDE-99 interfering with cellular TH signaling during O4(+) cell formation. BDE-99 reduced hMBP expression due to oligodendrocyte reduction, but concentrations that did not affect the number of mouse O4(+) cells inhibited TH-induced mMog transcription by a yet unknown mechanism. In addition, ascorbic acid antagonized only the BDE-99-dependent loss of human, not mouse, O4(+) cells by a mechanism probably independent of reactive oxygen species. These data point to species-specific modes of action of BDE-99 on h/mNPC development into the oligodendrocyte lineage.

  1. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  2. Flagellated algae protein evolution suggests the prevalence of lineage-specific rules governing evolutionary rates of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Yan; Liao, Ben-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the general rules governing the rate of protein evolution is fundamental to evolutionary biology. However, attempts to address this issue in yeasts and mammals have revealed considerable differences in the relative importance of determinants for protein evolutionary rates. This phenomenon was previously explained by the fact that yeasts and mammals are different in many cellular and genomic properties. Flagellated algae species have several cellular and genomic characteristics that are intermediate between yeasts and mammals. Using partial correlation analyses on the evolution of 6,921 orthologous proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, we examined factors influencing evolutionary rates of proteins in flagellated algae. Previous studies have shown that mRNA abundance and gene compactness are strong determinants for protein evolutionary rates in yeasts and mammals, respectively. We show that both factors also influence algae protein evolution with mRNA abundance having a larger impact than gene compactness on the rates of algae protein evolution. More importantly, among all the factors examined, coding sequence (CDS) length has the strongest (positive) correlation with protein evolutionary rates. This correlation between CDS length and the rates of protein evolution is not due to alignment-related issues or domain density. These results suggest no simple and universal rules governing protein evolutionary rates across different eukaryotic lineages. Instead, gene properties influence the rate of protein evolution in a lineage-specific manner.

  3. Twist-ing cell fate: mechanistic insights into the role of twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cakouros, D; Raices, R M; Gronthos, S; Glackin, C A

    2010-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), are multipotent cells that give rise to multiple lineages including osteoblasts, adipocytes, muscle, and fibroblasts. MSCs are useful for clinical applications such as cell therapy because they can be isolated from an individual and expanded for use in tissue repair, as well as other therapeutic applications, without immune rejection. However, one of the key problems in the use of MSCs for these applications is the efficiency of these cells to engraft and fully regenerate damaged tissues. Therefore, to optimize this process, a comprehensive understanding of the key regulators of MSCs self-renewal and maintenance are critical to the success of future cell therapy as well as other clinical applications. The basic helix loop helix transcription factor, Twist, plays a master regulatory role in all of these processes and, therefore, a thorough understanding of the mechanistic insights in the role of Twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis is vital to the success of future clinical applications for the therapeutic use of MSCs. In this article, we highlight the basic mechanisms and signaling pathways that are important to MSC fate, maintenance, and differentiation, as well as the critical role that Twist plays in these processes. In addition, we review the known literature suggesting a critical role for Twist in the generation of cancer stem cells, as this information may contribute to a broader understanding of stem cell biology and stem-cell-based therapeutics.

  4. Construction of transgenic Drosophila by using the site-specific integrase from phage phiC31.

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Amy C; Fish, Matthew; Nusse, Roel; Calos, Michele P

    2004-01-01

    The phiC31 integrase functions efficiently in vitro and in Escherichia coli, yeast, and mammalian cells, mediating unidirectional site-specific recombination between its attB and attP recognition sites. Here we show that this site-specific integration system also functions efficiently in Drosophila melanogaster in cultured cells and in embryos. Intramolecular recombination in S2 cells on transfected plasmid DNA carrying the attB and attP recognition sites occurred at a frequency of 47%. In addition, several endogenous pseudo attP sites were identified in the fly genome that were recognized by the integrase and used as substrates for integration in S2 cells. Two lines of Drosophila were created by integrating an attP site into the genome with a P element. phiC31 integrase injected into embryos as mRNA functioned to promote integration of an attB-containing plasmid into the attP site, resulting in up to 55% of fertile adults producing transgenic offspring. A total of 100% of these progeny carried a precise integration event at the genomic attP site. These experiments demonstrate the potential for precise genetic engineering of the Drosophila genome with the phiC31 integrase system and will likely benefit research in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:15126397

  5. Retinal determination genes coordinate neuroepithelial specification and neurogenesis modes in the Drosophila optic lobe

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Differences in neuroepithelial patterning and neurogenesis modes contribute to area-specific diversifications of neural circuits. In the Drosophila visual system, two neuroepithelia, the outer (OPC) and inner (IPC) proliferation centers, generate neuron subtypes for four ganglia in several ways. Whereas neuroepithelial cells in the medial OPC directly convert into neuroblasts, in an IPC subdomain they generate migratory progenitors by epithelial-mesenchymal transition that mature into neuroblasts in a second proliferative zone. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the identity of these neuroepithelia, including their neurogenesis modes, remain poorly understood. Analysis of Polycomblike revealed that loss of Polycomb group-mediated repression of the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B) caused the transformation of OPC to IPC neuroepithelial identity. This suggests that the neuroepithelial default state is IPC-like, whereas OPC identity is derived. Ectopic Abd-B blocks expression of the highly conserved retinal determination gene network members Eyes absent (Eya), Sine oculis (So) and Homothorax (Hth). These factors are essential for OPC specification and neurogenesis control. Finally, eya and so are also sufficient to confer OPC-like identity, and, in parallel with hth, the OPC-specific neurogenesis mode on the IPC. PMID:27381228

  6. Hox-mediated regulation of doublesex sculpts sex-specific abdomen morphology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yoder, John H

    2012-06-01

    Hox transcription factors are deeply conserved proteins that guide development through regulation of diverse target genes. Furthermore, alteration in Hox target cis-regulation has been proposed as a major mechanism of animal morphological evolution. Crucial to understanding how homeotic genes sculpt the developing body and contribute to the evolution of form is identification and characterization of regulatory targets. Because target specificity is achieved through physical or genetic interactions with cofactors or co-regulators, characterizing interactions between homeotic genes and regulatory partners is also critical. In Drosophila melanogaster, sexually dimorphic abdominal morphology results from sex-specific gene regulation mediated by the Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B) and products of the sex-determination gene doublesex (dsx). Together these transcription factors regulate numerous sex-specific characters, including pigmentation, cuticle morphology, and abdominal segment number. We show Dsx expression in the developing D. melanogaster pupal abdomen is spatiotemporally dynamic, correlating with segments that undergo sexually dimorphic morphogenesis. Furthermore, our genetic analyses show Dsx expression is Abd-B dependent. Doublesex and Abd-B are not only requisite co-regulators of sexually dimorphic abdominal morphology. We propose that dsx is itself a transcriptional target of Abd-B. These data present a testable hypothesis about the evolution of sexually dimorphic segment number in Diptera. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The specificity of protein–DNA crosslinking by formaldehyde: in vitro and in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Joseph; Biggin, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    Formaldehyde crosslinking has been widely used to study binding of specific proteins to DNA elements in intact cells. However, previous studies have not determined if this crosslinker preserves the bona fide pattern of DNA binding. Here we show that formaldehyde crosslinking of Drosophila embryos maps an interaction of the transcription factor Zeste to a known target element in the Ultrabithorax promoter. This data agrees broadly with previous mapping of the same Zeste binding sites by in vivo UV crosslinking, though the formaldehyde method does give a low, possibly artifactual signal on other DNA fragments that is not detected by the UV method. We also demonstrate, using an in vitro assay, that formaldehyde crosslinking accurately reflects the DNA binding specificities of both Zeste and a second transcription factor, Eve. The crosslinking reagent methylene blue is shown to preserve DNA binding specificity in vitro as well. Our results suggest that crosslinking by formaldehyde, and possibly also by methylene blue, provide an accurate guide to the interaction of proteins with their high affinity target sites in cells. PMID:10606672

  8. An analysis of the gene complement of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica: Evolution of lineage-specific genes and giant chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Webber, Caleb; Ponting, Chris P.

    2007-01-01

    The newly sequenced genome of Monodelphis domestica not only provides the out-group necessary to better understand our own eutherian lineage, but it enables insights into the innovative biology of metatherians. Here, we compare Monodelphis with Homo sequences from alignments of single nucleotides, genes, and whole chromosomes. Using PhyOP, we have established orthologs in Homo for 82% (15,250) of Monodelphis gene predictions. Those with single orthologs in each species exhibited a high median synonymous substitution rate (dS = 1.02), thereby explaining the relative paucity of aligned regions outside of coding sequences. Orthology assignments were used to construct a synteny map that illustrates the considerable fragmentation of Monodelphis and Homo karyotypes since their therian last common ancestor. Fifteen percent of Monodelphis genes are predicted, from their low divergence at synonymous sites, to have been duplicated in the metatherian lineage. The majority of Monodelphis-specific genes possess predicted roles in chemosensation, reproduction, adaptation to specific diets, and immunity. Using alignments of Monodelphis genes to sequences from either Homo or Trichosurus vulpecula (an Australian marsupial), we show that metatherian X chromosomes have elevated silent substitution rates and high G+C contents in comparison with both metatherian autosomes and eutherian chromosomes. Each of these elevations is also a feature of subtelomeric chromosomal regions. We attribute these observations to high rates of female-specific recombination near the chromosomal ends and within the X chromosome, which act to sustain or increase G+C levels by biased gene conversion. In particular, we propose that the higher G+C content of the Monodelphis X chromosome is a direct consequence of its small size relative to the giant autosomes. PMID:17495010

  9. An analysis of the gene complement of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica: evolution of lineage-specific genes and giant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Webber, Caleb; Ponting, Chris P

    2007-07-01

    The newly sequenced genome of Monodelphis domestica not only provides the out-group necessary to better understand our own eutherian lineage, but it enables insights into the innovative biology of metatherians. Here, we compare Monodelphis with Homo sequences from alignments of single nucleotides, genes, and whole chromosomes. Using PhyOP, we have established orthologs in Homo for 82% (15,250) of Monodelphis gene predictions. Those with single orthologs in each species exhibited a high median synonymous substitution rate (d(S) = 1.02), thereby explaining the relative paucity of aligned regions outside of coding sequences. Orthology assignments were used to construct a synteny map that illustrates the considerable fragmentation of Monodelphis and Homo karyotypes since their therian last common ancestor. Fifteen percent of Monodelphis genes are predicted, from their low divergence at synonymous sites, to have been duplicated in the metatherian lineage. The majority of Monodelphis-specific genes possess predicted roles in chemosensation, reproduction, adaptation to specific diets, and immunity. Using alignments of Monodelphis genes to sequences from either Homo or Trichosurus vulpecula (an Australian marsupial), we show that metatherian X chromosomes have elevated silent substitution rates and high G+C contents in comparison with both metatherian autosomes and eutherian chromosomes. Each of these elevations is also a feature of subtelomeric chromosomal regions. We attribute these observations to high rates of female-specific recombination near the chromosomal ends and within the X chromosome, which act to sustain or increase G+C levels by biased gene conversion. In particular, we propose that the higher G+C content of the Monodelphis X chromosome is a direct consequence of its small size relative to the giant autosomes.

  10. Lineage-specific serology confirms Brazilian Atlantic forest lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas and Leontopithecus rosalia, as reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi II (TcII).

    PubMed

    Kerr, Charlotte L; Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Xavier, Samanta C C; Barros, Juliana H; Lima, Valdirene S; Jansen, Ana M; Miles, Michael A

    2016-11-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans, has a vast reservoir of mammalian hosts in the Americas, and is classified into six genetic lineages, TcI-TcVI, with a possible seventh, TcBat. Elucidating enzootic cycles of the different lineages is important for understanding the ecology of this parasite, the emergence of new outbreaks of Chagas disease and for guiding control strategies. Direct lineage identification by genotyping is hampered by limitations of parasite isolation and culture. An indirect method is to identify lineage-specific serological reactions in infected individuals; here we describe its application with sylvatic Brazilian primates. Synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface protein TSSA were used in ELISA with sera from Atlantic Forest Leontopithecus chrysomelas (golden-headed lion tamarin), L. rosalia (golden lion tamarin), Amazonian Sapajus libidinosus (black-striped capuchin) and Alouatta belzebul (red-handed howler monkey). The epitope common to lineages TcII, TcV and TcVI was recognised by sera from 15 of 26 L. chrysomelas and 8 of 13 L. rosalia. For 12 of these serologically identified TcII infections, the identity of the lineage infection was confirmed by genotyping T. cruzi isolates. Of the TcII/TcV/TcVI positive sera 12 of the 15 L. chrysomelas and 2 of the 8 L. rosalia also reacted with the specific epitope restricted to TcV and TcVI. Sera from one of six S. libidinous recognised the TcIV/TcIII epitopes. This lineage-specific serological surveillance has verified that Atlantic Forest primates are reservoir hosts of at least TcII, and probably TcV and TcVI, commonly associated with severe Chagas disease in the southern cone region of South America. With appropriate reagents, this novel methodology is readily applicable to a wide range of mammal species and reservoir host discovery.

  11. Expression of the Idefix retrotransposon in early follicle cells in the germarium of Drosophila melanogaster is determined by its LTR sequences and a specific genomic context.

    PubMed

    Tcheressiz, S; Calco, V; Arnaud, F; Arthaud, L; Dastugue, B; Vaury, C

    2002-04-01

    Retrotransposons are transcriptionally activated in different tissues and cell types by a variety of genomic and environmental factors. Transcription of LTR retrotransposons is controlled by cis-acting regulatory sequences in the 5' LTR. Mobilization of two LTR retroelements, Idefix and ZAM, occurs in the unstable RevI line of Drosophila melanogaster, in which their copy numbers are high, while they are low in all other stocks tested. Here we show that both a full-length and a subgenomic Idefix transcript that are necessary for its mobilization are present in the Rev1 line, but not in the other lines. Studies on transgenic strains demonstrate that the 5' LTR of Idefix contains sequences that direct the tissue-specific expression of the retroelement in testes and ovaries of adult flies. In ovaries, expression occurs in the early follicle and in other somatic cells of the germarium, and is strictly associated with the unstable genetic context conferred by the RevI line. Control of tissue-specific Idefix expression by interactions between cis-acting sequences of its LTR and trans-acting genomic factors provides an opportunity to use this retroelement as a tool for the study of the early follicle cell lineage in the germarium.

  12. Influenza B virus-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes strongly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage

    PubMed Central

    van de Sandt, Carolien E.; Dou, YingYing; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E.; Westgeest, Kim B.; Pronk, Mark R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Hillaire, Marine L. B.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza B viruses fall in two antigenically distinct lineages (B/Victoria/2/1987 and B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage) that co-circulate with influenza A viruses of the H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes during seasonal epidemics. Infections with influenza B viruses contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality in the human population. Influenza B virus neutralizing antibodies, elicited by natural infections or vaccination, poorly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage. Therefore, there is an increased interest in identifying other correlates of protection which could aid the development of broadly protective vaccines. blast analysis revealed high sequence identity of all viral proteins. With two online epitope prediction algorithms, putative conserved epitopes relevant for study subjects used in the present study were predicted. The cross-reactivity of influenza B virus-specific polyclonal CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) populations obtained from HLA-typed healthy study subjects, with intra-lineage drift variants and viruses of the opposing lineage, was determined by assessing their in vitro IFN-γ response and lytic activity. Here, we show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that CTLs directed to viruses of the B/Victoria/2/1987 lineage cross-react with viruses of the B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage and vice versa. PMID:25900135

  13. Influenza B virus-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes strongly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Dou, YingYing; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Westgeest, Kim B; Pronk, Mark R; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Hillaire, Marine L B

    2015-08-01

    Influenza B viruses fall in two antigenically distinct lineages (B/Victoria/2/1987 and B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage) that co-circulate with influenza A viruses of the H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes during seasonal epidemics. Infections with influenza B viruses contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality in the human population. Influenza B virus neutralizing antibodies, elicited by natural infections or vaccination, poorly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage. Therefore, there is an increased interest in identifying other correlates of protection which could aid the development of broadly protective vaccines. blast analysis revealed high sequence identity of all viral proteins. With two online epitope prediction algorithms, putative conserved epitopes relevant for study subjects used in the present study were predicted. The cross-reactivity of influenza B virus-specific polyclonal CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) populations obtained from HLA-typed healthy study subjects, with intra-lineage drift variants and viruses of the opposing lineage, was determined by assessing their in vitro IFN-γ response and lytic activity. Here, we show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that CTLs directed to viruses of the B/Victoria/2/1987 lineage cross-react with viruses of the B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage and vice versa.

  14. Discrimination between lineage-specific shelters by bat- and human-associated bed bugs does not constitute a stable reproductive barrier.

    PubMed

    Balvín, Ondřej; Bartonička, Tomáš; Pilařová, Kateřina; DeVries, Zachary; Schal, Coby

    2017-01-01

    The common bed bug Cimex lectularius, has been recently shown to constitute two host races, which are likely in the course of incipient speciation. The human-associated lineage splits from the ancestral bat-associated species deep in the history of modern humans, likely even prior to the Neolithic Period and establishment of the first permanent human settlements. Hybridization experiments between these two lineages show that post-mating reproductive barriers are incomplete due to local variation. As mating takes place in off-host refugia marked by aggregation semiochemicals, the present investigation tested the hypothesis that bed bugs use these semiochemicals to differentiate between refugia marked by bat- and human-associated bed bugs; this would constitute a pre-copulation isolation mechanism. The preference for lineage-specific odors was tested using artificial shelters conditioned by a group of either male or female bed bugs. Adult males were assayed individually in four-choice assays that included two clean unconditioned control shelters. In most assays, bed bugs preferred to rest in conditioned shelters, with no apparent fidelity to shelters conditioned by their specific lineage. However, 51 % of the bat-associated males preferred unconditioned shelters over female-conditioned shelters of either lineage. Thus, bed bugs show no preferences for lineage-specific shelters, strongly suggesting that semiochemicals associated with shelters alone do not function in reproductive isolation.

  15. Genetic vaccination against the melanocyte lineage-specific antigen gp100 induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated tumor protection.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, M W; de Boer, A J; Figdor, C G; Adema, G J

    1998-06-15

    Melanocyte lineage-specific antigens, such as gp100, have been shown to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses against melanoma. Therefore, these antigens are potential targets for specific antimelanoma immunotherapy. A novel approach to induce both cellular and humoral immunity is genetic vaccination, the injection of antigen-encoding naked plasmid DNA. In a mouse model, we investigated whether genetic vaccination against the human gp100 antigen results in specific antitumor immunity. The results demonstrate that vaccinated mice were protected against a lethal challenge with syngeneic B16 melanoma-expressing human gp100, but not control-transfected B16. Both cytotoxic T cells and IgG specific for human gp100 could be detected in human gp100-vaccinated mice. However, only adoptive transfer of spleen-derived lymphocytes, not of the serum, isolated from protected mice was able to transfer antitumor immunity to nonvaccinated recipients, indicating that CTLs are the predominant effector cells. CTI, lines generated from human gp100-vaccinated mice specifically recognized human gp100. Interestingly, one of the CTL lines cross-reacted between human and mouse gp100, indicating the recognition of a conserved epitope. However, these CTLs did not appear to be involved in the observed tumor protection. Collectively, our results indicate that genetic vaccination can result in a potent antitumor response in vivo and constitutes a potential immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer.

  16. Lineage-Specific Genome Architecture Links Enhancers and Non-coding Disease Variants to Target Gene Promoters.

    PubMed

    Javierre, Biola M; Burren, Oliver S; Wilder, Steven P; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hill, Steven M; Sewitz, Sven; Cairns, Jonathan; Wingett, Steven W; Várnai, Csilla; Thiecke, Michiel J; Burden, Frances; Farrow, Samantha; Cutler, Antony J; Rehnström, Karola; Downes, Kate; Grassi, Luigi; Kostadima, Myrto; Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Wang, Fan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Todd, John A; Zerbino, Daniel R; Stegle, Oliver; Ouwehand, Willem H; Frontini, Mattia; Wallace, Chris; Spivakov, Mikhail; Fraser, Peter

    2016-11-17

    Long-range interactions between regulatory elements and gene promoters play key roles in transcriptional regulation. The vast majority of interactions are uncharted, constituting a major missing link in understanding genome control. Here, we use promoter capture Hi-C to identify interacting regions of 31,253 promoters in 17 human primary hematopoietic cell types. We show that promoter interactions are highly cell type specific and enriched for links between active promoters and epigenetically marked enhancers. Promoter interactomes reflect lineage relationships of the hematopoietic tree, consistent with dynamic remodeling of nuclear architecture during differentiation. Interacting regions are enriched in genetic variants linked with altered expression of genes they contact, highlighting their functional role. We exploit this rich resource to connect non-coding disease variants to putative target promoters, prioritizing thousands of disease-candidate genes and implicating disease pathways. Our results demonstrate the power of primary cell promoter interactomes to reveal insights into genomic regulatory mechanisms underlying common diseases.

  17. DNMT3A and TET2 compete and cooperate to repress lineage-specific transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Su, Jianzhong; Jeong, Mira; Ko, Myunggon; Huang, Yun; Park, Hyun Jung; Guzman, Anna; Lei, Yong; Huang, Yung-Hsin; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the epigenetic modifiers DNMT3A and TET2 non-randomly co-occur in lymphoma and leukemia despite their epistasis in the methylation-hydroxymethylation pathway. Using Dnmt3a and Tet2 double knock-out (DKO) mice in which malignancy development is accelerated, we show that the DKO methylome reflects regions of independent, competitive and cooperative activity. Expression of lineage-specific transcription factors, including the erythroid regulator Klf1 is upregulated in DKO HSCs. DNMT3A and TET2 both repress Klf1 suggesting a model of cooperative inhibition by the epigenetic modifiers. These data demonstrate a dual role for TET2 in promoting and inhibiting HSC differentiation, loss of which, along with DNMT3A, obstructs differentiation leading to transformation. PMID:27428748

  18. Noise in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila with implications for mechanisms of body axis specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, David M.; Harrison, Lionel G.; Spirov, Alexander V.

    2003-05-01

    Specification of the anteroposterior (head-to-tail) axis in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the best understood examples of embryonic pattern formation, at the genetic level. A network of some 14 segmentation genes controls protein expression in narrow domains which are the first manifestation of the segments of the insect body. Work in the New York lab has led to a databank of more than 3300 confocal microscope images, quantifying protein expression for the segmentation genes, over a series of times during which protein pattern is developing (http://flyex.ams.sunysb.edu/FlyEx/). Quantification of the variability in expression evident in this data (both between embryos and within single embryos) allows us to determine error propagation in segmentation signalling. The maternal signal to the egg is highly variable, with noise levels more than several times those seen for expression of downstream genes. This implies that error suppression is active in the embryonic patterning mechanism. Error suppression is not possible with the favored mechanism of local concentration gradient reading for positional specification. We discuss possible patterning mechanisms which do reliably filter input noise.

  19. Drosophila starvin encodes a tissue-specific BAG-domain protein required for larval food uptake.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Michelle; Robert, Stanley; Saint, Robert

    2005-12-01

    We describe a developmental, genetic, and molecular analysis of the sole Drosophila member of the BAG family of genes, which is implicated in stress response and survival in mammalian cells. We show that the gene, termed starvin (stv), is expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner, accumulating primarily in tendon cells following germ-band retraction and later in somatic muscles and the esophagus during embryonic stage 15. We show that stv expression falls within known tendon and muscle cell transcriptional regulatory cascades, being downstream of stripe, but not of another tendon transcriptional regulator, delilah, and downstream of the muscle regulator, mef-2. We generated a series of stv alleles and, surprisingly, given the muscle and tendon-specific embryonic expression of stv, found that the gross morphology and function of somatic muscles is normal in stv mutants. Nonetheless, stv mutant larvae exhibit a striking and fully penetrant mutant phenotype of failure to grow after hatching and a severely impaired ability to take up food. Our study provides the first report of an essential, developmentally regulated BAG-family gene.

  20. Coordination between Drosophila Arc1 and a specific population of brain neurons regulates organismal fat☆

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Jeremy; Zhang, Wei; Blumhagen, Rachel Z.; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C.; Hesselberth, Jay R.; Reis, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    The brain plays a critical yet incompletely understood role in regulating organismal fat. We performed a neuronal silencing screen in Drosophila larvae to identify brain regions required to maintain proper levels of organismal fat. When used to modulate synaptic activity in specific brain regions, the enhancer-trap driver line E347 elevated fat upon neuronal silencing, and decreased fat upon neuronal activation. Unbiased sequencing revealed that Arc1 mRNA levels increase upon E347 activation. We had previously identified Arc1 mutations in a high-fat screen. Here we reveal metabolic changes in Arc1 mutants consistent with a high-fat phenotype and an overall shift toward energy storage. We find that Arc1-expressing cells neighbor E347 neurons, and manipulating E347 synaptic activity alters Arc1 expression patterns. Elevating Arc1 expression in these cells decreased fat, a phenocopy of E347 activation. Finally, loss of Arc1 prevented the lean phenotype caused by E347 activation, suggesting that Arc1 activity is required for E347 control of body fat. Importantly, neither E347 nor Arc1 manipulation altered energy-related behaviors. Our results support a model wherein E347 neurons induce Arc1 in specific neighboring cells to prevent excess fat accumulation. PMID:26209258

  1. Flagellar mitochondrial association of the male-specific Don Juan protein in Drosophila spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Santel, A; Blümer, N; Kämpfer, M; Renkawitz-Pohl, R

    1998-11-01

    The Drosophila don juan gene encodes a basic protein (Don Juan protein), which is solely expressed postmeiotically during spermiogenesis in elongated spermatids and in mature sperm. Transgenic expression of a GFP-tagged Don Juan protein (DJ-GFP) in the male germ line showed an association of the fusion protein with the sperm tail. Detailed examination of DJ-GFP localization revealed novel insights into its distinct temporal and spatial distribution along the sperm tail during the last phase of spermatid maturation. Co-localization of DJ-GFP with actin-labeled cysts demonstrated its emergence in elongated spermatids during individualization. Additionally, the endogenous Don Juan protein was detected with epitope-specific antibodies in finally elongated nuclei of spermatids. After completion of nuclear shaping Don Juan is no longer detectable in the sperm heads with the onset of individualization. Mislocalization of the DJ-GFP protein in flagella of a mutant with defective mitochondrial differentiation provides evidence of mitochondrial association of the fusion protein with flagellar mitochondrial arrays. Ectopically expressed DJ-GFP in premeiotic germ cells as well as salivary gland cells confirmed the capability of the fusion protein to associate with mitochondria. Therefore we suppose that Don Juan is a nuclear-encoded, germ-cell specifically expressed mitochondrial protein, which might be involved in the final steps of mitochondrial differentiation within the flagellum.

  2. Specific Kinematics and Motor-Related Neurons for Aversive Chemotaxis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaojing J; Potter, Christopher J; Gohl, Daryl M; Silies, Marion; Katsov, Alexander Y

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Chemotaxis, the ability to direct movements according to chemical cues in the environment, is important for the survival of most organisms. The vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, displays robust olfactory aversion and attraction, but how these behaviors are executed via changes in locomotion remains poorly understood. In particular, it is not clear whether aversion and attraction bi-directionally modulate a shared circuit or recruit distinct circuits for execution. Results Using a quantitative behavioral assay, we determined that both aversive and attractive odorants modulate the initiation and direction of turns, but display distinct kinematics. Using genetic tools to perturb these behaviors, we identified specific populations of neurons required for aversion but not attraction. Inactivation of these populations of cells affected the completion of aversive turns but not their initiation. Optogenetic activation of the same populations of cells triggered a locomotion pattern resembling aversive turns. Perturbations in both the ellipsoid body and the ventral nerve cord, two regions involved in motor control, resulted in defects in aversion. Conclusions Aversive chemotaxis in vinegar flies triggers ethologically appropriate kinematics distinct from those of attractive chemotaxis, and requires specific motor-related neurons. PMID:23770185

  3. Genetic regulation of tissue-specific expression of amylase structural genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, I; Doane, W W

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster were screened for spatial variations in adult midgut alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucan glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) expression. No strain-specific differences were found anteriorly, but three patterns of activity were discerned in the posterior midgut: A, activity throughout most of the region; B, activity in the anterior part of the region; and C, little or no activity. Alleles of a control gene, map, are responsible for this tissue-specific regulation of activity; e.g., mapA homozygotes produce the A pattern and mapC homozygotes the C pattern. The map locus was placed at 2--80 +/- on the genetic map of chromosome 2R, about two crossover units distal to the Amy structural gene region for alpha-amylase. Electrophoretic studies showed that mapA is trans acting in mapA/mapC flies, allowing expression of amylase isozymes coded for by genes on the opposite chromosome. The map gene behaves as a temporal gene that is clearly separable from the tightly linked, duplicated Amy structural genes. Images PMID:100784

  4. Sex-specific responses to sexual familiarity, and the role of olfaction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cedric K. W.; Løvlie, Hanne; Greenway, Elisabeth; Goodwin, Stephen F.; Pizzari, Tommaso; Wigby, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Studies of mating preferences have largely neglected the potential effects of individuals encountering their previous mates (‘directly sexually familiar’), or new mates that share similarities to previous mates, e.g. from the same family and/or environment (‘phenotypically sexually familiar’). Here, we show that male and female Drosophila melanogaster respond to the direct and phenotypic sexual familiarity of potential mates in fundamentally different ways. We exposed a single focal male or female to two potential partners. In the first experiment, one potential partner was novel (not previously encountered) and one was directly familiar (their previous mate); in the second experiment, one potential partner was novel (unrelated, and from a different environment from the previous mate) and one was phenotypically familiar (from the same family and rearing environment as the previous mate). We found that males preferentially courted novel females over directly or phenotypically familiar females. By contrast, females displayed a weak preference for directly and phenotypically familiar males over novel males. Sex-specific responses to the familiarity of potential mates were significantly weaker or absent in Orco1 mutants, which lack a co-receptor essential for olfaction, indicating a role for olfactory cues in mate choice over novelty. Collectively, our results show that direct and phenotypic sexual familiarity is detected through olfactory cues and play an important role in sex-specific sexual behaviour. PMID:24068355

  5. Specific subgroups of FruM neurons control sexually dimorphic patterns of aggression in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yick-Bun; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    A great challenge facing neuroscience is to understand how genes, molecules, cells, circuits, and systems interact to generate social behavior. Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) offer a powerful model system to address questions of this magnitude. These animals display genetically specified, sexually dimorphic patterns of fighting behavior via sex-specific splicing of the fruitless gene. Here, we show that sexually dimorphic behavioral patterns displayed during aggression are controlled by specific subgroups of neurons expressing male forms of fruitless proteins (FruM). Using the GAL4/UAS system to manipulate transformer expression, we feminized or masculinized different populations of neurons in fly nervous systems. With a panneuronal elav-GAL4 driver, male patterns of fighting behavior were transferred into females and female patterns into males. We screened 60 Gal4 lines that express the yeast transcription factor in different patterns in fly central nervous systems and found five that showed abnormal same-sex courtship behavior. The sexually dimorphic fighting patterns, however, were completely switched only in one and partially switched in a second of these lines. In the other three lines, female patterns of aggression were seen despite a switch in courtship preference. A tight correspondence was seen between FruM expression and how flies fight in several subgroups of neurons usually expressing these proteins: Expression is absent when flies fight like females and present when flies fight like males, thereby beginning a separation between courtship and aggression among these neurons. PMID:18042702

  6. Neurotransmitter Transporter-Like: A Male Germline-specific SLC6 Transporter Required for Drosophila Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nabanita; Rollins, Janet; Mahowald, Anthony P.; Bazinet, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The SLC6 class of membrane transporters, known primarily as neurotransmitter transporters, is increasingly appreciated for its roles in nutritional uptake of amino acids and other developmentally specific functions. A Drosophila SLC6 gene, Neurotransmitter transporter-like (Ntl), is expressed only in the male germline. Mobilization of a transposon inserted near the 3′ end of the Ntl coding region yields male-sterile mutants defining a single complementation group. Germline transformation with Ntl cDNAs under control of male germline-specific control elements restores Ntl/Ntl homozygotes to normal fertility, indicating that Ntl is required only in the germ cells. In mutant males, sperm morphogenesis appears normal, with elongated, individualized and coiled spermiogenic cysts accumulating at the base of the testes. However, no sperm are transferred to the seminal vesicle. The level of polyglycylation of Ntl mutant sperm tubulin appears to be significantly lower than that of wild type controls. Glycine transporters are the most closely related SLC6 transporters to Ntl, suggesting that Ntl functions as a glycine transporter in developing sperm, where augmentation of the cytosolic pool of glycine may be required for the polyglycylation of the massive amounts of tubulin in the fly's giant sperm. The male-sterile phenotype of Ntl mutants may provide a powerful genetic system for studying the function of an SLC6 transporter family in a model organism. PMID:21298005

  7. Interrogating translational efficiency and lineage-specific transcriptomes using ribosome affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pingzhu; Zhang, Yijing; Ma, Qing; Gu, Fei; Day, Daniel S; He, Aibin; Zhou, Bin; Li, Jing; Stevens, Sean M; Romo, Daniel; Pu, William T

    2013-09-17

    Transcriptional profiling is a useful strategy to study development and disease. Approaches to isolate RNA from specific cell types, or from specific cellular compartments, would extend the power of this strategy. Previous work has shown that isolation of genetically tagged ribosomes (translating ribosome affinity purification; TRAP) is an effective means to isolate ribosome-bound RNA selectively from transgene-expressing cells. However, widespread application of this technology has been limited by available transgenic mouse lines. Here we characterize a TRAP allele (Rosa26(fsTRAP)) that makes this approach more widely accessible. We show that endothelium-specific activation of Rosa26(fsTRAP) identifies endothelial cell-enriched transcripts, and that cardiomyocyte-restricted TRAP is a useful means to identify genes that are differentially expressed in cardiomyocytes in a disease model. Furthermore, we show that TRAP is an effective means for studying translational regulation, and that several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes are under strong translational control. Our analysis of ribosome-bound transcripts also shows that a subset of long intergenic noncoding RNAs are weakly ribosome-bound, but that the majority of noncoding RNAs, including most long intergenic noncoding RNAs, are ribosome-bound to the same extent as coding transcripts. Together, these data show that the TRAP strategy and the Rosa26(fsTRAP) allele will be useful tools to probe cell type-specific transcriptomes, study translational regulation, and probe ribosome binding of noncoding RNAs.

  8. The RhoGEF Trio Functions in Sculpting Class Specific Dendrite Morphogenesis in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Srividya Chandramouli; Wang, Dennis; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R.; Trunnell, Sarah A.; Meduri, Ramakrishna; Shinwari, Riaz; Sulkowski, Mikolaj J.; Cox, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the primary sites of synaptic or sensory input in the nervous system, dendrites play an essential role in processing neuronal and sensory information. Moreover, the specification of class specific dendrite arborization is critically important in establishing neural connectivity and the formation of functional networks. Cytoskeletal modulation provides a key mechanism for establishing, as well as reorganizing, dendritic morphology among distinct neuronal subtypes. While previous studies have established differential roles for the small GTPases Rac and Rho in mediating dendrite morphogenesis, little is known regarding the direct regulators of these genes in mediating distinct dendritic architectures. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate that the RhoGEF Trio is required for the specification of class specific dendritic morphology in dendritic arborization (da) sensory neurons of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS). Trio is expressed in all da neuron subclasses and loss-of-function analyses indicate that Trio functions cell-autonomously in promoting dendritic branching, field coverage, and refining dendritic outgrowth in various da neuron subtypes. Moreover, overexpression studies demonstrate that Trio acts to promote higher order dendritic branching, including the formation of dendritic filopodia, through Trio GEF1-dependent interactions with Rac1, whereas Trio GEF-2-dependent interactions with Rho1 serve to restrict dendritic extension and higher order branching in da neurons. Finally, we show that de novo dendritic branching, induced by the homeodomain transcription factor Cut, requires Trio activity suggesting these molecules may act in a pathway to mediate dendrite morphogenesis. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our analyses implicate Trio as an important regulator of class specific da neuron dendrite morphogenesis via interactions with Rac1 and Rho1 and indicate that Trio is required as downstream effector in Cut

  9. Prey choice by carabid beetles feeding on an earthworm community analysed using species- and lineage-specific PCR primers.

    PubMed

    King, R Andrew; Vaughan, Ian P; Bell, James R; Bohan, David A; Symondson, William O C

    2010-04-01

    The carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius is a major natural enemy of pests, such as aphids and slugs in agricultural systems. Earthworms are a dominant non-pest component of the diet of P. melanarius which help sustain the beetles during periods when the pest population is low or absent. In this study we wanted to test whether this predator exercises prey choice among different earthworm species or ecological groups. High levels of genetic diversity within morphological species of earthworm necessitated the development of primers that were specific not just to species but lineages and sub-lineages within species as well. Gut samples from beetles were analysed using multiplex-PCR and fluorescent-labelled primers. Calibratory feeding trials were undertaken to calculate median detection times for prey DNA following ingestion. Extensive testing demonstrated that the primers were species-specific, that detection periods were negatively related to amplicon size and that meal size had a highly significant effect on detection periods. Monte Carlo simulations showed that, in general, worms were being predated in proportion to their densities in the field with little evidence of prey choice, other than probable avoidance of the larger, deep-living species. There was no evidence that epigeic species were being taken preferentially in comparison with endogeic species. There was also no evidence that defensive secretions by Allolobophora chlorotica reduced predation pressure on this species by P. melanarius. We concluded that any management system that increases earthworm densities generally, regardless of component species, is likely to be optimal for increasing numbers of this beneficial beetle predator.

  10. miRNA-embedded shRNAs for Lineage-specific BCL11A Knockdown and Hemoglobin F Induction.

    PubMed

    Guda, Swaroopa; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Du, Peng; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Grimson, Andrew W; Kamran, Sophia C; Thornton, James; de Boer, Helen; Root, David E; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) expressed via RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters has been widely exploited to modulate gene expression in a variety of mammalian cell types. For certain applications, such as lineage-specific knockdown, embedding targeting sequences into pol II-driven microRNA (miRNA) architecture is required. Here, using the potential therapeutic target BCL11A, we demonstrate that pol III-driven shRNAs lead to significantly increased knockdown but also increased cytotoxcity in comparison to pol II-driven miRNA adapted shRNAs (shRNA(miR)) in multiple hematopoietic cell lines. We show that the two expression systems yield mature guide strand sequences that differ by a 4 bp shift. This results in alternate seed sequences and consequently influences the efficacy of target gene knockdown. Incorporating a corresponding 4 bp shift into the guide strand of shRNA(miR)s resulted in improved knockdown efficiency of BCL11A. This was associated with a significant de-repression of the hemoglobin target of BCL11A, human γ-globin or the murine homolog Hbb-y. Our results suggest the requirement for optimization of shRNA sequences upon incorporation into a miRNA backbone. These findings have important implications in future design of shRNA(miR)s for RNAi-based therapy in hemoglobinopathies and other diseases requiring lineage-specific expression of gene silencing sequences.

  11. Target Organ Specific Activity of Drosophila MRP (ABCC1) Moderates Developmental Toxicity of Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Lisa; Korbas, Malgorzata; Davidson, Philip; Broberg, Karin; Rand, Matthew Dearborn

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous and persistent neurotoxin that poses a risk to human health. Although the mechanisms of MeHg toxicity are not fully understood, factors that contribute to susceptibility are even less well known. Studies of human gene polymorphisms have identified a potential role for the multidrug resistance-like protein (MRP/ABCC) family, ATP-dependent transporters, in MeHg susceptibility. MRP transporters have been shown to be important for MeHg excretion in adult mouse models, but their role in moderating MeHg toxicity during development has not been explored. We therefore investigated effects of manipulating expression levels of MRP using a Drosophila development assay. Drosophila MRP (dMRP) is homologous to human MRP1–4 (ABCC1–4), sharing 50% identity and 67% similarity with MRP1. A greater susceptibility to MeHg is seen in dMRP mutant flies, demonstrated by reduced rates of eclosion on MeHg-containing food. Furthermore, targeted knockdown of dMRP expression using GAL4>UAS RNAi methods demonstrates a tissue-specific function for dMRP in gut, Malpighian tubules, and the nervous system in moderating developmental susceptibility to MeHg. Using X-ray synchrotron fluorescence imaging, these same tissues were also identified as the highest Hg-accumulating tissues in fly larvae. Moreover, higher levels of Hg are seen in dMRP mutant larvae compared with a control strain fed an equivalent dose of MeHg. In sum, these data demonstrate that dMRP expression, both globally and within Hg-targeted organs, has a profound effect on susceptibility to MeHg in developing flies. Our findings point to a potentially novel and specific role for dMRP in neurons in the protection against MeHg. Finally, this experimental system provides a tractable model to evaluate human polymorphic variants of MRP and other gene variants relevant to genetic studies of mercury-exposed populations. PMID:24863968

  12. Target organ specific activity of drosophila MRP (ABCC1) moderates developmental toxicity of methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Prince, Lisa; Korbas, Malgorzata; Davidson, Philip; Broberg, Karin; Rand, Matthew Dearborn

    2014-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous and persistent neurotoxin that poses a risk to human health. Although the mechanisms of MeHg toxicity are not fully understood, factors that contribute to susceptibility are even less well known. Studies of human gene polymorphisms have identified a potential role for the multidrug resistance-like protein (MRP/ABCC) family, ATP-dependent transporters, in MeHg susceptibility. MRP transporters have been shown to be important for MeHg excretion in adult mouse models, but their role in moderating MeHg toxicity during development has not been explored. We therefore investigated effects of manipulating expression levels of MRP using a Drosophila development assay. Drosophila MRP (dMRP) is homologous to human MRP1-4 (ABCC1-4), sharing 50% identity and 67% similarity with MRP1. A greater susceptibility to MeHg is seen in dMRP mutant flies, demonstrated by reduced rates of eclosion on MeHg-containing food. Furthermore, targeted knockdown of dMRP expression using GAL4>UAS RNAi methods demonstrates a tissue-specific function for dMRP in gut, Malpighian tubules, and the nervous system in moderating developmental susceptibility to MeHg. Using X-ray synchrotron fluorescence imaging, these same tissues were also identified as the highest Hg-accumulating tissues in fly larvae. Moreover, higher levels of Hg are seen in dMRP mutant larvae compared with a control strain fed an equivalent dose of MeHg. In sum, these data demonstrate that dMRP expression, both globally and within Hg-targeted organs, has a profound effect on susceptibility to MeHg in developing flies. Our findings point to a potentially novel and specific role for dMRP in neurons in the protection against MeHg. Finally, this experimental system provides a tractable model to evaluate human polymorphic variants of MRP and other gene variants relevant to genetic studies of mercury-exposed populations.

  13. Direct lineage reprogramming reveals disease-specific phonotypes of motor neurons from human ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS-patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS-hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification. PMID:26725112

  14. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-05

    Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  15. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  16. The GreenCut2 Resource, a Phylogenomically Derived Inventory of Proteins Specific to the Plant Lineage*

    PubMed Central

    Karpowicz, Steven J.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2011-01-01

    The plastid is a defining structure of photosynthetic eukaryotes and houses many plant-specific processes, including the light reactions, carbon fixation, pigment synthesis, and other primary metabolic processes. Identifying proteins associated with catalytic, structural, and regulatory functions that are unique to plastid-containing organisms is necessary to fully define the scope of plant biochemistry. Here, we performed phylogenomics on 20 genomes to compile a new inventory of 597 nucleus-encoded proteins conserved in plants and green algae but not in non-photosynthetic organisms. 286 of these proteins are of known function, whereas 311 are not characterized. This inventory was validated as applicable and relevant to diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes using an additional eight genomes from distantly related plants (including Micromonas, Selaginella, and soybean). Manual curation of the known proteins in the inventory established its importance to plastid biochemistry. To predict functions for the 52% of proteins of unknown function, we used sequence motifs, subcellular localization, co-expression analysis, and RNA abundance data. We demonstrate that 18% of the proteins in the inventory have functions outside the plastid and/or beyond green tissues. Although 32% of proteins in the inventory have homologs in all cyanobacteria, unexpectedly, 30% are eukaryote-specific. Finally, 8% of the proteins of unknown function share no similarity to any characterized protein and are plant lineage-specific. We present this annotated inventory of 597 proteins as a resource for functional analyses of plant-specific biochemistry. PMID:21515685

  17. Genome-wide lineage-specific transcriptional networks underscore Ikaros-dependent lymphoid priming in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Samuel Yao-Ming; Yoshida, Toshimi; Zhang, Jiangwen; Georgopoulos, Katia

    2009-04-17

    The mechanisms regulating lineage potential during early hematopoiesis were investigated. First, a cascade of lineage-affiliated gene expression signatures, primed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and differentially propagated in lineage-restricted progenitors, was identified. Lymphoid transcripts were primed as early as the HSC, together with myeloid and erythroid transcripts. Although this multilineage priming was resolved upon subsequent lineage restrictions, an unexpected cosegregation of lymphoid and myeloid gene expression and potential past a nominal myeloid restriction point was identified. Finally, we demonstrated that whereas the zinc finger DNA-binding factor Ikaros was required for induction of lymphoid lineage priming in the HSC, it was also necessary for repression of genetic programs compatible with self-renewal and multipotency downstream of the HSC. Taken together, our studies provide new insight into the priming and restriction of lineage potentials during early hematopoiesis and identify Ikaros as a key bivalent regulator of this process.

  18. Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bivik, Caroline; Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Ulvklo, Carina; Nilsson, Patrik; Angel, Anna; Fransson, Fredrik; Lundin, Erika; Renhorn, Jakob; Thor, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptides is often extremely restricted in the nervous system, making them powerful markers for addressing cell specification . In the developing Drosophila ventral nerve cord, only six cells, the Ap4 neurons, of some 10,000 neurons, express the neuropeptide FMRFamide (FMRFa). Each Ap4/FMRFa neuron is the last-born cell generated by an identifiable and well-studied progenitor cell, neuroblast 5-6 (NB5-6T). The restricted expression of FMRFa and the wealth of information regarding its gene regulation and Ap4 neuron specification makes FMRFa a valuable readout for addressing many aspects of neural development, i.e., spatial and temporal patterning cues, cell cycle control, cell specification, axon transport, and retrograde signaling. To this end, we have conducted a forward genetic screen utilizing an Ap4-specific FMRFa-eGFP transgenic reporter as our readout. A total of 9781 EMS-mutated chromosomes were screened for perturbations in FMRFa-eGFP expression, and 611 mutants were identified. Seventy-nine of the strongest mutants were mapped down to the affected gene by deficiency mapping or whole-genome sequencing. We isolated novel alleles for previously known FMRFa regulators, confirming the validity of the screen. In addition, we identified novel essential genes, including several with previously undefined functions in neural development. Our identification of genes affecting most major steps required for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4 neurons provides a comprehensive view of the genetic flow controlling the generation of highly unique neuronal cell types in the developing nervous system. PMID:26092715

  19. Sex-specific Trans-regulatory Variation on the Drosophila melanogaster X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Stocks, Michael; Dean, Rebecca; Rogell, Björn; Friberg, Urban

    2015-01-01

    The X chromosome constitutes a unique genomic environment because it is present in one copy in males, but two copies in females. This simple fact has motivated several theoretical predictions with respect to how standing genetic variation on the X chromosome should differ from the autosomes. Unmasked expression of deleterious mutations in males and a lower census size are expected to reduce variation, while allelic variants with sexually antagonistic effects, and potentially those with a sex-specific effect, could accumulate on the X chromosome and contribute to increased genetic variation. In addition, incomplete dosage compensation of the X chromosome could potentially dampen the male-specific effects of random mutations, and promote the accumulation of X-linked alleles with sexually dimorphic phenotypic effects. Here we test both the amount and the type of genetic variation on the X chromosome within a population of Drosophila melanogaster, by comparing the proportion of X linked and autosomal trans-regulatory SNPs with a sexually concordant and discordant effect on gene expression. We find that the X chromosome is depleted for SNPs with a sexually concordant effect, but hosts comparatively more SNPs with a sexually discordant effect. Interestingly, the contrasting results for SNPs with sexually concordant and discordant effects are driven by SNPs with a larger influence on expression in females than expression in males. Furthermore, the distribution of these SNPs is shifted towards regions where dosage compensation is predicted to be less complete. These results suggest that intrinsic properties of dosage compensation influence either the accumulation of different types of trans-factors and/or their propensity to accumulate mutations. Our findings document a potential mechanistic basis for sex-specific genetic variation, and identify the X as a reservoir for sexually dimorphic phenotypic variation. These results have general implications for X chromosome

  20. Quality assessment and control of tissue specific RNA-seq libraries of Drosophila transgenic RNAi models.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Andreia J; Brito, Francisco F; Chobanyan, Tamar; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Yokokura, Takakazu; Van Vactor, David; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is rapidly emerging as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, RNA-seq is not a bias free technique. It requires large amounts of RNA and library preparation can introduce multiple artifacts, compounded by problems from later stages in the process. Nevertheless, RNA-seq is increasingly used in multiple studies, including the characterization of tissue-specific transcriptomes from invertebrate models of human disease. The generation of samples in this context is complex, involving the establishment of mutant strains and the delicate contamination prone process of dissecting the target tissue. Moreover, in order to achieve the required amount of RNA, multiple samples need to be pooled. Such datasets pose extra challenges due to the large variability that may occur between similar pools, mostly due to the presence of cells from surrounding tissues. Therefore, in addition to standard quality control of RNA-seq data, analytical procedures for control of "biological quality" are critical for successful comparison of gene expression profiles. In this study, the transcriptome of the central nervous system (CNS) of a Drosophila transgenic strain with neuronal-specific RNAi of an ubiquitous gene was profiled using RNA-seq. After observing the existence of an unusual variance in our dataset, we showed that the expression profile of a small panel of marker genes, including GAL4 under control of a tissue specific driver, can identify libraries with low levels of contamination from neighboring tissues, enabling the selection of a robust dataset for differential expression analysis. We further analyzed the potential of profiling a complex tissue to identify cell-type specific changes in response to target gene down-regulation. Finally, we showed that trimming 5' ends of reads decreases nucleotide frequency biases, increasing the coverage of protein coding genes with a potential positive impact in the incurrence of systematic

  1. Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 is a context-specific positive regulator of Notch signaling during neurogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jay Prakash; Deshpande, Girish; Shashidhara, L S

    2017-03-01

    The role of the Notch pathway during the lateral inhibition that underlies binary cell fate choice is extensively studied, but the context specificity that generates diverse outcomes is less well understood. In the peripheral nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster, differential Notch signaling between cells of the proneural cluster orchestrates sensory organ specification. Here we report functional analysis of Drosophila Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 (A2BP1) during this process. Its human ortholog is linked to type 2 spinocerebellar ataxia and other complex neuronal disorders. Downregulation of Drosophila A2BP1 in the proneural cluster increases adult sensory bristle number, whereas its overexpression results in loss of bristles. We show that A2BP1 regulates sensory organ specification by potentiating Notch signaling. Supporting its direct involvement, biochemical analysis shows that A2BP1 is part of the Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] complex in the presence and absence of Notch. However, in the absence of Notch signaling, the A2BP1 interacting fraction of Su(H) does not associate with the repressor proteins Groucho and CtBP. We propose a model explaining the requirement of A2BP1 as a positive regulator of context-specific Notch activity.

  2. Lineage and species-specific long noncoding RNAs during erythro-megakaryocytic development

    PubMed Central

    Paralkar, Vikram R.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Luan, Jing; Yao, Yu; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Dunagin, Margaret; Pimkin, Maxim; Gore, Meghneel; Sun, Diana; Konuthula, Neeraja; Raj, Arjun; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Bodine, David M.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals express thousands of long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, a few of which are known to function in tissue development. However, the entire repertoire of lncRNAs in most tissues and species is not defined. Indeed, most lncRNAs are not conserved, raising questions about function. We used RNA sequencing to identify 1109 polyadenylated lncRNAs expressed in erythroblasts, megakaryocytes, and megakaryocyte-erythroid precursors of mice, and 594 in erythroblasts of humans. More than half of these lncRNAs were unannotated, emphasizing the opportunity for new discovery through studies of specialized cell types. Analysis of the mouse erythro-megakaryocytic polyadenylated lncRNA transcriptome indicates that ∼75% arise from promoters and 25% from enhancers, many of which are regulated by key transcription factors including GATA1 and TAL1. Erythroid lncRNA expression is largely conserved among 8 different mouse strains, yet only 15% of mouse lncRNAs are expressed in humans and vice versa, reflecting dramatic species-specificity. RNA interference assays of 21 abundant erythroid-specific murine lncRNAs in primary mouse erythroid precursors identified 7 whose knockdown inhibited terminal erythroid maturation. At least 6 of these 7 functional lncRNAs have no detectable expression in human erythroblasts, suggesting that lack of conservation between mammalian species does not predict lack of function. PMID:24497530

  3. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs.

  4. Experimental evolution reveals habitat-specific fitness dynamics among Wolbachia clades in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Versace, Elisabetta; Nolte, Viola; Pandey, Ram Vinay; Tobler, Ray; Schlötterer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    The diversity and infection dynamics of the endosymbiont Wolbachia can be influenced by many factors, such as transmission rate, cytoplasmic incompatibility, environment, selection and genetic drift. The interplay of these factors in natural populations can result in heterogeneous infection patterns with substantial differences between populations and strains. The causes of these heterogeneities are not yet understood, partly due to the complexity of natural environments. We present experimental evolution as a new approach to study Wolbachia infection dynamics in replicate populations exposed to a controlled environment. A natural Drosophila melanogaster population infected with strains of Wolbachia belonging to different clades evolved in two laboratory environments (hot and cold) for 1.5 years. In both treatments, the rate of Wolbachia infection increased until fixation. In the hot environment, the relative frequency of different Wolbachia clades remained stable over 37 generations. In the cold environment, however, we observed marked changes in the composition of the Wolbachia population: within 15 generations, one Wolbachia clade increased more than 50% in frequency, whereas the other two clades decreased in frequency, resulting in the loss of one clade. The frequency change was highly reproducible not only among replicates, but also when flies that evolved for 42 generations in the hot environment were transferred to the cold environment. These results document how environmental factors can affect the composition of Wolbachia in D. melanogaster. The high reproducibility of the pattern suggests that experimental evolution studies can efficiently determine the functional basis of habitat-specific fitness among Wolbachia strains.

  5. Specification of leading and trailing cell features during collective migration in the Drosophila trachea.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Gaëlle; Casanova, Jordi

    2014-01-15

    The role of tip and rear cells in collective migration is still a matter of debate and their differences at the cytoskeletal level are poorly understood. Here, we analysed these issues in the Drosophila trachea, an organ that develops from the collective migration of clusters of cells that respond to Branchless (Bnl), a fibroblast growth factor (FGF) homologue expressed in surrounding tissues. We track individual cells in the migratory cluster and characterise their features and unveil two prototypical types of cytoskeletal organisation that account for tip and rear cells respectively. Indeed, once the former are specified, they remain as such throughout migration. Furthermore, we show that FGF signalling in a single tip cell can trigger the migration of the cells in the branch. Finally, we found specific Rac activation at the tip cells and analysed how FGF-independent cell features, such as adhesion and motility, act on coupling the behaviour of trailing and tip cells. Thus, the combined effect of FGF promoting leading cell behaviour and the modulation of cell properties in a cluster can account for the wide range of migratory events driven by FGF.

  6. The role of the small GTPase Rap in Drosophila R7 photoreceptor specification

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatakis, Yannis Emmanuel; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila R7 photoreceptor provides an excellent model system with which to study how cells receive and “decode” signals that specify cell fate. R7 is specified by the combined actions of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and Notch (N) signaling pathways. These pathways interact in a complex manner that includes antagonistic effects on photoreceptor specification: RTK promotes the photoreceptor fate, whereas N inhibits. Although other photoreceptors are subject to only mild N activation, R7 experiences a high-level N signal. To counter this effect and to ensure that the cell is specified as a photoreceptor, a high RTK signal is transduced in the cell. Thus, there are two levels of RTK transduction in the photoreceptors: in R7 it is high, whereas in others it is low. Here, we address how this high-level RTK signal is transduced in R7 and find that, in addition to Ras, another small GTPase, Rap, is also engaged. Thus, when N activity is high, a robust RTK signal operates that uses both Ras and Rap, but when N activity is low, only a mild RTK signal is transduced and Ras alone suffices for the purpose. PMID:22355117

  7. Novel small Cajal-body-specific RNAs identified in Drosophila: probing guide RNA function

    PubMed Central

    Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are modified post-transcriptionally by introduction of pseudouridines and 2′-O-methyl modifications, which are mediated by box H/ACA and box C/D guide RNAs, respectively. Because of their concentration in the nuclear Cajal body (CB), these guide RNAs are known as small CB-specific (sca) RNAs. In the cell, scaRNAs are associated with the WD-repeat protein WDR79. We used coimmunoprecipitation with WDR79 to recover seven new scaRNAs from Drosophila cell lysates. We demonstrated concentration of these new scaRNAs in the CB by in situ hybridization, and we verified experimentally that they can modify their putative target RNAs. Surprisingly, one of the new scaRNAs targets U6 snRNA, whose modification is generally assumed to occur in the nucleolus, not in the CB. Two other scaRNAs have dual guide functions, one for an snRNA and one for 28S rRNA. Again, the modification of 28S rRNA is assumed to take place in the nucleolus. These findings suggest that canonical scaRNAs may have functions in addition to their established role in modifying U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNAs. We discuss the likelihood that processing by scaRNAs is not limited to the CB. PMID:24149844

  8. The Drosophila ubiquitin-specific protease Puffyeye regulates dMyc-mediated growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Anderson, Sarah; Secombe, Julie; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    The essential and highly conserved role of Myc in organismal growth and development is dependent on the control of Myc protein abundance. It is now well established that Myc levels are in part regulated by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Using a genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila Myc (dMyc)-induced growth, we identified and characterized a ubiquitin-specific protease (USP), Puffyeye (Puf), as a novel regulator of dMyc levels and function in vivo. We show that puf genetically and physically interacts with dMyc and the ubiquitin ligase archipelago (ago) to modulate a dMyc-dependent cell growth phenotype, and that varying Puf levels in both the eye and wing phenocopies the effects of altered dMyc abundance. Puf containing point mutations within its USP enzymatic domain failed to alter dMyc levels and displayed no detectable phenotype, indicating the importance of deubiquitylating activity for Puf function. We find that dMyc induces Ago, indicating that dMyc triggers a negative-feedback pathway that is modulated by Puf. In addition to its effects on dMyc, Puf regulates both Ago and its cell cycle substrate Cyclin E. Therefore, Puf influences cell growth by controlling the stability of key regulatory proteins. PMID:24173801

  9. R7 Photoreceptor Specification in the Developing Drosophila Eye: The Role of the Transcription Factor Deadpan.

    PubMed

    Mavromatakis, Yannis Emmanuel; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    As cells proceed along their developmental pathways they make a series of sequential cell fate decisions. Each of those decisions needs to be made in a robust manner so there is no ambiguity in the state of the cell as it proceeds to the next stage. Here we examine the decision made by the Drosophila R7 precursor cell to become a photoreceptor and ask how the robustness of that decision is achieved. The transcription factor Tramtrack (Ttk) inhibits photoreceptor assignment, and previous studies found that the RTK-induced degradation of Ttk was critically required for R7 specification. Here we find that the transcription factor Deadpan (Dpn) is also required; it is needed to silence ttk transcription, and only when Ttk protein degradation and transcriptional silencing occur together is the photoreceptor fate robustly achieved. Dpn expression needs to be tightly restricted to R7 precursors, and we describe the role played by Ttk in repressing dpn transcription. Thus, Dpn and Ttk act as mutually repressive transcription factors, with Dpn acting to ensure that Ttk is effectively removed from R7, and Ttk acting to prevent Dpn expression in other cells. Furthermore, we find that N activity is required to promote dpn transcription, and only in R7 precursors does the removal of Ttk coincide with high N activity, and only in this cell does Dpn expression result.

  10. R7 Photoreceptor Specification in the Developing Drosophila Eye: The Role of the Transcription Factor Deadpan

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatakis, Yannis Emmanuel; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    As cells proceed along their developmental pathways they make a series of sequential cell fate decisions. Each of those decisions needs to be made in a robust manner so there is no ambiguity in the state of the cell as it proceeds to the next stage. Here we examine the decision made by the Drosophila R7 precursor cell to become a photoreceptor and ask how the robustness of that decision is achieved. The transcription factor Tramtrack (Ttk) inhibits photoreceptor assignment, and previous studies found that the RTK-induced degradation of Ttk was critically required for R7 specification. Here we find that the transcription factor Deadpan (Dpn) is also required; it is needed to silence ttk transcription, and only when Ttk protein degradation and transcriptional silencing occur together is the photoreceptor fate robustly achieved. Dpn expression needs to be tightly restricted to R7 precursors, and we describe the role played by Ttk in repressing dpn transcription. Thus, Dpn and Ttk act as mutually repressive transcription factors, with Dpn acting to ensure that Ttk is effectively removed from R7, and Ttk acting to prevent Dpn expression in other cells. Furthermore, we find that N activity is required to promote dpn transcription, and only in R7 precursors does the removal of Ttk coincide with high N activity, and only in this cell does Dpn expression result. PMID:27427987

  11. A region-specific neurogenesis mode requires migratory progenitors in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Holger; Salecker, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Brain areas each generate specific neuron subtypes during development. However, underlying regional variations in neurogenesis strategies and regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. In Drosophila, neurons in four optic lobe ganglia originate from two neuroepithelia, the outer (Opc) and inner (Ipc) proliferation centers. Using genetic manipulations, we demonstrate that one Ipc neuroepithelial domain progressively transforms into migratory progenitors that mature into neural stem cells/neuroblasts within a second domain. Progenitors emerge by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like mechanism, requiring the Snail-family member Escargot and, in subdomains, Decapentaplegic signaling. The proneural factors Lethal of scute and Asense differentially control progenitor supply and maturation into neuroblasts. These switch expression from Asense to a third proneural protein, Atonal. Dichaete and Tailless mediate this transition essential for generating two neuron populations at defined positions. We propose that this neurogenesis mode is central for setting-up a new proliferative zone to facilitate spatio-temporal matching of neurogenesis and connectivity across ganglia. PMID:25501037

  12. Australin: a chromosomal passenger protein required specifically for Drosophila melanogaster male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Buttrick, Graham J.; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Auton, Adam; Gatti, Maurizio; Wakefield, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which is composed of conserved proteins aurora B, inner centromere protein (INCENP), survivin, and Borealin/DASRA, localizes to chromatin, kinetochores, microtubules, and the cell cortex in a cell cycle–dependent manner. The CPC is required for multiple aspects of cell division. Here we find that Drosophila melanogaster encodes two Borealin paralogues, Borealin-related (Borr) and Australin (Aust). Although Borr is a passenger in all mitotic tissues studied, it is specifically replaced by Aust for the two male meiotic divisions. We analyzed aust mutant spermatocytes to assess the effects of fully inactivating the Aust-dependent functions of the CPC. Our results indicate that Aust is required for sister chromatid cohesion, recruitment of the CPC to kinetochores, and chromosome alignment and segregation but not for meiotic histone phosphorylation or spindle formation. Furthermore, we show that the CPC is required earlier in cytokinesis than previously thought; cells lacking Aust do not initiate central spindle formation, accumulate anillin or actin at the cell equator, or undergo equatorial constriction. PMID:18268101

  13. Age-specific patterns of genetic variance in Drosophila melanogaster. I. Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Promislow, D.E.L.; Tatar, M.; Curtsinger, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    Peter Medawar proposed that senescence arises from an age-related decline in the force of selection, which allows late-acting deleterious mutations to accumulate. Subsequent workers have suggested that mutation accumulation could produce an age-related increase in additive genetic variance (V{sub A}) for fitness traits, as recently found in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report results from a genetic analysis of mortality in 65,134 D. melanogaster. Additive genetic variance for female mortality rates increases from 0.007 in the first week of life to 0.325 by the third week, and then declines to 0.002 by the seventh week. Males show a similar pattern, though total variance is lower than in females. In contrast to a predicted divergence in mortality curves, mortality curves of different genotypes are roughly parallel. Using a three-parameter model, we find significant V{sub A} for the slope and constant term of the curve describing age-specific mortality rates, and also for the rate at which mortality decelerates late in life. These results fail to support a prediction derived from Medawar`s {open_quotes}mutation accumulation{close_quotes} theory for the evolution of senescence. However, our results could be consistent with alternative interpretations of evolutionary models of aging. 65 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Axon Branch-Specific Semaphorin-1a Signaling in Drosophila Mushroom Body Development

    PubMed Central

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Goossens, Tim; Clements, Jason; Kang, Yuan Y.; Callaerts, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Correct wiring of the mushroom body (MB) neuropil in the Drosophila brain involves appropriate positioning of different axonal lobes, as well as the sister branches that develop from individual axons. This positioning requires the integration of various guidance cues provided by different cell types, which help the axons find their final positions within the neuropil. Semaphorins are well-known for their conserved roles in neuronal development and axon guidance. We investigated the role of Sema-1a in MB development more closely. We show that Sema-1a is expressed in the MBs as well as surrounding structures, including the glial transient interhemispheric fibrous ring, throughout development. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we show that the MB axons display lobe and sister branch-specific Sema-1a signaling, which controls different aspects of axon outgrowth and guidance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these effects are modulated by the integration of MB intrinsic and extrinsic Sema-1a signaling pathways involving PlexA and PlexB. Finally, we also show a role for neuronal- glial interaction in Sema-1a dependent β-lobe outgrowth. PMID:27656129

  15. Involvement of a tissue-specific RNA recognition motif protein in Drosophila spermatogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Cooper, M T; Pype, S; Stolow, D T

    1997-01-01

    RNA binding proteins mediate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression via their roles in nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism. Many of the proteins involved in these processes have a common RNA binding domain, the RNA recognition motif (RRM). We have characterized the Testis-specific RRM protein gene (Tsr), which plays an important role in spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Disruption of Tsr led to a dramatic reduction in male fertility due to the production of spermatids with abnormalities in mitochondrial morphogenesis. Tsr is located on the third chromosome at 87F, adjacent to the nuclear pre-mRNA binding protein gene Hrb87F. A 1.7-kb Tsr transcript was expressed exclusively in the male germ line. It encoded a protein containing two RRMs similar to those found in HRB87F as well as a unique C-terminal domain. TSR protein was located in the cytoplasm of spermatocytes and young spermatids but was absent from mature sperm. The cellular proteins expressed in premeiotic primary spermatocytes from Tsr mutant and wild-type males were assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Lack of TSR resulted in the premature expression of a few proteins prior to meiosis; this was abolished by a transgenic copy of Tsr. These data demonstrate that TSR negatively regulated the expression of some testis proteins and, in combination with its expression pattern and subcellular localization, suggest that TSR regulates the stability or translatability of some mRNAs during spermatogenesis. PMID:9111341

  16. The gypsy insulator can function as a promoter-specific silencer in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H N; Levine, M

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila gypsy retrotransposon disrupts gene activity by blocking the interactions of distal enhancers with target promoters. This enhancer-blocking activity is mediated by a 340 bp insulator DNA within gypsy. The insulator contains a cluster of binding sites for a zinc finger protein, suppressor of Hairy wing [su(Hw)]. Recent studies have shown that a second protein, mod(mdg4), is also important for normal insulator function. Mutations in mod(mdg4) exert paradoxical effects on different gypsy-induced phenotypes. For example, it enhances yellow2 but suppresses cut6. Here, we employ a stripe expression assay in transgenic embryos to investigate the role of mod(mdg4) in gypsy insulator activity. The insulator was inserted between defined enhancers and placed among divergently transcribed reporter genes (white and lacZ) containing distinct core promoter sequences. These assays indicate that mod(mdg4) is essential for the enhancer-blocking activity of the insulator DNA. Moreover, reductions in mod(mdg4)+ activity cause the insulator to function as a promoter-specific silencer that selectively represses white, but not lacZ. The repression of white does not affect the expression of the closely linked lacZ gene, suggesting that the insulator does not propagate changes in chromatin structure. These results provide an explanation for why mod(mdg4) exerts differential effects on different gypsy-induced mutations. PMID:9130717

  17. rhomboid mediates specification of blue- and green-sensitive R8 photoreceptor cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Denise A; Chou, Wen-Hai; Phistry, Meridee M; Britt, Steven G

    2009-03-04

    Color vision is based on the differential color sensitivity of retinal photoreceptors, however the developmental programs that control photoreceptor cell differentiation and specify color sensitivity are poorly understood. In Drosophila there is growing evidence that the color sensitivity of the R8 cell within an individual ommatidium is regulated by an inductive signal from the adjacent R7 cell. We previously examined the retinal patterning defect in Scutoid mutants, which results from a disruption of rhomboid expression. Here we show that loss of rhomboid blocks the induction of Rh5 expression and misexpression of rhomboid leads to the inappropriate induction of Rh5. These effects are specific to rhomboid, because its paralogue roughoid is neither required nor sufficient for the induction of Rh5 expression. We show that rhomboid is required cell-autonomously within the R8 photoreceptor cells and nonautonomously elsewhere in the eye for Rh5 induction. Interestingly, we found that the Epidermal growth factor receptor is also required for Rh5 induction, and its activation is sufficient to rescue the loss of Rh5 induction in a rhomboid mutant. This suggests that rhomboid may function in R8 cells to activate Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in R7 cells and promote their differentiation to a signaling competent state.

  18. The Drosophila ubiquitin-specific protease Puffyeye regulates dMyc-mediated growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Anderson, Sarah; Secombe, Julie; Eisenman, Robert N

    2013-12-01

    The essential and highly conserved role of Myc in organismal growth and development is dependent on the control of Myc protein abundance. It is now well established that Myc levels are in part regulated by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Using a genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila Myc (dMyc)-induced growth, we identified and characterized a ubiquitin-specific protease (USP), Puffyeye (Puf), as a novel regulator of dMyc levels and function in vivo. We show that puf genetically and physically interacts with dMyc and the ubiquitin ligase archipelago (ago) to modulate a dMyc-dependent cell growth phenotype, and that varying Puf levels in both the eye and wing phenocopies the effects of altered dMyc abundance. Puf containing point mutations within its USP enzymatic domain failed to alter dMyc levels and displayed no detectable phenotype, indicating the importance of deubiquitylating activity for Puf function. We find that dMyc induces Ago, indicating that dMyc triggers a negative-feedback pathway that is modulated by Puf. In addition to its effects on dMyc, Puf regulates both Ago and its cell cycle substrate Cyclin E. Therefore, Puf influences cell growth by controlling the stability of key regulatory proteins.

  19. The same or not the same: lineage-specific gene expansions and homology relationships in multigene families in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Markov, Gabriel V; Baskaran, Praveen; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-01-01

    Homology is a fundamental concept in comparative biology and a crucial tool for the analysis of character distribution. Introduced by Owen in 1843 (Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals, Longman, Brown, Green and Longman, London) in a morphological context, homology can similarly be applied to protein-coding genes. However, in molecular biology the proper distinction between orthology and paralogy was long limited by the absence of whole-genome sequencing data. By now, genome-wide sequencing allows comprehensive analyses of the homology of genes and gene families at the level of an entire phylum. Here, we analyze a manually curated dataset of more than 2,000 proteins from the genomes of 11 nematode species of seven different genera, including free-living and animal and plant parasites to study the principles of homology assignments in gene families. Using all sequenced species as an extensive outgroup, we specifically focus on the two model species Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus and compare enzymes involved in detoxification of xenobiotics and synthesis of fatty acids. We find that only a small proportion of genes in these families are one-to-one orthologs and that their history is shaped by massive duplication events. Of a total of 349 and 528 genes from C. elegans and P. pacificus, respectively, only 39 are one-to-one orthologs. Thus, frequent amplifications and losses are a widespread phenomenon in nematode lineages. We also report variation in birth and death rates depending on gene families and nematode lineages. Finally, we discuss the consequence of the near absence of one-to-one orthology in related organisms for the application of the homology concept to protein-coding genes in the era of whole-genome sequencing data.

  20. High affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal yeloid lineage without HSC toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C; Feng, Yang; Schutsky, Keith; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here, we isolated a high affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific scFv (2.48nM KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T-cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ+ AML in vitro and in vivo compared to a low affinity (LA) FRβ CAR (54.3nM KD). Using the HA-FRβ IgG, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T-cells lysed mature CD14+ monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T-cells retained effective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T-cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity. PMID:26898190

  1. Somatic sex-specific transcriptome differences in Drosophila revealed by whole transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding animal development and physiology at a molecular-biological level has been advanced by the ability to determine at high resolution the repertoire of mRNA molecules by whole transcriptome resequencing. This includes the ability to detect and quantify rare abundance transcripts and isoform-specific mRNA variants produced from a gene. The sex hierarchy consists of a pre-mRNA splicing cascade that directs the production of sex-specific transcription factors that specify nearly all sexual dimorphism. We have used deep RNA sequencing to gain insight into how the Drosophila sex hierarchy generates somatic sex differences, by examining gene and transcript isoform expression differences between the sexes in adult head tissues. Results Here we find 1,381 genes that differ in overall expression levels and 1,370 isoform-specific transcripts that differ between males and females. Additionally, we find 512 genes not regulated downstream of transformer that are significantly more highly expressed in males than females. These 512 genes are enriched on the × chromosome and reside adjacent to dosage compensation complex entry sites, which taken together suggests that their residence on the × chromosome might be sufficient to confer male-biased expression. There are no transcription unit structural features, from a set of features, that are robustly significantly different in the genes with significant sex differences in the ratio of isoform-specific transcripts, as compared to random isoform-specific transcripts, suggesting that there is no single molecular mechanism that generates isoform-specific transcript differences between the sexes, even though the sex hierarchy is known to include three pre-mRNA splicing factors. Conclusions We identify thousands of genes that show sex-specific differences in overall gene expression levels, and identify hundreds of additional genes that have differences in the abundance of isoform-specific transcripts. No

  2. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes. PMID:21542906

  3. Limited gene misregulation is exacerbated by allele-specific upregulation in lethal hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kevin H-C; Clark, Andrew G; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Misregulation of gene expression is often observed in interspecific hybrids and is generally attributed to regulatory incompatibilities caused by divergence between the two genomes. However, it has been challenging to distinguish effects of regulatory divergence from secondary effects including developmental and physiological defects common to hybrids. Here, we use RNA-Seq to profile gene expression in F1 hybrid male larvae from crosses of Drosophila melanogaster to its sibling species D. simulans. We analyze lethal and viable hybrid males, the latter produced using a mutation in the X-linked D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) gene and compare them with their parental species and to public data sets of gene expression across development. We find that Hmr has drastically different effects on the parental and hybrid genomes, demonstrating that hybrid incompatibility genes can exhibit novel properties in the hybrid genetic background. Additionally, we find that D. melanogaster alleles are preferentially affected between lethal and viable hybrids. We further determine that many of the differences between the hybrids result from developmental delay in the Hmr(+) hybrids. Finally, we find surprisingly modest expression differences in hybrids when compared with the parents, with only 9% and 4% of genes deviating from additivity or expressed outside of the parental range, respectively. Most of these differences can be attributed to developmental delay and differences in tissue types. Overall, our study suggests that hybrid gene misexpression is prone to overestimation and that even between species separated by approximately 2.5 Ma, regulatory incompatibilities are not widespread in hybrids. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A Hh-driven gene network controls specification, pattern and size of the Drosophila simple eyes.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Domínguez-Cejudo, María A; Amore, Gabriele; Brockmann, Anette; Lemos, María C; Córdoba, Antonio; Casares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    During development, extracellular signaling molecules interact with intracellular gene networks to control the specification, pattern and size of organs. One such signaling molecule is Hedgehog (Hh). Hh is known to act as a morphogen, instructing different fates depending on the distance to its source. However, how Hh, when signaling across a cell field, impacts organ-specific transcriptional networks is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate this issue during the development of the Drosophila ocellar complex. The development of this sensory structure, which is composed of three simple eyes (or ocelli) located at the vertices of a triangular patch of cuticle on the dorsal head, depends on Hh signaling and on the definition of three domains: two areas of eya and so expression--the prospective anterior and posterior ocelli--and the intervening interocellar domain. Our results highlight the role of the homeodomain transcription factor engrailed (en) both as a target and as a transcriptional repressor of hh signaling in the prospective interocellar region. Furthermore, we identify a requirement for the Notch pathway in the establishment of en maintenance in a Hh-independent manner. Therefore, hh signals transiently during the specification of the interocellar domain, with en being required here for hh signaling attenuation. Computational analysis further suggests that this network design confers robustness to signaling noise and constrains phenotypic variation. In summary, using genetics and modeling we have expanded the ocellar gene network to explain how the interaction between the Hh gradient and this gene network results in the generation of stable mutually exclusive gene expression domains. In addition, we discuss some general implications our model may have in some Hh-driven gene networks.

  5. The SR family proteins B52 and dASF/SF2 modulate development of the Drosophila visual system by regulating specific RNA targets.

    PubMed

    Gabut, Mathieu; Dejardin, Jérôme; Tazi, Jamal; Soret, Johann

    2007-04-01

    Deciphering the role of alternative splicing in developmental processes relies on the identification of key genes whose expression is controlled by splicing regulators throughout the growth of a whole organism. Modulating the expression levels of five SR proteins in the developing eye of Drosophila melanogaster revealed that these splicing factors induce various phenotypic alterations in eye organogenesis and also affect viability. Although the SR proteins dASF/SF2 and B52 caused defects in ommatidia structure, only B52 impaired normal axonal projections of photoreceptors and neurogenesis in visual ganglia. Microarray analyses revealed that many transcripts involved in brain organogenesis have altered splicing profiles upon both loss and gain of B52 function. Conversely, a large proportion of transcripts regulated by dASF/SF2 are involved in eye development. These differential and specific effects of SR proteins indicate that they function to confer accuracy to developmental gene expression programs by facilitating the cell lineage decisions that underline the generation of tissue identities.

  6. Identification of focally amplified lineage-specific super-enhancers in human epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Choi, Peter S.; Francis, Joshua M.; Imielinski, Marcin; Watanabe, Hideo; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome analysis approaches are revealing recurrent cancer-associated somatic alterations in non-coding DNA regions. We combined somatic copy number analysis of 12 tumor types with tissue-specific epigenetic profiling to identify significant regions of focal amplification harboring super-enhancers. Copy-number gains of non-coding regions harboring super-enhancers near KLF5, USP12, PARD6B and MYC are associated with over-expression of these cancer-related genes. We show that two distinct focal amplifications of super-enhancers 3′ to MYC in lung adenocarcinoma (MYC-LASE) and endometrial carcinoma (MYC-ECSE), are physically associated with the MYC promoter and correlate with MYC over-expression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated repression or deletion of a constituent enhancer within the MYC-LASE region led to significant reductions in the expression of MYC and its target genes, and to the impairment of anchorage-independent and clonogenic growth, consistent with an oncogenic function. Our results demonstrate that genomic amplification of super-enhancers represents a common mechanism to activate cancer driver genes in multiple cancer types. PMID:26656844

  7. Phylogenetics of lophotrochozoan bHLH genes and the evolution of lineage-specific gene duplicates.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yongbo; Xu, Fei; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2017-03-11

    The gain and loss of genes encoding transcription factors is of importance to understanding the evolution of gene regulatory complexity. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes encode a large superfamily of transcription factors. We systematically classify the bHLH genes from five mollusc, two annelid and one brachiopod genomes, tracing the pattern of bHLH gene evolution across these poorly-studied Phyla. 56 to 88 bHLH genes were identified in each genome, with most identifiable as members of previously described bilaterian families, or of new families we define. Of such families only one, Mesp, appears lost by all these species. Additional duplications have also played a role in the evolution of the bHLH gene repertoire, with many new lophotrochozoan-, mollusc-, bivalve- or gastropod-specific genes defined. Using a combination of transcriptome mining, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we compared the expression of several of these novel genes in tissues and embryos of the molluscs Crassostrea gigas and Patella vulgata, finding both conserved expression and evidence for neofunctionalisation. We also map the positions of the genes across these genomes, identifying numerous gene linkages. Some reflect recent paralogue divergence by tandem duplication, others are remnants of ancient tandem duplications dating to the lophotrochozoan or bilaterian common ancestors. These data are built into a model of the evolution of bHLH genes in molluscs, showing formidable evolutionary stasis at the family level but considerable within-family diversification by tandem gene duplication.

  8. New Functional Signatures for Understanding Melanoma Biology from Tumor Cell Lineage-Specific Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rambow, Florian; Job, Bastien; Petit, Valérie; Gesbert, Franck; Delmas, Véronique; Seberg, Hannah; Meurice, Guillaume; Van Otterloo, Eric; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Caroline; Gautheret, Daniel; Cornell, Robert A; Sarasin, Alain; Larue, Lionel

    2015-10-27

    Molecular signatures specific to particular tumor types are required to design treatments for resistant tumors. However, it remains unclear whether tumors and corresponding cell lines used for drug development share such signatures. We developed similarity core analysis (SCA), a universal and unsupervised computational framework for extracting core molecular features common to tumors and cell lines. We applied SCA to mRNA/miRNA expression data from various sources, comparing melanoma cell lines and metastases. The signature obtained was associated with phenotypic characteristics in vitro, and the core genes CAPN3 and TRIM63 were implicated in melanoma cell migration/invasion. About 90% of the melanoma signature genes belong to an intrinsic network of transcription factors governing neural development (TFAP2A, DLX2, ALX1, MITF, PAX3, SOX10, LEF1, and GAS7) and miRNAs (211-5p, 221-3p, and 10a-5p). The SCA signature effectively discriminated between two subpopulations of melanoma patients differing in overall survival, and classified MEKi/BRAFi-resistant and -sensitive melanoma cell lines. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.