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Sample records for drug delivery system

  1. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  2. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  3. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  4. Implantable drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, P J

    1979-12-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems are being developed to release drugs to the bloodstream continuously as well as free patients from being hospitalized to receive intravenous infusions or frequent injections. One technique is implantation of a pellet in the subcutaneous tissue so the pellet may be released by erosion. Drugs are also diffused through silicone rubber capsules but only polyacrylamide is able to release large molecules. Contraceptive rings containing progesterone and placed in the uterus or vagina and implanted silicone-rubber capsules use these principles. Disadvantages to the subcutaneous delivery of drugs include: 1) release of the drug in subcutaneous tissue rather than in the bloodstream directly; 2) entry into the circulatory system is controlled by surrounding blood supplies which vary with fat; 3) diffusion may be difficult due to dense layers of fibrous tissue; and 4) drug amounts cannot be readily regulated. The Ommaya reservoir uses a container with a self-sealing membrane implanted in the scalp and connected to a cerebral ventricle to treat forms of leukemia and fungal meningitis. Another development is an implantable disk-shaped infusion pump with 2 compartments, the outer one containing a propellant and the inner chamber containing the drug, holds 45 milliliters and releases about 1 milliliter/day. In the future these systems may release drugs in response to biochemical feedback or deliver a drug to 1 specific area.

  5. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  6. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

  7. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  8. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  9. Drug delivery systems from nose to brain.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ambikanandan; Kher, Gitanjali

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is particularly challenging due to the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles to deliver drugs selectively and effectively to the brain. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) constitutes the major obstacle to the uptake of drugs into the brain following systemic administration. Intranasal delivery offers a non-invasive and convenient method to bypass the BBB and delivery of therapeutics directly to the brain. The review discusses the potential of intranasal route to deliver drugs to the brain, the mechanisms and pathways of direct nose to brain drug transport, the various factors influencing transnasal drug absorption, the conventional and novel intranasal drug delivery systems, the various intranasal drug delivery techniques and devices, and examples of brain drug transport that have been feasible in treating various brain disorders. Moreover, products on the market, investigational drugs, and the author's perceptions about the prospect of intranasal delivery for treating brain disorders are also been discussed.

  10. Intelligent hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    He, Liumin; Zuo, Qinhua; Xie, Shasha; Huang, Yuexin; Xue, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Intelligent hydrogel, also known as smart hydrogels, are materials with great potential for development in drug delivery system. Intelligent hydrogel also has the ability to perceive as a signal structure change and stimulation. The review introduces the temperature-, pH-, electric signal-, biochemical molecule-, light- and pressure- sensitive hydrogels. Finally, we described the application of intelligent hydrogel in drug delivery system and the recent patents involved for hydrogel in drug delivery.

  11. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  12. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan; Ozer, A Yekta

    2014-06-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation.

  13. [Site-specific drug delivery systems. I. Colon targeted delivery].

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-01-01

    Colon specific drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon like Chron's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer or infections, but also for the potential it holds for the systemic delivery of proteins (e.g. insulin) and therapeutic peptides. These systems enable the protection of healthy tissues from the side effects of drugs and the drug intake of targeted cells, as well. The formulation of colon specific drug delivery systems is of great impact in the case of diseases having circadian rhythm (midnight gerd). Such circadian rhythm release drug delivery systems are designed to provide a plasma concentration--time profile, which varies according to physiological need at different times during the dosing period, i.e., mimicking the circadian rhythm and severity/manifestation of gastric acid secretion (and/or midnight gerd). In general four primary approaches have been proposed for colon targeted delivery namely pH-dependent systems, time dependent systems, colonic microflora activated systems and prodrugs.

  14. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  15. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  16. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment.

  17. Intelligent, self-powered, drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Patra, Debabrata; Sengupta, Samudra; Duan, Wentao; Zhang, Hua; Pavlick, Ryan; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-02-21

    Self-propelled nano/micromotors and pumps are considered to be next generation drug delivery systems since the carriers can either propel themselves ("motor"-based drug delivery) or be delivered ("pump"-based drug delivery) to the target in response to specific biomarkers. Recently, there has been significant advancement towards developing nano/microtransporters into proof-of-concept tools for biomedical applications. This review encompasses the progress made to date on the design of synthetic nano/micromotors and pumps with respect to transportation and delivery of cargo at specific locations. Looking ahead, it is possible to imagine a day when intelligent machines navigate through the human body and perform challenging tasks.

  18. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  19. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  20. Liposomal drug delivery systems--clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Parveen; Goyal, Kumud; Vijaya Kumar, Sengodan Gurusamy; Singh, Ajit; Katare, Om Prakash; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2005-03-01

    Liposomes have been widely investigated since 1970 as drug carriers for improving the delivery of therapeutic agents to specific sites in the body. As a result, numerous improvements have been made, thus making this technology potentially useful for the treatment of certain diseases in the clinics. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. The current pharmaceutical preparations of liposome-based therapeutic systems mainly result from our understanding of lipid-drug interactions and liposome disposition mechanisms. The insight gained from clinical use of liposome drug delivery systems can now be integrated to design liposomes that can be targeted on tissues, cells or intracellular compartments with or without expression of target recognition molecules on liposome membranes. This review is mainly focused on the diseases that have attracted most attention with respect to liposomal drug delivery and have therefore yielded most progress, namely cancer, antibacterial and antifungal disorders. In addition, increased gene transfer efficiencies could be obtained by appropriate selection of the gene transfer vector and mode of delivery.

  1. Chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Assa, Farnaz; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Ajamein, Hossein; Vaghari, Hamideh; Anarjan, Navideh; Ahmadi, Omid; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in drug delivery systems (DDSs) is mainly related to its magnetic core and surface coating. These coatings can eliminate or minimize their aggregation under physiological conditions. Also, they can provide functional groups for bioconjugation to anticancer drugs and/or targeted ligands. Chitosan, as a derivative of chitin, is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs), due to their huge surface to volume ratio as compared to the chitosan in its bulk form, have outstanding physico-chemical, antimicrobial and biological properties. These unique properties make chitosan NPs a promising biopolymer for the application of DDSs. In this review, the current state and challenges for the application magnetic chitosan NPs in drug delivery systems were investigated. The present review also revisits the limitations and commercial impediments to provide insight for future works.

  2. Mucoadhesive drug delivery system: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Bindu M.; Mohammed, Zulkar N. K.; Nath, Ravinder A.; Banji, David

    2010-01-01

    Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems interact with the mucus layer covering the mucosal epithelial surface, and mucin molecules and increase the residence time of the dosage form at the site of absorption. The drugs which have local action or those which have maximum absorption in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) require increased duration of stay in GIT. Thus, mucoadhesive dosage forms are advantageous in increasing the drug plasma concentrations and also therapeutic activity. In this regard, this review covers the areas of mechanisms and theories of mucoadhesion, factors influencing the mucoadhesive devices and also various mucoadhesive dosage forms. PMID:22247877

  3. Emulsion forming drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Jyoti; Nair, Anroop; Kumria, Rachna

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, there is a growing interest in the lipid-based formulations for delivery of lipophilic drugs. Due to their potential as therapeutic agents, preferably these lipid soluble drugs are incorporated into inert lipid carriers such as oils, surfactant dispersions, emulsions, liposomes etc. Among them, emulsion forming drug delivery systems appear to be a unique and industrially feasible approach to overcome the problem of low oral bioavailability associated with the BCS class II drugs. Self-emulsifying formulations are ideally isotropic mixtures of oils, surfactants and co-solvents that emulsify to form fine oil in water emulsions when introduced in aqueous media. Fine oil droplets would pass rapidly from stomach and promote wide distribution of drug throughout the GI tract, thereby overcome the slow dissolution step typically observed with solid dosage forms. Recent advances in drug carrier technologies have promulgated the development of novel drug carriers such as control release self-emulsifying pellets, microspheres, tablets, capsules etc. that have boosted the use of "self-emulsification" in drug delivery. This article reviews the different types of formulations and excipients used in emulsion forming drug delivery system to enhance the bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

  4. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  5. Microemulsions based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Harini C; Narendran, Hyndavi; Nagaswaram, Tejeswari; Yaga, Gowri; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of microemulsions by Jack H Schulman, there has been huge progress made in applying microemulsion systems in plethora of research and industrial process. Microemulsions are optically isotropic systems consisting of water, oil and amphiphile. These systems are beneficial due to their thermodynamic stability, optical clarity, ease of preparation, higher diffusion and absorption rates. Moreover, it has been reported that the ingredients of microemulsion can effectively overcome the diffusion barrier and penetrate through the stratum corneum of the skin. Hence it becomes promising for both transdermal and dermal drug delivery. However, low viscosity of microemulsion restrains its applicability in pharmaceutical industry. To overcome the above drawback, the low viscous microemulsions were added to viscous gel bases to potentiate its applications as topical drug delivery systems so that various drug related toxic effects and erratic drug absorption can be avoided. The present review deals with the microemulsions, various techniques involved in the development of organic nanoparticles. The review emphasized on microemulsion based systems such as hydrogels and organogels. The physicochemical characteristics, mechanical properties, rheological and stability principles involved in microemulsion based viscous gels were also explored.

  6. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  7. Silk Electrogel Based Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianrui

    Gastric cancer has become a global pandemic and there is imperative to develop efficient therapies. Oral dosing strategy is the preferred route to deliver drugs for treating the disease. Recent studies suggested silk electro hydrogel, which is pH sensitive and reversible, has potential as a vehicle to deliver the drug in the stomach environment. The aim of this study is to establish in vitro electrogelation e-gel based silk gel as a gastroretentive drug delivery system. We successfully extended the duration of silk e-gel in artificial gastric juice by mixing silk solution with glycerol at different ratios before the electrogelation. Structural analysis indicated the extended duration was due to the change of beta sheet content. The glycerol mixed silk e-gel had good doxorubicin loading capability and could release doxorubicin in a sustained-release profile. Doxorubicin loaded silk e-gels were applied to human gastric cancer cells. Significant cell viability decrease was observed. We believe that with further characterization as well as functional analysis, the silk e-gel system has the potential to become an effective vehicle for gastric drug delivery applications.

  8. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  9. In Situ Forming Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Madan, M.; Bajaj, A.; Lewis, S.; Udupa, N.; Baig, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  10. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting.

  11. Thiolated polymers as mucoadhesive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sarah; Cummins, Wayne; O' Donovan, Orla; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor

    2017-03-30

    Mucoadhesion is the process of binding a material to the mucosal layer of the body. Utilising both natural and synthetic polymers, mucoadhesive drug delivery is a method of controlled drug release which allows for intimate contact between the polymer and a target tissue. It has the potential to increase bioavailability, decrease potential side effects and offer protection to more sensitive drugs such as proteins and peptide based drugs. The thiolation of polymers has, in the last number of years, come to the fore of mucoadhesive drug delivery, markedly improving mucoadhesion due to the introduction of free thiol groups onto the polymer backbone while also offering a more cohesive polymeric matrix for the slower and more controlled release of drug. This review explores the concept of mucoadhesion and the recent advances in both the polymers and the methods of thiolation used in the synthesis of mucoadhesive drug delivery devices.

  12. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems.

  13. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-03-18

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems.

  14. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse; Yang, Mingshi; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use of biorelevant media when applicable can increase the knowledge about the quality of DDS for oral protein delivery. Hopefully, the knowledge provided in this review will aid the establishment of improved biorelevant models capable of forecasting the performance of particulate DDS for oral peptide/protein delivery.

  15. [Studies on market of drug delivery system product and drug delivery system of compound Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Xu, De-Sheng; Hong, Yan-Long; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Yue-Ming

    2006-10-01

    Based on the progress in the world market of drug delivery system (DDS) product and the research profile of DDS of compound Chinese Medicine, The article puts forward a new method of studies on DDS of compound Chinese Medicine. It is expected that the theory of compatibility of compound Chinese Medicine can be shown and its role can be exerted to the largest extent with the application of pharmaceutics technology to change the mode of drug delivery of activated components of compound Chinese Medicine.

  16. Light-sensitive intelligent drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Bromberg, Lev; Concheiro, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) capable of releasing an active molecule at the appropriate site and at a rate that adjusts in response to the progression of the disease or to certain functions/biorhythms of the organism are particularly appealing. Biocompatible materials sensitive to certain physiological variables or external physicochemical stimuli (intelligent materials) can be used for achieving this aim. Light-responsiveness is receiving increasing attention owing to the possibility of developing materials sensitive to innocuous electromagnetic radiation (mainly in the UV, visible and near-infrared range), which can be applied on demand at well delimited sites of the body. Some light-responsive DDS are of a single use (i.e. the light triggers an irreversible structural change that provokes the delivery of the entire dose) while others able to undergo reversible structural changes when cycles of light/dark are applied, behave as multi-switchable carriers (releasing the drug in a pulsatile manner). In this review, the mechanisms used to develop polymeric micelles, gels, liposomes and nanocomposites with light-sensitiveness are analyzed. Examples of the capability of some polymeric, lipidic and inorganic structures to regulate the release of small solutes and biomacromolecules are presented and the potential of light-sensitive carriers as functional components of intelligent DDS is discussed.

  17. Implantable microchip: the futuristic controlled drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Kumar Bishwajit; Sumi, Chandra Datta

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that controlled and pulsatile drug delivery system is an important challenge in medicine over the conventional drug delivery system in case of therapeutic efficacy. However, the conventional drug delivery systems often offer a limited by their inability to drug delivery which consists of systemic toxicity, narrow therapeutic window, complex dosing schedule for long term treatment etc. Therefore, there has been a search for the drug delivery system that exhibit broad enhancing activity for more drugs with less complication. More recently, some elegant study has noted that, a new type of micro-electrochemical system or MEMS-based drug delivery systems called microchip has been improved to overcome the problems related to conventional drug delivery. Moreover, micro-fabrication technology has enabled to develop the implantable controlled released microchip devices with improved drug administration and patient compliance. In this article, we have presented an overview of the investigations on the feasibility and application of microchip as an advanced drug delivery system. Commercial manufacturing materials and methods, related other research works and current advancement of the microchips for controlled drug delivery have also been summarized.

  18. Drug delivery systems for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rautioa, Jarkko; Chikhale, Prashant J

    2004-01-01

    Brain tumors are one of the most lethal forms of cancer. They are extremely difficult to treat. Although, the rate of brain tumor incidence is relatively low, the field clearly lacks therapeutic strategies capable of overcoming barriers for effective delivery of drugs to brain tumors. Clinical failure of many potentially effective therapeutics for the treatment of brain tumors is usually not due to a lack of drug potency, but rather can be attributed to shortcomings in the methods by which a drug is delivered to the brain and into brain tumors. In response to the lack of efficacy of conventional drug delivery methods, extensive efforts have been made to develop novel strategies to overcome the obstacles for brain tumor drug delivery. The challenge is to design therapeutic strategies that deliver drugs to brain tumors in a safe and effective manner. This review provides some insight into several potential techniques that have been developed to improve drug delivery to brain tumors, and it should be helpful to clinicians and research scientists as well.

  19. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  20. Herbal Excipients in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shirwaikar, A.; Shirwaikar, Annie; Prabu, S. Lakshmana; Kumar, G. Aravind

    2008-01-01

    The use of natural excipients to deliver the bioactive agents has been hampered by the synthetic materials. However advantages offered by these natural excipients are their being non-toxic, less expensive and freely available. The performance of the excipients partly determines the quality of the medicines. The traditional concept of the excipients as any component other than the active substance has undergone a substantial evolution from an inert and cheap vehicle to an essential constituent of the formulation. Excipients are any component other than the active substance(s) intentionally added to formulation of a dosage form. This article gives an overview of herbal excipients which are used in conventional dosage forms as well as novel drug delivery systems. PMID:20046764

  1. Oral Dispersible System: A New Approach in Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, P. A.; Khan, J. A.; Khan, A.; Safiullah, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dosage form is a mean used for the delivery of drug to a living body. In order to get the desired effect the drug should be delivered to its site of action at such rate and concentration to achieve the maximum therapeutic effect and minimum adverse effect. Since oral route is still widely accepted route but having a common drawback of difficulty in swallowing of tablets and capsules. Therefore a lot of research has been done on novel drug delivery systems. This review is about oral dispersible tablets a novel approach in drug delivery systems that are now a day's more focused in formulation world, and laid a new path that, helped the patients to build their compliance level with the therapy, also reduced the cost and ease the administration especially in case of pediatrics and geriatrics. Quick absorption, rapid onset of action and reduction in drug loss properties are the basic advantages of this dosage form. PMID:27168675

  2. Designing polymeric microparticulate drug delivery system for hydrophobic drug quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Moumita; Dasgupta Mandal, Dalia; Mandal, Tamal; Bhuniya, Saikat; Ghosh, Mallika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate pharmaceutical potentialities of a polymeric microparticulate drug delivery system for modulating the drug profile of poorly water-soluble quercetin. In this research work two cost effective polymers sodium alginate and chitosan were used for entrapping the model drug quercetin through ionic cross linking method. In vitro drug release, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency, Fourier Transforms Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) studies were also done for physicochemical characterization of the formulations. Swelling index and drug release study were done at a pH of 1.2, 6.8 and 7.4 to evaluate the GI mimetic action which entails that the swelling and release of the all the Formulation1 (F1), Formulation2 (F2) and Formulation3 (F3) at pH 1.2 were minimal confirming the prevention of drug release in the acidic environment of stomach. Comparatively more sustained release was seen from the formulations F2 & F3 at pH 6.8 and pH 7.4 after 7 h of drug release profiling. Drug entrapment efficiency of the formulations shows in F1 (D:C:A = 2:5:30) was approximately 70% whereas the increase in chitosan concentration in F2 (D:C:A = 2:10:30) has shown an entrapment efficiency of 81%. But the comparative further increase of chitosan concentration in F3 (D:C:A = 2:15:30) has shown a entrapment of 80% which is not having any remarkable difference from F2. The FTIR analysis of drug, polymers and the formulations indicated the compatibility of the drug with the polymers. The smoothness of microspheres in F2 & F3 was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). However F1 microsphere has shown more irregular shape comparatively. The DSC studies indicated the absence of drug-polymer interaction in the microspheres. Our XRD studies have revealed that when pure drug exhibits crystalline structure with less dissolution profile

  3. A Molecular Communication System Model for Particulate Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Pierobon, Massimiliano; Song, Sang Ok; Akyildiz, Ian F

    2013-12-01

    The goal of a drug delivery system (DDS) is to convey a drug where the medication is needed, while, at the same time, preventing the drug from affecting other healthy parts of the body. Drugs composed of micro- or nano-sized particles (particulate DDS) that are able to cross barriers which prevent large particles from escaping the bloodstream are used in the most advanced solutions. Molecular communication (MC) is used as an abstraction of the propagation of drug particles in the body. MC is a new paradigm in communication research where the exchange of information is achieved through the propagation of molecules. Here, the transmitter is the drug injection, the receiver is the drug delivery, and the channel is realized by the transport of drug particles, thus enabling the analysis and design of a particulate DDS using communication tools. This is achieved by modeling the MC channel as two separate contributions, namely, the cardiovascular network model and the drug propagation network. The cardiovascular network model allows to analytically compute the blood velocity profile in every location of the cardiovascular system given the flow input by the heart. The drug propagation network model allows the analytical expression of the drug delivery rate at the targeted site given the drug injection rate. Numerical results are also presented to assess the flexibility and accuracy of the developed model. The study of novel optimization techniques for a more effective and less invasive drug delivery will be aided by this model, while paving the way for novel communication techniques for Intrabody communication networks.

  4. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  5. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Matias J.; Costa, Rui R.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine. PMID:26861358

  6. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Matias J; Costa, Rui R; Mano, João F

    2016-02-05

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine.

  7. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  8. Potential of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems by intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Javed; Ali, Mushir; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahani, Jasjeet Kaur; Ramassamy, Charles; Dao, Lé; Bhavna

    2010-05-01

    Due to number of problems related with oral, parenteral, rectal and other routes of drug administration, the interest of pharmaceutical scientists has increased towards exploring the possibilities of intranasal delivery of various drugs. Nasal drug delivery system is commonly known for the treatment of local ailments like cold, cough, rhinitis, etc. Efforts have been made to deliver various drugs, especially peptides and proteins, through nasal route for systemic use; utilizing the principles and concepts of various nanoparticulate drug delivery systems using various polymers and absorption promoters. The incorporation of drugs into nanoparticles might be a promising approach, since colloidal formulations have been shown to protect them from the degrading milieu in the nasal cavity and facilitate their transport across the mucosal barriers. The use of nanoparticles for vaccine delivery provides beneficial effect, by achieving good immune responses. This could be due to the fact that small particles can be transported preferentially by the lymphoid tissue of the nasal cavity (NALT). The brain gets benefited through the intranasal delivery as direct olfactory transport bypasses the blood brain barrier and nanoparticles are taken up and conveyed along cell processes of olfactory neurons through the cribriform plate to synaptic junctions with neurons of the olfactory bulb. The intranasal delivery is aimed at optimizing drug bioavailability for systemic drugs, as absorption decreases with increasing molecular weight, and for drugs, which are susceptible to enzymatic degradation such as proteins and polypeptides. This review discusses the potential benefits of using nanoparticles for nasal delivery of drugs and vaccines for brain, systemic and topical delivery. The article aims at giving an insight into nasal cavity, consideration of factors affecting and strategies to improve drug absorption through nasal route, pharmaceutical dosage forms and delivery systems with

  9. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  10. Niosomes: a controlled and novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rajera, Rampal; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade formulation of vesicles as a tool to improve drug delivery, has created a lot of interest amongst the scientist working in the area of drug delivery systems. Vesicular system such as liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes and ethosomes provide an alternative to improve the drug delivery. Niosomes play an important role owing to their nonionic properties, in such drug delivery system. Design and development of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) has two prerequisites. First, it should deliver the drug in accordance with a predetermined rate and second it should release therapeutically effective amount of drug at the site of action. Conventional dosage forms are unable to meet these requisites. Niosomes are essentially non-ionic surfactant based multilamellar or unilamellar vesicles in which an aqueous solution of solute is entirely enclosed by a membrane resulting from the organization of surfactant macromolecules as bilayer. Niosomes are formed on hydration of non-ionic surfactant film which eventually hydrates imbibing or encapsulating the hydrating aqueous solution. The main aim of development of niosomes is to control the release of drug in a sustained way, modification of distribution profile of drug and for targeting the drug to the specific body site. This paper deals with composition, characterization/evaluation, merits, demerits and applications of niosomes.

  11. Iontophoresis: A Potential Emergence of a Transdermal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Dhote, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Punit; Mishra, Pradyumna K.; Mahajan, Suresh C.; Mishra, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of drugs into systemic circulation via skin has generated much attention during the last decade. Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin and into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. However, the excellent impervious nature of the skin offers the greatest challenge for successful delivery of drug molecules by utilizing the concepts of iontophoresis. The present review deals with the principles and the recent innovations in the field of iontophoretic drug delivery system together with factors affecting the system. This delivery system utilizes electric current as a driving force for permeation of ionic and non-ionic medications. The rationale behind using this technique is to reversibly alter the barrier properties of skin, which could possibly improve the penetration of drugs such as proteins, peptides and other macromolecules to increase the systemic delivery of high molecular weight compounds with controlled input kinetics and minimum inter-subject variability. Although iontophoresis seems to be an ideal candidate to overcome the limitations associated with the delivery of ionic drugs, further extrapolation of this technique is imperative for translational utility and mass human application. PMID:22396901

  12. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  13. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  14. Supramolecular hydrogels as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Roya Mahdavi

    2015-04-01

    Drug delivery from a hydrogel carrier implanted under the kidney capsule is an innovative way to induce kidney tissue regeneration and/or prevent kidney inflammation or fibrosis. We report here on the development of supramolecular hydrogels for this application. Chain-extended hydrogelators containing hydrogen bonding units in the main chain, and bifunctional hydrogelators end-functionalized with hydrogen bonding moieties, were made. The influence of these hydrogels on the renal cortex when implanted under the kidney capsule was studied. The overall tissue response to these hydrogels was found to be mild, and minimal damage to the cortex was observed, using the infiltration of macrophages, formation of myofibroblasts, and the deposition of collagen III as relevant read-out parameters. Differences in tissue response to these hydrogels could be related to the different physico-chemical properties of the three hydrogels.

  15. Preparation of drug delivery systems using supercritical fluid technology.

    PubMed

    Kompella, U B; Koushik, K

    2001-01-01

    Small changes in temperature and pressure near the critical region induce dramatic changes in the density and solubility of supercritical fluids, thereby facilitating the use of environmentally benign agents such as CO2 for their solvent and antisolvent properties in processing a wide variety of materials. While supercritical fluid technologies have been in commercial use in the food and chromatography industries for several years, only recently has this technology made inroads in the formulation of drug delivery systems. This review summarizes some of the recent applications of supercritical fluid technology in the preparation of drug delivery systems. Drugs containing polymeric particles, plain drug particles, solute-containing liposomes, and inclusion complexes of drug and carrier have been formulated using this technology. Also, polymer separation using this technology is enabling the selection of a pure fraction of a polymer, thereby allowing a more precise control of drug release from polymeric delivery systems.

  16. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozdağ Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  17. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  18. Recent advances of cocktail chemotherapy by combination drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Gu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Combination chemotherapy is widely exploited for enhanced cancer treatment in the clinic. However, the traditional cocktail administration of combination regimens often suffers from varying pharmacokinetics among different drugs. The emergence of nanotechnology offers an unparalleled opportunity for developing advanced combination drug delivery strategies with the ability to encapsulate various drugs simultaneously and unify the pharmacokinetics of each drug. This review surveys the most recent advances in combination delivery of multiple small molecule chemotherapeutics using nanocarriers. The mechanisms underlying combination chemotherapy, including the synergistic, additive and potentiation effects, are also discussed with typical examples. We further highlight the sequential and site-specific co-delivery strategies, which provide new guidelines for development of programmable combination drug delivery systems. Clinical outlook and challenges are also discussed in the end.

  19. Recent Advances of Cocktail Chemotherapy by Combination Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is widely exploited for enhanced cancer treatment in clinic. However, the traditional cocktail administration of combination regimens often suffers from varying pharmacokinetics among different drugs. The emergence of nanotechnology offers an unparalleled opportunity for developing advanced combination drug delivery strategies with the ability to encapsulate various drugs simultaneously and unify the pharmacokinetics of each drug. This review surveys the most recent advances in combination delivery of multiple small molecule chemotherapeutics using nanocarriers. The mechanisms underlying combination chemotherapy, including the synergistic, additive and potentiation effects, are also discussed with typical examples. We further highlight the sequential and site-specific co-delivery strategies, which provide new guidelines for development of programmable combination drug delivery systems. Clinical outlook and challenges are also discussed in the end. PMID:26546751

  20. Pharmacosomes: An Emerging Novel Vesicular Drug Delivery System for Poorly Soluble Synthetic and Herbal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the arena of solubility enhancement, several problems are encountered. A novel approach based on lipid drug delivery system has evolved, pharmacosomes. Pharmacosomes are colloidal, nanometric size micelles, vesicles or may be in the form of hexagonal assembly of colloidal drug dispersions attached covalently to the phospholipid. They act as befitting carrier for delivery of drugs quite precisely owing to their unique properties like small size, amphiphilicity, active drug loading, high entrapment efficiency, and stability. They help in controlled release of drug at the site of action as well as in reduction in cost of therapy, drug leakage and toxicity, increased bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs, and restorative effects. There has been advancement in the scope of this delivery system for a number of drugs used for inflammation, heart diseases, cancer, and protein delivery along with a large number of herbal drugs. Hence, pharmacosomes open new challenges and opportunities for improved novel vesicular drug delivery system. PMID:24106615

  1. Strategies for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Dwibhashyam, V. S. N. M.; Nagappa, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Treating central nervous system diseases is very challenging because of the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles that impede drug delivery. Physiological barriers like the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier as well as various efflux transporter proteins make the entry of drugs into the central nervous system very difficult. The present review provides a brief account of the blood brain barrier, the P-glycoprotein efflux and various strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:20046703

  2. Current HPLC Methods for Assay of Nano Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Tekkeli, Serife Evrim Kepekci; Kiziltas, Mustafa Volkan

    2016-12-22

    In nano drug formulations the mechanism of release is a critical process to recognize controlled and targeted drug delivery systems. In order to gain high bioavailability and specificity from the drug to reach its therapeutic goal, the active substance must be loaded into the nanoparticles efficiently. Therefore, the amount in biological fluids or tissues and the remaining amount in nano carriers are very important parameters to understand the potential of the nano drug delivery systems. For this aim, suitable and validated quantitation methods are required to determine released drug concentrations from nano pharmaceutical formulations. HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) is one of the most common techniques used for determination of released drug content out of nano drug formulations, in different physical conditions, over different periods of time. Since there are many types of HPLC methods depending on detector and column types, it is a challenge for the researchers to choose a suitable method that is simple, fast and validated HPLC techniques for their nano drug delivery systems. This review's goal is to compare HPLC methods that are currently used in different nano drug delivery systems in order to provide detailed and useful information for researchers.

  3. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  4. Porous Inorganic Drug Delivery Systems-a Review.

    PubMed

    Sayed, E; Haj-Ahmad, R; Ruparelia, K; Arshad, M S; Chang, M-W; Ahmad, Z

    2017-02-28

    Innovative methods and materials have been developed to overcome limitations associated with current drug delivery systems. Significant developments have led to the use of a variety of materials (as excipients) such as inorganic and metallic structures, marking a transition from conventional polymers. Inorganic materials, especially those possessing significant porosity, are emerging as good candidates for the delivery of a range of drugs (antibiotics, anticancer and anti-inflammatories), providing several advantages in formulation and engineering (encapsulation of drug in amorphous form, controlled delivery and improved targeting). This review focuses on key selected developments in porous drug delivery systems. The review provides a short broad overview of porous polymeric materials for drug delivery before focusing on porous inorganic materials (e.g. Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA) and Mobil Composition of Matter (MCM)) and their utilisation in drug dosage form development. Methods for their preparation and drug loading thereafter are detailed. Several examples of porous inorganic materials, drugs used and outcomes are discussed providing the reader with an understanding of advances in the field and realistic opportunities.

  5. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A. Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. Methods: This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. Results: It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson’s disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α-synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Conclusion: Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson’s disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson’s Disease therapy and reduce its side effects. PMID:26714584

  6. Interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin Chiat; Ong, Charlene Li Ching; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah; Wong, Tin Wui

    2008-02-01

    The effectiveness of an interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system is compared with that of a solid dispersion. The influences of drug load, particle size, and crystallinity of these test systems are investigated. The interactive mixtures and solid dispersions were prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydrophobic nifedipine drug by means of physical mixing and melting methods, respectively. The formed products were subjected to drug particle size and crystallinity analyses, and dissolution tests. In comparison with the interactive mixtures, the solid dispersions with low drug load were more effective as a rapid drug delivery system, as the size of a given batch of drug particles was markedly reduced by the molten PEG 3350. The rate and extent of drug dissolution were mainly promoted by decreasing effective drug particle size. However, these were lower in the solid dispersions than in the interactive mixtures when a high load of fine drug particles was used as the starting material. This was attributed to drug coarsening during the preparation of the solid dispersion. Unlike solid dispersions, the interactive mixtures could accommodate a high load of fine drug particles without compromising its capacity to enhance the rate and extent of drug dissolution. The interactive mixture is appropriate for use to deliver a fine hydrophobic drug in a formulation requiring a high drug load.

  7. Drug delivery system based on chronobiology--A review.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asim Sattwa; Biswas, Nikhil; Karim, Kazi Masud; Guha, Arijit; Chatterjee, Sugata; Behera, Mamata; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2010-11-01

    With the advancement in the field of chronobiology, modern drug delivery approaches have been elevated to a new concept of chronopharmacology i.e. the ability to deliver the therapeutic agent to a patient in a staggered profile. However the major drawback in the development of such delivery system that matches the circadian rhythm requires the availability of precise technology (pulsatile drug delivery). The increasing research interest surrounding this delivery system has widened the areas of pharmaceutics in particular with many more sub-disciplines expected to coexist in the near future. This review on chronopharmaceutics gives a comprehensive emphasis on potential disease targets, revisits the existing technologies in hand and also addresses the theoretical approaches to emerging discipline such as genetic engineering and target based specific molecules. With the biological prospective approaches in delivering drugs it is well understood that safer and more realistic approaches in the therapy of diseases will be achieved in the days to come.

  8. 3-dimensional (3D) fabricated polymer based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2014-11-10

    Drug delivery from 3-dimensional (3D) structures is a rapidly growing area of research. It is essential to achieve structures wherein drug stability is ensured, the drug loading capacity is appropriate and the desired controlled release profile can be attained. Attention must also be paid to the development of appropriate fabrication machinery that allows 3D drug delivery systems (DDS) to be produced in a simple, reliable and reproducible manner. The range of fabrication methods currently being used to form 3D DDSs include electrospinning (solution and melt), wet-spinning and printing (3-dimensional). The use of these techniques enables production of DDSs from the macro-scale down to the nano-scale. This article reviews progress in these fabrication techniques to form DDSs that possess desirable drug delivery kinetics for a wide range of applications.

  9. Electrohydrodynamics: A facile technique to fabricate drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Liao, I-Chien; Adler, Andrew; Leong, Kam W.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning and electrospraying are facile electrohydrodynamic fabrication methods that can generate drug delivery systems (DDS) through a one-step process. The nano-structured fiber and particle morphologies produced by these techniques offer tunable release kinetics applicable to diverse biomedical applications. Coaxial-electrospinning/electrospraying, a relatively new technique of fabricating core-shell fibers/particles have added to the versatility of these DDS by affording a near zero-order drug release kinetics, dampening of burst release, and applicability to a wider range of bioactive agents. Controllable electrospinning/spraying of fibers and particles and subsequent drug release from these chiefly polymeric vehicles depends on well-defined solution and process parameters. The additional drug delivery capability from electrospun fibers can further enhance the material’s functionality in tissue engineering applications. This review discusses the state-of-the-art of using electrohydrodynamic technique to generate nano-fiber/particles as drug delivery devices. PMID:19651167

  10. Hydrazone linkages in pH responsive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Sandeep J; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2017-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymeric drug delivery systems using various triggers to release the drug at the sites have become a major focus area. Among various stimuli-responsive materials, pH-responsiveness has been studied extensively. The materials used for fabricating pH-responsive drug delivery systems include a specific chemical functionality in their structure that can respond to changes in the pH of the surrounding environment. Various chemical functionalities, for example, acetal, amine, ortho ester, amine and hydrazone, have been used to design materials that are capable of releasing their payload at the acidic pH conditions of the tumor or infection sites. Hydrazone linkages are significant synthons for numerous transformations and have gained importance in pharmaceutical sciences due to their various biological and clinical applications. These linkages have been employed in various drug delivery vehicles, such as linear polymers, star shaped polymers, dendrimers, micelles, liposomes and inorganic nanoparticles, for pH-responsive drug delivery. This review paper focuses on the synthesis and characterization methods of hydrazone bond containing materials and their applications in pH-responsive drug delivery systems. It provides detailed suggestions as guidelines to materials and formulation scientists for designing biocompatible pH-responsive materials with hydrazone linkages and identifying future studies.

  11. Drug delivery systems improve pharmaceutical profile and facilitate medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Santella, Thomas M; Finestone, Albert J; Levy, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Innovations in dosage forms and dose delivery systems across a wide range of medications offer substantial clinical advantages, including reduced dosing frequency and improved patient adherence; minimized fluctuation of drug concentrations and maintenance of blood levels within a desired range; localized drug delivery; and the potential for reduced adverse effects and increased safety. The advent of new large-molecule drugs for previously untreatable or only partially treatable diseases is stimulating the development of suitable delivery systems for these agents. Although advanced formulations may be more expensive than conventional dosage forms, they often have a more favorable pharmacologic profile and can be cost-effective. Inclusion of these dosage forms on drug formulary lists may help patients remain on therapy and reduce the economic and social burden of care.

  12. Micro and Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems for Preventing Allotransplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James D.; Acharya, Abhinav P.; Little, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in transplant immunology, tissue damage caused by acute allograft rejection remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the transplant recipient. Moreover, the long-term sequelae of lifelong immunosuppression leaves patients at risk for developing a host of other deleterious conditions. Controlled drug delivery using micro- and nanoparticles (MNPs) is an effective way to deliver higher local doses of a given drug to specific tissues and cells while mitigating systemic effects. Herein, we review several descriptions of MNP immunotherapies aimed at prolonging allograft survival. We also discuss developments in the field of biomimetic drug delivery that use MNP constructs to induce and recruit our bodies' own suppressive immune cells. Finally, we comment on the regulatory pathway associated with these drug delivery systems. Collectively, it is our hope the studies described in this review will help to usher in a new era of immunotherapy in organ transplantation. PMID:25937032

  13. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  14. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  15. Nanostructured lipid carriers system: recent advances in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Md Asif; Md, Shadab; Sahni, Jasjeet Kaur; Baboota, Sanjula; Dang, Shweta; Ali, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) is second generation smarter drug carrier system having solid matrix at room temperature. This carrier system is made up of physiological, biodegradable and biocompatible lipid materials and surfactants and is accepted by regulatory authorities for application in different drug delivery systems. The availability of many products in the market in short span of time reveals the success story of this delivery system. Since the introduction of the first product, around 30 NLC preparations are commercially available. NLC exhibit superior advantages over other colloidal carriers viz., nanoemulsions, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, SLN etc. and thus, have been explored to more extent in pharmaceutical technology. The whole set of unique advantages such as enhanced drug loading capacity, prevention of drug expulsion, leads to more flexibility for modulation of drug release and makes NLC versatile delivery system for various routes of administration. The present review gives insights on the definitions and characterization of NLC as colloidal carriers including the production techniques and suitable formulations. This review paper also highlights the importance of NLC in pharmaceutical applications for the various routes of drug delivery viz., topical, oral, pulmonary, ocular and parenteral administration and its future perspective as a pharmaceutical carrier.

  16. Liposomal drug delivery systems: from concept to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Allen, Theresa M; Cullis, Pieter R

    2013-01-01

    The first closed bilayer phospholipid systems, called liposomes, were described in 1965 and soon were proposed as drug delivery systems. The pioneering work of countless liposome researchers over almost 5 decades led to the development of important technical advances such as remote drug loading, extrusion for homogeneous size, long-circulating (PEGylated) liposomes, triggered release liposomes, liposomes containing nucleic acid polymers, ligand-targeted liposomes and liposomes containing combinations of drugs. These advances have led to numerous clinical trials in such diverse areas as the delivery of anti-cancer, anti-fungal and antibiotic drugs, the delivery of gene medicines, and the delivery of anesthetics and anti-inflammatory drugs. A number of liposomes (lipidic nanoparticles) are on the market, and many more are in the pipeline. Lipidic nanoparticles are the first nanomedicine delivery system to make the transition from concept to clinical application, and they are now an established technology platform with considerable clinical acceptance. We can look forward to many more clinical products in the future.

  17. A clinical perspective on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Gilhotra, Ritu M; Ikram, Mohd; Srivastava, Sunny; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucoadhesion can be defined as a state in which two components, of which one is of biological origin, are held together for extended periods of time by the help of interfacial forces. Among the various transmucosal routes, buccal mucosa has excellent accessibility and relatively immobile mucosa, hence suitable for administration of retentive dosage form. The objective of this paper is to review the works done so far in the field of mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems (MBDDS), with a clinical perspective. Starting with a brief introduction of the mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, oral mucosa, and the theories of mucoadhesion, this article then proceeds to cover the works done so far in the field of MBDDS, categorizing them on the basis of ailments they are meant to cure. Additionally, we focus on the various patents, recent advancements, and challenges as well as the future prospects for mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems. PMID:24683406

  18. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    PubMed Central

    Shelate, Pragna; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  19. Crystallization Methods for Preparation of Nanocrystals for Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Jingkang; Wang, Yongli; Yin, Qiuxiang; Glennon, Brian; Zhong, Jian; Ouyang, Jinbo; Huang, Xin; Hao, Hongxun

    2015-01-01

    Low water solubility of drug products causes delivery problems such as low bioavailability. The reduced particle size and increased surface area of nanocrystals lead to the increasing of the dissolution rate. The formulation of drug nanocrystals is a robust approach and has been widely applied to drug delivery system (DDS) due to the significant development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. It can be used to improve drug efficacy, provide targeted delivery and minimize side-effects. Crystallization is the main and efficient unit operation to produce nanocrystals. Both traditional crystallization methods such as reactive crystallization, anti-solvent crystallization and new crystallization methods such as supercritical fluid crystallization, high-gravity controlled precipitation can be used to produce nanocrystals. The current mini-review outlines the main crystallization methods addressed in literature. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were summarized and compared.

  20. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain’s vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual’s age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:24550672

  1. Use of microwave in processing of drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Wong, T W

    2008-04-01

    Microwave has received a widespread application in pharmaceuticals and food processing, microbial sterilization, biomedical therapy, scientific and biomedical analysis, as well as, drug synthesis. This paper reviews the basis of application of microwave to prepare pharmaceutical dosage forms such as agglomerates, gel beads, microspheres, nanomatrix, solid dispersion, tablets and film coat. The microwave could induce drying, polymeric crosslinkages as well as drug-polymer interaction, and modify the structure of drug crystallites via its effects of heating and/or electromagnetic field on the dosage forms. The use of microwave opens a new approach to control the physicochemical properties and drug delivery profiles of pharmaceutical dosage forms without the need for excessive heat, lengthy process or toxic reactants. Alternatively, the microwave can be utilized to process excipients prior to their use in the formulation of drug delivery systems. The intended release characteristics of drugs in dosage forms can be met through modifying the physicochemical properties of excipients using the microwave.

  2. Using DNA nanotechnology to produce a drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyen La, Thi; Thu Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Phuc Pham, Van; Huyen Nguyen, Thi Minh; Huan Le, Quang

    2013-03-01

    Drug delivery to cancer cells in chemotherapy is one of the most advanced research topics. The effectiveness of the current cancer treatment drugs is limited because they are not capable of distinguishing between cancer cells and normal cells so that they kill not only cancer cells but also normal ones. To overcome this disadvantage by profiting from the differences in physical and chemical properties between cancer and normal cells, nanoparticles (NPs) delivering a drug are designed in a specific manner such that they can distinguish the cancer cells from the normal ones and are targeted only to the cancer cells. Currently, there are various drug delivery systems with many advantages, but sharing some common disadvantages such as difficulty with controlling the size, low encapsulation capacity and low stability. With the development and success of DNA nanotechnology, DNA strands are used to create effective drug delivery NPs with precisely controlled size and structure, safety and high stability. This article presents our study on drug encapsulation in DNA nanostructure which loaded docetaxel and curcumin in a desire to create a new and effective drug delivery system with high biological compatibility. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  3. An emerging platform for drug delivery: aerogel based systems.

    PubMed

    Ulker, Zeynep; Erkey, Can

    2014-03-10

    Over the past few decades, advances in "aerogel science" have provoked an increasing interest for these materials in pharmaceutical sciences for drug delivery applications. Because of their high surface areas, high porosities and open pore structures which can be tuned and controlled by manipulation of synthesis conditions, nanostructured aerogels represent a promising class of materials for delivery of various drugs as well as enzymes and proteins. Along with biocompatible inorganic aerogels and biodegradable organic aerogels, more complex systems such as surface functionalized aerogels, composite aerogels and layered aerogels have also been under development and possess huge potential. Emphasis is given to the details of the aerogel synthesis and drug loading methods as well as the influence of synthesis parameters and loading methods on the adsorption and release of the drugs. Owing to their ability to increase the bioavailability of low solubility drugs, to improve both their stability and their release kinetics, there are an increasing number of research articles concerning aerogels in different drug delivery applications. This review presents an up to date overview of the advances in all kinds of aerogel based drug delivery systems which are currently under investigation.

  4. Programmable nanomedicine: synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis B.; Ligler, Frances S.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in nanomedicine for the cancer therapy have enabled programmable delivery of therapeutics by exploiting the stimuli-responsive properties of nanocarriers. These therapeutic systems were designed with the relevant chemical and physical properties that respond to different triggers for enhanced anticancer efficacy, including the reduced development of drug-resistance, lower therapeutic dose, site-specific transport, and spatiotemporally controlled release. This minireview discusses the current advances in programmable nanocarriers for cancer therapy with particular emphasis on synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems.

  5. Adamantane in Drug Delivery Systems and Surface Recognition.

    PubMed

    Štimac, Adela; Šekutor, Marina; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Frkanec, Leo; Frkanec, Ruža

    2017-02-16

    The adamantane moiety is widely applied in design and synthesis of new drug delivery systems and in surface recognition studies. This review focuses on liposomes, cyclodextrins, and dendrimers based on or incorporating adamantane derivatives. Our recent concept of adamantane as an anchor in the lipid bilayer of liposomes has promising applications in the field of targeted drug delivery and surface recognition. The results reported here encourage the development of novel adamantane-based structures and self-assembled supramolecular systems for basic chemical investigations as well as for biomedical application.

  6. Drug delivery systems: polymers and drugs monitored by capillary electromigration methods.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Gallardo, Alberto

    2003-11-25

    In this paper, different electromigration methods used to monitor drugs and polymers released from drug delivery systems are reviewed. First, an introduction to the most typical arrangements used as drug delivery systems (e.g., polymer-drug covalent conjugates, membrane or matrix-based devices) is presented. Next, the principles of different capillary electromigration procedures are discussed, followed by a revision on the different procedures employed to monitor the release of drugs and the degradation or solubilization of the polymeric matrices from drug delivery systems during both in vitro and in vivo assays. A critical comparison between these capillary electrophoretic methods and the more common chromatographic methods employed to analyze drugs and polymers from drug delivery systems is presented. Finally, future outlooks of these electromigration procedures in the controlled release field are discussed.

  7. Applications of polymers in intraocular drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Alhalafi, Ali Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    We are entering a new era of ophthalmic pharmacology where new drugs are rapidly being developed for the treatment of anterior and posterior segment of the eye disease. The pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the eye remains a very active area of ophthalmic research. Intraocular drug delivery systems allow the release of the drug, bypassing the blood-ocular barrier. The main advantage of these preparations is that they can release the drug over a long time with one single administration. These pharmaceutical systems are of great important in the treatment of the posterior segment diseases, and they can be prepared from biodegradable or nonbiodegradable polymers. Biodegradable polymers have the advantage of disappearing from the site of action after releasing the drug. The majority of intraocular devices are prepared from nonbiodegradable polymers, and they can release controlled amounts of drugs for months. Nonbiodegradable polymers include silicone, polyvinyl alcohol, and ethylene-vinyl acetate. The polymers usually employed to prepare nanoparticles for the topical ophthalmic route are poly (acrylic acid) derivatives (polyalquilcyanocrylates), albumin, poly-ε-caprolactone, and chitosan. Dendrimers are a recent class of polymeric materials with unique nanostructure which has been studied to discover their role in the delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Hydrogels are polymers that can swell in aqueous solvent system, and they hold the solvents in a swollen cross-linked gel for delivery. This review exhibits the current literature regarding applications of polymers in ophthalmic drug delivery systems including pharmacokinetics, advantages, disadvantages, and indications aimed to obtain successful eye therapy. Method of Literature Search: A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed databases into two steps. The first step was oriented to classification of intraocular polymers implants focusing on their advantages and disadvantages. The second

  8. Retinal Drug Delivery System, Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy. Intraocular injection can place the drug directly into the vitreous cavity but is not recommended...drugs for treatment of other ocular diseases such as retinal tumors, diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and cytomegalovirus...with the changes in mobile phase as indicated in each section. Data was collected for 10 min and the peak area was analyzed using the standard

  9. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  10. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  11. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy.

  12. Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Innovative Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Alka; Singh, Garima; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Verma, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Polymers have always been valuable excipients in conventional dosage forms, also have shown excellent performance into the parenteral arena, and are now capable of offering advanced and sophisticated functions such as controlled drug release and drug targeting. Advances in polymer science have led to the development of several novel drug delivery systems. Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) have shown superior performances over the conventional individual polymers and, consequently, the ranges of applications have grown rapidly for such class of materials. The advanced properties of IPNs like swelling capacity, stability, biocompatibility, nontoxicity and biodegradability have attracted considerable attention in pharmaceutical field especially in delivering bioactive molecules to the target site. In the past few years various research reports on the IPN based delivery systems showed that these carriers have emerged as a novel carrier in controlled drug delivery. The present review encompasses IPNs, their types, method of synthesis, factors which affects the morphology of IPNs, extensively studied IPN based drug delivery systems, and some natural polymers widely used for IPNs. PMID:24949205

  13. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems’ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We’ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients. PMID:26109999

  14. Current Multistage Drug Delivery Systems Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Binlong; Dai, Wenbing; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of traditional tumor-targeted drug delivery systems based on EPR effect and receptor-mediated endocytosis is very challenging probably because of the biological complexity of tumors as well as the limitations in the design of the functional nano-sized delivery systems. Recently, multistage drug delivery systems (Ms-DDS) triggered by various specific tumor microenvironment stimuli have emerged for tumor therapy and imaging. In response to the differences in the physiological blood circulation, tumor microenvironment, and intracellular environment, Ms-DDS can change their physicochemical properties (such as size, hydrophobicity, or zeta potential) to achieve deeper tumor penetration, enhanced cellular uptake, timely drug release, as well as effective endosomal escape. Based on these mechanisms, Ms-DDS could deliver maximum quantity of drugs to the therapeutic targets including tumor tissues, cells, and subcellular organelles and eventually exhibit the highest therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we expatiate on various responsive modes triggered by the tumor microenvironment stimuli, introduce recent advances in multistage nanoparticle systems, especially the multi-stimuli responsive delivery systems, and discuss their functions, effects, and prospects. PMID:28255348

  15. Use of liposomes as injectable-drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ostro, M J; Cullis, P R

    1989-08-01

    The formation of liposomes and their application as delivery systems for injectable drugs are described. Liposomes are microscopic vesicles composed of one or more lipid membranes surrounding discrete aqueous compartments. These vesicles can encapsulate water-soluble drugs in their aqueous spaces and lipid-soluble drugs within the membrane itself. Liposomes release their contents by interacting with cells in one of four ways: adsorption, endocytosis, lipid exchange, or fusion. Liposome-entrapped drugs are distributed within the body much differently than free drugs; when administered intravenously to healthy animals and humans, most of the injected vesicles accumulate in the liver, spleen, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. Liposomes also accumulate preferentially at the sites of inflammation and infection and in some solid tumors; however, the reason for this accumulation is not clear. Four major factors influence liposomes' in vivo behavior and biodistribution: (1) liposomes tend to leak if cholesterol is not included in the vesicle membrane, (2) small liposomes are cleared more slowly than large liposomes, (3) the half-life of a liposome increases as the lipid dose increases, and (4) charged liposomal systems are cleared more rapidly than uncharged systems. The most advanced application of liposome-based therapy is in the treatment of systemic fungal infections, especially with amphotericin B. Liposomes are also under investigation for treatment of neoplastic disorders. Liposomes' uses in cancer therapy include encapsulation of known antineoplastic agents such as doxorubicin and methotrexate, delivery of immune modulators such as N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-isoglutamine, and encapsulation of new chemical entities that are synthesized with lipophilic segments tailored for insertion into lipid bilayers. Liposomal formulations of injectable antimicrobial agents and antineoplastic agents already are undergoing clinical testing, and most probably will receive

  16. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  17. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'.

  18. Carrier-Based Drug Delivery System for Treatment of Acne

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Amber; Kumar Sonker, Avinesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the population suffers at some point in their lifetime from acne vulgaris. Acne is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit. This inflammatory skin disorder is most common in adolescents but also affects neonates, prepubescent children, and adults. Topical conventional systems are associated with various side effects. Novel drug delivery systems have been used to reduce the side effect of drugs commonly used in the topical treatment of acne. Topical treatment of acne with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) makes direct contact with the target site before entering the systemic circulation which reduces the systemic side effect of the parenteral or oral administration of drug. The objective of the present review is to discuss the conventional delivery systems available for acne, their drawbacks, and limitations. The advantages, disadvantages, and outcome of using various carrier-based delivery systems like liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so forth, are explained. This paper emphasizes approaches to overcome the drawbacks and limitations associated with the conventional system and the advances and application that are poised to further enhance the efficacy of topical acne formulations, offering the possibility of simplified dosing regimen that may improve treatment outcomes using novel delivery system. PMID:24688376

  19. Nanoengineered drug delivery systems for enhancing antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Suleman, Nadia; Mocktar, Chunderika; Seedat, Nasreen; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-03-01

    Formulation scientists are recognizing nanoengineered drug delivery systems as an effective strategy to overcome limitations associated with antibiotic drug therapy. Antibiotics encapsulated into nanodelivery systems will contribute to improved management of patients with various infectious diseases and to overcoming the serious global burden of antibiotic resistance. An extensive review of several antibiotic-loaded nanocarriers that have been formulated to target drugs to infectious sites, achieve controlled drug release profiles, and address formulation challenges, such as low-drug entrapment efficiencies, poor solubility and stability is presented in this paper. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro/in vivo performances of various antibiotic-loaded delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, nanohybirds, nanofibers/scaffolds, nanosheets, nanoplexes, and nanotubes/horn/rods and nanoemulsions, are highlighted and evaluated. Future studies that will be essential to optimize formulation and commercialization of these antibiotic-loaded nanosystems are also identified. The review presented emphasizes the significant formulation progress achieved and potential that novel nanoengineered antibiotic drug delivery systems have for enhancing the treatment of patients with a range of infections.

  20. Ex vivo investigation of magnetically targeted drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Fukui, S.; Fujimoto, S.; Mishima, F.; Takeda, S.; Izumi, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Fujitani, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2007-03-01

    In conventional systemic drug delivery the drug is administered by intravenous injection; it then travels to the heart from where it is pumped to all regions of the body. When the drug is aimed at a small target region, this method is extremely inefficient and leads to require much larger doses than those being necessary. In order to overcome this problem a number of targeted drug delivery methods are developed. One of these, magnetically targeted drug delivery system (MT-DDS) will be a promising way, which involves binding a drug to small biocompatible magnetic particles, injecting these into the blood stream and using a high gradient magnetic field to pull them out of suspension in the target region. In the present paper, we describe an ex vivo experimental work. It is also reported that navigation and accumulation test of the magnetic particles in the Y-shaped glass tube was performed in order to examine the threshold of the magnetic force for accumulation. It is found that accumulation of the magnetic particles was succeeded in the blood vessel when a permanent magnet was placed at the vicinity of the blood vessel. This result indicates the feasibility of the magnetically drug targeting in the blood vessel.

  1. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems: Microfabrication, drug delivery, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Woolfson, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Many promising therapeutic agents are limited by their inability to reach the systemic circulation, due to the excellent barrier properties of biological membranes, such as the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin or the sclera/cornea of the eye and others. The outermost layer of the skin, the SC, is the principal barrier to topically-applied medications. The intact SC thus provides the main barrier to exogenous substances, including drugs. Only drugs with very specific physicochemical properties (molecular weight < 500 Da, adequate lipophilicity, and low melting point) can be successfully administered transdermally. Transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecular agents of interest, including peptides, DNA, and small interfering RNA is problematic. Therefore, facilitation of drug penetration through the SC may involve by-pass or reversible disruption of SC molecular architecture. Microneedles (MNs), when used to puncture skin, will by-pass the SC and create transient aqueous transport pathways of micron dimensions and enhance the transdermal permeability. These micropores are orders of magnitude larger than molecular dimensions, and, therefore, should readily permit the transport of hydrophilic macromolecules. Various strategies have been employed by many research groups and pharmaceutical companies worldwide, for the fabrication of MNs. This review details various types of MNs, fabrication methods and, importantly, investigations of clinical safety of MN. PMID:20297904

  2. Self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) for phytoconstituents: a review.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Neeraj; Mittal, Vineet; Kaushik, Deepak; Khatkar, Anurag; Raina, Mitali

    2015-01-01

    The self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) is considered to be the novel technique for the delivery of lipophillic plant actives. The self emulsifying (SE) formulation significantly enhance the solubility and bioavailability of poorly aqueous soluble phytoconstituents. The self emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) can be developed for such plant actives to enhance the oral bioavailability using different excipients (lipid, surfactant, co solvent etc.) and their concentration is selected on the basis of pre formulation studies like phase equilibrium studies, solvent capacity of oil for drug and mutual miscibility of excipients. The present review focuses mainly on the development of SEDDS and effect of excipients on oral bioavailability and aqueous solubility of poorly water soluble phytoconstituents/ derived products. A recent list of patents issued for self emulsifying herbal formulation has also been included. The research data for various self emulsifying herbal formulation and patents issued were reviewed using different databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Google patents, Scopus and Web of Science. In a nutshell, we can say that SEDDS was established as a novel drug delivery system for herbals and with the advances in this technique, lots of patents on herbal SEDDS can be translated into the commercial products.

  3. Characterization of Release Mechanism in Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplante, Arthur James; Plachy, Robin Marie; Aou, Kaoru; Ferguson, Jake; Hsu, Shaw Ling

    2006-03-01

    Our polymeric drug delivery system is based on our understanding of phase behavior of polymers [e.g poly(lactic acid)], low molecular drugs and various solvents used in processing. Clearly the different morphologies achieved, based on different phase separation kinetics, can affect drug release rates. Release of drugs, in most cases, involves the exchange between the extraction media and drug. We have characterized the transport behavior using a number of unique techniques. Reflectance infrared spectroscopy has given us a detailed description of the release rate of drugs into the extraction media. Surface plasmon resonance has shown the overall mass loss. UV-visible spectroscopy has yielded the concentration of drug in the solution. These measurements are compared to the release mechanism based on Fickian diffusion. The two step release rates observed can only be explained by taking into account differences in the morphological features of the phase separated films.

  4. Potential and problems in ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Du, Li-Na; Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Yi-Guang; Ge, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important local stimulus for triggering drug release at the target tissue. Ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems (URDDS) have become an important research focus in targeted therapy. URDDS include many different formulations, such as microbubbles, nanobubbles, nanodroplets, liposomes, emulsions, and micelles. Drugs that can be loaded into URDDS include small molecules, biomacromolecules, and inorganic substances. Fields of clinical application include anticancer therapy, treatment of ischemic myocardium, induction of an immune response, cartilage tissue engineering, transdermal drug delivery, treatment of Huntington’s disease, thrombolysis, and disruption of the blood–brain barrier. This review focuses on recent advances in URDDS, and discusses their formulations, clinical application, and problems, as well as a perspective on their potential use in the future. PMID:23637531

  5. [A novel anticancer drug delivery system -DAC-70/CDDP].

    PubMed

    Sugitachi, Akio; Otsuka, Koki; Fujisawa, Kentaro; Itabashi, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Yuji; Sasaki, Akira; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Yasuo; Takamori, Yoshimori; Kurozumi, Seiji; Mori, Takatoshi; Wakabayashi, Go

    2007-11-01

    We devised a muco-adhesive anticancer drug delivery system using 70% deacetylated chitin (DAC-70) and cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The adhesive force between the system and human colonic mucosa was measured ex vivo, and a release profile of each drug was examined in vitro. Each system demonstrated a stronger muco-adhesive force at 37 degrees C than that of 25 degrees C. The CDDP-loaded system showed a sustained release of the drug while the 5-FU-loaded system exhibited an initial bursting of the agent. We presume that the release profile of CDDP and 5-FU is closely related to both degradability of the chitin and interactions between the chitin and each drug. The DAC-70/CDDP system would be clinically promising in loco-regional cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Evolution of implantable and insertable drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Lothar W; Wright, Jeremy C; Wang, Yunbing

    2014-05-10

    The paper describes the development of implantable and insertable drug delivery systems (IDDS) from their early stage in the 1960s until the current stage in the 2010s. It gives a detailed summary of non-degradable and biodegradable systems and their applications in different areas such as vascular disease treatment, birth control, cancer treatment, and eye disease treatment. It also describes the development of various implantable pump systems and some other atypical IDDS, the challenges and the future of IDDS.

  7. Biodegradable block copolymers as injectable drug-delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Bae, You Han; Lee, Doo Sung; Kim, Sung Wan

    1997-08-01

    Polymers that display a physicochemical response to stimuli are widely explored as potential drug-delivery systems. Stimuli studied to date include chemical substances and changes in temperature, pH and electric field. Homopolymers or copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide, and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (known as poloxamers) are typical examples of thermosensitive polymers, but their use in drug delivery is problematic because they are toxic and non-biodegradable. Biodegradable polymers used for drug delivery to date have mostly been in the form of injectable microspheres or implant systems, which require complicated fabrication processes using organic solvents. Such systems have the disadvantage that the use of organic solvents can cause denaturation when protein drugs are to be encapsulated. Furthermore, the solid form requires surgical insertion, which often results in tissue irritation and damage. Here we report the synthesis of a thermosensitive, biodegradable hydrogel consisting of blocks of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(L-lactic acid). Aqueous solutions of these copolymers exhibit temperature-dependent reversible gel-sol transitions. The hydrogel can be loaded with bioactive molecules in an aqueous phase at an elevated temperature (around 45 °C), where they form a sol. In this form, the polymer is injectable. On subcutaneous injection and subsequent rapid cooling to body temperature, the loaded copolymer forms a gel that can act as a sustained-release matrix for drugs.

  8. Elastic vesicles as topical/transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Maibach, H I

    2005-08-01

    Skin acts a major target as well as a principle barrier for topical/transdermal drug delivery. Despite the many advantages of this system, the major obstacle is the low diffusion rate of drugs across the stratum corneum. Several methods have been assessed to increase the permeation rate of drugs temporarily. One simple and convenient approach is application of drugs in formulation with elastic vesicles or skin enhancers. Elastic vesicles are classified with phospholipid (Transfersomes((R)) and ethosomes) and detergent-based types. Elastic vesicles were more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. Their effectiveness strongly depends on their physicochemical properties: composition, duration and application volume, and entrapment efficiency and application methods. This review focuses on the effect of elastic liposomes for enhancing the drug penetration and defines the action mechanism of penetration into deeper skin.

  9. Recent advances in pulsatile oral drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Politis, Stavros N; Rekkas, Dimitrios M

    2013-08-01

    It is well established that several diseases exhibit circadian behavior, following the relevant rhythm of the physiological functions of the human body. Their study falls in the fields of chronobiology and chronotherapeutics, the latter being essentially the effort of timely matching the treatment with the disease expression, in order to maximize the therapeutic benefits and minimize side effects. Pulsatile drug delivery is one of the pillars of chronopharmaceutics, achieved through dosage form design that allows programmable release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to follow the disease's time profile. Its major characteristic is the presence of lag phases, followed by drug release in a variety of rates, immediate, repeated or controlled. The scope of this review is to summarize the recent literature on pulsatile oral drug delivery systems and provide an overview of the ready to use solutions and early stage technologies, focusing on the awarded and pending patents in this technical field during the last few years.

  10. Exosome mimetics: a novel class of drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kooijmans, Sander A A; Vader, Pieter; van Dommelen, Susan M; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of extracellular phospholipid vesicles as conveyors of cellular information has created excitement in the field of drug delivery. Biological therapeutics, including short interfering RNA and recombinant proteins, are prone to degradation, have limited ability to cross biological membranes, and may elicit immune responses. Therefore, delivery systems for such drugs are under intensive investigation. Exploiting extracellular vesicles as carriers for biological therapeutics is a promising strategy to overcome these issues and to achieve efficient delivery to the cytosol of target cells. Exosomes are a well studied class of extracellular vesicles known to carry proteins and nucleic acids, making them especially suitable for such strategies. However, the considerable complexity and the related high chance of off-target effects of these carriers are major barriers for translation to the clinic. Given that it is well possible that not all components of exosomes are required for their proper functioning, an alternative strategy would be to mimic these vesicles synthetically. By assembly of liposomes harboring only crucial components of natural exosomes, functional exosome mimetics may be created. The low complexity and use of well characterized components strongly increase the pharmaceutical acceptability of such systems. However, exosomal components that would be required for the assembly of functional exosome mimetics remain to be identified. This review provides insights into the composition and functional properties of exosomes, and focuses on components which could be used to enhance the drug delivery properties of exosome mimetics.

  11. Chronopharmaceutical Drug Delivery Systems: Hurdles, Hype or Hope?⊗

    PubMed Central

    Youan, Bi-Botti C.

    2010-01-01

    The current advances in chronobiology and the knowledge gained from chronotherapy of selected diseases strongly suggest that “the one size fits all at all times” approach to drug delivery is no longer substantiated, at least for selected bioactive agents and disease therapy or prevention. Thus, there is a critical and urgent need for chronopharmaceutical research (e.g., design and evaluation of robust, spatially and temporally controlled drug delivery systems that would be clinically intended for chronotherapy by different routes of administration). This review provides a brief overview of current delivery system intended for chronotherapy. In theory, such an ideal “magic pill” preferably with affordable cost, would improve the safety, efficacy and patient compliance of old and new drugs. However, currently, there are three major hurdles for the successful transition of such system from laboratory to patient bedside. These include the challenges to identify adequate (i) rhythmic biomaterials and systems, (ii) rhythm engineering modeling, perhaps using system biology and (iii) regulatory guidance. PMID:20438781

  12. Potential applications for halloysite nanotubes based drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin

    Drug delivery refers to approaches, formulations, technologies, and systems for transporting a drug in the body. The purpose is to enhance the drug efficacy and to reduce side reactions, which can significantly improve treatment outcomes. Halloysite is a naturally occurred alumino-silicate clay with a tubular structure. It is a biocompatible material with a big surface area which can be used for attachment of targeted molecules. Besides, loaded molecules can present a sustained release manner in solution. These properties make halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) a good option for drug delivery. In this study, a drug delivery system was built based on halloysite via three different fabrication methods: physical adsorption, vacuum loading and layer-by-layer coating. Methotrexate was used as the model drug. Factors that may affect performance in both drug loading and release were tested. Results showed that methotrexate could be incorporated within the HNTs system and released in a sustained manner. Layer-by-layer coating showed a better potential than the other two methods in both MTX loading and release. Besides, lower pH could greatly improve MTX loading and release while the increased number of polyelectrolytes bilayers had a limited impact. Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy in children and adolescents. Postoperative recurrence and metastasis has become one of the leading causes for patient death after surgical remove of the tumor mass. A strategy could be a sustained release of chemotherapeutics directly at the primary tumor sites where recurrence would mostly occur. Then, this HNTs based system was tested with osteosarcoma cells in vitro to show the potential of delivering chemotherapeutics in the treatment of osteosarcoma. Methotrexate was incorporated within HNTs with a layer-bylayer coating technique, and drug coated HNTs were filled into nylon-6 which is a common material for surgical sutures in industry. Results showed that (1) methotrexate

  13. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanisms lead to drug failure because of inability to reach the desired target at a sufficient concentration. This perspective reviews the leading strategies that aim to improve drug delivery to brain tumors and their likelihood to change clinical practice. The English literature was searched for defined search items. Strategies that use systemic delivery and those that use local delivery are critically reviewed. In addition, challenges posed for drug delivery by combined treatment with anti-angiogenic therapy are outlined. To impact clinical practice and to achieve more than just a limited local control, new drugs and delivery systems must adhere to basic clinical expectations. These include, in addition to an antitumor effect, a verified favorable adverse effects profile, easy introduction into clinical practice, feasibility of repeated or continuous administration, and compatibility of the drug or delivery system with any tumor size and brain location. PMID:23502426

  14. An implantable thermoresponsive drug delivery system based on Peltier device.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongbing; Gorelov, Alexander V; Aldabbagh, Fawaz; Carroll, William M; Rochev, Yury

    2013-04-15

    Locally dropping the temperature in vivo is the main obstacle to the clinical use of a thermoresponsive drug delivery system. In this paper, a Peltier electronic element is incorporated with a thermoresponsive thin film based drug delivery system to form a new drug delivery device which can regulate the release of rhodamine B in a water environment at 37 °C. Various current signals are used to control the temperature of the cold side of the Peltier device and the volume of water on top of the Peltier device affects the change in temperature. The pulsatile on-demand release profile of the model drug is obtained by turning the current signal on and off. The work has shown that the 2600 mAh power source is enough to power this device for 1.3 h. Furthermore, the excessive heat will not cause thermal damage in the body as it will be dissipated by the thermoregulation of the human body. Therefore, this simple novel device can be implanted and should work well in vivo.

  15. Spatiotemporal drug delivery using laser-generated-focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Di, Jin; Kim, Jinwook; Hu, Quanyin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Laser-generated-focused ultrasound (LGFU) holds promise for the high-precision ultrasound therapy owing to its tight focal spot, broad frequency band, and stable excitation with minimal ultrasound-induced heating. We here report the development of the LGFU as a stimulus for promoted drug release from microgels integrated with drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. The pulsed waves of ultrasound, generated by a carbon black/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-photoacoustic lens, were introduced to trigger the drug release from alginate microgels encapsulated with drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We demonstrated the antibacterial capability of this drug delivery system against Escherichia coli by the disk diffusion method, and antitumor efficacy toward the HeLa cell-derived tumor spheroids in vitro. This novel LGFU-responsive drug delivery system provides a simple and remote approach to precisely control the release of therapeutics in a spatiotemporal manner and potentially suppress detrimental effects to the surrounding tissue, such as thermal ablation. PMID:26299506

  16. Intelligent system design for bionanorobots in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mark; Biglarbegian, Mohammad; Neethirajan, Suresh

    A nanorobot is defined as any smart structure which is capable of actuation, sensing, manipulation, intelligence, and swarm behavior at the nanoscale. In this study, we designed an intelligent system using fuzzy logic for diagnosis and treatment of tumors inside the human body using bionanorobots. We utilize fuzzy logic and a combination of thermal, magnetic, optical, and chemical nanosensors to interpret the uncertainty associated with the sensory information. Two different fuzzy logic structures, for diagnosis (Mamdani structure) and for cure (Takagi-Sugeno structure), were developed to efficiently identify the tumors and treat them through delivery of effective dosages of a drug. Validation of the designed system with simulated conditions proved that the drug delivery of bionanorobots was robust to reasonable noise that may occur in the bionanorobot sensors during navigation, diagnosis, and curing of the cancer cells. Bionanorobots represent a great hope for successful cancer therapy in the near future.

  17. Current approaches for drug delivery to central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sharif; Akaike, Toshihiro; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2010-12-01

    Brain, the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate, plays the most vital role in every function of human body. However, many neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infections of the brain become more prevalent as populations become older. In spite of the major advances in neuroscience, many potential therapeutics are still unable to reach the central nervous system (CNS) due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is formed by the tight junctions within the capillary endothelium of the vertebrate brain. This results in the capillary wall behaving as a continuous lipid bilayer and preventing the passage of polar and lipid insoluble substances. Several approaches for delivering drugs to the CNS have been developed to enhance the capacity of therapeutic molecules to cross the BBB by modifying the drug itself, or by coupling it to a vector for receptor-mediated, carrier mediated or adsorption-mediated transcytosis. The current challenge is to develop drug delivery systems that ensure the safe and effective passage of drugs across the BBB. This review focuses on the strategies and approaches developed to enhance drug delivery to the CNS.

  18. Issues and challenges in developing ruminal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Th F; Ellis, K J

    2004-06-23

    Ruminants have a specialised digestive system that contains anaerobic bacteria and protozoa capable of digesting the cellulosic materials that are so common in plant materials. In addition, their distinct digestive system can change the metabolism and mode of action of some nutrients, medicines or other bioactive materials when delivered orally or may provide opportunities for alternative oral dosing strategies. In particular, there is interest in administering a relatively large depot of some drugs into the rumen, which then provides for a prolonged and sustained release of small quantities of these drugs over time. Any strategy to develop a new ruminal drug delivery system must take into account the characteristics of the digestive system of ruminants and its specific bioactive application. For example, in the case of products to control parasitic infections, the development of the host's immunity against the nematodes, which can be acquired during the pasture season, must be considered; likewise, where pharmacologically active materials are used to manipulate a particular metabolic or biochemical process, one must always be aware of interactions with other processes, which might eventuate. This article reviews the necessary concepts, the issues and the challenges to construct ruminal drug delivery systems.

  19. Design of a Multiple Drug Delivery System Directed at Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, Sharath C.; Thomas, Mark V.; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Puleo, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  20. Potential applications of boron nitride nanotubes as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of research in the 'bio-nano' field, with the discovery and introduction of ever more fascinating materials for applications as drug delivery systems, sensors, transducers, and so on. The author's group, for the first time in the literature, proposed boron nitride nanotubes as a valid alternative to carbon nanotubes and other kinds of inorganic materials, because of their improved chemical properties that theoretically guarantee better stability and compatibility in a biological context. In this paper, the bio-applications of boron nitride nanotubes that have emerged in the literature are summarized, with special attention given to their exploitation as safe drug delivery and targeting carriers. Finally, the possibility of combining their physical and chemical properties is approached, highlighting the features that render these innovative nanovectors unique and exceptional candidates for many bio-applications.

  1. Stimulus-responsive "smart" hydrogels as novel drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Soppimath, K S; Aminabhavi, T M; Dave, A M; Kumbar, S G; Rudzinski, W E

    2002-09-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of research activity in the development of stimulus-responsive polymeric hydrogels. These hydrogels are responsive to external or internal stimuli and the response can be observed through abrupt changes in the physical nature of the network. This property can be favorable in many drug delivery applications. The external stimuli can be temperature, pH, ionic strength, ultrasonic sound, electric current, etc. A majority of the literature related to the development of stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems deals with temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAAm) and its various derivatives. However, acrylic-based pH-sensitive systems with weakly acidic/basic functional groups have also been widely studied. Quite recently, glucose-sensitive hydrogels that are responsive to glucose concentration have been developed to monitor the release of insulin. The present article provides a brief introduction and recent developments in the area of stimulus-responsive hydrogels, particularly those that respond to temperature and pH, and their applications in drug delivery.

  2. Systemic and Local Drug Delivery for Treating Diseases of the Central Nervous System in Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Laura; Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; James, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Thorough preclinical testing of central nervous system (CNS) therapeutics includes a consideration of routes of administration and agent biodistribution in assessing therapeutic efficacy. Between the two major classifications of administration, local vs. systemic, systemic delivery approaches are often preferred due to ease of administration. However, systemic delivery may result in suboptimal drug concentration being achieved in the CNS, and lead to erroneous conclusions regarding agent efficacy. Local drug delivery methods are more invasive, but may be necessary to achieve therapeutic CNS drug levels. Here, we demonstrate proper technique for three routes of systemic drug delivery: intravenous injection, intraperitoneal injection, and oral gavage. In addition, we show a method for local delivery to the brain: convection-enhanced delivery (CED). The use of fluorescently-labeled compounds is included for in vivo imaging and verification of proper drug administration. The methods are presented using murine models, but can easily be adapted for use in rats. PMID:20736920

  3. The effect of carbon nanotubes on drug delivery in an electro-sensitive transdermal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Im, Ji S; Bai, Byong Ch; Lee, Young-Seak

    2010-02-01

    An electro-sensitive transdermal drug delivery system was prepared by the electrospinning method to control drug release. A semi-interpenetrating polymer network was prepared as the matrix with polyethylene oxide and pentaerythritol triacrylate polymers. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used as an additive to increase the electrical sensitivity. The release experiment was carried out under different electric voltage conditions. Carbon nanotubes were observed in the middle of the electrospun fibers by SEM and TEM. The amount of released drug was effectively increased with higher applied electric voltages. These results were attributed to the excellent electrical conductivity of the carbon additive. The suggested mechanism of drug release involves polyethylene oxide of the semi-interpenetrating polymer network being dissolved under the effects of carbon nanotubes, thereby releasing the drug. The effects of the electro-sensitive transdermal drug delivery system were enhanced by the carbon nanotubes.

  4. A new approach in gastroretentive drug delivery system using cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Umamaheshwari, R B; Jain, Subheet; Jain, N K

    2003-01-01

    We prepared cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)-coated cholestyramine microcapsules as a intragastric floating drug delivery system endowed with floating ability due to the carbon dioxide generation when exposed to the gastric fluid. The microcapsules also have a mucoadhesive property. Ion-exchange resin particles can be loaded with bicarbonate followed by acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) and coated with CAB by emulsion solvent evaporation method. The drug concentration was monitored to maintain the floating property and minimum effective concentration. The effect of CAB: drug-resin ratio (2:1, 4:1, 6:1 w/w) on the particle size, floating time, and drug release was determined. Cholestyramine microcapsules were characterized for shape, surface characteristics, and size distribution; cholestyramine/acetohydroxamic acid interactions inside microcapsules were investigated by X-ray diffractometry. The buoyancy time of CAB-coated formulations was better than that of uncoated resin particles. Also, a longer floating time was observed with a higher polymer:drug resin complex ratio (6:1). With increasing coating thickness the particle size was increased but drug release rate was decreased. The drug release rate was higher in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) than in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). The in vivo mucoadhesion studies were performed with rhodamine-isothiocyanate (RITC) by fluorescent probe method. The amount of CAB-coated cholestyramine microcapsules that remained in the stomach was slightly lower than that of uncoated resin particles. Cholestyramine microcapsules were distributed throughout the stomach and exhibited prolonged gastric residence via mucoadhesion. These results suggest that CAB-coated microcapsules could be a floating as well as a mucoadhesive drug delivery system. Thus, it has promise in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

  5. Bionanocomposites containing magnetic graphite as potential systems for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lígia N M; Alcântara, Ana C S; Darder, Margarita; Aranda, Pilar; Herrmann, Paulo S P; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M; García-Hernández, Mar; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2014-12-30

    New magnetic bio-hybrid matrices for potential application in drug delivery are developed from the assembly of the biopolymer alginate and magnetic graphite nanoparticles. Ibuprofen (IBU) intercalated in a Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was chosen as a model drug delivery system (DDS) to be incorporated as third component of the magnetic bionanocomposite DDS. For comparative purposes DDS based on the incorporation of pure IBU in the magnetic bio-hybrid matrices were also studied. All the resulting magnetic bionanocomposites were processed as beads and films and characterized by different techniques with the aim to elucidate the role of the magnetic graphite on the systems, as well as that of the inorganic brucite-like layers in the drug-loaded LDH. In this way, the influence of both inorganic components on the mechanical properties, the water uptake ability, and the kinetics of the drug release from these magnetic systems were determined. In addition, the possibility of modulating the levels of IBU release by stimulating the bionanocomposites with an external magnetic field was also evaluated in in vitro assays.

  6. Synthetic Tumor Networks for Screening Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Garson, Charles J.; Mills, Ivy R.; Matar, Majed M.; Fewell, Jason G.; Pant, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle’s physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of “leaky vessels”. Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  7. [Regulatory authorities expect innovative drug delivery systems (DDS)].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) and the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) are responsible for appropriately implementing regulations and providing necessary instructions and advice so that patients have access to safer, more effective drugs. These responsibilities are essential missions of the MHLW/PMDA, although restrictions on drug use or development might be considered to be purely regulatory matters. In the genomic drug discovery era of the 21st century, it is expected that new, innovative drugs will be developed, although the reality can be slightly disturbing. The number of approvals of new molecular entities (NMEs) is only approximately 20 per year both in Japan and the USA and may reach an even lower level. In light of current drug development trends, drug delivery systems (DDS) for targeted therapy or personalized medicines as well as NMEs should be explored more proactively. To promote the development and evaluation of innovative DDS, the MHLW/PMDA considers it important to communicate smoothly among industry-government-academia from the very early stage of development. To promote this, the MHLW/PMDA launched regulatory affairs consultations on R&D strategy for drugs in July 2011. Innovative DDS require not only cutting-edge technology or materials but also extensions of existing pharmaceutical technology. It is most important for innovative DDS to benefit patients in practical clinical settings. The MHLW/PMDA encourages the relevant parties to develop a far-sighted strategy with this goal in mind.

  8. Sponges carrying self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Josef, Elinor; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2013-12-15

    Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) increase the solubility of lipophilic drugs. One barrier to their wide application is their liquid nature. We report on a new method to solidify SMEDDS-their incorporation in sponges made from a hydrophilic natural polymer. Using different freeze-drying schemes, sponges were prepared from alginate gels containing microemulsions. The sponges' structures were studied with scanning electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering. The oil droplets survived the drying process, and SMEDDS were present as 9 nm-sized objects in the dried sponges. The sponges were rehydrated in water, and evidence of the presence of SMEDDS in the rehydrated sponges was found. A model hydrophobic molecule, Nile red, was soluble in all dry and rehydrated sponges. SMEDDS containing Nile red were gradually released from the sponges, at a rate that depended on the drying method. The equilibrium water uptake of the sponges was also found to be influenced by the drying scheme. The combination of SMEDDS and sponges may be a way to overcome the disadvantages of each component separately, provide a solid dosage form for SMEDDS that can sustain the release of drugs and also enable utilization of hydrophilic sponges for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  9. Chemical delivery systems and soft drugs: Retrometabolic approaches of drug design.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Yashumati Ratan; Pareek, Ashutosh; Jain, Vivek; Kishore, Dharma

    2014-09-01

    Inclusion of metabolic considerations in the drug design process leads to significant development in the field of chemical drug targeting and the design of safer drugs during past few years which is a part of an approach now designated as Retro metabolic drug design (RMDD). This approach represents systematic methodologies that integrate structure-activity and structure-metabolism relationships and are aimed to design safe, locally active compounds with an improved therapeutic index. It embraces two distinct methods, chemical delivery systems and a soft drug approach. Present review recapitulates an impression of RMDD giving reflections on the chemical delivery system and the soft drug approach and provides a variety of examples to embody its concepts. Successful application of such design principles has already been applied to a number of marketed drugs like esmolol; loteprednol etc., and many other candidates like beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, alkylating agents, antimicrobials etc., are also under investigation.

  10. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations.

  11. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Fang; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the unprecedented progresses of biomedical nanotechnology during the past few decades, conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been involved into smart DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. Benefiting from the response to specific internal or external triggers, those well-defined nanoplatforms can increase the drug targeting efficacy, in the meantime, reduce side effects/toxicities of payloads, which are key factors for improving patient compliance. In academic field, variety of smart DDSs have been abundantly demonstrated for various intriguing systems, such as stimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, metals/metal oxides, and exosomes. However, these nanoplatforms are lack of standardized manufacturing method, toxicity assessment experience, and clear relevance between the pre-clinical and clinical studies, resulting in the huge difficulties to obtain regulatory and ethics approval. Therefore, such relatively complex stimulus-sensitive nano-DDSs are not currently approved for clinical use. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of smart nanoplatforms for targeting drug delivery. Furthermore, the clinical translation obstacles faced by these smart nanoplatforms have been reviewed and discussed. We also present the future directions and perspectives of stimuli-sensitive DDS in clinical applications. PMID:27375781

  12. Cubic and Hexagonal Liquid Crystals as Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulin; Ma, Ping; Gui, Shuangying

    2014-01-01

    Lipids have been widely used as main constituents in various drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, and lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals. Among them, lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals have highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix. The intricate nanostructures of the cubic phase and hexagonal phase have been shown to provide diffusion controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients with a wide range of molecular weights and polarities. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates the minimum toxicity and thus they are used for various routes of administration. Therefore, the research on lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystalline phases has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. This review will provide an overview of the lipids used to prepare cubic phase and hexagonal phase at physiological temperature, as well as the influencing factors on the phase transition of liquid crystals. In particular, the most current research progresses on cubic and hexagonal phases as drug delivery systems will be discussed. PMID:24995330

  13. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Fang; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the unprecedented progresses of biomedical nanotechnology during the past few decades, conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been involved into smart DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. Benefiting from the response to specific internal or external triggers, those well-defined nanoplatforms can increase the drug targeting efficacy, in the meantime, reduce side effects/toxicities of payloads, which are key factors for improving patient compliance. In academic field, variety of smart DDSs have been abundantly demonstrated for various intriguing systems, such as stimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, metals/metal oxides, and exosomes. However, these nanoplatforms are lack of standardized manufacturing method, toxicity assessment experience, and clear relevance between the pre-clinical and clinical studies, resulting in the huge difficulties to obtain regulatory and ethics approval. Therefore, such relatively complex stimulus-sensitive nano-DDSs are not currently approved for clinical use. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of smart nanoplatforms for targeting drug delivery. Furthermore, the clinical translation obstacles faced by these smart nanoplatforms have been reviewed and discussed. We also present the future directions and perspectives of stimuli-sensitive DDS in clinical applications.

  14. Chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems: an approach to circadian rhythms diseases.

    PubMed

    Sunil, S A; Srikanth, M V; Rao, N Sreenivasa; Uhumwangho, M U; Latha, K; Murthy, K V Ramana

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of writing this review on chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems (ChrDDs) is to review the literatures with special focus on ChrDDs and the various dosage forms, techniques that are used to target the circadian rhythms (CR) of various diseases. Many functions of the human body vary considerably in a day. ChrDDs refers to a treatment method in which in vivo drug availability is timed to match circadian rhythms of disease in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes and minimize side effects. Several techniques have been developed but not many dosage forms for all the diseases are available in the market. ChrDDs are gaining importance in the field of pharmaceutical technology as these systems reduce dosing frequency, toxicity and deliver the drug that matches the CR of that particular disease when the symptoms are maximum to worse. Finally, the ultimate benefit goes to the patient due the compliance and convenience of the dosage form. Some diseases that follow circadian rhythms include cardiovascular diseases, asthma, arthritis, ulcers, diabetes etc. ChrDDs in the market were also discussed and the current technologies used to formulate were also stated. These technologies include Contin® , Chronotopic®, Pulsincaps®, Ceform®, Timerx®, Oros®, Codas®, Diffucaps®, Egalet®, Tablet in capsule device, Core-in-cup tablet technology. A coated drug-core tablet matrix, A bi-layered tablet, Multiparticulate-based chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems, Chronoset and Controlled release microchips.

  15. Progress in Psoriasis Therapy via Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Nitha; Ramya, Devi D; Vedha, Hari BN

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment. PMID:25386329

  16. Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems in Gastrointestinal Targeting: Interactions with Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Karavolos, Michail; Holban, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The new age of nanotechnology has signaled a stream of entrepreneurial possibilities in various areas, form industry to medicine. Drug delivery has benefited the most by introducing nanostructured systems in the transport and controlled release of therapeutic molecules at targeted sites associated with a particular disease. As many nanosized particles reach the gastrointestinal tract by various means, their interactions with the molecular components of this highly active niche are intensively investigated. The well-characterized antimicrobial activities of numerous nanoparticles are currently being considered as a reliable and efficient alternative to the eminent world crisis in antimicrobial drug discovery. The interactions of nanosystems present in the gastrointestinal route with host microbiota is unavoidable; hence, a major research initiative is needed to explore the mechanisms and effects of these nanomaterials on microbiota and the impact that microbiota may have in the outcome of therapies entailing drug delivery nanosystems through the gastrointestinal route. These coordinated studies will provide novel techniques to replace or act synergistically with current technologies and help develop new treatments for major diseases via the discovery of unique antimicrobial molecules. PMID:27690060

  17. Liposomal Conjugates for Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Frieder; Fricker, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Treatments of central nervous system (CNS) diseases often fail due to the blood–brain barrier. Circumvention of this obstacle is crucial for any systemic treatment of such diseases to be effective. One approach to transfer drugs into the brain is the use of colloidal carrier systems—amongst others, liposomes. A prerequisite for successful drug delivery by colloidal carriers to the brain is the modification of their surface, making them invisible to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and to target them to specific surface epitopes at the blood–brain barrier. This study characterizes liposomes conjugated with cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA) as transport vectors in vitro in porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC) and in vivo in rats using fluorescently labelled liposomes. Experiments with PBCEC showed that sterically stabilized (PEGylated) liposomes without protein as well as liposomes conjugated to native bovine serum albumin (BSA) were not taken up. In contrast, cBSA-liposomes were taken up and appeared to be concentrated in intracellular vesicles. Uptake occurred in a concentration and time dependent manner. Free BSA and free cBSA inhibited uptake. After intravenous application of cBSA-liposomes, confocal fluorescence microscopy of brain cryosections from male Wistar rats showed fluorescence associated with liposomes in brain capillary surrounding tissue after 3, 6 and 24 h, for liposomes with a diameter between 120 and 150 nm, suggesting successful brain delivery of cationized-albumin coupled liposomes. PMID:25835091

  18. Novel nano drug delivery systems for hepatic tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Jing; Ma, Hong; Bai, Jing; Qi, Chao

    2009-08-01

    The adriamycin and galactose was grafted to dextran. The novel nanopartcile drug delivery system (DDS) was prepared from the chemical modified polysaccharide by the dialysis. The content of the ADR moiety in the polymeric-drug conjugate was about 2 mol%. The size and morphology of prepared nanoparticles were characterized using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the nanoparticles were spherical and their size was less than 200 nm. In vitro cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles was tested by the MTT assay. The nano DDS has similar cytotoxicity as free adriamycin for incubation with HepG2 cells. In contrast, for the incubation with Hela cells of the DDS, there was no signicant cytotoxicity change.

  19. Cell or Cell Membrane-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Songwei; Wu, Tingting; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Natural cells have been explored as drug carriers for a long period. They have received growing interest as a promising drug delivery system (DDS) until recently along with the development of biology and medical science. The synthetic materials, either organic or inorganic, are found to be with more or less immunogenicity and/or toxicity. The cells and extracellular vesicles (EVs), are endogenous and thought to be much safer and friendlier. Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles. We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications. PMID:26000058

  20. Processing of Polymer Nanofibers Through Electrospinning as Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenawy, E.; Abdel-Hay, F. I.; El-Newehy, M. H.; Wnek, G. E.

    The use of electrospun fibers as drug carriers could be promising in the future for biomedical applications, especially postoperative local chemotherapy. In this research, electrospun fibers were developed as a new system for the delivery of ketoprofen as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The fibers were made either from polycaprolactone (PCL) as a biodegradable polymer or polyurethane (PU) as a non-biodegradable polymer, or from the blends of the two. The release of the ketoprofen was followed by UV—VIS spectroscopy in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4 at 37°C and 20°C. The results showed that the release rates from the polycaprolactone, polyurethane and their blend were similar. However, the blend of the polycaprolactone with polyurethane improved its visual mechanical properties. Release profiles from the electrospun mats were compared to cast films of the various formulations.

  1. Matrix embedded microspherules containing indomethacin as controlled drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Swamy, K M Lokamatha; Satyanath, B; Shantakumar, S M; Manjula, D; Mohammedi, Hafsa; Farhana, Ayesha

    2008-10-01

    This work is focused on the development of controlled drug delivery systems using different wax/fat embedded indomethacin (IM). Discrete wax/fat embedded microspherules containing indomethacin were prepared by using cetostearyl alcohol, paraffin wax and stearic acid by employing emulsification-phase separation method. These matrices have been used as barrier coatings due to their hydrophobic nature. Chemically inert and tasteless nature of wax/fats promotes their use as taste masking agents for bitter drugs. Various waxes and fats are available having different physicochemical properties to suit the needs of formulation. Methyl cellulose (MC) 1% w/v, sodium alginate (SA) 0.5% w/v and Tween-80 (TW) 1% w/v were used as emulgents. The resulting microspherules were discrete, large, spherical and also free flowing. It is revealed from the literature that natures of wax/fat emulgents were found to influence the rate of drug release. In the present work the drug content in all the batches of microspherules were found to be uniform. The rate of drug release corresponded best to first order kinetics, followed by Higuchi and zero-order equations. The release of the model drug from these wax/fat microspherules was prolonged over an extended period of time and the drug release mechanism followed anomalous (non-Fickian) diffusion controlled as well as Super Case II transport. Among the three matrix materials used, paraffin wax retarded the drug release more than the other two. Surface characteristics of microspherules have been studied by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). A fair degree rank of correlation was found to exist between the size and release retardation in all the three-wax/fat emulgent combinations.

  2. Bimodal Gastroretentive Drug Delivery Systems of Lamotrigine: Formulation and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Poonuru, R. R.; Gonugunta, C. S. R

    2014-01-01

    Gastroretentive bimodal drug delivery systems of lamotrigine were developed using immediate release and extended release segments incorporated in a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose capsule and in vitro and in vivo evaluations were conducted. In vivo radiographic studies were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers with replacement of drug polymer complex by barium sulphate and the floating time was noted. Here the immediate release segment worked as loading dose and extended release segment as maintenance dose. The results of release studies of formulations with hydrophillic matrix to formulations with dual matrix hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate shown that as the percentage of polymer increased, the release decreased. Selected formulation F2 having F-Melt has successfully released the drug within one hour and hydrophillic matrix composing polyethylene oxide with 5% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate showed a lag time of one hour and then extended its release up to 12th hour with 99.59% drug release following zero order kinetics with R2 value of 0.989. The Korsmeyer-Peppas equation showed the R2 value to be 0.941 and n value was 1.606 following non-Fickian diffusion pattern with supercase II relaxation mechanism. Here from extended release tablet the drug released slowly from the matrix while floating. PMID:25593380

  3. A review of drug delivery systems for capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Fredy; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-05-01

    The development of a highly controllable drug delivery system (DDS) for capsule endoscopy has become an important field of research due to its promising applications in therapeutic treatment of diseases in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and drug absorption studies. Several factors need to be considered to establish the minimum requirements for a functional DDS. Environmental factors of the GI tract and also pharmaceutical factors can help determine the requirements to be met by a DDS in an endoscopic capsule. In order to minimize the influence of such factors on the performance of an effective DDS, at least two mechanisms should be incorporated into a capsule endoscope: an anchoring mechanism to control the capsule position and a drug release mechanism to control variables such as the drug release rate, number of doses and amount of drug released. The implementation of such remotely actuated mechanisms is challenging due to several constraints, including the limited space available in a swallowable capsule endoscope and the delicate and complex environment within the GI tract. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of existing DDS. A comparison of such DDS for capsule endoscopy based on the minimum DDS requirements is presented and future work is also discussed.

  4. Development of Systems for Delivery of Antiviral Drugs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    synthesis of CNS-targeted prodrug esters of ribavirin and selenazole, pharmacokinetic studies of drug distribution and sustained delivery of drug in the brain...The scope of the research program involves the synthesis of CNS-targeted prodrug esters of ribavirin and selenazole, pharmaco- kinetic, studies of...blood-brain barrier. Our initial efforts have been directed toward the synthesis of ribavirin prodrugs. Based upon the brain-specific delivery of, for

  5. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  6. On-off pulsed oral drug-delivery systems: a possible tool for drug delivery in chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh Huyen; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2011-09-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate most body functions and are important factors to consider when administering drugs. The existence of circadian rhythms in nature and their influences on human biological systems have given rise to the concept of chronotherapy, which is the science of delivering drugs in a synchronized manner with the rhythm-dependent circadian variation inherent in the human body. The safety and efficacy of a drug can be improved by matching the peak plasma concentration during a 24 h period of the rhythms. An on-off pulsed (pulsatile or time-controlled) release drug-delivery system offers rapid and transient release; stepwise release; and the sustained release of a certain amount of drug within a short time period after a predetermined off-release period according to the circadian rhythm of disease states. These systems deliver the drug at the right time and at an appropriate dosage and are the best approach for chronotherapy. These systems show promise for the optimal therapy of chronic diseases such as asthma, hypertension, myocardial infarction and arthritis, which show a circadian dependency. Various technologies have been adopted to mimic circadian rhythms in physiological functions and diseases. This review focuses on the basic concept of circadian rhythm, chronotherapy and recent advances in the development of on-off pulsed oral drug-delivery systems for optimal therapy.

  7. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner.

  8. Formulation and evaluation of nano based drug delivery system for the buccal delivery of acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Al-Dhubiab, Bandar E; Nair, Anroop B; Kumria, Rachna; Attimarad, Mahesh; Harsha, Sree

    2015-12-01

    Oral bioavailability of acyclovir is limited, primarily because of low permeability across the gastrointestinal membrane. The purpose of this study is the prospective evaluation of buccal films impregnated with acyclovir loaded nanospheres as a drug delivery system to improve systemic bioavailability. Acyclovir polymeric nanospheres were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Nanospheres were embedded into buccoadhesive films (A1-A4) comprising of different concentrations of polymers (Eudragit RL 100, HPMC K15 and carbopol 974P). Films were characterized for physico-mechanical properties, mucoadhesive strength, hydration, drug release and ex vivo permeation. In vivo studies were carried out on rabbits to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of buccal film (A3) as compared to oral therapy. The prepared films demonstrated excellent physical properties, adequate hydration and buccoadhesive strength. In vitro drug release data inferred that the drug release was dependent on the composition of film. Ex vivo permeation studies indicated greater flux in film A3. In vivo studies revealed a significant enhancement in absorption of acyclovir (P<0.0001) with Cmax (~3 folds) and AUC0-α (~8 folds, P<0.0001) when compared to oral dosing. Moreover, the extended Tmax value (6h) signifies the potential of the prepared film to prolong acyclovir delivery. Given the promising results, the study concludes that the developed buccal film (A3) impregnated with acyclovir loaded nanospheres could be a promising approach for effective delivery of acyclovir.

  9. Expand classical drug administration ways by emerging routes using dendrimer drug delivery systems: a concise overview.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Serge; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Drugs are introduced into the body by numerous routes such as enteral (oral, sublingual and rectum administration), parenteral (intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous and inhalation administration), or topical (skin and mucosal membranes). Each route has specific purposes, advantages and disadvantages. Today, the oral route remains the preferred one for different reasons such as ease and compliance by patients. Several nanoformulated drugs have been already approved by the FDA, such as Abelcet®, Doxil®, Abraxane® or Vivagel®(Starpharma) which is an anionic G4-poly(L-lysine)-type dendrimer showing potent topical vaginal microbicide activity. Numerous biochemical studies, as well as biological and pharmacological applications of both dendrimer based products (dendrimers as therapeutic compounds per se, like Vivagel®) and dendrimers as drug carriers (covalent conjugation or noncovalent encapsulation of drugs) were described. It is widely known that due to their outstanding physical and chemical properties, dendrimers afforded improvement of corresponding carried-drugs as dendrimer-drug complexes or conjugates (versus plain drug) such as biodistribution and pharmacokinetic behaviors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent progresses of dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery systems for the delivery of drugs using enteral, parenteral and topical routes. In particular, we focus our attention on the emerging and promising routes such as oral, transdermal, ocular and transmucosal routes using dendrimers as delivery systems.

  10. New developments and opportunities in oral mucosal drug delivery for local and systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Hearnden, Vanessa; Sankar, Vidya; Hull, Katrusha; Juras, Danica Vidović; Greenberg, Martin; Kerr, A Ross; Lockhart, Peter B; Patton, Lauren L; Porter, Stephen; Thornhill, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    The oral mucosa's accessibility, excellent blood supply, by-pass of hepatic first-pass metabolism, rapid repair and permeability profile make it an attractive site for local and systemic drug delivery. Technological advances in mucoadhesives, sustained drug release, permeability enhancers and drug delivery vectors are increasing the efficient delivery of drugs to treat oral and systemic diseases. When treating oral diseases, these advances result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced drug wastage and the prospect of using biological agents such as genes, peptides and antibodies. These technologies are also increasing the repertoire of drugs that can be delivered across the oral mucosa to treat systemic diseases. Trans-mucosal delivery is now a favoured route for non-parenteral administration of emergency drugs and agents where a rapid onset of action is required. Furthermore, advances in drug delivery technology are bringing forward the likelihood of transmucosal systemic delivery of biological agents.

  11. The use of gelatin in a multiple drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Abby W.

    The use of gelatin for growth factor delivery was investigated. Protein-gelatin interactions were characterized using the Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system. Acidic gelatin sheets and basic gelatin microspheres were fabricated and optimized for delivering transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. The two delivery vehicles were then combined to produce two distinct release sequences and the effect of sequence on bone healing was determined. Using the BIND system, TGF-beta1 was found to interact more strongly with acidic gelatin than basic gelatin whereas BMP-2 only slightly favors basic gelatin over acidic gelatin. Acidic gelatin sheets were fabricated by a casting technique. These sheets successfully delivered TGF-beta1 to a rabbit ulna defect to encourage new bone formation. Basic gelatin microspheres were fabricated by the precision particle fabrication (PPF) method. Uniform drug distribution within the microspheres lead to controlled release of BMP-2 that induced bone formation within the thigh muscle of mice. The sheets and microspheres were combined to deliver both drugs either simultaneously or with a four-day delay to a rabbit calvarial defect. Both sequences encouraged more bone regeneration than empty defects by 8 weeks. Protein-gelatin interactions improved protein stability and lead to release through enzymatic degradation of the gelatin. Growth factors released either singly or in a dual system from gelatin successfully produced bone in vivo. However, single release systems require higher dosages to achieve similar healing results as observed in the dual release systems. No difference was observed between the dual release systems investigated.

  12. Sublingual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tarun; Jasti, Bhaskara; Li, Xiaoling

    2008-01-01

    The sublingual route is one of the early modes of administration for systemic drug delivery. This route avoids first-pass metabolism and affords quick drug entry into the systemic circulation. Attempts have been made to deliver various pharmacologically active agents, such as cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and peptides, across the sublingual mucosa. In this review, the anatomical structure, blood supply, biochemical composition, transport pathways, permeation enhancement strategies, in vitro/in vivo models, and clinical investigations for the sublingual route of drug delivery is discussed.

  13. Bionanocomposites based on layered double hydroxides as drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Pilar; Alcântara, Ana C. S.; Ribeiro, Ligia N. M.; Darder, Margarita; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biopolymers to produce bionanocomposites, able to act as effective drug delivery systems (DDS). Ibuprofen (IBU) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been chosen as model drugs, being intercalated in a Mg-Al LDH matrix. On the one side, the LDHIBU intercalation compound prepared by ion-exchange reaction was blended with the biopolymers zein, a highly hydrophobic protein, and alginate, a polysaccharide widely applied for encapsulating drugs. On the other side, the LDH- 5-ASA intercalation compound prepared by co-precipitation was assembled to the polysaccharides chitosan and pectin, which show mucoadhesive properties and resistance to acid pH values, respectively. Characterization of the intercalation compounds and the resulting bionanocomposites was carried out by means of different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, chemical and thermal analysis, as well as optical and scanning electron microscopies. Data on the swelling behavior and drug release under different pH conditions are also reported.

  14. Polysaccharides-based polyelectrolyte nanoparticles as protein drugs delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shujun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinge; Wu, Zhongming; Wang, Zhen; Li, Chaoxing

    2011-09-01

    Polysaccharides-based nanoparticles were prepared by synthesized quaternized chitosan and dextran sulfate through simple ionic-gelation self-assembled method. Introduction of quaternized groups was intended to increase water solubility of chitosan and make the nanoparticles have broader pH sensitive range which can remain more stable in physiological pH and decrease the loss of protein drugs caused by the gastric cavity. The load of BSA was affected by molecular parameter, i.e., degree of substitution, and average molecular weight of quaternized chitosan, as well as concentration of BSA. Fast release occurred in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) while the release was slow in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.4). The drug release mechanism is Fickian diffusion through release kinetics analysis. Cell uptake demonstrated nanoparicles can internalize into Caco-2 cells, which suggested that nanoparticles had good biocompatibility. No significant conformation change was noted for the released BSA in comparison with native BSA using circular dichroism spectroscopy. This kind of novel composite nanoparticles may be a promising delivery system for oral protein and peptide drugs.

  15. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Efficient Drug and Gene Delivery Systems: Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely applied as advanced drug and gene delivery nanosystems. Among them, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have attracted great attention as colloidal drug delivery systems for incorporating hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs and various macromolecules as well as proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, SLNs offer great promise for controlled and site specific drug and gene delivery. This article includes general information about SLN structures and properties, production procedures, characterization. In addition, recent progress on development of drug and gene delivery systems using SLNs was reviewed. PMID:26236652

  16. Impact of emulsion-based drug delivery systems on intestinal permeability and drug release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Buyukozturk, Fulden; Benneyan, James C; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2010-02-25

    Lipid based drug delivery systems, and in particular self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS), show great potential for enhancing oral bioavailability but have not been broadly applied, largely due to lack of general formulation guidance. To help understand how formulation design influences physicochemical emulsion properties and associated function in the gastrointestinal environment, a range of twenty-seven representative self-emulsifying formulations were investigated. Two key functions of emulsion-based drug delivery systems, permeability enhancement and drug release, were studied and statistically related to three formulation properties - oil structure, surfactant hydrophilic liphophilic balance (HLB) values, and surfactant-to-oil ratio. Three surfactants with HLB values ranging from 10 to 15 and three structurally different oils (long chain triglyceride, medium chain triglyceride, and propylene glycol dicaprylate/dicaprate) were combined at three different weight ratios (1:1, 5:1, 9:1). Unstable formulations of low HLB surfactant (HLB=10) had a toxic effect on cells at high (1:1) surfactant concentrations, indicating the importance of formulation stability for minimizing toxicity. Results also indicate that high HLB surfactant (Tween 80) loosens tight junction at high (1:1) surfactant concentrations. Release coefficients for each emulsion system were calculated. Incorporation of a long chain triglyceride (Soybean oil) as the oil phase increased the drug release rate constant. These results help establish an initial foundation for relating emulsion function to formulation design and enabling bioavailability optimization across a broad, representative range of SEDDS formulations.

  17. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  18. Multiple sclerosis: Therapeutic applications of advancing drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Dolati, Sanam; Babaloo, Zohreh; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Ayromlou, Hormoz; Sadreddini, Sanam; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, which is accompanying with demyelination, neurodegeneration and sensibility to oxidative stress. In MS, auto-reactive lymphocytes cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reside in the perivenous demyelinating lesions which create various distinct inflammatory demyelinated plaques situated predominantly in the white matter. The current MS-related therapeutic approaches can be classified into disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) and symptomatic therapy. DMTs suppress circulating immune cells, inhibit passing the BBB and decrease the inflammatory responses. Recent advances have remarkably delayed disease development and improved the quality of life for numerous patients. In spite of major improvements in therapeutic options, there are some limitations regarding the routes of administration and the necessity for repeated and long-term dosing in which cause to systemic disadvantageous consequences and patient non-compliance. Nanotechnology presents promising approaches to improve autoimmune disease treatment with the capability to overcome many of the limitations common to the current immunosuppressive and biological therapies. Here we emphasis on nanomedicine-based drug delivery approaches of biological immunomodulatory mediators for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This comprehensive review details the most successful drugs in MS therapy and also focuses on conceptions and clinical potential of novel nanomedicine attitudes for inducing immunosuppression and immunological tolerance in MS to modulate abnormal and pathologic immune responses.

  19. Precise control of the drug kinetics by means of non-invasive magnetic drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuzawa, M.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of the side effects and medical lowering, has been advanced a study on the drug delivery system (DDS) to accumulate the drugs locally in the body with minimum dosage. The DDS is a system that controls the drug kinetics in the body precisely and accumulates the drug locally at the target part, keeping the drugs at high density. Among the DDS, the magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is the one that we studied. This is a technique to accumulate drugs by using the magnetic force as the physical driving force. Our previous researches showed the possibility of the technique of MDDS to accumulate the drugs with higher accumulation rate and locality than the traditional methods. It is necessary to apply a strong external magnetic field and a high magnetic gradient to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs at a deep diseased part non-invasively. However, by applying a static magnetic field from one direction, the drug accumulates only at the surface of the body locates near the magnet. In this study, we tried to change the magnetic field applied by a superconducting bulk magnet with time, in order to make a constant and strong magnetic field applied in the center of the body and to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs at the deep target part in the body. First of all, the effect of the surface treatment of the ferromagnetic drugs to prevent its absorption in the normal tissue was examined. Then, to increase the accumulation rate of the ferromagnetic drugs at the target part, the distribution of magnetic field was changed, and the optimum spatial and temporal conditions of magnetic field were examined.

  20. A Self-Powered Implantable Drug-Delivery System Using Biokinetic Energy.

    PubMed

    Song, Peiyi; Kuang, Shuangyang; Panwar, Nishtha; Yang, Guang; Tng, Danny Jian Hang; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Ng, Wun Jern; Majid, Maszenan Bin Abdul; Zhu, Guang; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-03-01

    The first triboelectric-nanogenerator (TENG)-based self-powered implantable drug-delivery system is presented. Pumping flow rates from 5.3 to 40 µL min(-1) under different rotating speeds of the TENG are realized. The implantable drug-delivery system can be powered with a TENG device rotated by human hand motion. Ex vivo trans-sclera drug delivery in porcine eyes is demonstrated by utilizing the biokinetic energies of human hands.

  1. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) for oral delivery of protein drugs: II. In vitro transport study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sripriya Venkata Ramana; Agarwal, Payal; Shao, Jun

    2008-10-01

    To develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for protein drugs, and particularly, to test the in vitro transport of beta-lactamase (BLM) by SNEDDS across the cell monolayer. Fluorescently labeled BLM (FITC-BLM), a model protein, formulated into 16 SNEDDS preparations through a solid dispersion technique were studied for transport across MDCK monolayer. All the SNEDDS nanoemulsions resulted in higher transport rate than the free solution. The transport rate by SNEDDS depends on the SNEDDS composition. SNEDDS NE-12-7 (oil: Lauroglycol FCC, surfactant: Cremophor EL and a cosurfactant: Transcutol HP) at the ratio of 5:4:3, rendered the highest transportation rate, 33% as compared to negligible transport by the free solution. FITC-BLM solution mixed with the surfactant and the cosurfactant of SNEDDS NE-12-7 or with blank SNEDDS NE-12-7 increased the transport only by 3.3 and 1.5 folds, respectively, compared to free solution alone. It was found that the monolayer integrity was not compromised in the presence of SNEDDS NE-12-7 or its surfactant/cosurfactant. The SNEDDS significantly increased the transport of FITC-BLM across MDCK monolayer in vitro. SNEDDS may be a potential effective delivery system for non-invasive protein drug delivery.

  2. Development of a pH-responsive drug delivery system for enantioselective-controlled delivery of racemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Suedee, Roongnapa; Jantarat, Chutima; Lindner, Wolfgang; Viernstein, Helmut; Songkro, Sarunyoo; Srichana, Teerapol

    2010-02-25

    This study aimed to develop enantioselective-controlled drug delivery systems for selective release of the required (S)-enantiomer in a dose formulation containing a racemic drug in response to pH stimuli. The recognition system was obtained from a nanoparticle-on-microsphere (NOM) molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with a multifunctional chiral cinchona anchor synthesised by suspension polymerisation using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. (S)-omeprazole was used as an imprinting molecule conferring stereoselectivity upon the polymers. The ability of the prepared recognition polymers to selectively rebind (S)-omeprazole was evident at different pH levels (the highest being at pH 7.4). The partial selective-release phenomenon of the (S)-enantiomer in MIP-containing composite cellulose membranes with increased vehicular racemic omeprazole concentrations was highly pH-dependent. Cinchona-bonded polymers imprinted with (S)-omeprazole could recognise the moldable contact site of (S)-omeprazole independently of its chirality; this is responsible for the delivery of (S)-enantiomer from racemic omeprazole. The controlled-release drug devices were fabricated with synthesised composite latex, and consisted of a pH stimuli-responsive poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (HEMA) and polycaprolactone-triol (PCL-T) blend, and a MIP with preloaded drug, along with pH 7.4 buffer in the device's interior. The results demonstrate that drug delivery systems containing (S)-omeprazole imprinted cinchona-polymer nanoparticle-on-microspheres may maximise efficacy while minimising dose frequency.

  3. Thermosensitive liposomal drug delivery systems: state of the art review

    PubMed Central

    Kneidl, Barbara; Peller, Michael; Winter, Gerhard; Lindner, Lars H; Hossann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Thermosensitive liposomes are a promising tool for external targeting of drugs to solid tumors when used in combination with local hyperthermia or high intensity focused ultrasound. In vivo results have demonstrated strong evidence that external targeting is superior over passive targeting achieved by highly stable long-circulating drug formulations like PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Up to March 2014, the Web of Science listed 371 original papers in this field, with 45 in 2013 alone. Several formulations have been developed since 1978, with lysolipid-containing, low temperature-sensitive liposomes currently under clinical investigation. This review summarizes the historical development and effects of particular phospholipids and surfactants on the biophysical properties and in vivo efficacy of thermosensitive liposome formulations. Further, treatment strategies for solid tumors are discussed. Here we focus on temperature-triggered intravascular and interstitial drug release. Drug delivery guided by magnetic resonance imaging further adds the possibility of performing online monitoring of a heating focus to calculate locally released drug concentrations and to externally control drug release by steering the heating volume and power. The combination of external targeting with thermosensitive liposomes and magnetic resonance-guided drug delivery will be the unique characteristic of this nanotechnology approach in medicine. PMID:25258529

  4. Metrology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., <1 ml/h and applications involving drug delivery by means of multiple pumps. The risks in infusing are caused by a lack of awareness, incompletely understood properties of the complete drug delivery system and a lack of a proper metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed.

  5. Toxicological Concerns of Engineered Nanosize Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit; Maji, Ruma; Roychowdhury, Samrat; Ghosh, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Matters when converted into nanosize provide some unique surface properties, which are different from those of the bulk materials. Nanomaterials show some extraordinary behavioral patterns because of those properties, such as supermagnetism, quantum confinement, etc. A great deal of implication of nanomaterials in nanomedicine has already been realized. Utility of nanomaterials as drug nanocarrier projects many potential advantages of them in drug delivery. Despite many such advantages, the potential risk of health and environmental hazards related to them cannot be ignored. Here various physicochemical factors, such as chemical nature, degradability, surface properties, surface charge, particle size, and shape, have been shown to play a crucial role in toxicity related to drug nanocarriers. Evidence-based findings of some drug nanocarriers have been incorporated to provide distinct knowledge to the readers in the field. A glimpse of current regulatory controls and measures required to combat the challenges of toxicological aspects of drug nanocarriers have been described.

  6. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  7. The potential of liposomes as dental drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sanko; Hiorth, Marianne; Rykke, Morten; Smistad, Gro

    2011-01-01

    The potential of liposomes as a drug delivery system for use in the oral cavity has been investigated. Specifically targeting for the teeth, the in vitro adsorption of charged liposomal formulations to hydroxyapatite (HA), a common model substance for the dental enamel, has been conducted. The experiments were performed in human parotid saliva to simulate oral-like conditions. It was observed, however, that precipitation occurred in tubes containing DPPC/DPTAP or DPPC/DPPG-liposomes in parotid saliva with no HA present, indicating that constituents of parotid saliva reacted with the liposomes. The aggregation reactions of liposome-parotid saliva mixtures were examined by turbidimetry and by atomic force microscopy. Negatively charged DPPC/DPPS and DPPC/PI-liposomes were additionally included in these experiments. The initial turbidity of positive DPPC/DPTAP-liposomes in parotid saliva was very high, but decreased markedly after 30 min. AFM images showed large aggregates of micelle-like globules known to be present in saliva. The turbidity of the various negatively charged liposome and parotid saliva mixtures stayed relatively constant throughout the measuring time; however, their initial turbidities were different; mixtures with DPPC/DPPG-liposomes were the most turbid and DPPC/DPPA-liposomes the least. Pyrophosphate (PP) was added to the various liposome-parotid saliva mixtures to examine the effect of Ca(2+) on the interactions. The effect of PP treatment of the negatively charged liposome-parotid saliva mixtures was most pronounced with DPPC/DPPG-liposome mixtures where it caused a sudden drop in turbidity. For positive DPPC/DPTAP liposome and parotid saliva mixtures, the effect of PP was minimal. These experiments showed that saliva constituents may interact with liposomes. An appropriate liposomal drug delivery system intended for use in the oral cavity seems to be dependent on the liposomal formulation. Based on the present results, negatively charged DPPC

  8. Nanocarrier-Integrated Microspheres: Nanogel Tectonic Engineering for Advanced Drug-Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yoshiro; Mukai, Sada-Atsu; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2015-09-09

    A nanocarrier-integrated bottom-up method is a promising strategy for advanced drug-release systems. Self-assembled nanogels, which are one of the most beneficial nanocarriers for drug-delivery systems, are tectonically integrated to prepare nanogel-crosslinked (NanoClik) microspheres. NanoClik microspheres consisting of nanogel-derived structures (observed by STED microscopy) release "drug-loaded nanogels" after hydrolysis, resulting in successful sustained drug delivery in vivo.

  9. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of "new drug delivery systems" is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  10. [Treatment of rheumatic diseases with intraarticular drug delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Andrea; Zelkó, Romána; Antal, István

    2011-01-01

    Present work provides an overall study about the types and the medicinal treatment of the rheumatic diseases especially the intraarticular formulations. Due to the localized nature of the joint, intraarticular injections are very favourable drug delivery systems. It has a big advantage over the oral medication; the systemic side effects are kept away. The review shows two types of the rheumatic diseases on the example of the healthy joint: the joint damage (osteoarthritis) and the inflamed joint (rheumatoid arthritis). There are many active ingredients for the treatment of the rheumatic diseases but the number of the intraarticular products is limited. At present are only formulations with hyaluronic acid or glucocorticoid on the market. Several physiological and biopharmaceutical aspects must be considered for the design of intraarticular injections. During and after the production many quality requirements have to be complied. On the market the formulations in solution or in suspension are available, which provide a short-term effect. The aim of the developments is to achieve long-term effect based on nano- or microparticles.

  11. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  12. Recent progress in solid-state NMR studies of drugs confined within drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Ewa; Jeziorna, Agata; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR (SS NMR) spectroscopy in structural studies of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) embedded in different drug carriers is detailed. This article is divided into sections. The first part reports short characterization of the nanoparticles and microparticles that can be used as drug delivery systems (DDSs). The second part shows the applicability of SS NMR to study non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In this section, problems related to API-DDS interactions, morphology, local molecular dynamics, nature of inter- or intramolecular connections, and pore filling are reviewed for different drug carriers (e.g. mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), cyclodextrins, polymeric matrices and others). The third and fourth sections detail the recent applications of SS NMR for searching for antibiotics and anticancer drugs confined in zeolites, MSNs, amorphous calcium phosphate and other carriers.

  13. Hydrophilic silica aerogels as dermal drug delivery systems--dithranol as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Guenther, U; Smirnova, I; Neubert, R H H

    2008-08-01

    A special class of porous silica materials, silica aerogels, was recently shown to be a potential candidate for oral drug delivery systems. It was demonstrated, that stability of drugs and their dissolution rate can essentially be improved through the adsorption on to these materials. In this work, drug loaded silica aerogels are firstly applied as dermal drug delivery systems. Dithranol is used as a representative drug since there is a need to enhance its dermal availability. The unstable and nearly water-insoluble drug exhibits a poor penetration. Release of dithranol from aerogels into various semi-solid formulations and its dissolution as well as the release and penetration into artificial membranes were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Two model membranes (one hydrophilic and one lipophilic) were applied. Several formulations were tested and the most promising one was used in order to study the penetration of dithranol into human stratum corneum (SC). Dithranol adsorbed on hydrophilic silica aerogels exhibited superior penetration behaviour compared to that of the standard ointment (dithranol in white soft paraffin).

  14. Role of Components in the Formation of Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, A. K.; Deshpande, P. B.; Kar, S. S.; Nayak, Usha Y.; Udupa, N.; Reddy, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research is focused in designing novel drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems, one among the lipid-based dosage forms were proven to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of such drugs by enhancing solubility, permeability and avoiding first-pass metabolism via enhanced lymphatic transport. Further, they have been successful in avoiding both inter and intra individual variations as well as the dose disproportionality. Aqueous insoluble drugs, in general, show greater solubility in lipid based excipients, and hence they are formulated as lipid based drug delivery systems. The extent of solubility of a hydrophobic drug in lipid excipients i.e. oil, surfactant and co-surfactant (components of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems) greatly affects the drug loading and in producing stable self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. The present review highlighted the influence of physicochemical factors and structural features of the hydrophobic drug on its solubility in lipid excipients and an attempt was made to explore the role of each component of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems in the formation of stable microemulsion upon dilution. PMID:26180269

  15. Drug development in Parkinson's disease: from emerging molecules to innovative drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2013-11-01

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at addressing motor symptoms but there is no therapy focused on modifying the course of the disease. Successful treatment strategies have been so far limited and brain drug delivery remains a major challenge that restricts its treatment. This review provides an overview of the most promising emerging agents in the field of PD drug discovery, discussing improvements that have been made in brain drug delivery for PD. It will be shown that new approaches able to extend the length of the treatment, to release the drug in a continuous manner or to cross the blood-brain barrier and target a specific region are still needed. Overall, the results reviewed here show that there is an urgent need to develop both symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments, giving priority to neuroprotective treatments. Promising perspectives are being provided in this field by rasagiline and by neurotrophic factors like glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The identification of disease-relevant genes has also encouraged the search for disease-modifying therapies that function by identifying molecularly targeted drugs. The advent of new molecular and cellular targets like α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 or parkin, among others, will require innovative delivery therapies. In this regard, drug delivery systems (DDS) have shown great potential for improving the efficacy of conventional and new PD therapy and reducing its side effects. The new DDS discussed here, which include microparticles, nanoparticles and hydrogels among others, will probably open up possibilities that extend beyond symptomatic relief. However, further work needs to be done before DDS become a therapeutic option for PD patients.

  16. In vitro efficiency of vancomycin containing experimental drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Szász, Máté; Hajdú, Mária; Pesti, Natasa; Domahidy, Mónika; Kristóf, Katalin; Zahár, Akos; Nagy, Károly; Szabó, Dóra

    2013-12-01

    Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis strains are common cause of the periprosthetic infection. The treatment of the periprosthetic infection is very problematic, so the prevention of these infections by an antibiotic containing prothesis could be an option for prevention.The purpose of the present study was to examine the in vitro effects of drug delivery systems (DDSs), namely Wax 1 and Wax 2 with different vancomycin content: 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mg. In order to control the antibacterial activity of DDSs killing curve study was performed and in order to determine the antibiotic release and the antibiotic peak concentration from the DDSs biological assay was carried out.The time kill curve studies showed, that both DDSs with all vancomycin concentration decreased significantly the bacterial counts, however, Wax 2 with 4 mg vancomycin significantly decreased the bacterial count than all the other groups.The vancomycin release was the best with the highest peak concentration from DDSs with 4 mg vancomycin contain; it was significantly better than in the other groups, however, no significant difference was observed between Wax 1 and Wax 2 in this respect.These findings suggest that Wax 2 with 4 mg vancomycin content could be a potential agent for clinical use.

  17. Drug-Induced Morphology Switch in Drug Delivery Systems Based on Poly(2-oxazoline)s

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Defined aggregates of polymers such as polymeric micelles are of great importance in the development of pharmaceutical formulations. The amount of drug that can be formulated by a drug delivery system is an important issue, and most drug delivery systems suffer from their relatively low drug-loading capacity. However, as the loading capacities increase, i.e., promoted by good drug–polymer interactions, the drug may affect the morphology and stability of the micellar system. We investigated this effect in a prominent system with very high capacity for hydrophobic drugs and found extraordinary stability as well as a profound morphology change upon incorporation of paclitaxel into micelles of amphiphilic ABA poly(2-oxazoline) triblock copolymers. The hydrophilic blocks A comprised poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline), while the middle blocks B were either just barely hydrophobic poly(2-n-butyl-2-oxazoline) or highly hydrophobic poly(2-n-nonyl-2-oxazoline). The aggregation behavior of both polymers and their formulations with varying paclitaxel contents were investigated by means of dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, (cryogenic) transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering. While without drug, wormlike micelles were present, after incorporation of small amounts of drugs only spherical morphologies remained. Furthermore, the much more hydrophobic poly(2-n-nonyl-2-oxazoline)-containing triblock copolymer exhibited only half the capacity for paclitaxel than the poly(2-n-butyl-2-oxazoline)-containing copolymer along with a lower stability. In the latter, contents of paclitaxel of 8 wt % or higher resulted in a raspberry-like micellar core. PMID:24548260

  18. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of “new drug delivery systems” is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today. PMID:27882209

  19. Systemic drug delivery systems for bone tissue regeneration- a mini review.

    PubMed

    Xinluan, Wang; Yuxiao, Lai; Helena, Ng HueiLeng; Zhijun, Yang; Ling, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis have become the major public health problems worldwide in our aging society. Pharmaceutical therapy is one of the approaches to prevent and treat related medical conditions. Most of the clinically used anti-osteoporotic drugs are administered systemically and have demonstrated some side effects in non-skeletal tissues. One of the innovative approaches to prevent potential adverse effects is the development of bone-targeting drug delivery technologies that not only minimizes the systemic toxicity but also improves the pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic efficacy of chemical drugs. This paper reviews the currently available bone targeting drug delivery systems with emphasis as bone-targeting moieties, including the bonesurface- site-specific (bone formation dominant or bone resorption dominant) and cell-specific moieties. In addition, the connections of drug-bone-targeting moieties-carrier are also summarized, and the newly developed liposomes and nanoparticles are discussed for their potential use and main challenges in delivering therapeutic agents to bone tissue. As a rapid-developing biotechnology, systemic bonetargeting delivery system is promising but still in its infancy where challenges are ahead of us, including the stability and the toxicity issues, especially to fulfill the regulatory requirement to realize bench-to-bedside translation. Newly developed biomaterials and technologies with potential for safer and more effective drug delivery require multidisciplinary collaborations with preclinical and clinical scientists that are essential to facilitate their clinical applications.

  20. An Overview of Clinical and Commercial Impact of Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery systems are widely researched and developed to improve the delivery of pharmaceutical compounds and molecules. The last few decades have seen a marked growth of the field fueled by increased number of researchers, research funding, venture capital and the number of start-ups. Collectively, the growth has led to novel systems that make use of micro/nano-particles, transdermal patches, inhalers, drug reservoir implants and antibody-drug conjugates. While the increased research activity is clearly an indication of proliferation of the field, clinical and commercial translation of early-stage research ideas is critically important for future growth and interest in the field. Here, we will highlight some of the examples of novel drug delivery systems that have undergone such translation. Specifically, we will discuss the developments, advantages, limitations and lessons learned from: (i) microparticle-based depot formulations, (ii) nanoparticle-based cancer drugs, (iii) transdermal systems, (iv) oral drug delivery systems, (v) pulmonary drug delivery, (vi) implants and (vii) antibody-drug conjugates. These systems have impacted treatment of many prevalent diseases including diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, among others. At the same time, these systems are integral and enabling components of products that collectively generate annual revenues exceeding US $100 billion. These examples provide strong evidence of the clinical and commercial impact of drug delivery systems. PMID:24747160

  1. A survey on the applications of implantable micropump systems in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahnama, Ali; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad; Ghorbaniasl, Ghader

    2014-01-01

    Systemic drug delivery is the most prevalent form of the drug administration; but it is not possible to extend this approach to all of diseases. In the traditional approaches of drug delivery, the drug spreads through whole of body and this could cause severe side effects in the healthy parts. In addition, in some parts of our body like the eye, ear and brain, there are biological barriers against drug penetration which made drug delivery to these organs as a challenging work. Micropumps are one of the MEMS based devices with great capabilities in controlled drug administration. The most prevalent application of micropumps in drug delivery is known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for diabetic patients; but our study showed that there are some other ongoing investigations to extend application of micropumps in new treatment methods for some incurred diseases.

  2. Controlled Drug Delivery Using Microdevices

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Sharma T.; Dou, Maowei; Fu, Guanglei; Xu, Feng; Li, XiuJun

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs administered systematically are evenly distributed to the whole body through blood circulation and have to cross many biological barriers before reaching the pathological site. Conventional drug delivery may make drugs inactive or reduce their potency as they may be hydrolyzed or degraded enzymatically and are rapidly excreted through the urinary system resulting in suboptimal concentration of drugs at the desired site. Controlled drug delivery aims to localize the pharmacological activity of the drug to the desired site at desired release rates. The advances made by micro/nanofluidic technologies have provided new opportunities for better-controlled drug delivery. Various components of a drug delivery system can be integrated within a single tiny micro/nanofluidic chip. This article reviews recent advances of controlled drug delivery made by microfluidic/nanofluidic technologies. We first discuss microreservoir-based drug delivery systems. Then we highlight different kinds of microneedles used for controlled drug delivery, followed with a brief discussion about the current limitations and the future prospects of controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:26813304

  3. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid drug delivery systems through transdermal pathway: an overview.

    PubMed

    Naves, Lucas; Dhand, Chetna; Almeida, Luis; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Soares, Graça

    2017-02-06

    In past few decades, scientists have made tremendous advancement in the field of drug delivery systems (DDS), through transdermal pathway, as the skin represents a ready and large surface area for delivering drugs. Efforts are in progress to design efficient transdermal DDS that support sustained drug release at the targeted area for longer duration in the recommended therapeutic window without producing side-effects. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is one of the most promising Food and Drug Administration approved synthetic polymers in designing versatile drug delivery carriers for different drug administration routes, including transdermal drug delivery. The present review provides a brief introduction over the transdermal drug delivery and PLGA as a material in context to its role in designing drug delivery vehicles. Attempts are made to compile literatures over PLGA-based drug delivery vehicles, including microneedles, nanoparticles, and nanofibers and their role in transdermal drug delivery of different therapeutic agents. Different nanostructure evaluation techniques with their working principles are briefly explained.

  4. Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

    2010-01-01

    The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

  5. Alternating current electrospinning for preparation of fibrous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Cselkó, Richárd; Démuth, Balázs; Verreck, Geert; Mensch, Jürgen; Marosi, György; Nagy, Zsombor Kristóf

    2015-11-10

    Alternating current electrospinning (ACES) was compared to direct current electrospinning (DCES) for the preparation of drug-loaded nanofibrous mats. It is generally considered that DCES is the solely technique to produce nanofibers using the electrostatic force from polymer solutions, however, less studied and also capable ACES provides further advantages such as increased specific productivities. A poorly water-soluble drug (carvedilol) was incorporated into the fibers based on three different polymeric matrices (an acid-soluble terpolymer (Eudragit(®) E), a base-soluble copolymer (Eudragit(®) L 100-55) and a nonionic homopolymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone K90)) to improve the dissolution of the weak base drug under different pH conditions. Morphology and fiber diameter evaluation showed similar electrospun fibers regardless the type of the high voltage and the major differences in feeding rates. The amorphous ACES and DCES fibers provided fast and total drug dissolutions in all cases. The presented results show that ACES can be a more feasible novel alternative to formulate fibers for drug delivery purposes.

  6. Formulation and Evaluation of Galantamine Gel as Drug Reservoir in Transdermal Patch Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Fong Yen, Woo; Basri, Mahiran; Ahmad, Mansor; Ismail, Maznah

    2015-01-01

    Galantamine hydrobromide is formulated in tablets and capsules prescribed through oral delivery for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, oral delivery of drugs can cause severe side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Transdermal delivery of galantamine hydrobromide could avoid these unwanted side effects. In this work, galantamine hydrobromide was formulated in gel drug reservoir which was then fabricated in the transdermal patch. The in vitro drug release studies revealed that the drug release from the donor chamber to receptor chamber of Franz diffusion cell was affected by the amount of polymer, amount of neutralizer, amount of drug, types of permeation enhancer, and amount of permeation enhancer. Visual observations of the gels showed that all formulated gels are translucent, homogeneous, smooth, and stable. These gels have pH in the suitable range for skin. The gel also showed high drug content uniformity. Hence, this formulation can be further used in the preparation of transdermal patch drug delivery system. PMID:25853145

  7. The Benefits and Challenges Associated with the Use of Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, Edna; Khan, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Drug Delivery Systems as nanocarriers for chemotherapeutic agents can improve the pharmacological properties of drugs by altering drug pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Among the many drug delivery systems available, both micelles and liposomes have gained the most attention in recent years due to their clinical success. There are several formulations of these nanocarrier systems in various stages of clinical trials, as well as currently clinically approved liposomal-based drugs. In this review, we discuss these drug carrier systems, as well as current efforts that are being made in order to further improve their delivery efficacy through the incorporation of targeting ligands. In addition, this review discusses aspects of drug resistance attributed to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix that occurs during tumor development and progression, as well as to the acidic, hypoxic, and glucose deprived tumor microenvironment. Finally, we address future prospective approaches to overcoming drug resistance by further modifications made to these drug delivery systems, as well as the possibility of coencapsulation/coadministration of various drugs aimed to surmount some of these microenvironmental-influenced obstacles for efficacious drug delivery in chemotherapy. PMID:20417189

  8. [Progress of the hydrokinetic chromatography and its application in the characterization of particulate drug delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Hai-Yan; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Ji-Wen; Sun, Li-Xin

    2011-06-01

    In the present paper, the basic principles, the device and the analytical method of the hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) were summarized, which is most widely used in hydrokinetic chromatography. The application of the hydrodynamic chromatography in the determination of the particle size and size distribution of the particulate drug delivery system was also reviewed. The method can determine the particle size of nano- and micron-scale particulate drug delivery systems rapidly. And this method also has the advantages of economic, convenient and no damage to the samples. In summary, there will be a good prospect for the application of HDC in the determination of particle size distribution features of particulate drug delivery systems.

  9. Naltrexone: a review of existing sustained drug delivery systems and emerging nano-based systems.

    PubMed

    Goonoo, Nowsheen; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Ujoodha, Reetesh; Jhugroo, Anil; Hulse, Gary K; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2014-06-10

    Narcotic antagonists such as naltrexone (NTX) have shown some efficiency in the treatment of both opiate addiction and alcohol dependence. A few review articles have focused on clinical findings and pharmacogenetics of NTX, advantages and limitations of sustained release systems as well as pharmacological studies of NTX depot formulations for the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependency. To date, three NTX implant systems have been developed and tested in humans. In this review, we summarize the latest clinical data on commercially available injectable and implantable NTX-sustained release systems and discuss their safety and tolerability aspects. Emphasis is also laid on recent developments in the area of nanodrug delivery such as NTX-loaded micelles and nanogels as well as related research avenues. Due to their ability to increase the therapeutic index and to improve the selectivity of drugs (targeted delivery), nanodrug delivery systems are considered as promising sustainable drug carriers for NTX in addressing opiate and alcohol dependence.

  10. Nanocapsules: The Weapons for Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kothamasu, Pavankumar; Kanumur, Hemanth; Ravur, Niranjan; Maddu, Chiranjeevi; Parasuramrajam, Radhika; Thangavel, Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nanocapsules, existing in miniscule size, range from 10 nm to 1000 nm. They consist of a liquid/solid core in which the drug is placed into a cavity, which is surrounded by a distinctive polymer membrane made up of natural or synthetic polymers. They have attracted great interest, because of the protective coating, which are usually pyrophoric and easily oxidized and delay the release of active ingredients. Methods Various technical approaches are utilized for obtaining the nanocapsules; however, the methods of interfacial polymerization for monomer and the nano-deposition for preformed polymer are chiefly preferred. Most important characteristics in their preparation is particle size and size distribution which can be evaluated by using various techniques like X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolu¬tion transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device, multi angle laser light scattering and other spectroscopic techniques. Results Nanocapsules possessing extremely high reproducibility have a broad range of life science applications. They may be applied in agrochemicals, genetic engineering, cosmetics, cleansing products, wastewater treatments, adhesive component applications, strategic delivery of the drug in tumors, nanocapsule bandages to fight infec¬tion, in radiotherapy and as liposomal nanocapsules in food science and agriculture. In addition, they can act as self-healing materials. Conclusion The enhanced delivery of bio¬active molecules through the targeted delivery by means of a nanocapsule opens numerous challenges and opportunities for the research and future development of novel improved therapies. PMID:23678444

  11. Biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS): Revolution in drug delivery and analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jivani, Rishad R.; Lakhtaria, Gaurang J.; Patadiya, Dhaval D.; Patel, Laxman D.; Jivani, Nurrudin P.; Jhala, Bhagyesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Advancement in microelectromechanical system has facilitated the microfabrication of polymeric substrates and the development of the novel class of controlled drug delivery devices. These vehicles have specifically tailored three dimensional physical and chemical features which together, provide the capacity to target cell, stimulate unidirectional controlled release of therapeutics and augment permeation across the barriers. Apart from drug delivery devices microfabrication technology’s offer exciting prospects to generate biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models. BioMEMS are capable of analysing biochemical liquid sample like solution of metabolites, macromolecules, proteins, nucleic acid, cells and viruses. This review summarized multidisciplinary application of biomedical microelectromechanical systems in drug delivery and its potential in analytical procedures. PMID:26903763

  12. Solid‐in‐oil nanodispersions for transdermal drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Momoko; Wakabayashi, Rie; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transdermal administration of drugs has advantages over conventional oral administration or administration using injection equipment. The route of administration reduces the opportunity for drug evacuation before systemic circulation, and enables long‐lasting drug administration at a modest body concentration. In addition, the skin is an attractive route for vaccination, because there are many immune cells in the skin. Recently, solid‐in‐oil nanodisperison (S/O) technique has demonstrated to deliver cosmetic and pharmaceutical bioactives efficiently through the skin. S/O nanodispersions are nanosized drug carriers designed to overcome the skin barrier. This review discusses the rationale for preparation of efficient and stable S/O nanodispersions, as well as application examples in cosmetic and pharmaceutical materials including vaccines. Drug administration using a patch is user‐friendly, and may improve patient compliance. The technique is a potent transcutaneous immunization method without needles. PMID:27529824

  13. Enzymatic action of phospholipase A₂ on liposomal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders H; Mouritsen, Ole G; Arouri, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    The overexpression of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in tumors has opened new avenues for enzyme-triggered active unloading of liposomal antitumor drug carriers selectively at the target tumor. However, the effects of the liposome composition, drug encapsulation, and tumor microenvironment on the activity of sPLA2 are still not well understood. We carried out a physico-chemical study to characterize the sPLA2-assisted breakdown of liposomes using dye-release assays in the context of drug delivery and under physiologically relevant conditions. The influence of temperature, lipid concentration, enzyme concentration, and drug loading on the hydrolysis of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC, Tm=42°C) liposomes with snake venom sPLA2 was investigated. The sensitivity of human sPLA2 to the liposome composition was checked using binary lipid mixtures of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) phospholipids with C14 and C16 acyl chains. Increasing temperature (36-41°C) was found to mainly shorten the enzyme lag-time, whereas the effect on lipid hydrolysis rate was modest. The enzyme lag-time was also found to be inversely dependent on the lipid-to-enzyme ratio. Drug encapsulation can alter the hydrolysis profile of the carrier liposomes. The activity of human sPLA2 was highly sensitive to the phospholipid acyl-chain length and negative surface charge density of the liposomes. We believe our work will prove useful for the optimization of sPLA2-susceptible liposomal formulations as well as will provide a solid ground for predicting the hydrolysis profile of the liposomes in vivo at the target site.

  14. Dosage Form Developments of Nanosuspension Drug Delivery System for Oral Administration Route.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Shi, Ye; Yan, Zhiqiang; Hao, Hongxun; Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Jian; Hou, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of new drug candidates are practically insoluble in aqueous solvents and are even simultaneously poorly soluble in organic solvents. Nanosuspension drug delivery system (DDS) was firstly developed in 1994 and has attracted more and more attention as a formation solution for the poorly soluble drugs. By nansizing the poorly soluble drugs, nanosuspensions have several outstanding advantages for drug delivery. Among many administration routes of drug delivery, oral administration is the most preferred route due to its advantages such as ease of ingestion, versatility to accommodate various types of drug candidates, low production cost, high safety, good patient compliance, and pain avoidance. Current marketed pharmaceutical nanosuspension DDS products are mostly for oral administration. This review is to systematically summarize the nanosuspension DDS dosage form developments of poorly soluble drugs for oral administration use.

  15. In Vivo Precipitation of Poorly Soluble Drugs from Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Sassene, P J; Michaelsen, M H; Mosgaard, M D; Jensen, M K; Van Den Broek, E; Wasan, K M; Mu, H; Rades, T; Müllertz, A

    2016-10-03

    Precipitation of poorly water-soluble drugs from lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS) has been studied extensively during in vitro lipolysis but has never been shown in vivo. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate if drug precipitation can occur from LbDDS during transit of the gastrointestinal tract in vivo. Rats were administered 300 μL of either of two LbDDS (LbDDS I and LbDDS II) loaded with danazol or fenofibrate (or paracetamol to assess gastric emptying). The rats were euthanized at various time points after administration of both LbDDS containing either drug, and the contents of the stomach and proximal part of the small intestine were harvested. The contents were analyzed for crystalline drug by X-ray powder diffraction and polarized light microscopy. No drug precipitation was evident in the stomach or the intestine after administration of LbDDS I containing danazol at the tested time points. Fenofibrate precipitation was absent in the stomach initially after administration of LbDDS I, but was evident in the stomach 90 min after dosing. No crystalline fenofibrate was observed in the intestine. Danazol and fenofibrate precipitation was evident in the stomach following administration of LbDDS II containing either drug, but not in the intestine at the tested time point. Drug precipitation from LbDDS was observed in the stomach, but not in the intestine, which is contrary to what in vitro lipolysis data (obtained under human GI conditions) suggests. Thus, precipitation of drugs from LbDDS in vivo in rats is much lower than might be anticipated from in vitro lipolysis data.

  16. Development of Bioadhesive Chitosan Superporous Hydrogel Composite Particles Based Intestinal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Modhia, Ishan; Mehta, Anant; Patel, Rupal; Patel, Chhagan

    2013-01-01

    Bioadhesive superporous hydrogel composite (SPHC) particles were developed for an intestinal delivery of metoprolol succinate and characterized for density, porosity, swelling, morphology, and bioadhesion studies. Chitosan and HPMC were used as bioadhesive and release retardant polymers, respectively. A 32 full factorial design was applied to optimize the concentration of chitosan and HPMC. The drug loaded bioadhesive SPHC particles were filled in capsule, and the capsule was coated with cellulose acetate phthalate and evaluated for drug content, in vitro drug release, and stability studies. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the drug release profiles were fitted for mathematical models. The prepared system remains bioadhesive up to eight hours in intestine and showed Hixson-Crowell release with anomalous nonfickian type of drug transport. The application of SPHC polymer particles as a biomaterial carrier opens a new insight into bioadhesive drug delivery system and could be a future platform for other molecules for intestinal delivery. PMID:23984380

  17. Biophysics and Thermodynamics: The Scientific Building Blocks of Bio-inspired Drug Delivery Nano Systems.

    PubMed

    Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-01

    Biophysics and thermodynamics are considered as the scientific milestones for investigating the properties of materials. The relationship between the changes of temperature with the biophysical variables of biomaterials is important in the process of the development of drug delivery systems. Biophysics is a challenge sector of physics and should be used complementary with the biochemistry in order to discover new and promising technological platforms (i.e., drug delivery systems) and to disclose the 'silence functionality' of bio-inspired biological and artificial membranes. Thermal analysis and biophysical approaches in pharmaceuticals present reliable and versatile tools for their characterization and for the successful development of pharmaceutical products. The metastable phases of self-assembled nanostructures such as liposomes should be taken into consideration because they represent the thermal events can affect the functionality of advanced drug delivery nano systems. In conclusion, biophysics and thermodynamics are characterized as the building blocks for design and development of bio-inspired drug delivery systems.

  18. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems for Noncancer Pain: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrathecal drug delivery systems can be used to manage refractory or persistent chronic nonmalignant (noncancer) pain. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of these systems compared with current standards of care for adult patients with chronic pain owing to nonmalignant conditions. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the National Health Service's Economic Evaluation Database and Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry from January 1994 to April 2014 for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness. We used existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screen methods and also searched for studies published after the search date reported in the latest systematic review to identify studies. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. Results We found comparative evidence of effectiveness and harms in one cohort study at high risk of bias (≥ 3-year follow-up, N = 130). Four economic evaluations of low to very low quality were also included. Compared with oral opioid analgesia alone or a program of analgesia plus rehabilitation, intrathecal drug delivery systems significantly reduced pain (27% additional improvement) and morphine consumption. Despite these reductions, intrathecal drug delivery systems were not superior in patient-reported well-being or quality of life. There is no evidence of superiority of intrathecal drug delivery systems over oral opioids in global pain improvement and global treatment satisfaction. Comparative evidence of harms was not found. Cost-effectiveness evidence is of insufficient quality to assess the appropriateness of funding intrathecal drug delivery systems. Evidence comparing intrathecal drug delivery systems with standard care was of very low quality. Conclusions Current evidence does not establish (or rule out) superiority or cost-effectiveness of intrathecal drug delivery systems for managing

  19. Production of Electrospun Fast-Dissolving Drug Delivery Systems with Therapeutic Eutectic Systems Encapsulated in Gelatin.

    PubMed

    Mano, Francisca; Martins, Marta; Sá-Nogueira, Isabel; Barreiros, Susana; Borges, João Paulo; Reis, Rui L; Duarte, Ana Rita C; Paiva, Alexandre

    2017-02-24

    Fast-dissolving delivery systems (FDDS) have received increasing attention in the last years. Oral drug delivery is still the preferred route for the administration of pharmaceutical ingredients. Nevertheless, some patients, e.g. children or elderly people, have difficulties in swallowing solid tablets. In this work, gelatin membranes were produced by electrospinning, containing an encapsulated therapeutic deep-eutectic solvent (THEDES) composed by choline chloride/mandelic acid, in a 1:2 molar ratio. A gelatin solution (30% w/v) with 2% (v/v) of THEDES was used to produce electrospun fibers and the experimental parameters were optimized. Due to the high surface area of polymer fibers, this type of construct has wide applicability. With no cytotoxicity effect, and showing a fast-dissolving release profile in PBS, the gelatin fibers with encapsulated THEDES seem to have promising applications in the development of new drug delivery systems.

  20. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior.

  1. Innovative polymeric system (IPS) for solvent-free lipophilic drug transdermal delivery via dissolving microneedles.

    PubMed

    Dangol, Manita; Yang, Huisuk; Li, Cheng Guo; Lahiji, Shayan Fakhraei; Kim, Suyong; Ma, Yonghao; Jung, Hyungil

    2016-02-10

    Lipophilic drugs are potential drug candidates during drug development. However, due to the need for hazardous organic solvents for their solubilization, these drugs often fail to reach the pharmaceutical market, and in doing so highlight the importance of solvent free systems. Although transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDSs) are considered prospective safe drug delivery routes, a system involving lipophilic drugs in solvent free or powder form has not yet been described. Here, we report, for the first time, a novel approach for the delivery of every kind of lipophilic drug in powder form based on an innovative polymeric system (IPS). The phase transition of powder form of lipophilic drugs due to interior chemical bonds between drugs and biodegradable polymers and formation of nano-sized colloidal structures allowed the fabrication of dissolving microneedles (DMNs) to generate a powerful TDDS. We showed that IPS based DMN with powder capsaicin enhances the therapeutic effect for treatment of the rheumatic arthritis in a DBA/1 mouse model compared to a solvent-based system, indicating the promising potential of this new solvent-free platform for lipophilic drug delivery.

  2. Oral self-nanoemulsifying peptide drug delivery systems: impact of lipase on drug release.

    PubMed

    Mahjub, Reza; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Bernkop Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to evaluate the impact of lipases on the release behaviour of a peptide drug from oral self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems. Octreotide was ion paired with the anionic surfactants deoxycholate, decanoate, oleate and dodecylsulphate. The lipophilic character of these complexes was characterised by determining the n-octanol/buffer pH 7.4 partition coefficient. In the following the most hydrophilic complex was incorporated in a likely lipase degradable self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) formulation containing a triglyceride (olive oil; Pharm.Eur.) and in a likely not lipase degradable SNEDDS containing lipids and surfactants without any ester bonds. After 1:100 dilutions in artificial intestinal fluid (AIF), the lipid droplets were characterised regarding size distribution. With these SNEDDS, drug release studies were performed in AIF with and without lipase. Results showed that the most hydrophobic complex can be formed with deoxycholate in an octreotide:anionic surfactant ratio of 1:5. Even 73.1 ± 8.1% of it could be quantified in the n-octanol phase. SNEDDS containing octreotide | olive oil | cremophor EL | propylene glycol (2|57|38|3) and octreotide | liquid paraffin | Brij 35 | propylene glycol | ethanol (2|66.5|25|5|1.5) showed after dilution in AIF, a mean droplet size of 232 ± 53 nm and 235 ± 50 nm, respectively. Drug release studies showed a sustained release of octreotide out of these formulations for at least 24 h, whereas > 80% of the drug was released within 2 h in the presence of lipase in the case of the triglyceride containing SNEEDS. In contrast the release profile from ester-free SNEDDS was not significantly altered (p < 0.05) due to the addition of lipase providing evidence for the stability of this formulation towards lipases. According to these results, SNEDDS could be identified as a useful tool for sustained oral peptide delivery taking an enzymatic degradation by

  3. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  4. Fast disintegrating tablets: Opportunity in drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Ved; Maan, Saurabh; Deepika; Yadav, Shiv Kumar; Hemlata; Jogpal, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Fast disintegrating tablets (FDTs) have received ever-increasing demand during the last decade, and the field has become a rapidly growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. Oral drug delivery remains the preferred route for administration of various drugs. Recent developments in the technology have prompted scientists to develop FDTs with improved patient compliance and convenience. Upon introduction into the mouth, these tablets dissolve or disintegrate in the mouth in the absence of additional water for easy administration of active pharmaceutical ingredients. The popularity and usefulness of the formulation resulted in development of several FDT technologies. FDTs are solid unit dosage forms, which disintegrate or dissolve rapidly in the mouth without chewing and water. FDTs or orally disintegrating tablets provide an advantage particularly for pediatric and geriatric populations who have difficulty in swallowing conventional tablets and capsules. This review describes various formulations and technologies developed to achieve fast dissolution/dispersion of tablets in the oral cavity. In particular, this review describes in detail FDT technologies based on lyophilization, molding, sublimation, and compaction, as well as approaches to enhancing the FDT properties, such as spray drying and use of disintegrants. In addition, taste-masking technologies, experimental measurements of disintegration times, and dissolution are also discussed. PMID:22247889

  5. Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Medicine: Emphasis on RNAi-Containing Nanoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Díaz, Mónica; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine is a growing research field dealing with the creation and manipulation of materials at a nanometer scale for the better treatment, diagnosis and imaging of diseases. In cancer medicine, the use of nanoparticles as drug delivery systems has advanced the bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. The expansion of novel nanoparticles for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies, including small interference RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNAs)-based molecules. In this review, we focus on the currently available drug delivery systems for anticancer agents. In addition, we will discuss the promising use of nanoparticles for novel cancer treatment strategies. PMID:24287462

  6. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  7. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  8. Classification of stimuli-responsive polymers as anticancer drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Bita; Taranejoo, Shahrouz; Monemian, Seyed Ali; Salehi Moghaddam, Zoha; Daliri, Karim; Derakhshankhah, Hossein; Derakhshani, Zaynab

    2015-02-01

    Although several anticancer drugs have been introduced as chemotherapeutic agents, the effective treatment of cancer remains a challenge. Major limitations in the application of anticancer drugs include their nonspecificity, wide biodistribution, short half-life, low concentration in tumor tissue and systemic toxicity. Drug delivery to the tumor site has become feasible in recent years, and recent advances in the development of new drug delivery systems for controlled drug release in tumor tissues with reduced side effects show great promise. In this field, the use of biodegradable polymers as drug carriers has attracted the most attention. However, drug release is still difficult to control even when a polymeric drug carrier is used. The design of pharmaceutical polymers that respond to external stimuli (known as stimuli-responsive polymers) such as temperature, pH, electric or magnetic field, enzymes, ultrasound waves, etc. appears to be a successful approach. In these systems, drug release is triggered by different stimuli. The purpose of this review is to summarize different types of polymeric drug carriers and stimuli, in addition to the combination use of stimuli in order to achieve a better controlled drug release, and it discusses their potential strengths and applications. A survey of the recent literature on various stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems is also provided and perspectives on possible future developments in controlled drug release at tumor site have been discussed.

  9. Development of an injectable two-phase drug delivery system for sequential release of antiresorptive and osteogenic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zou, Y; Brooks, J L; Talwalkar, V; Milbrandt, T A; Puleo, D A

    2012-01-01

    Unlike controlled release systems that deliver a single drug, dual or multidrug delivery systems with distinct release profiles are more likely to promote timely and effective tissue regeneration as they provide both temporally and concentration-dependent release of different molecules to mimic natural biological events. In this study, an injectable and biodegradable delivery system was developed to sequentially release an antiresorptive drug (clodronate) followed by an osteogenic agent (simvastatin) to treat bone disease. The injectable delivery system comprised simvastatin-loaded gelatin microspheres suspended in a viscous solution of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) containing clodronate. Several factors (CMC concentration, glutaraldehyde concentration, simvastatin loading, and gelatin microsphere processing conditions) were investigated for their effects on drug release. Clodronate release was not affected by CMC concentration, with complete delivery within 12 hr, and simvastatin release could be modulated by cross-linking of the gelatin microspheres, loading, and washing conditions. Burst release of simvastatin was reduced from 70% to 6% in conjunction with sustained release for up to 3 weeks. The combined system showed early release of the antiresorptive clodronate sequentially followed by sustained delivery of the osteogenic simvastatin. This robust and flexible two-phase delivery system may prove useful for applications in which multiple drug delivery is desired.

  10. Drug-in-cyclodextrin-in-liposomes: A novel drug delivery system for flurbiprofen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Wenji; Lin, Congcong; Chen, Fen; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2015-08-15

    A novel delivery system based on drug-cyclodextrin (CD) complexation and liposomes has been developed to improve therapeutic effect. Three different means, i.e., co-evaporation (COE), co-ground (GR) and co-lyophilization (COL) and three different CDs (β-CD, HP-β-CD and SBE-β-CD) were contrasted to investigate the characteristics of the end products. FP/FP-CD loaded liposomes were obtained by thin layer evaporation technique. Size, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency were investigated by light scattering analysis and minicolumn centrifugation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the amorphous form of complexes and spherical morphology of FP-HP-β-CD COE loaded liposomes. The pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was selected as the medium for the in vitro release. Wistar rats were put into use to study the pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo. FP-HP-β-CD COE loaded liposomes showed the better physicochemical characters that followed the average particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and mean encapsulation efficiency 158±10 nm, 0.19±0.1, -12.4±0.1 mW and 56.1±0.5%, separately. The relative bioavailability of FP-HP-β-CD COE loaded liposomes was 420%, 201% and 402% compared with FP solution, FP-HP-β-CD and FP-liposomes, respectively. In conclusion, the novel delivery system improved the relative bioavailability of FP significantly and provided a perspective way for delivery of insoluble drugs.

  11. Intranasal delivery of systemic-acting drugs: small-molecules and biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Serralheiro, Ana; Sousa, Joana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-09-01

    As a non-invasive route, intranasal administration offers patient comfort and compliance which are hurdled in parenteral drug therapy. In addition, the current recognition that the high permeability and vascularization of nasal mucosa coupled to the avoidance of the first-pass elimination and/or gastrointestinal decomposition ensure higher systemic drug absorption than oral route has contributed to the growing interest for intranasal delivery of drugs that require considerable systemic exposure to exert their therapeutic actions (systemic-acting drugs). Nevertheless, several features may hamper drug absorption through the nasal mucosa, particularly the drug molecular weight and intrinsic permeability, and, therefore, several strategies have been employed to improve it, propelling a constant challenge during nasal drug (formulation) development. This review will firstly provide an anatomical, histological and mechanistic overview of drug systemic absorption after nasal administration and the relevant aspects of the therapeutic interest and limitations of the intranasal systemic delivery. The current studies regarding the nasal application of systemic-acting small drugs (analgesic drugs, cardiovascular drugs and antiviral drugs) and biomacromolecular drugs (peptide/protein drugs and vaccines) will also be outlined, addressing drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic improvements.

  12. Controlled Release System for Localized and Sustained Drug Delivery Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Lidia Betsabe

    Current controlled release formulations has many drawbacks such as excess of initial burst release, low drug efficiency, non-degradability of the system and low reproducibility. The present project aims to offer an alternative by developing a technique to prepare uniform, biodegradable particles ( ˜19 mum ) that can sustainably release a drug for a specific period of time. Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide that has many characteristics to be used for biomedical applications. In the last two decades, there have been a considerable number of studies affirming that chitosan could be used for pharmaceutical applications. However, chitosan suffers from inherent weaknesses such as low mechanical stability and dissolution of the system in acidic media. In the present study, chitosan microparticles were prepared by emulsification process. The model drug chosen was acetylsalicylic acid as it is a small and challenging molecule. The maximum loading capacity obtained for the microparticles was approximately 96%. The parameters for the preparation of uniform particles with a narrow size distribution were identified in a triangular phase diagram. Moreover, chitosan particles were successfully coated with thin layers of poly lactic-coglycolic acid (PLGA) and poly lactic acid (PLA). The performance of different layerswas tested for in vitro drug release and degradation studies. Additionally, the degradability of the system was evaluated by measuring the weight loss of the system when exposed to enzyme and without enzyme. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) were used to characterize the controlled release system. Additionally, the in vitro drug release was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The results obtained from this project showed that it is

  13. Preparation, characterization and drug delivery study of a novel nanobiopolymeric multidrug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah Tehrani, Abbas; Parsamanesh, Masoumeh

    2017-04-01

    New nanocarrier for codelivery of curcumin and doxorubicin as the anticancer drugs was synthesized using biocompatible and biodegradable materials. Firstly, an inclusion complex of amylose (Am) and curcumin (CUR) was formed through entrapment of curcumin into the amylose helices. Then the surface of amylose-curcumin (Am-CUR) complex was modified by polycaprolactone (PCL) via esterification reaction between hydroxyl functional groups of amylose and carbonyl groups of PCL. Finally, poly citric acid (PCA) reacted with terminal hydroxyl groups of PCL by esterification reaction. Then, doxorubicin (DOX) reacted with the surface carboxylic acid functional groups of Am-CUR-PCL-PCA through noncovalent interactions to form Am-CUR-PCL-PCA-DOX as a multidrug delivery system. These new synthesized nanomaterials were characterized by spectroscopic measurement methods such as IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. FE-SEM analyses and DLS measurements showed that the hydrodynamic dimensions of Am-Cur-PCL-PCA were about 50nm. Due to the presence of ester bonds, the synthesized nanomaterials are pH sensitive. Furthermore, the resulting copolymer was completely water soluble because of the hydrophilic nature of poly citric acid part of copolymer and therefore successfully can be utilized in biomedical applications.

  14. Turning theory into practice: the development of modern transdermal drug delivery systems and future trends.

    PubMed

    Perumal, O; Murthy, S N; Kalia, Y N

    2013-01-01

    Despite its remarkable barrier function, the skin remains an attractive site for systemic drug delivery given its easy accessibility, large surface area and the possibility to bypass the gastrointestinal tract and the liver and so modify drug absorption kinetics. The pioneering work of Scheuplein, Higuchi and others in the 1960s helped to explain the processes involved in passive percutaneous absorption and led to the development of mathematical models to describe transdermal drug delivery. The intervening years have seen these theories turned to practice and a significant number of transdermal systems are now available including some that employ active drug delivery. This review briefly discusses the evolution of transdermal therapeutic systems over the years and the potential of newer transdermal technologies to deliver hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules through the skin.

  15. Topical Delivery of Aceclofenac: Challenges and Promises of Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Kumar, Pramod; Malik, Ruchi; Sharma, Gajanand; Kaur, Manmeet; Katare, O. P.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a common musculoskeletal disorder, is projected to affect about 60 million people of total world population by 2020. The associated pain and disability impair the quality of life and also pose economic burden to the patient. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed in OA, while diclofenac is the most prescribed one. Oral NSAIDs are not very patient friendly, as they cause various gastrointestinal adverse effects like bleeding, ulceration, and perforation. To enhance the tolerability of diclofenac and decrease the common side effects, aceclofenac (ACE) was developed by its chemical modification. As expected, ACE is more well-tolerated than diclofenac and possesses superior efficacy but is not completely devoid of the NSAID-tagged side effects. A series of chemical modifications of already planned drug is unjustified as it consumes quanta of time, efforts, and money, and this approach will also pose stringent regulatory challenges. Therefore, it is justified to deliver ACE employing tools of drug delivery and nanotechnology to refine its safety profile. The present review highlights the constraints related to the topical delivery of ACE and the various attempts made so far for the safe and effective topical delivery employing the novel materials and methods. PMID:25045671

  16. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  17. Advances in drug delivery system for platinum agents based combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiang; Xiao, Hai-Hua; Song, Hai-Qin; Jing, Xia-Bin; Yan, Le-San; Qi, Ruo-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer agents are widely used as first-line drugs in cancer chemotherapy for various solid tumors. However, great side effects and occurrence of resistance remain as the major drawbacks for almost all the platinum drugs developed. To conquer these problems, new strategies should be adopted for platinum drug based chemotherapy. Modern nanotechnology has been widely employed in the delivery of various therapeutics and diagnostic. It provides the possibility of targeted delivery of a certain anticancer drug to the tumor site, which could minimize toxicity and optimize the drug efficacy. Here, in this review, we focused on the recent progress in polymer based drug delivery systems for platinum-based combination therapy. PMID:26779373

  18. A review on bioadhesive buccal drug delivery systems: current status of formulation and evaluation methods

    PubMed Central

    Chinna Reddy, P; Chaitanya, K.S.C.; Madhusudan Rao, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to the ease of the administration, the oral cavity is an attractive site for the delivery of drugs. Through this route it is possible to realize mucosal (local effect) and transmucosal (systemic effect) drug administration. In the first case, the aim is to achieve a site-specific release of the drug on the mucosa, whereas the second case involves drug absorption through the mucosal barrier to reach the systemic circulation. The main obstacles that drugs meet when administered via the buccal route derive from the limited absorption area and the barrier properties of the mucosa. The effective physiological removal mechanisms of the oral cavity that take the formulation away from the absorption site are the other obstacles that have to be considered. The strategies studied to overcome such obstacles include the employment of new materials that, possibly, combine mucoadhesive, enzyme inhibitory and penetration enhancer properties and the design of innovative drug delivery systems which, besides improving patient compliance, favor a more intimate contact of the drug with the absorption mucosa. This presents a brief description of advantages and limitations of buccal drug delivery and the anatomical structure of oral mucosa, mechanisms of drug permeation followed by current formulation design in line with developments in buccal delivery systems and methodology in evaluating buccal formulations. PMID:23008684

  19. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  20. [Development of a novel transdermal delivery system of peptide and protein drugs using microneedle arrays].

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptide and protein drugs may be limited by the stratum corneum, which is a protective barrier against the entry of microorganisms and water. Many approaches have been utilized to promote peptide and protein drugs delivery across the stratum corneum, including chemical enhancer modification and physical disruption of barrier function. However, it has been difficult to achieve therapeutic levels of peptide and protein drugs via this route without any skin irritation. Recently, attention has been paid to the possibility of using microneedle arrays in delivering peptide and protein drugs into the skin. As a novel and minimally invasive approach, microneedle arrays are capable of creating superficial pathways across the skin for peptide and protein drugs to achieve enhanced transdermal drug delivery. This method combines the efficacy of conventional injection needles with the convenience of transdermal patches, while minimizing the disadvantages of these administration methods. Therefore, microneedle arrays are a very useful alternative method for delivering peptide and protein drugs from the skin into the systemic circulation without any serious damage to skin. In this review, recent challenges in the developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are summarized. Then, future developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are also discussed in order to improve their therapeutic efficacy and safety.

  1. Sericin/Dextran Injectable Hydrogel as an Optically Trackable Drug Delivery System for Malignant Melanoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Qi, Chao; Tao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Luming; Jiang, Xulin; Zhang, Yunti; Huang, Lei; Li, Qilin; Xie, Hongjian; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Severe side effects of cancer chemotherapy prompt developing better drug delivery systems. Injectable hydrogels are an effective site-target system. For most of injectable hydrogels, once delivered in vivo, some properties including drug release and degradation, which are critical to chemotherapeutic effects and safety, are challenging to monitor. Developing a drug delivery system for effective cancer therapy with in vivo real-time noninvasive trackability is highly desired. Although fluorescence dyes are used for imaging hydrogels, the cytotoxicity limits their applications. By using sericin, a natural photoluminescent protein from silk, we successfully synthesized a hydrazone cross-linked sericin/dextran injectable hydrogel. This hydrogel is biodegradable and biocompatible. It achieves efficient drug loading and controlled release of both macromolecular and small molecular drugs. Notably, sericin's photoluminescence from this hydrogel is directly and stably correlated with its degradation, enabling long-term in vivo imaging and real-time monitoring of the remaining drug. The hydrogel loaded with Doxorubicin significantly suppresses tumor growth. Together, the work demonstrates the efficacy of this drug delivery system, and the in vivo effectiveness of this sericin-based optical monitoring strategy, providing a potential approach for improving hydrogel design toward optimal efficiency and safety of chemotherapies, which may be widely applicable to other drug delivery systems.

  2. Pathogen-inspired drug delivery to the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Rebecca L; Cacaccio, Joseph; Wrabel, Eileen; Schwartz, Mary E; Coleman, Timothy P; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2014-01-01

    For as long as the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been evolving to exclude bloodborne agents from the central nervous system (CNS), pathogens have adopted a multitude of strategies to bypass it. Some pathogens, notably viruses and certain bacteria, enter the CNS in whole form, achieving direct physical passage through endothelial or neuronal cells to infect the brain. Other pathogens, including bacteria and multicellular eukaryotic organisms, secrete toxins that preferentially interact with specific cell types to exert a broad range of biological effects on peripheral and central neurons. In this review, we will discuss the directed mechanisms that viruses, bacteria, and the toxins secreted by higher order organisms use to enter the CNS. Our goal is to identify ligand-mediated strategies that could be used to improve the brain-specific delivery of engineered nanocarriers, including polymers, lipids, biologically sourced materials, and imaging agents. PMID:25610755

  3. Design, fabrication and characterization of drug delivery systems based on lab-on-a-chip technology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Kashaninejad, Navid; Phan, Dinh-Tuan

    2013-11-01

    Lab-on-a-chip technology is an emerging field evolving from the recent advances of micro- and nanotechnologies. The technology allows the integration of various components into a single microdevice. Microfluidics, the science and engineering of fluid flow in microscale, is the enabling underlying concept for lab-on-a-chip technology. The present paper reviews the design, fabrication and characterization of drug delivery systems based on this amazing technology. The systems are categorized and discussed according to the scales at which the drug is administered. Starting with the fundamentals on scaling laws of mass transfer and basic fabrication techniques, the paper reviews and discusses drug delivery devices for cellular, tissue and organism levels. At the cellular level, a concentration gradient generator integrated with a cell culture platform is the main drug delivery scheme of interest. At the tissue level, the synthesis of smart particles as drug carriers using lab-on-a-chip technology is the main focus of recent developments. At the organism level, microneedles and implantable devices with fluid-handling components are the main drug delivery systems. For drug delivery to a small organism that can fit into a microchip, devices similar to those of cellular level can be used.

  4. [Progress in the study of core-crosslinked polymeric micelles in drug delivery system].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Mou; Wu, Jia-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Shi; Jin, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The core-crosslinked polymeric micelles were used as a new drug delivery system, which can decrease the premature drug release in blood circulation, improve the stability of the micelles, and effectively transport the drug into the therapy sites. Then the drug bioavailability increased further, while the side effect reduced. Most drugs were physically entrapped or chemically covalent with the polymer in the internals of micelles. Based on the various constitutions and properties of polymeric micelles as well as the special characteristics of body microenvironment, the environment-responsive or active targeting core-crosslinked micelles were designed and prepared. As a result, the drug controlled release behavior was obtained. In the present paper, the research progress of all kinds of core-crosslinked micelles which were published in recent years is introduced. Moreover, the characteristic and application prospect of these micelles in drug delivery system are analyzed and summarized.

  5. An Engineering Approach to Biomedical Sciences: Advanced Strategies in Drug Delivery Systems Production

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa; d’Amore, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Development and optimization of novel production techniques for drug delivery systems are fundamental steps in the “from the bench to the bedside” process which is the base of translational medicine. In particular, in the current scenery where the need for reducing energy consumption, emissions, wastes and risks drives the development of sustainable processes, new pharmaceutical manufacturing does not constitute an exception. In this paper, concepts of process intensification are presented and their transposition in drug delivery systems production is discussed. Moreover, some examples on intensified techniques, for drug microencapsulation and granules drying, are reported. PMID:23905058

  6. An engineering approach to biomedical sciences: advanced strategies in drug delivery systems production.

    PubMed

    Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa; d'Amore, Matteo

    2012-09-01

    Development and optimization of novel production techniques for drug delivery systems are fundamental steps in the "from the bench to the bedside" process which is the base of translational medicine. In particular, in the current scenery where the need for reducing energy consumption, emissions, wastes and risks drives the development of sustainable processes, new pharmaceutical manufacturing does not constitute an exception. In this paper, concepts of process intensification are presented and their transposition in drug delivery systems production is discussed. Moreover, some examples on intensified techniques, for drug microencapsulation and granules drying, are reported.

  7. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  8. Organ-on-a-Chip Platforms for Studying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Nupura S.; Ribas, João; Manoharan, Vijayan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Polini, Alessandro; Massa, Solange; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Novel microfluidic tools allow new ways to manufacture and test drug delivery systems. Organ-on-a-chip systems – microscale recapitulations of complex organ functions – promise to improve the drug development pipeline. This review highlights the importance of integrating microfluidic networks with 3D tissue engineered models to create organ-on-a-chip platforms, able to meet the demand of creating robust preclinical screening models. Specific examples are cited to demonstrate the use of these systems for studying the performance of drug delivery vectors and thereby reduce the discrepancies between their performance at preclinical and clinical trials. We also highlight the future directions that need to be pursued by the research community for these proof-of-concept studies to achieve the goal of accelerating clinical translation of drug delivery nanoparticles. PMID:24818770

  9. A novel liposomal drug delivery system for PMMA bone cements

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, James C.; Evans, Samuel L.; Denyer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population in developed countries is ageing and the number of people experiencing joint‐related conditions, such as osteoarthritis, is expected to increase. Joint replacements are currently the most effective treatment for severe joint conditions and although many of these procedures are successful, infection developing after the procedure is still an issue, requiring complex and expensive revisions. Whilst incorporating a powdered antibiotic within the bone cement can reduce infection rates, the powder frequently agglomerates, resulting in poor antibiotic release characteristics and compromised mechanical performance of the cement. To overcome these issues, a novel delivery system consisting of antibiotic‐loaded nano‐sized liposomes was developed for inclusion into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. This system was tested in a commercial cement (Palacos R) and consistently delivered a higher percentage (22%) of the incorporated antibiotic when compared to the powdered antibiotic cement (9%), meaning less antibiotic needs to be incorporated than with conventional cement. The novel system resulted in a controlled and gradual release of antibiotic over a longer, 30‐day period and enhanced the toughness, bending strength and Vickers hardness of the cement, without altering its polymerization or molecular structure. This new material has the potential to significantly reduce infections in cemented joint replacements leading to enhanced patient quality of life and reduced healthcare costs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1510–1524, 2016. PMID:26256271

  10. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:28243062

  11. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  12. Polymeric Micelles, a Promising Drug Delivery System to Enhance Bioavailability of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Peixue; Zhang, Tianmin

    2013-01-01

    Oral administration is the most commonly used and readily accepted form of drug delivery; however, it is find that many drugs are difficult to attain enough bioavailability when administered via this route. Polymeric micelles (PMs) can overcome some limitations of the oral delivery acting as carriers able to enhance drug absorption, by providing (1) protection of the loaded drug from the harsh environment of the GI tract, (2) release of the drug in a controlled manner at target sites, (3) prolongation of the residence time in the gut by mucoadhesion, and (4) inhibition of efflux pumps to improve the drug accumulation. To explain the mechanisms for enhancement of oral bioavailability, we discussed the special stability of PMs, the controlled release properties of pH-sensitive PMs, the prolongation of residence time with mucoadhesive PMs, and the P-gp inhibitors commonly used in PMs, respectively. The primary purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential of PMs for delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs with bioavailability being well maintained. PMID:23936656

  13. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  14. Implementation of wireless power transfer and communications for an implantable ocular drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Tang, T B; Smith, S; Flynn, B W; Stevenson, J T M; Gundlach, A M; Reekie, H M; Murray, A F; Renshaw, D; Dhillon, B; Ohtori, A; Inoue, Y; Terry, J G; Walton, A J

    2008-09-01

    A wireless power transfer and communication system based on near-field inductive coupling has been designed and implemented. The feasibility of using such a system to remotely control drug release from an implantable drug delivery system is addressed. The architecture of the wireless system is described and the signal attenuation over distance in both water and phosphate buffered saline is studied. Additionally, the health risk due to exposure to radio frequency (RF) radiation is examined using a biological model. The experimental results demonstrate that the system can trigger the release of drug within 5 s, and that such short exposure to RF radiation does not produce any significant (system could replace a chemical battery in an implantable system, eliminating the risks associated with battery failure and leakage and also allowing more compact designs for applications such as drug delivery.

  15. Role of pressure-sensitive adhesives in transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Shabbir; Sachdeva, Sameer; Goswami, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are employed for the delivery of drugs across skin into the systemic circulation. Pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) is one of the most critical components used in a TDDS. The primary function of PSA is to help in adhesion of patch to skin, but more importantly it acts as a matrix for the drug and other excipients. Hence, apart from adhesion of the patch, PSA also affects other critical quality attributes of the TDDS such as drug delivery, flux through skin and physical and chemical stability of the finished product. This review article provides a summary of the adhesives used in various types of TDDS. In particular, this review will cover the design types of TDDS, categories of PSAs and their evaluation and regulatory aspects.

  16. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Pain: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrathecal drug delivery systems can be used to manage refractory or persistent cancer pain. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of these systems compared with current standards of care for adult patients with chronic pain due owing to cancer. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library databases, National Health Service's Economic Evaluation Database, and Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry from January 1994 to April 2014 for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness. We used existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screen methods and searched for studies published after the search date reported in the latest systematic review to identify studies. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. The cost burden of publicly funding intrathecal drug delivery systems for cancer pain was estimated for a 5-year timeframe using a combination of published literature, information from the device manufacturer, administrative data, and expert opinion for the inputs. Results We included one randomized trial that examined effectiveness and harms, and one case series that reported an eligible economic evaluation. We found very low quality evidence that intrathecal drug delivery systems added to comprehensive pain management reduce overall drug toxicity; no significant reduction in pain scores was observed. Weak conclusions from economic evidence suggested that intrathecal drug delivery systems had the potential to be more cost-effective than high-cost oral therapy if administered for 7 months or longer. The cost burden of publicly funding this therapy is estimated to be $100,000 in the first year, increasing to $500,000 by the fifth year. Conclusions Current evidence could not establish the benefit, harm, or cost-effectiveness of intrathecal drug delivery systems compared with current standards of care for managing refractory cancer pain in

  17. A review on mucoadhesive polymer used in nasal drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Mayank; Kumar, Manish; Pathak, Kamla

    2011-01-01

    This update review is on mucoadhesive polymers used in nasal dosage forms. The nasal mucosa provides a potentially good route for systemic drug delivery. One of the most important features of the nasal route is that it avoids first-pass hepatic metabolism, thereby reducing metabolism. The application of mucoadhesive polymers in nasal drug delivery systems has gained to promote dosage form residence time in the nasal cavity as well as improving intimacy of contact with absorptive membranes of the biological system. The various new technology uses in development of nasal drug delivery dosage forms are discussed. The various dosage forms are vesicular carriers (liposome, noisome), nanostructured particles, prodrugs, in situ gelling system with special attention to in vivo studies. PMID:22247888

  18. Polymers and formulation strategies of nanofibrous systems for drug delivery application and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sebe, I; Kállai-Szabó, B; Zelkó, R; Szabó, D

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, the formulation of nanofibrous materials loaded with different drugs for biomedical applications has evoked considerable interest. The large specific surface area, the special micro- and macrostructure of fiber mats, the possibility for gradual release and site-specific local delivery of the active compounds lead to cytotoxicity decrease and enhancement of the therapeutic effect of drugs and implants. The present review details the different spinning techniques applied for the design of micro- and nanofibrous drug delivery systems. It furthermore deals with the use of various polymers that are capable for the formation of fiber scaffolds of various biomedical applications.

  19. Synthesis of a dextran based thermo-sensitive drug delivery system by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J F; Ferreira, P; Alves, P; Lopes, A; Gil, M H

    2013-10-01

    Gamma radiation was used as the initiator/crosslinker agent for the synthesis of thermo-sensitive hydrogel networks, under the form of membranes, using dextran and N-isopropylacrylamide. The prepared membranes were loaded with Ondansetron™, a potent antiemetic drug and tested as drug delivery systems. The characterization of the materials was accomplished by: Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, lower critical solution temperature (LCST) determination, swelling behaviour evaluation, determination of surface energy by contact angle measurement and drug delivery kinetics studies. Also, the influence of irradiation time and temperature on the materials properties was evaluated.

  20. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  1. Dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug-delivery system for diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Dong, Wei-Jiang; Yang, Gao-Yi; Wang, Wei; Ji, Cong-Hua; Zhou, Fei-Ni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a novel transdermal drug-delivery system comprising a polyamidoamine dendrimer coupled with sonophoresis to enhance the permeation of diclofenac (DF) through the skin. The novel transdermal drug-delivery system was developed by using a statistical Plackett-Burman design. Hairless male Wistar rat skin was used for the DF-permeation study. Coupling media concentration, ultrasound-application time, duty cycle, distance from probe to skin, and a third-generation polyamidoamine-dendrimer concentration were selected as independent variables, while in vitro drug release was selected as a dependent variable. Independent variables were found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). DF gel without dendrimer and ultrasound treatment to skin (passive delivery, run 13) showed 56.69 µg/cm(2) cumulative drug permeated through the skin, while the DF-dendrimer gel without sonophoresis treatment (run 14) showed 257.3 µg/cm(2) cumulative drug permeated through the skin after 24 hours. However, when the same gel was applied to sonophoresis-treated skin, drastic permeation enhancement was observed. In the case of run 3, the cumulative drug that permeated through the skin was 935.21 µg/cm(2). It was concluded that dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug delivery system has the potential to enhance the permeation of DF through the skin.

  2. Dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug-delivery system for diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Dong, Wei-Jiang; Yang, Gao-Yi; Wang, Wei; Ji, Cong-Hua; Zhou, Fei-Ni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a novel transdermal drug-delivery system comprising a polyamidoamine dendrimer coupled with sonophoresis to enhance the permeation of diclofenac (DF) through the skin. The novel transdermal drug-delivery system was developed by using a statistical Plackett–Burman design. Hairless male Wistar rat skin was used for the DF-permeation study. Coupling media concentration, ultrasound-application time, duty cycle, distance from probe to skin, and a third-generation polyamidoamine-dendrimer concentration were selected as independent variables, while in vitro drug release was selected as a dependent variable. Independent variables were found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). DF gel without dendrimer and ultrasound treatment to skin (passive delivery, run 13) showed 56.69 µg/cm2 cumulative drug permeated through the skin, while the DF-dendrimer gel without sonophoresis treatment (run 14) showed 257.3 µg/cm2 cumulative drug permeated through the skin after 24 hours. However, when the same gel was applied to sonophoresis-treated skin, drastic permeation enhancement was observed. In the case of run 3, the cumulative drug that permeated through the skin was 935.21 µg/cm2. It was concluded that dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug delivery system has the potential to enhance the permeation of DF through the skin. PMID:26229447

  3. Heterostructured layered aluminosilicate-itraconazole nanohybrid for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hun; Jung, Hyun; Kim, Su Yeon; Yo, Chul Hyun; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2013-11-01

    A nanohybrid, consisting of layered aluminosilicate as a host material and itraconazole as a guest molecule, was successfully synthesized through the interfacial intercalation reaction across the boundary between water and water-immiscible liquid at the various pH. According to the powder X-ray diffraction pattern, the basal spacing of the intraconazole-layered aluminosilicate nanohybrid increased from 14.7 to 22.7 A depending on the pH of the aqueous suspension. The total amounts of itraconazole in the hybrids were determined to be 2.3-25.4 wt% by HPLC analysis. The in vivo pharmacokinetics study was performed in rats in order to compare the absorptions of itraconazole for the itraconazole-layered aluminosilicate nanohybrid and a commercial product, Sporanox. The pharmacokinetic data for the nanohybrid and Sporanox showed that the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC, 2477 +/- 898 ng x hr/mL and 2630 +/- 953 ng x hr/mL, respectively) and maximum concentration (Cmax, 225.4 +/- 77.4 ng x hr/mL and 223.6 +/- 51.9 ng x hr/mL, respectively), were within the bioequivalence (BE) range. Therefore, we concluded that this drug-layered aluminosilicate nanohybrid system has a great potential for its application in formulation of poorly soluble drugs.

  4. Carbon-Dot-Coated Alginate Beads as a Smart Stimuli-Responsive Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sristi; Krishnatreya, Gargee; Gogoi, Neelam; Thakur, Debajit; Chowdhury, Devasish

    2016-12-21

    In this work, we report a smart stimuli-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) that can release drug depending upon the amount of pathogen (MRSA) present in the target. A greater amount of MRSA in the system will lead to more release of drug and vice versa. Carbon-dot-coated novel alginate beads (CA-CD) exhibiting superior stability was successfully used as smart drug delivery vehicle. Garlic extract (GE), which contains allicin, was taken as model drug system to demonstrate the phenomena. It was observed that GE loading was 19 and 78% with CA and CA-CD, respectively. CA-CD-GE shows pH-dependent controlled drug release, which results in increased therapeutic efficiency. CA-CD-GE is not only stimuli responsive but also a controlled drug release system as it releases drug according to the pathogen concentration (MRSA). All the three factors viz. drug release, MRSA concentration and pH of the medium are interdependent as when the cell divides, it produces secondary metabolites that lead to the decrease in pH of the medium. The drop in the pH value triggers drug release from the beads. And the effect of the drug is reflected by the MRSA cell death. Hence, we demonstrate a smart stimuli responsive DDS. However, such DDS will be useful in cases where increased amount of pathogen in the system will lead to reduction in pH.

  5. Calcium phosphate ceramic systems in growth factor and drug delivery for bone tissue engineering: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman

    2012-01-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are the most widely used bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering due to their compositional similarities to bone mineral and excellent biocompatibility. In recent years, CaPs, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, have attracted significant interest in simultaneous use as bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle, adding a new dimension to their application. CaPs are more biocompatible than many other ceramic and inorganic nanoparticles. Their biocompatibility and variable stoichiometry, thus surface charge density, functionality, and dissolution properties, make them suitable for both drug and growth factor delivery. CaP matrices and scaffolds have been reported to act as delivery vehicles for growth factors and drugs in bone tissue engineering. Local drug delivery in musculoskeletal disorder treatments can address some of the critical issues more effectively and efficiently than the systemic delivery. CaPs are used as coatings on metallic implants, CaP cements, and custom designed scaffolds to treat musculoskeletal disorders. This review highlights some of the current drug and growth factor delivery approaches and critical issues using CaP particles, coatings, cements, and scaffolds towards orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:22127225

  6. Nanomaterials for Drugs Delivery

    DOE PAGES

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and medicine of today. These disciplines are evolving thanks to the ongoing development of new materials and applications. Nanomedicine, as application of nanotechnology in the field of health care, has undergone unprecedented development. Some of these changes have real applications as, for example, the use of nanoparticles in MRI imaging, in hyperthermia, in immunotherapy, or to improve the bioavailability of drugs, among others. Furthermore, when a drug is administered to a patient, the blood distributes it throughout the body. In the case of very localized diseases (i.e. tumors), only a small fraction ofmore » the drug reaches the target. Chemotherapy is one of the most aggressive treatment options used in some types of cancer, and is usually administered intravenously. The drug circulates throughout the body, reaching and destroying healthy and cancerous tissues, producing side effects throughout the body, sometimes with serious consequences for the health of the patient (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, anemia, etc.) in this type of therapy. Among the many applications of nanotechnology, the fabrication of nanostructures capable of safely transporting these drugs is seen as a strategy for reducing these side effects. Nanoparticles are able to carry and release the drug in the right place and with the required dose, greatly reducing the problems associated with direct treatment with these drugs. In recent years, there have been continuous improvements in the design and development of new tailor-made drug delivery systems, including hollow magnetic nanoparticles, liposomal structures, dendrimers, nanoporous silicon, etc. These structures can be obtained with different molecular weights (in the case of polymers), structures, shapes, and even with the appropriate functional groups for interaction at the desired positions. But, a great effort is still required to

  7. Nanomaterials for Drugs Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and medicine of today. These disciplines are evolving thanks to the ongoing development of new materials and applications. Nanomedicine, as application of nanotechnology in the field of health care, has undergone unprecedented development. Some of these changes have real applications as, for example, the use of nanoparticles in MRI imaging, in hyperthermia, in immunotherapy, or to improve the bioavailability of drugs, among others. Furthermore, when a drug is administered to a patient, the blood distributes it throughout the body. In the case of very localized diseases (i.e. tumors), only a small fraction of the drug reaches the target. Chemotherapy is one of the most aggressive treatment options used in some types of cancer, and is usually administered intravenously. The drug circulates throughout the body, reaching and destroying healthy and cancerous tissues, producing side effects throughout the body, sometimes with serious consequences for the health of the patient (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, anemia, etc.) in this type of therapy. Among the many applications of nanotechnology, the fabrication of nanostructures capable of safely transporting these drugs is seen as a strategy for reducing these side effects. Nanoparticles are able to carry and release the drug in the right place and with the required dose, greatly reducing the problems associated with direct treatment with these drugs. In recent years, there have been continuous improvements in the design and development of new tailor-made drug delivery systems, including hollow magnetic nanoparticles, liposomal structures, dendrimers, nanoporous silicon, etc. These structures can be obtained with different molecular weights (in the case of polymers), structures, shapes, and even with the appropriate functional groups for interaction at the desired positions. But, a great effort is still required to solve many

  8. Intranasal drug delivery to the central nervous system: present status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Nwankwo, Innocent Ejike; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex task. Different parameters may negatively influence effective targeting of the CNS and drug compliance, for example, poor brain-blood barrier (BBB) permeability, patient forgetfulness or neglect, and lack of collaboration between caregivers and patients. Pharmaceutical science is constantly looking for new administration strategies for efficient drug delivery to the CNS that could obviate these problems. Drugs can reach the brain through the skin, nasal cavity and oral cavity, and while effective transport of drugs from skin and nasal cavity to the CNS has been documented, these studies did not stimulate the introduction of a substantial number of new drug formulations to treat CNS disorders. Nasal drug delivery, generally used to administer locally acting molecules, is not common for systemic administration, although the possibility and importance of such systemic administration is suggested by several studies. This paper reviewed different anatomical and pharmaceutical factors related to drug administration through the nasal route, and explored whether nasal delivery of selected CNS drugs could improve their pharmacokinetics and patient compliance. This route offers attractive advantages, and pharmaceutical scientists and anatomists should collaborate to improve CNS drug compliance and to increase the number of compounds that can be administered intranasally.

  9. A targeted drug delivery system based on dopamine functionalized nano graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudipour, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Maleki, Nasim

    2017-01-01

    The cellular targeting property of a biocompatible drug delivery system can widely increase the therapeutic effect against various diseases. Here, we report a dopamine conjugated nano graphene oxide (DA-nGO) carrier for cellular delivery of the anticancer drug, Methotrexate (MTX) into DA receptor positive human breast adenocarcinoma cell line. The material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, the antineoplastic action of MTX loaded DA-nGO against DA receptor positive and negative cell lines were explored. The results presented in this article demonstrated that the application of DA functionalized GO as a targeting drug carrier can improve the drug delivery efficacy for DA receptor positive cancer cell lines and promise future designing of carrier conjugates based on it.

  10. High efficient anti-cancer drug delivery systems using tea polyphenols reduced and functionalized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqian; Hao, Liying; Zhang, Chaoliang; Chen, Jiao; Zhang, Ping

    2017-03-01

    Targeted drug delivery is urgently needed for cancer therapy, and green synthesis is important for the biomedical use of drug delivery systems in the human body. In this work, we report two targeted delivery systems for anticancer drugs based on tea polyphenol functionalized and reduced graphene oxide (TPGs). The obtained TPGs demonstrated an efficient doxorubicin loading capacity as high as 3.430 × 10(6 )mg g(-1) and 3.932 × 10(4 )mg g(-1), and exhibited pH-triggered release. Furthermore, the kinetic models, adsorption isotherms, and possible loading mechanisms were investigated in details. Compared to TPG1 and free doxorubicin, TPG2 is biocompatible to normal cells even at high concentrations and promotes tumor cells death by delivering the doxorubicin mainly to the nuclei. These results were confirmed using cell viability tests and confocal laser microscopy. Moreover, apoptosis tests showed that the mechanism of cancer cell death induced by TPG1 and TPG2 might follow the similar mechanisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TPGs provide a multifunctional drug delivery system with a greater loading capacity and pH-sensitive drug release for enhanced cancer therapy. The high drug payload capability and enhanced antitumor efficacy demonstrate that we developed systems are promising for various biomedical applications and cancer therapy.

  11. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  12. Mimicking Biological Delivery Through Feedback-Controlled Drug Release Systems Based on Molecular Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kryscio, David R.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent drug delivery systems (DDS) are able to rapidly detect a biological event and respond appropriately by releasing a therapeutic agent; thus, they are advantageous over their conventional counterparts. Molecular imprinting is a promising area that generates a polymeric network which can selectively recognize a desired analyte. This field has been studied for a variety of applications over a long period of time, but only recently has it been investigated for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Recent work in the area of molecularly imprinted polymers in drug delivery highlights the potential of these recognitive networks as environmentally responsive DDS that can ultimately lead to feedback controlled recognitive release systems. PMID:26500352

  13. The role of polymer membrane formation in sustained release drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    McHugh, A J

    2005-12-05

    A discussion of the role of polymer membrane-based drug delivery systems is presented. This is followed with a review of recent studies in our laboratories of the membrane formation and drug delivery characteristics of injectable polymer solution platforms. Attention is focused on the role of depot formulation in terms of solvent quality and water miscibility and polymer type (amorphous versus crystallizable), as well as the effects of bath-side additives on the in vitro release behavior. A quantitative model describing the protein release dynamics in fast phase inverting systems (FPI) is also discussed.

  14. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-06-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,l-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content.

  15. Application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicate in oral amorphous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ken K; Bogner, Robin H

    2012-02-01

    Aqueous solubility of an active pharmaceutical ingredient is an important consideration to ensure successful drug development. Mesoporous materials have been investigated as an amorphous drug delivery system owing to their nanosized capillaries and large surface areas. The complex interactions of crystalline compounds with mesoporous media and their implication in drug delivery are not well understood. Molecules interacting with porous media behave very differently than those in bulk phase. Their altered dynamics and thermodynamics play an important role in the properties and product performance of the amorphous system. In this review, application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicates in drug amorphization is the main focus. First, as background, the nature of gas-porous media interactions is summarized. The synthesis of various types of mesoporous silica, which are used by many investigators in this field, is described. Second, the behavior of molecules confined in mesopores is compared with those in bulk, crystalline phase. The molecular dynamics of compounds due to confinement, analyzed using various techniques, and their consequences in drug delivery are discussed. Finally, the preparation and performance of drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica are examined.

  16. Broadly Applicable Nanowafer Drug Delivery System for Treating Eye Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    the drug molecular transport into the cornea. Intravital laser confocal imaging of the live mouse cornea demonstrating the presence of drug in the...vivo drug release in the mouse cornea by laser confocal fluorescence imaging study revealed that the nanowafers upon instillation on mouse eye were...C) 500nm; (D) 1µm; (E) 1.5µm; and (F) 3µm A B C D E F microscopy (SEM) for the feature integrity and uniformity. The SEM images revealed the presence

  17. Perivascular medical devices and drug delivery systems: Making the right choices.

    PubMed

    Mylonaki, Ioanna; Allémann, Éric; Saucy, François; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Delie, Florence; Jordan, Olivier

    2017-02-28

    Perivascular medical devices and perivascular drug delivery systems are conceived for local application around a blood vessel during open vascular surgery. These systems provide mechanical support and/or pharmacological activity for the prevention of intimal hyperplasia following vessel injury. Despite abundant reports in the literature and numerous clinical trials, no efficient perivascular treatment is available. In this review, the existing perivascular medical devices and perivascular drug delivery systems, such as polymeric gels, meshes, sheaths, wraps, matrices, and metal meshes, are jointly evaluated. The key criteria for the design of an ideal perivascular system are identified. Perivascular treatments should have mechanical specifications that ensure system localization, prolonged retention and adequate vascular constriction. From the data gathered, it appears that a drug is necessary to increase the efficacy of these systems. As such, the release kinetics of pharmacological agents should match the development of the pathology. A successful perivascular system must combine these optimized pharmacological and mechanical properties to be efficient.

  18. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological disorder that results in cognitive and behavioral impairment. Conventional treatment strategies, such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drugs, often fail due to their poor solubility, lower bioavailability, and ineffective ability to cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnological treatment methods, which involve the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems, have been employed to optimize therapeutics. These nanotechnologies include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and liquid crystals. Each of these are promising tools for the delivery of therapeutic devices to the brain via various routes of administration, particularly the intranasal route. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26345528

  19. Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Alina Y.; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). PMID:26644797

  20. Microfabricated Engineered Particle Systems for Respiratory Drug Delivery and Other Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Andres; Mack, Peter; Williams, Stuart; Fromen, Catherine; Shen, Tammy; Tully, Janet; Pillai, Jonathan; Kuehl, Philip; Napier, Mary; DeSimone, Joseph M.; Maynor, Benjamin W.

    2012-01-01

    Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT®) is a platform particle drug delivery technology that coopts the precision and nanoscale spatial resolution inherently afforded by lithographic techniques derived from the microelectronics industry to produce precisely engineered particles. We describe the utility of PRINT technology as a strategy for formulation and delivery of small molecule and biologic therapeutics, highlighting previous studies where particle size, shape, and chemistry have been used to enhance systemic particle distribution properties. In addition, we introduce the application of PRINT technology towards respiratory drug delivery, a particular interest due to the pharmaceutical need for increased control over dry powder characteristics to improve drug delivery and therapeutic indices. To this end, we have produced dry powder particles with micro- and nanoscale geometric features and composed of small molecule and protein therapeutics. Aerosols generated from these particles show attractive properties for efficient pulmonary delivery and differential respiratory deposition characteristics based on particle geometry. This work highlights the advantages of adopting proven microfabrication techniques in achieving unprecedented control over particle geometric design for drug delivery. PMID:22518316

  1. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M.; Aloorkar, Nagesh H.; Ingale, Dipti J.; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K.; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R.; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-01-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug–polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and particle size analysis, and evaluated for morphology, drug loading, in vitro drug release and ex vivo diffusion as well. There were no chemical interactions between drug and polymers used as revealed by compatibility studies outcomes. The drug polymer ratio reflected notable effect on drug content, encapsulation efficiency and particle size. SEM results revealed spherical microsponges with porous surface, and had 7.21 μm mean particle size. The microsponges were then incorporated in gel; which exhibited viscous modulus along with pseudoplastic behavior. In vitro drug release results depicted that microsponges with 1:2 drug–polymer ratio were more efficient to give extended drug release of 75.88% at the end of 8 h; while conventional formulation get exhausted incredibly earlier by releasing 81.11% drug at the end of 4 h only. Thus the formulated microsponge-based gel of diclofenac diethylamine would be a promising alternative to conventional therapy for safer and efficient treatment of arthritis and musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:26594124

  2. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  3. Laser-induced disruption of systemically administered liposomes for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Larabi, Malika; Shinde, Rajesh; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M.; Guccione, Samira; Contag, Christopher H.

    2009-07-01

    Liposomal formulations of drugs have been shown to enhance drug efficacy by prolonging circulation time, increasing local concentration and reducing off-target effects. Controlled release from these formulations would increase their utility, and hyperthermia has been explored as a stimulus for targeted delivery of encapsulated drugs. Use of lasers as a thermal source could provide improved control over the release of the drug from the liposomes with minimal collateral tissue damage. Appropriate methods for assessing local release after systemic delivery would aid in testing and development of better formulations. We use in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of luciferin, used as a model small molecule, and demonstrate laser-induced release from liposomes in animal models after systemic delivery. These liposomes were tested for luciferin release between 37 and 45 °C in PBS and serum using bioluminescence measurements. In vivo studies were performed on transgenic reporter mice that express luciferase constitutively throughout the body, thus providing a noninvasive readout for controlled release following systemic delivery. An Nd:YLF laser was used (527 nm) to heat tissues and induce rupture of the intravenously delivered liposomes in target tissues. These data demonstrate laser-mediated control of small molecule delivery using thermally sensitive liposomal formulations.

  4. Simultaneous monitoring of the drug release and antitumor effect of a novel drug delivery system-MWCNTs/DOX/TC.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xia; Sun, Zhiting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Dunwan; Liu, Lanxia; Leng, Xigang

    2017-11-01

    Monitoring drug release and therapeutic efficacy is crucial for developing drug delivery systems. Our preliminary study demonstrated that, as compared with pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), transactivator of transcription (TAT)-chitosan functionalized MWCNTs (MWCNTs-TC) were a more promising candidate for drug delivery in cancer therapy. In the present study, a MWCNTs/TC-based drug delivery system was developed for an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX). The drug loading and in vitro release profiles, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity were assessed. More importantly, the in vivo drug release and antitumor effect of MWCNTs/DOX/TC were evaluated by noninvasive fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. It was demonstrated that MWCNTs/DOX/TC can be efficiently taken up by BEL-7402 hepatoma cells. The release of DOX from MWCNTs/DOX/TC was faster under lower pH condition, which was beneficial for intrcellular drug release. The in vivo release process of DOX and antitumor effect in animal model were monitored simultaneously by noninvasive fluorescence and luminescence imaging, which demonstrated the application potential of MWCNTs/DOX/TC for cancer therapy.

  5. An implantable MEMS micropump system for drug delivery in small animals.

    PubMed

    Gensler, Heidi; Sheybani, Roya; Li, Po-Ying; Mann, Ronalee Lo; Meng, Ellis

    2012-06-01

    We present the first implantable drug delivery system for controlled timing and location of dosing in small animals. Current implantable drug delivery devices do not provide control over these factors nor are they feasible for implantation in research animals as small as mice. Our system utilizes an integrated electrolysis micropump, is refillable, has an inert drug reservoir for broad drug compatibility, and is capable of adjustment to the delivery regimen while implanted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for characterization of electrodes on glass substrate and a flexible Parylene substrate. Benchtop testing of the electrolysis actuator resulted in flow rates from 1 μL/min to 34 μL/min on glass substrate and up to 6.8 μL/min on Parylene substrate. The fully integrated system generated a flow rate of 4.72 ± 0.35 μL/min under applied constant current of 1.0 mA while maintaining a power consumption of only ~3 mW. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo application of the system for anti-cancer drug delivery in mice.

  6. In-silico simulations of advanced drug delivery systems: what will the future offer?

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Juergen

    2013-09-15

    This commentary enlarges on some of the topics addressed in the Position Paper "Towards more effective advanced drug delivery systems" by Crommelin and Florence (2013). Inter alia, the role of mathematical modeling and computer-assisted device design is briefly addressed in the Position Paper. This emerging and particularly promising field is considered in more depth in this commentary. In fact, in-silico simulations have become of fundamental importance in numerous scientific and related domains, allowing for a better understanding of various phenomena and for facilitated device design. The development of novel prototypes of space shuttles, nuclear power plants and automobiles are just a few examples. In-silico simulations are nowadays also well established in the field of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) and have become an integral part of the discovery and development process of novel drug products. Since Takeru Higuchi published his seminal equation in 1961 the use of mathematical models for the analysis and optimization of drug delivery systems in vitro has also become more and more popular. However, applying in-silico simulations for facilitated optimization of advanced drug delivery systems is not yet common practice. One of the reasons is the gap between in vitro and in vivo (PK/PD) simulations. In the future it can be expected that this gap will be closed and that computer assisted device design will play a central role in the research on, and development of advanced drug delivery systems.

  7. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Kuldeep Hemraj; Nath, Lilakant

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A), and concentration of cross linking agent (B) on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24511481

  8. Therapy of Chronic Hepatitis C in the Era of Nanotechnology: Drug Delivery Systems and Liver Targeting.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Maria Lujan

    2017-01-01

    Since the British scientist Michael Houghton along with George Kuo, Qui-Lim Choo (Chiron Corporation Emeryville), and Daniel W. Bradley (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) codiscovered the causative agent of hepatitis C in 1989, so much progress has been made for the screening of blood donors and management of this chronic liver disease. In this regard, direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have emerged as the potential "cure" of this slowly progressing and devastating disease. However, improvements are still clearly required since the anti-hepatitis C drugs currently available in the market are so extremely expensive (i.e. $94,500 for a 12-week course of treatment), that many patients will have a denied access to such drugs by their insurers.

    In the last few years, nanotechnology has emerged as a new platform for drug development, contributing significantly to the improvement of the administration and delivery of many drugs. Additionally, nanotechnologies can provide unique solutions even in poorer societies.

    This manuscript reviews the current knowledges on the available anti-hepatitis C drugs and the new drug candidates being investigated as well, and introduces the recent advances in nanocarrier-based delivery systems. Finally, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver are also discussed.

  9. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy.

  10. A Microparticle/Hydrogel Combination Drug-Delivery System for Sustained Release of Retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song-Qi; Maeda, Tadao; Okano, Kiichiro; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To design and develop a drug-delivery system containing a combination of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles and alginate hydrogel for sustained release of retinoids to treat retinal blinding diseases that result from an inadequate supply of retinol and generation of 11-cis-retinal. Methods. To study drug release in vivo, either the drug-loaded microparticle–hydrogel combination was injected subcutaneously or drug-loaded microparticles were injected intravitreally into Lrat−/− mice. Orally administered 9-cis-retinoids were used for comparison and drug concentrations in plasma were determined by HPLC. Electroretinography (ERG) and both chemical and histologic analyses were used to evaluate drug effects on visual function and morphology. Results. Lrat−/− mice demonstrated sustained drug release from the microparticle/hydrogel combination that lasted 4 weeks after subcutaneous injection. Drug concentrations in plasma of the control group treated with the same oral dose rose to higher levels for 6−7 hours but then dropped markedly by 24 hours. Significantly increased ERG responses and a markedly improved retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE)–rod outer segment (ROS) interface were observed after subcutaneous injection of the drug-loaded delivery combination. Intravitreal injection of just 2% of the systemic dose of drug-loaded microparticles provided comparable therapeutic efficacy. Conclusions. Sustained release of therapeutic levels of 9-cis-retinoids was achieved in Lrat−/− mice by subcutaneous injection in a microparticle/hydrogel drug-delivery system. Both subcutaneous and intravitreal injections of drug-loaded microparticles into Lrat−/− mice improved visual function and retinal structure. PMID:22918645

  11. Phototriggered multifunctional drug delivery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtner, S.; Kim, H.-C.; Hampp, N.

    2006-02-01

    Although phototriggered cleavage of chemical bonds induced by single-photon or two-photon-absorption provides attractive tools for controlled drug delivery, the choice of drugs is still limited by the linker system to which the therapeutic molecules need to be bound covalently. The use of a multifunctional linker system suitable for coupling a broad spectrum of drugs to the polymeric carrier will open a new field for drug delivery. We have developed a novel photocleavable multifunctional linker system based on coumarin dimers, whose unique photochemical behavior are well characterized. As a first example, an acrylic polymer-drug conjugate with antimetabolites is explored. The cleavage of the link between the drug and the polymer backbone is triggered by both single- as well as two-photon absorption. The release of the drug is investigated. It is possible to manufacture a polymeric drug delivery device with several drugs in different areas. In particular the two-photon-absorption induced process offers the possibility to address the drug of interest owing to the superior spatial resolution. The key to such devices is a versatile linker-system which can be adopted to work with various drug compounds.

  12. Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases by Means of Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S; Amaral, M H; Lobo, J M Sousa; Silva, A C

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are prevalent neurodegenerative disorders worldwide, which are essentially related to aging. Within the remarkable era of nanomedicine, nowadays several delivery systems have been suggested to improve the treatment of these disorders, namely, liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles (polymeric, lipid, metallic and inorganic), exosomes, dendrimers and fullerenes. The advantage that has been claimed to these delivery systems is that they facilitate the passage of drugs through the blood brain barrier (BBB), enabling targeting before body degradation, and increasing therapeutic efficacy, comparied to conventional pharmaceutical dosage forms. This review article provides a state of the art regarding the drug delivery systems that have been studied for the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. It begins with a brief description of the central nervous system (CNS) and the mechanisms involved in the development of these diseases. Later, some examples of drugs used in the treatment of these neurodegenerative diseases are presented, which are currently available in conventional pharmaceutical dosage forms, and in new drug delivery systems that are under development.

  13. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review.

    PubMed

    Dineshkumar, B; Krishnakumar, K; Bhatt, A R; Paul, D; Cherian, J; John, A; Suresh, S

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  14. Dry Powder Inhalers: A Focus on Advancements in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Administration of drug molecules by inhalation route for treatment of respiratory diseases has the ability to deliver drugs, hormones, nucleic acids, steroids, proteins, and peptides, particularly to the site of action, improving the efficacy of the treatment and consequently lessening adverse effects of the treatment. Numerous inhalation delivery systems have been developed and studied to treat respiratory diseases such as asthma, COPD, and other pulmonary infections. The progress of disciplines such as biomaterials science, nanotechnology, particle engineering, molecular biology, and cell biology permits further improvement of the treatment capability. The present review analyzes modern therapeutic approaches of inhaled drugs with special emphasis on novel drug delivery system for treatment of various respiratory diseases. PMID:27867663

  15. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Melanoma Antitumoral Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rigon, Roberta Balansin; Oyafuso, Márcia Helena; Fujimura, Andressa Terumi; do Prado, Alice Haddad; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma (MEL) is a less common type of skin cancer, but it is more aggressive with a high mortality rate. The World Cancer Research Fund International (GLOBOCAN 2012) estimates that there were 230,000 new cases of MEL in the world in 2012. Conventional MEL treatment includes surgery and chemotherapy, but many of the chemotherapeutic agents used present undesirable properties. Drug delivery systems are an alternative strategy by which to carry antineoplastic agents. Encapsulated drugs are advantageous due to such properties as high stability, better bioavailability, controlled drug release, a long blood circulation time, selective organ or tissue distribution, a lower total required dose, and minimal toxic side effects. This review of scientific research supports applying a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for MEL therapy. PMID:26078967

  16. Ionic Gelation Controlled Drug Delivery Systems for Gastric-Mucoadhesive Microcapsules of Captopril

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, M. A.; Sreedharan; Charyulu, N.

    2008-01-01

    A new oral drug delivery system was developed utilizing both the concepts of controlled release and mucoadhesiveness, in order to obtain a unique drug delivery system which could remain in stomach and control the drug release for longer period of time. Captopril microcapsules were prepared with a coat consisting of alginate and a mucoadhesive polymer such as hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose, carbopol 934p, chitosan and cellulose acetate phthalate using emulsification ionic gelation process. The resulting microcapsules were discrete, large, spherical and free flowing. Microencapsulation efficiency was 41.7-89.7% and high percentage efficiency was observed with (9:1) alginate-chitosan microcapsules. All alginate-carbopol 934p microcapsules exhibited good mucoadhesive property in the in vitro wash off test. Drug release pattern for all formulation in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) was diffusion controlled, gradually over 8 h and followed zero order kinetics. PMID:21394268

  17. Development of Drug Delivery Systems Based on Layered Hydroxides for Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Layered hydroxides (LHs) have recently fascinated researchers due to their wide application in various fields. These inorganic nanoparticles, with excellent features as nanocarriers in drug delivery systems, have the potential to play an important role in healthcare. Owing to their outstanding ion-exchange capacity, many organic pharmaceutical drugs have been intercalated into the interlayer galleries of LHs and, consequently, novel nanodrugs or smart drugs may revolutionize in the treatment of diseases. Layered hydroxides, as green nanoreservoirs with sustained drug release and cell targeting properties hold great promise of improving health and prolonging life. PMID:24802876

  18. [Strategy and collaboration between medicinal chemists and pharmaceutical scientists for drug delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Mano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In order to successfully apply drug delivery systems (DDS) to new chemical entities (NCEs), collaboration between medicinal chemists and formulation scientists is critical for efficient drug discovery. Formulation scientists have to use 'language' that medicinal chemists understand to help promote mutual understanding, and medicinal chemists and formulation scientists have to set up strategies to use suitable DDS technologies at the discovery phase of the programmes to ensure successful transfer into the development phase. In this review, strategies of solubilisation formulation for oral delivery, inhalation delivery, nasal delivery and bioconjugation are all discussed. For example, for oral drug delivery, multiple initiatives can be proposed to improve the process to select an optimal delivery option for an NCE. From a technical perspective, formulation scientists have to explain the scope and limitations of formulations as some DDS technologies might be applicable only to limited chemical spaces. Other limitations could be the administered dose and, cost, time and resources for formulation development and manufacturing. Since DDS selection is best placed as part of lead-optimisation, formulation scientists need to be involved in discovery projects at lead selection and optimisation stages. The key to success in their collaboration is to facilitate communication between these two areas of expertise at both a strategic and scientific level. Also, it would be beneficial for medicinal chemists and formulation scientists to set common goals to improve the process of collaboration and build long term partnerships to improve DDS.

  19. Synthetic Zeolites as Controlled-Release Delivery Systems for Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Khodaverdi, Elham; Soleimani, Hossein Ali; Mohammadpour, Fatemeh; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2016-06-01

    Scientists have always been trying to use artificial zeolites to make modified-release drug delivery systems in the gastrointestinal tract. An ideal carrier should have the capability to release the drug in the intestine, which is the main area of absorption. Zeolites are mineral aluminosilicate compounds with regular structure and huge porosity, which are available in natural and artificial forms. In this study, soaking, filtration and solvent evaporation methods were used to load the drugs after activation of the zeolites. Weight measurement, spectroscopy FTIR, thermogravimetry and scanning electronic microscope were used to determine drug loading on the systems. Finally, consideration of drug release was made in a simulated gastric fluid and a simulated intestinal fluid for all matrixes (zeolites containing drugs) and drugs without zeolites. Diclofenac sodium (D) and piroxicam (P) were used as the drug models, and zeolites X and Y as the carriers. Drug loading percentage showed that over 90% of drugs were loaded on zeolites. Dissolution tests in stomach pH environment showed that the control samples (drug without zeolite) released considerable amount of drugs (about 90%) within first 15 min when it was about 10-20% for the matrixes. These results are favorable as NSAIDs irritate the stomach wall and it is ideal not to release much drugs in the stomach. Furthermore, release rate of drugs from matrixes has shown slower rate in comparison with control samples in intestine pH environment.

  20. [Efficacy of a new fenbendazole formulation produced by nanotechnology-based drug delivery system against nematodosis].

    PubMed

    Varlamova, A I; Arkhipov, I A; Odoevskaia, I M; Danilevskaia, N V; Khalikov, S S; Chistiachenko, Iu S; Dushkin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of a new fenbendazile formulation produced by nanotechnology-based drug delivery system was investigated in45 sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The formulation showed 95.6% efficacy against Nematodes spp. at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg dw of its active ingredient and 100% efficacy against other species of gastrointestinal nematodes. Given at a dose of 10 mg/kg dw, the basic drug--fenbendazole (substance) displayed 96.39 and 100% efficacy, respectively.

  1. Novel in Situ Gel Drug Delivery System for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alekha K. Dash, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Creighton University...COVERED (From - To) 1 JUL 2005 - 30 JUN 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel in Situ Gel Drug Delivery System for Breast Cancer

  2. Pectin/zein microspheres as a sustained drug delivery system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of microspheres were prepared from pectins and corn proteins from various sources in the presence of the divalent ions calcium or zinc. The results showed that the yield of microsphere and the efficiency of drug incorporation were dependent on the type and ratio of biopolymers, the size of ...

  3. The expanding role of aerosols in systemic drug delivery, gene therapy, and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L

    2005-09-01

    Aerosolized medications have been used for centuries to treat respiratory diseases. Until recently, inhalation therapy focused primarily on the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the pressurized metered-dose inhaler was the delivery device of choice. However, the role of aerosol therapy is clearly expanding beyond that initial focus. This expansion has been driven by the Montreal protocol and the need to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from traditional metered-dose inhalers, by the need for delivery devices and formulations that can efficiently and reproducibly target the systemic circulation for the delivery of proteins and peptides, and by developments in medicine that have made it possible to consider curing lung diseases with aerosolized gene therapy and preventing epidemics of influenza and measles with aerosolized vaccines. Each of these drivers has contributed to a decade or more of unprecedented research and innovation that has altered how we think about aerosol delivery and has expanded the role of aerosol therapy into the fields of systemic drug delivery, gene therapy, and vaccination. During this decade of innovation, we have witnessed the coming of age of dry powder inhalers, the development of new soft mist inhalers, and improved pressurized metered-dose inhaler delivery as a result of the replacement of CFC propellants with hydrofluoroalkane. The continued expansion of the role of aerosol therapy will probably depend on demonstration of the safety of this route of administration for drugs that have their targets outside the lung and are administered long term (eg, insulin aerosol), on the development of new drugs and drug carriers that can efficiently target hard-to-reach cell populations within the lungs of patients with disease (eg, patients with cystic fibrosis or lung cancer), and on the development of devices that improve aerosol delivery to infants, so that early intervention in disease processes with aerosol

  4. Biodegradable PLGA- b-PEG polymeric nanoparticles: synthesis, properties, and nanomedical applications as drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Erica; Comes Franchini, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    During the past decades many synthetic polymers have been studied for nanomedicine applications and in particular as drug delivery systems. For this purpose, polymers must be non-toxic, biodegradable, and biocompatible. Polylactic- co-glycolic acid (PLGA) is one of the most studied polymers due to its complete biodegradability and ability to self-assemble into nanometric micelles that are able to entrap small molecules like drugs and to release them into body in a time-dependent manner. Despite fine qualities, using PLGA polymeric nanoparticles for in vivo applications still remains an open challenge due to many factors such as poor stability in water, big diameter (150-200 nm), and the removal of these nanocarriers from the blood stream by the liver and spleen thus reducing the concentration of drugs drastically in tumor tissue. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is the most used polymers for drug delivery applications and the first PEGylated product is already on the market for over 20 years. This is due to its stealth behavior that inhibits the fast recognition by the immune system (opsonization) and generally leads to a reduced blood clearance of nanocarriers increasing blood circulation time. Furthermore, PEG is hydrophilic and able to stabilize nanoparticles by steric and not ionic effects especially in water. PLGA-PEG block copolymer is an emergent system because it can be easily synthesized and it possesses all good qualities of PLGA and also PEG capability so in the last decade it arose as one of the most promising systems for nanoparticles formation, drug loading, and in vivo drug delivery applications. This review will discuss briefly on PLGA- b-PEG synthesis and physicochemical properties, together with its improved qualities with respect to the single PLGA and PEG polymers. Moreover, we will focus on but in particular will treat nanoparticles formation and uses as new drug delivery system for nanomedical applications.

  5. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  6. Advanced drug and gene delivery systems based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-09-28

    Biodegradable polymeric nanocarriers are one of the most promising systems for targeted and controlled drug and gene delivery. They have shown several unique advantages such as excellent biocompatibility, prolonged circulation time, passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, and degradation in vivo into nontoxic products after completing their tasks. The current biodegradable drug and gene delivery systems exhibit, however, typically low in vivo therapeutic efficacy, due to issues of low loading capacity, inadequate in vivo stability, premature cargo release, poor uptake by target cells, and slow release of therapeutics inside tumor cells. To overcome these problems, a variety of advanced drug and gene delivery systems has recently been designed and developed based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers. Notably, polycarbonates and copolymers with diverse functionalities such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, amine, alkene, alkyne, halogen, azido, acryloyl, vinyl sulfone, pyridyldisulfide, and saccharide, could be readily obtained by controlled ring-opening polymerization. In this paper, we give an overview on design concepts and recent developments of functional polycarbonate-based nanocarriers including stimuli-sensitive, photo-crosslinkable, or active targeting polymeric micelles, polymersomes and polyplexes for enhanced drug and gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. These multifunctional biodegradable nanosystems might be eventually developed for safe and efficient cancer chemotherapy and gene therapy.

  7. Reactive‐Oxygen‐Species‐Responsive Drug Delivery Systems: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Saravanakumar, Gurusamy; Kim, Jihoon

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasing evidence indicates that many pathological conditions are associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, there have been growing research efforts focused on the development of ROS‐responsive carrier systems because of their promising potential to realize more specific diagnosis and effective therapy. By judicious utilization of ROS‐responsive functional moieties, a wide range of carrier systems has been designed for ROS‐mediated drug delivery. In this review article, insights into design principle and recent advances on the development of ROS‐responsive carrier systems for drug delivery applications are provided alongside discussion of their in vitro and in vivo evaluation. In particular, the discussions in this article will mainly focus on polymeric nanoparticles, hydrogels, inorganic nanoparticles, and activatable prodrugs that have been integrated with diverse ROS‐responsive moieties for spatiotemporally controlled release of drugs for effective therapy. PMID:28105390

  8. Biomedical Properties Study of Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss and summarize some of the interesting findings and applications of modified chitosan (MCS) and their derivatives in different areas of drug delivery. This review highlights the important applications of MCS in the design of various novel delivery systems like liposomes, microspheres, microcapsules, and nanoparticles. In addition to their well-known effects on drug solubility and dissolution, bioavailability, safety, and stability, their uses as recipients in drug formulation are also discussed. This review also focuses on various factors influencing inclusion complex formation because an understanding of the same is necessary for proper handling of these versatile materials. Some important considerations in selecting MCS in drug formulation such as their commercial availability, regulatory status, and patent status are also summarized.

  9. Folic acid conjugated magnetic drug delivery system for controlled release of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andhariya, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Ramesh; Mehta, Rasbindu; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2013-01-01

    Targeting tumors by means of their vascular endothelium is a promising strategy, which utilizes targets that are easily accessible, stable, and do not develop resistance against therapeutic agents. Folate receptor is a highly specific tumor marker, frequently over expressed in cancer tumors. In the present study, an active drug delivery system, which can effectively target cancer cells by means of folate receptor-mediated endocytosis, have ability to escape from opsonization and capability of magnetic targeting to withstand the drag force of the body fluid have been designed and synthesized. The core of the drug delivery system is of mono-domain magnetic particles of magnetite. Magnetite nanoparticles are shielded with PEG, which prevents their phagocytosis by reticuloendothelial system. These PEG shielded magnetite nanoparticles are further decorated with an antitumor receptor—folic acid and loaded with an antineoplastic agent doxorubicin. An in vitro drug loading and release kinetics study reveals that the drug delivery system can take 52 % of drug load and can release doxorubicin over a sustained period of 7 days. The control and sustained release over a period of several days may find its practical utilities in chemotherapy where frequent dosing is not possible.

  10. Transdermal Drug Delivery System. Stage 1. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-30

    AND TOXICOLOGY f" Draize: Appraisal of the Safety of Chemicals in Foods, Drugs and Cosme cs(1%5) Published by the Editorial Committee of the... K5 0. C..1 4)E 43 4 -439$ JE 4 -jE 4 LA 611>0)a %ww>2 4 >62 C 0 C L *0> .0e:I-00000000S-0 00 0 00 0 0 Lbw.9W- a-1 Ci N U 4.1 a iu tu u iu ju c LA ua L

  11. Design optimization of a novel pMDI actuator for systemic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kakade, Prashant P; Versteeg, Henk K; Hargrave, Graham K; Genova, Perry; Williams Iii, Robert C; Deaton, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are the most widely prescribed and economical respiratory drug delivery systems. Conventional pMDI actuators-those based on "two-orifice-and-sump" designs-produce an aerosol with a reasonable respirable fraction, but with high aerosol velocity. The latter is responsible for high oropharyngeal deposition, and consequently low drug delivery efficiency. Kos' pMDI technology is based on a proprietary vortex nozzle actuator (VNA), an innovative actuator configuration that seeks to reduce aerosol plume velocity, thereby promoting deep lung deposition. Using VNA development as a case study, this paper presents a systematic design optimization process to improve the actuator performance through use of advanced optical characterization tools. The optimization effort mainly relied on laser-based optical diagnostics to provide an improved understanding of the fundamentals of aerosol formation and interplay of various geometrical factors. The performance of the optimized VNA design thus evolved was characterized using phase Doppler anemometry and cascade impaction. The aerosol velocities for both standard and optimized VNA designs were found to be comparable, with both notably less than conventional actuators. The optimized VNA design also significantly reduces drug deposition in the actuator as well as USP throat adapter, which in turn, leads to a significantly higher fine particle fraction than the standard design (78 +/- 3% vs. 63 +/- 2% on an ex valve basis). This improved drug delivery efficiency makes VNA technology a practical proposition as a systemic drug delivery platform. Thus, this paper demonstrates how advanced optical diagnostic and characterization tools can be used in the development of high efficiency aerosol drug delivery devices.

  12. Curcumin loaded mesoporous silica: an effective drug delivery system for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kotcherlakota, Rajesh; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Prashar, Sanjiv; Fajardo, Mariano; Briones, David; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Gómez-Ruiz, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we report the delivery of anti-cancer drug curcumin to cancer cells using mesoporous silica materials. A series of mesoporous silica material based drug delivery systems (S2, S4 and S6) were first designed and developed through the amine functionalization of KIT-6, MSU-2 and MCM-41 followed by the loading of curcumin. The curcumin loaded materials were characterized with several physico-chemical techniques and thoroughly screened on cancer cells to evaluate their in vitro drug delivery efficacy. All the curcumin loaded silica materials exhibited higher cellular uptake and inhibition of cancer cell viability compared to pristine curcumin. The effective internalization of curcumin in cancer cells through the mesoporous silica materials initiated the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the down regulation of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) enzyme levels compared to free curcumin leading to the activation of apoptosis. This study shows that the anti-cancer activity of curcumin can be potentiated by loading onto mesoporous silica materials. Therefore, we strongly believe that mesoporous silica based curcumin loaded drug delivery systems may have future potential applications for the treatment of cancers.

  13. Ingenious pH-sensitive dextran/mesoporous silica nanoparticles based drug delivery systems for controlled intracellular drug release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Jia; Kuang, Ying; Li, Qilin; Zheng, Di-Wei; Song, Qiongfang; Chen, Hui; Chen, Xueqin; Xu, Yanglin; Li, Cao; Jiang, Bingbing

    2017-02-04

    In this work, dextran, a polysaccharide with excellent biocompatibility, is applied as the "gatekeeper" to fabricate the pH-sensitive dextran/mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) based drug delivery systems for controlled intracellular drug release. Dextran encapsulating on the surface of MSNs is oxidized by NaIO4 to obtain three kinds of dextran dialdehydes (PADs), which are then coupled with MSNs via pH-sensitive hydrazone bond to fabricate three kinds of drug carriers. At pH 7.4, PADs block the pores to prevent premature release of anti-cancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). However, in the weakly acidic intracellular environment (pH∼5.5) the hydrazone can be ruptured; and the drug can be released from the carriers. The drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and release rates of the drug carriers can be adjusted by the amount of NaIO4 applied in the oxidation reaction. And from which DOX@MSN-NH-N=C-PAD10 is chosen as the most satisfactory one for the further in vitro cytotoxicity studies and cellular uptake studies. The results demonstrate that DOX@MSN-NH-N=C-PAD10 with an excellent pH-sensitivity can enter HeLa cells to release DOX intracellular due to the weakly acidic pH intracellular and kill the cells. In our opinion, the ingenious pH-sensitive drug delivery systems have application potentials for cancer therapy.

  14. Two-photon triggered drug delivery system: a new way to prevent posterior capsule opacification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Härtner, S.; Hampp, N.

    2006-02-01

    One of the major complications of cataract surgery is posterior capsule opacification caused by proliferation and migration of residual lens epithelial cells into the visual axis. In this study we present a novel approach to treat posterior capsule opacification in a non-invasive manner. A polymer-drug conjugate has been developed which is suitable for manufacturing functional intraocular lenses equipped with a drug delivery system. The therapeutic molecules, 5-fluorouracil, were attached through a photolabile linkage to the acrylic polymer backbone of the intraocular lens material. The controlled release of 5-fluorouracil is accomplished by two-photon induced cleavage of the linkage which is stable in ordinary conditions. The properties of the therapeutic system are characterized and the function is demonstrated in in vitro tests. The utilization of two-photon-absorption processes in drug delivery may provide a powerful tool to prevent posterior capsule opacification.

  15. Modified titanium implant as a gateway to the human body: the implant mediated drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Seok; Cho, Joo-Youn; Lee, Shin-Jae; Hwang, Chee Il

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a proposed new implant mediated drug delivery system (IMDDS) in rabbits. The drug delivery system is applied through a modified titanium implant that is configured to be implanted into bone. The implant is hollow and has multiple microholes that can continuously deliver therapeutic agents into the systematic body. To examine the efficacy and feasibility of the IMDDS, we investigated the pharmacokinetic behavior of dexamethasone in plasma after a single dose was delivered via the modified implant placed in the rabbit tibia. After measuring the plasma concentration, the areas under the curve showed that the IMDDS provided a sustained release for a relatively long period. The result suggests that the IMDDS can deliver a sustained release of certain drug components with a high bioavailability. Accordingly, the IMDDS may provide the basis for a novel approach to treating patients with chronic diseases.

  16. 76 FR 51038 - Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... delivery systems (TMDS), and topical patch products regarding use of an appropriate scientific approach... topical patch products regarding use of an appropriate scientific approach during product design and... necessary to ensure that an appropriate scientific approach is used to design and develop these...

  17. Skin Delivery of Kojic Acid-Loaded Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for the Treatment of Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalez, M. L.; Corrêa, M. A.; Chorilli, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aging process causes a number of changes in the skin, including oxidative stress and dyschromia. The kojic acid (KA) is iron chelator employed in treatment of skin aging, and inhibits tyrosinase, promotes depigmentation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, such as liquid crystalline systems (LCSs), can modulate drug permeation through the skin and improve the drug activity. This study is aimed at structurally developing and characterizing a kojic acid-loaded LCS, consists of water (W), cetostearyl isononanoate (oil—O) and PPG-5-CETETH-20 (surfactant-S) and evaluating its in vitro skin permeation and retention. Three regions of the diagram were selected for characterization: A (35% O, 50% S, 15% W), B (30% O, 50% S, 20% W) and C (20% O, 50% S, 30% W), to which 2% KA was added. The formulations were subjected to polarized light microscopy, which indicated the presence of a hexagonal mesophase. Texture and bioadhesion assay showed that formulation B is suitable for topical application. According to the results from the in vitro permeation and retention of KA, the formulations developed can modulate the permeation of KA in the skin. The in vitro cytotoxic assays showed that KA-unloaded LCS and KA-loaded LCS didn't present cytotoxicity. PPG-5-CETETH-20-based systems may be a promising platform for KA skin delivery. PMID:24369010

  18. Drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: A promising therapy method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; DU, Lian Fang; Chen, Ming; Wang, Hang Hui; Xing, Ling Xi; Jing, Li Fang; Li, Yun Hua

    2013-07-01

    The nano-microcapsules drug delivery system is currently a promising method for the treatment of many types of diseases, particularly tumors. However, the drug delivery efficiency does not reach a satisfactory level to meet treatment demands. Therefore, the effectiveness of delivery needs to be improved. Based on the alterations in the structure and modification of nano-microcapsules, ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), a safe physical targeted method, may increase tissue penetration and cell membrane permeability, aiding the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules ingress the interior of targeted tissues and cells. The effectiveness and exact mechanism of action of the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by UTMD have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the latest advancement in UTMD-mediated drug loaded nano-microcapsules system technology was reviewed and the hindrances of UTMD-mediated drug delivery were assessed, in combination with a prospective study. The findings suggested that the drug delivery efficiency of nano-microcapsules mediated by UTMD was distinctly improved. Thus, the UTMD-mediated drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system may significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery, which may be a promising new therapeutic method.

  19. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  20. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  1. Formulation and Evaluation of a Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery System Containing Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eon-Pyo; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyu-Mok; Park, Chun-Woong; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Weon, Kwon-Yeon; Jeong, Seo Young; Park, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to develop a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) containing bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor. The solubility of the drug was evaluated in 15 pharmaceutical excipients. Combinations of oils, surfactants and cosurfactants were screened by drawing pseudo-ternary phase diagrams. The system exhibiting the largest region of microemulsion was considered optimal. Bortezomib SMEDDS spontaneously formed a microemulsion when diluted with an aqueous medium with a median droplet size of approximately 20-30 nm. In vitro release studies showed that the SMEDDS had higher initial release rates for the drug when compared with the raw drug material alone. Measurement of the viscosity, size, and ion conductivity indicated that a phase inversion from water in an oil system to oil in a water system occurred when the weight ratio of the water exceeded 30% of the entire microemulsion system. In a pharmacokinetics study using rats, the bortezomib microemulsion failed to improve the bioavailability of the drug. The reason was assumed to be degradation of the drug in the microemulsion in the gastrointestinal tract. However, bortezomib in Labrasol(®) solution (an aqueous solution containing 0.025% Labrasol(®)) showed significantly increased area under the curve from 0-24 h (AUC0-24 h) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values compared to the drug suspension. The findings of this study imply that oral delivery of a bortezomib and colloidal system containing Labrasol(®) could be an effective strategy for the delivery of bortezomib.

  2. Engineered Polymer-Transferrin Conjugates as Self-Assembling Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Hiteshri; Mastrotto, Francesca; Magnusson, Johannes Pall; Sleep, Darrell; Hay, Joanna; Nicholls, Karl J; Allen, Stephanie; Alexander, Cameron

    2017-03-28

    Polymer-protein conjugates can be engineered to self-assemble into discrete and well-defined drug delivery systems which combine the advantages of receptor targeting and controlled drug release. We designed specific conjugates of the iron-binding and transport protein, transferrin (Tf), to combine the advantages of this serum-stable protein as a targeting agent for cancer cells with self-assembling polymers to act as carriers of cytotoxic drugs. Tf variants were expressed with cysteine residues at sites spanning different regions of the protein surface and the polymer conjugates grown from these variants were compared with polymer conjugates grown from non-selectively derivatised sites on native Tf. The resulting synthetic biopolymer hybrids were evaluated for self-assembly properties, size and topology, ability to carry an anti-cancer drug (paclitaxel) and cytotoxicity with and without a drug payload in a representative human colon cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that the engineered Tf variant polymer conjugates formed better-defined self-assembled nanoparticles than the non-selectively derivatised conjugates and showed greater efficacy in paclitaxel delivery. A polymer conjugate grown from a specific Tf variant, S415C was found to be taken up rapidly into cancer cells expressing the Tf-receptor, and, while tolerated well by cells in the absence of drugs, was as cytotoxic as free paclitaxel when loaded with the drug. Importantly, the S415C conjugate polymer was not the most active variant in Tf-receptor binding, suggesting that the nanoscale self-assembly of the polymer-protein hybrid is also a key factor in delivery efficacy. The data overall suggest new design rules for polymer-biopolymer hybrids and therapeutic delivery systems which include engineering specific residues for conjugation which mediate nanoscale assembly as well as control of ligand-receptor interactions to target specific cell types.

  3. [Mechanisms of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose for the precipitation inhibitor of supersaturatable self-emulsifying drug delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lu; Yi, Tao

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) propels self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) to achieve the supersaturated state in gastrointestinal tract, which possesses important significance to enhance oral absorption for poorly water-soluble drugs. This study investigated capacities and mechanisms of HPMC with different viscosities (K4M, K15M and K100M) to inhibit drug precipitation of SEDDS in the simulated gastrointestinal tract environment in vitro. The results showed that HPMC inhibited drug precipitation during the dispersion of SEDDS under gastric conditions by inhibiting the formation of crystal nucleus and the growth of crystals. HPMC had evident effects on the rate of SEDDS lipolysis and benefited the distribution of drug molecules across into the aqueous phase and the decrease of drug sediment. The mechanisms were related to the formed network of HPMC and its viscosities and molecular weight. These results offered a reference for selecting appropriate type of HPMC as the precipitation inhibitor of supersaturatable SEDDS.

  4. A modified emulsion gelation technique to improve buoyancy of hydrogel tablets for floating drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2015-10-01

    The use of buoyant or floating hydrogel tablets is of particular interest in the sustained release of drugs to the stomach. They have an ability to slow the release rates of drugs by prolonging their absorption window in the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study we synthesized bioactive hydrogels that have sustainable release rates for drugs in the stomach based on a hydrogel preparation technique that employs emulsifying surfactants. The emulsion gelation technique, which encapsulates oil droplets within the hydrogels during crosslinking, was used to decrease their specific gravity in aqueous environments, resulting in floating drug release depots. Properties such as swelling, buoyancy, density and drug release were manipulated by changing the polymer concentrations, surfactant percentages and the oil:polymer ratios. The relationship between these properties and the hydrogel's floating lag time was documented. The potential for this material to be used as a floating drug delivery system was demonstrated.

  5. Advances in nanotechnology-based carrier systems for targeted delivery of bioactive drug molecules with special emphasis on immunotherapy in drug resistant tuberculosis - a critical review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-06-01

    From the early sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the present day of life, tuberculosis (TB) still is a global health threat with some new emergence of resistance. This type of emergence poses a vital challenge to control TB cases across the world. Mortality and morbidity rates are high due to this new face of TB. The newer nanotechnology-based drug-delivery approaches involving micro-metric and nano-metric carriers are much needed at this stage. These delivery systems would provide more advantages over conventional systems of treatment by producing enhanced therapeutic efficacy, uniform distribution of drug molecule to the target site, sustained and controlled release of drug molecules and lesser side effects. The main aim to develop these novel drug-delivery systems is to improve the patient compliance and reduce therapy time. This article reviews and elaborates the new concepts and drug-delivery approaches for the treatment of TB involving solid-lipid particulate drug-delivery systems (solid-lipid micro- and nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers), vesicular drug-delivery systems (liposomes, niosomes and liposphere), emulsion-based drug-delivery systems (micro and nanoemulsion) and some other novel drug-delivery systems for the effective treatment of tuberculosis and role of immunomodulators as an adjuvant therapy for management of MDR-TB and XDR-TB.

  6. Ultrasound enhanced drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of ultrasound to enhance drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system. Disorders of the brain and CNS historically have had poor response to drug therapy due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Techniques for circumventing the BBB are typically highly invasive or involve disrupting large portions of the BBB, exposing the brain to pathogens. Ultrasound can be non-invasively delivered to the brain through the intact skull. When combined with preformed microbubbles, ultrasound can safely induce transient, localised and reversible disruption of the BBB, allowing therapeutics to be delivered. Investigations to date have shown positive response to ultrasound BBB disruption combined with therapeutic agent delivery in rodent models of primary and metastatic brain cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Recent work in non-human primates has demonstrated that the technique is feasible for use in humans. This review examines the current status of drug delivery to the brain and CNS both by disruption of the BBB, and by ultrasound enhancement of drug delivery through the already compromised BBB. Cellular and physical mechanisms of disruption are discussed, as well as treatment technique, safety and monitoring.

  7. Nanodiamonds as novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications: drug delivery and imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Randeep; Badea, Ildiko

    2013-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are emerging as delivery vehicles for small chemical drugs and macromolecular biotechnology products due to their primary particle size of 4 to 5 nm, stable inert core, reactive surface, and ability to form hydrogels. Nanoprobe technology capitalizes on the intrinsic fluorescence, high refractive index, and unique Raman signal of the NDs, rendering them attractive for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. This review provides a brief introduction of the various types of NDs and describes the development of procedures that have led to stable single-digit-sized ND dispersions, a crucial feature for drug delivery systems and nanoprobes. Various approaches used for functionalizing the surface of NDs are highlighted, along with a discussion of their biocompatibility status. The utilization of NDs to provide sustained release and improve the dispersion of hydrophobic molecules, of which chemotherapeutic drugs are the most investigated, is described. The prospects of improving the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids by using NDs as a platform are exemplified. The photoluminescent and optical scattering properties of NDs, together with their applications in cellular labeling, are also reviewed. Considering the progress that has been made in understanding the properties of NDs, they can be envisioned as highly efficient drug delivery and imaging biomaterials for use in animals and humans.

  8. Nanodiamonds as novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications: drug delivery and imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Randeep; Badea, Ildiko

    2013-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are emerging as delivery vehicles for small chemical drugs and macromolecular biotechnology products due to their primary particle size of 4 to 5 nm, stable inert core, reactive surface, and ability to form hydrogels. Nanoprobe technology capitalizes on the intrinsic fluorescence, high refractive index, and unique Raman signal of the NDs, rendering them attractive for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. This review provides a brief introduction of the various types of NDs and describes the development of procedures that have led to stable single-digit-sized ND dispersions, a crucial feature for drug delivery systems and nanoprobes. Various approaches used for functionalizing the surface of NDs are highlighted, along with a discussion of their biocompatibility status. The utilization of NDs to provide sustained release and improve the dispersion of hydrophobic molecules, of which chemotherapeutic drugs are the most investigated, is described. The prospects of improving the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids by using NDs as a platform are exemplified. The photoluminescent and optical scattering properties of NDs, together with their applications in cellular labeling, are also reviewed. Considering the progress that has been made in understanding the properties of NDs, they can be envisioned as highly efficient drug delivery and imaging biomaterials for use in animals and humans. PMID:23326195

  9. Potential for layered double hydroxides-based, innovative drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Xu, Zhi Ping; Lu, Ji; Tang, Zhi Yong; Zhao, Hui Jun; Good, David A; Wei, Ming Qian

    2014-04-29

    Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs)-based drug delivery systems have, for many years, shown great promises for the delivery of chemical therapeutics and bioactive molecules to mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. This system offers high efficiency and drug loading density, as well as excellent protection of loaded molecules from undesired degradation. Toxicological studies have also found LDHs to be biocompatible compared with other widely used nanoparticles, such as iron oxide, silica, and single-walled carbon nanotubes. A plethora of bio-molecules have been reported to either attach to the surface of or intercalate into LDH materials through co-precipitation or anion-exchange reaction, including amino acid and peptides, ATPs, vitamins, and even polysaccharides. Recently, LDHs have been used for gene delivery of small molecular nucleic acids, such as antisense, oligonucleotides, PCR fragments, siRNA molecules or sheared genomic DNA. These nano-medicines have been applied to target cells or organs in gene therapeutic approaches. This review summarizes current progress of the development of LDHs nanoparticle drug carriers for nucleotides, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer drugs and recent LDH application in medical research. Ground breaking studies will be highlighted and an outlook of the possible future progress proposed. It is hoped that the layered inorganic material will open up new frontier of research, leading to new nano-drugs in clinical applications.

  10. Potential for Layered Double Hydroxides-Based, Innovative Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Xu, Zhi Ping; Lu, Ji; Tang, Zhi Yong; Zhao, Hui Jun; Good, David A.; Wei, Ming Qian

    2014-01-01

    Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs)-based drug delivery systems have, for many years, shown great promises for the delivery of chemical therapeutics and bioactive molecules to mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. This system offers high efficiency and drug loading density, as well as excellent protection of loaded molecules from undesired degradation. Toxicological studies have also found LDHs to be biocompatible compared with other widely used nanoparticles, such as iron oxide, silica, and single-walled carbon nanotubes. A plethora of bio-molecules have been reported to either attach to the surface of or intercalate into LDH materials through co-precipitation or anion-exchange reaction, including amino acid and peptides, ATPs, vitamins, and even polysaccharides. Recently, LDHs have been used for gene delivery of small molecular nucleic acids, such as antisense, oligonucleotides, PCR fragments, siRNA molecules or sheared genomic DNA. These nano-medicines have been applied to target cells or organs in gene therapeutic approaches. This review summarizes current progress of the development of LDHs nanoparticle drug carriers for nucleotides, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer drugs and recent LDH application in medical research. Ground breaking studies will be highlighted and an outlook of the possible future progress proposed. It is hoped that the layered inorganic material will open up new frontier of research, leading to new nano-drugs in clinical applications. PMID:24786098

  11. Dropwise Additive Manufacturing of Pharmaceutical Products for Amorphous and Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Içten, Elçin; Purohit, Hitesh S; Wallace, Chelsey; Giridhar, Arun; Taylor, Lynne S; Nagy, Zoltan K; Reklaitis, Gintaras V

    2017-04-02

    The improvements in healthcare systems and the advent of the precision medicine initiative have created the need to develop more innovative manufacturing methods for the delivery and production of individualized dosing and personalized treatments. In accordance with the changes observed in healthcare systems towards more innovative therapies, this paper presents dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products (DAMPP) for small scale, distributed manufacturing of individualized dosing as an alternative to conventional manufacturing methods A dropwise additive manufacturing process for amorphous and self-emulsifying drug delivery systems is reported, which utilizes drop-on-demand printing technology for automated and controlled deposition of melt-based formulations onto inert tablets. The advantages of drop on demand technology include reproducible production of droplets with adjustable sizing and high placement accuracy, which enable production of individualized dosing even for low dose and high potency drugs. Flexible use of different formulations, such as lipid-based formulations, allows enhancement of the solubility of poorly water soluble and highly lipophilic drugs with DAMPP. Here, DAMPP is used to produce solid oral dosage forms from melts of an active pharmaceutical ingredient and a surfactant. The dosage forms are analyzed to show the amorphous nature, self-emulsifying drug delivery system characteristics and dissolution behavior of these formulations.

  12. Mathematical modeling of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2008-12-08

    Due to the significant advances in information technology mathematical modeling of drug delivery is a field of steadily increasing academic and industrial importance with an enormous future potential. The in silico optimization of novel drug delivery systems can be expected to significantly increase in accuracy and easiness of application. Analogous to other scientific disciplines, computer simulations are likely to become an integral part of future research and development in pharmaceutical technology. Mathematical programs can be expected to be routinely used to help optimizing the design of novel dosage forms. Good estimates for the required composition, geometry, dimensions and preparation procedure of various types of delivery systems will be available, taking into account the desired administration route, drug dose and release profile. Thus, the number of required experimental studies during product development can be significantly reduced, saving time and reducing costs. In addition, the quantitative analysis of the physical, chemical and potentially biological phenomena, which are involved in the control of drug release, offers another fundamental advantage: The underlying drug release mechanisms can be elucidated, which is not only of academic interest, but a pre-requisite for an efficient improvement of the safety of the pharmaco-treatments and for effective trouble-shooting during production. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of mathematical modeling of drug delivery, including empirical/semi-empirical and mechanistic realistic models. Analytical as well as numerical solutions are described and various practical examples are given. One of the major challenges to be addressed in the future is the combination of mechanistic theories describing drug release out of the delivery systems with mathematical models quantifying the subsequent drug transport within the human body in a realistic way. Ideally, the effects of the design

  13. Nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of saquinavir mesylate for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Hitendra S; Mahajan, Milind S; Nerkar, Pankaj P; Agrawal, Anshuman

    2014-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunological privileged sanctuary site-providing reservoir for HIV-1 virus. Current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. The low permeability of anti-HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) leads to insufficient delivery. Therefore, developing a novel approaches enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required for the treatment of neuro-AIDS. The aim of this study was to develop intranasal nanoemulsion (NE) for enhanced bioavailability and CNS targeting of saquinavir mesylate (SQVM). SQVM is a protease inhibitor which is a poorly soluble drug widely used as antiretroviral drug, with oral bioavailability is about 4%. The spontaneous emulsification method was used to prepare drug-loaded o/w nanoemulsion, which was characterized by droplet size, zeta potential, pH, drug content. Moreover, ex-vivo permeation studies were performed using sheep nasal mucosa. The optimized NE showed a significant increase in drug permeation rate compared to the plain drug suspension (PDS). Cilia toxicity study on sheep nasal mucosa showed no significant adverse effect of SQVM-loaded NE. Results of in vivo biodistribution studies show higher drug concentration in brain after intranasal administration of NE than intravenous delivered PDS. The higher percentage of drug targeting efficiency (% DTE) and nose-to-brain drug direct transport percentage (% DTP) for optimized NE indicated effective CNS targeting of SQVM via intranasal route. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated transport of drug in the CNS at larger extent after intranasal administration as NE.

  14. Role of excipients and polymeric advancements in preparation of floating drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Avinash Y; Tiwari, Ajay K; Gaur, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Since decade or two, the development of floating drug delivery systems becomes a significant and novel tool as having low density than gastric content. There are various advanced polymers including chitosan, eudragit, etc., and excipients such as; pore forming agent, surfactants, etc. All of them are discussed briefly, and results are concluded from various reputed researches. We have discussed all natural and synthetic systems with their effect on the release and other parameters which are essential for the floating formulation development. PMID:25599027

  15. A Transdermal Drug Delivery System Based on LIGA Technology and Soft Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Marco; Perennes, Frederic; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a transdermal drug delivery system based on LIGA fabricated microparts. It is a portable device combining a magnetically actuated micro gear pump with a microneedle array. The fluidic behaviour of the system is analyzed in order to predict its performance according to the dimension of the microparts and then compared to experimental data. The manufacturing process of both micropump and microneedle array are described.

  16. A sustained intravitreal drug delivery system with remote real time monitoring capability

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huiyuan; Nieto, Alejandra; Belghith, Akram; Nan, Kaihui; Li, Yangyang; Freeman, William R.; Sailor, Michael J.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Many chorioretinal diseases are chronic and need sustained drug delivery systems to keep therapeutic drug level at the disease site. Many intravitreal drug delivery systems under developing do not have mechanism incorporated for a non-invasive monitoring of drug release. Current study prepared rugate porous silicon (pSi) particles by electrochemical etching with the currents frequency (K value) of 2.17 and 2.45. Two model drugs (Rapmycin and Dexamethasone) and two drug-loading strategies were tested for the feasibility to monitor drug release from the pSi particles through a color fundus camera. The pSi particles (k=2.45) with infiltration loading of rapamycin demonstrated progressively more violet color reflection which was negatively associated with the rapamycin released into the vitreous (r=−0.4, p<0.001, pairwise). In contrast, pSi with K value of 2.17 demonstrated progressive color change towards green and a weak association between rapmycin released into vitreous and green color abundance was identified (r=−0.23, p=0.002, pairwise). Dexamethasone was covalently loaded on to the fully oxidized pSi particles that appeared in vitreous as yellow color and fading over time. The yellow color decrease over time was strongly associated with the dexamethasone detected from the vitreous samples (r=0.7, p<0.0001, pairwise). These results suggest that engineered porous silicon particles may be used as a self-reporting drug delivery system for a non-invasive real time remote monitoring. PMID:26087110

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System of Olmesartan Medoxomil for Bioavailability Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Shailesh T.; Joshi, Harsh A.; Patel, Chhaganbhai N.

    2013-01-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) antihypertensive agent administered orally that has absolute bioavailability of only 26% due to the poor aqueous solubility (7.75 μg/ml). The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) to enhance the oral absorption of OLM. The solubility of OLM in various oils, surfactants, and cosurfactants was determined. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed using Acrysol EL 135, Tween 80, Transcutol P, and distilled water to identify the efficient self-microemulsification region. Prepared SMEDDS was further evaluated for its emulsification time, drug content, optical clarity, droplet size, zeta potential, in vitro dissolution, and in vitro and ex vivo drug diffusion study. The optimized formulation S2 contained OLM (20 mg), Tween 80 (33%v/v), Transcutol P (33%v/v), and Acrysol EL 135 (34%v/v) had shown the smallest particle size, maximum solubility, less emulsification time, good optical clarity, and in vitro release. The in vitro and ex vivo diffusion rate of the drug from the SMEDDS was significantly higher than that of the plain drug suspension. It was concluded that SMEDDS would be a promising drug delivery system for poorly water-soluble drugs by the oral route. PMID:26555991

  18. Apoferritin nanocage as streptomycin drug reservoir: Technological optimization of a new drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, B; Veratti, P; Vandelli, M A; Tombesi, A; Tonelli, M; Forni, F; Pederzoli, F; Belletti, D; Tosi, G

    2017-02-25

    The aim of this study is to formulate and characterize streptomycin-loaded apoferritin nanoparticles (ApoStrep NPs) for their potential therapeutic use in bacterial resistant infections (i.e. tuberculosis). ApoStrep NPs were prepared by disassembly/reassembly process via pH method and changing apoferritin/drug molar ratio, purified by dialyses process also associated with gel filtration chromatography and characterized in their chemico-physical and technological parameters as yield, size distribution, polidispersivity, morphology, internal structure, zeta potential and loading efficacy. The results showed that spherical reproducible NPs could be obtained by using apoferritin/drug molar ratio lower than 1:25 and purification based on the combination of dialysis and gel filtration chromatography. Photon correlation spectroscopy, Uv-visible detection and electron microscopy showed the maintenance of the native apoferritin chemico-physical properties and structure. When formulated with apoferritin/drug 1:10 and 1:25 molar ratio, ApoStrep NPs showed remarkable encapsulation efficacy (35% and 28%, respectively) along with kinetic profile of drug delivery, approximately 15% at 37 °C in 72h, as evidenced by "in vitro" release experiments.

  19. Formulation development of smart gel periodontal drug delivery system for local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents with application of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Dabhi, Mahesh R; Nagori, Stavan A; Gohel, Mukesh C; Parikh, Rajesh K; Sheth, Navin R

    2010-01-01

    Smart gel periodontal drug delivery systems (SGPDDS) containing gellan gum (0.1-0.8% w/v), lutrol F127 (14, 16, and 18% w/v), and ornidazole (1% w/v) were designed for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Each formulation was characterized in terms of in vitro gelling capacity, viscosity, rheology, content uniformity, in vitro drug release, and syringeability. In vitro gelation time and the nature of the gel formed in simulated saliva for prepared formulations showed polymeric concentration dependency. Drug release data from all formulations was fitted to different kinetic models and the Korsemeyer-Peppas model was the best fit model. Drug release was significantly decreased as the concentration of each polymer component was increased. Increasing the concentration of each polymeric component significantly increased viscosity, syringeability, and time for 50%, 70%, and 90% drug release. In conclusion, the formulations described offer a wide range of physical and drug release characteristics. The formulation containing 0.8% w/v of gellan gum and 16% w/v of lutrol F127 exhibited superior physical characteristics.

  20. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape.

  1. Nanomedicine: towards development of patient-friendly drug-delivery systems for oncological applications

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Ramya; Madanmohan, Shruthilaya; Kesavan, Akila; Baskar, Ganga; Krishnamoorthy, Yoganathan Ramia; Santosham, Roy; Ponraju, D; Rayala, Suresh Kumar; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    The focus on nanotechnology in cancer treatment and diagnosis has intensified due to the serious side effects caused by anticancer agents as a result of their cytotoxic actions on normal cells. This nonspecific action of chemotherapy has awakened a need for formulations capable of definitive targeting with enhanced tumor-killing. Nanooncology, the application of nanobiotechnology to the management of cancer, is currently the most important area of nanomedicine. Currently several nanomaterial-based drug-delivery systems are in vogue and several others are in various stages of development. Tumor-targeted drug-delivery systems are envisioned as magic bullets for cancer therapy and several groups are working globally for development of robust systems. PMID:22403487

  2. Collagen Coated Nanoliposome as a Targeted and Controlled Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Stephen, P.; Prabhu, M.; Sehgal, P. K.; Sadulla, S.

    2010-10-01

    The collagen coated nanoliposome (CCNL) have been prepared and characterized in order to develop a targeted and controlled drug delivery system. The zeta potential (ZP) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Cell viability assay data showed that the collagen coated nanoliposome particle size and charges, structural interaction and surface morphology and high bio-cyto-compatibility of collagen coated nanoliposome. The particle sizes of nanoliposome (NL) and collagen coated nanoliposome are 20-300 nm and 0.1-10 μm respectively. The introduction of triple helical, coiled coil and fibrous protein of collagen into nanoliposome can improves the stability of nanoliposome, resistant to phospholipase activities and decreasing the phagocytosis of liposomes by reticuloendothelial system. The collagen coated nanoliposome is expected to be used as for targeted and controlled drug delivery system, and tissue engineering application.

  3. [The effect of air within the infusion syringe on drug delivery of syringe pump infusion systems] .

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Fischer, J; Neff, T; Bänziger, O; Weiss, M

    2000-12-01

    Application of highly concentrated short-acting vasoactive drugs in the critically ill patient requires precisely working syringe pump systems for continuous intravenous drug delivery. We performed a bench study to investigate the consequences of small amounts of air entrapped within a 50-ml infusion syringe. In particular we studied the effect of entrapped air on drug delivery after moderate vertical displacement of the pump by 50 cm (e.g. in preparation for transport) and the effect on the time required to trigger the pressure alarm after occlusion of the infusion line. At a flow rate of 1 ml/h, lowering the syringe pump prolonged the zero-drug delivery time from (mean +/- SD) 4.1 +/- 0.8 min (without air) to 6.2 +/- 0.9 (with 1 ml air) and to 13.1 +/- 0.9 min (with 2 ml of air, p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Entrapping of 2 ml of air within the syringe resulted in a 2.6-fold prolongation of the occlusion alarm time after accidental occlusion of the infusion line and a 3-fold increase of the resulting infusion bolus after occlusion. Enclosed air within infusion syringes considerably affects the syringe compliance. It increases the susceptibility of constant drug delivery to vertical displacement of syringe pumps and impairs the occlusion alarm function. Therefore, any air in syringe of infusion pump systems should be carefully removed. To avoid infusion boluses of short-acting vasoactive drugs after accidental occlusions, the occluded infusion line should be released to ambient pressure first.

  4. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  5. Evaluation of powder mixtures and hydrophilic gastroretentive drug delivery systems containing zinc acetate and sodium bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Baki, Gabriella; Bajdik, János; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2011-03-25

    The aim of this study was to develop and study floating controlled drug delivery systems consisting of a model drug (zinc acetate dihydrate), different forms of a matrix-forming polymer (Metolose 90 SH) and sodium bicarbonate as an effervescent component. The proportions of Metolose and bicarbonate were varied, and the effects of the different ratios on the properties of the resulting powders and tablets were determined. The water uptakes of different powder mixtures were initially evaluated. These tests indicated the interaction of the active and effervescent agent, this phenomenon leading to an unpredicted increase in the amount of liquid taken up. This interaction was evaluated as concerns the degradation of the hydrophilic matrix system. The disintegration of tablets with different compositions revealed that this interaction increases the time required for the disintegration of these systems. The study demonstrated that the interaction of the components induced significant changes in the parameters of this new sensitive delivery system. In the last steps, the buoyancy and dissolution properties of tablets that appeared appropriate for the formulation of a controlled drug delivery system were investigated.

  6. Drug Release Kinetics and Transport Mechanisms of Non-degradable and Degradable Polymeric Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yao; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field The advancement in material design and engineering has led to the rapid development of novel materials with increasing complexity and functions. Both non-degradable and degradable polymers have found wide applications in the controlled delivery field. Studies on drug release kinetics provide important information into the function of material systems. To elucidate the detailed transport mechanism and the structure-function relationship of a material system, it is critical to bridge the gap between the macroscopic data and the transport behavior at the molecular level. Areas covered in this review The structure and function information of selected non-degradable and degradable polymers have been collected and summarized from literatures published after 1990s. The release kinetics of selected drug compounds from various material systems will be discussed in case studies. Recent progresses in the mathematical models based on different transport mechanisms will be highlighted. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of structure-function relationships of selected non-degradable and degradable polymers as drug delivery matrices. Take home message Understanding the structure-function relationship of the material system is key to the successful design of a delivery system for a particular application. Moreover, developing complex polymeric matrices requires more robust mathematical models to elucidate the solute transport mechanisms. PMID:20331353

  7. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Voltan, Aline Raquel; Quindós, Guillermo; Alarcón, Kaila P Medina; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. PMID:27540288

  8. Emerging Research and Clinical Development Trends of Liposome and Lipid Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    KRAFT, JOHN C.; FREELING, JENNIFER P.; WANG, ZIYAO; HO, RODNEY J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are spherical-enclosed membrane vesicles mainly constructed with lipids. Lipid nanoparticles are loaded with therapeutics and may not contain an enclosed bilayer. The majority of those clinically approved have diameters of 50–300 nm. The growing interest in nanomedicine has fueled lipid–drug and lipid–protein studies, which provide a foundation for developing lipid particles that improve drug potency and reduce off-target effects. Integrating advances in lipid membrane research has enabled therapeutic development. At present, about 600 clinical trials involve lipid particle drug delivery systems. Greater understanding of pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and disposition of lipid–drug particles facilitated particle surface hydration technology (with polyethylene glycol) to reduce rapid clearance and provide sufficient blood circulation time for drug to reach target tissues and cells. Surface hydration enabled the liposome-encapsulated cancer drug doxorubicin (Doxil) to gain clinical approval in 1995. Fifteen lipidic therapeutics are now clinically approved. Although much research involves attaching lipid particles to ligands selective for occult cells and tissues, preparation procedures are often complex and pose scale-up challenges. With emerging knowledge in drug target and lipid–drug distribution in the body, a systems approach that integrates knowledge to design and scale lipid–drug particles may further advance translation of these systems to improve therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:24338748

  9. Design of Drug Delivery Methods for the Brain and Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueshen, Eric

    Due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to macromolecules delivered systemically, drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is quite difficult and has become an area of intense research. Techniques such as convection-enhanced intraparenchymal delivery and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting offer a means of circumventing the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutics. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of drug delivery: pharmacokinetics, convection-enhanced delivery, and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Classical pharmacokinetics mainly uses black-box curve fitting techniques without biochemical or biological basis. This dissertation advances the state-of-the-art of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics by incorporating first principles and biochemical/biotransport mechanisms in the prediction of drug fate in vivo. A whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modeling framework is engineered which creates multiscale mathematical models for entire organisms composed of organs, tissues, and a detailed vasculature network to predict drug bioaccumulation and to rigorously determine kinetic parameters. These models can be specialized to account for species, weight, gender, age, and pathology. Systematic individual therapy design using the proposed mechanistic PBPK modeling framework is also a possibility. Biochemical, anatomical, and physiological scaling laws are also developed to accurately project drug kinetics in humans from small animal experiments. Our promising results demonstrate that the whole-body mechanistic PBPK modeling approach not only elucidates drug mechanisms from a biochemical standpoint, but offers better scaling precision. Better models can substantially accelerate the introduction of drug leads to clinical trials and eventually to the market by offering more understanding of the drug mechanisms, aiding in therapy design, and serving as an accurate dosing tool. Convection

  10. Tramadol hydrochloride: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse side effects, co-administration of drugs and new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, M; Andreani, T; Fangueiro, J; Faggio, C; Silva, C; Santini, A; Garcia, M L; Silva, A M; Souto, E B

    2015-03-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride (TrHC) is a synthetic analgesic drug exhibiting opioid and non-opioid properties, acting mainly on the central nervous system. It has been mostly used to treat pain, although its use to treat anxiety and depression has also been documented. These properties arise from the fact that they inhibit serotonin (5-HT) reuptake augmenting 5-HT concentration on the synaptic cleft. Despite this, TrHC has also been described to have several side effects which are mainly due to its fast metabolization and excretion which in turn requires multiple doses per day. To surpass this limitation, new pharmaceutical formulations are being developed intending the protection, target and sustained delivery as well as a reduction on daily dose aiming a reduction on the side effects. In the present work we have revised the efficacy, safety, biological and adverse effects of TrHC, and the added value of developing a novel drug delivery system for topical administration.

  11. Hydroxyapatite-magnetite-MWCNT nanocomposite as a biocompatible multifunctional drug delivery system for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Alessandro; Iannazzo, Daniela; Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Tampieri, Anna; Galvagno, Signorino

    2014-10-01

    New magnetic hydroxyapatite-based nanomaterials as bone-specific systems for controlled drug delivery have been synthesized. The synthesized hydroxyapatite, HA, decorated with magnetite nanoparticles by a deposition method (HA/Fe3O4) and the nanocomposite system obtained using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (HA/MWCNT/Fe3O4) as a filler for HA have been characterized by chemical and morphological analyses, and their biological behavior was investigated. The systems have also been doped with clodronate in order to combine the effect of bone biomineralization induced by hydroxyapatite-based composites with the decrease of osteoclast formation induced by the drug. An analysis of the preosteoclastic RAW264.7 cell proliferation by MTT assay confirmed the high biocompatibility of the three systems. TRAP staining of RAW 264.7 conditioned with sRAKL to induce osteoclastogenesis, cultured in the presence of the systems doped and undoped with clodronate, showed the inhibitory effect of clodronate after we counted the MNC TRAP+cells but only in the osteoclast formation; in particular, the system HA/Fe3O4-Clo exerted a high inhibitory effect compared to the drug alone. These results demonstrate that the synthesized nanocomposites are a biocompatible magnetic drug delivery system and can represent a useful multimodal platform for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  12. Logical enzyme triggered (LET) layer-by-layer nanocapsules for drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Marie-Michelle

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women in the United States. Early detection and treatment methods have resulted in 100% 5-year survival rates for stage 0-I breast cancer. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival rate of metastatic breast cancer (stage IV) is reduced fivefold. The most challenging issues of metastatic breast cancer treatment are the ability to selectively target the adenoma and adenocarcinoma cells both in their location of origin and as they metastasize following initial treatment. Multilayer/Layer-by-Layer (LbL) nanocapsules have garnered vast interest as anticancer drug delivery systems due to their ability to be easily modified, their capacity to encapsulate a wide range of chemicals and proteins, and their improved pharmacokinetics. Multilayer nanocapsule formation requires the layering of opposing charged polyelectrolytic polymers over a removable core nanoparticle. Our goal is to have a programmable nanocapsules degrade only after receiving and validating specific breast cancer biomarkers. The overall objective is to fabricate a novel programmable LbL nanocapsule with a specific logical system that will enhance functions pertinent to drug delivery systems. Our central hypothesis is that LbL technology coupled with extracellular matrix (ECM) protein substrates will result in a logical enzyme triggered LbL nanocapsule drug delivery system. This platform represents a novel approach toward a logically regulated nano-encapsulated cancer therapy that can selectively follow and deliver chemotherapeutics to cancer cells. The rationale for this project is to overcome a crucial limitation of existing drug delivery systems where chemotherapeutic can be erroneously delivered to non-carcinogenic cells.

  13. Formation of controllable hydrophilic/hydrophobic drug delivery systems by electrospinning of vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Luo, Tian; Yang, Yanjuan; Tan, Xiuniang; Liu, Lifei

    2015-05-12

    Novel multifunctional poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) nanofibrous membrane, which contains vesicles constructed by mixed surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), has been designed as dual drug-delivery system and fabricated via the electrospinning process. 5-FU and paeonolum, which are hydrophilic and hydrophobic anticancer model drugs, can be dissolved in vesicle solution's bond water and lipid bilayer membranes, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the electrospun nanofibrous membrane were systematically studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Drug release behaviors of the electrospun nanofibrous membrane fabricated with different molar ratio of CTAB/SDBS vesicle solution were investigated. The result showed that the releasing amount of hydrophilic drug presented an ascending release manner, while the hydrophobic one showed a descending release behavior with increasing of the molar ratio of CTAB/SDBS. Moreover, the release amount of drugs from drug delivery system can be controlled by the molar ratio of CTAB/SDBS in the vesicle solution easily and conveniently. The distinct properties can be utilized to encapsulate environmental demanding and quantificational materials.

  14. PLGA based drug delivery systems: Promising carriers for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique

    2016-03-01

    Wound treatment remains one of the most prevalent and economically burdensome healthcare issues in the world. Current treatment options are limited and require repeated administrations which led to the development of new therapeutics to satisfy the unmet clinical needs. Many potent wound healing agents were discovered but most of them are fragile and/or sensitive to in vivo conditions. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a widely used biodegradable polymer approved by food and drug administration and European medicines agency as an excipient for parenteral administrations. It is a well-established drug delivery system in various medical applications. The aim of the current review is to elaborate the applications of PLGA based drug delivery systems carrying different wound healing agents and also present PLGA itself as a wound healing promoter. PLGA carriers encapsulating drugs such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins/peptides, and nucleic acids targeting various phases/signaling cycles of wound healing, are discussed with examples. The combined therapeutic effects of PLGA and a loaded drug on wound healing are also mentioned.

  15. Perspectives in Engineered Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Based Anti- Cancer Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Ackova, Darinka Gjorgieva; Kanjevac, Tatjana; Rimondini, Lia; Bosnakovski, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and apprehension of the characteristics and circumstances in which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) affect and make alterations (enhance or reduce) to the growth of tumors and metastasis spread is pivotal, not only for reaching the possibility to employ MSCs as drug delivery systems, but also for making forward movement in the existing knowledge of involvement of major factors (tumor microenvironment, soluble signaling molecules, etc.) in the process of carcinogenesis. This capability is reliable because MSCs present a great basis for engineering and constructions of new systems to target cancers, intended to secrete therapeutic proteins in the tumor region, or for delivering of oncolytic viruses' directly at the tumor site (targeted chemotherapy with enzyme prodrug conversion or induction of tumor cell apoptosis). MSCs as a crucial segment of the tumor surroundings and their confirmed tumor tropism, are assumed to be an open gateway for the design of promising drug delivery systems. The presented paper reviews current publications in this fieldwork, searches out the most recent patents that were published after 2012 (WO2014066122, US20140017787, WO2015100268, US20150086515), and tries to present the current progress and future prospective on the design and development in anti-cancer drug delivery systems based on MSCs.

  16. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for treatment of oral cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Calixto, Giovana; Bernegossi, Jéssica; Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Chorilli, Marlus

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx) is a common and aggressive cancer that invades local tissue, can cause metastasis, and has a high mortality rate. Conventional treatment strategies, such as surgery and chemoradiotherapy, have improved over the past few decades; however, they remain far from optimal. Currently, cancer research is focused on improving cancer diagnosis and treatment methods (oral cavity and oropharynx) nanotechnology, which involves the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems. In medicine, nanotechnologies, such as polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, gold nanoparticles, hydrogels, cyclodextrin complexes, and liquid crystals, are promising tools for diagnostic probes and therapeutic devices. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for oral cancers. PMID:25143724

  17. Nanomiemgel - A Novel Drug Delivery System for Topical Application - In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Somagoni, Jaganmohan; Boakye, Cedar H. A.; Godugu, Chandraiah; Patel, Apurva R.; Mendonca Faria, Henrique Antonio; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Singh, Mandip

    2014-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate a unique matrix mixture (nanomiemgel) of nanomicelle and nanoemulsion containing aceclofenac and capsaicin using in vitro and in vivo analyses and to compare it to a marketed formulation (Aceproxyvon). Methods Nanomicelles were prepared using Vitamin E TPGS by solvent evaporation method and nanoemulsion was prepared by high-pressure homogenization method. In vitro drug release and human skin permeation studies were performed and analyzed using HPLC. The efficiency of nanomiemgel as a delivery system was investigated using an imiquimod-induced psoriatic like plaque model developed in C57BL/6 mice. Results Atomic Force Microscopy images of the samples exhibited a globular morphology with an average diameter of 200, 250 and 220 nm for NMI, NEM and NMG, respectively. Nanomiemgel demonstrated a controlled release drug pattern and induced 2.02 and 1.97-fold more permeation of aceclofenac and capsaicin, respectively than Aceproxyvon through dermatomed human skin. Nanomiemgel also showed 2.94 and 2.09-fold greater Cmax of aceclofenac and capsaicin, respectively than Aceproxyvon in skin microdialysis study in rats. The PASI score, ear thickness and spleen weight of the imiquimod-induced psoriatic-like plaque model were significantly (p<0.05) reduced in NMG treated mice compared to free drug, NEM, NMI & Aceproxyvon. Conclusion Using a new combination of two different drug delivery systems (NEM+NMI), the absorption of the combined system (NMG) was found to be better than either of the individual drug delivery systems due to the utilization of the maximum possible paths of absorption available for that particular drug. PMID:25546392

  18. Development of a multilayered association polymer system for sequential drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnakavanam Sundararaj, Sharath kumar

    As all the physiological processes in our body are controlled by multiple biomolecules, comprehensive treatment of certain disease conditions may be more effectively achieved by administration of more than one type of drug. Thus, the primary objective of this research was to develop a multilayered, polymer-based system for sequential delivery of multiple drugs. This particular device was designed aimed at the treatment of periodontitis, a highly prevalent oral inflammatory disease that affects 90% of the world population. This condition is caused by bacterial biofilm on the teeth, resulting in a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The polymers used for the fabrication of this multilayered device consists of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) complexed with Pluronic F-127 (P). After evaluating morphology of the resulting CAPP system, in vitro release of small molecule drugs and a model protein was studied from both single and multilayered devices. Drug release from single-layered CAPP films followed zero-order kinetics related to surface erosion property of the association polymer. Release studies from multilayered CAPP devices showed the possibility of achieving intermittent release of one type of drug as well as sequential release of more than one type of drug. Mathematical modeling accurately predicted the release profiles for both single layer and multilayered devices. After the initial characterization of the CAPP system, the device was specifically modified to achieve sequential release of drugs aimed at the treatment of periodontitis. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. To obtain different erosion

  19. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems (IDDS): The Implantable Systems Performance Registry (ISPR)

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, John M.; Stearns, Lisa M.; Plunkett, Robert J.; Grigsby, Eric J.; Stromberg, E. K.; Roediger, Mollie P.; Wells, Michelle D.; Weaver, Todd W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The ISPR was initially created to monitor the product performance of Medtronic implanted intrathecal drug infusion and spinal cord systems available in the United States. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 50 representative sites implanting and following patients with intrathecal drug delivery systems across the United States between August 7, 2003 and January 31, 2014. Device performance over time was estimated using life table survival methods. Results Of the 6093 patients enrolled in the ISPR, 3405 (55.9%) were female and 2675 (43.9%) were male, and 13 (0.2%) did not provide gender data. The average age at enrollment was 52.9 years (SD =17.6 years) and average follow‐up time was 29.6 months. Currently, the estimates of device survival from pump‐related events exceed 90% for all pump models across the applicable follow‐up time points. The majority of product performance events were catheter‐related. At 5 years of follow‐up, all applicable catheter models, with the exception of revised not as designed or grafted not as designed catheters, had greater than 81% survival from catheter‐related events. Conclusions The ISPR is designed to serve as an ongoing source of system and device‐related information with a focus on “real‐world” safety and product performance. ISPR data continue to be used to guide future product development efforts aimed at improving product reliability and quality. PMID:27730704

  20. Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems as a tool to improve solubility and bioavailability of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Balata, Gehan F; Essa, Ebtessam A; Shamardl, Hanan A; Zaidan, Samira H; Abourehab, Mohammed As

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a nonflavonoid polyphenolic compound which has a broad range of desirable biological actions which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, cardioprotective, and antitumor activities. However, there is concern that the bioavailability of resveratrol may limit some of its clinical utility. So, the aim of this study was to enhance the dissolution rate and oral hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of resveratrol. This was achieved using self-emulsifying drug delivery system. The solubility of resveratrol was determined in various oils, surfactants, and cosurfactants. Phase diagram was plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsification regions using olive oil, Tween 80, and propylene glycol. The prepared self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations were tested for thermodynamic stability, emulsification efficiency, droplet size, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release. Self-emulsification time averaged 17-99 seconds without precipitation and the mean droplet sizes ranged from 285 to 823 nm with overall zeta potential of -2.24 to -15.4 mv. All formulations improved drug dissolution in relation to unprocessed drug with a trend of decreased dissolution parameters with increasing oil content. The optimized formula, F19, with dissolution efficiency of 94% compared to only 42% of pure drug was used to study the in vivo hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of resveratrol in diabetic-induced albino rats and comparing these effects with that of pure resveratrol in different doses. Treatment with the optimized formula, F19, at 10 mg/kg had significant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic-induced albino rats which were nearly similar to the high dose (20 mg/kg) of unprocessed resveratrol. From the study, it was concluded that formulation F19 has good emulsification property with uniform globule size, satisfactory in vitro drug release profile, and significant in vivo hypoglycemic effects which identify future opportunities

  1. Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems as a tool to improve solubility and bioavailability of resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Balata, Gehan F; Essa, Ebtessam A; Shamardl, Hanan A; Zaidan, Samira H; Abourehab, Mohammed AS

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a nonflavonoid polyphenolic compound which has a broad range of desirable biological actions which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, cardioprotective, and antitumor activities. However, there is concern that the bioavailability of resveratrol may limit some of its clinical utility. So, the aim of this study was to enhance the dissolution rate and oral hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of resveratrol. This was achieved using self-emulsifying drug delivery system. The solubility of resveratrol was determined in various oils, surfactants, and cosurfactants. Phase diagram was plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsification regions using olive oil, Tween 80, and propylene glycol. The prepared self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations were tested for thermodynamic stability, emulsification efficiency, droplet size, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release. Self-emulsification time averaged 17–99 seconds without precipitation and the mean droplet sizes ranged from 285 to 823 nm with overall zeta potential of −2.24 to −15.4 mv. All formulations improved drug dissolution in relation to unprocessed drug with a trend of decreased dissolution parameters with increasing oil content. The optimized formula, F19, with dissolution efficiency of 94% compared to only 42% of pure drug was used to study the in vivo hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of resveratrol in diabetic-induced albino rats and comparing these effects with that of pure resveratrol in different doses. Treatment with the optimized formula, F19, at 10 mg/kg had significant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic-induced albino rats which were nearly similar to the high dose (20 mg/kg) of unprocessed resveratrol. From the study, it was concluded that formulation F19 has good emulsification property with uniform globule size, satisfactory in vitro drug release profile, and significant in vivo hypoglycemic effects which identify future

  2. Transmucosal macromolecular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prego, C; García, M; Torres, D; Alonso, M J

    2005-01-03

    Mucosal surfaces are the most common and convenient routes for delivering drugs to the body. However, macromolecular drugs such as peptides and proteins are unable to overcome the mucosal barriers and/or are degraded before reaching the blood stream. Among the approaches explored so far in order to optimize the transport of these macromolecules across mucosal barriers, the use of nanoparticulate carriers represents a challenging but promising strategy. The present paper aims to compare the characteristics and potential of nanostructures based on the mucoadhesive polysaccharide chitosan (CS). These are CS nanoparticles, CS-coated oil nanodroplets (nanocapsules) and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles. The characteristics and behavior of CS nanoparticles and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles already reported [A. Vila, A. Sanchez, M. Tobio, P. Calvo, M.J. Alonso, Design of biodegradable particles for protein delivery, J. Control. Rel. 78 (2002) 15-24; R. Fernandez-Urrusuno, P. Calvo, C. Remunan-Lopez, J.L. Vila-Jato, M.J. Alonso, Enhancement of nasal absorption of insulin using chitosan nanoparticles, Pharm. Res. 16 (1999) 1576-1581; M. Garcia-Fuentes, D. Torres, M.J. Alonso, New surface-modified lipid nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for salmon calcitonin (submitted for publication).] are compared with those of CS nanocapsules originally reported here. The three types of systems have a size in the nanometer range and a positive zeta potential that was attributed to the presence of CS on their surface. They showed an important capacity for the association of peptides such as insulin, salmon calcitonin and proteins, such as tetanus toxoid. Their mechanism of interaction with epithelia was investigated using the Caco-2 model cell line. The results showed that CS-coated systems caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the transepithelial resistance of the cell monolayer. Moreover, within the range of concentrations investigated, these systems were internalized in the

  3. Smart drug delivery systems: back to the future vs. clinical reality.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Twan

    2013-09-15

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and material science have re-ignited interest in drug delivery research. Arguably, however, hardly any of the systems developed and strategies proposed are really relevant for shaping the future (clinical) face of the nanomedicine field. Consequently, as outlined in this commentary, instead of making ever more carrier materials, and making nanomedicine both science-fiction and fiction-science, we should try to come up with rational and realistic concepts to make nanomedicines work, in particular in patients.

  4. A microfluidic reciprocating intracochlear drug delivery system with reservoir and active dose control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ernest S; Gustenhoven, Erich; Mescher, Mark J; Pararas, Erin E Leary; Smith, Kim A; Spencer, Abigail J; Tandon, Vishal; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Fiering, Jason

    2014-02-21

    Reciprocating microfluidic drug delivery, as compared to steady or pulsed infusion, has unique features which may be advantageous in many therapeutic applications. We have previously described a device, designed for wearable use in small animal models, that periodically infuses and then withdraws a sub-microliter volume of drug solution to and from the endogenous fluid of the inner ear. This delivery approach results in zero net volume of liquid transfer while enabling mass transport of compounds to the cochlea by means of diffusion and mixing. We report here on an advanced wearable delivery system aimed at further miniaturization and complex dosing protocols. Enhancements to the system include the incorporation of a planar micropump to generate reciprocating flow and a novel drug reservoir that maintains zero net volume delivery and permits programmable modulation of the drug concentration in the infused bolus. The reciprocating pump is fabricated from laminated polymer films and employs a miniature electromagnetic actuator to meet the size and weight requirements of a head-mounted in vivo guinea pig testing system. The reservoir comprises a long microchannel in series with a micropump, connected in parallel with the reciprocating flow network. We characterized in vitro the response and repeatability of the planar pump and compared the results with a lumped element simulation. We also characterized the performance of the reservoir, including repeatability of dosing and range of dose modulation. Acute in vivo experiments were performed in which the reciprocating pump was used to deliver a test compound to the cochlea of anesthetized guinea pigs to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of the system. These advances are key steps toward realization of an implantable device for long-term therapeutic applications in humans.

  5. Polypyrrole Film as a Drug Delivery System for the Controlled Release of Risperidone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirskis, Darren; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Rodgers, Anthony; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-07-01

    Conducting polymers are finding applications in medicine including drug delivery systems, biosensors and templates for the regeneration of nervous pathways. We aim to develop a novel system where the drug release rate can be controlled by electrical stimulation. Polypyrrole (PPY) is being used as a drug delivery system due to its inherent electrical conductivity, ease of preparation and apparent biocompatibility. Risperidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug used in the treatment of psychosis and related disorders, including schizophrenia. PPY was synthesised using p-toluene sulfonic acid as a primary dopant, in the presence of risperidone. A validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analytical method was used to quantify risperidone release. It has been demonstrated that the release rate of risperidone can be altered through the application, or absence, of electrical stimulation. Technology such as this would find use in drug-delivering implants where the dose could be adjusted through application of external stimulus, optimising benefit to side effect ratio, while simultaneously ensuring patient adherence (which is a particular challenge in mental health conditions).

  6. Composition and characterization of in situ usable light cured dental drug delivery hydrogel system.

    PubMed

    Bakó, József; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Kovácsné, Ildikó Bácskay; Borbíró, István; Bíró, Tamás; Borbély, János; Hegedűs, Csaba

    2013-03-01

    Biodegradable polymers are compatible, permeable and nontoxic, thus they can provide a useful tool for drug delivery or tissue engineering. These polymers can form hydrogels, which are suitable vehicles for different types of materials e.g. drugs, bioactive molecules or cells. In the case of dentistry, photopolymerization is an obvious method to obtain in situ useable devices which can provide a more efficient way of tailoring drug release. A hydrogel system was developed based on poly-gamma-glutamic acid that was modified with methacryloyl groups to achieve this purpose. The resulting new reactive structure was proved by NMR spectroscopy. The swelling ratio of this type of hydrogel has been found remarkable, over 300 % after 24 h, and it can release 5 ng/mm(2) metronidazole. The prepared hydrogels were nontoxic as viability, cytotoxicity tests and cell morphology investigations proved it. These results render this model system an excellent candidate for use as an in situ curing local drug delivery device. The new photoactive system can be utilized in the treatment of periodontal diseases or raising the effectiveness of drugs used only in the minimal effective dose.

  7. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

  8. Design and Characterization of Silicone and Surfactant Based Systems for Topical Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Oyafuso, Márcia Helena; Carvalho, Flávia Chiva; Chiavacci, Leila Aparecida; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers advantages for new drug delivery design by providing drug targeting while minimizing the side effects. Polyoxyethylene 20 cetyl alcohol (CETETH-20) is a surfactant that may form nanostructured systems, such as liquid crystals, when in contact with water/oil, which are structurally similar to biological membranes and may improve skin interaction. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize CETETH 20-based nanostructured systems by combining CETETH-20 with water and different oily phases, including PEG-12-dimethicone for topical drug administration. The systems were characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), rheology, texture profile analyses (TPA), in vitro cytotoxicity and histopathological analyses of rabbits' skin. Lamellar, hexagonal and cubic phases were identified and their viscoelastic moduli varied according to each phase. The stiffness of the cubic phase was 3-fold higher and twice more adhesive than the hexagonal phase. The formulations did not affect the normal macrophages cells, neither promoted skin irritation. They were spontaneously obtained by simply mixing the components, which corroborates for an ease scaled-up. These results suggest that systems composed of CETETH 20, PEG-12-dimethicone and water are a promising new approach for designing nanostructured topical drug delivery systems.

  9. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  10. A review of multifunctional nanoemulsion systems to overcome oral and CNS drug delivery barriers.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Srinivas; Deshpande, Dipti; Korde, Anisha; Amiji, Mansoor

    2010-10-01

    The oral and central nervous systems (CNS) present a unique set of barriers to the delivery of important diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Extensive research over the past few years has enabled a better understanding of these physical and biological barriers based on tight cellular junctions and expression of active transporters and metabolizing enzymes at the luminal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This review focuses on the recent understanding of transport across the GI tract and BBB and the development of nanotechnology-based delivery strategies that can enhance bioavailability of drugs. Multifunctional lipid nanosystems, such as oil-in-water nanoemulsions, that integrate enhancement in permeability, tissue and cell targeting, imaging, and therapeutic functions are especially promising. Based on strategic choice of edible oils, surfactants and additional surface modifiers, and different types of payloads, rationale design of multifunctional nanoemulsions can serve as a safe and effective delivery vehicle across oral and CNS barriers.

  11. Konjac glucomannan and konjac glucomannan/xanthan gum mixtures as excipients for controlled drug delivery systems. Diffusion of small drugs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Manceñido, Felipe; Landin, Mariana; Lacik, Igor; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón

    2008-02-12

    Konjac glucomannan (KGM), alone or in combination with xanthan gum (XG), was evaluated as main component of systems capable of controlling the diffusion of small molecules with a view of their use in drug delivery. To provide the study with enough general character, KGM batches were obtained from the three main areas of excipient harmonization (Europe, USA and Japan). The rheological evaluation at physiological temperature of KGM (0.5%, w/v) aqueous dispersions, with or without XG at different ratios, showed significant variability among the three KGMs owing to differences in the acetylation degree. The Japanese and European varieties of KGM synergically interact with XG giving rise to gel formation; the synergism being maximum at a 1:1 ratio. By contrast, the American KGM does not show such effect forming only viscous solutions. Drug diffusion coefficients of theophylline and diltiazem HCl, with different molecular size and net charge, were evaluated in systems containing KGM/XG ratio 1:1. KGM/XG systems were more efficient than the XG alone dispersion for controlling drug diffusion of small molecules because of the gel formation. These results point out the potential of mixtures of some KGM types with XG to develop delivery systems capable of maintaining physical integrity and drug release control for up to 8-h period.

  12. Nanoscaled Zinc Pyrazolate Metal-Organic Frameworks as Drug-Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Sara; Carmona, Francisco J; Maldonado, Carmen R; Horcajada, Patricia; Hidalgo, Tania; Serre, Christian; Navarro, Jorge A R; Barea, Elisa

    2016-03-07

    This work describes synthesis at the nanoscale of the isoreticular metal-organic framework (MOF) series ZnBDP_X, based on the assembly of Zn(II) metal ions and the functionalized organic spacers 1,4-bis(1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-2-X-benzene (H2BDP_X; X = H, NO2, NH2, OH). The colloidal stability of these systems was evaluated under different relevant intravenous and oral-simulated physiological conditions, showing that ZnBDP_OH nanoparticles exhibit good structural and colloidal stability probably because of the formation of a protein corona on their surface that prevents their aggregation. Furthermore, two antitumor drugs (mitroxantrone and [Ru(p-cymene)Cl2(pta)] (RAPTA-C) where pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phospaadamantane) were encapsulated within the pores of the ZnBDP_X series in order to investigate the effect of the framework functionalization on the incorporation/delivery of bioactive molecules. Thus, the loading capacity of both drugs within the ZnBDP_X series seems to directly depend on the surface area of the solids. Moreover, ligand functionalization significantly affects both the delivery kinetics and the total amount of released drug. In particular, ZnBDP_OH and ZnBDP_NH2 matrixes show a slower rate of delivery and higher percentage of release than ZnBDP_NO2 and ZnBDP_H systems. Additionally, RAPTA-C delivery from ZnBDP_OH is accompanied by a concomitant and progressive matrix degradation due to the higher polarity of the BPD_OH ligand, highlighting the impact of functionalization of the MOF cavities over the kinetics of delivery.

  13. Current Trends in Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SEDDSs) to Enhance the Bioavailability of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Karwal, Rohit; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Markandeywar, Tanmay S

    2016-01-01

    The main object of the self-emulsifying drug-delivery system (SEDDS) is oral bioavailability (BA) enhancement of a poorly water-soluble drug. Low aqueous solubility and low oral BA are major concerns for formulation scientists. As many drugs are lipophilic in nature, their lower solubility and dissolution are major drawbacks for their successful formulation into oral dosage forms. More than 60% of drugs have a lipophilic nature and exhibit poor aqueous solubility. Various strategies are reported in the literature to improve the solubility and enhance BA of lipophilic drugs, including the formation of a cyclodextrin complex, solid dispersions, and micronization. SEDDSs are ideally isotropic mixtures of drug, oil, surfactant, and/or cosurfactant. SEDDSs have gained increasing attention for enhancing oral BA and reducing drug dose. SEDDSs also provide an effective and excellent solution to the various issues related to the formulation of hydrophobic drugs that have limited solubility in gastrointestinal fluid. Our major focus of this review is to highlight the importance of SEDDSs in oral BA enhancement of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  14. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Jianping; Weng, Tengfei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Lu, Yi; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA) as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS) were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2±12.8 nm) was larger than that of NLCs (89.7±9.0 nm) and SMEDDS (26.9±1.9 nm). All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%±1.6% and 80.3%±0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral®, according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral®. However, PLGA NPs failed to achieve efficient absorption, with relative bioavailability of about 22.7%. It is concluded that lipid-based nanoscale drug-delivery systems are superior to polymeric NPs in enhancing oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. PMID:25378925

  15. pH-Sensitive drug delivery system based on modified dextrin coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyu; Zheng, Diwei; Liu, Jia; Kuang, Ying; Li, Qilin; Zhang, Min; Ye, Haifeng; Qin, Hongyang; Xu, Yanglin; Li, Cao; Jiang, Bingbing

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a novel pH-sensitive drug delivery system based on modified dextrin coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), DOX@MSN-DDA-CL, are prepared. The dextrin grafting on the surface of MSNs is oxidized by KIO4 to obtain dextrin dialdehyde, which is then cross-linked by tetraethylenepentamine through a pH-sensitive Schiff's base. Under physiological conditions, the cross-linked dextrin dialdehyde blocks the pores to prevent premature release of model drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). In the weak acidic environment, pH 6.0 in this work, the Schiff's base can be hydrolyzed and released the drug. The in vitro drug release studies at different pHs prove the pH-sensitivity of DOX@MSN-DDA-CL. The cytotoxicity and cell internalization behavior are also investigated in detail. In vivo tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics with a H22-bearing mouse animal mode are also studied, prove that DOX@MSN-DDA-CL has a longer retention time than that of pure DOX and can accumulate in tumor region via enhanced permeation and retention and nanomaterials-induced endothelial cell leakiness effects. In conclusion, the pH-sensitive modified dextrin/MSNs complex drug delivery system has a great potential for cancer therapy.

  16. Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems: An Attractive Strategy for Enhanced Therapeutic Profile

    PubMed Central

    Akula, Samatha; Gurram, Aravind Kumar; Devireddy, Srinivas Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Ease of administration and painless approach made oral route the most preferred. Poor oral bioavailability is pronounced with the majority of recent active ingredients because of dissolution rate limited absorption. Failure to attain intended therapeutic effect of the poor water soluble drugs by this route led to development of novel drug delivery systems which will fulfill therapeutic needs with minimum dose. Although many formulation approaches like solid dispersions, complexation, pH modification, and cocrystals exist, lipid based delivery systems finding increased appliance with the apparent increase in absorption of drug. Among lipid based formulations, self-microemulsifying formulations (droplet size < 100 nm) are evident to improve the oral bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs primarily due to their efficiency in facilitating solubilization and in presenting the hydrophobic drug in solubilized form whereby dissolution process can be circumvented. Various components that are used to formulate these dosage forms like surfactants and lipids contribute to the overall improvement in oral bioavailability via promoting the lymphatic transport; thereby hepatic first pass metabolism can be surmounted. The present paper gives exhaustive information on the formulation design and characterization of SMEDDS along with the probable mechanisms by which the bioavailability can be improved with SMEDDS. PMID:27382619

  17. Novel vaginal drug delivery system: deformable propylene glycol liposomes-in-hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Vanić, Željka; Hurler, Julia; Ferderber, Kristina; Golja Gašparović, Petra; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Filipović-Grčić, Jelena

    2014-03-01

    Deformable propylene glycol-containing liposomes (DPGLs) incorporating metronidazole or clotrimazole were prepared and evaluated as an efficient drug delivery system to improve the treatment of vaginal microbial infections. The liposome formulations were optimized based on sufficient trapping efficiencies for both drugs and membrane elasticity as a prerequisite for successful permeability and therapy. An appropriate viscosity for vaginal administration was achieved by incorporating the liposomes into Carbopol hydrogel. DPGLs were able to penetrate through the hydrogel network more rapidly than conventional liposomes. In vitro studies of drug release from the liposomal hydrogel under conditions simulating human treatment confirmed sustained and diffusion-based drug release. Characterization of the rheological and textural properties of the DPGL-containing liposomal hydrogels demonstrated that the incorporation of DPGLs alone had no significant influence on mechanical properties of hydrogels compared to controls. These results support the great potential of DPGL-in-hydrogel as an efficient delivery system for the controlled and sustained release of antimicrobial drugs in the vagina.

  18. [Release characteristics in vitro and pharmacokinetics of da chuanxiong fang multiunit drug delivery system in rats].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan-feng; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi

    2011-09-01

    The drug release characteristics ofDa Chuanxiong Fang multiunit drug delivery system (DCXFMDDS) in vivo and in vitro were evaluated. Ferulic acid (FA) and senkyunolide I (SI) were used as marker components, which were two of the effective components of Da Chuanxiong Fang. And their contents were determined by HPLC. Drug release characteristics in vitro of DCXFMDDS and Da Chuanxiong pills and pharmacokinetics characteristics of DCXFMDDS and Da Chuanxiong Fang active fraction (DCXFAF) in rats were compared. It was obvious that FA released from the DCXFMDDS in a sustained fashion but SI in a fast fashion both in vitro and in vivo. The releasing process and the releasing mechanism of FA and SI from DCXFMDDS were different, but the AUC value indicated that compared with DCXFAF the extent of absorption of FA and SI from DCXFMDDS was increased. Though from the same multiunit drug delivery system, FA an SI had different drug release characteristics both in vitro and in vivo, and that may be one of the reason why DCXFMDDS has the good properties such as rapid and long-lasting effect and high efficiency.

  19. Design and synthesis of novel polyglycerol hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Ali; Adeli, Mohsen; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2011-03-10

    The synthesis of a new drug delivery system based on hybrid nanomaterials containing a β-CD core and hyperbranched PG is described. Conjugating PG branches onto β-CD not only increases its water solubility but also affects its host/guest properties deeply. It can form molecular inclusion complexes with small hydrophobic guest molecules such as ferrocene or FITC with reasonable release. In addition, the achievable payloads are significantly higher as for carriers such as hyperbranched PGs. Short-term in vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility tests on L929 cell lines show that the hybrid nanomaterial is highly biocompatible. Due to their outstanding properties, β-CD-g-PG hybrid nanomaterials are introduced as promising materials for nanomedicine, e.g., for drug delivery issues.

  20. Stimuli responsive drug delivery systems based on nano-graphene for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-10-01

    Nano-graphene as a class of two-dimensional sp(2) carbon nanomaterial has attracted tremendous attentions in various fields in the past decade. Utilizing its unique physical and chemical properties, nano-graphene has also shown great promises in the area of biomedicine, for application in biosensing, imaging and therapy. In particular, with all atoms exposed on its surface, nano-graphene exhibits ultra-high surface area available for efficient binding/loading of various biomolecules of interests, and has been widely used as multifunctional nano-carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this review article, we will summarize the recent advances in the development of nano-graphene as stimuli-responsive nano-carriers for drug delivery, as well as the applications of these smart systems for cancer therapy.

  1. In vivo evaluation of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for curcumin.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Vanani, R; Moezi, L; Heli, H

    2017-04-01

    Curcumin has attracted particular attention in recent years due to its great variety of beneficial biological and pharmacological activities. However, its efficacy has been limited due to its low bioavailability, and this limitation can be overcome by novel drug delivery systems. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) is a novel route to improve oral bioavailability of lipophilic drugs. SNEDDS spontaneously forms fine oil-in-water nanoemulsion by mild agitation. An optimal formula for a SNEDDS comprised ethyl oleate:tween 80:PEG 600 (50:40:10% w/w) with 11.2-nm uniform droplets was developed for curcumin delivery. The SNEDDS was characterized and its loading properties for curcumin were orally evaluated in rat. The results showed a significant increment of 3.95 times in Cmax, and the curcumin bioavailability was enhanced by 194.2%, compared to the curcumin suspension in water. The development of the SNEDDS formulation had a great potential as a possible alternative for curcumin administration.

  2. Whether a novel drug delivery system can overcome the problem of biofilms in respiratory diseases?

    PubMed

    Dua, Kamal; Shukla, Shakti D; Tekade, Rakesh K; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm comprises a community of microorganisms which form on medical devices and can lead to various threatening infections. It is a major concern in various respiratory diseases like cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, etc. The treatment strategies for such infections are difficult due to the resistance of the microflora existing in the biofilms against various antimicrobial agents, thus posing threats to the patient population. The present era witnesses the beginning of research to understand the biofilm physiology and the associated microfloral diversity by applying -omics approaches. There is very limited information about how the deposition of biofilm on the respiratory devices and lung itself affects the drug delivered, the delivery system, and other implications. The present mini review summarizes the basic introduction to the biofilms and its avoidance using various drug delivery systems with special emphasis on the respiratory diseases. Understanding the approaches, principles, and modes of drug delivery involved in preventing biofilm deposition will be of interest to both biological and formulation scientists, thereby opening avenues to explore the new vistas in biofilm research for identifying better treatments for pulmonary infectious diseases.

  3. MicroRNAs as therapeutics for future drug delivery systems in treatment of lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Dua, Kamal; Hansbro, Nicole G; Foster, Paul S; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-02-01

    The rapid advancement in the area of microRNAs (miRNAs) from discovery to their translation into therapeutic moieties reflects their significance as important regulators in the management of disease pathology. The miRNAs can potentially be a new class of drugs in the near future for the treatment of various lung diseases, but it lacks the current knowledge how these identified therapeutic moieties can be designed into an effective, patient complaint and targeted drug delivery system. miRNAs have characteristic features like small size and low molecular weight which makes them easily translated into an effective drug delivery system. In this review, we have summarised the concept of miRNAs and different approaches which can be employed to deliver miRNAs effectively and safely to the target cells including the challenges associated with their development in particular emphasis on pulmonary diseases. Such approaches will be of interest for both the biological and formulation scientists to understand and explore the new vistas in the area of miRNA delivery for pulmonary inflammatory diseases.

  4. Self-double-emulsifying drug delivery system (SDEDDS): a new way for oral delivery of drugs with high solubility and low permeability.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Lishuang; Zhu, Jiabi; Hu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jie

    2011-05-16

    Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions are potential for enhancing oral bioavailability of drugs with high solubility and low permeability, but their industrial application is limited due to the instability. Herein, we developed a novel formulation, self-double-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SDEDDS) by formulating mixtures of hydrophilic surfactants and water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions, which were easier to be stable through formulations optimization. SDEDDS can spontaneously emulsify to water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions in the mixed aqueous gastrointestinal environment, with drugs encapsulated in the internal water phase of the double emulsions. We employed SDEDDS to improve the oral absorption of pidotimod, a peptide-like drug with high solubility and low permeability. The optimized pidotimod-SDEDDS were found to be stable up to 6 months under 25°C. Plasma concentration-time profiles from pharmacokinetic studies in rats dosed with SDEDDS showed 2.56-fold (p<0.05) increased absorption of pidotimod, compared to the pidotimod solution. Histopathologic studies confirmed that SDEDDS exerted absorption promoting effect without serious local damages. These studies demonstrate that SDEDDS may be a promising strategy for peroral delivery of peptide and peptidomimetic drugs.

  5. Preparation and characterization of conjugated polyamidoamine-MPEG-methotrexate for potential drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Sabri, Siti Noorzidah bt; Abu, Norhidayah; Mastor, Azreena; Hisham, Siti Farhana; Noorsal, Kartini

    2012-07-01

    Star polymers have unique characteristics due to their well-defined size and tailor ability which makes these polymers attractive candidates as carriers in drug delivery system applications. This work focuses on attaching a drug to the star polymer (polyamidoamine). The conjugation of polyamidoamine (PAMAM, generation 4) with methotrexate (MTX) (model drug) was studied in which monomethyl polyethylene glycol (MPEG) was used as a linker to reduce the toxicity of dendrimer. Conjugation starts with attaching the drug to the linker and followed by further conjugation with the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer. The conjugation of PAMAM-PEG-MTX was confirmed through UV-Vis, FTIR, 1H NMR and DSC. The loading capacities and release profile of this conjugate were determined using 1H NMR and UV spectrometer.

  6. Evaluation of gliadins nanoparticles as drug delivery systems: a study of three different drugs.

    PubMed

    Duclairoir, C; Orecchioni, A-M; Depraetere, P; Osterstock, F; Nakache, E

    2003-03-06

    In this paper, biopolymer nanoparticles are studied, which unlike many synthetic carriers used for controlled release, are biocompatible and biodegradable systems. Gliadins nanoparticles are obtained by a desolvatation method, also known as drawning-out precipitation. These particles have been shown to be interesting as drug release systems for all-trans-retinoic acid. The aim of this paper was to study the influence of the polarity of different drugs on nanoparticle characteristics such as size and drug loading efficiency. Three drugs of three different polarities were studied: the hydrophobic Vitamin E (VE), the slightly polar mixture of linalool and of linalyl acetate (LLA) and the cationic amphiphilic benzalkonium chloride (BZC). This comparative work shows that the amount of the entrapped VE and LLA is higher than that of the cationic BZC, confirming a strong interaction between gliadins and apolar compounds, due to the apolarity of the proteins. This interaction results in a low diffusion coefficient and a partition coefficient in favour of gliadins, resulting in a low permeability coefficient. The drug release kinetics of two substances, LLA and BZC, are observed, in showing a burst effect, then a diffusion process, which can be modelled assuming that the particles are homogeneous spheres.

  7. Integrated microsystems for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Razzacki, S Zafar; Thwar, Prasanna K; Yang, Ming; Ugaz, Victor M; Burns, Mark A

    2004-02-10

    Efficient drug delivery and administration are needed to realize the full potential of molecular therapeutics. Integrated microsystems that incorporate extremely fast sensory and actuation capabilities can fulfill this need for efficient drug delivery tools. Photolithographic technologies borrowed from the semiconductor industry enable mass production of such microsystems. Rapid prototyping allows for the quick development of customized devices that would accommodate for diverse therapeutic requirements. This paper reviews the capabilities of existing microfabrication and their applications in controlled drug delivery microsystems. The next generation of drug delivery systems--fully integrated and self-regulating--would not only improve drug administration, but also revolutionize the health-care industry.

  8. Anthracycline Nano-Delivery Systems to Overcome Multiple Drug Resistance: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracyclines (doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and idarubicin) are very effective chemotherapeutic drugs to treat many cancers; however, the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR) is one of the major limitations for their clinical applications. Nano-delivery systems have emerged as the novel cancer therapeutics to overcome MDR. Up until now, many anthracycline nano-delivery systems have been developed and reported to effectively circumvent MDR both in-vitro and in-vivo, and some of these systems have even advanced to clinical trials, such as the HPMA-doxorubicin (HPMA-DOX) conjugate. Doxil, a DOX PEGylated liposome formulation, was developed and approved by FDA in 1995. Unfortunately, this formulation does not address the MDR problem. In this comprehensive review, more than ten types of developed anthracycline nano-delivery systems to overcome MDR and their proposed mechanisms are covered and discussed, including liposomes; polymeric micelles, conjugate and nanoparticles; peptide/protein conjugates; solid-lipid, magnetic, gold, silica, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles; and carbon nanotubes. PMID:23888183

  9. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  10. Breathable Medicine: Pulmonary Mode of Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Tay, Samuel Sam Wah; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds require different modes of drug delivery systems to accomplish therapeutic activity without loss of its activity and lead to exhibit no adverse effects. Originating from ancient days, pulmonary mode of drug delivery is gaining much importance compared to other modes of drug delivery systems with respect to specific diseases. Pulmonary drug delivery is a non-invasive route for local and systemic therapies together with more patient convenience, compliance and is a needleless system. In this review, we addressed the vaccine delivery via non- or minimally invasive routes. Polymeric nanoparticles are preferred for use in the pulmonary delivery devices owing to a prolonged retention in lungs. Small site for absorption, mucociliary clearance, short residence time and low bioavailability are some of the limitations in pulmonary drug delivery have been resolved by generating micro- and nano-sized aerosol particles. We have classified the breathable medicine on the basis of available devices for inhalation and also prominent diseases treated through pulmonary mode of drug delivery. Owing to increasing toxicity of pharmacological drugs, the use of natural medicines has been rapidly gaining importance recently. The review article describes breathability of medicines or the pulmonary mode of drug delivery system and their drug release profile, absorption, distribution and efficacy to cure asthma and diabetes.

  11. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958

  12. Chitosomes as drug delivery systems for C-phycocyanin: preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Manconi, M; Mura, S; Manca, M L; Fadda, A M; Dolz, M; Hernandez, M J; Casanovas, A; Díez-Sales, O

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate chitosomes, i.e. liposomes coated by a polyelectrolyte complex between chitosan (CH) and xantan gum (XG), as potential delivery system for oral administration of the protein C-phycocyanin. To this purpose several CH-XG-microcomplexes were prepared in aqueous lactic acid at different chitosan-xanthan gum percent ratios and rheological properties of the microcomplexes were studied to analyse the contribution of chitosan and xanthan gum in the reaction of microcomplexation. After establishing the best microcomplexes, chitosomes were prepared by coating C-phycocyanin loaded liposomes with the CH-XG hydrogels using spray-drying or freeze-drying. The chitosomes were characterized in terms of morphology, size distribution, zeta potential, swelling properties, drug release, and mucoadhesive properties. Rheological studies showed the influence of xanthan gum in the microcomplex properties. Moreover, obtained results demonstrated the effects of formulation and process variables on particle size, drug content, swelling, drug release, and especially on the mucoadhesiveness of C-PC chitosomes of CH-XG. In particular, chitosomes prepared by spray-drying technique using CH-XG in 0.5/8.0 (w/w) ratio showed a regular surface and a drug release characteristic for a Fickian diffusion of the active ingredient. The in vitro mucoadhesive study revealed that the spray-drying method is advantageous to prepare C-phycocyanin loaded chitosomes with excellent mucoadhesive properties for colonic drug delivery.

  13. Nanowired Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier in Central Nervous System Injury and Repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Menon, Preeti; Muresanu, Dafin F; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tian, Z Ryan; Lafuente, José V; Sharma, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological regulator of transport of essential items from blood to brain for the maintenance of homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) within narrow limits. The BBB is also responsible for export of harmful or metabolic products from brain to blood to keep the CNS fluid microenvironment healthy. However, noxious insults to the brain caused by trauma, ischemia or environmental/chemical toxins alter the BBB function to small as well as large molecules e.g., proteins. When proteins enter the CNS fluid microenvironment, development of brain edema occurs due to altered osmotic balance between blood and brain. On the other hand, almost all neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic insults to the CNS and subsequent BBB dysfunction lead to edema formation and cell injury. To treat these brain disorders suitable drug therapy reaching their brain targets is needed. However, due to edema formation or only a focal disruption of the BBB e.g., around brain tumors, many drugs are unable to reach their CNS targets in sufficient quantity. This results in poor therapeutic outcome. Thus, new technology such as nanodelivery is needed for drugs to reach their CNS targets and be effective. In this review, use of nanowires as a possible novel tool to enhance drug delivery into the CNS in various disease models is discussed based on our investigations. These data show that nanowired delivery of drugs may have superior neuroprotective ability to treat several CNS diseases effectively indicating their role in future therapeutic strategies.

  14. Electrochemical investigation of interaction between mitomycin C and DNA in a novel drug-delivery system.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, Hakan; Alparslan, Levent; Erdem, Arzum; Karasulu, Ercument

    2007-10-18

    A novel drug-delivery system was developed by loading the anticancer drug, mitomycin C (MC) into an oil/water system with the aim of investigation by electrochemical sensing the interaction between the drug and DNA in microemulsion phase. The physical and physicochemical properties (droplet size, pH, viscosity, conductivity and refractive index) of this microemulsion were examined. The electrochemical detection of the interaction between MC and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in microemulsion phase was performed by using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in combination with a disposable sensor, pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The magnitude of guanine oxidation signal was monitored before and after interaction between MC and dsDNA. The effect of different experimental parameters, such as MC concentration, MC interaction time with dsDNA, and dsDNA concentration were also studied to find the optimum analytical performance based on electrochemical detection of this interaction in microemulsion phase.

  15. From silk spinning in insects and spiders to advanced silk fibroin drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Werner, Vera; Meinel, Lorenz

    2015-11-01

    The natural process of silk spinning covers a fascinating versatility of aggregate states, ranging from colloidal solutions through hydrogels to solid systems. The transition among these states is controlled by a carefully orchestrated process in vivo. Major players within the natural process include the control of spatial pH throughout passage of the silk dope, the composition and type of ions, and fluid flow mechanics within the duct, respectively. The function of these input parameters on the spinning process is reviewed before detailing their impact on the design and manufacture of silk based drug delivery systems (DDS). Examples are reported including the control of hydrogel formation during storage or significant parameters controlling precipitation in the presence of appropriate salts, respectively. The review details the use of silk fibroin (SF) to develop liquid, semiliquid or solid DDS with a focus on the control of SF crystallization, particle formation, and drug-SF interaction for tailored drug load.

  16. Enzyme responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Ding, Xingwei; Li, Jinghua; Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Liu, Junjie; Dai, Liangliang; Zhou, Jun; Hou, Changjun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-04-01

    To reduce the toxic side effects of traditional chemotherapeutics in vivo, we designed and constructed a biocompatible, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). MMPs substrate peptide containing PLGLAR (sensitive to MMPs) was immobilized onto the surfaces of amino-functionalized MSNs via an amidation reaction, serving as MMPs sensitive intermediate linker. Bovine serum albumin was then covalently coupled to linker as end-cap for sealing the mesopores of MSNs. Lactobionic acid was further conjugated to the system as targeting motif. Doxorubicin hydrochloride was used as the model anticancer drug in this study. A series of characterizations revealed that the system was successfully constructed. The peptide-functionalized MSNs system demonstrated relatively high sensitivity to MMPs for triggering drug delivery, which was potentially important for tumor therapy since the tumor’s microenvironment overexpressed MMPs in nature. The in vivo experiments proved that the system could efficiently inhibit the tumor growth with minimal side effects. This study provides an approach for the development of the next generation of nanotherapeutics toward efficient cancer treatment.

  17. Light-sensitive intelligent drug delivery systems of coumarin-modified mesoporous bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Lin, H-M; Wang, W-K; Hsiung, P-A; Shyu, S-G

    2010-08-01

    Functionalized mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBG) with photoactive coumarin demonstrates photo-responsive dimerization resulting in reversible gate operation. Coumarin-modified MBG was used as a drug delivery carrier to investigate drug storage/release characteristics using phenanthrene as a model drug. Irradiation with UV light (>310 nm) induced photo-dimerization of the coumarin-modified MBG, which led to the pores' closing with cyclobutane dimers and trapping of the guest phenanthrene in the mesopores. However, irradiating the dimerized-coumarin-modified MBG with shorter wavelength UV light (approximately 250 nm) regenerates the coumarin monomer derivative by the photo-cleavage of cyclobutane dimers, such that trapped guest molecules are released from the mesopores. The structural, morphological, textural and optical properties are well characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The results reveal that the MBG exhibits the typical ordered characteristics of the hexagonal mesostructure. The system demonstrates great potential in light-sensitive intelligent drug delivery systems and disease therapy fields.

  18. Effect of ca2+ to salicylic acid release in pectin based controlled drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistriyani, L.; Wirawan, S. K.; Sediawan, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Wastes from orange peel are potentially be utilized to produce pectin, which are currently an import commodity. Pectin can be used in making edible film. Edible films are potentially used as a drug delivery system membrane after a tooth extraction. Drug which is used in the drug delivery system is salicylic acid. It is an antiseptic. In order to control the drug release rate, crosslinking process is added in the manufacturing of membrane with CaCl2.2H2O as crosslinker. Pectin was diluted in water and mixed with a plasticizer and CaCl2.2H2O solution at 66°C to make edible film. Then the mixture was dried in an oven at 50 °C. After edible film was formed, it was coated using plasticizer and CaCl2.2H2O solution with various concentration 0, 0.015, 0.03 and 0.05g/mL. This study showed that the more concentration of crosslinker added, the slower release of salicylic acid would be. This was indicated by the value of diffusivites were getting smaller respectively. The addition of crosslinker also caused smaller gels swelling value,which made the membrane is mechanically stronger

  19. Medicinal chemistry based approaches and nanotechnology-based systems to improve CNS drug targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Vlieghe, Patrick; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2013-05-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by various barriers, which regulate nervous tissue homeostasis and control the selective and specific uptake, efflux, and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Among these barriers is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a physical and physiological barrier that filters very efficiently and selectively the entry of compounds from the blood to the brain and protects nervous tissue from harmful substances and infectious agents present in the bloodstream. The BBB also prevents the entry of potential drugs. As a result, various drug targeting and delivery strategies are currently being developed to enhance the transport of drugs from the blood to the brain. Following a general introduction, we briefly overview in this review article the fundamental physiological properties of the BBB. Then, we describe current strategies to bypass the BBB (i.e., invasive methods, alternative approaches, and temporary opening) and to cross it (i.e., noninvasive approaches). This section is followed by a chapter addressing the chemical and technological solutions developed to cross the BBB. A special emphasis is given to prodrug-targeting approaches and targeted nanotechnology-based systems, two promising strategies for BBB targeting and delivery of drugs to the brain.

  20. Nano-niosomes as nanoscale drug delivery systems: an illustrated review.

    PubMed

    Moghassemi, Saeid; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2014-07-10

    The field of nanochemistry research has shown a great progress in the developing of novel nanocarriers as potential drug delivery systems. Niosome is a class of molecular cluster formed by self-association of non-ionic surfactants in an aqueous phase. The unique structure of niosome presents an effective novel drug delivery system (NDDS) with ability of loading both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs. Numerous research articles have been published in scientific journals, reporting valuable results of individual case studies in this context. However, surveying and discussing the recent, rapidly growing reported studies along with their theoretical principals is required for the fully understanding and exploring the great potential of this approach. To this aim, we have provided an illustrated and comprehensive study from the view of a supramolecular chemist, interested in the synthesizing and studying chemical aggregates on the nanoscale for the development of nanotechnological clusters including niosomes. First, a connectional review of the molecular structure and physicochemical properties of niosome forming non-ionic surfactants and additive agents have been discussed. Second, a systematic survey of niosome preparation and loading methods, administration routes, characterization of niosomes, their toxicity studies and mechanism of drug release; used in recent articles have been performed.

  1. Persistent Spinal Headache After Removal of Intrathecal Drug Delivery System: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurnutala, Lakshmi N.; Kim, David; Sayeed, Huma; Sibai, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To report and discuss the spinal headache following insertion and removal of intrathecal drug delivery system in patients with chronic pain disorders. Case Presentation: Intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) was initially used for the management of chronic malignant pain; it has since been used to manage pain from other nonmalignant conditions as well. Spinal headache is one of the complications during the trial, permanent placement and after removal of intrathecal drug delivery catheter systems. A 48-year-male patient with chronic pain disorder developed a refractory spinal headache after removing the intrathecal drug delivery system requiring a surgical intervention to resolve the problem. Conclusions: Conservative management is successful in the vast majority of patients with spinal headache. Interventional procedures are required in a small fraction of patients for symptomatic relief. PMID:26587409

  2. Drug nanocarrier, the future of atopic diseases: Advanced drug delivery systems and smart management of disease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mei; Hussain, Zahid; Thu, Hnin Ei; Khan, Shahzeb; Katas, Haliza; Ahmed, Tarek A; Tripathy, Minaketan; Leng, Jing; Qin, Hua-Li; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing skin inflammatory disorder characterized by perivascular infiltration of immunoglobulin-E (IgE), T-lymphocytes and mast cells. The key pathophysiological factors causing this disease are immunological disorders and the compromised epidermal barrier integrity. Pruritus, intense itching, psychological stress, deprived physical and mental performance and sleep disturbance are the hallmark features of this dermatological complication. Preventive interventions which include educational programs, avoidance of allergens, exclusive care towards skin, and the rational selection of therapeutic regimen play key roles in the treatment of dermatosis. In last two decades, it is evident from a plethora of studies that scientific focus is being driven from conventional therapies to the advanced nanocarrier-based regimen for an effective management of AD. These nanocarriers which include polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), hydrogel NPs, liposomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanoemulsion, provide efficient roles for the target specific delivery of the therapeutic payload. The success of these targeted therapies is due to their pharmaceutical versatility, longer retention time at the target site, avoiding off-target effects and preventing premature degradation of the incorporated drugs. The present review was therefore aimed to summarise convincing evidence for the therapeutic superiority of advanced nanocarrier-mediated strategies over the conventional therapies used in the treatment of AD.

  3. Drug delivery by lipid cochleates.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Leila

    2005-01-01

    Drug delivery technology has brought additional benefits to pharmaceuticals such as reduction in dosing frequency and side effects, as well as the extension of patient life. To address this need, cochleates, a precipitate obtained as a result of the interaction between phosphatidylserine and calcium, have been developed and proved to have potential in encapsulating and delivering small molecule drugs. This chapter discusses the molecules that can be encapsulated in a cochleate system and describes in detail the methodology that can be used to encapsulate and characterize hydrophobic drugs such as amphotericin B, a potent antifungal agent. Some efficacy data in animal models infected with candidiasis or aspergillosis are described as well.

  4. Preliminary Studies on Two Vegetable Oil Based Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System (SEDDS) for the Delivery of Metronidazole, A Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obitte, N. C.; Ezeiruaku, H.; Onyishi, V. I.

    A preliminary evaluation was carried out on metronidazole-loaded Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System (SEDDS) using two vegetable oils-Palm Kernel Oil (PKO) and Palm Oil (PO). Purification of oils, drug solubility in the oils, pre/post formulation isotropicity tests, emulsification times and release studies of metronidazole from the SEDDS were carried out. Results indicated solubility values of 4.441 and 4.654%w/w, respectively for metronidazole in PKO and PO. Preformulation isotropicity test revealed that out of the 24 batches evaluated 10 of the SEDDS formulations containing different oil: surfactant ratios and PKO:PO admixtures were found to be isotropic after 5 h. However when the SEDDS were loaded with metronidazole there was a reduction in the number (to 7) of formulations that maintained isotropicity and stability after 72 h. All the batches had emulsification times of less than two minutes except batch 4D with oil:surfactant concentration of 50:50. The release profile showed that most of the formulations released 50% of drug in less than 8 min and 85% of drug in less than 30 min. We therefore conclude that SEDDS containing the two vegetable oils are potential alternatives when immediate release and delivery of metronidazole is the primary motivation.

  5. Manufacturing of a Secretoneurin Drug Delivery System with Self-Assembled Protamine Nanoparticles by Titration

    PubMed Central

    Scheicher, Bernhard; Lorenzer, Cornelia; Gegenbauer, Katrin; Partlic, Julia; Andreae, Fritz; Kirsch, Alexander H.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Werzer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Since therapeutic peptides and oligonucleotides are gathering interests as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are becoming of great importance. Thereby, the possibility to design drug delivery systems according to the therapeutic needs of APIs enhances clinical implementation. Over the last years, the focus of our group was laid on protamine-oligonucleotide-nanoparticles (so called proticles), however, the possibility to modify the size, zeta potential or loading efficiencies was limited. Therefore, at the present study we integrated a stepwise addition of protamine (titration) into the formation process of proticles loaded with the angiogenic neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN). A particle size around 130 nm was determined when proticles were assembled by the commonly used protamine addition at once. Through application of the protamine titration process it was possible to modify and adjust the particle size between approx. 120 and 1200 nm (dependent on mass ratio) without influencing the SN loading capacity. Dynamic light scattering pointed out that the difference in particle size was most probably the result of a secondary aggregation. Initially-formed particles of early stages in the titration process aggregated towards bigger assemblies. Atomic-force-microscopy images also revealed differences in morphology along with different particle size. In contrast, the SN loading was only influenced by the applied mass ratio, where a slight saturation effect was observable. Up to 65% of deployed SN could be imbedded into the proticle matrix. An in-vivo biodistribution study (i.m.) showed a retarded distribution of SN from the site of injection after the application of a SN-proticle formulation. Further, it was demonstrated that SN loaded proticles can be successfully freeze-dried and resuspended afterwards. To conclude, the integration of the protamine titration process offers new possibilities for the formulation of proticles in

  6. Manufacturing of a Secretoneurin Drug Delivery System with Self-Assembled Protamine Nanoparticles by Titration.

    PubMed

    Scheicher, Bernhard; Lorenzer, Cornelia; Gegenbauer, Katrin; Partlic, Julia; Andreae, Fritz; Kirsch, Alexander H; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Werzer, Oliver; Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Since therapeutic peptides and oligonucleotides are gathering interests as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are becoming of great importance. Thereby, the possibility to design drug delivery systems according to the therapeutic needs of APIs enhances clinical implementation. Over the last years, the focus of our group was laid on protamine-oligonucleotide-nanoparticles (so called proticles), however, the possibility to modify the size, zeta potential or loading efficiencies was limited. Therefore, at the present study we integrated a stepwise addition of protamine (titration) into the formation process of proticles loaded with the angiogenic neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN). A particle size around 130 nm was determined when proticles were assembled by the commonly used protamine addition at once. Through application of the protamine titration process it was possible to modify and adjust the particle size between approx. 120 and 1200 nm (dependent on mass ratio) without influencing the SN loading capacity. Dynamic light scattering pointed out that the difference in particle size was most probably the result of a secondary aggregation. Initially-formed particles of early stages in the titration process aggregated towards bigger assemblies. Atomic-force-microscopy images also revealed differences in morphology along with different particle size. In contrast, the SN loading was only influenced by the applied mass ratio, where a slight saturation effect was observable. Up to 65% of deployed SN could be imbedded into the proticle matrix. An in-vivo biodistribution study (i.m.) showed a retarded distribution of SN from the site of injection after the application of a SN-proticle formulation. Further, it was demonstrated that SN loaded proticles can be successfully freeze-dried and resuspended afterwards. To conclude, the integration of the protamine titration process offers new possibilities for the formulation of proticles in

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of carboxylated nanodiamond as a topical drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dae Gon; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Eunah; Lim, Sun Hee; Ricci, Jeremy; Sung, Si Kwon; Kwon, Myoung Taek; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The best strategy in the development of topical drug delivery systems may be to facilitate the permeation of drugs without any harmful effects, while staying on the skin surface and maintaining stability of the system. Nanodiamonds (NDs) play a key role with their excellent physicochemical properties, including high biocompatibility, physical adsorption, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capability, and photostabilizing activity. Z-average sizes of carboxylated ND (ND–COOH) agglutinate decreased significantly as the pH increased. Fluorescein-conjugated ND was observed only on the stratum corneum, and no sample diffused into the dermal layer even after 48 hours. Moreover, ND–COOH and ND–COOH/eugenol complex did not show significant toxic effects on murine macrophage cells. ND improved in vitro skin permeation >50% acting as a “drug reservoir” to maintain a high drug concentration in the donor chamber, which was supported by quartz crystal microbalance results. Moreover, ND–COOH could adsorb a drug amount equivalent to 80% of its own weight. A photostability study showed that ND–COOH increased the photostability ~47% with regard to rate constant of the eugenol itself. A significant decrease in ROS was observed in the ND–COOH and ND–COOH/eugenol complex compared with the negative control during intracellular ROS assay. Moreover, ROS and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity evaluation showed that ND–COOH had synergistic effects of antioxidation with eugenol. Therefore, ND–COOH could be used as an excellent topical drug delivery system with improved permeability, higher stability, and minimized safety issue. PMID:27307736

  8. Optical properties of the chemotherapy drugs used in the central nervous system lymphoma therapy: monitoring drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, T.; Popov, A.; Surazyński, L.; Oinas, J.; Bibikova, O.; Bykov, A.; Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.; Meglinski, I.; Kuittinen, O.

    2015-07-01

    Our aim is to optically monitor the delivery of the chemotherapy drugs for brain tumours, particularly used in the central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma therapy. In vivo monitoring would help to optimize the treatment and avoiding unnecessary medications. Moreover, it would be beneficial to be able to measure which of the multi-regimen drugs actually do penetrate and how well into the brain tissue. There exist several potential optical measurement techniques to be utilised for the purpose. The most desired method would allow the detection of the drugs without using optical biomarkers as a contrast agent. In this case, for non-invasive sensing of the drug in the brain cortex, the drug should have a reasonably strong optical absorption band somewhere in the range between 600 nm and 1700 nm, and not directly coincident with the strong bands of haemoglobin or water. Alternatively, mid-infrared (MIR) range has the potential for invasive drug monitoring techniques. In this paper, we report the optical properties of several chemotherapy drugs used in CNS lymphoma therapy, such as rituximabi, cyclophosphamide and etoposide. We measured their transmittance and reflectance spectra in near-infrared (NIR) range, particularly 900 nm - 2500 nm, to be considered when choosing the in vivo monitoring method to be developed. The absorption and scattering coefficients were retrieved from the measurements and applying Beer's law. For the measurement of the sum of total transmission and reflection in NIR range we used integrating sphere with spektralo to enable calculation of the scattering coefficient.

  9. Bioadhesive Drug Delivery System for Enhancing the Permeability of a BCS Class III Drug via Hot-Melt Extrusion Technology.

    PubMed

    Mendonsa, Nicole S; Thipsay, Priyanka; Kim, Dong Wuk; Martin, Scott T; Repka, Michael A

    2017-02-28

    As the buccal route of administration has the ability to avoid the GI tract and first-pass effect by directing the absorption toward the cheek area, the bioavailability of BCS class III drugs can be increased through this route. Only a handful of studies have been conducted using oleic acid as a permeation enhancer in any transbuccal drug delivery system. Therefore, the objectives of this novel study were to develop a buccal tablet using two concentrations of oleic acid for a model BCS class III drug via hot-melt extrusion technology and to investigate the effects of oleic acid on the physicochemical properties of the tablet. The model drug selected was ondansetron hydrochloride. Formulations consisting of polymers (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide) and two concentrations of oleic acid were prepared by hot-melt extrusion techniques. A melting point depression of the drug was obtained in the extruded granules as seen by the DSC thermograms. The ex vivo permeation studies showed a greater permeation of the drug in the formulation containing 10% oleic acid (F2) as compared to the formulation containing 20% oleic acid (F1), although not statistically significant. The in vitro bioadhesion studies, swelling studies, and surface pH measurements of the tablets were also conducted. In conclusion, permeation studies exhibited the potential of oleic acid as a buccal permeation enhancer as a significant permeation of the drug was obtained in the formulations. Hot-melt extrusion technology was successfully employed to formulate buccal tablets of ondansetron hydrochloride.

  10. Local Intravascular Drug Delivery: In Vitro Comparison of Three Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alfke, Heiko; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Calmer, Christian; Klose, Klaus Jochen

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare different catheter systems for local drug delivery with respect to the penetration depth of a biotin marker solution delivered into the vessel wall. Methods: Post-mortem carotid arteries from pigs were locally infused with a biotin solution using three different catheter systems. With all catheters (microporous balloon catheter, hydrogel-coated balloon catheter, and spiral balloon catheter) we used the same pressure of 405 kPa (4 atm) and infusion times of 60, 90, and 300 sec. After infusion the arteries were histologically prepared and stained using a biotin-specific method. With a light microscope an observer, blinded to the catheter type, scored the amount of biotin within the vessel wall, measured as staining intensity, and the penetration depth of the biotin. Results: Delivery with the hydrogel-coated balloon catheter was limited to the intima and the innermost parts of the media. The spiral balloon and microporous balloon catheter showed both a deeper penetration and a larger amount of delivered biotin compared with the hydrogel catheter, with a slightly deeper penetration using the microporous catheter. The penetration depth showed a correlation with infusion time for the spiral balloon and microporous catheters, but not for the hydrogel-coated catheter. Conclusion: Different catheter designs lead to different patterns of local drug delivery. The differences in penetration depth and amount of the substance delivered to the vessel wall should be known and might be useful for targeting specific areas within the vessel wall.

  11. Ethosomes: a novel delivery system for antifungal drugs in the treatment of topical fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhalaria, M K; Naik, Sachin; Misra, A N

    2009-05-01

    Aim of this work was to prepare and characterize fluconazole (FLZ) encapsulated ethosomes, incorporate it in suitable dermatological base, and asses its comparative clinical efficacy in the treatment of Candidiasis patients against liposomal gel, marketed product and hydroethanolic solution of the drug. Drug encapsulated ethosomes and liposomes were prepared and optimized by "Hot" method technique and lipid film hydration technique. Vesicular carriers were characterized for % entrapment efficiency, particle size and shape, in vitro drug diffusion study, mean % reduction in dimension of Candidiasis lesion and stability study by using suitable analytical technique. Vesicle size and drug entrapment efficiency of the optimized ethosomes and liposomes were found to be 144 +/- 6.8 nm and 82.68% and 216 +/- 9.2 nm and 68.22% respectively. Microscopic examinations suggest ethosomes to be multilamellar spherical vesicles with a smooth surface. The differential scanning calorimetry results suggest high fluidity of the ethosomes than liposomes. In vitro drug diffusion studies demonstrated that % drug diffused from ethosomes was nearly twice than liposomes and three times higher than the hydroethanolic solution across rat skin. From the clinical evaluation, the developed novel delivery system demonstrated enhanced antifungal activity compared to liposomal formulation, marketed formulation and hydroethanolic solution of the drug.

  12. Implantable and transdermal polymeric drug delivery technologies for the treatment of central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Govender, Thiresen; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Pillay, Viness

    2016-06-07

    The complexity of the brain and the membranous blood-brain barrier (BBB) has proved to be a significant limitation to the systemic delivery of pharmaceuticals to the brain rendering them sub-therapeutic and ineffective in the treatment of neurological diseases. Apart from this, lack of innovation in product development to counteract the problem is also a major contributing factor to a poor therapeutic outcome. Various innovative strategies show potential in treating some of the neurological disorders; however, drug delivery remains the most popular. To attain therapeutic drug levels in the central nervous system, large, intolerable systemic doses are generally administered. The major factors responsible for the success maintenance therapy of neurological diseases included controlled and sustained release of neurotherapeutics, reduced frequency of administration, higher bioavailability, and patient compliances. Conventional oral or injectable formulations cannot satisfy all the requirements in many circumstances. This article reviews the therapeutic implantable polymeric and transdermal devices employed in an attempt to effectively achieve therapeutic quantities of drug across the BBB over a prolonged period, to improve patient disease prognosis.

  13. Recent Advances in Anticancer Activities and Drug Delivery Systems of Tannins.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Jinming; Chen, Nelson G; Shi, Zhi; Qiu, Jiange; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-12-22

    Tannins, polyphenols in medicinal plants, have been divided into two groups of hydrolysable and condensed tannins, including gallotannins, ellagitannins, and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Potent anticancer activities have been observed in tannins (especially EGCG) with multiple mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of invasion and metastases. Furthermore, the combinational effects of tannins and anticancer drugs have been demonstrated in this review, including chemoprotective, chemosensitive, and antagonizing effects accompanying with anticancer effect. However, the applications of tannins have been hindered due to their poor liposolubility, low bioavailability, off-taste, and shorter half-life time in human body, such as EGCG, gallic acid, and ellagic acid. To tackle these obstacles, novel drug delivery systems have been employed to deliver tannins with the aim of improving their applications, such as gelatin nanoparticles, micelles, nanogold, liposomes, and so on. In this review, the chemical characteristics, anticancer properties, and drug delivery systems of tannins were discussed with an attempt to provide a systemic reference to promote the development of tannins as anticancer agents.

  14. The synthesis and application of two mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug delivery system with different shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiayi; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Zong, Shenfei; Cui, Yiping

    2015-05-01

    Mesoporous silica nanospheres(MSNSs) have been obtained utilizing the conventional reverse micelles synthesis method while the mesoporous silica nanorods(MSNRs) have been acquired by means of changing certain parameters. Afterwards, the prepared mesoporous silica nanospheres and nanorods were used as drug carriers to load and release the classical cancer therapeutic drug—DOX. According to the absorption spectra, the encapsulation efficiency of the mesoporous silica nanospheres is almost as high as that of the nanospheres. Different from the familiar encapsulation efficiency, the release characteristic curves of the mesoporous silica nanospheres and nanorods possessed certain differences during the release process. Finally incellular fluorescence imaging was achieved to observe the endocytosis of the mesoporous silica materials. Our results show that although both of the two kinds of nanoparticles possess favourable properties for loading and releasing drugs, the mesoporous silica nanospheres perform better in dispersity and controlled release than the nanorods, which probably endow them the potential as incellular drug delivery system.

  15. Polymeric micelles as a drug delivery system enhance cytotoxicity of vinorelbine through more intercellular accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Fayun; Qin, Lei; Xiao, Fengying; Liang, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Polymeric micelles had been used as an efficacious carrier system for anti-cancer drug delivery. However, it is not clear whether the molecular mechanism of drug encapsulated in micelles is same as free drug. In this study, the mechanism of vinorelbine loaded in glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) micelles (M-Vino) on tumor cells was investigated. Compared with free vinorelbine (Free Vino), M-Vino was more effective in inhibiting the growth of tumor cells in vitro, inducing G(2)/M phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. M-Vino showed a faster entry and higher accumulation in 4T1 cells than free vinorelbine. Therefore, M-Vino destabilized microtubules, induced cell death, and enhanced its cytotoxicity through more intercellular accumulation of vinorelbine.

  16. Development of drug delivery systems for taxanes using ionic gelation of carboxyacyl derivatives of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Skorik, Yury A; Golyshev, Anton A; Kritchenkov, Andreii S; Gasilova, Ekaterina R; Poshina, Daria N; Sivaram, Amal J; Jayakumar, Rangasamy

    2017-04-15

    Nanoparticles of two chitosan derivatives - N-succinyl-chitosan (SC) and N-glutaryl-chitosan (GC) - were developed as passive transport systems for taxanes (paclitaxel and docetaxel) using an ionic gelation technique with sodium tripolyphosphate. These nanoparticles had an apparent hydrodynamic diameter of 300-350nm, a ζ-potential of 25-31mV, an encapsulation efficiency of 21-26%, and a drug loading efficiency of 6-13%. DLS and SLS analysis shows that the nanoparticles have a unimodal size distribution and spherical form. Drug release kinetics of the taxane-loaded nanoparticles demonstrates that more than 50% of the loaded taxane could be released upon the degradation of the nanoparticles after targeted delivery. The drug-loaded SC and GC nanoparticles exhibit high cytotoxicity towards AGS cancer cell lines and their antitumor activity is consequently enhanced when compared with free taxanes.

  17. Nanoparticle-cored dendrimers: functional hybrid nanocomposites as a new platform for drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, V.; Bouchet, L. M.; Strumia, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs) are now offering themselves as versatile carriers because of their colloidal stability, tunable membrane properties and ability to encapsulate or integrate a broad range of drugs and molecules. This kind of hybrid nanocomposite aims to combine the advantages of stimuli-responsive dendritic coatings, in order to regulate the drug release behaviour under different conditions and improve the biocompatibility and in vivo half-time circulation of the inorganic nanoparticles. Size, surface chemistry and shape are key nanocarrier properties to evaluate. Here, we have reviewed the most recent advances of NCDs in drug delivery systems, compared their behaviour with non-dendritic stabilized nanoparticles and highlighted their challenges and promising applications in the future.

  18. Self-microemulsifying drug-delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of probucol: preparation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Xianyi; Wu, Juan; Chen, Yanzuo; Fang, Xiaoling

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our investigation was to design a self-microemulsifying drug-delivery system (SMEDDS) to improve the bioavailability of probucol. SMEDDS was composed of probucol, olive oil, Lauroglycol FCC, Cremophor EL, Tween-80, and PEG-400. Droplet sizes were determined. In vitro release was investigated. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of probucol suspension, oil solution, and SMEDDS were evaluated and compared in rats. Plasma drug concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. After administration of probucol suspension, plasma drug concentration was very low. Relative bioavailability of SMEDDS was dramatically enhanced in an average of 2.15- and 10.22-fold that of oil solution and suspension, respectively. It was concluded that bioavailability of probucol was enhanced greatly by SMEDDS. Improved solubility and lymphatic transport may contribute to the enhancement of bioavailability. PMID:22359449

  19. Evaluation of Organogel Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery System for Lipophilic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Martin, Baptiste; Brouillet, Fabien; Franceschi, Sophie; Perez, Emile

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate organogel nanoparticles as a drug delivery system by investigating their stability, according to the formulation strategy, and their release profile. The gelled nanoparticles were prepared by hot emulsification (above the gelation temperature) of an organogel in water, and cooling at room temperature. In the first step, we used DLS and DSC to select the most suitable formulations by optimizing the proportion of ingredients (HSA, PVA, castor oil) to obtain particles of the smallest size and greatest stability. Then, two lipophilic drug models, indomethacin and ketoconazole were entrapped in the nanoparticles made of castor oil gelled by 12-hydroxystearic acid. Thermal studies (DSC) confirmed that there was no significant alteration of gelling due to the entrapped drugs, even at 3% w/w. Very stable dispersions were obtained (>3 months), with gelled oil nanoparticles presenting a mean diameter between 250 and 300 nm. High encapsulation efficiency (>98%) was measured for indomethacin and ketoconazole. The release profile determined by in vitro dialysis showed an immediate release of the drug from the organogel nanoparticles, due to rapid diffusion. The study demonstrates the interest of these gelled oil nanoparticles for the encapsulation and the delivery of lipophilic active compounds.

  20. Neutrophil targeted nano-drug delivery system for chronic obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj; Min, Taehong; Bodas, Manish; Gorde, Aakruti; Roy, Indrajit

    2016-11-01

    The success of drug delivery to target airway cell(s) remains a significant challenge due to the limited ability of nanoparticle (NP) systems to circumvent protective airway-defense mechanisms. The size, density, surface and physical-chemical properties of nanoparticles are the key features that determine their ability to navigate across the airway-barrier. We evaluated here the efficacy of a PEGylated immuno-conjugated PLGA-nanoparticle (PINP) to overcome this challenge and selectively deliver drug to specific inflammatory cells (neutrophils). We first characterized the size, shape, surface-properties and neutrophil targeting using dynamic laser scattering, transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. Next, we assessed the efficacy of neutrophil-targeted PINPs in transporting through the airway followed by specific binding and release of drug to neutrophils. Finally, our results demonstrate the efficacy of PINP mediated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-(ibuprofen) delivery to neutrophils in murine models of obstructive lung diseases, based on its ability to control neutrophilic-inflammation and resulting lung disease.

  1. Emerging integrated nanoclay-facilitated drug delivery system for papillary thyroid cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Long, Mei; Huang, Peng; Yang, Huaming; Chang, Shi; Hu, Yuehua; Tang, Aidong; Mao, Linfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nanoclay can be incorporated into emerging dual functional drug delivery systems (DDSs) to promote efficiency in drug delivery and reduce the toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX) used for thyroid cancer treatment. This paper reports the expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite nanoclay was expanded from 0.72 nm to 0.85 nm, which could provide sufficiently spacious site for hosting doxorubicin molecules and controlling the diffusion rate. A targeted design for papillary thyroid cancer cells was achieved by introducing KI, which is consumed by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS). As indicated by MTT assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy and bio-TEM observations, methoxy-intercalated kaolinite (KaolinMeOH) exhibited negligible cytotoxicity against papillary thyroid cancer cells. By contrast, DOX-KaolinMeOH showed dose-dependent therapeutic effects in vitro, and KI@DOX-KaolinMeOH was found to act as a powerful targeted therapeutic drug. Furthermore, active and passive targeting strategies played a role in the accumulation of the drug molecules, as verified by an in vivo bio-distribution analysis. PMID:27616592

  2. Emerging integrated nanoclay-facilitated drug delivery system for papillary thyroid cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Long, Mei; Huang, Peng; Yang, Huaming; Chang, Shi; Hu, Yuehua; Tang, Aidong; Mao, Linfeng

    2016-09-01

    Nanoclay can be incorporated into emerging dual functional drug delivery systems (DDSs) to promote efficiency in drug delivery and reduce the toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX) used for thyroid cancer treatment. This paper reports the expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite nanoclay was expanded from 0.72 nm to 0.85 nm, which could provide sufficiently spacious site for hosting doxorubicin molecules and controlling the diffusion rate. A targeted design for papillary thyroid cancer cells was achieved by introducing KI, which is consumed by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS). As indicated by MTT assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy and bio-TEM observations, methoxy-intercalated kaolinite (KaolinMeOH) exhibited negligible cytotoxicity against papillary thyroid cancer cells. By contrast, DOX-KaolinMeOH showed dose-dependent therapeutic effects in vitro, and KI@DOX-KaolinMeOH was found to act as a powerful targeted therapeutic drug. Furthermore, active and passive targeting strategies played a role in the accumulation of the drug molecules, as verified by an in vivo bio-distribution analysis.

  3. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of atorvastatin calcium by self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS).

    PubMed

    Kadu, Pawan J; Kushare, Sachin S; Thacker, Dhaval D; Gattani, Surendra G

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate a self-emulsifying drug delivery system of atorvastatin calcium and its characterization including in vitro and in vivo potential. The solubility of atorvastatin calcium was determined in various vehicles such as Captex 355, Captex 355 EP/NF, Ethyl oleate, Capmul MCM, Capmul PG-8, Gelucire 44/14, Tween 80, Tween 20, and PEG 400. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were plotted on the basis of solubility data of drug in various components to evaluate the microemulsification region. Formulation development and screening was carried out based on results obtained from phase diagrams and characteristics of resultant microemulsion. Prepared formulations were tested for microemulsifying properties and evaluated for clarity, precipitation, viscosity determination, drug content and in vitro dissolution. The optimized formulation further evaluated for particle size distribution, zeta potential, stability studies and in vivo potential. In vivo performance of the optimized formulation was evaluated using a Triton-induced hypercholesterolemia model in male Albino Wistar rats. The formulation significantly reduced serum lipid levels as compared with atorvastatin calcium. Thus studies illustrated the potential use for the delivery of hydrophobic drug such as atorvastatin calcium by oral route.

  4. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Andrew S; Partanen, Ari; Yarmolenko, Pavel; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Wood, Bradford J

    2015-11-01

    The use of clinical imaging modalities for the guidance of targeted drug delivery systems, known as image-guided drug delivery (IGDD), has emerged as a promising strategy for enhancing antitumor efficacy. MR imaging is particularly well suited for IGDD applications because of its ability to acquire images and quantitative measurements with high spatiotemporal resolution. The goal of IGDD strategies is to improve treatment outcomes by facilitating planning, real-time guidance, and personalization of pharmacologic interventions. This article reviews basic principles of targeted drug delivery and highlights the current status, emerging applications, and future paradigms of MR-guided drug delivery.

  5. Development of a novel injectable drug delivery system for subconjunctival glaucoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Voss, Karsten; Falke, Karen; Bernsdorf, Arne; Grabow, Niels; Kastner, Christian; Sternberg, Katrin; Minrath, Ingo; Eickner, Thomas; Wree, Andreas; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Guthoff, Rudolf; Witt, Martin; Hovakimyan, Marina

    2015-09-28

    In this study we present the development of an injectable polymeric drug delivery system for subconjunctival treatment of primary open angle glaucoma. The system consists of hyaluronic acid sodium salt (HA), which is commonly used in ophthalmology in anterior segment surgery, and an isocyanate-functionalized 1,2-ethylene glycol bis(dilactic acid) (ELA-NCO). The polymer mixtures with different ratios of HA to ELA-NCO (1/1, 1/4, and 1/10 (v/v)) were investigated for biocompatibility, degradation behavior and applicability as a sustained release system. For the latter, the lipophilic latanoprost ester pro-drug (LA) was incorporated into the HA/ELA-NCO system. In vitro, a sustained LA release over a period of about 60days was achieved. In cell culture experiments, the HA/ELA-NCO (1/1, (v/v)) system was proven to be biocompatible for human and rabbit Tenon's fibroblasts. Examination of in vitro degradation behavior revealed a total mass loss of more than 60% during the observation period of 26weeks. In vivo, LA was continuously released for 152days into rabbit aqueous humor and serum. Histological investigations revealed a marked leuko-lymphocytic infiltration soon after subconjunctival injection. Thereafter, the initial tissue reaction declined concomitantly with a continuous degradation of the polymer, which was completed after 10months. Our study demonstrates the suitability of the polymer resulting from the reaction of HA with ELA-NCO as an injectable local drug delivery system for glaucoma therapy, combining biocompatibility and biodegradability with prolonged drug release.

  6. Electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers as a potential oromucosal delivery system for poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Potrč, Tanja; Baumgartner, Saša; Roškar, Robert; Planinšek, Odon; Lavrič, Zoran; Kristl, Julijana; Kocbek, Petra

    2015-07-30

    nanodelivery system compared to the drug-loaded polymer films that were used as the reference formulation. As a result, electrospinning was shown to be a very promising nanotechnology-based approach to the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs in order to enhance their dissolution. In addition, the great potential of the produced drug-loaded PCL nanofiber mats for subsequent formulation as oromucosal drug delivery systems for children and the elderly was confirmed.

  7. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  8. Refilling drug delivery depots through the blood.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Yevgeny; Silva, Eduardo A; Kearney, Cathal J; Lewin, Sarah A; Miller, Alex; Martinick, Kathleen D; Aizenberg, Michael; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-02

    Local drug delivery depots have significant clinical utility, but there is currently no noninvasive technique to refill these systems once their payload is exhausted. Inspired by the ability of nanotherapeutics to target specific tissues, we hypothesized that blood-borne drug payloads could be modified to home to and refill hydrogel drug delivery systems. To address this possibility, hydrogels were modified with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that provide a target for drug payloads in the form of free alginate strands carrying complementary ODNs. Coupling ODNs to alginate strands led to specific binding to complementary-ODN-carrying alginate gels in vitro and to injected gels in vivo. When coupled to a drug payload, sequence-targeted refilling of a delivery depot consisting of intratumor hydrogels completely abrogated tumor growth. These results suggest a new paradigm for nanotherapeutic drug delivery, and this concept is expected to have applications in refilling drug depots in cancer therapy, wound healing, and drug-eluting vascular grafts and stents.

  9. Optimizing drugs for local delivery.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, S; Lock, R; Searcey, M

    2009-12-01

    An international panel of speakers together with approximately 70 delegates were brought together by The Society for Medicines Research's symposium on Optimising Drugs for Local Delivery, held on June 11, 2009 at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Horsham, UK. The focus of the conference was on the delivery of drugs direct to the site of action and the consequences of this delivery route on delivery technologies, formulation science and molecular design.

  10. Microprocessor controlled transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramony, J Anand; Sharma, Ashutosh; Phipps, J B

    2006-07-06

    Transdermal drug delivery via iontophoresis is reviewed with special focus on the delivery of lidocaine for local anesthesia and fentanyl for patient controlled acute therapy such as postoperative pain. The role of the microprocessor controller in achieving dosimetry, alternating/reverse polarity, pre-programmed, and sensor-based delivery is highlighted. Unique features such as the use of tactile signaling, telemetry control, and pulsatile waveforms in iontophoretic drug delivery are described briefly.

  11. Preparation and characterization of 6-mercaptopurine-coated magnetite nanoparticles as a drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Dorniani, Dena; Hussein, Mohd Zobir bin; Kura, Aminu Umar; Fakurazi, Sharida; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Ahmad, Zalinah

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron oxide nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their use in magnetic recording tape, ferrofluid, magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, and treatment of cancer. The specific morphology of nanoparticles confers an ability to load, carry, and release different types of drugs. Methods and results We synthesized superparamagnetic nanoparticles containing pure iron oxide with a cubic inverse spinal structure. Fourier transform infrared spectra confirmed that these Fe3O4 nanoparticles could be successfully coated with active drug, and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analyses showed that the thermal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with chitosan and 6-mercaptopurine (FCMP) was markedly enhanced. The synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles and the FCMP nanocomposite were generally spherical, with an average diameter of 9 nm and 19 nm, respectively. The release of 6-mercaptopurine from the FCMP nanocomposite was found to be sustained and governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. In order to improve drug loading and release behavior, we prepared a novel nanocomposite (FCMP-D), ie, Fe3O4 nanoparticles containing the same amounts of chitosan and 6-mercaptopurine but using a different solvent for the drug. The results for FCMP-D did not demonstrate “burst release” and the maximum percentage release of 6-mercaptopurine from the FCMP-D nanocomposite reached about 97.7% and 55.4% within approximately 2,500 and 6,300 minutes when exposed to pH 4.8 and pH 7.4 solutions, respectively. By MTT assay, the FCMP nanocomposite was shown not to be toxic to a normal mouse fibroblast cell line. Conclusion Iron oxide coated with chitosan containing 6-mercaptopurine prepared using a coprecipitation method has the potential to be used as a controlled-release formulation. These nanoparticles may serve as an alternative drug delivery system for the treatment of cancer, with the added advantage of sparing healthy surrounding cells and

  12. Formulation and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of irbesartan.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Sheth, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Irbesartan (IRB) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB. The solubility of IRB in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. The optimized SNEDDS formulation contained IRB (75 mg), Cremophor(®) EL (43.33%), Carbitol(®) (21.67%) and Capryol(®) 90 (32%). SNEDDS was further evaluated for its percentage transmittance, emulsification time, drug content, phase separation, dilution, droplet size and zeta potential. The optimized formulation of IRB-loaded SNEDDS exhibited complete in vitro drug release in 15 min as compared with the plain drug, which had a limited dissolution rate. It was also compared with the pure drug solution by oral administration in male Wister rats. The in vivo study exhibited a 7.5-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of IRB from SNEDDS compared with the pure drug solution. These results suggest the potential use of SNEDDS to improve dissolution and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB.

  13. A comparative study on the nanoparticles for improved drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Nosrat O; Ghavidast, Atefeh; Amirmahani, Najmeh

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted considerable recent interest for diverse biomedical applications because of the unique properties of the nanomaterials. It is already known that one of the major advances in the relative application of nanoparticles is the recognition of the steric stabilization which can increase the particle stability in the biological environment and provide the opportunities of the application of nanoparticles in the development of drug delivery systems (DDSs) for achieving drug targeting and controlled drug release. To facilitate their use in such applications, the appropriate design of surface ligands on these nanoparticles is necessary. In view of these, functionalized nanoparticles through surface modification can be utilized to specifically interact with the target molecules on the cell membrane or intracellular ones. This review briefly presents self-assembled nanoparticles with molecules of therapeutic significance with two strategies. The first strategy attempts to improve the placement of the drugs using conjugating the appropriate ligands or adding targeting moieties to the DDS. The second strategy utilizes trigger-controlled drug-release, which restricts drug release at the targeted site to kill cancer cells by externally controlled mechanisms. Among external stimulations, conveniently light has attracted much interest because it, as an orthogonal external stimulus, gives spatiotemporal control of payload release.

  14. Lacidipine self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for the enhancement of oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Natesan; Sharavanan, Shanmugam Palaniappan; Chandrasekar, Ponnusamy; Balakumar, Alagar; Moulik, Satya Priya

    2016-04-01

    Low bioavailability of Lacidipine (LD), an calcium channel blocker pose many challenges in the treatment of hypertension. The objective of this study was to formulate and characterize LD self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) to improve oral bioavailability of the drug. Formulations were evaluated for globule size, surface morphology, emulsification time, cloud point, drug content, in vitro dissolution, ex vivo permeation, stability and oral bioavailability studies. Captex 810D, TPGS, Tween-60, Transcutol P and PEG 400 was selected based on the solubility study results. The optimized SNEDDS readily gets nanoemulsified at 37 °C with droplet size of 41 nm when mixed with 200 times of its water. Transmission electron microscope photographs confirmed the spherical shape of the globules. In vitro dissolution of SNEDDS showed more than 80% of drug release within 15 min. The ex vivo permeation of LD from SNEDDS is 4.8- and 9-fold higher compared to pure drug in the absence and presence of verapamil respectively. The stability study of the SNEDDS confirmed no environmental effect on the physical nature and drug content. Oral bioavailability of SNEDDS is 2.5 times higher than marketed tablet. The results suggest that, the SNEDDS formulation can be used as a possible alternative for the traditional oral formulations of LD to improve its oral bioavailability.

  15. Pure and Strontium Doped Nano Hydroxyapatite: New Approach for Bone Implant and Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Kashmira P.; Vasant, Sonal R.; Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2011-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite, (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2-Hap), an excellent inorganic biomaterial, find various applications. The chemical composition of Hap is similar to that of the inorganic matrix of human bone and dental enamel. It is also used in drug delivery system and coating of bone implant. In the present study, pure nano Hap and Strontium doped nano-Hap (Sr-Hap) with different concentrations were synthesized by surfactant mediated approach. The samples were characterized by EDAX, XRD and TEM. The hemolytic properties were also studied and it proved that all the samples were non-hemolytic.

  16. The formalism of fractal aggregation phenomena of colloidal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Demetzos, Costas; Danezis, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Classical Newtonian Physics and Euclidean Geometry are currently used to describe biological phenomena and the processes of drug formulation, which are characterized by homogeneity and linearity. On the other hand, at the mesoscopic level, the principles and the laws of physics are quite different from the Classical Newtonian Physics and Euclidean approach especially at nanoscale dimension. The investigation of the aggregation process of liposomes is of paramount importance due to their applications in pharmaceutical nanotechnology as drug delivery systems and as membrane models, in biosciences. The physical stability and the aggregation process of colloidal systems as well as the surface phenomena are described using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The elucidation of the dimensionality of liposome aggregates obeys the fractal approach because the aggregation phenomena are irreversible. This approach can be correlated with the extended DLVO theory, which includes the hydration energy, too.

  17. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system.

  18. Sonophoresis in transdermal drug deliverys.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has several significant advantages compared to oral drug delivery, including elimination of pain and sustained drug release. However, the use of TDD is limited by low skin permeability due to the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin. Sonophoresis is a technique that temporarily increases skin permeability such that various medications can be delivered noninvasively. For the past several decades, various studies of sonophoresis in TDD have been performed focusing on parameter optimization, delivery mechanism, transport pathway, or delivery of several drug categories including hydrophilic and high molecular weight compounds. Based on these various studies, several possible mechanisms of sonophoresis have been suggested. For example, cavitation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for drug delivery in sonophoresis. This review presents details of various studies on sonophoresis including the latest trends, delivery of various therapeutic drugs, sonophoresis pathways and mechanisms, and outlook of future studies.

  19. Chronomodulated drug delivery system of urapidil for the treatment of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sona S.; Patel, Hetal K.; Parejiya, Punit B.; Shelat, Pragna K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hypertension is a disease which shows circadian rhythm in the pattern of two peaks, one in the evening at about 7pm and other in the early morning between 4 am to 8 am. Conventional therapies are incapable to target those time points when actually the symptoms get worsened. To achieve drug release at two time points, chronomodulated delivery system may offer greater benefits. Materials and methods: The chronomodulated system comprised of dual approach; immediate release granules (IRG) and pulsatile release mini-tablets (PRM) filled in the hard gelatin capsule. The mini-tablets were coated using Eudragit S-100 which provided the lag time. To achieve the desired release, various parameters like coating duration and coat thickness were studied. The immediate release granules were evaluated for micromeritical properties and drug release, while mini-tablets were evaluated for various parameters such as hardness, thickness, friability, weight variation, drug content, and disintegration time and in-vitro drug release. Compatibility of drug-excipient was checked by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Differential scanning calorimetry studies and pellets morphology was done by Scanning electron microscopy studies. Results: The in-vitro release profile suggested that immediate release granules gives drug release within 20 min at the time of evening attack while the programmed pulsatile release was achieved from coated mini-tablets after a lag time of 9hrs, which was consistent with the demand of drug during early morning hour attack. Pellets found to be spherical in shape with smooth surface. Moreover compatibility studies illustrated no deleterious reaction between drug and polymers used in the study. Conclusions: The dual approach of developed chronomodulated formulation found to be satisfactory in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25838996

  20. Novel gastroretentive controlled-release drug delivery system for amoxicillin therapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, E; Kagan, L; Chamisha, Y; Gati, I; Hoffman, A; Friedman, M; Lavy, E

    2011-10-01

    Beta-lactam antimicrobials, commonly used in both veterinary and human medicine, generally present short biologic half-lives, whereas their activity is enhanced as pathogen exposure is prolonged. These properties necessitate multiple-dose regimens of standard dosage forms, thereby hampering pet owner adherence, frequently resulting in therapeutic failure. This study presents a novel controlled-release gastroretentive oral drug delivery system for beta-lactams with which single-dose administration provides an effective antimicrobial course, optimizing pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles, minimizing adverse effects and emergence of antimicrobial resistance and facilitating adherence. Our prototype sustained-delivery swelling-tablet (SDST), based on a degradable hydrophilic polymeric matrix, was designed to enable continuous input of these drugs to their absorption sites over several days. Several SDST formulations of the beta-lactam amoxicillin were evaluated in in vitro dissolution studies. Two formulations were selected for further in vivo canine studies, for determination of gastric retention and PK-PD profiling. Prolonged gastric retention times maintaining allowed for maintained effective drug concentrations against many clinically relevant pathogens for more than 48 h for one formulation and more than 5 days for the other. Both SDST formulations offer significant advantages over standard immediate-release therapy in achieving PK-PD goals and enhancing adherence. The prototypical formulations represent a novel platform which may be modified to meet various clinical requirements.

  1. Nanopharmaceutics: phytochemical-based controlled or sustained drug-delivery systems for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeetah, Roubeena; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2014-09-01

    This review is an attempt to assess the different classes of phytochemicals and some of their members which have been encapsulated into nanocarrier systems for their chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive properties. Given the broad spectrum of nanomedicines currently in clinical trial and clinical use from polymer-protein conjugates, through nanocrystals, nanogels, dendrimers to ethosomes, the focus of this review will be on block copolymer nanomicelles, nanoparticles, polymer-drug conjugates, liposomes and solid lipid nanocarriers (SLNs). The twenty phytochemicals investigated for encapsulation and targeted delivery were selected from a variety of classes intended to encompass the largest possible chemical compositions, namely flavonoids, aromatic acids, xanthones, terpenes, quinones, lignans and alkaloids. To the best of our knowledge, reviews on the nanoencapsulation of these phytochemicals and their delivery are not available. In this review, the issues associated with the limited use of each phytochemical in cancer therapy in humans are reviewed and the advantages of entrapment into nanocarriers are assessed in terms of drug loading efficiency, size of nanocarriers, drug release profiles and in vitro and/or in vivo testing specific to cancer research, e.g., cytotoxicity assay, cell inhibition/viability, scavenging of reactive oxygen species and biodistribution studies (elimination half-life and mean residence time).

  2. Investigations into Thermally Mediated Drug Delivery Using a Preclinical System for MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staruch, Robert; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the use of a preclinical system for MRI-guided focused ultrasound to achieve MRI-controlled hyperthermia and thermally-mediated drug delivery in vivo. Here we report results from ten rabbits, where a focused ultrasound (FUS) beam was scanned in a circular trajectory to heat 10-15 mm diameter regions in normal thigh to 43 °C for 20-30 minutes. MRI thermometry was used for closed-loop feedback control to achieve temporally and spatially uniform heating. Lyso-thermosensitive pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (ThermoDox®, Celsion Corporation, Columbia, MD) was infused intravenously during hyperthermia, and the tissue doxorubicin concentration was measured by the fluorescence intensity of homogenized tissue samples from heated and unheated thigh, obtained 2 hours after heating. Closed-loop control of FUS hyperthermia using MRI thermometry achieved temperature distributions with mean, T90 and T10 of 42.9 °C, 41.0 °C and 44.8 °C across the 10 mm diameter target, varying ±0.9 °C (SD) over 20 min. Drug concentrations in heated regions were, on average 15.3±8.1 (SD) times higher than in the unheated contralateral thigh. The results show the feasibility of using MRI-controlled FUS hyperthermia for preclinical studies of thermally mediated drug delivery with temperature-sensitive liposomes.

  3. Molecular engineering of dendritic polymers and their application as drug and gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Paleos, Constantinos M; Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Sideratou, Zili

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the development of functional and multifunctional dendrimeric and hyperbranched polymers, collectively called dendritic polymers, with the objective of being applied as drug and gene delivery systems. In particular, using as starting materials known and well-characterized basic dendritic polymers, the review deals with the type of structural modifications to which these dendritic polymers were subjected for the development of drug carriers with low toxicity, high encapsulating capacity, a specificity for certain biological cells, and the ability to be transported through their membranes. Proceeding from functional to multifunctional dendritic polymers, one is able to prepare products that fulfill one or more of these requirements, which an effective drug carrier should exhibit. A common feature of the dendritic polymers is the exhibition of polyvalent interactions, while for multifunctional derivatives, a number of targeting ligands determine specificity, another type of group secures stability in biological milieu and prolonged circulation, while others facilitate their transport through cell membranes. Furthermore, dendritic polymers employed for gene delivery should be or become cationic in the biological environment for the formation of complexes with the negatively charged genetic material.

  4. Development and characterization of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Shiva Kumar; Pashikanti, Shailaja; Murthy, K V Ramana

    2012-03-01

    The main aim of the present investigation is to develop and characterize the self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of atorvastatin calcium (ATV) for improving the dissolution thereby oral bioavailability and to minimize the gastric degradation. Naturally occurring different vegetable oils, various surfactants and co-surfactants were studied for ATV solubility to identify the components of SNEDDS. Ternary phase diagrams comprising surfactant, cosurfactant and oil were plotted. In the ternary phase diagrams the area of self-nanoemulsifying region was marked for the compositions that are giving dispersion with a globule size ≤ 200 nm. Effect of drug loading on the phase behavior of selected system was studied. A series of SNEDDS were prepared by selecting from the nanoemulsifying area of 2.5% ATV system. Prepared SNEDDS were evaluated for visual observations, turbidity, effect of pH of the dispersion media on globule size and zeta potential, robustness to dilution and in vitro dissolution study and optimized. FT-IR and DSC were studied for interaction between drug and excipients if any. Forced degradation and accelerated stability studies were conducted for optimized SNEDDS. ATVF 04 and 11 were selected as optimized SNEDDS due to their smaller mean globule size (75.2 and 85.8 nm respectively), lower turbidity values, faster drug release and higher DE values among the other SNEDDS. The optimized ATV SNEDDS were not affected by the pH of dissolution medium. FT-IR study revealed no interaction between drug and excipients used. Forced degradation studies indicated the stability of ATV in the gastric environment. Accelerated stability studies showed no significant changes in the mean globule size, zeta potential, drug content and drug release before and after storage of optimized SNEDDS.

  5. Mucoadhesive cellulosic derivative sponges as drug delivery system for vaginal application.

    PubMed

    Furst, Tania; Piette, Marie; Lechanteur, Anna; Evrard, Brigitte; Piel, Géraldine

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal delivery of active drugs has been largely studied for local and systemic applications. It is well known that vagina is a complex route, due to physiological and non-physiological changes. Therefore, in order to achieve a prolonged local effect, these variations have to be considered. The aim of this study was to formulate and to characterize a solid system, called sponges, obtained by lyophilization of cellulosic derivative (HEC 250M) hydrogels. These sponges have to meet particular criteria to be adapted for vaginal application: they have to adhere to the vaginal cavity and to be rehydrated by the small amount of vaginal fluids. Moreover, they have to be easily manipulated and to be stable. Three freezing temperatures have been tested to prepare sponges (-15°C, -25°C, -35°C). By SEM analyzes, it was observed that the pores into the sponges were smaller and numerous as the freezing temperature decreases. However, this temperature did not have any influence on the rehydration speed that was rather influenced by the HEC concentration. Viscosity and mucoadhesive strength of hydrogels and corresponding sponges were also measured. It appeared that these parameters are mainly dependent on the HEC concentration. These mucoadhesive sponges can be considered as potential drug delivery systems intended for vaginal application.

  6. Roles of dextrans on improving lymphatic drainage for liposomal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linglin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Min; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chenyu; Gu, Bing; Liu, Yu; Wei, Gang; Zhong, Gaoren; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a novel liposomal drug delivery system containing dextrans to reduce undesirable retention of antineoplastic agents and thus alleviate local tissue damage. At the cell level, diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DEAE-Dx) showed the strongest inhibiting effect on liposome uptake by macrophages among tested dextrans. The distribution of radiolabeled liposomes mixed with dextrans in injection site and draining lymph node was investigated in rats after subcutaneous injection. DEAE-Dx substantially reduced the undesired local retention and promoted the draining of liposome into lymphatics, which was further confirmed by confocal microscopy images revealing the substantial prevention of rhodamine B-labelled liposome sequestration by macrophages in normal lymph node in rats. Pharmacokinetic data indicated the accelerated drainage of liposome through lymphatics back to systemic circulation by mixing with DEAE-Dx. In the toxicological study in rabbits, DEAE-Dx alleviated the local tissue damage caused by liposomal doxorubicin. In conclusion, dextrans, particularly DEAE-Dx, could efficiently enhanced liposomes drainage into lymphatics, which proves themselves as promising adjuvants for lymphatic-targeted liposomal drug delivery system.

  7. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Meiying; Pan, Limin; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4) and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin) and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide) for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors. PMID:26766908

  8. The emerging potential of by-products as platforms for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Joanitti, Graziella A; Silva, Luciano P

    2014-05-01

    Natural resources are widely used as raw materials by industries. In most cases, abundant byproducts with low economic interest are also generated from agro-industrial supply chains. There are several examples for the rational use of agro-industrial byproducts in the nanobiotechnology field aiming for the development of novel products and high value added processes. Such raw materials include carapaces, pelages, blood, bagasses, and straws. Molecules from such materials (e.g. chitosan, cellulose, and albumin) are used as scaffolds of unprecedented novel nanostructure. Research efforts comprising a combination of sustainability, nanobiotechnology, and nanomedicine have emerged. One major area in nano-biotechnological research of agro-industrial byproducts is represented by the field of drug delivery systems (DDS). Among the main advantages of agro-industrial byproducts used as drug carriers are their abundance; low price; high biocompatibility; good biodegradability; moderate bioresorbability, associated with reduced systemic toxicity or even no toxicity; and often bioactivity. The goal of these efforts includes not only the possibility to characterize and manipulate matter on the nanoscale, but also to develop sustainable products and processes, including the development of platforms for drug delivery aiming for the treatment of pathologies such as cancer and diabetes. Indeed, there is great hope that the use of agro-industrial byproducts in nanobiotechnology will increase not only agricultural and livestock productivity, but will also contribute to other areas such as the development of DDS with new properties and low production costs; and sustainable environmental management due to the reuse of industrial discharged byproducts. This review will compile current findings on the use of byproducts as building blocks for modern drug carrier systems, emphasizing the challenges and promising applications.

  9. Developments on drug delivery systems for the treatment of mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, M M; Cruz, A; Fraga, A G; Castro, A G; Cruz, M E M; Pedrosa, J

    2008-01-01

    The clinical management of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases with antimycobacterial chemotherapy remains a difficult task. The classical treatment protocols are long-lasting; the drugs reach mycobacteria-infected macrophages in low amounts and/or do not persist long enough to develop the desired antimycobacterial effect; and the available agents induce severe toxic effects. Nanotechnology has provided a huge improvement to pharmacology through the designing of drug delivery systems able to target phagocytic cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria. Liposomes and nanoparticles of polymeric nature represent two of the most efficient drug carrier systems that after in vivo administration are endocytosed by phagocytic cells and then release the carried agents into these cells. This article reviews the relevant publications describing the effectiveness of the association of antimycobacterial agents with liposomes or nanoparticles for the treatment of mycobacterioses, particularly for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium infections. The increased therapeutic index of antimycobacterial drugs; the reduction of dosing frequency; and the improvement of solubility of hydrophobic agents, allowing the administration of higher doses, have been demonstrated in experimental infections. These advantages may lead to new therapeutic protocols that will improve patient compliance and, consequently, lead to a more successful control of mycobacterial infections. The potential therapeutic advantages resulting from the use of non-invasive administration routes for nanoparticulate systems are also discussed.

  10. Strategies of targeting oral drug delivery systems to the colon and their potential use for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Often, surgical intervention remains the choice in treating CRC. Traditional dosage forms used for treating CRC deliver drug to wanted as well as unwanted sites of drug action resulting in several adverse side effects. Targeted oral drug delivery systems are being investigated to target and deliver chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents directly to colon and rectum. Site-specific delivery of a drug to colon increases its concentration at the target site, and thus requires a lower dose with reduced incidence of side effects. The major obstacle to be overcome for successful targeting of drug to colon through oral route is that drug absorption/degradation must be avoided in stomach and small intestine before the dosage form reaches colon. The review includes discussion of physiological factors that must be considered when targeting drugs directly to colorectal region, an outline on drugs used for treatment and prevention of CRC, and a brief description of various types of colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems. The focus is on the assessment of various formulation approaches being investigated for oral colon-specific delivery of drugs used in the treatment and prevention of CRC.

  11. Review paper: critical issues in tissue engineering: biomaterials, cell sources, angiogenesis, and drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Hojjat; Matin, Maryam M; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2011-11-01

    Tissue engineering is a newly emerging biomedical technology, which aids and increases the repair and regeneration of deficient and injured tissues. It employs the principles from the fields of materials science, cell biology, transplantation, and engineering in an effort to treat or replace damaged tissues. Tissue engineering and development of complex tissues or organs, such as heart, muscle, kidney, liver, and lung, are still a distant milestone in twenty-first century. Generally, there are four main challenges in tissue engineering which need optimization. These include biomaterials, cell sources, vascularization of engineered tissues, and design of drug delivery systems. Biomaterials and cell sources should be specific for the engineering of each tissue or organ. On the other hand, angiogenesis is required not only for the treatment of a variety of ischemic conditions, but it is also a critical component of virtually all tissue-engineering strategies. Therefore, controlling the dose, location, and duration of releasing angiogenic factors via polymeric delivery systems, in order to ultimately better mimic the stem cell niche through scaffolds, will dictate the utility of a variety of biomaterials in tissue regeneration. This review focuses on the use of polymeric vehicles that are made of synthetic and/or natural biomaterials as scaffolds for three-dimensional cell cultures and for locally delivering the inductive growth factors in various formats to provide a method of controlled, localized delivery for the desired time frame and for vascularized tissue-engineering therapies.

  12. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  13. Orally dissolving strips: A new approach to oral drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Bala, Rajni; Pawar, Pravin; Khanna, Sushil; Arora, Sandeep

    2013-04-01

    Recently, fast dissolving films are gaining interest as an alternative of fast dissolving tablets. The films are designed to dissolve upon contact with a wet surface, such as the tongue, within a few seconds, meaning the consumer can take the product without need for additional liquid. This convenience provides both a marketing advantage and increased patient compliance. As the drug is directly absorbed into systemic circulation, degradation in gastrointestinal tract and first pass effect can be avoided. These points make this formulation most popular and acceptable among pediatric and geriatric patients and patients with fear of choking. Over-the-counter films for pain management and motion sickness are commercialized in the US markets. Many companies are utilizing transdermal drug delivery technology to develop thin film formats. In the present review, recent advancements regarding fast dissolving buccal film formulation and their evaluation parameters are compiled.

  14. Orally dissolving strips: A new approach to oral drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Rajni; Pawar, Pravin; Khanna, Sushil; Arora, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Recently, fast dissolving films are gaining interest as an alternative of fast dissolving tablets. The films are designed to dissolve upon contact with a wet surface, such as the tongue, within a few seconds, meaning the consumer can take the product without need for additional liquid. This convenience provides both a marketing advantage and increased patient compliance. As the drug is directly absorbed into systemic circulation, degradation in gastrointestinal tract and first pass effect can be avoided. These points make this formulation most popular and acceptable among pediatric and geriatric patients and patients with fear of choking. Over-the-counter films for pain management and motion sickness are commercialized in the US markets. Many companies are utilizing transdermal drug delivery technology to develop thin film formats. In the present review, recent advancements regarding fast dissolving buccal film formulation and their evaluation parameters are compiled. PMID:24015378

  15. Development, Characterization, and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of Hydrochlorothiazide Loaded Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pankajkumar S.; Yadav, Ekta; Verma, Amita; Amin, Saima

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to develop optimized self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) and evaluate their in vitro and in vivo performance. The research comprised various studies which includes solubility studies in various vehicles, pseudoternary phase diagram construction, and preparation and characterization of SNEDDS along with in vitro dissolution and in vivo pharmacodynamic profiling. Based on dissolution profile, a remarkable increase in rate of dissolution was observed in comparison with plain drug and marketed formulation. Optimized SNEDDS formulation was composed of Capmul MCM (19.17% w/w), Tween 80 (57.5% w/w), Transcutol P (12.7% w/w), and HCT (4.17% w/w). In vivo pharmacodynamic evaluation in Wistar rats showed considerable increase in pharmacological effect of HCT by SNEDDS formulation as compared with plain HCT. PMID:25580455

  16. Boron Nitride Nanoparticles with a Petal-Like Surface as Anticancer Drug-Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Sukhorukova, Irina V; Zhitnyak, Irina Y; Kovalskii, Andrey M; Matveev, Andrei T; Lebedev, Oleg I; Li, Xia; Gloushankova, Natalia A; Golberg, Dmitri; Shtansky, Dmitry V

    2015-08-12

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have a great potential as nanosized drug-delivery carriers. Such systems must safely deliver the drug to the site of the tumor without drug leakage, effectively penetrate inside cancer cells, and provide intracellular drug release. Herein we developed an original and simple method aimed at the fabrication of spherical boron nitride NPs (BNNPs), 100-200 nm in diameter, with peculiar petal-like surfaces via chemical vapor deposition. Such structures were found to be able to absorb a large amount of antitumor drug-killing tumor cells. They revealed low cytotoxicity and rapid cellular uptake. BNNPs were saturated with doxorubicin (DOX) and then dispersed. The BNNPs loaded with DOX (BNNPs-DOX) were stable at neutral pH but effectively released DOX at pH 4.5-5.5. MTT assay and cell growth testing showed that the BNNPs-DOX nanocarriers had been toxic for IAR-6-1 cells. BNNPs loaded with DOX penetrated into the neoplastic IAR-6-1 cells using endocytic pathways, and then DOX released into the cytoplasm and cell nuclei and resulted in cell death.

  17. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for Alzheimer's disease management: Technical, industrial, and clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming Ming; El-Salamouni, Noha S; El-Refaie, Wessam M; Hazzah, Heba A; Ali, Mai M; Tosi, Giovanni; Farid, Ragwa M; Blanco-Prieto, Maria J; Billa, Nashiru; Hanafy, Amira S

    2017-01-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease with high prevalence in the rapidly growing elderly population in the developing world. The currently FDA approved drugs for the management of symptomatology of AD are marketed mainly as conventional oral medications. Due to their gastrointestinal side effects and lack of brain targeting, these drugs and dosage regiments hinder patient compliance and lead to treatment discontinuation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (NTDDS) administered by different routes can be considered as promising tools to improve patient compliance and achieve better therapeutic outcomes. Despite extensive research, literature screening revealed that clinical activities involving NTDDS application in research for AD are lagging compared to NTDDS for other diseases such as cancers. The industrial perspectives, processability, and cost/benefit ratio of using NTDDS for AD treatment are usually overlooked. Moreover, active and passive immunization against AD are by far the mostly studied alternative AD therapies because conventional oral drug therapy is not yielding satisfactorily results. NTDDS of approved drugs appear promising to transform this research from 'paper to clinic' and raise hope for AD sufferers and their caretakers. This review summarizes the recent studies conducted on NTDDS for AD treatment, with a primary focus on the industrial perspectives and processability. Additionally, it highlights the ongoing clinical trials for AD management.

  18. Emerging integrated nanohybrid drug delivery systems to facilitate the intravenous-to-oral switch in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Sun, Jin; Du, Yuqian; He, Zhonggui

    2014-02-28

    Nanohybrid drug delivery systems have presented lots of characteristic advantages as an efficient strategy to facilitate oral drug delivery. Nonetheless, oral administration of chemotherapy agents by nanoparticulate delivery technology still faces great challenges owing to the multiple biobarriers ranging from poorly physicochemical properties of drugs, to complex gastrointestinal disposition and to presystemic metabolism. This review briefly analyzes a series of biobarriers hindering oral absorption and describes the multiple aspects for facilitating the intravenous-to-oral switch in cancer therapy. Moreover, the developed nanoparticulate drug delivery strategies to overcome the above obstacles are provided, including metabolic enzyme inhibition, enteric-coated nanocarriers, bioadhesive and mucus-penetrating strategies, P-gp inhibition and active targeting. On these foundations, the emerging trends of integrated hybrid nanosystems in response to the present low-efficiency drug delivery of any single approach are summarized, such as mixed polymeric micelles and nanocomposite particulate systems. Finally, the recent advances of high-efficiency hybrid nanoparticles in oral chemotherapy are highlighted, with special attention on integrated approach to design drug delivery nanosystems.

  19. Pulsed Laser Processing of Functionalized Polysaccharides for Controlled Release Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Popescu, A. C.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.; Caraene, G.; Albulescu, R.; Buruiana, T.; Chrisey, D.

    We report on the deposition of triacetate-pullulan polysaccharide thin films on drug pellets (diclofenac sodium) by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation method. The radiation generated by a pulsed excimer KrF* laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 20 ns) operated at 2 Hz repetition rate was used for ice targets evaporation. The timed - controlled drug delivery was proved by spectroscopic in vitro studies and in vivo anti-inflammatory investigations on rabbits. We showed that the coating of drug pellets with triacetate-pullulan thin films resulted in the delayed delivery of the drug for up to 30 min.

  20. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for oral insulin delivery: in vitro and in vivo evaluations of enteric coating and drug loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Müllertz, Anette

    2014-12-30

    This study aims at evaluating the combination of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) and enteric-coated capsules as a potential delivery strategy for oral delivery of insulin. The SNEDDS preconcentrates, loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex at different levels (0, 2.5 and 10% w/w), were readily dispersed in water to form nanoemulsions of 35 nm and vesicles of 300 nm. The association efficiency of non-complexed insulin in the dispersed SNEDDS was 18.6%, and was increased to 73.1% for insulin-phospholipid complex (at 10% loading level). The morphology of the dispersed SNEDDS changed from nanoemulsion droplets to vesicular structures with increasing complex loading levels. A pH-dependent insulin release profile was observed for SNEDDS filled into capsules coated with the enteric polymer, Eudragit(®) L100. Using a Caco-2 cell model, it was observed that the transport of insulin was enhanced by factors of 7.7- and 9.3- for SNEDDS loaded with 2.5 and 10% complex, respectively. In healthy fasted rats, administration of SNEDDS (10% complex) filled in enteric-coated capsules produced a 2.7-fold and 3.4-fold enhancement in the relative bioavailability and glucose reduction, respectively. This study shows the effectiveness of combining SNEDDS (loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex) with enteric-coated capsules for enhancing the oral absorption and efficacy of insulin.

  1. Nanotechnology in dentistry: drug delivery systems for the control of biofilm-dependent oral diseases.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Francisco Fabio Oliveira; Ferraz, Camila; Rodrigues, Lidiany K Arla de Azevedo; Nojosa, Jacqueline de Santiago; Yamauti, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Dental disorders, such as caries, periodontal and endodontic diseases are major public health issues worldwide. In common, they are biofilm-dependent oral diseases, and the specific conditions of oral cavity may develop infectious foci that could affect other physiological systems. Efforts have been made to develop new treatment routes for the treatment of oral diseases, and therefore, for the prevention of some systemic illnesses. New drugs and materials have been challenged to prevent and treat these conditions, especially by means of bacteria elimination. "Recent progresses in understanding the etiology, epidemiology and microbiology of the microbial flora in those circumstances have given insight and motivated the innovation on new therapeutic approaches for the management of the oral diseases progression". Some of the greatest advances in the medical field have been based in nanosized systems, ranging from the drug release with designed nanoparticles to tissue scaffolds based on nanotechnology. These systems offer new possibilities for specific and efficient therapies, been assayed successfully in preventive/curative therapies to the oral cavity, opening new challenges and opportunities to overcome common diseases based on bacterial biofilm development. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent nanotechnological developments in the drug delivery field related to the prevention and treatment of the major biofilm-dependent oral diseases and to identify those systems, which may have higher potential for clinical use.

  2. Nanomedicine and drug delivery: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The field of nanotechnology now has pivotal roles in electronics, biology and medicine. Its application can be appraised, as it involves the materials to be designed at atomic and molecular level. Due to the advantage of their size, nanospheres have been shown to be robust drug delivery systems and may be useful for encapsulating drugs and enabling more precise targeting with a controlled release. In this review specifically, we highlight the recent advances of this technology for medicine and drug delivery systems.

  3. Polymers and drugs suitable for the development of a drug delivery drainage system in glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Löbler, Marian; Sternberg, Katrin; Stachs, Oliver; Allemann, Reto; Grabow, Niels; Roock, Anne; Kreiner, Christine F; Streufert, Detlef; Neffe, Axel T; Hanh, Bui Duc; Lendlein, Andreas; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Guthoff, Rudolf

    2011-05-01

    Implantation of a glaucoma drainage system is an appropriate therapeutic intervention in some glaucoma patients. However, one drawback with this approach is the fibrotic tissue response to the implant material, leading to reduced flow of aqueous liquid or complete blockage of the drainage system. As a basis for developing an aqueous shunt we report here investigations with poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) and poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(4HB)) as polymer matrices and with paclitaxel (PTX) and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as drugs that might, in combination, delay or prevent the process of fibrosis by reducing fibroblast activity. P(3HB) and P(4HB) were fabricated into test prototypes with 500 μm outer and 200 μm inner diameter and ∼1 cm length. The antiproliferative agent PTX and the anti-inflammatory agent TA were incorporated into the polymer matrices and were released by diffusion. In vitro cell assays demonstrated that the polymers have the potential to reduce fibroblast viability, while TA showed differential inhibition of Tenon fibroblasts, but not cornea keratocytes. Implantation of polymer disks and prototype devices into rabbit eyes confirmed the good biocompatibility of the materials. The combined use of a poly(hydroxybutyrate) polymer with PTX or TA has the potential to reduce the fibrosis associated with conventional glaucoma drainage systems.

  4. Characterization and stability of nanostructured lipid carriers as drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abbasalipourkabir, R; Salehzadeh, A; Abdullah, R

    2012-02-01

    Recently more focus has been put to the development of innovative drug-delivery systems that includes polymer nanoparticles, emulsions and liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). The SLNs have been proposed to be an alternative colloidal drug delivery system. The aim of this study was preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) using varieties of emulsifier for encapsulation of the drug with poor water solubility. In these study four types of solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared based on different compositions of palm oil (S154) and lecithin (Lipoid 100) using the high pressure homogenization method. The SLN formulation had the following (palm oil+lecithin) compositions: SLN-01 (90 + 10%, respectively), SLN-02 (80 + 20%, respectively), SLN-03 (70 + 30%, respectively) and SLN-04 (60 + 40%, respectively). The SLNs were characterized and the optimum stability factors for one year storage determined. The parameters used to characterize the SLNs were particle size and polydispersity index (particle sizer), zeta potential (zetasizer), crystallinity (differential scanning calorimetry and wide angle X-ray diffraction), ultrastructure (transmission electron microscopy). Varying the palm oil and lecithin compositions resulted in SLNs of variable sizes and zeta potentials. The particle sizes of SLN-01, SLN-02, SLN-03 and SLN-04 were 298.40 +/- 11.80, 255.40 +/- 3.20, 145.00 +/- 3.39 and 273.00 +/- 86.50 nm, respectively, while the zeta potentials were -19.44 +/- 60.00, -19.50 +/- 1.80, -17.83 +/- 10.00 and -13.33 +/- 2.30 mV, respectively. Thermoanalysis and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the SLNs had lower crystallinity than bulk lipid. The SLNs were generally round and uniform in shape under transmission electron microscopy. The SLN dimensional data suggested they had high quality physicochemical characteristics, which are conducive for the loading of poor water solubility drugs.

  5. Emerging intra-articular drug delivery systems for the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Mountziaris, Paschalia M; Kramer, Phillip R; Mikos, Antonios G

    2009-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases that cause progressive joint degeneration leading to chronic pain and reduced quality of life. Both effective pain reduction and restoration of TMJ function remain unmet challenges. Intra-articular injections of corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are currently used to treat chronic pain, but these methods require multiple injections that increase the risk of iatrogenic joint damage and other complications. The small and emerging field of TMJ tissue engineering aims to reduce pain and disability through novel strategies that induce joint tissue regeneration. Development of methods for sustained, intra-articular release of growth factors and other pro-regenerative signals will be critical for the success of TMJ tissue engineering strategies. This review discusses methods of intra-articular drug delivery to the TMJ, as well as emerging injectable controlled release systems with potential to improve TMJ drug delivery, to encourage further research in the development of sustained release systems for both long-term pain management and to enhance tissue engineering strategies for TMJ regeneration.

  6. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for targeting photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Chen, Zhi-long; Yang, Xiao-xia; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Xin-ping; Du, Xiao-xia

    2009-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an increasingly recognized alternative to cancer treatment in clinic. However, PDT therapy agents, namely photosensitizer (PS), are limited in application as a result of prolonged cutaneous photosensitivity, poor water solubility and inadequate selectivity, which are encountered by numerous chemical therapies. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles provide excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity and water solubility without compromising their magnetic targeting. Nevertheless, no previous attempt has been reported to develop an in vivo magnetic drug delivery system with chitosan nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored targeting photodynamic therapy. In this study, magnetic targeting chitosan nanoparticles (MTCNPs) were prepared and tailored as a drug delivery system and imaging agents for PS, designated as PHPP. Results showed that PHPP-MTCNPs could be used in MRI monitored targeting PDT with excellent targeting and imaging ability. Non-toxicity and high photodynamic efficacy on SW480 carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo were achieved with this method at the level of 0-100 µM. Notably, localization of nanoparticles in skin and hepatic tissue was significantly less than in tumor tissue, therefore photosensitivity and hepatotoxicity can be attenuated.

  7. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of persimmon leaf extract: Optimization and bioavailability studies.