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Sample records for drug interactions clinical

  1. Clinically significant drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ament, P W; Bertolino, J G; Liszewski, J L

    2000-03-15

    A large number of drugs are introduced every year, and new interactions between medications are increasingly reported. Consequently, it is no longer practical for physicians to rely on memory alone to avoid potential drug interactions. Multiple drug regimens carry the risk of adverse interactions. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. Regularly updated manuals of drug interactions and CD-ROM-formatted programs are useful office references. PMID:10750880

  2. Clinical nutrition and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ekincioğlu, Aygin Bayraktar; Demirkan, Kutay

    2013-01-01

    A drug's plasma level, pharmacological effects or side effects, elimination, physicochemical properties or stability could be changed by interactions of drug-drug or drug-nutrition products in patients who receive enteral or parenteral nutritional support. As a result, patients might experience ineffective outcomes or unexpected effects of therapy (such as drug toxicity, embolism). Stability or incompatibility problems between parenteral nutrition admixtures and drugs might lead to alterations in expected therapeutic responses from drug and/or parenteral nutrition, occlusion in venous catheter or symptoms or mortality due to infusion of composed particles. Compatibilities between parenteral nutrition and drugs are not always guaranteed in clinical practice. Although the list of compatibility or incompatibilities of drugs are published for the use of clinicians in their practices, factors such as composition of parenteral nutrition admixture, drug concentration, contact time in catheter, temperature of the environment and exposure to light could change the status of compatibilities between drugs and nutrition admixtures. There could be substantial clinical changes occurring in the patient's nutritional status and pharmacological effects of drugs due to interactions between enteral nutrition and drugs. Drug toxicity and ineffective nutritional support might occur as a result of those predictable interactions. Although administration of drugs via feeding tube is a complex and problematic route for drug usage, it is possible to minimise the risk of tube occlusion, decreased effects of drug and drug toxicity by using an appropriate technique. Therefore, it is important to consider pharmacological dosage forms of drugs while administering drugs via a feeding tube. In conclusion, since the pharmacists are well-experienced and more knowledgeable professionals in drugs and drug usage compared to other healthcare providers, it is suggested that provision of information and

  3. Clinically significant drug interactions with newer antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Caraci, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    After the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other newer antidepressants with different mechanisms of action have been introduced in clinical practice. Because antidepressants are commonly prescribed in combination with other medications used to treat co-morbid psychiatric or somatic disorders, they are likely to be involved in clinically significant drug interactions. This review examines the drug interaction profiles of the following newer antidepressants: escitalopram, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran, mirtazapine, reboxetine, bupropion, agomelatine and vilazodone. In general, by virtue of a more selective mechanism of action and receptor profile, newer antidepressants carry a relatively low risk for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, at least as compared with first-generation antidepressants, i.e. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). On the other hand, they are susceptible to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. All new antidepressants are extensively metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, and therefore may be the target of metabolically based drug interactions. Concomitant administration of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isoenzymes involved in the biotransformation of specific antidepressants may cause changes in their plasma concentrations. However, due to their relatively wide margin of safety, the consequences of such kinetic modifications are usually not clinically relevant. Conversely, some newer antidepressants may cause pharmacokinetic interactions through their ability to inhibit specific CYPs. With regard to this, duloxetine and bupropion are moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6. Therefore, potentially harmful drug interactions may occur when they are coadministered with substrates of these isoforms, especially compounds with a narrow therapeutic index. The other new antidepressants are only weak inhibitors or are not inhibitors of CYP isoforms at

  4. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  5. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient's age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical-pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  6. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  7. Clinical herbal interactions with conventional drugs: from molecules to maladies.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-W; Serag, E S; Sneed, K B; Liang, J; Chew, H; Pan, S-Y; Zhou, S-F

    2011-01-01

    Clinical studies and case reports have identified a number of herb-drug interactions potentiated by the concurrent use of herbal medicines with prescription drugs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the mechanisms and clinical implications of such herb-drug interactions by reviewing published human studies. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may be involved in herbdrug interactions, although metabolic induction or inhibition is a common underlying mechanism for many herb-drug interactions. Drugs that have a high potential to interact with herbal medicines usually have a narrow therapeutic index, including warfarin, digoxin, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, amitriptyline, midazolam, indinavir, and irinotecan. Many of them are substrates of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and/or P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Herbal medicines that are reported to interact with drugs include garlic (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax ginseng), and St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum). For example, garlic has been shown to increase the clotting time and international normalized ratio (INR) of warfarin, cause hypoglycaemia when taken with chlorpropamide, and reduce the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum concentration of saquinavir in humans. Similarly, case reports have demonstrated that ginkgo may potentiate bleeding when combined with warfarin or aspirin, increases blood pressure when combined with thiazide diuretics, and has even led to a coma when combined with trazodone, a serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor used to treat depression. Furthermore, ginseng reduced the blood levels of warfarin and alcohol as well as induced mania if taken concomitantly with phenelzine, a non-selective and irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor used as an antidepressant and anxiolytic agent. Lastly, multiple herb-drug interactions have been identified with St. John's wort that involve significantly reduced AUC

  8. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient’s age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical–pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  9. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  10. Drug interaction networks: an introduction to translational and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Azuaje, Francisco

    2013-03-15

    This article introduces fundamental concepts to guide the analysis and interpretation of drug-target interaction networks. An overview of the generation and integration of interaction networks is followed by key strategies for extracting biologically meaningful information. The article highlights how this information can enable novel translational and clinically motivated applications. Important advances for the discovery of new treatments and for the detection of adverse drug effects are discussed. Examples of applications and findings originating from cardiovascular research are presented. The review ends with a discussion of crucial challenges and opportunities.

  11. Drug interaction networks: an introduction to translational and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Azuaje, Francisco

    2013-03-15

    This article introduces fundamental concepts to guide the analysis and interpretation of drug-target interaction networks. An overview of the generation and integration of interaction networks is followed by key strategies for extracting biologically meaningful information. The article highlights how this information can enable novel translational and clinically motivated applications. Important advances for the discovery of new treatments and for the detection of adverse drug effects are discussed. Examples of applications and findings originating from cardiovascular research are presented. The review ends with a discussion of crucial challenges and opportunities. PMID:22977007

  12. USING SEMANTIC PREDICATIONS TO UNCOVER DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS IN CLINICAL DATA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Cairelli, Michael J.; Fiszman, Marcelo; Rosemblat, Graciela; Kilicoglu, Halil; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Pakhomov, Serguei V.; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we report on potential drug-drug interactions between drugs occurring in patient clinical data. Results are based on relationships in SemMedDB, a database of structured knowledge extracted from all MEDLINE citations (titles and abstracts) using SemRep. The core of our methodology is to construct two potential drug-drug interaction schemas, based on relationships extracted from SemMedDB. In the first schema, Drug1 and Drug2 interact through Drug1’s effect on some gene, which in turn affects Drug2. In the second, Drug1 affects Gene1, while Drug2 affects Gene2. Gene1 and Gene2, together, then have an effect on some biological function. After checking each drug pair from the medication lists of each of 22 patients, we found 19 known and 62 unknown drug-drug interactions using both schemas. For example, our results suggest that the interaction of Lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor commonly prescribed for hypertension, and the antidepressant sertraline can potentially increase the likelihood and possibly the severity of psoriasis. We also assessed the relationships extracted by SemRep from a linguistic perspective and found that the precision of SemRep was 0.58 for 300 randomly selected sentences from MEDLINE. Our study demonstrates that the use of structured knowledge in the form of relationships from the biomedical literature can support the discovery of potential drug-drug interactions occurring in patient clinical data. Moreover, SemMedDB provides a good knowledge resource for expanding the range of drugs, genes, and biological functions considered as elements in various drug-drug interaction pathways. PMID:24448204

  13. Clinically significant drug interactions with antacids: an update.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ryuichi; Echizen, Hirotoshi

    2011-10-01

    One may consider that drug-drug interactions (DDIs) associated with antacids is an obsolete topic because they are prescribed less frequently by medical professionals due to the advent of drugs that more effectively suppress gastric acidity (i.e. histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists [H2RAs] and proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]). Nevertheless, the use of antacids by ambulant patients may be ever increasing, because they are freely available as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Antacids consisting of weak basic substances coupled with polyvalent cations may alter the rate and/or the extent of absorption of concomitantly administered drugs via different mechanisms. Polyvalent cations in antacid formulations may form insoluble chelate complexes with drugs and substantially reduce their bioavailability. Clinical studies demonstrated that two classes of antibacterials (tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones) are susceptible to clinically relevant DDIs with antacids through this mechanism. Countermeasures against this type of DDI include spacing out the dosing interval - taking antacid either 4 hours before or 2 hours after administration of these antibacterials. Bisphosphonates may be susceptible to DDIs with antacids by the same mechanism, as described in the prescription information of most bisphosphonates, but no quantitative data about the DDIs are available. For drugs with solubility critically dependent on pH, neutralization of gastric fluid by antacids may alter the dissolution of these drugs and the rate and/or extent of their absorption. However, the magnitude of DDIs elicited by antacids through this mechanism is less than that produced by H2RAs or PPIs; therefore, the clinical relevance of such DDIs is often obscure. Magnesium ions contained in some antacid formulas may increase gastric emptying, thereby accelerating the rate of absorption of some drugs. However, the clinical relevance of this is unclear in most cases because the difference in plasma drug concentration

  14. Delamanid Coadministered with Antiretroviral Drugs or Antituberculosis Drugs Shows No Clinically Relevant Drug-Drug Interactions in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Charles; Petersen, Carolyn; Paccaly, Anne; Shoaf, Susan E.; Patil, Shiva; Geiter, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Delamanid is a medicinal product approved for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential drug-drug interactions between delamanid and antiretroviral drugs, including ritonavir, a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, and selected anti-TB drugs, including rifampin, a strong inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes. Multiple-dose studies were conducted in parallel groups of healthy subjects. Plasma samples were analyzed for delamanid, delamanid metabolite, and coadministered drug concentrations, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were determined. The magnitude of the interaction was assessed by the ratio of the geometric means and 90% confidence intervals. Coadministration of delamanid with tenofovir or efavirenz did not affect the PK characteristics of delamanid. Coadministration of Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) with delamanid resulted in an approximately 25% higher delamanid area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to the end of the dosing interval (AUCτ). Tenofovir, efavirenz, lopinavir, and ritonavir exposure were not affected by delamanid. Coadministration of delamanid with the TB drugs (ethambutol plus Rifater [rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid]) resulted in lower delamanid exposures (47 and 42% for the AUCτ and Cmax [maximum concentration of a drug in plasma] values, respectively), as well as decreased exposure of three primary metabolites (approximately 30 to 50% lower AUCτ values). Delamanid did not affect rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid exposure; the ethambutol AUCτ and Cmax values were about 25% higher with delamanid coadministration. The lack of clinically significant drug-drug interactions between delamanid and selected antiretroviral agents (including the strong CYP inhibitor ritonavir) and a combination of anti-TB drugs was demonstrated. Although there was a decrease in the delamanid concentrations when coadministered with ethambutol plus Rifater, this is likely related to

  15. Clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Venitz, Jürgen; Zack, Julia; Gillies, Hunter; Allard, Martine; Regnault, Jean; Dufton, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    The authors review the basic pharmacology and potential for adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of bosentan and ambrisentan, the 2 endothelin receptor antagonists currently approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment. Bosentan, an endothelin (ET) receptor-type ET(A) and ET(B) antagonist, is metabolized to active metabolites by and an inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP3A. Ambrisentan, a selective ET(A) receptor antagonist, is metabolized primarily by uridine 5'diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) 1A9S, 2B7S, and 1A3S and, to a lesser extent, by CYP3A and CYP2C19. Drug interactions observed with bosentan DDI studies have demonstrated a potential for significant clinical implications during PAH management: bosentan is contraindicated with cyclosporine A and glyburide, and additional monitoring/dose adjustments are required when coadministered with hormonal contraceptives, simvastatin, lopinavir/ritonavir, and rifampicin. As bosentan carries a boxed warning regarding risks of liver injury and showed dose-dependant increases in serum aminotransferase abnormalities, drug interactions that increase bosentan exposure are of particular clinical concern. Ambrisentan DDI studies performed to date have shown only one clinically relevant DDI, an interaction with cyclosporine A that requires ambrisentan dose reduction. As the treatment of PAH moves toward multimodal combination therapy, scrutiny should be placed on ensuring that drug combinations achieve maximal clinical benefit while minimizing side effects.

  16. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  17. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html. PMID:26196247

  18. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html.

  19. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design.

  20. Relationship between drug interactions and drug-related negative clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cremades, Javier; Gonzalo, Mario; Arrebola, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Drug interactions may represent an iatrogenic risk that should be controlled in community pharmacies at the dispensing level. Aim We analyzed the association between potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and negative clinical outcomes. Methods We used dispensing data from two community pharmacies: instances where drug dispensing was associated with a potential DDI and a comparison group of randomized dispensing operations with no potential DDI. In cases where potential DDIs were detected, we analyzed the underlying negative clinical outcomes. Age and gender data were included in the analysis. Results During the study period, we registered 417 potential DDIs. The proportion of women and age were higher in the study group than in the comparison group. The average potential DDIs per patient was 1.31 (SD=0.72). The Consejo General de Colegios Oficiales de Farmacéuticos (CGCOF) database did not produce an alert in 2.4% of the cases. Over-the-counter medication use was observed in 5% of the potential DDI cases. The drugs most frequently involved in potential DDIs were acenocoumarol, calcium salts, hydrochlorothiazide, and alendronic acid, whereas the most predominant potential DDIs were calcium salts and bisphosphonates, oral antidiabetics and thiazide diuretics, antidiabetics and glucose, and oral anticoagulant and paracetamol. The existence of a drug-related negative clinical outcome was observed only in 0.96% of the potential DDI cases (50% safety cases and 50% effectiveness cases). Conclusions Only a small proportion of the detected potential DDIs lead to medication negative outcomes. Considering the drug-related negative clinical outcomes encountered, tighter control would be recommended in potential DDIs with NSAIDs or benzodiazepines. PMID:25147590

  1. Fosamprenavir : clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of the amprenavir prodrug.

    PubMed

    Wire, Mary Beth; Shelton, Mark J; Studenberg, Scott

    2006-01-01

    CYP3A4 inhibition contraindicates the coadministration of certain CYP3A4 substrates and requires others to be co-administered with caution. However, fosamprenavir can be co-administered with many other antiretroviral agents, including drugs of the nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and HIV entry inhibitor classes. Coadministration with other HIV-1 PIs continues to be studied.The extensive fosamprenavir and amprenavir clinical drug interaction information provides guidance on how to co-administer fosamprenavir and fosamprenavir plus ritonavir with many other commonly co-prescribed medications, such as gastric acid suppressants, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, antibacterials and antifungal agents. PMID:16485915

  2. Recommendations for Selecting Drug-Drug Interactions for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Tilson, Hugh; Hines, Lisa E.; McEvoy, Gerald; Weinstein, David M.; Hansten, Philip D.; Matuszewski, Karl; le Comte, Marianne; Higby-Baker, Stefanie; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Pezzullo, Lynn; Vieson, Kathleen; Helwig, Amy L.; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Perre, Anthony; Bates, David W.; Poikonen, John; Wittie, Michael A.; Grizzle, Amy J.; Brown, Mary; Malone, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To recommend principles for including drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to improve clinical decision support (CDS) for DDIs. The Content Workgroup met monthly by webinar from January 2013 to February 2014, with two in-person meetings to reach consensus. The workgroup consisted of 20 experts in pharmacology, drug information, and CDS from academia, government agencies, health information (IT) vendors, and healthcare organizations. Workgroup members addressed four key questions: (1) What process should be used to develop and maintain a standard set of DDIs?; (2) What information should be included in a knowledgebase of standard DDIs?; (3) Can/should a list of contraindicated drug pairs be established?; and (4) How can DDI alerts be more intelligently filtered? Results To develop and maintain a standard set of DDIs for CDS in the United States, we recommend a transparent, systematic, and evidence-driven process with graded recommendations by a consensus panel of experts and oversight by a national organization. We outline key DDI information needed to help guide clinician decision-making. We recommend judicious classification of DDIs as contraindicated, as only a small set of drug combinations are truly contraindicated. Finally, we recommend more research to identify methods to safely reduce repetitive and less relevant alerts. Conclusion A systematic ongoing process is necessary to select DDIs for alerting clinicians. We anticipate that our recommendations can lead to consistent and clinically relevant content for interruptive DDIs, and thus reduce alert fatigue and improve patient safety. PMID:27045070

  3. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum): drug interactions and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L; Yue, Q Y; Bergquist, C; Gerden, B; Arlett, P

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of this work is to identify the medicines which interact with the herbal remedy St John's wort (SJW), and the mechanisms responsible. Methods A systematic review of all the available evidence, including worldwide published literature and spontaneous case reports provided by healthcare professionals and regulatory authorities within Europe has been undertaken. Results A number of clinically significant interactions have been identified with prescribed medicines including warfarin, phenprocoumon, cyclosporin, HIV protease inhibitors, theophylline, digoxin and oral contraceptives resulting in a decrease in concentration or effect of the medicines. These interactions are probably due to the induction of cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP1A2 and the transport protein P-glycoprotein by constituent(s) in SJW. The degree of induction is unpredictable due to factors such as the variable quality and quantity of constituent(s) in SJW preparations. In addition, possible pharmacodynamic interactions with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and serotonin (5-HT1d) receptor-agonists such as triptans used to treat migraine were identified. These interactions are associated with an increased risk of adverse reactions. Conclusions In Sweden and the UK the potential risks to patients were judged to be significant and therefore information about the interactions was provided to health care professionals and patients. The product information of the licensed medicines involved has been amended to reflect these newly identified interactions and SJW preparations have been voluntarily labelled with appropriate warnings. PMID:12392581

  4. Clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antiepileptic drugs with new antidepressants and new antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Pisani, Francesco; de Leon, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are frequently co-prescribed with new antidepressants (ADs) or new antipsychotics (APs). A PubMed search with no time limit was used to update the review of the clinically significant pharmacokinetic (PK) drug interactions DIs (DIs) between AEDs with new ADs and APs. Our best interpretation of what to expect regarding dosing changes in the average patient after combining AEDs with new ADs or new APs is summarized on updated tables that integrate the information on in vitro metabolism studies, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) studies, case report/series and prospective studies. There will be a need to periodically update these dose correction factors as new knowledge becomes available. These tables will provide some orientation to clinicians with no TDM access and may also encourage clinicians to further study TDM. The clinical relevance of the inductive properties of carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone on new ADs and new APs and the inhibitory properties of valproic acid and some new ADs, are relatively well understood. On the other hand, PK DI studies combining new AEDs with weak inductive properties (particularly oxcarbazepine doses≥1200mg/day), topiramate doses≥400mg/day, clobazam, eslicarbazepine, and rufinamide), with new ADs and new APs are needed. Valproic acid may be 1) an inhibitor and/or inducer of clozapine and olanzapine with potential for clinically relevant DIs, 2) an inhibitor of paliperidone, and 3) a weak inducer of aripiprazole. Fluoxetine and fluvoxamine are relevant inhibitors of phenytoin and valproic acid and possibly of clobazam, lacosamide, phenobarbital, or primidone. PMID:26896788

  5. Is pomegranate juice a potential perpetrator of clinical drug-drug interactions? Review of the in vitro, preclinical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2013-12-01

    The area of fruit juice-drug interaction has received wide attention with numerous scientific and clinical investigations performed and reported for scores of drugs metabolized by CYP3A4/CYP2C9. While grapefruit juice has been extensively studied with respect to its drug-drug interaction potential, numerous other fruit juices such as cranberry juice, orange juice, grape juice, pineapple juice and pomegranate juice have also been investigated for its potential to show drug-drug interaction of any clinical relevance. This review focuses on establishing any relevance for clinical drug-drug interaction potential with pomegranate juice, which has been shown to produce therapeutic benefits over a wide range of disease areas. The review collates and evaluates relevant published in vitro, preclinical and clinical evidence of the potential of pomegranate juice to be a perpetrator in drug-drug interactions mediated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C9. In vitro and animal pharmacokinetic data support the possibility of CYP3A4/CYP2C9 inhibition by pomegranate juice; however, the human relevance for drug-drug interaction was not established based on the limited case studies.

  6. Clinical drug interaction profile of idelalisib in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Robeson, Michelle; Zhou, Huafeng; Moyer, Candra; Wilbert, Sibylle; Murray, Bernard; Ramanathan, Srini

    2015-08-01

    Idelalisib, a potent phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor, is metabolized primarily by aldehyde oxidase to form GS-563117 and to a lesser extent by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A4. In vitro, idelalisib inhibits P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and organic anion transporting polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3, and GS-563117 is a time-dependent CYP3A inhibitor. This study enrolled 24 healthy subjects and evaluated (1) the effect of idelalisib on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of digoxin, a P-gp probe substrate, rosuvastatin, a breast cancer resistance protein, and OATP1B1/OATP1B3 substrate, and midazolam, a CYP3A substrate; and (2) the effect of a strong inducer, rifampin, on idelalisib PK. On treatment, the most common clinical adverse events (AEs) were headache and pyrexia. Grade 3 transaminase increases were observed in 5 of 24 subjects and were reversible. Two subjects had serious AEs after treatment completion (grade 3 pyrexia and/or drug-induced liver injury). Idelalisib coadministration did not affect digoxin and rosuvastatin PK. Coadministration with idelalisib increased plasma exposures of midazolam (138% and 437% for maximum observed plasma concentration [Cmax ] and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 extrapolated to infinity [AUCinf ], respectively), consistent with the in vitro finding of CYP3A inhibition by GS-563117. Rifampin caused a substantial decrease in idelalisib (58% and 75%, Cmax and AUCinf , respectively) and GS-563117 exposures, indicating an enhanced contribution of CYP3A to idelalisib metabolism under a strongly induced state. PMID:25760671

  7. Potentially significant versus clinically significant drug interactions: pomegranate juice as a case in point.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-04-01

    In vitro and in vivo laboratory data show that pomegranate juice consistently inhibits intestinal CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 enzymes. Pomegranate juice may therefore increase the bioavailability of drugs that are metabolized by these enzymes. However, studies in humans find that pomegranate juice does not increase exposure to either CYP2C9 or CYP3A4 substrates. These contradictory findings suggest that potential drug interactions identified in the laboratory may not necessarily translate into clinically significant drug interactions in humans, and hence that laboratory data are insufficient grounds upon which clinical decisions may be based.

  8. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  9. Sildenafil and furosemide associated ototoxicity: consideration of drug-drug interactions, synergy, and broader clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Skeith, Leslie; Yamashita, Cory; Mehta, Sanjay; Farquhar, Donald; Kim, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced ototoxicity, particularly those involving phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, is considered to be rare and to our knowledge such an adverse effect has not been reported in Canada. Here we present a case of a 77-year old man initiated on a sildenfil regimen for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, who developed sudden bilateral hearing loss after taking sildenafil, in the setting of high dose furosemide and diltiazem. We outline the likely interplay of patient characteristics, drug synergy and drug-drug interactions in the development of his ototoxicity. Importantly, given the extent and popularity of PDE-5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction as well as a newer therapeutic option for pulmonary hypertension, clinicians should be aware of the risk for drug-induced ototoxicity, particularly in the setting of concomitant loop diuretics and CYP3A4 inhibiting medications. PMID:23756362

  10. ITC commentary on the prediction of digoxin clinical drug-drug interactions from in vitro transporter assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, C A; Kalvass, J C; Galetin, A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, M J

    2014-09-01

    The "P-glycoprotein" IC50 working group reported an 18- to 796-fold interlaboratory range in digoxin transport IC50 (inhibitor concentration achieving 50% of maximal inhibition), raising concerns about the predictability of clinical transporter-based drug-drug interactions (DDIs) from in vitro data. This Commentary describes complexities of digoxin transport, which involve both uptake and efflux processes. We caution against attributing digoxin transport IC50 specifically to P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or extending this composite uptake/efflux IC50 variability to individual transporters. Clinical digoxin interaction studies should be interpreted as evaluation of digoxin safety, not P-gp DDIs.

  11. DGIdb 2.0: mining clinically relevant drug-gene interactions.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Alex H; Coffman, Adam C; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Spies, Nicholas C; Skidmore, Zachary L; Campbell, Katie M; Krysiak, Kilannin; Pan, Deng; McMichael, Joshua F; Eldred, James M; Walker, Jason R; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L

    2016-01-01

    The Drug-Gene Interaction Database (DGIdb, www.dgidb.org) is a web resource that consolidates disparate data sources describing drug-gene interactions and gene druggability. It provides an intuitive graphical user interface and a documented application programming interface (API) for querying these data. DGIdb was assembled through an extensive manual curation effort, reflecting the combined information of twenty-seven sources. For DGIdb 2.0, substantial updates have been made to increase content and improve its usefulness as a resource for mining clinically actionable drug targets. Specifically, nine new sources of drug-gene interactions have been added, including seven resources specifically focused on interactions linked to clinical trials. These additions have more than doubled the overall count of drug-gene interactions. The total number of druggable gene claims has also increased by 30%. Importantly, a majority of the unrestricted, publicly-accessible sources used in DGIdb are now automatically updated on a weekly basis, providing the most current information for these sources. Finally, a new web view and API have been developed to allow searching for interactions by drug identifiers to complement existing gene-based search functionality. With these updates, DGIdb represents a comprehensive and user friendly tool for mining the druggable genome for precision medicine hypothesis generation.

  12. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  13. Clinical pharmacology profile of boceprevir, a hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitor: focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Feng, Hwa-Ping; Hulskotte, Ellen G J; Wenning, Larissa A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir is a potent, orally administered ketoamide inhibitor that targets the active site of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural (NS) 3 protease. The addition of boceprevir to peginterferon plus ribavirin resulted in higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) than for peginterferon plus ribavirin alone in phase III studies in both previously treated and untreated patients with HCV infection. Because boceprevir is metabolized by metabolic routes common to many other drugs, and is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, there is a high potential for drug-drug interactions when boceprevir is administered with other therapies, particularly when treating patients with chronic HCV infection who are often receiving other medications concomitantly. Boceprevir is no longer widely used in the US or EU due to the introduction of second-generation treatments for HCV infection. However, in many other geographic regions, first-generation protease inhibitors such as boceprevir continue to form an important treatment option for patients with HCV infection. This review summarizes the interactions between boceprevir and other therapeutic agents commonly used in this patient population, indicating dose adjustment requirements where needed. Most drug interactions do not affect boceprevir plasma concentrations to a clinically meaningful extent, and thus efficacy is likely to be maintained when boceprevir is coadministered with the majority of other therapeutics. Overall, the drug-drug interaction profile of boceprevir suggests that this agent is suitable for use in a wide range of HCV-infected patients receiving concomitant therapies. PMID:25787025

  14. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  15. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  16. Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    McTigue, Michele; Murray, Brion William; Chen, Jeffrey H.; Deng, Ya-Li; Solowiej, James; Kania, Robert S.

    2012-09-17

    We performed analyses of compounds in clinical development which have shown that ligand efficient-molecules with privileged physical properties and low dose are less likely to fail in the various stages of clinical testing, have fewer postapproval withdrawals, and are less likely to receive black box safety warnings. However, detailed side-by-side examination of molecular interactions and properties within single drug classes are lacking. As a class, VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) have changed the landscape of how cancer is treated, particularly in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is molecularly linked to the VEGF signaling axis. Despite the clear role of the molecular target, member molecules of this validated drug class exhibit distinct clinical efficacy and safety profiles in comparable renal cell carcinoma clinical studies. The first head-to-head randomized phase III comparative study between active VEGFR TKIs has confirmed significant differences in clinical performance [Rini BI, et al. (2011) Lancet 378:193–1939]. To elucidate how fundamental drug potency–efficiency is achieved and impacts differentiation within the VEGFR TKI class, we determined potencies, time dependence, selectivities, and X-ray structures of the drug–kinase complexes using a VEGFR2 TK construct inclusive of the important juxtamembrane domain. Collectively, the studies elucidate unique drug–kinase interactions that are dependent on distinct juxtamembrane domain conformations, resulting in significant potency and ligand efficiency differences. Finally, the identified structural trends are consistent with in vitro measurements, which translate well to clinical performance, underscoring a principle that may be broadly applicable to prospective drug design for optimal in vivo performance.

  17. Raltegravir Has a Low Propensity To Cause Clinical Drug Interactions through Inhibition of Major Drug Transporters: an In Vitro Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Robert; Chan, Grace Hoyee; Hafey, Mike; Rhee, Elizabeth G.; Chu, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Raltegravir (RAL) is a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase inhibitor approved to treat HIV infection in adults in combination with other antiretrovirals. The potential of RAL to cause transporter-related drug-drug interactions (DDIs) as an inhibitor has not been well described to date. In this study, a series of in vitro experiments were conducted to assess the inhibitory effects of RAL on major human drug transporters known to be involved in clinically relevant drug interactions, including hepatic and renal uptake transporters and efflux transporters. For hepatic uptake transporters, RAL showed no inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), weak inhibition of OATP1B3 (40% inhibition at 100 μM), and no inhibition of organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1). Studies of renal uptake transporters showed that RAL inhibited organic anion transporters 1 and 3 (OAT1 and OAT3) with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) (108 μM and 18.8 μM, respectively) well above the maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) at the clinical 400-mg dose and did not inhibit organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2). As for efflux transporters, RAL did not inhibit breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and showed weak inhibition of multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) (52% inhibition at 100 μM) and MATE2-K (29% inhibition at 100 μM). These studies indicate that at clinically relevant exposures, RAL does not inhibit or only weakly inhibits hepatic uptake transporters OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OCT1, renal uptake transporters OCT2, OAT1, and OAT3, as well as efflux transporters BCRP, MATE1, and MATE2-K. The propensity for RAL to cause DDIs via inhibition of these transporters is therefore considered low. PMID:24295974

  18. Antiplatelet drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, I S; Coughtrie, M W H; MacDonald, T M; Wei, L

    2010-12-01

    Both laboratory studies in healthy volunteers and clinical studies have suggested adverse interactions between antiplatelet drugs and other commonly used medications. Interactions described include those between aspirin and ibuprofen, aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and the thienopyridine, clopidogrel, and drugs inhibiting CYP2C19, notably the proton pump inhibitors (PPI) omeprazole and esomeprazole. Other interactions between thienopyridines and CYP3A4/5 have also been reported for statins and calcium channel blockers. The ibuprofen/aspirin interaction is thought to be caused by ibuprofen blocking the access of aspirin to platelet cyclo-oxygenase. The thienopyridine interactions are caused by inhibition of microsomal enzymes that metabolize these pro-drugs to their active metabolites. We review the evidence for these interactions, assess their clinical importance and suggest strategies of how to deal with them in clinical practice. We conclude that ibuprofen is likely to interact with aspirin and reduce its anti-platelet action particularly in those patients who take ibuprofen chronically. This interaction is of greater relevance to those patients at high cardiovascular risk. A sensible strategy is to advise users of aspirin to avoid chronic ibuprofen or to ingest aspirin at least 2 h prior to ibuprofen. Clearly the use of NSAIDs that do not interact in this way is preferred. For the clopidogrel CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5 interactions, there is good evidence that these interactions occur. However, there is less good evidence to support the clinical importance of these interactions. Again, a reasonable strategy is to avoid the chronic use of drugs that inhibit CYP2C19, notably PPIs, in subjects taking clopidogrel and use high dose H2 antagonists instead. Finally, anti-platelet agents probably interact with other drugs that affect platelet function such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and clinicians should probably judge

  19. Integration of heterogeneous clinical decision support systems and their knowledge sets: feasibility study with Drug-Drug Interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Kam, Hye Jin; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, InSook; Kim, Yoon; Park, Rae Woong

    2011-01-01

    There exist limitations in both commercial and in-house clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and issues related to the integration of different knowledge sources and CDSSs. We chose Standard-based Shareable Active Guideline Environment (SAGE) as a new architecture with knowledge integration and a centralized knowledge base which includes authoring/management functions and independent CDSS, and applied it to Drug-Drug Interaction (DDI) CDSS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the newly integrated DDI alerting CDSS into a real world hospital information system involving construction of an integrated CDSS derived from two heterogeneous systems and their knowledge sets. The proposed CDSS was successfully implemented and compensated for the weaknesses of the old CDSS from knowledge integration and management, and its applicability in actual situations was verified. Although the DDI CDSS was constructed as an example case, the new CDS architecture might prove applicable to areas of CDSSs.

  20. How the Probability and Potential Clinical Significance of Pharmacokinetically Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Are Assessed in Drug Development: Desvenlafaxine as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alice I.; Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The avoidance of adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a high priority in terms of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the individual prescriber. With this perspective in mind, this article illustrates the process for assessing the risk of a drug (example here being desvenlafaxine) causing or being the victim of DDIs, in accordance with FDA guidance. Data Sources/Study Selection: DDI studies for the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine conducted by the sponsor and published since 2009 are used as examples of the systematic way that the FDA requires drug developers to assess whether their new drug is either capable of causing clinically meaningful DDIs or being the victim of such DDIs. In total, 8 open-label studies tested the effects of steady-state treatment with desvenlafaxine (50–400 mg/d) on the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome (CYP) 2D6 and/or CYP 3A4 substrate drugs, or the effect of CYP 3A4 inhibition on desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics. The potential for DDIs mediated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter was assessed in in vitro studies using Caco-2 monolayers. Data Extraction: Changes in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; CYP studies) and efflux (P-gp studies) were reviewed for potential DDIs in accordance with FDA criteria. Results: Desvenlafaxine coadministration had minimal effect on CYP 2D6 and/or 3A4 substrates per FDA criteria. Changes in AUC indicated either no interaction (90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC geometric least-squares means [GM] within 80%–125%) or weak inhibition (AUC GM ratio 125% to < 200%). Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in a weak interaction with desvenlafaxine (AUC GM ratio of 143%). Desvenlafaxine was not a substrate (efflux ratio < 2) or inhibitor (50% inhibitory drug concentration values > 250 μM) of P-gp. Conclusions: A 2-step process based on FDA guidance can be used first to determine whether a pharmacokinetically mediated

  1. Clinical relevancy and risks of potential drug–drug interactions in intensive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Aline Teotonio; Stahlschmidt, Rebeca; Granja, Silvia; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Moriel, Patricia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the potential Drug–Drug Interactions (pDDI) found in prescription orders of adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Brazilian public health system hospital; quantify and qualify the pDDI regarding their severity and risks to the critical patient, using the database from Micromedex®. Methods Prospective study (January–December of 2011) collecting and evaluating 369 prescription orders (convenient sampling), one per patient. Results During the study 1844 pDDIs were identified and distributed in 405 pairs (medication A × medication B combination). There was an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 pDDIs per prescription order, the most prevalent being moderate and important interactions, present in 74% and 67% of prescription orders, respectively. In total, there were 9 contraindicated, 129 important and 204 moderate pDDIs. Among them 52 had as management recommendation to “avoid concomitant use” or “suspension of medication”, while 306 had as recommendation “continuous and adequate monitoring”. Conclusion The high number of pDDIs found in the study combined with the evaluation of the clinical relevancy of the most frequent pDDIs in the ICU shows that moderate and important interactions are highly incident. As the majority of them demand monitoring and adequate management, being aware of these interactions is major information for the safe and individualized risk management. PMID:27134536

  2. Lack of clinical pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between warfarin and the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoyang; Hard, Marjie L; Grundy, John S; Singh, Tejdip; von Moltke, Lisa L; Boltje, Ingrid

    2014-08-01

    Mipomersen is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide indicated as an adjunct therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). Warfarin is commonly prescribed for a variety of cardiac disorders in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia population, and concurrent use of warfarin and mipomersen is likely. This open-label, single-sequence 2-period phase 1 study in healthy subjects evaluated the potential drug-drug interactions between mipomersen and warfarin. The subjects received a single oral 25 mg dose of warfarin alone on day 1, and after a 7-day washout period, received 200 mg mipomersen alone subcutaneously every other day on days 8-12, and received both concurrently on day 14. Coadministration of mipomersen did not change the pharmacodynamics (international normalized ratio, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of warfarin. There were no clinically significant changes in the PK of mipomersen with concurrent administration of warfarin. There were no events indicative of an increase in bleeding tendency when warfarin was coadministered with mipomersen, and the adverse event profile of mipomersen did not appear to be altered in combination with warfarin, as compared with that of the respective reference treatment. The combination of these 2 medications appeared to be safe and well tolerated. These results suggest that the dosage adjustment of warfarin or mipomersen is not expected to be necessary with coadministration. PMID:24691275

  3. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention.

  4. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gufford, Brandon T.; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G.; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4′- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27–66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2–8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19–73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65–120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20–310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product–drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention. PMID:26070840

  5. Clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioid analgesics used for pain treatment in patients with cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Klepstad, Pål; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids are the most frequently used drugs to treat pain in cancer patients. In some patients, however, opioids can cause adverse effects and drug–drug interactions. No advice concerning the combination of opioids and other drugs is given in the current European guidelines. Objective To identify studies that report clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioids used for pain treatment in adult cancer patients. Design and data sources Systematic review with searches in Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the start of the databases (Embase from 1980) through January 2014. In addition, reference lists of relevant full-text papers were hand-searched. Results Of 901 retrieved papers, 112 were considered as potentially eligible. After full-text reading, 17 were included in the final analysis, together with 15 papers identified through hand-searching of reference lists. All of the 32 included publications were case reports or case series. Clinical manifestations of drug–drug interactions involving opioids were grouped as follows: 1) sedation and respiratory depression, 2) other central nervous system symptoms, 3) impairment of pain control and/or opioid withdrawal, and 4) other symptoms. The most common mechanisms eliciting drug–drug interactions were alteration of opioid metabolism by inhibiting the activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 and pharmacodynamic interactions due to the combined effect on opioid, dopaminergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. Conclusion Evidence for drug–drug interactions associated with opioids used for pain treatment in cancer patients is very limited. Still, the cases identified in this systematic review give some important suggestions for clinical practice. Physicians prescribing opioids should recognize the risk of drug–drug interactions and if possible avoid polypharmacy. PMID:26396499

  6. A Critical Approach to Evaluating Clinical Efficacy, Adverse Events and Drug Interactions of Herbal Remedies.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Angelo A; Hoon-Kim, Sung; Radhakrishnan, Rajan; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses represent the uppermost ladders in the hierarchy of evidence. Systematic reviews/meta-analyses suggest preliminary or satisfactory clinical evidence for agnus castus (Vitex agnus castus) for premenstrual complaints, flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) for hypertension, feverfew (Tanacetum partenium) for migraine prevention, ginger (Zingiber officinalis) for pregnancy-induced nausea, ginseng (Panax ginseng) for improving fasting glucose levels as well as phytoestrogens and St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) for the relief of some symptoms in menopause. However, firm conclusions of efficacy cannot be generally drawn. On the other hand, inconclusive evidence of efficacy or contradictory results have been reported for Aloe vera in the treatment of psoriasis, cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) in cystitis prevention, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) for tinnitus and intermittent claudication, echinacea (Echinacea spp.) for the prevention of common cold and pomegranate (Punica granatum) for the prevention/treatment of cardiovascular diseases. A critical evaluation of the clinical data regarding the adverse effects has shown that herbal remedies are generally better tolerated than synthetic medications. Nevertheless, potentially serious adverse events, including herb-drug interactions, have been described. This suggests the need to be vigilant when using herbal remedies, particularly in specific conditions, such as during pregnancy and in the paediatric population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887532

  7. Fusidic Acid Inhibits Hepatic Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Potential Cause of Clinical Drug-Drug Interaction Observed with Statin Coadministration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshul; Harris, Jennifer J; Lin, Jianrong; Bulgarelli, James P; Birmingham, Bruce K; Grimm, Scott W

    2016-10-01

    Fusidic acid (FA), which was approved in the 1960s in many European and Asian countries, has gained renewed interest due to its continued effectiveness against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus As rhabdomyolysis has been reported upon coadministration of FA with statins, we aimed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to FA-statin drug-drug interactions. Because of the association between rhabdomyolysis and increased exposure to statins, we investigated if cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and transporters involved in the disposition of various statins are inhibited by FA. FA was found to inhibit BCRP and OATP1B1 but not P-gp. In overexpressing cell systems, FA inhibited BCRP-mediated efflux (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], ∼50 to 110 μM) and OATP1B1-mediated uptake (IC50, ∼4 to 35 μM) of statins at clinically relevant concentrations achievable in the intestine and liver (based on a 550-mg oral dose of FA, the expected maximum theoretical gastrointestinal concentration is ∼4 mM, and the maximum total or unbound concentration in the inlet to the liver was reported to be up to 223 μM or 11 μM, respectively, upon multiple dosing). Similarly, FA inhibited metabolism of statins in human liver microsomes (IC50, ∼17 to 195 μM). These data suggest that FA inhibits at least 3 major dispositional pathways (BCRP, OATP1B1, and CYP3A) and thus affects the clearance of several statins. We confirmed that FA is eliminated via phase 1 metabolism (primarily via CYP3A); however, there is also some phase 2 metabolism (mediated primarily by UGT1A1). Taken together, these data provide evidence for molecular mechanisms that may explain the occurrence of rhabdomyolysis when FA is administered with statins.

  8. Mechanism of an unusual, but clinically significant, digoxin-bupropion drug interaction.

    PubMed

    He, Jiake; Yu, Yang; Prasad, Bhagwat; Chen, Xijing; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2014-07-01

    An unusual, but clinically significant, digoxin (DIG)-bupropion (BUP) drug interaction (DDI), in which BUP increased DIG renal clearance by 80% is reported. To investigate the mechanism(s) of this unusual DDI, first the effect of BUP, its circulating metabolites or their combination on [(3) H]-DIG transport by cells expressing human P-gp or human OATP4C1 was determined. Second, the study asked whether this DDI could be replicated in the rat so that it could be used to conduct mechanistic studies. Then, the effect of BUP and its rat metabolites on [(3) H]-DIG transport were tested by cells expressing rat Oatp4c1. Bupropion and its metabolites had no effect on human P-gp mediated transepithelial transport of [(3) H]-DIG. Bupropion and hydroxybupropion (HBUP) significantly stimulated H-OATP4C1 mediated transport of [(3) H]-DIG. In addition, BUP cocktail (BUP plus its metabolites) significantly increased the H-OATP4C1 mediated transport of [(3) H]-DIG, and partially reversed the inhibition by 100 µm DIG. However, erythro-hydrobupropion (EBUP) and threo-hydrobupropion (TBUP) did not affect the [(3) H]-DIG uptake by H-OATP4C1 cells. Bupropion administration significantly increased digoxin renal clearance in rats. Surprisingly, bupropion significantly inhibited r-Oatp4c1 mediated transport of [(3) H]-DIG at clinically relevant unbound plasma concentrations of BUP or those observed in the rat study, while HBUP or TBUP did not. These data support our hypothesis that at clinically relevant plasma concentrations, bupropion and its metabolites activate H-OATP4C1 mediated DIG tubular secretion, and could possibly explain the increase in digoxin renal clearance produced by bupropion. While bupropion increased digoxin renal clearance in the rat, it appeared to do so by inhibiting r-Oatp4c1-mediated digoxin renal reabsorption.

  9. How pre-marketing data can be used for predicting the weight of drug interactions in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvio; Pasina, Luca; Nobili, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Unexpected drug interactions have led to the withdrawal of many drugs, raising concern about the gap between what is known at the time of approval and the risk of serious effects in the longer term, particularly in high-risk populations generally excluded from drug development. This is because the majority of drug interaction studies are done using in vitro methods, or in healthy young volunteers who may not reflect the complexity of patients, and the settings in which the drug will be used in clinical practice. Pre-marketing interaction studies should therefore be designed to make information easily accessible and clinically transferable. They should be adequate in terms of sample size, population, comorbidity, phenotyping and/or genotyping, end-points and outcome measures, and conducted in conditions of dose, route and timing of co-administration that reproduce the proposed therapeutic indications of the new drug. Although young volunteers have the advantage of minimizing some confounding effects introduced by diseases or polypharmacy, patients drawn from populations for whom the drug is intended would be more relevant and accurate, providing the studies are feasible and safe.

  10. Drug interactions with quinolones.

    PubMed

    Davies, B I; Maesen, F P

    1989-01-01

    Numerous drug interactions with the new 4-quinolone antimicrobial agents have now been established. Many, but not all, quinolones are extensively metabolized and can have inhibitory effects on the liver cytochrome P450 enzyme system, leading to reduced metabolism and clearance of certain other drugs that are normally thus eliminated. Examples include the highly significant interaction between enoxacin and theophylline and the interaction between ciprofloxacin and theophylline, which may also be important clinically. The quinolone-caffeine interaction does not usually cause problems. Absorption of all quinolones from the stomach and small intestine is greatly reduced by antacids containing magnesium or aluminium salts, including sucralfate, probably as a result of the formation of nonabsorbable chelates. Cimetidine can reduce the clearance of pefloxacin (but not of ciprofloxacin) through its effects on liver metabolism, although newer H2-inhibitors appear not to have these effects. Probenecid reduces the renal elimination of some quinolones by inhibiting tubular secretion. New evidence is now coming to light of interactions between certain nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (e.g., fenbufen), quinolones, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, producing increased cerebral excitation and, sometimes, epileptiform convulsions. PMID:2570456

  11. Clinical Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic, and Drug-Drug Interaction Profile of Canagliflozin, a Sodium-Glucose Co-transporter 2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Polidori, David

    2015-10-01

    The sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors represent novel therapeutic approaches in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus; they act on kidneys to decrease the renal threshold for glucose (RTG) and increase urinary glucose excretion (UGE). Canagliflozin is an orally active, reversible, selective SGLT2 inhibitor. Orally administered canagliflozin is rapidly absorbed achieving peak plasma concentrations in 1-2 h. Dose-proportional systemic exposure to canagliflozin has been observed over a wide dose range (50-1600 mg) with an oral bioavailability of 65 %. Canagliflozin is glucuronidated into two inactive metabolites, M7 and M5 by uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A9 and UGT2B4, respectively. Canagliflozin reaches steady state in 4 days, and there is minimal accumulation observed after multiple dosing. Approximately 60 % and 33 % of the administered dose is excreted in the feces and urine, respectively. The half-life of orally administered canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg in healthy participants is 10.6 and 13.1 h, respectively. No clinically relevant differences are observed in canagliflozin exposure with respect to age, race, sex, and body weight. The pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin remains unaffected by mild or moderate hepatic impairment. Systemic exposure to canagliflozin is increased in patients with renal impairment relative to those with normal renal function; however, the efficacy is reduced in patients with renal impairment owing to the reduced filtered glucose load. Canagliflozin did not show clinically relevant drug interactions with metformin, glyburide, simvastatin, warfarin, hydrochlorothiazide, oral contraceptives, probenecid, and cyclosporine, while co-administration with rifampin modestly reduced canagliflozin plasma concentrations and thus may necessitate an appropriate monitoring of glycemic control. Canagliflozin increases UGE and suppresses RTG in a dose-dependent manner, thereby lowering the plasma glucose

  12. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  13. Incidence rate and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions in a large outpatient population of a developing country.

    PubMed

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine incidence rate, type, and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in a large outpatient population of a developing country. A retrospective, descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on outpatients' prescriptions in Khorasan Razavi province, Iran, over 12 months. A list of 25 clinically relevant DDIs, which are likely to occur in the outpatient setting, was used as the reference. Most frequent clinically relevant pDDIs, most common drugs contributing to the pDDIs, and the pattern of pDDIs for each medical specialty were determined. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. In total, out of 8,169,142 prescriptions, 6,096 clinically relevant pDDIs were identified. The most common identified pDDIs were theophyllines-quinolones, warfarin-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines-azole antifungal agents, and anticoagulants-thyroid hormones. The most common drugs contributing to the identified pDDIs were ciprofloxacin, theophylline, warfarin, aminophylline, alprazolam, levothyroxine, and selegiline. While the incidence rate of clinically relevant pDDIs in prescriptions of general practitioners, internists, and cardiologists was the highest, the average pDDI incidence per 10,000 prescriptions of pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, and cardiologists was highest. Although a small proportion of the analyzed prescriptions contained drug pairs with potential for clinically relevant DDIs, a significant number of outpatients have been exposed to the adverse effects associated with these interactions. It is recommended that in addition to training physicians and pharmacists, other effective interventions such as computerized alerting systems and electronic prescribing systems be designed and implemented. PMID:27499793

  14. Important drug interactions and reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Aria, Nancy; Kauffman, C Lisa

    2003-01-01

    A constantly expanding pharmacological armamentarium increases the concern for serious drug interactions. This article discusses drug metabolism and how the cytochrome P-450 family facilitates drug biotransformation. Clinically significant drug interactions involving antifungal drugs, antibiotics, retinoids, and immunosuppressive agents, as well as topical anesthetics and various foods, are included.

  15. Development, validation and utility of an in vitro technique for assessment of potential clinical drug-drug interactions involving P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Keogh, John P; Kunta, Jeevan R

    2006-04-01

    Regulatory interest is increasing for drug transporters generally and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in particular, primarily in the area of drug-drug interactions. To aid in both identifying and discharging the potential liabilities associated with drug-transporter interactions, the pharmaceutical industry has a growing requirement for routine and robust non-clinical assays. An assay was designed, optimised and validated to determine the in vitro inhibitory potency of new chemical entities (NCEs) towards human Pgp-mediated transport. [3H]-Digoxin was established as a suitable probe substrate by investigating its characteristics in the in vitro system (MDCKII-MDR1 cells grown in 24-multiwell inserts). The inhibitory potencies (apparent IC50) of known Pgp inhibitors astemizole, GF120918, ketoconazole, itraconazole, quinidine, verapamil and quinine were determined over at least a 1000-fold concentration range. Validation was carried out using manual and automatic techniques. [3H]-Digoxin was found to be stable and have good mass balance in the system. In contrast to [A-->B] transport, [3H]-digoxin [B-->A] transport rates were readily measured with good reproducibility. There was no evidence of saturation of transport up to 10 microM digoxin and 30 nM digoxin was selected for routine assay use, reflecting clinical therapeutic concentrations. IC50 values ranged over approximately 100-fold with excellent reproducibility. Results from manual and automated versions were in close agreement. This method is suitable for routine use to assess the in vitro inhibitory potency of NCEs on Pgp-mediated digoxin transport. Comparison of IC50 values against clinical interaction profiles for the probe inhibitors indicated the in vitro assay is predictive of clinical digoxin-drug interactions mediated via Pgp.

  16. Clinical Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and Drug-Interaction Profile of the Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Mackenzie L.; Hadzic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Dolutegravir is a second generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) currently under review by the US FDA for marketing approval. Dolutegravir’s in vitro, protein adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) for wild-type virus is 0.064 μg/ml, and it retains in vitro anti-HIV 1 activity across a broad range of viral phenotypes known to confer resistance to the currently marketed INSTIs, raltegravir and elvitegravir. Dolutegravir has a half-life (t½) of 13 to 14 hours and maintains concentrations over the in vitro, protein adjusted IC90 for more than 30 hours following a single dose. Additionally, dolutegravir has comparatively low intersubject variability compared to raltegravir and elvitegravir. A plasma exposure-response relationship has been well described, with antiviral activity strongly correlating to trough concentration (Ctrough) values. Phase III trials have assessed the antiviral activity of dolutegravir compared with efavirenz and raltegravir in antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve patients and found dolutegravir to achieve more rapid and sustained virologic suppression in both instances. Additionally, studies of dolutegravir activity in patients with known INSTI-resistant mutations have been favorable, indicating that dolutegravir retains activity in a variety of INSTI resistant phenotypes. Much like currently marketed INSTIs, dolutegravir is very well tolerated. Because dolutegravir inhibits the renal transporter, organic cation transporter (OCT) 2, reduced tubular secretion of creatinine leads to non-progressive increases in serum creatinine. These serum creatinine increases have not been associated with decreased glomerular filtration rate or progressive renal impairment. Dolutegravir’s major and minor metabolic pathways are UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 and cytochrome (CYP)3A4, respectively, and it neither induces nor inhibits CYP isozymes. Thus dolutegravir has a modest drug interaction profile. However, antacids significantly

  17. Rifampicin and anti-hypertensive drugs in chronic kidney disease: Pharmacokinetic interactions and their clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, A.; Agarwal, S. K.; Kaleekal, T.; Gupta, Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients on dialysis have an increased incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Rifampicin, a first-line antitubercular therapy (ATT) drug, is a potent inducer of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP). There is potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between rifampicin and anti-hypertensives that are CYP substrates: amlodipine and metoprolol. Therefore, hypertensive patients receiving rifampicin-based ATT are at risk for worsening of hypertension. However, this hypothesis has not yet been systematically studied. In this prospective study, hypertensive CKD 5D patients with TB were followed after rifampicin initiation. Blood pressure (BP) was ≤140/90 mmHg with stable anti-HT requirement at inclusion. Serum amlodipine, metoprolol, and prazosin levels were estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography at baseline and 3, 7, 10, and 14 days after rifampicin initiation. BP and anti-HT requirement were monitored for 2 weeks or until stabilization. All 24 patients in the study had worsening of hypertension after rifampicin and 83.3% required increase in drugs to maintain BP <140/90 mmHg. Serial amlodipine levels were estimated in 16 patients; metoprolol and prazosin in four patients each. Drug levels declined by >50% in all patients and became undetectable in 50-75%. Drug requirement increased from 4.5 ± 3.6 to 8.5 ± 6.4 units (P < 0.0001). Mean time to first increase in dose was 6.5 ± 3.6 days. Eleven (46%) patients experienced a hypertensive crisis at 9.1 ± 3.8 days. Three of them had a hypertensive emergency with acute pulmonary edema. In two patients, rifampicin had to be discontinued to achieve BP control. In conclusion, rifampicin caused a significant decrease in blood levels of commonly used anti hypertensives. This decrease in levels correlated well with worsening of hypertension. Thus, we suggest very close BP monitoring in CKD patients after rifampicin initiation. PMID:27795624

  18. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  19. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  20. Evaluation of CYP2B6 Induction and Prediction of Clinical Drug-Drug Interactions: Considerations from the IQ Consortium Induction Working Group-An Industry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Odette A; Shebley, Mohamad; Palamanda, Jairam; Sinz, Michael W; Ramsden, Diane; Einolf, Heidi J; Chen, Liangfu; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-10-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) due to CYP2B6 induction have recently gained prominence and clinical induction risk assessment is recommended by regulatory agencies. This work aimed to evaluate the potency of CYP2B6 versus CYP3A4 induction in vitro and from clinical studies and to assess the predictability of efavirenz versus bupropion as clinical probe substrates of CYP2B6 induction. The analysis indicates that the magnitude of CYP3A4 induction was higher than CYP2B6 both in vitro and in vivo. The magnitude of DDIs caused by induction could not be predicted for bupropion with static or dynamic models. On the other hand, the relative induction score, net effect, and physiologically based pharmacokinetics SimCYP models using efavirenz resulted in improved DDI predictions. Although bupropion and efavirenz have been used and are recommended by regulatory agencies as clinical CYP2B6 probe substrates for DDI studies, CYP3A4 contributes to the metabolism of both probes and is induced by all reference CYP2B6 inducers. Therefore, caution must be taken when interpreting clinical induction results because of the lack of selectivity of these probes. Although in vitro-in vivo extrapolation for efavirenz performed better than bupropion, interpretation of the clinical change in exposure is confounded by the coinduction of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4, as well as the increased contribution of CYP3A4 to efavirenz metabolism under induced conditions. Current methods and probe substrates preclude accurate prediction of CYP2B6 induction. Identification of a sensitive and selective clinical substrate for CYP2B6 (fraction metabolized > 0.9) is needed to improve in vitro-in vivo extrapolation for characterizing the potential for CYP2B6-mediated DDIs. Alternative strategies and a framework for evaluating the CYP2B6 induction risk are proposed.

  1. Informatics confronts drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Altman, Russ B

    2013-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an emerging threat to public health. Recent estimates indicate that DDIs cause nearly 74000 emergency room visits and 195000 hospitalizations each year in the USA. Current approaches to DDI discovery, which include Phase IV clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance, are insufficient for detecting many DDIs and do not alert the public to potentially dangerous DDIs before a drug enters the market. Recent work has applied state-of-the-art computational and statistical methods to the problem of DDIs. Here we review recent developments that encompass a range of informatics approaches in this domain, from the construction of databases for efficient searching of known DDIs to the prediction of novel DDIs based on data from electronic medical records, adverse event reports, scientific abstracts, and other sources. We also explore why DDIs are so difficult to detect and what the future holds for informatics-based approaches to DDI discovery. PMID:23414686

  2. A statistical methodology for drug-drug interaction surveillance.

    PubMed

    Norén, G Niklas; Sundberg, Rolf; Bate, Andrew; Edwards, I Ralph

    2008-07-20

    Interaction between drug substances may yield excessive risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when two drugs are taken in combination. Collections of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) related to suspected ADR incidents in clinical practice have proven to be very useful in post-marketing surveillance for pairwise drug--ADR associations, but have yet to reach their full potential for drug-drug interaction surveillance. In this paper, we implement and evaluate a shrinkage observed-to-expected ratio for exploratory analysis of suspected drug-drug interaction in ICSR data, based on comparison with an additive risk model. We argue that the limited success of previously proposed methods for drug-drug interaction detection based on ICSR data may be due to an underlying assumption that the absence of interaction is equivalent to having multiplicative risk factors. We provide empirical examples of established drug-drug interaction highlighted with our proposed approach that go undetected with logistic regression. A database wide screen for suspected drug-drug interaction in the entire WHO database is carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. As always in the analysis of ICSRs, the clinical validity of hypotheses raised with the proposed method must be further reviewed and evaluated by subject matter experts. PMID:18344185

  3. Relevance of in vitro and clinical data for predicting CYP3A4-mediated herb-drug interactions in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Goey, Andrew K L; Mooiman, Kim D; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Meijerman, Irma

    2013-11-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) by cancer patients is increasing. Concomitant use of CAM and anticancer drugs could lead to serious safety issues in patients. CAM have the potential to cause pharmacokinetic interactions with anticancer drugs, leading to either increased or decreased plasma levels of anticancer drugs. This could result in unexpected toxicities or a reduced efficacy. Significant pharmacokinetic interactions have already been shown between St. John's Wort (SJW) and the anticancer drugs imatinib and irinotecan. Most pharmacokinetic CAM-drug interactions, involve drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular CYP3A4. The effect of CAM on CYP3A4 activity and expression can be assessed in vitro. However, no data have been reported yet regarding the relevance of these in vitro data for the prediction of CAM-anticancer drug interactions in clinical practice. To address this issue, a literature research was performed to evaluate the relevance of in vitro data to predict clinical effects of CAM frequently used by cancer patients: SJW, milk thistle, garlic and Panax ginseng (P. ginseng). Furthermore, in clinical studies the sensitive CYP3A4 substrate probe midazolam is often used to determine pharmacokinetic interactions. Results of these clinical studies with midazolam are used to predict pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs metabolized by CYP3A4. Therefore, this review also explored whether clinical trials with midazolam are useful to predict clinical pharmacokinetic CAM-anticancer drug interactions. In vitro data of SJW have shown CYP3A4 inhibition after short-term exposure and induction after long-term exposure. In clinical studies using midazolam or anticancer drugs (irinotecan and imatinib) as known CYP3A4 substrates in combination with SJW, decreased plasma levels of these drugs were observed, which was expected as a consequence of CYP3A4 induction. For garlic, no effect on CYP3A4 has been shown in vitro

  4. The Use of Transporter Probe Drug Cocktails for the Assessment of Transporter-Based Drug-Drug Interactions in a Clinical Setting-Proposal of a Four Component Transporter Cocktail.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Thomas; Ishiguro, Naoki; Taub, Mitchell E

    2015-09-01

    Probe drug cocktails are used clinically to assess the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and in particular, DDIs resulting from coadministration of substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymes. However, a probe drug cocktail has not been identified to assess DDIs involving inhibition of drug transporters. We propose a cocktail consisting of the following substrates to explore the potential for DDIs caused by inhibition of key transporters: digoxin (P-glycoprotein, P-gp), rosuvastatin (breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP; organic anion transporting polypeptides, OATP), metformin (organic cation transporter, OCT; multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters, MATE), and furosemide (organic anion transporter, OAT). Furosemide was evaluated in vitro, and is a substrate of OAT1 and OAT3, with Km values of 38.9 and 21.5 μM, respectively. Furosemide was also identified as a substrate of BCRP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. Furosemide inhibited BCRP (50% inhibition of drug transport: 170 μM), but did not inhibit OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT2, MATE1, and MATE2-K at concentrations below 300 μM, and P-gp at concentrations below 2000 μM. Conservative approaches for the estimation of the likelihood of in vivo DDIs indicate a remote chance of in vivo transporter inhibition by these probe drugs when administered at low single oral doses. This four component probe drug cocktail is therefore proposed for clinical evaluation. PMID:25981193

  5. The Use of Transporter Probe Drug Cocktails for the Assessment of Transporter-Based Drug-Drug Interactions in a Clinical Setting-Proposal of a Four Component Transporter Cocktail.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Thomas; Ishiguro, Naoki; Taub, Mitchell E

    2015-09-01

    Probe drug cocktails are used clinically to assess the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and in particular, DDIs resulting from coadministration of substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymes. However, a probe drug cocktail has not been identified to assess DDIs involving inhibition of drug transporters. We propose a cocktail consisting of the following substrates to explore the potential for DDIs caused by inhibition of key transporters: digoxin (P-glycoprotein, P-gp), rosuvastatin (breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP; organic anion transporting polypeptides, OATP), metformin (organic cation transporter, OCT; multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters, MATE), and furosemide (organic anion transporter, OAT). Furosemide was evaluated in vitro, and is a substrate of OAT1 and OAT3, with Km values of 38.9 and 21.5 μM, respectively. Furosemide was also identified as a substrate of BCRP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. Furosemide inhibited BCRP (50% inhibition of drug transport: 170 μM), but did not inhibit OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT2, MATE1, and MATE2-K at concentrations below 300 μM, and P-gp at concentrations below 2000 μM. Conservative approaches for the estimation of the likelihood of in vivo DDIs indicate a remote chance of in vivo transporter inhibition by these probe drugs when administered at low single oral doses. This four component probe drug cocktail is therefore proposed for clinical evaluation.

  6. [Importance of drug interactions with smoking in modern drug research].

    PubMed

    Laki, Szilvia; Kalapos-Kovács, Bernadett; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Drug interaction is a process during which a drug's fate in the body or its pharmacological properties are altered by an influencing factor. The extent of the drug interaction's effect can vary. The interaction could result from the modulation by another drug, food, alcohol, caffeine, narcotics, a drug influencing absorption or smoking. Moreover, transporter interactions with smoking could also have a major impact on many drug's efficacy. Clinically relevant drug interactions with smoking were classified in terms of their effect: pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and transporter interactions. Policyclic aromatic carbohydrates, found in cigarette smoke, have enzyme inducing properties. The interaction affects mainly the hepatic isoenzyme CYP1A2. Interactions caused by smoking have an effect on all drugs being substrates of and therefore metabolised by CYP1A2. Pharmacokinetic alteration can also occur during the absorption, distribution and elimination process. The pharmacodynamic interactions are mainly caused by the effects of nicotine, a cigarette smoke component. Through interactions, smoking could also modify the activity of transporter proteins, altering this way the ADME properties of many drugs. Since smoking is one of the deadliest artefact in the history of human civilisation, identifying drug interactions with smoking is the physician's and pharmacist's major responsibility and task. Moreover, it is necessary to identify the patient's smoking habits during a medical treatment. This review aims to investigate the main types of drug interactions (PK/PD), identify factors influencing the activity of CYP enzymes and transporters, and also summarize the mechanisms of the most important drug interactions with smoking and their clinically relevant consequences (Table II-VI.). Drugs, with effects somehow altered by smoking-interactions, have been studied. PMID:24575657

  7. In vitro evaluation of metabolic drug-drug interactions: a descriptive and critical commentary.

    PubMed

    Li, Albert P

    2007-01-01

    Adverse drug-drug interactions represent a major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, in vitro approaches for the evaluation of metabolism-related drug-drug interactions have been developed. These in vitro approaches are found to be useful in the assessment of clinical drug-drug interaction potential of new chemical entities and to aid the understanding of clinically significant drug-drug interactions observed with existing drugs. The general methods for the evaluation of drug-drug interactions using in vitro, human-based experimental systems are described and critically reviewed.

  8. Drug interactions with quinolones.

    PubMed

    Janknegt, R

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions and pharmaceutical compatibilities of fluoroquinolones are reviewed. Incompatibilities are observed between quinolones and penicillins such as flucloxacillin and amoxicillin and with clindamycin when mixed in an administration set. Fluoroquinolones, especially enoxacin, and to a lesser extent ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin, inhibit the metabolic clearance of theophylline and caffeine. It is advisable to use non-interacting quinolones such as ofloxacin or norfloxacin or to measure theophylline levels and reduce caffeine intake where appropriate. A potential interaction with midazolam needs further study. The absorption of fluoroquinolones is markedly reduced by antacids, calcium carbonate, ferrous sulphate and sucralfate. Although quantitative differences between fluoroquinolones exist, these combinations should be avoided whenever possible. Cimetidine reduces the metabolic clearance of pefloxacin. More studies are needed on the possible reduction of absorption of fluoroquinolones by opiates. Several case reports of a pharmacodynamic interaction between fluoroquinolones and cyclosporin or oral anticoagulants exist. No pharmacokinetic interaction has been observed and more, controlled studies are needed to assess the significance of the pharmacodynamic interaction. A high incidence of convulsions has been observed in patients receiving the combination enoxacin and fenbufen, an NSAID. A synergistic inhibitory effect of fluoroquinolones and several NSAIDs has been observed on the binding of the neurotransmitter GABA. Although the relevance of this interaction is probably not great, except with fenbufen, a possible epileptogenic effect of the combination cannot be excluded.

  9. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  10. A clinical therapeutic protein drug–drug interaction study: coadministration of denosumab and midazolam in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Graham; Kaufman, Allegra; Lee, Edward; Hamilton, Lisa; Hutton, Shauna; Egbuna, Ogo; Padhi, Desmond

    2014-01-01

    Drug–disease interactions involving therapeutic proteins that target cytokines and potentially impact cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have been of increased interest to drug regulatory agencies and industry sponsors in recent years. This parallel-group open-label study evaluated the effects of the monoclonal antibody denosumab, an inhibitor of the cytokine RANKL, on the pharmacokinetics of the probe CYP3A4 substrate midazolam in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The pharmacokinetics of a 2 mg oral dose of midazolam was evaluated on days 1 and 16. Subjects in Group A received a 60 mg subcutaneous dose of denosumab on day 2, 2 weeks before the second midazolam dose, while subjects in Group B did not. For Group A (n = 17), point estimates for the ratio of least square means for midazolam exposures based on maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax) and areas under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUCs) on day 16 versus day 1 ranged from 1.02 to 1.04 and 90% confidence intervals were within 0.80–1.25. No period effect was observed for Group B (n = 8). Midazolam and denosumab coadministration was safe and well tolerated. Inhibition of the cytokine RANKL by denosumab does not affect CYP3A4 in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and will not alter the pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized by this enzyme. These results are consistent with data suggesting that RANKL does not impact markers of inflammation and represent the first clinical data demonstrating a lack of effect on CYP3A4 of a therapeutic protein that is a cytokine modulator. PMID:25505582

  11. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  12. [Mechanisms of drug metabolism--implications for drug interaction].

    PubMed

    Sitkiewicz, D

    2000-09-01

    Most drugs undergo biotransformation before excretion by renal, biliary or other routes. The main purpose of metabolism is to make the drug, which is usually lipophilic, more water soluble. Metabolic reactions, depending upon the end product formed, can be classified as functionalisation (phase I) or conjugation (Phase II) reactions. Phase I metabolic reactions include oxidation, reduction and hydrolysis; while phase II processes are glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, acetylation and mercapture formation. Cytochrome P-450 isozymes play a central role in metabolism of great majority of xenobiotics, as well as some endogenous substances. Many drugs can inhibit, induce and alter relative amounts of different P-450 enzymes; therefore, possibilities of drug-drug interactions exist in that one drug can influence biodisposition of another with potential clinical implications. One drug can inhibit metabolism of another, leading to excessive accumulation and toxicity. Alternatively, one drug can stimulate or induce metabolism of another drug resulting in subtherapeutic plasma levels of the later.

  13. Early Identification of Clinically Relevant Drug Interactions With the Human Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP/ABCB11)

    PubMed Central

    Artursson, Per

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis was performed to investigate how inhibition of the human bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) relates to clinically observed drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Inhibition of taurocholate (TA) transport was investigated in BSEP membrane vesicles for a data set of 250 compounds, and 86 BSEP inhibitors were identified. Structure-activity modeling identified BSEP inhibition to correlate strongly with compound lipophilicity, whereas positive molecular charge was associated with a lack of inhibition. All approved drugs in the data set (n = 182) were categorized according to DILI warnings in drug labels issued by the Food and Drug Administration, and a strong correlation between BSEP inhibition and DILI was identified. As many as 38 of the 61 identified BSEP inhibitors were associated with severe DILI, including 9 drugs not previously linked to BSEP inhibition. Further, among the tested compounds, every second drug associated with severe DILI was a BSEP inhibitor. Finally, sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) were used to investigate the relationship between BSEP inhibition, TA transport, and clinically observed DILI in detail. BSEP inhibitors associated with severe DILI greatly reduced the TA canalicular efflux, whereas BSEP inhibitors with less severe or no DILI resulted in weak or no reduction of TA efflux in SCHH. This distinction illustrates the usefulness of SCHH in refined analysis of BSEP inhibition. In conclusion, BSEP inhibition in membrane vesicles was found to correlate to DILI severity, and altered disposition of TA in SCHH was shown to separate BSEP inhibitors associated with severe DILI from those with no or mild DILI. PMID:24014644

  14. Perhaps More Consideration of Pavlovian-Operant Interaction May Improve the Clinical Efficacy of Behaviorally Based Drug Treatment Programs.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse remains costly. Drug-related cues can evoke cue-reactivity and craving, contributing to relapse. The Pavlovian extinction-based cue-exposure therapy (CET) has not been very successful in treating drug abuse. A functional operant analysis of complex rituals involved in CET is outlined and reinterpreted as an operant heterogeneous chain maintained by observing responses, conditioned reinforcers, and discriminative stimuli. It is further noted that operant functions are not predicated on Pavlovian processes but can be influenced by them in contributing to relapse; several empirical studies from the animal and human literature highlight this view. Cue-reactivity evoked by Pavlovian processes is conceptualized as an operant establishing/motivating operation. CET may be more effective in incorporating an operant-based approach that takes into account the complexity of Pavlovian-operant interaction. Extinction of the operant chain coupled with the shaping of alternative behaviors is proposed as an integrated therapy. It is proposed that operant-based drug abuse treatments (contingency management, voucher programs, and the therapeutic work environment) might consider incorporating cue-reactivity, as establishing/motivating operations, to increase long-term success-a hybrid approach based on Pavlovian-operant interaction.

  15. Perhaps More Consideration of Pavlovian–Operant Interaction May Improve the Clinical Efficacy of Behaviorally Based Drug Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Troisi, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse remains costly. Drug-related cues can evoke cue-reactivity and craving, contributing to relapse. The Pavlovian extinction-based cue-exposure therapy (CET) has not been very successful in treating drug abuse. A functional operant analysis of complex rituals involved in CET is outlined and reinterpreted as an operant heterogeneous chain maintained by observing responses, conditioned reinforcers, and discriminative stimuli. It is further noted that operant functions are not predicated on Pavlovian processes but can be influenced by them in contributing to relapse; several empirical studies from the animal and human literature highlight this view. Cue-reactivity evoked by Pavlovian processes is conceptualized as an operant establishing/motivating operation. CET may be more effective in incorporating an operant-based approach that takes into account the complexity of Pavlovian–operant interaction. Extinction of the operant chain coupled with the shaping of alternative behaviors is proposed as an integrated therapy. It is proposed that operant-based drug abuse treatments (contingency management, voucher programs, and the therapeutic work environment) might consider incorporating cue-reactivity, as establishing/motivating operations, to increase long-term success—a hybrid approach based on Pavlovian–operant interaction. PMID:25346551

  16. Warfarin and Drug Interactions: Prescribing Vigilance.

    PubMed

    Hook, J; Millsopp, Lynne; Field, E Anne

    2016-01-01

    A patient taking warfarin presented to the Oral Medicine Clinic at Liverpool University Dental Hospital, having been prescribed metronidazole and miconazole by his general dental practitioner (GDP) for his oral mucosal problem. He subsequently developed bruising on his torso following mild trauma. Having read the drug information leaflet provided with his metronidazole and miconazole, he noted the potential drug interactions between these and warfarin. He therefore stopped his warfarin. The details of this case are outlined, and the potential for significant drug interactions with warfarin are highlighted. The need for dental practitioners to be vigilant concerning drug interactions is emphasized, together with the importance of CPD in relation to drug prescribing. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This case report, which is of relevance to all dental practitioners, highlights the importance of up-to-date medical and drug histories and the continuing awareness of potential drug interactions. In this case, patient intervention after checking drug information leaflets prevented serious consequences. The importance and potentially serious consequences of significant drug interactions needs to be understood. PMID:27024900

  17. Comparison of FDA Approved Kinase Targets to Clinical Trial Ones: Insights from Their System Profiles and Drug-Target Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingyu; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Li, Yinghong; Li, Xiaoxu; Xue, Weiwei; Yu, Chunyan; Tian, Yubin; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Kinase is one of the most productive classes of established targets, but the majority of approved drugs against kinase were developed only for cancer. Intensive efforts were therefore exerted for releasing its therapeutic potential by discovering new therapeutic area. Kinases in clinical trial could provide great opportunities for treating various diseases. However, no systematic comparison between system profiles of established targets and those of clinical trial ones was conducted. The reveal of probable difference or shift of trend would help to identify key factors defining druggability of established targets. In this study, a comparative analysis of system profiles of both types of targets was conducted. Consequently, the systems profiles of the majority of clinical trial kinases were identified to be very similar to those of established ones, but percentages of established targets obeying the system profiles appeared to be slightly but consistently higher than those of clinical trial targets. Moreover, a shift of trend in the system profiles from the clinical trial to the established targets was identified, and popular kinase targets were discovered. In sum, this comparative study may help to facilitate the identification of the druggability of established drug targets by their system profiles and drug-target interaction networks.

  18. Comparison of FDA Approved Kinase Targets to Clinical Trial Ones: Insights from Their System Profiles and Drug-Target Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyu; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Hong; Li, Yinghong; Yu, Chunyan; Tian, Yubin

    2016-01-01

    Kinase is one of the most productive classes of established targets, but the majority of approved drugs against kinase were developed only for cancer. Intensive efforts were therefore exerted for releasing its therapeutic potential by discovering new therapeutic area. Kinases in clinical trial could provide great opportunities for treating various diseases. However, no systematic comparison between system profiles of established targets and those of clinical trial ones was conducted. The reveal of probable difference or shift of trend would help to identify key factors defining druggability of established targets. In this study, a comparative analysis of system profiles of both types of targets was conducted. Consequently, the systems profiles of the majority of clinical trial kinases were identified to be very similar to those of established ones, but percentages of established targets obeying the system profiles appeared to be slightly but consistently higher than those of clinical trial targets. Moreover, a shift of trend in the system profiles from the clinical trial to the established targets was identified, and popular kinase targets were discovered. In sum, this comparative study may help to facilitate the identification of the druggability of established drug targets by their system profiles and drug-target interaction networks. PMID:27547755

  19. A pocket aide-memoire on drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Stockley, I H

    1975-04-01

    A pocket size "slide-rule" type device designed to be used by physicians, pharmacists and nurses as a memory aid on potential drug-drug interactions is described. Color-coded symbols on the device indicate both the type and clinical significance of the potential interactions involving 56 drugs or groups of drugs.

  20. Drug Interactions and Antiretroviral Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Matthew; Sperati, C. John; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the improved longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected individuals are developing several non-AIDS related comorbid conditions. Consequently, medical management of the HIV-infected population is increasingly complex, with a growing list of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This article reviews some of the most relevant and emerging potential interactions between antiretroviral medications and other agents. The most common DDIs are those involving protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors which alter the cytochrome P450 enzyme system and/or drug transporters such as p-glycoprotein. Of note are the new agents for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. These new classes of drugs and others drugs which are increasingly used in this patient population represent a significant challenge with regard to achieving the goals of effective HIV suppression and minimization of drug-related toxicities. Awareness of DDIs and a multidisciplinary approach are imperative in reaching these goals. PMID:24950731

  1. Drug-mineral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of drugs such as glucocorticoids and thyroid extract on calcium metabolism is unknown. However, several other medications affect the excretion and intestinal absorption of calcium. A controlled study was carried out to investigate these aspects. Urinary calcium was determined for 3 months during the long-term intake of the antituberculous drug isoniazid (INH) and of the antibiotic tetracycline. The effect of the diuretics furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide, of several aluminum-containing antacids, of thyroid extract and of corticosteroids was also studied. Metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc were determined, as well as the intestinal absorption of calcium using Ca 47. Plasma levels, urinary and fecal excretions of Ca 47 were determined. All drugs tested increased urinary calcium except for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Regarding the effect of corticosteroids: the intestinal absorption of calcium was unchanged after the short-term use and was very high after long-term use. The studies have shown that several commonly used drugs induce an increase in urinary calcium excretion which may contribute to calcium loss, if this increase persists for prolonged periods of time. Urinary excretions of phosphorus, magnesium and zinc increased in some of the studies.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of antiretrovirals: an update.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Laura; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2010-01-01

    Current antiretroviral treatment has allowed HIV infection to become a chronic manageable condition with many HIV patients living longer. However, available antiretrovirals are not without limitations, for example the development of resistance and adverse effects. Consequently, new drugs in existing and novel classes are urgently required to provide viable treatment options to patients with few remaining choices. Darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc and raltegravir have been recently approved for treatment-experienced patients and other agents such as rilpivirine, vicriviroc and elvitegravir are currently under phase III study. Clinical studies are necessary to optimise potential treatment combinations and to manage drug-drug interactions to help avoid toxicity or therapy failure. This review aims to summarise the pharmacokinetics and key drug-drug interaction studies for newly available antiretrovirals and those in development. Further information regarding drug-drug interactions of well established antiretrovirals and those recently approved are readily available online at sites such as http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org, http://www.clinicaloptions.com/hiv, http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010.

  3. The nasty surprise of a complex drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Bode, Chris

    2010-05-01

    In vitro investigation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) has officially been part of the regulatory pathway for new drugs in the USA since the publication of an FDA guidance on the subject in 1997. The field has continued to evolve, driven by preclinical and clinical experience, improved understanding of the molecular basis of DDIs, technological advances, and a continuous dialogue between the FDA and pharmaceutical industry scientists. Some striking DDIs involve multiple molecular species and targets; their mechanisms and magnitude would have been difficult or impossible to predict with available in vitro tools. This article focuses on one such example.

  4. Investigation of drug interactions with pinaverium bromide.

    PubMed

    Devred, C; Godeau, P; Guerot, C; Librez, P; Mougeot, G; Orsetti, A; Segrestaa, J M

    1986-01-01

    A series of studies was carried out at 6 centres to investigate possible drug interaction between the spasmolytic, pinaverium bromide, and cardiac glycosides, anticoagulants and hypoglycaemic agents given to patients as part of the long-term treatment of their condition. The results of clinical and laboratory investigations did not show any evidence of pinaverium bromide interfering with the action or activity of any of the drugs studied. PMID:3084176

  5. Opioid pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Brian R; Foster, David R

    2011-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving opioid analgesics can be problematic. Opioids are widely used, have a narrow therapeutic index, and can be associated with severe toxicity. The purpose of this review is to describe pharmacokinetic DDIs associated with opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings (morphine, codeine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone). An introduction to the pharmacokinetic basis of DDIs is provided, and potential DDIs associated with opioids are reviewed. Opioids metabolized by the drug metabolizing enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) system (codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone) are associated with numerous DDIs that can result in either a reduction in opioid effect or excess opioid effects. Conversely, opioids that are not metabolized by that system (morphine, oxymorphone, and hydromorphone) tend to be involved in fewer CYP450-associated pharmacokinetic DDIs.

  6. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Bogetti-Salazar, Michele; González-González, Cesar; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe) (n=64) and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent) (n=117). Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5%) and 124 women (68.5%) with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1%) patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81%) were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%), clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%), and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%). Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population. PMID:26872079

  7. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  8. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs, and between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Perucca, Emilio

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between antiepileptic drugs, or between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs, can be pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic in nature. Pharmacokinetic interactions involve changes in absorption, distribution or elimination, whereas pharmacodynamic interactions involve synergism and antagonism at the site of action. Most clinically important interactions of antiepileptic drugs result from induction or inhibition of drug metabolism. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone are strong inducers of cytochrome P450 and glucuronizing enzymes (as well as P-glycoprotein) and can reduce the efficacy of co-administered medications such as oral anticoagulants, calcium antagonists, steroids, antimicrobial and antineoplastic drugs through this mechanism. Oxcarbazepine, eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, rufinamide, topiramate (at doses ≥ 200 mg/day) and perampanel (at doses ≥ 8 mg/day) have weaker inducing properties, and a lower propensity to cause interactions mediated by enzyme induction. Unlike enzyme induction, enzyme inhibition results in decreased metabolic clearance of the affected drug, the serum concentration of which may increase leading to toxic effects. Examples of important interactions mediated by enzyme inhibition include the increase in the serum concentration of phenobarbital and lamotrigine caused by valproic acid. There are also interactions whereby other drugs induce or inhibit the metabolism of antiepileptic drugs, examples being the increase in serum carbamazepine concentration by erythromycin, and the decrease in serum lamotrigine concentration by oestrogen-containing contraceptives. Pharmacodynamic interactions between antiepileptic drugs may also be clinically important. These interactions can have potentially beneficial effects, such as the therapeutic synergism of valproic acid combined with lamotrigine, or adverse effects, such as the reciprocal potentiation of neurotoxicity observed in patients treated with a combination of

  9. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  10. Evaluation of enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yu; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Inhibition of CYP enzymes is thought to be the most common cause of drug-drug and/or herb-drug interactions. To characterize the inhibition of CYP enzymes activities by chemicals, enzyme inhibition kinetic experiments are usually carried out. The purpose of this letter is to call attention to evaluate the enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

  11. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors (gliptins): focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2010-09-01

    speaking, almost no drug-drug interactions or only minor drug-drug interactions have been reported between DPP-4 inhibitors and any of these drugs. The gliptins do not significantly modify the pharmacokinetic profile and exposure of the other tested drugs, and the other drugs do not significantly alter the pharmacokinetic profile of the gliptins or exposure to these. The only exception concerns saxagliptin, which is metabolized to an active metabolite by CYP3A4/5. Therefore, exposure to saxagliptin and its primary metabolite may be significantly modified when saxagliptin is coadministered with specific strong inhibitors (ketoconazole, diltiazem) or inducers (rifampicin) of CYP3A4/5 isoforms. The absence of significant drug-drug interactions could be explained by the favourable pharmacokinetic characteristics of DPP-4 inhibitors, which are not inducers or inhibitors of CYP isoforms and are not bound to plasma proteins to a great extent. Therefore, according to these pharmacokinetic findings, which were generally obtained in healthy young male subjects, no dosage adjustment is recommended when gliptins are combined with other pharmacological agents in patients with T2DM, with the exception of a reduction in the daily dosage of saxagliptin when this drug is used in association with a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4/A5. It is worth noting, however, that a reduction in the dose of sulfonylureas is usually recommended when a DPP-4 inhibitor is added, because of a pharmacodynamic interaction (rather than a pharmacokinetic interaction) between the sulfonylurea and the DPP-4 inhibitor, which may result in a higher risk of hypoglycaemia. Otherwise, any gliptin may be combined with metformin or a thiazolidinedione (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone), leading to a significant improvement in glycaemic control without an increased risk of hypoglycaemia or any other adverse event in patients with T2DM. Finally, the absence of drug-drug interactions in clinical trials in healthy subjects requires

  12. Assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia in listing and ranking of drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Božana S.; Ilić, Maja S.

    2013-01-01

    Inconsistent information about drug-drug interactions can cause variations in prescribing, and possibly increase the incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess whether there is an inconsistency in drug-drug interaction listing and ranking in three authoritative, freely accessible online drug information sources: The British National Formulary; The Compendium about Drugs Licensed for Use in the United Kingdom (the Electronic Medicines Compendium) and the Compendium about Drugs Licensed for Use in the United States (the DailyMed). Information on drug-drug interactions for thirty drugs which have a high or medium potential for interactions have been selected for analysis. In total, 1971 drug-drug interactions were listed in all three drug information sources, of these 992 were ranked as the interactions with the potential of clinical significance. Comparative analysis identified that 63.98% of interactions were listed in only one drug information source, and 66.63% of interactions were ranked in only one drug information source. Only 15.12% listed and 11.19% ranked interactions were identified in all three information sources. Intraclass correlation coefficient indicated a weak correlation among the three drug information sources in listing (0.366), as well as in ranking drug interactions (0.467). This study showed inconsistency of information on drug-drug interaction for the selected drugs in three authoritative, freely accessible online drug information sources. The application of a uniform methodology in assessment of information, and then the presentation of information in a standardized format is required to prevent and adequately manage drug-drug interactions. PMID:24289762

  13. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  14. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  15. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  16. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases. PMID:26204087

  17. [Terbinafine : Relevant drug interactions and their management].

    PubMed

    Dürrbeck, A; Nenoff, P

    2016-09-01

    The allylamine terbinafine is the probably most frequently prescribed systemic antifungal agent in Germany for the treatment of dermatomycoses and onychomycoses. According to the German drug law, terbinafine is approved for patients who are 18 years and older; however, this antifungal agent is increasingly used off-label for treatment of onychomycoses and tinea capitis in children. Terbinafine is associated with only a few interactions with other drugs, which is why terbinafine can generally be used without problems in older and multimorbid patients. Nevertheless, some potential interactions of terbinafine with certain drug substances are known, including substances of the group of antidepressants/antipsychotics and some cardiovascular drugs. Decisive for the relevance of interactions is-along with the therapeutic index of the substrate and the possible alternative degradation pathways-the genetically determined type of metabolism. When combining terbinafine with tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin/noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors, the clinical response and potential side effects must be monitored. Problematic is the use of terbinafine with simultaneous treatment with tamoxifen. The administration of potent CYP2D6 inhibitors leads to a diminished efficacy of tamoxifen because one of its most important active metabolites-endoxifen-is not sufficiently available. Therefore, combination of tamoxifen and terbinafine should be avoided. In conclusion, the number of substances which are able to cause clinically relevant interactions in case of simultaneously administration with terbinafine is clear and should be manageable in the dermatological office with adequate monitoring. PMID:27474731

  18. Mechanism of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Warfarin and Statins.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abdul Naveed; Bohnert, Tonika; Williams, David A; Gan, Lawrence L; LeDuc, Barbara W

    2016-06-01

    The anticoagulant drug warfarin and the lipid-lowering statin drugs are commonly co-administered to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between these drugs have been recognized through case studies for many years, but the biochemical mechanisms causing these interactions have not been explained fully. Previous theories include kinetic alterations in cytochrome P-450-mediated drug metabolism or disturbances of drug-protein binding, leading to anticoagulant activity of warfarin; however, neither the enantioselective effects on warfarin metabolism nor the potential disruption of drug transporter function have been well investigated. This study investigated the etiology of the DDIs between warfarin and statins. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed and validated to quantify racemic warfarin, 6 of its hydroxylated metabolites, and pure enantiomers of warfarin; these methods were applied to study the role of different absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties, leading to DDIs. Plasma protein binding displacement of warfarin was performed in the presence of statins using equilibrium dialysis method. Substrate kinetics of warfarin and pure enantiomers were performed with human liver microsomes to determine the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) for the formation of all 6 hydroxywarfarin metabolites, inhibition of warfarin metabolism in the presence of statins, was determined. Uptake transport studies of warfarin were performed using overexpressing HEK cell lines and efflux transport using human adenocarcinoma colonic cell line cells. Fluvastatin significantly displaced plasma protein binding of warfarin and pure enantiomers; no other statin resulted in significant displacement of warfarin. All the statins that inhibited the formation of 10-hydroxywarfarin, atorvastatin, pitavastatin, and simvastatin were highly potent compared to other statins; in contrast, only fluvastatin

  19. [New antiepileptic drugs: characteristics and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yoko

    2014-05-01

    New antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that have been used in many other countries for more than 10 years have only recently became available for use in Japan. Gabapentin, topiramate, lamotrigine and levetiracetam were licensed for use in Japan between 2006 and 2010. Stiripentol for Dravet syndrome and rufinamide for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome were also approved in 2012 and 2013 as orphan drugs. Clinical trials of other new AEDs such as oxcarbazepine, vigabatrin, lacosamide, and perampanel are in progress. In this review, the general characteristics of the new AEDs are discussed with regards to their effectiveness, tolerability, drug interaction, safety and mechanisms of action. The effectiveness, of the new AEDs compared with established AEDs is also discussed. Clinical applications of the new AEDs, focusing on gabapentin, topiramate, lamotrigine and levetiracetam are also discussed based on our domestic experience as well as overseas reports. PMID:24912297

  20. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Panday, Prashant N.; Pranger, Arianna D.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs. PMID:24309312

  1. Teratogenic drugs and their drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ahn, M R; Li, L; Shon, J; Bashaw, E D; Kim, M-J

    2016-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for Industry-Drug Interaction Studies, recommends that a potential human teratogen needs to be studied in vivo for effects on contraceptive steroids.(1) This article highlights the need to evaluate the drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between drugs with teratogenic potential and hormonal contraceptives (HCs) during drug development. It also addresses the FDA's effort of communicating DDI findings in product labels to mitigate the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:27090193

  2. Reactions and interactions in handling anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, P F

    1983-01-01

    The clinical toxicity of anticancer drugs has been well documented with regard to the adverse effects of treatment in patients. However, many of these drugs have a direct irritant effect on the skin, eyes, mucous membranes, and other tissues. Handled without due care, especially when being prepared for injection, most cytotoxic drugs can cause local toxic or allergic reactions; they also present hazards of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. This spectrum of potential risk should be kept in mind by personnel administering or handling these drugs, especially in oncology units where just a few individuals may routinely and frequently reconstitute many doses of cytotoxic agents. This is work in which the hospital pharmacist should and must be involved; indeed, many of the techniques and skills required are identical with those used in standard aseptic procedures for preparing pharmaceutical products. Pharmacy departments should take the initiative in making hospital staff aware of the potential risks of handling neoplastic agents, and they should spearhead a multidisciplinary assessment for producing local guidelines for working with these drugs. This article warns practitioners about the inherent dangers of these practitioner-drug interactions and suggests ways in which they may be reduced. Information is given in tabular form regarding recommended procedures for reconstituting 24 anticancer drugs and precautions to protect the personnel handling them, especially when there is spillage of powdered or liquid drugs. Also, guidelines are given about incompatibilities with admixtures of such drugs, and the literature is reviewed relative to recent developments in hospital pharmacy departments where reconstitution of anticancer drugs has been incorporated into existing intravenous fluid preparation/admixture units. Not only has this been shown to be safer and more effective in terms of time and labor, but also it has cut the cost of injectable cytotoxic drugs by an

  3. Drug Interactions: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... you still have questions after reading the drug product label, ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information ... not take the place of reading the actual product label. Back to top Drug Interaction Information Category Drug ...

  4. Understanding and preventing drug–drug and drug–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Sheehan, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant administration of multiple drugs can lead to unanticipated drug interactions and resultant adverse drug events with their associated costs. A more thorough understanding of the different cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters has led to new methods to try to predict and prevent clinically relevant drug interactions. There is also an increased recognition of the need to identify the impact of pharmacogenetic polymorphisms on drug interactions. More stringent regulatory requirements have evolved for industry to classify cytochrome inhibitors and inducers, test the effect of drug interactions in the presence of polymorphic enzymes, and evaluate multiple potentially interacting drugs simultaneously. In clinical practice, drug alert software programs have been developed. This review discusses drug interaction mechanisms and strategies for screening and minimizing exposure to drug interactions. We also provide future perspectives for reducing the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. PMID:24745854

  5. Drug chirality and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Hutt, A J; Tan, S C

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 4 therapeutic agents are marked as racemic mixtures, the individual enantiomers of which frequently differ in both their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. The use of racemates has become the subject of considerable discussion in recent years, and an area of concern for both the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory authorities. The use of single enantiomers has a number of potential clinical advantages, including an improved therapeutic/pharmacological profile, a reduction in complex drug interactions, and simplified pharmacokinetics. In a number of instances stereochemical considerations have contributed to an understanding of the observed pharmacological effects of a drug administered as a racemate. However, relatively little is known of the influence of patient factors (e.g. disease state, age, gender and genetics) on drug enantiomer disposition and action in man. Examples may also be cited where the use of a single enantiomers, nonracemic mixtures and racemates of currently used agents may offer clinical advantages. The issues associated with drug chirality are complex and depend upon the relative merits of the individual agent. In the future it is likely that a number of existing racemates will be re-marketed as single enantiomer products with potentially improved clinical profiles and possible novel therapeutic indications. PMID:8922553

  6. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... workshop regarding FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research professional... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  7. Gene-drug interaction in stroke.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality and one of most frequent causes of long-term neurological disability, as well as a complex disease that results from the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The focus on genetics has produced a large number of studies with the objective of revealing the genetic basis of cerebrovascular diseases. Furthermore, pharmacogenetic research has investigated the relation between genetic variability and drug effectiveness/toxicity. This review will examine the implications of pharmacogenetics of stroke; data on antihypertensives, statins, antiplatelets, anticoagulants, and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator will be illustrated. Several polymorphisms have been studied and some have been associated with positive drug-gene interaction on stroke, but the superiority of the genotype-guided approach over the clinical approach has not been proved yet; for this reason, it is not routinely recommended. PMID:22135769

  8. Gene-Drug Interaction in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amici, Serena; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality and one of most frequent causes of long-term neurological disability, as well as a complex disease that results from the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The focus on genetics has produced a large number of studies with the objective of revealing the genetic basis of cerebrovascular diseases. Furthermore, pharmacogenetic research has investigated the relation between genetic variability and drug effectiveness/toxicity. This review will examine the implications of pharmacogenetics of stroke; data on antihypertensives, statins, antiplatelets, anticoagulants, and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator will be illustrated. Several polymorphisms have been studied and some have been associated with positive drug-gene interaction on stroke, but the superiority of the genotype-guided approach over the clinical approach has not been proved yet; for this reason, it is not routinely recommended. PMID:22135769

  9. Prevalence and type of drug–drug interactions involving ART in patients attending a specialist HIV outpatient clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Seden, K.; Merry, C.; Hewson, R.; Siccardi, M.; Lamorde, M.; Byakika-Kibwika, P.; Laker, E.; Parkes-Ratanshi, R.; Back, D. J.; Khoo, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Scale-up of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa has rapidly increased, necessitating evaluation of medication safety in these settings. Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) involving antiretrovirals (ARVs) in sub-Saharan Africa are poorly characterized. We evaluated the prevalence and type of ARV DDIs in Ugandan outpatients and identified the patients most at risk. Methods A total of 2000 consecutive patients receiving ARVs at the Infectious Diseases Institute, Kampala were studied. The most recent prescription for each patient was screened for clinically significant DDIs using www.hiv-druginteractions.org. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for DDIs. A screening tool was developed using significant risk factors and tested in a further 500 patients. Results Clinically significant DDIs were observed in 374 (18.7%) patients, with a total of 514 DDIs observed. Only 0.2% of DDIs involved a contraindicated combination. Comedications commonly associated with DDIs were antibiotics (4.8% of 2000 patients), anthelmintics (2.2%) and antifungals (3.5%). Patient age, gender, CD4 count and weight did not affect risk of DDIs. In multivariable analysis, the patient factors that independently increased risk of DDIs were two or more comedications (P < 0.0001), a PI-containing ARV regimen (P < 0.0001), use of an anti-infective (P < 0.0001) and WHO clinical stage 3–4 (P = 0.04). A scoring system based on having at least two of these risk factors identified between 75% and 90% of DDIs in a validation cohort. Conclusions Significant ARV DDIs occur at similar rates in resource-limited settings and developed countries; however, the comedications frequently causing DDIs differ. Development of tools that are relevant to particular settings should be a priority to assist with prevention and management of DDIs. PMID:26286575

  10. Polytherapy and drug interactions in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gujjarlamudi, Hima Bindu

    2016-01-01

    There is an increase in population of elderly above the age of 65. As age advances, more diseases develop resulting in use of more medications. Physiological changes, alterations in homeostatic regulation and diseases modify pharmacokinetics and drug response in older patients. The risk for drug interactions and drug-related problems increases along with multiple medications. Periodic evaluation of the patients’ drug regimen is essential to minimize polytherapy. Clinicians must be alert to the use of herbal and dietary supplements as they are prone to drug-drug interactions. This article focuses on the possible pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and herbal drug interactions occurring in the elderly. PMID:27721636

  11. Interaction network among functional drug groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More attention has been being paid to combinatorial effects of drugs to treat complex diseases or to avoid adverse combinations of drug cocktail. Although drug interaction information has been increasingly accumulated, a novel approach like network-based method is needed to analyse that information systematically and intuitively Results Beyond focussing on drug-drug interactions, we examined interactions between functional drug groups. In this work, functional drug groups were defined based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System. We defined criteria whether two functional drug groups are related. Then we constructed the interaction network of drug groups. The resulting network provides intuitive interpretations. We further constructed another network based on interaction sharing ratio of the first network. Subsequent analysis of the networks showed that some features of drugs can be well described by this kind of interaction even for the case of structurally dissimilar drugs. Conclusion Our networks in this work provide intuitive insights into interactions among drug groups rather than those among single drugs. In addition, information on these interactions can be used as a useful source to describe mechanisms and features of drugs. PMID:24555875

  12. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nieber, Karen; Kraft, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root) was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients. PMID:25093031

  13. Valerian: no evidence for clinically relevant interactions.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Olaf; Nieber, Karen; Kraft, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root) was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients. PMID:25093031

  14. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  15. Drug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure. The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio. Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with

  16. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 2)

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Phopin, Kamonrat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    To date, a number of significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by various phytochemicals. Among the most noteworthy are those involving St. John's wort and drugs metabolized by human CYP3A4 enzyme. This review article is the continued work from our previous article (Part 1) published in this journal (Wanwimolruk and Prachayasittikul, 2014[ref:133]). This article extends the scope of the review to six more herbs and updates information on herbal drug interactions. These include black cohosh, ginseng, grape seed extract, green tea, kava, saw palmetto and some important Chinese medicines are also presented. Even though there have been many studies to determine the effects of herbs and herbal medicines on the activity of CYP, most of them were in vitro and in animal studies. Therefore, the studies are limited in predicting the clinical relevance of herbal drug interactions. It appeared that the majority of the herbal medicines have no clear effects on most of the CYPs examined. For example, the existing clinical trial data imply that black cohosh, ginseng and saw palmetto are unlikely to affect the pharmacokinetics of conventional drugs metabolized by human CYPs. For grape seed extract and green tea, adverse herbal drug interactions are unlikely when they are concomitantly taken with prescription drugs that are CYP substrates. Although there were few clinical studies on potential CYP-mediated interactions produced by kava, present data suggest that kava supplements have the ability to inhibit CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 significantly. Therefore, caution should be taken when patients take kava with CYP1A2 or CYP2E1 substrate drugs as it may enhance their therapeutic and adverse effects. Despite the long use of traditional Chinese herbal medicines, little is known about the potential drug interactions with these herbs. Many popularly used Chinese medicines have been shown in vitro to significantly change the

  17. Systematic discovery of drug interaction mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chevereau, Guillaume; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Drug combinations are increasingly important in disease treatments, for combating drug resistance, and for elucidating fundamental relationships in cell physiology. When drugs are combined, their individual effects on cells may be amplified or weakened. Such drug interactions are crucial for treatment efficacy, but their underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. To uncover the causes of drug interactions, we developed a systematic approach based on precise quantification of the individual and joint effects of antibiotics on growth of genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains. We found that drug interactions between antibiotics representing the main modes of action are highly robust to genetic perturbation. This robustness is encapsulated in a general principle of bacterial growth, which enables the quantitative prediction of mutant growth rates under drug combinations. Rare violations of this principle exposed recurring cellular functions controlling drug interactions. In particular, we found that polysaccharide and ATP synthesis control multiple drug interactions with previously unexplained mechanisms, and small molecule adjuvants targeting these functions synthetically reshape drug interactions in predictable ways. These results provide a new conceptual framework for the design of multidrug combinations and suggest that there are universal mechanisms at the heart of most drug interactions. PMID:25924924

  18. Herb–drug interactions: Review and assessment of report reliability

    PubMed Central

    Fugh-Berman, Adriane; Ernst, E

    2001-01-01

    Aims The aim of this systematic review was to assess the published clinical evidence on interactions between herbal and conventional drugs. Methods Four electronic databases were searched for case reports, case series or clinical trials of such interactions. The data were extracted and validated using a scoring system for interaction probability. Results One hundred and eight cases of suspected interactions were found. 68.5% were classified as ‘unable to be evaluated’, 13% as ‘well-documented’ and 18.5% as ‘possible’ interactions. Warfarin was the most common drug (18 cases) and St John's wort the most common herb (54 cases) involved. Conclusion Herb–drug interactions undoubtedly do occur and may put individuals at risk. However our present knowledge is incomplete and more research is urgently needed. PMID:11736868

  19. The clinical pharmacology of appetite suppressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, T; Goodall, E

    1984-01-01

    One way of gaining a greater understanding of the central mechanisms underlying hunger and the regulation of feeding behaviour in humans is to examine the actions and interactions on hunger and food intake of drugs with known or presumed pharmacological modes of action. To this end we have undertaken a number of studies which fall into three main categories: the mechanisms by which amphetamine anorexia is induced; the possible role of endogenous opioids in feeding; the action of amino acids thought to be involved in the regulation of feeding. In this field the potential for cross-fertilization between basic scientists working with laboratory animals and clinical scientists working with human subjects exists. For example, the clinical pharmacologist has been able to test out hypotheses on human subjects which could only have been developed using laboratory animals. Furthermore, using human subjects it is possible to extend the field of inquiry into an exploration of the subjective dimensions of appetite and hunger.

  20. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  1. Drug interaction in the emergency service

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Cintra, Raíssa Silveira; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the occurrence of potential drug interactions in prescriptions for adult patients admitted to the Emergency Department of Hospital São Paulo. Methods: A cross-sectional and descriptive study. Its sample consisted of 200 medical prescriptions. The analysis of drug interactions was performed using the Drugs.com database, where they are classified according to severity of interaction as severe, moderate, mild and without interaction. Results: The number of drugs in prescriptions ranged from 2 to 19, and the average per prescription was 4.97 drugs. A total of 526 potential drug interactions were identified in 159 prescriptions (79.5%); in that, 109 were severe, 354 moderate, 63 mild interactions, and 41 showed no interaction. Conclusion: This study demonstrated potential drug interactions in 79.5% of prescriptions examined in the Emergency Department. Drug interactions can occur at any time when using medications and, during this working process, the nursing staff is involved in several steps. Therefore, training the nursing staff for the rational use of drugs can increase safety of care delivered to patients. PMID:24488385

  2. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 1)

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that herbal supplements or herbal medicines are now commonly used. As many patients taking prescription medications are concomitantly using herbal supplements, there is considerable risk for adverse herbal drug interactions. Such interactions can enhance the risk for an individual patient, especially with regard to drugs with a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin, cyclosporine A and digoxin. Herbal drug interactions can alter pharmacokinetic or/and pharmacodynamic properties of administered drugs. The most common pharmacokinetic interactions usually involve either the inhibition or induction of the metabolism of drugs catalyzed by the important enzymes, cytochrome P450 (CYP). The aim of the present article is to provide an updated review of clinically relevant metabolic CYP-mediated drug interactions between selected herbal supplements and prescription drugs. The commonly used herbal supplements selected include Echinacea, Ginkgo biloba, garlic, St. John's wort, goldenseal, and milk thistle. To date, several significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of CYP enzyme activity by various phytochemicals. Numerous herbal drug interactions have been reported. Although the significance of many interactions is uncertain but several interactions, especially those with St. John’s wort, may have critical clinical consequences. St. John’s wort is a source of hyperforin, an active ingredient that has a strong affinity for the pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR). As a PXR ligand, hyperforin promotes expression of CYP3A4 enzymes in the small intestine and liver. This in turn causes induction of CYP3A4 and can reduce the oral bioavailability of many drugs making them less effective. The available evidence indicates that, at commonly recommended doses, other selected herbs including Echinacea, Ginkgo biloba, garlic, goldenseal and milk thistle do not act as potent or moderate inhibitors or inducers of CYP enzymes. A good

  3. A clinician's guide to statin drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kellick, Kenneth A; Bottorff, Michael; Toth, Peter P; The National Lipid Association's Safety Task Force

    2014-01-01

    The statins are widely used worldwide to reduce risk for cardiovascular events in both the primary and secondary prevention settings. Although generally quite safe, the statins can be associated with a variety of serious side adverse effects, including myalgia, myopathy, and changes in plasma enzymes of hepatic origin. Although rare, the most serious of these is rhabdomyolysis. Several drugs can interfere with the metabolism and disposal of the statins, thereby increasing risk for adverse events. It is important that clinicians treating patients with statins be aware of the potential for drug-drug interactions between each statin and specific other drugs and take measures to prevent them. The prediction of potential drug-drug interactions derives from basic pharmacokinetic principles. Certain drug interactions are predicted by measuring the effect of interacting drugs on blood plasma concentrations of the statin. Individual patient variations resulting in part from polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes confound some of these predictions. Based on these known effects, a new classification for predicting statin drug interactions is proposed. This report discusses likely prescription and nonprescription interactions as well as potential alternatives for special populations.

  4. Adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  5. Statins Often Interact with Other Heart Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... a couple of other potential consequences of statin interactions, the AHA says. Statins may, for example, raise ... the risk of internal bleeding. Many of the interactions between statins and other heart drugs are "minor," ...

  6. 'RE:fine drugs': an interactive dashboard to access drug repurposing opportunities.

    PubMed

    Moosavinasab, Soheil; Patterson, Jeremy; Strouse, Robert; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Regan, Kelly; Payne, Philip R O; Huang, Yungui; Lin, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    The process of discovering new drugs has been extremely costly and slow in the last decades despite enormous investment in pharmaceutical research. Drug repurposing enables researchers to speed up the process of discovering other conditions that existing drugs can effectively treat, with low cost and fast FDA approval. Here, we introduce 'RE:fine Drugs', a freely available interactive website for integrated search and discovery of drug repurposing candidates from GWAS and PheWAS repurposing datasets constructed using previously reported methods in Nature Biotechnology. 'RE:fine Drugs' demonstrates the possibilities to identify and prioritize novelty of candidates for drug repurposing based on the theory of transitive Drug-Gene-Disease triads. This public website provides a starting point for research, industry, clinical and regulatory communities to accelerate the investigation and validation of new therapeutic use of old drugs.Database URL: http://drug-repurposing.nationwidechildrens.org. PMID:27189611

  7. Vaccine-Drug Interactions: Cytokines, Cytochromes, and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Perrotta, Cristiana; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to reduce the risk of vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Vaccines are often administered in patients with chronic diseases who are likely to be treated with several drugs. A growing number of clinical observations have indicated the possibility of interactions between vaccines and drugs, leading to changes in drug metabolism after vaccination. These interactions represent a significant concern because of the increasing use of vaccines in older patients who are likely to be treated with several drugs. Because of the possible implications of adverse reactions in terms of public health, several studies were performed to verify the risk posed by these interactions and to clarify the biologic mechanisms that drive these events. Of the several mechanisms proposed to be at the basis of vaccine-drug interactions, the most convincing evidence suggests a role of inflammatory cytokines on the regulation of specific cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Differences in the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of these drugs could explain these contrasting results and provide important insights to fully understand the clinical importance of these events. Further studies are required to verify whether vaccine-drug interactions may occur in other clinical settings, especially the ones for which patients are required to be vaccinated against specific diseases.

  8. New era in drug interaction evaluation: US Food and Drug Administration update on CYP enzymes, transporters, and the guidance process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiew-Mei; Strong, John M; Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S; Nallani, Srikanth; Temple, Robert; Abraham, Sophia; Habet, Sayed Al; Baweja, Raman K; Burckart, Gilbert J; Chung, Sang; Colangelo, Philip; Frucht, David; Green, Martin D; Hepp, Paul; Karnaukhova, Elena; Ko, Hon-Sum; Lee, Jang-Ik; Marroum, Patrick J; Norden, Janet M; Qiu, Wei; Rahman, Atiqur; Sobel, Solomon; Stifano, Toni; Thummel, Kenneth; Wei, Xiao-Xiong; Yasuda, Sally; Zheng, Jenny H; Zhao, Hong; Lesko, Lawrence J

    2008-06-01

    Predicting clinically significant drug interactions during drug development is a challenge for the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies. Since the publication of the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) first in vitro and in vivo drug interaction guidance documents in 1997 and 1999, researchers and clinicians have gained a better understanding of drug interactions. This knowledge has enabled the FDA and the industry to progress and begin to overcome these challenges. The FDA has continued its efforts to evaluate methodologies to study drug interactions and communicate recommendations regarding the conduct of drug interaction studies, particularly for CYP-based and transporter-based drug interactions, to the pharmaceutical industry. A drug interaction Web site was established to document the FDA's current understanding of drug interactions (http://www.fda.gov/cder/drug/drugInteractions/default.htm). This report provides an overview of the evolution of the drug interaction guidances, includes a synopsis of the steps taken by the FDA to revise the original drug interaction guidance documents, and summarizes and highlights updated sections in the current guidance document, Drug Interaction Studies-Study Design, Data Analysis, and Implications for Dosing and Labeling.

  9. Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs Updated:Oct 15,2014 ... celebrations when eating habits tend to change. Common Medication Interactions Drugs with Food and Beverages Food and drinks don’t mix ...

  10. Alcohol-medical drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bankole A; Seneviratne, Chamindi

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant use of alcohol and medications may lead to potentially serious medical conditions. Increasing prescription medication abuse in today's society necessitates a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in alcohol-medication interactions in order to help prevent adverse events. Interactions of medications with alcohol result in altered bioavailability of the medication or alcohol (pharmacokinetic interactions) or modification of the effects at receptor or ion channel sites to alter behavioral or physical outcome (pharmacodynamic interactions). The nature of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions involved in alcohol-medication interactions may differ between acute and chronic alcohol use and be influenced by race, gender, or environmental or genetic factors. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between alcohol and medications and provides examples for such interactions from replicated research studies. In conclusion, further translational research is needed to address several gaps in our current knowledge of alcohol-medication interactions, including those under various pathologic conditions.

  11. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex. PMID:16480505

  12. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  13. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  14. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms. PMID:26392756

  15. Prediction of Drug Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions in Microscale Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Christine; Shi, Julianne; Moore, Amanda; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of in vivo hepatic drug clearance using in vitro assays is important to properly estimate clinical dosing regimens. Clearance of low-turnover compounds is especially difficult to predict using short-lived suspensions of unpooled primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and functionally declining PHH monolayers. Micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 fibroblasts have been shown previously to display major liver functions for several weeks in vitro. In this study, we first characterized long-term activities of major cytochrome P450 enzymes in MPCCs created from unpooled cryopreserved PHH donors. MPCCs were then used to predict the clearance of 26 drugs that exhibit a wide range of turnover rates in vivo (0.05-19.5 ml/min per kilogram). MPCCs predicted 73, 92, and 96% of drug clearance values for all tested drugs within 2-fold, 3-fold, and 4-fold of in vivo values, respectively. There was good correlation (R(2) = 0.94, slope = 1.05) of predictions between the two PHH donors. On the other hand, suspension hepatocytes and conventional monolayers created from the same donor had significantly reduced predictive capacity (i.e., 30-50% clearance values within 4-fold of in vivo), and were not able to metabolize several drugs. Finally, we modulated drug clearance in MPCCs by inducing or inhibiting P450s. Rifampin-mediated CYP3A4 induction increased midazolam clearance by 73%, while CYP3A4 inhibition with ritonavir decreased midazolam clearance by 79%. Similarly, quinidine-mediated CYP2D6 inhibition reduced clearance of dextromethorphan and desipramine by 71 and 22%, respectively. In conclusion, MPCCs created using cryopreserved unpooled PHHs can be used for drug clearance predictions and to model drug-drug interactions. PMID:26452722

  16. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profiles of proton pump inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, Ralph-Steven; Blume, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders, often over the long term, which raises the potential for clinically significant drug interactions in patients receiving concomitant medications. These drug-drug interactions have been previously reviewed. However, the current knowledge is likely to have advanced, so a thorough review of the literature published since 2006 was conducted. This identified new studies of drug interactions that are modulated by gastric pH. These studies showed the effect of a PPI-induced increase in intragastric pH on mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics, which were characterised by a decrease in the maximum exposure and availability of mycophenolic acid, at least at early time points. Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. New data for the more recently marketed dexlansoprazole suggest it has no impact on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam, phenytoin, theophylline and warfarin. The CYP2C19-mediated interaction that seems to exist between clopidogrel and omeprazole or esomeprazole has been shown to be clinically important in research published since the 2006 review; this effect is not seen as a class effect of PPIs. Finally, data suggest that coadministration of PPIs with methotrexate may affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics, although the mechanism of interaction is not well understood. As was shown in the previous review, individual PPIs differ in their propensities to interact with other drugs and the extent to which their interaction profiles have been defined. The interaction profiles of omeprazole and pantoprazole sodium (pantoprazole-Na) have been studied most extensively. Several studies have shown that omeprazole carries a considerable potential for drug interactions because of its high affinity for CYP2C19 and moderate affinity for CYP3A4. In contrast, pantoprazole-Na appears to have

  18. Pharmacokinetic Herb-Drug Interaction between Essential Oil of Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and Acetaminophen and Caffeine: A Potential Risk for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Isidora; Petković, Stojan; Stilinović, Nebojša; Vukmirović, Saša; Mijatović, Vesna; Božin, Biljana

    2016-02-01

    Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and its essential oil (EO) have been widely used. Because there are some data about the impact of aniseed EO on drug effects, this survey aimed to assess the potential of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction between aniseed EO and acetaminophen and caffeine in mice. The chemical analysis (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) of aniseed EO has confirmed trans-anethole (87.96%) as the main component. The pharmacokinetic studies of intraperitoneally (i.p.) and orally applied acetaminophen (200 mg/kg) and caffeine (20 mg/kg) were performed in mice after 5 days of oral treatment with human equivalent dose of aniseed EO (0.3 mg/kg/day). The analysis of pharmacokinetic data showed that in the group treated by aniseed EO, the significant decrease in the peak plasma concentration of acetaminophen after oral application (p = 0.024) was revealed when compared with control group and the reduction of systemic exposure to the drug after oral application (74 ± 32% vs. 85 ± 35% in the control) was noted. The bioavailability of orally applied caffeine was also significantly decreased (p = 0.022) after the EO treatment in comparison with the control (57 ± 24% vs. 101 ± 29%). Therefore, the compromised therapeutic efficacy of acetaminophen and caffeine during the usage of aniseed EO preparations should be considered.

  19. Pharmacokinetic Herb-Drug Interaction between Essential Oil of Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and Acetaminophen and Caffeine: A Potential Risk for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Isidora; Petković, Stojan; Stilinović, Nebojša; Vukmirović, Saša; Mijatović, Vesna; Božin, Biljana

    2016-02-01

    Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and its essential oil (EO) have been widely used. Because there are some data about the impact of aniseed EO on drug effects, this survey aimed to assess the potential of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction between aniseed EO and acetaminophen and caffeine in mice. The chemical analysis (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) of aniseed EO has confirmed trans-anethole (87.96%) as the main component. The pharmacokinetic studies of intraperitoneally (i.p.) and orally applied acetaminophen (200 mg/kg) and caffeine (20 mg/kg) were performed in mice after 5 days of oral treatment with human equivalent dose of aniseed EO (0.3 mg/kg/day). The analysis of pharmacokinetic data showed that in the group treated by aniseed EO, the significant decrease in the peak plasma concentration of acetaminophen after oral application (p = 0.024) was revealed when compared with control group and the reduction of systemic exposure to the drug after oral application (74 ± 32% vs. 85 ± 35% in the control) was noted. The bioavailability of orally applied caffeine was also significantly decreased (p = 0.022) after the EO treatment in comparison with the control (57 ± 24% vs. 101 ± 29%). Therefore, the compromised therapeutic efficacy of acetaminophen and caffeine during the usage of aniseed EO preparations should be considered. PMID:26619825

  20. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  1. 76 FR 17138 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  2. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  3. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  4. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  5. 75 FR 51824 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  6. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  7. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing.

    PubMed

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  8. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system.

  9. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system. PMID:25991099

  10. Statin drug-drug interactions in a Romanian community pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    BADIU, RALUCA; BUCSA, CAMELIA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Statins are frequently prescribed for patients with dyslipidemia and have a well-established safety profile. However, when associated with interacting dugs, the risk of adverse effects, especially muscular toxicity, is increased. The objective of this study was to identify, characterize and quantify the prevalence of the potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) of statins in reimbursed prescriptions from a community pharmacy in Bucharest. Methods We analyzed the reimbursed prescriptions including statins collected during one month in a community pharmacy. The online program Medscape Drug Interaction Checker was used for checking the drug interactions and their classification based on severity: Serious – Use alternative, Significant – Monitor closely and Minor. Results 132 prescriptions pertaining to 125 patients were included in the analysis. Our study showed that 25% of the patients who were prescribed statins were exposed to pDDIs: 37 Serious and Significant interactions in 31 of the statins prescriptions. The statins involved were atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin. Conclusions Statin pDDIs have a high prevalence and patients should be monitored closely in order to prevent the development of adverse effects that result from statin interactions. PMID:27152080

  11. [Adaptive clinical study methodologies in drug development].

    PubMed

    Antal, János

    2015-11-29

    The evolution of drug development in human, clinical phase studies triggers the overview of those technologies and procedures which are labelled as adaptive clinical trials. The most relevant procedural and operational aspects will be discussed in this overview from points of view of clinico-methodological aspect.

  12. Alcohol effects on drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H K

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of ethanol with drugs and xenobiotics is complex because ethanol can affect any of the following steps; absorption, plasma protein binding, hepatic blood flow, distribution, hepatic uptake of drugs, and phase I and II hepatic metabolism. The ingestion of ethanol can lead to malabsorption of a variety of nutrients and can modify the absorption of various drugs. High concentrations of ethanol in conjunction with aspirin causes gastric mucosal damage. The principal effect of acute ethanol ingestion on drug metabolism is inhibition of microsomal drug metabolism. The synergistic effects of ethanol on central nervous system depressants can be explained by this mechanism. In contrast, chronic ethanol consumption increases mixed function oxidation and drug metabolism. The cross tolerance between ethanol and sedatives in chronic alcoholics may be due to this effect of alcohol. In addition, enhanced production of hepatotoxic products from certain drugs and xenobiotics and an increased activation of procarcinogens to carcinogens can result from this microsomal induction. The increased susceptibility to hepatotoxins and the enhanced carcinogenesis in the alcoholic may be explained by this fact. Other effects of the interaction between drugs and ethanol are the result of changes in organ susceptibility, best demonstrated for the central nervous system. Subsequently, the presence of liver disease has a great effect on drug metabolism in alcoholics.

  13. Drug interactions with the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--Part 2: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between AEDs and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2013-12-01

    Since antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed to treat various non-epilepsy-related disorders in addition to the fact that patients with epilepsy may develop concurrent disorders that will need treatment, the propensity for AEDs to interact with non-AEDs is considerable and indeed can present a difficult clinical problem. The present review details the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that have been reported to occur with the new AEDs (eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, retigabine (ezogabine), rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide) and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders. Interaction study details are described, as necessary, so as to allow the reader to take a view as to the possible clinical significance of particular interactions. Pharmacokinetic interactions relate to hepatic enzyme induction or inhibition and involved a variety of drugs including psychoactive drugs, cardioactive drugs, oral contraceptives, antituberculous agents, analgesics and antineoplastic drugs. A total of 68 pharmacokinetic interactions have been described, with lamotrigine (n = 22), topiramate (n = 18) and oxcarbazepine (n = 7) being associated with most, whilst lacosamide, pregabalin, stiripentol and vigabatrin are associated with none. Overall, only three pharmacodynamic interactions have been described and occur with oxcarbazepine, perampanel and pregabalin. PMID:23794036

  14. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database. PMID:26669717

  15. Impact of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions on gait speed in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Marcum, Zachary A.; Perera, Subashan; Newman, Anne B.; Greenspan, Susan L.; Gray, Shelly L.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gait speed decline, an early marker of functional impairment, is a sensitive predictor of adverse health outcomes in older adults. The effect of potentially inappropriate prescribing on gait speed decline is not well known. Objective To determine if potentially inappropriate drug interactions impair functional status as measured by gait speed. Methods The sample included 2,402 older adults with medication and gait speed data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study. The independent variable was the frequency of drug-disease and/or drug-drug interactions at baseline and three additional years. The main outcome was a clinically meaningful gait speed decline ≥ 0.1 m/s the year following drug interaction assessment. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariate generalized estimating equations for both the overall sample and a sample stratified by gait speed at time of drug interaction assessment. Results The prevalence of drug-disease and drug-drug interactions ranged from 7.6–9.3% and 10.5–12.3%, respectively, with few participants (3.8–5.7%) having multiple drug interactions. At least 22% of participants had a gait speed decline of ≥ 0.1 m/s annually. Drug interactions were not significantly associated with gait speed decline overall or in the stratified sample of fast walkers. There was some evidence, however, that drug interactions increased the risk of gait speed decline among those participants with slower gait speeds, though p values did not reach statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence intervals 0.96–1.56, p=0.11). Moreover, a marginally significant dose-response relationship was seen with multiple drug interactions and gait speed decline (adjusted odds ratio 1.40; 95% confidence intervals 0.95–2.04, p=0.08). Conclusions Drug interactions may increase the likelihood of gait speed decline among older adults with evidence of preexisting debility. Future studies

  16. Similarity-based modeling in large-scale prediction of drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Friedman, Carol; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of adverse drug effects and a public health concern, as they increase hospital care expenses and reduce patients’ quality of life. DDI detection is, therefore, an important objective in patient safety, one whose pursuit affects drug development and pharmacovigilance. In this article, we describe a protocol applicable on a large scale to predict novel DDIs based on similarity of drug interaction candidates to drugs involved in established DDIs. the method integrates a reference standard database of known DDIs with drug similarity information extracted from different sources, such as 2D and 3D molecular structure, interaction profile, target and side-effect similarities. the method is interpretable in that it generates drug interaction candidates that are traceable to pharmacological or clinical effects. We describe a protocol with applications in patient safety and preclinical toxicity screening. the time frame to implement this protocol is 5–7 h, with additional time potentially necessary, depending on the complexity of the reference standard DDI database and the similarity measures implemented. PMID:25122524

  17. Similarity-based modeling in large-scale prediction of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Friedman, Carol; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2014-09-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of adverse drug effects and a public health concern, as they increase hospital care expenses and reduce patients' quality of life. DDI detection is, therefore, an important objective in patient safety, one whose pursuit affects drug development and pharmacovigilance. In this article, we describe a protocol applicable on a large scale to predict novel DDIs based on similarity of drug interaction candidates to drugs involved in established DDIs. The method integrates a reference standard database of known DDIs with drug similarity information extracted from different sources, such as 2D and 3D molecular structure, interaction profile, target and side-effect similarities. The method is interpretable in that it generates drug interaction candidates that are traceable to pharmacological or clinical effects. We describe a protocol with applications in patient safety and preclinical toxicity screening. The time frame to implement this protocol is 5-7 h, with additional time potentially necessary, depending on the complexity of the reference standard DDI database and the similarity measures implemented. PMID:25122524

  18. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models. PMID:26885640

  19. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models.

  20. Drug Interactions with New and Investigational Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin C.; Paul, Sunita; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 individual and fixed-dose combinations of antiretrovirals are approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, owing to the ongoing limitations of drug resistance and adverse effects, new treatment options are still required. A number of promising new agents in existing or new drug classes are in development or have recently been approved by the US FDA. Since these agents will be used in combination with other new and existing antiretrovirals, understanding the potential for drug interactions between these compounds is critical to their appropriate use. This article summarizes the drug interaction potential of new and investigational protease inhibitors (darunavir), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (etravirine and rilpivirine), chemokine receptor antagonists (maraviroc, vicriviroc and INCB 9471), integrase inhibitors (raltegravir and elvitegravir) and maturation inhibitors (bevirimat). PMID:19492868

  1. Nanocrystal technology, drug delivery and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Junghanns, Jens-Uwe A H; Müller, Rainer H

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology will affect our lives tremendously over the next decade in very different fields, including medicine and pharmacy. Transfer of materials into the nanodimension changes their physical properties which were used in pharmaceutics to develop a new innovative formulation principle for poorly soluble drugs: the drug nanocrystals. The drug nanocrystals do not belong to the future; the first products are already on the market. The industrially relevant production technologies, pearl milling and high pressure homogenization, are reviewed. The physics behind the drug nanocrystals and changes of their physical properties are discussed. The marketed products are presented and the special physical effects of nanocrystals explained which are utilized in each market product. Examples of products in the development pipelines (clinical phases) are presented and the benefits for in vivo administration of drug nanocrystals are summarized in an overview. PMID:18990939

  2. Clinical implications of resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Vella, S

    1997-06-01

    New virological concepts are emerging and results from trials using potent combinations have demonstrated that drug resistance in AIDS therapy can be delayed, if not completely overcome, by appropriate treatment strategies. The definition and measures of resistance are explained, including the general mechanisms of resistance. Resistance patterns with nucleoside analogues, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors are examined, followed by a discussion of the clinical implications. It is suggested that, based on HIV-1 replication in vivo, early and aggressive antiretroviral therapy is needed to minimize the negative consequences of its replication. Recommended clinical guidelines for avoiding drug resistance are listed. PMID:11364354

  3. Validation of a transparent decision model to rate drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple databases provide ratings of drug-drug interactions. The ratings are often based on different criteria and lack background information on the decision making process. User acceptance of rating systems could be improved by providing a transparent decision path for each category. Methods We rated 200 randomly selected potential drug-drug interactions by a transparent decision model developed by our team. The cases were generated from ward round observations and physicians’ queries from an outpatient setting. We compared our ratings to those assigned by a senior clinical pharmacologist and by a standard interaction database, and thus validated the model. Results The decision model rated consistently with the standard database and the pharmacologist in 94 and 156 cases, respectively. In two cases the model decision required correction. Following removal of systematic model construction differences, the DM was fully consistent with other rating systems. Conclusion The decision model reproducibly rates interactions and elucidates systematic differences. We propose to supply validated decision paths alongside the interaction rating to improve comprehensibility and to enable physicians to interpret the ratings in a clinical context. PMID:22950884

  4. Unifying drug safety and clinical databases.

    PubMed

    Burnstead, Barry; Furlan, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and drugs safety organisations run their operation independently and use separate databases designed to comply with different data standards. This separation is neither efficient nor effective since investigators need to report serious adverse events both to the clinical and drug safety departments, causing the respective databases to contain partially overlapping data sets containing common elements that need to be reconciled. Electronic data capture provides the opportunity to avoid duplicate storage and obviate reconciliation. It also introduces the risk of non-compliance due to late submission of unexpected serious adverse reactions to competent authorities. This raises the potential for a clinical department to receive a case that the drug safety department is unaware of. However, the most significant inefficiency probably lies in the preparation of aggregate reports and regulatory documents that need to be prepared using data originating from both databases. In a resource-constrained world, unnecessary activities and associated costs are unwelcome, particularly when they are avoidable. The Clinical Data Interchange Consortium (CDISC) has set the standards for clinical trial data, while the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) dictates drug safety ones. CDISC is expanding its Clinical Data Acquisition Standards Harmonisation (CDASH) model to capture adverse event data associated with ICH E2B. All common data items have two labels that have been mapped. This exercise is showing that there is no scientific justification for data segregation. The differences between these two standards can be attributed to conventions or arise from new technology that renders unnecessary the keying in of certain context information (dates, times and recorder ID). Once this mapping is completed then a common data acquisition process will become feasible. This is the prerequisite to ultimately unifying the two databases and to implementing more efficient

  5. Drug–drug interactions with imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Récoché, Isabelle; Rousseau, Vanessa; Bourrel, Robert; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Chebane, Leila; Despas, Fabien; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many patients treated with imatinib, used in cancer treatment, are using several other drugs that could interact with imatinib. Our aim was to study all the drug–drug interactions (DDIs) observed in patients treated with imatinib. We performed 2 observational studies, between the 1st January 2012 and the 31st August 2015 in the Midi-Pyrénées area (South Western France), using the French health insurance reimbursement database and then the French Pharmacovigilance Database (FPVD). A total of 544 patients received at least 1 reimbursement for imatinib. Among them, 486 (89.3%) had at least 1 drug that could potentially interact with imatinib. Paracetamol was the most frequent drug involved (77.4%). Proton pump inhibitors, dexamethasone and levothyroxine, were found in >10% of patients. In the FPVD, among a total of 25 reports of ADRs with imatinib recorded in the Midi-Pyrénées area, 10 (40%) had potential DDIs with imatinib. Imatinib was most frequently prescribed by hospital physicians and drugs interacting with imatinib, by general practitioners. Our study showed that at least 40% of the patients treated with imatinib were at risk of DDIs and that all prescribers must be cautious with DDIs in patients treated with imatinib. During imatinib treatment, we particularly recommend to limit the dose of paracetamol at 1300 mg per day, to avoid the use of dexamethasone, and to double the dose of levothyroxine. PMID:27749579

  6. [Potential interactions between drugs and dietary supplements].

    PubMed

    Farghali, Hassan; Kameníková, Ludmila; Hodis, Jiří; Kutinová Canová, Nikolina

    2014-01-01

    Purified active plant constituents were isolated and assessed for their pharmacological activities that constitute a basis of modern drug development. The situation with herbal supplements is different because the extract or dried herb or mixture of herbs contains several substances beside the beneficial one(s) that might produce drug interaction with the conventional medicine(s). Most patients are misinformed and believe that anything "natural" must be safe. This article is focusing on plant-based substances referred as dietary supplements (DS). Examples of reported drug interactions and contraindications associated with DS with two case studies are presented. As supplements are typically not prescribed, many doctors seem to have no interest in drug-DS interactions since a typical medical history of the patients does not include any questions about self-prescribed remedies of this nature. Rather, patients are left alone when they are tempted to try this or that DS and tend to rely on advice from friends, or on material they read on internet. A better quality control, compliance, public awareness and healthcare professionals vigilance for potential interactions are needed. It is of utmost importance to appreciate the impact of supplements on different stages of pharmacokinetics, especially on drug absorption and metabolism.

  7. Drug-drug Interaction Discovery Using Abstraction Networks for “National Drug File – Reference Terminology” Chemical Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Christopher; Zheng, Ling; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Zakharchenko, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The National Drug File – Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is a large and complex drug terminology. NDF-RT provides important information about clinical drugs, e.g., their chemical ingredients, mechanisms of action, dosage form and physiological effects. Within NDF-RT such information is represented using tens of thousands of roles. It is difficult to comprehend large, complex terminologies like NDF-RT. In previous studies, we introduced abstraction networks to summarize the content and structure of terminologies. In this paper, we introduce the Ingredient Abstraction Network to summarize NDF-RT’s Chemical Ingredients and their associated drugs. Additionally, we introduce the Aggregate Ingredient Abstraction Network, for controlling the granularity of summarization provided by the Ingredient Abstraction Network. The Ingredient Abstraction Network is used to support the discovery of new candidate drug-drug interactions (DDIs) not appearing in First Databank, Inc.’s DDI knowledgebase. PMID:26958234

  8. [Drug interactions in the elderly with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Hendrychová, T; Vlček, J

    2012-04-01

    The elderly with diabetes mellitus are usually treated with many types of drugs. This, together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes connected with aging, can lead to an occurrence of drug interactions. They are often manifested as hypoglycaemia, decompensation of diabetes or an increase of frequency of adverse effects of drugs used together. It is important to pay an attention especially to hypoglycaemia, which brings many risks in the elderly. An article is focused on probable drug interactions when combination of various antidiabetics, antidiabetics with antihypertensives or hypolipidemics is used. Despite ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers can influence the compensation of diabetics, their use is not contraindicated in these patients, because of their huge benefit in the prevention of cardiovascular events. An article brings an overview of antidiabetics metabolised by means of the system of cytochrome P 450 and resulting drug interactions with inhibitors and inductors of these enzymes. These drug interactions are not usually important in clinical practice and it is possible to prevent them with careful monitoring of glycaemia, instruction of patients and alternatively modification of the doses of hypoglycaemic medication after a termination of the treatment of responsible inductor or inhibitor. PMID:22559804

  9. Interaction of antiarrhythmic drugs with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Sánchez, I; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1994-11-01

    Several hypotheses link the molecular mechanism of action of the antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) that belong to class I to nonspecific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of the sodium channels in the membrane of the myocard. The interactions of asocainol (ASOC), procainamide (PROC) and quinidine (QUIN) with: (a) multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), in both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic medium, and (b) DMPC vesicles, were studied, respectively, by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the three AAD interacted with the lipid bilayers. However, the extension of these interactions depended on the nature and concentration of the lipids and AAD as well as on the medium where the interactions were performed. The different capacity of ASOC and PROC to perturb the bilayer structures, mainly that of DMPC, indicated that the interactions were strongly dependent on the lipophilicity of these drugs. The fact that QUIN did not completely interact in accordance to its lipophilicity suggested that other factors also play a role in these interactions. It is concluded that it may be valid the suggested molecular mechanisms of action of class I AAD involving their interaction with the membrane phospholipids. PMID:7947909

  10. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  11. The New Antiepileptic Drugs: Their Neuropharmacology and Clinical Indications

    PubMed Central

    HANAYA, Ryosuke; ARITA, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    The administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the first treatment of epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases. Therapeutic guidelines include newer AEDs as front-line drugs; monotherapy with new AEDs is delivered in Japan. While about 70% of patients obtain good seizure control by taking one to three AEDs, about 60% experience adverse effects and 33% have to change drugs. Compared to traditional AEDs, the prolonged administration of new AEDs elicits fewer adverse effects and fewer drug interactions and their teratogenicity may be lower. These characteristics increase drug compliance and allow combination therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, although the antiepileptic effects of the new AEDs are not greater than of traditional AEDs. Comorbidities are not rare in epileptics; many adult patients present with stroke and brain tumors. In stroke patients requiring risk control and in chemotherapy-treated brain tumor patients, their fewer drug interactions render the new AEDs advantageous. Also, new AEDs offer favorable side benefits for concurrent diseases and conditions. Patients with stroke and traumatic brain injury often present with psychiatric/behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairment and some new AEDs alleviate such symptoms. This review presents an outline of the new AEDs used to treat adult patients based on the pharmacological activity of the drugs and discusses possible clinical indications from the perspective of underlying causative diseases and comorbidities. PMID:26935782

  12. The New Antiepileptic Drugs: Their Neuropharmacology and Clinical Indications.

    PubMed

    Hanaya, Ryosuke; Arita, Kazunori

    2016-05-15

    The administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the first treatment of epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases. Therapeutic guidelines include newer AEDs as front-line drugs; monotherapy with new AEDs is delivered in Japan. While about 70% of patients obtain good seizure control by taking one to three AEDs, about 60% experience adverse effects and 33% have to change drugs. Compared to traditional AEDs, the prolonged administration of new AEDs elicits fewer adverse effects and fewer drug interactions and their teratogenicity may be lower. These characteristics increase drug compliance and allow combination therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, although the antiepileptic effects of the new AEDs are not greater than of traditional AEDs. Comorbidities are not rare in epileptics; many adult patients present with stroke and brain tumors. In stroke patients requiring risk control and in chemotherapy-treated brain tumor patients, their fewer drug interactions render the new AEDs advantageous. Also, new AEDs offer favorable side benefits for concurrent diseases and conditions. Patients with stroke and traumatic brain injury often present with psychiatric/behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairment and some new AEDs alleviate such symptoms. This review presents an outline of the new AEDs used to treat adult patients based on the pharmacological activity of the drugs and discusses possible clinical indications from the perspective of underlying causative diseases and comorbidities.

  13. How Older People Can Head Off Dangerous Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Older People Can Head Off Dangerous Drug Interactions Taking multiple medications and supplements could cause serious ... especially when you travel. Learn about possible drug interactions and side effects. Some drugs affect how others ...

  14. Interaction between clinic and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elina; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Lassila, Riitta

    2011-01-01

    Clinicians order laboratory tests to diagnose, monitor, and screen for diseases, to evaluate or confirm previously abnormal results and to develop prognoses. The rigorous quality assurance programs, large automated processes and economic constraints may induce direct challenges to tailored diagnosis. Clinicians will have to gain an understanding of the underlying principles of laboratory technologies without losing their ability to practice 'the art of medicine' at their primary focus - the patient. Specialized laboratory services and expertise play especially important roles in coagulation hematology. Assays are technically demanding and often based on functional properties of proteins, producing results that are far more than plain numbers. Interpretation of laboratory data poses many challenges, such as pre-analytical and patient-dependent factors, of which the laboratory is often not well informed, but which the clinicians are required to take into account. The laboratory scientist needs to understand the multiple clinical circumstances causing variance or interference in the laboratory results. Direct interaction between clinic and laboratory is needed. When laboratory-specific issues are uncertain to the clinician, the laboratory scientist should become the clinician's primary consultant. The better the education and knowledge of both directions, the better the outcome. Regular multidisciplinary rounds by the clinicians and the laboratory scientists are of great benefit. This interaction at its best fosters research and development by identifying new mechanisms and tools. PMID:21193109

  15. Drug interactions in African herbal remedies.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Werner; Steenkamp, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Herbal usage remains popular as an alternative or complementary form of treatment, especially in Africa. However, the misconception that herbal remedies are safe due to their "natural" origins jeopardizes human safety, as many different interactions can occur with concomitant use with other pharmaceuticals on top of potential inherent toxicity. Cytochrome P450 enzymes are highly polymorphic, and pose a problem for pharmaceutical drug tailoring to meet an individual's specific metabolic activity. The influence of herbal remedies further complicates this. The plants included in this review have been mainly researched for determining their effect on cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein drug transporters. Usage of herbal remedies, such as Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Sutherlandia frutescens and Harpagophytum procumbensis popular in Africa. The literature suggests that there is a potential for drug-herb interactions, which could occur through alterations in metabolism and transportation of drugs. Research has primarily been conducted in vitro, whereas in vivo data are lacking. Research concerning the effect of African herbals on drug metabolism should also be approached, as specific plants are especially popular in conjunction with certain treatments. Although these interactions can be beneficial, the harm they pose is just as great. PMID:21756221

  16. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. This review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  17. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 1: drugs interacting with receptors.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 18 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease-modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  18. Prescribing clozapine and rifampicin: clinical impact of their interaction

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The predictable pharmacokinetic drug interaction between clozapine and rifampicin is listed in most standard reference texts but little detail is given or emphasis on its clinical significance. The interaction is based on theoretical knowledge of both drugs; to date just two case reports have been published. This article describes a third case demonstrating the significance of this interaction. This was potentially devastating for the patient who required an extended psychiatric admission. The enzyme induction was so potent that the dose of clozapine had to be increased approximately sixfold. Careful management of this significant interaction is essential for effective patient care. PMID:27280037

  19. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models. PMID:26199424

  20. Clinical methodology for testing of anxiolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    2000-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria and classification are changing. It is no longer acceptable to include patients with a general diagnosis of any anxiety, or neurotic anxiety. Regardless of the reference system used, DSM IV or ICD 10, anxiety disorders are now detailed in separate entities. General anxiety disorder, GAD, which is pivotal for the evaluation of new products, can only be claimed after the elimination of all the others, and is relatively rare. The inclusion of such outpatients is further complicated, as comorbidity is frequently associated with GAD--alcoholism, major depression, dysthymia, personality disorders, somatic disease likely to interfere with patient evaluation--and leads to exclusions, and also because the requested duration for the syndrome, prior to inclusion, is six months, which means six months without psychotropic drugs, including excessive alcohol consumption. As to patient evaluation, the reference scale remains the HAM-A. It should show a score above 20 at baseline. It has been designed to assess the level of anxiety of patients presenting with the diagnosis of anxiety, but not the diagnosis of GAD, and, clearly, in relation to the expected results obtained with BZD, which are still the standard reference drugs. The same is true for the other investigator scales and self-rating scales. Moreover, the criteria defining clinical improvement are still discussed. More generally, clinical testing in comparison with placebo and reference drugs is particularly important for anxiolytic drugs. The optimal dose range should be investigated in phase I, evidence of sedative or disinhibiting effects, and in phase II, defining the minimal active dose. Longer duration of treatment should be scrutinized in phase III, in order to check on long-term efficacy, recurrences and relapses. The effects of drug withdrawal should also be studied: withdrawal syndrome, rebound, recurrence, dependence. It currently looks difficult to market new anxiolytic drugs, and clinical

  1. Evaluation of a drug-drug interaction: fax alert intervention program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians often encounter information about drug-drug interactions (DDIs) during clinical practice. This information is found within product information (hardcopy and electronic) and various electronic systems. Prescribers may receive medication-related communications in practice that are distributed by facsimile (fax), mail, or telephone from pharmacies and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs). The purpose of this study was to determine if near-real time fax alerts for potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) would influence prescribing. Methods A prospective study, in cooperation with a pharmacy benefit manager (PBM), was conducted targeting 18 clinically important PDDIs. Fax alerts included an individualized letter to the prescriber with a list of the interacting drugs, PDDI evidence summaries with citations, and recommended clinical management strategies. Among the 18 PDDIs, 13 PDDIs could be assessed for prescription therapy changes using pharmacy claims data. A prospective cohort design was used to evaluate changes in prescription dispensing 90-days following a PDDI fax alert. Results A total of 8,075 fax alerts were sent to prescribers and there were 4,712 alerts for the 13 PDDIs that could be assessed for change using pharmacy claims data. There were 2,019 patients (interventions) for which fax alerts were sent to their prescribers who were matched with a control group consisting of patients with the same PDDIs but for whom no fax alert was sent. Overall, this study found 154 (7.6%) of patients in the fax alert group compared to 132 (6.5%) in the control group had changes in therapy (p = 0.177). Conclusions This fax alert intervention program observed no statistically significant differences in prescribing with a fax alert compared to the control group. If PBMs chose to send individualized, evidence-based information to clinicians regarding drug-drug interactions, this study suggests it may not be an effective intervention to mitigate harm. PMID

  2. Clinical implications of drug abuse epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Schulden, Jeffrey D; Lopez, Marsha F; Compton, Wilson M

    2012-06-01

    Research on the epidemiology of illicit drug use disorders provides continued critical insights into the distribution and determinants of drug use and drug use disorders in the United States. This research serves as a foundation for understanding the etiology of these disorders, helping to disentangle the complex interrelationship of developmental, genetic, and environmental risk and protective factors. Building on an understanding of this research in substance abuse epidemiology, it is important for clinicians to understand the unique trends in drug use in the overall communities that they serve and the unique risk factors for given individuals. The generally high prevalence of substance use disorders, along with their high comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders and with the HIV epidemic, make prevention, evaluation, and referral for treatment for drug abuse an important part of routine clinical practice in a range of clinical settings, including primary care, psychiatric, and emergency department settings. Ongoing efforts to ensure insurance coverage parity for the treatment of mental health and substance use disorders offer the promise of continued improvements in the integration and availability of such services in the broader US health care system.

  3. Drug Interactions of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, John Leonard; Howes, Laurence Guy

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, new direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been introduced into clinical practice that specifically inhibit either factor Ia or Xa. These drugs have, to a large extent, replaced warfarin for the treatment of venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. They have potential advantages over warfarin in providing more stable anticoagulation and the lack of a need for regular venesection to monitor activity. They also have the promise of less drug and food interactions. All of these drugs are substrates for the permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) excretion system, and several are metabolised, in part, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. This current article assesses the interactions that do or may occur with the DOACs, particularly with respect to the P-gp and CYP3A4 systems. PMID:27435452

  4. Noncovalent interaction-assisted polymeric micelles for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jianxun; Chen, Linghui; Xiao, Chunsheng; Chen, Li; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-10-01

    Polymeric micelles are one of the most promising nanovehicles for drug delivery. In addition to amphiphilicity, various individual or synergistic noncovalent interplays including strong hydrophobic, electrostatic, host-guest, hydrogen bonding, stereocomplex and coordination interactions have been recently employed to improve the physical stability of micelles, and even provide them with certain intelligences or bioactivities. Through the ingenious designs and precise preparations, many noncovalent-mediated micelles display great prospects in the realm of controlled drug delivery, and certain species have been promoted to clinical trials. The current review presents the diverse noncovalent interactions that are applied to enhance polymeric micelles as drug nanocarriers, and preliminarily discusses the future directions and perspectives of this field.

  5. Pharmacogenomics in clinical practice and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Andrew R; Topol, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of responses to drugs, including clopidogrel, pegylated-interferon and carbamazepine, have led to the identification of specific patient subgroups that benefit from therapy. However, the identification and replication of common sequence variants that are associated with either efficacy or safety for most prescription medications at odds ratios (ORs) >3.0 (equivalent to >300% increased efficacy or safety) has yet to be translated to clinical practice. Although some of the studies have been completed, the results have not been incorporated into therapy, and a large number of commonly used medications have not been subject to proper pharmacogenomic analysis. Adoption of GWAS, exome or whole genome sequencing by drug development and treatment programs is the most striking near-term opportunity for improving the drug candidate pipeline and boosting the efficacy of medications already in use. PMID:23138311

  6. [Clinical practice guideline. Drug prescription in elderly].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Valdivia-Ibarra, Francisco Javier; Hernández-Manzano, Mario; Medina-Beltrán, Gustavo Rodrigo; Cordero-Guillén, Miguel Angel; Baca-Zúñiga, José; Cruz-Avelar, Agles; Aguilar-Salas, Ismael; Avalos-Mejía, Annia Marisol

    2013-01-01

    The process of prescribing a medication is complex and includes: deciding whether it is indicated, choosing the best option, determining the dose and the appropriate management scheme to the physiological condition of the patient, and monitoring effectiveness and toxicity. We have to inform patients about the expected side effects and indications for requesting a consultation. Specific clinical questions were designed based on the acronym PICOST. The search was made in the specific websites of clinical practice guidelines, was limited to the population of older adults, in English or Spanish. We used 10 related clinical practice guidelines, eight systematic reviews and five meta-analyses. Finally, we made a search of original articles or clinical reviews for specific topics. The development and validation of clinical practice guidelines for "rational drug prescriptions in the elderly" is intended to promote an improvement in the quality of prescription through the prevention and detection of inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and, as a result of this, a decrease in the adverse events by drugs, deterioration of health of patients and expenditure of resources.

  7. A pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction study of venlafaxine and indinavir.

    PubMed

    Levin, G M; Nelson, L A; DeVane, C L; Preston, S L; Eisele, G; Carson, S W

    2001-01-01

    Depression is a common occurrence in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. Complications in treating depressed HIV-infected individuals include the use of multiple medications, additive side effects, and potentially significant drug-drug interactions. Based on the pharmacologic characteristics of venlafaxine and indinavir, we hypothesized that significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions would not occur when these drugs where taken concurrently. Nine healthy adult subjects were given a single 800 mg oral dose of indinavir and serial blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma drug concentrations. Over the next 9 days, venlafaxine was administered at a dosage of 50 mg every 8 hours following a brief titration. A venlafaxine trough plasma concentration and serial concentrations following venlafaxine administration were obtained on day 10. On day 11, venlafaxine and indinavir were administered together and serial blood sampling was repeated. Indinavir had no effect on venlafaxine plasma concentrations but resulted in a 7% decrease in plasma concentrations of O-desmethyl-venlafaxine (ODV)(P = 0.028). This effect is unlikely to be clinically significant. Venlafaxine coadministration resulted in a 28% decrease in the area under the concentration time curve (AUC) of plasma indinavir (P = 0.016) and a 36% decrease in its maximum plasma concentration (Cmax; P = 0.038). As the plasma concentration of protease inhibitors is a critical factor in maintaining efficacy and minimizing the potential for viral resistance, the decrease in both AUC and Cmax of indinavir from coadministration of venlafaxine is of concern. The clinical significance of these results obtained from a small number of healthy volunteers is unknown. Further studies are needed to substantiate or refute this apparent drug-drug interaction. Until such time, venlafaxine should be used cautiously in patients receiving indinavir.

  8. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%. PMID:26941831

  9. Text Mining Driven Drug-Drug Interaction Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Su; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Identifying drug-drug interactions is an important and challenging problem in computational biology and healthcare research. There are accurate, structured but limited domain knowledge and noisy, unstructured but abundant textual information available for building predictive models. The difficulty lies in mining the true patterns embedded in text data and developing efficient and effective ways to combine heterogenous types of information. We demonstrate a novel approach of leveraging augmented text-mining features to build a logistic regression model with improved prediction performance (in terms of discrimination and calibration). Our model based on synthesized features significantly outperforms the model trained with only structured features (AUC: 96% vs. 91%, Sensitivity: 90% vs. 82% and Specificity: 88% vs. 81%). Along with the quantitative results, we also show learned “latent topics”, an intermediary result of our text mining module, and discuss their implications. PMID:25131635

  10. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  12. Alcohol and cocaine. Clinical and pharmacological interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, D A

    1992-01-01

    Both clinical experience and epidemiological studies in community and specialized (e.g., treatment) populations indicate that the prevalence of co-use of alcohol and cocaine, and the comorbidity of alcoholism and cocaine addiction, are greater than would be expected from the chance occurrence of two independent conditions. Alcohol and cocaine have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may account for some of this co-use. While their reinforcing properties have neuropharmacological and behavioral differences, a unified theory of reinforcement by alcohol and cocaine has been proposed, involving dopamine activity in the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens circuit. Regardless of their pharmacology, the prevalent co-use of alcohol and cocaine has important implications for drug abuse treatment and indicates the need for future research on this topic.

  13. Evaluation and Quantitative Prediction of Renal Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Varma, Manthena V

    2016-07-01

    With numerous drugs cleared renally, inhibition of uptake transporters localized on the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells, eg, organic anion transporters (OATs) and organic cation transporters (OCTs), may lead to clinically meaningful drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Additionally, clinical evidence for the possible involvement of efflux transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1/2-K (MATE1/2-K), in the renal DDIs is emerging. Herein, we review recent progress regarding mechanistic understanding of transporter-mediated renal DDIs as well as the quantitative predictability of renal DDIs using static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. Generally, clinical DDI data suggest that the magnitude of plasma exposure changes attributable to renal DDIs is less than 2-fold, unlike the DDIs associated with inhibition of cytochrome P-450s and/or hepatic uptake transporters. It is concluded that although there is a need for risk assessment early in drug development, current available data imply that safety concerns related to the renal DDIs are generally low. Nevertheless, consideration must be given to the therapeutic index of the victim drug and potential risk in a specific patient population (eg, renal impairment). Finally, in vitro transporter data and clinical pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from the first-in-human studies have proven useful in support of quantitative prediction of DDIs associated with inhibition of renal secretory transporters, OATs or OCTs. PMID:27385169

  14. Impact of genetic polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions on clopidogrel and prasugrel response variability.

    PubMed

    Ancrenaz, V; Daali, Y; Fontana, P; Besson, M; Samer, C; Dayer, P; Desmeules, J

    2010-10-01

    Thienopyridine antiaggregating platelet agents (clopidogrel and prasugrel) act as irreversible P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. They are used with aspirin to prevent thrombotic complications after an acute coronary syndrome or percutaneous coronary intervention. A large interindividual variability in response to clopidogrel and to a lesser extent to prasugrel is observed and may be related to their metabolism. Clopidogrel and prasugrel are indeed prodrugs converted into their respective active metabolites by several cytochromes P450 (CYPs). Besides clopidogrel inactivation (85%) by esterases to the carboxylic acid, clopidogrel is metabolized by CYPs to 2-oxo-clopidogrel (15%) and further metabolized to an unstable but potent platelet-aggregating inhibitor. Prasugrel is more potent than clopidogrel with a better bioavailability and lower pharmacodynamic variability. Prasugrel is completely converted by esterases to an intermediate oxo-metabolite (R-95913) further bioactivated by CYPs. Numerous clinical studies have shown the influence of CYP2C19 polymorphism on clopidogrel antiplatelet activity. Moreover, unwanted drug-drug pharmacokinetic interactions influencing CYP2C19 activity and clopidogrel bioactivation such as with proton pump inhibitors remain a matter of intense controversy. Several studies have also demonstrated that CYP3A4/5 and CYP1A2 are important in clopidogrel bioactivation and should also be considered as potential targets for unwanted drug-drug interactions. Prasugrel bioactivation is mainly related to CYP3A4 and 2B6 activity and therefore the question of the effect of drug-drug interaction on its activity is open. The purpose of this review is to critically examine the current literature evaluating the influence of genetic and environmental factors such as unwanted drug-drug interaction affecting clopidogrel and prasugrel antiplatelet activity. PMID:20942779

  15. Drug interactions in dermatology: what the dermatologist should know.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Chattopadhyay, Chandan

    2013-07-01

    A drug interaction is a process by which a drug or any other substance interacts with another drug and affects its activity by increasing or decreasing its effect, causing a side effect or producing a new effect unrelated to the effect of either. Interactions may be of various types-drug-drug interactions, drug-food interactions, drug-medical condition interactions, or drug-herb interactions. Interactions may occur by single or multiple mechanisms. They may occur in vivo or in vitro (pharmaceutical reactions). In vivo interactions may be further subdivided into pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic reactions. Topical drug interactions which may be agonistic or antagonistic may occur between two drugs applied topically or between a topical and a systemic drug. Topical drug-food interaction (for example, grape fruit juice and cyclosporine) and drug-disease interactions (for example, topical corticosteroid and aloe vera) may also occur. It is important for the dermatologist to be aware of such interactions to avoid complications of therapy in day-to-day practice.

  16. Detection of Drug-Drug Interactions by Modeling Interaction Profile Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) constitute an important problem in postmarketing pharmacovigilance and in the development of new drugs. The effectiveness or toxicity of a medication could be affected by the co-administration of other drugs that share pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. For this reason, a great effort is being made to develop new methodologies to detect and assess DDIs. In this article, we present a novel method based on drug interaction profile fingerprints (IPFs) with successful application to DDI detection. IPFs were generated based on the DrugBank database, which provided 9,454 well-established DDIs as a primary source of interaction data. The model uses IPFs to measure the similarity of pairs of drugs and generates new putative DDIs from the non-intersecting interactions of a pair. We described as part of our analysis the pharmacological and biological effects associated with the putative interactions; for example, the interaction between haloperidol and dicyclomine can cause increased risk of psychosis and tardive dyskinesia. First, we evaluated the method through hold-out validation and then by using four independent test sets that did not overlap with DrugBank. Precision for the test sets ranged from 0.4–0.5 with more than two fold enrichment factor enhancement. In conclusion, we demonstrated the usefulness of the method in pharmacovigilance as a DDI predictor, and created a dataset of potential DDIs, highlighting the etiology or pharmacological effect of the DDI, and providing an exploratory tool to facilitate decision support in DDI detection and patient safety. PMID:23520498

  17. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated With Myopathy: A Translational Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Quinney, S K; Wang, Z; Zhang, P; Duke, J; Desta, Z; Elmendorf, J S; Flockhart, D A; Li, L

    2015-09-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00), and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System.

  18. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  19. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  20. Inferring Cuisine - Drug Interactions Using the Linked Data Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovik, Milos; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Trajanov, Dimitar; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2015-01-01

    Food - drug interactions are well studied, however much less is known about cuisine - drug interactions. Non-native cuisines are becoming increasingly more popular as they are available in (almost) all regions in the world. Here we address the problem of how known negative food - drug interactions are spread in different cuisines. We show that different drug categories have different distribution of the negative effects in different parts of the world. The effects certain ingredients have on different drug categories and in different cuisines are also analyzed. This analysis is aimed towards stressing out the importance of cuisine - drug interactions for patients which are being administered drugs with known negative food interactions. A patient being under a treatment with one such drug should be advised not only about the possible negative food - drug interactions, but also about the cuisines that could be avoided from the patient's diet. PMID:25792182

  1. Modification of K+ channel–drug interactions by ancillary subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L

    2008-01-01

    Reconciling ion channel α-subunit expression with native ionic currents and their pharmacological sensitivity in target organs has proved difficult. In native tissue, many K+ channel α-subunits co-assemble with ancillary subunits, which can profoundly affect physiological parameters including gating kinetics and pharmacological interactions. In this review, we examine the link between voltage-gated potassium ion channel pharmacology and the biophysics of ancillary subunits. We propose that ancillary subunits can modify the interaction between pore blockers and ion channels by three distinct mechanisms: changes in (1) binding site accessibility; (2) orientation of pore-lining residues; (3) the ability of the channel to undergo post-binding conformational changes. Each of these subunit-induced changes has implications for gating, drug affinity and use dependence of their respective channel complexes. A single subunit may modulate its associated α-subunit by more than one of these mechanisms. Voltage-gated potassium channels are the site of action of many therapeutic drugs. In addition, potassium channels interact with drugs whose primary target is another channel, e.g. the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, the sodium channel blocker quinidine, etc. Even when K+ channel block is the intended mode of action, block of related channels in non-target organs, e.g. the heart, can result in major and potentially lethal side-effects. Understanding factors that determine specificity, use dependence and other properties of K+ channel drug binding are therefore of vital clinical importance. Ancillary subunits play a key role in determining these properties in native tissue, and so understanding channel–subunit interactions is vital to understanding clinical pharmacology. PMID:18096604

  2. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA). The conference on FDA's clinical trial requirements is... relationships among FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards...

  3. Stress, alcohol and drug interaction: an update of human research

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Magdalena; Wand, Gary S.

    2008-01-01

    A challenging question that continues unanswered in the field of addiction is why some individuals are more vulnerable to substance use disorders than others. Numerous risk factors for alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including exposure to various forms of stress, have been identified in clinical studies. However, the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie this relationship remain unclear. Critical neurotransmitters, hormones and neurobiological sites have been recognized, which may provide the substrates that convey individual differences in vulnerability to addiction. With the advent of more sophisticated measures of brain function in humans, such as functional imaging technology, the mechanisms and neural pathways involved in the interactions between drugs of abuse, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system and stress systems are beginning to be characterized. This review provides a neuroadaptive perspective regarding the role of the hormonal and brain stress systems in drug addiction with a focus on the changes that occur during the transition from occasional drug use to drug dependence. We also review factors that contribute to different levels of hormonal/brain stress activation, which has implications for understanding individual vulnerability to drug dependence. Ultimately, these efforts may improve our chances of designing treatment strategies that target addiction at the core of the disorder. PMID:18855803

  4. Updates on the Clinical Evidenced Herb-Warfarin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Beikang; Zhang, Zhen; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Increasing and inadvertent use of herbs makes herb-drug interactions a focus of research. Concomitant use of warfarin, a highly efficacious oral anticoagulant, and herbs causes major safety concerns due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin. This paper presents an update overview of clinical findings regarding herb-warfarin interaction, highlighting clinical outcomes, severity of documented interactions, and quality of clinical evidence. Among thirty-eight herbs, Cannabis, Chamomile, Cranberry, Garlic, Ginkgo, Grapefruit, Lycium, Red clover, and St. John's wort were evaluated to have major severity interaction with warfarin. Herbs were also classified on account of the likelihood of their supporting evidences for interaction. Four herbs were considered as highly probable to interact with warfarin (level I), three were estimated as probable (level II), and ten and twenty-one were possible (level III) and doubtful (level IV), respectively. The general mechanism of herb-warfarin interaction almost remains unknown, yet several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors were estimated to influence the effectiveness of warfarin. Based on limited literature and information reported, we identified corresponding mechanisms of interactions for a small amount of “interacting herbs.” In summary, herb-warfarin interaction, especially the clinical effects of herbs on warfarin therapy should be further investigated through multicenter studies with larger sample sizes. PMID:24790635

  5. PRN prescribing in psychiatric inpatients: potential for pharmacokinetic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon J C; Lennard, Martin S; Ghahramani, Parviz; Pratt, Peter; Robertson, Andrea; Potokar, John

    2007-03-01

    Medications are commonly prescribed to psychiatric inpatients on a PRN (pro re nata/as required) basis, allowing drugs to be administered on patient request or at nurses' discretion for psychiatric symptoms, treatment side effects or physical complaints. However, there has been no formal study of the pharmacokinetic implications of PRN prescribing. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of PRN drug prescription and administration, and to assess the potential for interactions involving CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 between drugs prescribed and administered to inpatients on psychiatry wards.A cross-sectional survey of prescriptions on general adult and functional elderly psychiatric wards in one city was carried out. Data were recorded from prescription charts of 323 inpatients (236 on general adult and 87 on functional elderly wards). Of 2089 prescriptions, 997 (48%) of prescriptions were on a PRN basis (most commonly benzodiazepines and other hypnotic agents, antipsychotics, analgesics and anticholinergic agents), but only 143 (14%) of these had been administered in the previous 24 hours. One fifth of patients were prescribed drug combinations interacting with CYP2D6 or CYP3A4 of potential clinical importance which included one or more drugs prescribed on a PRN basis.PRN prescribing is common among inpatients in psychiatry, and may lead to cytochrome P450 mediated interactions. Prescribers should be aware of the potential for unpredictability in plasma concentrations, side effects and efficacy which PRN prescribing may cause through these interactions, particularly in old age psychiatry and in treatment of acute psychosis.

  6. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  7. Distinct properties of telmisartan on agonistic activities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ among clinically used angiotensin II receptor blockers: drug-target interaction analyses.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Hirotoshi; Kurosaki, Eiji; Niimi, Tatsuya; Gato, Katsuhiko; Kawasaki, Yuko; Suwa, Akira; Honbou, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Sanagi, Masanao; Tomura, Yuichi; Orita, Masaya; Yonemoto, Takako; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    A proportion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves glucose dyshomeostasis and insulin resistance in a clinical setting. Of these ARBs, telmisartan has the unique property of being a partial agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). However, the detailed mechanism of how telmisartan acts on PPARγ and exerts its insulin-sensitizing effect is poorly understood. In this context, we investigated the agonistic activity of a variety of clinically available ARBs on PPARγ using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Based on physicochemical data, we then reevaluated the metabolically beneficial effects of telmisartan in cultured murine adipocytes. ITC and SPR assays demonstrated that telmisartan exhibited the highest affinity of the ARBs tested. Distribution coefficient and parallel artificial membrane permeability assays were used to assess lipophilicity and cell permeability, for which telmisartan exhibited the highest levels of both. We next examined the effect of each ARB on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. To investigate the impact on adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated with each ARB in addition to standard inducers of differentiation for adipogenesis. Telmisartan dose-dependently facilitated adipogenesis and markedly augmented the mRNA expression of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), accompanied by an increase in the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and protein expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). In contrast, other ARBs showed only marginal effects in these experiments. In accordance with its highest affinity of binding for PPARγ as well as the highest cell permeability, telmisartan superbly activates PPARγ among the ARBs tested, thereby providing a fresh avenue for treating hypertensive patients with metabolic derangement. PMID:24424487

  8. Drug interactions with the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--part 1: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between AEDs.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2013-11-01

    Since 1989 there has been an exponential introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) into clinical practice and these include eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, retigabine (ezogabine), rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide; 16 in total. Because often the treatment of epilepsy is lifelong, and because patients are commonly prescribed polytherapy with other AEDs, AED interactions are an important consideration in the treatment of epilepsy and indeed can be a major therapeutic challenge. For new AEDs, their propensity to interact is particularly important because inevitably they can only be prescribed, at least in the first instance, as adjunctive polytherapy. The present review details the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that have been reported to occur with the new AEDs. Interaction study details are described, as necessary, so as to allow the reader to take a view as to the possible clinical significance of particular interactions. The principal pharmacokinetic interaction relates to hepatic enzyme induction or inhibition whilst pharmacodynamic interactions principally entail adverse effect synergism, although examples of anticonvulsant synergism also exist. Overall, the new AEDs are less interacting primarily because many are renally excreted or not hepatically metabolised (e.g. gabapentin, lacosamide, levetiracetam, topiramate, vigabatrin) and most do not (or minimally) induce or inhibit hepatic metabolism. A total of 139 pharmacokinetic interactions between concurrent AEDs have been described. The least pharmacokinetic interactions (n ≤ 5) are associated with gabapentin, lacosamide, tiagabine, vigabatrin and zonisamide, whilst lamotrigine (n = 17), felbamate (n = 15), oxcarbazepine (n = 14) and rufinamide (n = 13) are associated with the most. To date, felbamate, gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin

  9. Drug-drug interactions and Idiosyncratic Hepatotoxicity in the Liver Transplant setting

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Sarah; Fontana, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary studies of boceprevir and telaprevir based antiviral therapy in liver transplant (LT) recipients with hepatitis C have demonstrated dramatic increases in tacrolimus, cyclosporine, and the mTOR inhibitor exposure. In addition to empiric dose reductions, daily monitoring of immunosuppressant blood levels is required when initiating as well as discontinuing the protease inhibitors to maximize patient safety. Although improved suppression of HCV replication is anticipated, 20 to 40% of treated subjects have required early treatment discontinuation due to various adverse events including anemia (100%), infection (30%), nephrotoxicity (20%) and rejection (5 to 10%). Simeprevir and faldepravir are 2nd generation protease inhibitors which may have improved efficacy and tolerability profiles but potential drug interactions with other OATP1B1 substrates and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia are expected. In contrast, sofosbuvir and daclatasvir based therapies are not expected to lead to clinically significant drug-drug interactions in LT recipients but confirmatory studies are needed. Liver transplant recipients may also be at increased risk of developing drug induced liver injury (DILI). Establishing a diagnosis of DILI in the transplant setting is very difficult with the variable latency, laboratory features and histopathological manifestations of hepatotoxicity associated with a given drug, the need to exclude competing causes of allograft injury, and the lack of an objective and verifiable confirmatory test. Nonetheless, a heightened awareness of the possibility of DILI is warranted in light of the large number of medications used in LT recipients and the potential adverse impact that DILI may have on patient outcomes. PMID:24280292

  10. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug interactions in patients receiving statins.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-02-01

    Elderly patients commonly receive statin drugs for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Elderly patients also commonly receive antidepressant drugs, usually selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), for the treatment of depression, anxiety, or other conditions. SSRIs are associated with many pharmacokinetic drug interactions related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. There is concern that drugs that inhibit statin metabolism can trigger statin adverse effects, especially myopathy (which can be potentially serious, if rhabdomyolysis occurs). However, a detailed literature review of statin metabolism and of SSRI effects on CYP enzymes suggests that escitalopram, citalopram, and paroxetine are almost certain to be safe with all statins, and rosuvastatin, pitavastatin, and pravastatin are almost certain to be safe with all SSRIs. Even though other SSRI-statin combinations may theoretically be associated with risks, the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction is likely to be below the threshold for clinical significance. Risk, if at all, lies in combining fluvoxamine with atorvastatin, simvastatin, or lovastatin, and even this risk can be minimized by using lower statin doses and monitoring the patient.

  11. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique.

  12. Drug-Nutrient Interactions and Drug-Supplement Interactions: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... a healthy diet that includes foods high in vitamins and minerals, such as fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and fish. What is a drug-supplement interaction? Almost half of all Americans say they have taken a ... supplement is a vitamin, mineral, or herb that you take to improve ...

  13. Exposure-response relationships and drug interactions of sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, James J

    2004-10-15

    Sirolimus (rapamycin, RAPAMUNE, RAPA) is an immunosuppressive agent used for the prophylaxis of renal allograft rejection and exhibits an immunosuppressive mechanism that is distinct from that for cyclosporine and tacrolimus. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the exposure-response relationships and drug interactions of sirolimus. The various factors affecting sirolimus whole blood exposure included first-pass extraction, formulation, food, demographics, liver disease, assay method, and interacting drugs. Clinically significant effects caused by food, pediatric age, hepatic impairment, and interacting drugs require recommendations for the safe and efficacious use of sirolimus in renal allograft patients. An exposure-response model based on multivariate logistic regression was developed using the interstudy data from 1832 renal allograft patients. The analysis revealed an increased probability of acute rejection for sirolimus troughs <5 ng/mL, cyclosporine troughs <150 ng/mL, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches > or =4, and females. The outcomes suggested that individualization of sirolimus doses immediately after transplantation, based on HLA mismatch and sex, would likely decrease the probability of acute rejections in renal allograft recipients who receive concomitant sirolimus, cyclosporine (full-dose), and corticosteroid therapy. Sirolimus is a substrate for both Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and undergoes extensive first-pass extraction. Drugs that are known to inhibit or induce these proteins may potentially affect sirolimus whole blood exposure. In healthy volunteers, cyclosporine, diltiazem, erythromycin, ketoconazole, and verapamil significantly increased sirolimus whole blood exposure, and rifampin significantly decreased sirolimus exposure. However, sirolimus whole blood exposure was not affected by acyclovir, atorvastatin, digoxin, ethinyl estradiol/norgestrel, glyburide, nifedipine, or tacrolimus. Among the 15

  14. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events. PMID:18928560

  15. Clinical Pearls in Using Antiarrhythmic Drugs in the Outpatient Setting.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mary H; Sanoski, Cynthia A

    2016-02-01

    A role for oral antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) remains in clinical practice for patients with atrial and ventricular arrhythmias in spite of advances in nonpharmacologic therapy. Pharmacists play a vital role in the appropriate use of AAD dosing, administration, adverse effects, interactions, and monitoring. Pharmacists who are involved in providing care to patients with cardiac arrhythmias must remain updated regarding the efficacy and safety of the most commonly used AADs. This review will address key issues for appropriate initiation and maintenance of commonly selected Vaughan-Williams Class Ic and III agents in the outpatient setting.

  16. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  17. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  18. Machine learning-based prediction of drug–drug interactions by integrating drug phenotypic, therapeutic, chemical, and genomic properties

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    Objective Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) are an important consideration in both drug development and clinical application, especially for co-administered medications. While it is necessary to identify all possible DDIs during clinical trials, DDIs are frequently reported after the drugs are approved for clinical use, and they are a common cause of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and increasing healthcare costs. Computational prediction may assist in identifying potential DDIs during clinical trials. Methods Here we propose a heterogeneous network-assisted inference (HNAI) framework to assist with the prediction of DDIs. First, we constructed a comprehensive DDI network that contained 6946 unique DDI pairs connecting 721 approved drugs based on DrugBank data. Next, we calculated drug–drug pair similarities using four features: phenotypic similarity based on a comprehensive drug–ADR network, therapeutic similarity based on the drug Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system, chemical structural similarity from SMILES data, and genomic similarity based on a large drug–target interaction network built using the DrugBank and Therapeutic Target Database. Finally, we applied five predictive models in the HNAI framework: naive Bayes, decision tree, k-nearest neighbor, logistic regression, and support vector machine, respectively. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the HNAI models is 0.67 as evaluated using fivefold cross-validation. Using antipsychotic drugs as an example, several HNAI-predicted DDIs that involve weight gain and cytochrome P450 inhibition were supported by literature resources. Conclusions Through machine learning-based integration of drug phenotypic, therapeutic, structural, and genomic similarities, we demonstrated that HNAI is promising for uncovering DDIs in drug development and postmarketing surveillance. PMID:24644270

  19. Drug-drug interactions related to altered absorption and plasma protein binding: theoretical and regulatory considerations, and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Jerome; Tang, Cuyue; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant

    2015-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) related to altered drug absorption and plasma protein binding have received much less attention from regulatory agencies relative to DDIs mediated via drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. In this review, a number of theoretical bases and regulatory framework are presented for these DDI aspects. Also presented is an industry perspective on how to approach these issues in support of drug development. Overall, with the exception of highly permeable and highly soluble (BCS 1) drugs, DDIs related to drug-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology can be substantial, thus warranting more attentions. For a better understanding of absorption-associated DDI potential in a clinical setting, mechanistic studies should be conducted based on holistic integration of the pharmaceutical profiles (e.g., pH-dependent solubility) and pharmacological properties (e.g., GI physiology and therapeutic margin) of drug candidates. Although majority of DDI events related to altered plasma protein binding are not expected to be of clinical significance, exceptions exist for a subset of compounds with certain pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties. Knowledge of the identity of binding proteins and the binding extent in various clinical setting (including disease states) can be valuable in aiding clinical DDI data interpretations, and ensuring safe and effective use of new drugs.

  20. Drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on pharmacokinetics in vivo in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lifei; Liu, Jiajun; Yu, Xin; Shi, Lei; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Heping; Huang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Moxifloxacin and rifampicin are all the first-line options for the treatment of active tuberculosis, which are often combined for the treatment of multidrug resistance pulmonary tuberculosis in clinic. However, the potential drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin were unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on their pharmacokinetics in vivo after oral administration of the single drug and both drugs, and reveal their mutual effects on their pharmacokinetics. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: moxifloxacin group, rifampicin group and moxifloxacin + rifampicin group. Plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin and rifampicin were determined using LC-MS at the designated time points after drug administration, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. In addition, effects of moxifloxacin and rifampicin on their metabolic rate and absorption were investigated using rat liver microsome incubation systems and Caco-2 cell transwell model. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of moxifloxacin including Tmax , Cmax , t1/2 and AUC(0-t) increased more in the moxifloxacin + rifampicin group than in the moxifloxacin group, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). However, the pharmacokinetic parameters of rifampicin, including peak concentration, area under the concentration-time curve, half-life and the area under the first moment plasma concentration-time curve, increased significantly (p < 0.05) compared with the rifampicin group, and the time to peak concentration decreased significantly (p < 0.05). The mean residence time of rifampicin also increased in moxifloxacin + rifampicin group compared with the rifampicin group, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). The rat liver microsome incubation experiment indicated that moxifloxacin could increase the metabolic rate of rifampicin from 23.7 to 38.7 min. However

  1. Interactions between Transporters and Herbal Medicines/Drugs: A Focus on Hepatoprotective Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aijie; Li, Quansheng; He, Xin; Si, Duanyun; Liu, Changxiao

    2015-01-01

    Many herbal medicines and drugs are available in the clinic as potent hepatoprotective agents for the treatment of commonly occurring liver diseases. Recently, herbal medicines such as silymarin and curcumin have gained more attention and popularity for the treatment of various liver diseases because of their safety and efficacy profiles. Some of them are related to transporters for drug disposition processes, therapeutic efficacy and/or adverse drug reactions. Currently, herbal medicines and diet supplements made from natural products are widely used in patients who are being treated with conventional prescription medicines, which are related to an increasing risk of herbal-drug interactions (HDIs) and/or drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The purpose of present review is to summarize the contemporary knowledge of transporter-mediated HDIs or DDIs for herbal medicines/drugs focusing on hepatoprotective compounds. Several herbal medicines/drugs are discussed in detail in this review.

  2. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  3. Design Features of Drug-Drug Interaction Trials Between Antivirals and Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ruben C; Arya, Vikram; Younis, Islam R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the major design features of drug-drug interaction trials between antiviral medications (AVs) and oral contraceptives (OCs). Information on these trials (n = 27) was collected from approved drug labels and clinical pharmacology reviews conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The primary objective of all trials was to evaluate changes in OC exposure following the coadministration of AVs. In addition, an evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic interaction was performed in 10 of these trials. Twenty-two trials were open label with a fixed-sequence design, and 5 trials used a double-blind crossover design. The trials were conducted using one, two, or three 28-day ovulatory cycles in 10, 8, and 9 trials, respectively. Only 1 trial enrolled HIV-infected women. The median number of women in a trial was 20 (range, 12 to 52). Norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (EE) combination was the most commonly used OC (n = 16, 59%) followed by norgestimate/EE (n = 9, 33%). Labeling recommendations were based on exposure changes in 25 cases and on safety observations in the trial in 2 cases. In conclusion, a wide variety of trial designs was used, and there is no preferred design. The answer to the exposure question can be achieved using multiple designs.

  4. Polypharmacy-induced drug-drug interactions; threats to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, H; Hasanloei, M A V; Mahmoudi, J

    2014-12-01

    Patient safety is an increasingly recognized challenge and opportunity for stakeholders in improving health care delivery. Because of extensive use of medicines, life expectancy is increasing and elderly as well as comorbidities need polypharmacy, and therefore the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) increases.We searched PubMed and ScienseDirect for epidemiology of articles describing the frequency of potential DDIs published up to 2011 in title, abstract, keywords and text.Studies show that the rate of DDIs both in outpatients and hospitalized patients is high. The elderly, <5 year-old children and women are at higher risks for it. Also, the rate of DDIs in patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as heart failure (HF) and hypertension (HTN) and cancers is significant.Physicians, for lowering the risk of DDIs, should take precise drug history, prescribe appropriate and lowest drugs and ultimately counsel with clinical pharmacologist as a key strategy in order to insure the patient safety. This article reviews the existing data concerning this problem to provide an aid for choosing the appropriate drugs and prescribe the most effective with the lowest DDIs for providing patient safety. PMID:24500732

  5. Computerized techniques pave the way for drug-drug interaction prediction and interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza; Ferdousi, Reza; Aziziheris, Kamal; Niakan-Kalhori, Sharareh R.; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health care industry also patients penalized by medical errors that are inevitable but highly preventable. Vast majority of medical errors are related to adverse drug reactions, while drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are the main cause of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). DDIs and ADRs have mainly been reported by haphazard case studies. Experimental in vivo and in vitro researches also reveals DDI pairs. Laboratory and experimental researches are valuable but also expensive and in some cases researchers may suffer from limitations. Methods: In the current investigation, the latest published works were studied to analyze the trend and pattern of the DDI modelling and the impacts of machine learning methods. Applications of computerized techniques were also investigated for the prediction and interpretation of DDIs. Results: Computerized data-mining in pharmaceutical sciences and related databases provide new key transformative paradigms that can revolutionize the treatment of diseases and hence medical care. Given that various aspects of drug discovery and pharmacotherapy are closely related to the clinical and molecular/biological information, the scientifically sound databases (e.g., DDIs, ADRs) can be of importance for the success of pharmacotherapy modalities. Conclusion: A better understanding of DDIs not only provides a robust means for designing more effective medicines but also grantees patient safety. PMID:27525223

  6. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues. PMID:18721993

  7. St. John's wort and antidepressant drug interactions in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lantz, M S; Buchalter, E; Giambanco, V

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing interest in and use of the herbal preparation St. John's wort. Hypericin, the major active ingredient, has many psychoactive properties. The agent is sold in the US as a nutritional supplement and is recommended for numerous conditions, including depression, anxiety, insomnia, and inflammation. We report a series of five cases of clinically diagnosed central serotonergic syndrome among elderly patients who combined prescription antidepressants with St. John's wort. Older adults are large consumers of both over-the-counter and prescription medications. They are particularly vulnerable to interactions between medications and products sold as nutritional or herbal supplements. St. John's wort requires further evaluation due to potential for drug interactions with central nervous system agents and for more definitive therapeutic indications.

  8. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  9. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals. This article discusses drug resistance in herpesviruses and hepatitis B. PMID:20466277

  10. Evidence for Clinical Implementation of Pharmacogenomics in Cardiac Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Amy L.; Spitz, Jared; Jacobs, Michael; Sorrentino, Matthew; Yuen, Shennin; Danahey, Keith; Saner, Donald; Klein, Teri E.; Altman, Russ B.; Ratain, Mark J.; O’Donnell, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To comprehensively assess the pharmacogenomic evidence of routinely-used drugs for clinical utility. Methods From January 2, 2011 to May 31, 2013, we assessed 71 drugs by identifying all drug/genetic variant combinations with published clinical pharmacogenomic evidence. Literature supporting each drug/variant pair was assessed for study design and methodology, outcomes, statistical significance, and clinical relevance. Proposed clinical summaries were formally scored using a modified AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) II instrument, including recommendation for or against guideline implementation. Results Positive pharmacogenomic findings were identified for 51 of 71 cardiovascular drugs (71.8%) representing 884 unique drug/variant pairs from 597 publications. After analysis for quality and clinical relevance, 92 drug/variant pairs were proposed for translation into clinical summaries, encompassing 23 drugs (32.4% of drugs reviewed). All were found recommended for clinical implementation using AGREE, with average overall quality scores of 5.18 (out of 7.0; range 3.67 to 7.0; SD 0.91). Drug guidelines had highest scores in AGREE domain 1 (Scope) (average 91.9 out of 100; SD 6.1), and moderate but still robust scores in domain 3 (Rigour) (average 73.1; SD 11.1), domain 4 (Clarity) (average 67.8; SD 12.5), and domain 5 (Applicability) (average 65.8; SD 10). The drugs clopidogrel (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), simvastatin (rs4149056), dabigatran (rs2244613), hydralazine (rs1799983, rs1799998), and warfarin (CYP2C9/VKORC1) were distinguished by the highest scores. Eight of the 10 most commonly-prescribed drugs warranted translation guidelines summarizing clinical pharmacogenomic information. Conclusions Considerable clinically actionable pharmacogenomic information for cardiovascular drugs exists, supporting the idea that consideration of such information when prescribing is warranted. PMID:26046407

  11. Clinical pharmacology of analgesic drugs in cattle.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matthew L; Coetzee, Johann F

    2015-03-01

    Providing pain relief in cattle is challenging. In the absence of labeled drugs, the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act regulates the extralabel drug use of analgesics in cattle within the United States. Given the variety of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pain-relieving drugs, evidence needs to drive the development of analgesic protocols for cattle during pain-related events. This article reviews the commonly used analgesics investigated in cattle including local anesthetics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, α2-agonists, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists, and gabapentin. These compounds are examined with respect to evidence of analgesia in cattle during pain states. PMID:25578387

  12. Co-Prescription Trends in a Large Cohort of Subjects Predict Substantial Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jeffrey J.; Daly, Thomas M.; Liu, Xiong; Goldstein, Keith; Johnston, Joseph A.; Ryan, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical prescribing and drug-drug interaction data underlie recommendations on drug combinations that should be avoided or closely monitored by prescribers. Because the number of patients taking multiple medications is increasing, a comprehensive view of prescribing patterns in patients is important to better assess real world pharmaceutical response and evaluate the potential for multi-drug interactions. We obtained self-reported prescription data from NHANES surveys between 1999 and 2010, and confirm the previously reported finding of increasing drug use in the elderly. We studied co-prescription drug trends by focusing on the 2009-2010 survey, which contains prescription data on 690 drugs used by 10,537 subjects. We found that medication profiles were unique for individuals aged 65 years or more, with ≥98 unique drug regimens encountered per 100 subjects taking 3 or more medications. When drugs were viewed by therapeutic class, it was found that the most commonly prescribed drugs were not the most commonly co-prescribed drugs for any of the 16 drug classes investigated. We cross-referenced these medication lists with drug interaction data from Drugs.com to evaluate the potential for drug interactions. The number of drug alerts rose proportionally with the number of co-prescribed medications, rising from 3.3 alerts for individuals prescribed 5 medications to 11.7 alerts for individuals prescribed 10 medications. We found 22% of elderly subjects taking both a substrate and inhibitor of a given cytochrome P450 enzyme, and 4% taking multiple inhibitors of the same enzyme simultaneously. By examining drug pairs prescribed in 0.1% of the population or more, we found low agreement between co-prescription rate and co-discussion in the literature. These data show that prescribing trends in treatment could drive a large extent of individual variability in drug response, and that current pairwise approaches to assessing drug-drug interactions may be inadequate for

  13. Role of Cytochrome P450 2C8 in Drug Metabolism and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Backman, Janne T; Filppula, Anne M; Niemi, Mikko; Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2016-01-01

    During the last 10-15 years, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 has emerged as an important drug-metabolizing enzyme. CYP2C8 is highly expressed in human liver and is known to metabolize more than 100 drugs. CYP2C8 substrate drugs include amodiaquine, cerivastatin, dasabuvir, enzalutamide, imatinib, loperamide, montelukast, paclitaxel, pioglitazone, repaglinide, and rosiglitazone, and the number is increasing. Similarly, many drugs have been identified as CYP2C8 inhibitors or inducers. In vivo, already a small dose of gemfibrozil, i.e., 10% of its therapeutic dose, is a strong, irreversible inhibitor of CYP2C8. Interestingly, recent findings indicate that the acyl-β-glucuronides of gemfibrozil and clopidogrel cause metabolism-dependent inactivation of CYP2C8, leading to a strong potential for drug interactions. Also several other glucuronide metabolites interact with CYP2C8 as substrates or inhibitors, suggesting that an interplay between CYP2C8 and glucuronides is common. Lack of fully selective and safe probe substrates, inhibitors, and inducers challenges execution and interpretation of drug-drug interaction studies in humans. Apart from drug-drug interactions, some CYP2C8 genetic variants are associated with altered CYP2C8 activity and exhibit significant interethnic frequency differences. Herein, we review the current knowledge on substrates, inhibitors, inducers, and pharmacogenetics of CYP2C8, as well as its role in clinically relevant drug interactions. In addition, implications for selection of CYP2C8 marker and perpetrator drugs to investigate CYP2C8-mediated drug metabolism and interactions in preclinical and clinical studies are discussed. PMID:26721703

  14. Drug-Drug Interaction Potentials of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors via Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Liu, Yong; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are anticancer drugs that may be co-administered with other drugs. The aims of this study are to investigate the inhibitory effects of TKIs on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities, and to quantitatively evaluate their potential to cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Inhibition kinetic profiles of a panel of UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17) by four TKIs (axitinib, imatinib, lapatinib and vandetanib) were characterized by using hepatic microsomes and recombinant proteins. Lapatinib exhibited potent competitive inhibition against UGT1A1 activity with a Ki of 0.5 μM. Imatinib was found to exhibit broad inhibition on several UGTs, particularly potent competitive inhibition against UGT2B17 with a Ki of 0.4 μM. The TKIs also exerted intermediate inhibition against several UGTs (i.e., UGT1A7 by lapatinib; UGT1A1 by imatinib; UGT1A4, 1A7 and 1A9 by axitinib; and UGT1A9 by vandetanib). Results from modeling for the quantitative prediction of DDI risk indicated that the coadministration of lapatinib or imatinib at clinical doses could result in a significant increase in AUC of drugs primarily cleared by UGT1A1 or 2B17. Lapatinib and imatinib may cause clinically significant DDIs when co-administered UGT1A1 or 2B17 substrates. PMID:26642944

  15. Rxpert: An Intelligent Computer System For Drug Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayle, Brian G.; Dankel, Douglas D.

    1986-03-01

    Drug interactions have become very prevalent in modern medicine. With the increasing numbers of techniques for disease diagnosis and marketed medications for disease treatment, multiple drug patient care has become a customary practice. Consequently, the potential of harmful drug induced effects has become, and will continue to be, an enormous problem in providing patient care. A computer reference aid, knowledgeable about drug interactions, would be of great value to medical personnel in eliminating untoward drug effects in patient care. This research involved the development of such a system called RxPERT. RxPERT is an intelligent, easy to use, interactive computer system with expert level knowledge of drug interactions, implemented for use on an IBM-PC microcomputer. The microcomputer implementation allows the program to be highly accessible, and its information promptly retrievable for office as well as institutional settings. The system requires input of a patient history and patient drug requirements. Throughout the user/computer interactive session the user can review explanations of the possible interactions. Ultimately a listing of drug interactions and overall rating of the drug regimen instituted is displayed.

  16. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug–drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  17. [Clinical analysis of 410 cases of drug eruption].

    PubMed

    Mo, Bao-han

    2003-02-01

    An clinical analysis was conducted among a cohort of 410 patients drug eruption with treated in our department from January 1995 to December 2001. We found that the common drugs likely to lead to anaphylactic reactions included cephalosporins, ampicillin types, antipyretic analgesic types, rabies vaccine, sulfonamides, tetracyclines types, etc. The drug eruption mostly presents diverse clinical features resembling the rashes as seen in cases of scarlet fever, measles, urtica, or mucosal edema or ulceration.

  18. In silico methods for predicting drug-drug interactions with cytochrome P-450s, transporters and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ni; Fan, Xiaohui; Ekins, Sean

    2015-06-23

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are associated with severe adverse effects that may lead to the patient requiring alternative therapeutics and could ultimately lead to drug withdrawal from the market if they are severe. To prevent the occurrence of DDI in the clinic, experimental systems to evaluate drug interaction have been integrated into the various stages of the drug discovery and development process. A large body of knowledge about DDI has also accumulated through these studies and pharmacovigillence systems. Much of this work to date has focused on the drug metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P-450s as well as drug transporters, ion channels and occasionally other proteins. This combined knowledge provides a foundation for a hypothesis-driven in silico approach, using either cheminformatics or physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PK) modeling methods to assess DDI potential. Here we review recent advances in these approaches with emphasis on hypothesis-driven mechanistic models for important protein targets involved in PK-based DDI. Recent efforts with other informatics approaches to detect DDI are highlighted. Besides DDI, we also briefly introduce drug interactions with other substances, such as Traditional Chinese Medicines to illustrate how in silico modeling can be useful in this domain. We also summarize valuable data sources and web-based tools that are available for DDI prediction. We finally explore the challenges we see faced by in silico approaches for predicting DDI and propose future directions to make these computational models more reliable, accurate, and publically accessible.

  19. Pharmacogenomics and Herb-Drug Interactions: Merge of Future and Tradition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue-Li; Zeng, Mei-Zi; He, Fa-Zhong; Luo, Zhi-Ying; Luo, Jian-Quan; Wen, Jia-Gen; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide using of herb products and the increasing potential herb-drug interaction issue has raised enthusiasm on discovering the underlying mechanisms. Previous review indicated that the interactions may be mediated by metabolism enzymes and transporters in pharmacokinetic pathways. On the other hand, an increasing number of studies found that genetic variations showed some influence on herb-drug interaction effects whereas these genetic factors did not draw much attention in history. We highlight that pharmacogenomics may involve the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways to affect herb-drug interaction. We are here to make an updated review focused on some common herb-drug interactions in association with genetic variations, with the aim to help safe use of herbal medicines in different individuals in the clinic. PMID:25821484

  20. Mechanisms of cellular distribution of psychotropic drugs. Significance for drug action and interactions.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Władysława A

    2003-02-01

    Distribution of a drug in the body is dependent on its permeation properties, the blood flow rates in various tissues, and on plasma and tissue uptake. The distribution of drugs in vivo is largely determined by uptake competitions between blood and tissues, as well as competitions among individual tissues. Basic lipophilic drugs are characterized by extensive accumulation in tissues, which leads to a high volume of distribution. Nonspecific binding to cellular membranes and uptake by acidic compartments (mainly lysosomes) are responsible for such a distribution pattern. Lysosomal trapping is an important mechanism of distribution of basic psychotropic drugs; however, the tissue distribution of the aliphatic-type phenothiazine neuroleptic promazine, tricyclic antidepressants (TADs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) depends more on phospholipid binding than on lysosomal trapping, whereas in the case thioridazine and perazine, lysosomal trapping is as important for the tissue uptake as is phospholipid binding. Neuroleptics and antidepressants mutually inhibit their lysosomal uptake. A decrease in the intralysosomal drug concentrations in vivo leads to a shift of the drug from organs abundant in lysosomes (lungs, liver and kidneys) to those poor in these organella, e.g., the heart, which may be of clinical importance (cardiotoxicity). The brain is not a homogenous organ, i.e., the phospholipid pattern and density of lysosomes vary in its different regions. Therefore, the contribution of the two mechanisms (lysosomal trapping and tissue binding) to total drug uptake is different in areas of the brain. Both lysosomal trapping and binding to cellular elements for psychotropics are higher in the grey matter and neurons than in the white matter and astrocytes, respectively. Lysosomal trapping and distribution interactions of psychotropics take place mainly in neurons. A decrease (via a distributive interaction) in the concentration of psychotropics in

  1. Membrane–drug interactions studied using model membrane systems

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Jacqueline; Suhendro, Daniel K.; Zieleniecki, Julius L.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Köper, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The direct interaction of drugs with the cell membrane is often neglected when drug effects are studied. Systematic investigations are hindered by the complexity of the natural membrane and model membrane systems can offer a useful alternative. Here some examples are reviewed of how model membrane architectures including vesicles, Langmuir monolayers and solid supported membranes can be used to investigate the effects of drug molecules on the membrane structure, and how these interactions can translate into effects on embedded membrane proteins. PMID:26586998

  2. Graphic Mining of High-Order Drug Interactions and Their Directional Effects on Myopathy Using Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Du, L; Chakraborty, A; Chiang, C-W; Cheng, L; Quinney, S K; Wu, H; Zhang, P; Li, L; Shen, L

    2015-08-01

    We propose to study a novel pharmacovigilance problem for mining directional effects of high-order drug interactions on an adverse drug event (ADE). Our goal is to estimate each individual risk of adding a new drug to an existing drug combination. In this proof-of-concept study, we analyzed a large electronic medical records database and extracted myopathy-relevant case control drug co-occurrence data. We applied frequent itemset mining to discover frequent drug combinations within the extracted data, evaluated directional drug interactions related to these combinations, and identified directional drug interactions with large effect sizes. Furthermore, we developed a novel visualization method to organize multiple directional drug interaction effects depicted as a tree, to generate an intuitive graphical and visual representation of our data-mining results. This translational bioinformatics approach yields promising results, adds valuable and complementary information to the existing pharmacovigilance literature, and has the potential to impact clinical practice. PMID:26380157

  3. Application of Caco-2 Cell Line in Herb-Drug Interaction Studies: Current Approaches and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Awortwe, C.; Fasinu, P.S.; Rosenkranz, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Caco-2 model is employed in pre-clinical investigations to predict the likely gastrointestinal permeability of drugs because it expresses cytochrome P450 enzymes, transporters, microvilli and enterocytes of identical characteristics to the human small intestine. The FDA recommends this model as integral component of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Most dedicated laboratories use the Caco-2 cell line to screen new chemical entities through prediction of its solubility, bioavailability and the possibility of drug-drug or herb-drug interactions in the gut lumen. However, challenges in the inherent characteristics of Caco-2 cell and inter-laboratory protocol variations have resulted to generation of irreproducible data. These limitations affect the extrapolation of data from pre-clinical research to clinical studies involving drug-drug and herb-drug interactions. This review addresses some of these caveats and enumerates the plausible current and future approaches to reduce the anomalies associated with Caco-2 cell line investigations focusing on its application in herb-drug interactions. PMID:24735758

  4. Searching for Drug Synergy in Complex Dose-Response Landscapes Using an Interaction Potency Model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of multi-targeted drug combinations is a promising strategy to tackle the drug resistance problem for many complex disorders. A drug combination is usually classified as synergistic or antagonistic, depending on the deviation of the observed combination response from the expected effect calculated based on a reference model of non-interaction. The existing reference models were proposed originally for low-throughput drug combination experiments, which make the model assumptions often incompatible with the complex drug interaction patterns across various dose pairs that are typically observed in large-scale dose-response matrix experiments. To address these limitations, we proposed a novel reference model, named zero interaction potency (ZIP), which captures the drug interaction relationships by comparing the change in the potency of the dose-response curves between individual drugs and their combinations. We utilized a delta score to quantify the deviation from the expectation of zero interaction, and proved that a delta score value of zero implies both probabilistic independence and dose additivity. Using data from a large-scale anticancer drug combination experiment, we demonstrated empirically how the ZIP scoring approach captures the experimentally confirmed drug synergy while keeping the false positive rate at a low level. Further, rather than relying on a single parameter to assess drug interaction, we proposed the use of an interaction landscape over the full dose-response matrix to identify and quantify synergistic and antagonistic dose regions. The interaction landscape offers an increased power to differentiate between various classes of drug combinations, and may therefore provide an improved means for understanding their mechanisms of action toward clinical translation.

  5. [Clinical strategies for prevention of drug-induced urinary calculi].

    PubMed

    Kohjimoto, Yasuo; Sasaki, Yumiko; Hara, Isao

    2011-10-01

    Drug-induced urinary calculi, although they account for only 1-2% of urinary calculi, deserve consideration because most of them are preventable. In the drug-containing calculi resulting from the crystallization of a certain drug and its metabolites in the urine, stone analysis can identify the responsible drug. While, in the drug-induced metabolic calculi caused by interference with calcium, oxalate and purine metabolism, careful clinical inquiry is necessary to reveal involvement of a certain drug in stone formation. Better awareness of the possible drugs with lithogenic potential and close surveillance of patients on long-term treatment with these drugs are necessary. Especially, in patients with a history of urolithiaisis, prescription of lithogenic drugs deserve careful consideration. PMID:21960230

  6. Clinical pharmacologists and drug regulation--future perspective in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, K

    1996-07-01

    1. The Japanese pharmaceutical administration system, and recommendations for the improvement of clinical trial methodology following the implementation of GCP guidelines in Japan are described with special reference to three recent developments in Japanese drug regulation. 2. The implementation of GCP guidelines has not been fully satisfactory and clinical trials in Japan still run into problems. The Ministry of Health and Welfare has recently established a Committee on Safety of Medicines after serious trouble with a new drug was experienced. The Committee released an interim report on the reform of clinical trials supervision and the system for examination of New Drug Applications. 3. ICH-GCP guidelines will be implemented in Japan in the next few years. The principal differences between Japanese GCP and ICH-GCP guidelines, and their effects on clinical trials in Japan with reference to the acceptability of ICH-GCP, are discussed. 4. The final proposals on the National Health Insurance drug pricing method and the appropriate use of drugs by the Central Social Insurance Medical Council are anticipated to have a significant impact on the drug market. The changes in pricing system, especially premiums for innovative drugs, and the implications for the drug market are considered. 5. In these changed circumstances, the importance of the role of clinical pharmacologists in the framework of the new drug regulations in Japan is reviewed.

  7. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  8. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  9. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome probably induced by a lamotrigine-ginseng drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Myers, Amy P; Watson, Troy A; Strock, Steven B

    2015-03-01

    The likelihood of a drug reaction with lamotrigine is increased by dose escalation that is too rapid or drug interactions that increase the concentration of lamotrigine. There is a well-documented interaction between valproic acid and lamotrigine in which lamotrigine levels are increased, subsequently increasing the risk of a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, diffuse maculopapular rash, multivisceral involvement, eosinophilia, and atypical lymphocytes and has a mortality rate of 10-40%. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of DRESS syndrome that was probably induced by a drug interaction between lamotrigine and ginseng. A 44-year-old white man presented to the emergency department after experiencing a possible seizure. His medical history included two other lifetime events concerning for seizures at ages 14 and 29 years old. After referral to the neurology clinic, he was diagnosed with generalized tonic-clonic seizure disorder, and lamotrigine was started with up-titration according to the drug's package insert to a goal dosage of 150 mg twice/day. The patient had also been taking deer antler velvet and ginseng that he continued during his lamotrigine therapy. On day 43 of therapy, the patient presented to the emergency department with a pruritic rash that had started on his extremities and spread to his torso. He was thought to have experienced a drug reaction to lamotrigine, and the drug was discontinued. Thirteen days later, the patient was admitted from the acute care clinic for inpatient observation due to laboratory abnormalities in the setting of continued rash, headache, and myalgias. His admission laboratory results on that day were remarkable for leukocytosis, with a white blood cell count up to 17.6 × 10(3) /mm(3) , with a prominent eosinophilia of 3.04 × 10(3) /mm(3) ; his liver enzyme levels were also elevated, with an aspartate

  10. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome probably induced by a lamotrigine-ginseng drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Myers, Amy P; Watson, Troy A; Strock, Steven B

    2015-03-01

    The likelihood of a drug reaction with lamotrigine is increased by dose escalation that is too rapid or drug interactions that increase the concentration of lamotrigine. There is a well-documented interaction between valproic acid and lamotrigine in which lamotrigine levels are increased, subsequently increasing the risk of a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, diffuse maculopapular rash, multivisceral involvement, eosinophilia, and atypical lymphocytes and has a mortality rate of 10-40%. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of DRESS syndrome that was probably induced by a drug interaction between lamotrigine and ginseng. A 44-year-old white man presented to the emergency department after experiencing a possible seizure. His medical history included two other lifetime events concerning for seizures at ages 14 and 29 years old. After referral to the neurology clinic, he was diagnosed with generalized tonic-clonic seizure disorder, and lamotrigine was started with up-titration according to the drug's package insert to a goal dosage of 150 mg twice/day. The patient had also been taking deer antler velvet and ginseng that he continued during his lamotrigine therapy. On day 43 of therapy, the patient presented to the emergency department with a pruritic rash that had started on his extremities and spread to his torso. He was thought to have experienced a drug reaction to lamotrigine, and the drug was discontinued. Thirteen days later, the patient was admitted from the acute care clinic for inpatient observation due to laboratory abnormalities in the setting of continued rash, headache, and myalgias. His admission laboratory results on that day were remarkable for leukocytosis, with a white blood cell count up to 17.6 × 10(3) /mm(3) , with a prominent eosinophilia of 3.04 × 10(3) /mm(3) ; his liver enzyme levels were also elevated, with an aspartate

  11. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the... FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards (IRBs). Individual...

  12. Potential of metabolomics in preclinical and clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Baldeep; Prakash, Ajay; Ruhela, Rakesh Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2014-12-01

    Metabolomics is an upcoming technology system which involves detailed experimental analysis of metabolic profiles. Due to its diverse applications in preclinical and clinical research, it became an useful tool for the drug discovery and drug development process. This review covers the brief outline about the instrumentation and interpretation of metabolic profiles. The applications of metabolomics have a considerable scope in the pharmaceutical industry, almost at each step from drug discovery to clinical development. These include finding drug target, potential safety and efficacy biomarkers and mechanisms of drug action, the validation of preclinical experimental models against human disease profiles, and the discovery of clinical safety and efficacy biomarkers. As we all know, nowadays the drug discovery and development process is a very expensive, and risky business. Failures at any stage of drug discovery and development process cost millions of dollars to the companies. Some of these failures or the associated risks could be prevented or minimized if there were better ways of drug screening, drug toxicity profiling and monitoring adverse drug reactions. Metabolomics potentially offers an effective route to address all the issues associated with the drug discovery and development. PMID:25443721

  13. Theranostics meets traditional Chinese medicine: rational prediction of drug-herb interactions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao; Fan, Lan; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Tomlinson, Brian

    2012-11-01

    Herbal medicines including traditional Chinese medicine are becoming increasingly more popular worldwide. However, there is considerable potential for interaction between herbal components and drugs, as all herbal medicines contain a combination of potentially biologically active compounds possessing various inherent pharmacological activities, and the components of herbal products consumed are eliminated from the body by the same mechanisms that remove drugs. Indeed, many so-called conventional drugs are derived from plant sources. This article provides an update on the mechanisms and evidence of drug-herb interactions (DHIs) and genetic influences on DHIs. The rational prediction of clinically important DHIs is also discussed. Individualized and targeted drug therapy could be achieved by identifying the population most likely to be helped or harmed by drug-herb coadministration. PMID:23249200

  14. Herb–Drug Interactions: Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Scott J.; Argikar, Aneesh A.; Lin, Yvonne S.; Nagar, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a usage history that predates written records and the perception that “natural” ensures safety, herbal products have increasingly been incorporated into Western health care. Consumers often self-administer these products concomitantly with conventional medications without informing their health care provider(s). Such herb–drug combinations can produce untoward effects when the herbal product perturbs the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or transporters. Despite increasing recognition of these types of herb–drug interactions, a standard system for interaction prediction and evaluation is nonexistent. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying herb–drug interactions remain an understudied area of pharmacotherapy. Evaluation of herbal product interaction liability is challenging due to variability in herbal product composition, uncertainty of the causative constituents, and often scant knowledge of causative constituent pharmacokinetics. These limitations are confounded further by the varying perspectives concerning herbal product regulation. Systematic evaluation of herbal product drug interaction liability, as is routine for new drugs under development, necessitates identifying individual constituents from herbal products and characterizing the interaction potential of such constituents. Integration of this information into in silico models that estimate the pharmacokinetics of individual constituents should facilitate prospective identification of herb–drug interactions. These concepts are highlighted with the exemplar herbal products milk thistle and resveratrol. Implementation of this methodology should help provide definitive information to both consumers and clinicians about the risk of adding herbal products to conventional pharmacotherapeutic regimens. PMID:24335390

  15. Management of drug interactions with beta-blockers: continuing education has a short-term impact

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Annelies; Simoens, Steven; Laekeman, Gert

    There is a lack of clear guidelines regarding the management of drug-drug interactions. Objective To assess the impact of an educational intervention on the management of drug interactions with beta-blockers. Methods The study had a controlled before-and-after design. The intervention group (n=10 pharmacies) received a continuing education course and guidelines on the management of drug interactions with beta-blockers. The control group (n=10 pharmacies) received no intervention. Pharmacy students and staff of internship pharmacies participated in this study. Before and after the intervention, students registered interactions with beta-blockers during two weeks. Information was obtained on drug information of the beta-blocker and the interacting drug, patient’s demographics, and the mode of transaction. Results A total number of 288 interactions were detected during both study periods. Most beta-blockers causing an interaction were prescribed for hypertension, and interacted with hypoglycemic agents, NSAIDs, or beta2-agonists. Pharmacists’ intervention rate was low (14% in the pre-test compared to 39% in the post-test), but increased significantly in the post-test in the intervention group. Reasons for overriding the interaction included limited clinical relevance, refill prescriptions, not being aware of the interaction, and communication problems with the prescriber. Conclusion An interactive continuing education course, during which practice-oriented guidelines were offered, affected pharmacists’ short-term behavior at the counter in dealing with interactions of beta-blockers. Continuing education plays a role in raising pharmacists’ awareness and responsibility towards the detection and management of drug interactions in the pharmacy. PMID:25214902

  16. Effects of anticancer drugs on transcription factor-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2005-06-01

    DNA-interacting anticancer drugs are able to affect the propensity of DNA to interact with proteins through either reversible binding or covalent bond formation. The effect of the drugs on transcription factor interactions with DNA is reviewed. These effects can be classified as (i) competition between a drug and regulatory protein for target sequences; (ii) weakening of this interaction; (iii) enhancement of this interaction by chemical modification of the DNA and the creation of non-natural binding sites; and (iv) a 'suicide' mechanism, which is observed when a transcription factor induces changes in DNA structure, allowing a drug to bind to a target sequence. Several new strategies -- the antigene approach with oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids or locked nucleic acids, and sequence-specific polyamides -- are also reviewed. PMID:15948668

  17. Drug-Drug Interactions between Sofosbuvir and Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir with or without Dasabuvir.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer R; Dutta, Sandeep; Cohen, Daniel; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Ding, Bifeng; Awni, Walid M; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-02-01

    The combination of ombitasvir (an NS5A inhibitor), paritaprevir (an NS3/4A inhibitor) coadministered with ritonavir (r), and dasabuvir (an NS5B nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitor), referred to as the 3D regimen, and the combination of ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, referred to as the 2D regimen, have demonstrated high efficacy with and without ribavirin in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects. These regimens have potential for coadministration with sofosbuvir (nucleoside NS5B inhibitor) in the treatment of HCV. This phase 1, drug-drug interaction, open-label, multiple-dose study enrolled 32 healthy subjects to receive the 3D or 2D regimen in combination with sofosbuvir. Doses of study drugs were as follows: ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, 25/150/100 mg daily (QD); dasabuvir, 250 mg twice daily (BID); and sofosbuvir, 400 mg QD. Blood samples were collected on study days 7, 14, and 21 for evaluating drug interaction at steady state. The effect of the 3D and 2D regimens on the pharmacokinetics of sofosbuvir and its circulating metabolite GS-331007 and vice versa was assessed by a repeated-measures analysis. Exposures of the 3D and 2D regimens were similar (≤20% change) during coadministration with sofosbuvir and during administration alone. Sofosbuvir exposures were 61% to 112% higher with the 3D regimen and 64% to 93% higher with the 2D regimen than with sofosbuvir alone. GS-331007 total exposures were 27% and 32% higher with the 3D and 2D regimens, respectively, than with sofosbuvir alone. Increases in sofosbuvir and GS-331007 exposures likely resulted from breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and/or P glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter inhibition by paritaprevir and ritonavir. No subjects discontinued the study due to study drug-related adverse events. No dose adjustment is recommended for 3D, 2D, or sofosbuvir in clinical trials exploring the safety and efficacy of the combination. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT

  18. Drug-Drug Interactions between Sofosbuvir and Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir with or without Dasabuvir

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sandeep; Cohen, Daniel; Podsadecki, Thomas J.; Ding, Bifeng; Awni, Walid M.; Menon, Rajeev M.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of ombitasvir (an NS5A inhibitor), paritaprevir (an NS3/4A inhibitor) coadministered with ritonavir (r), and dasabuvir (an NS5B nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitor), referred to as the 3D regimen, and the combination of ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, referred to as the 2D regimen, have demonstrated high efficacy with and without ribavirin in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects. These regimens have potential for coadministration with sofosbuvir (nucleoside NS5B inhibitor) in the treatment of HCV. This phase 1, drug-drug interaction, open-label, multiple-dose study enrolled 32 healthy subjects to receive the 3D or 2D regimen in combination with sofosbuvir. Doses of study drugs were as follows: ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, 25/150/100 mg daily (QD); dasabuvir, 250 mg twice daily (BID); and sofosbuvir, 400 mg QD. Blood samples were collected on study days 7, 14, and 21 for evaluating drug interaction at steady state. The effect of the 3D and 2D regimens on the pharmacokinetics of sofosbuvir and its circulating metabolite GS-331007 and vice versa was assessed by a repeated-measures analysis. Exposures of the 3D and 2D regimens were similar (≤20% change) during coadministration with sofosbuvir and during administration alone. Sofosbuvir exposures were 61% to 112% higher with the 3D regimen and 64% to 93% higher with the 2D regimen than with sofosbuvir alone. GS-331007 total exposures were 27% and 32% higher with the 3D and 2D regimens, respectively, than with sofosbuvir alone. Increases in sofosbuvir and GS-331007 exposures likely resulted from breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and/or P glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter inhibition by paritaprevir and ritonavir. No subjects discontinued the study due to study drug-related adverse events. No dose adjustment is recommended for 3D, 2D, or sofosbuvir in clinical trials exploring the safety and efficacy of the combination. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT

  19. New Antituberculosis Drugs: From Clinical Trial to Programmatic Use

    PubMed Central

    Gualano, Gina; Capone, Susanna; Matteelli, Alberto; Palmieri, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases is challenging because it relies on second-line drugs that are less potent and more toxic than those used in the clinical management of drug-susceptible TB. Moreover, treatment outcomes for MDR-TB are generally poor compared to drug sensitive disease, highlighting the need for of new drugs. For the first time in more than 50 years, two new anti-TB drugs were approved and released. Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diarylquinoline compound that showed durable culture conversion at 24 weeks in phase IIb trials. Delamanid is the first drug of the nitroimidazole class to enter clinical practice. Similarly to bedaquiline results of phase IIb studies showed increased sputum-culture conversion at 2 months and better final treatment outcomes in patients with MDR-TB. Among repurposed drugs linezolid and carbapenems may represent a valuable drug to treat cases of MDR and extensively drug-resistant TB. The recommended regimen for MDR-TB is the combination of at least four drugs to which M. tuberculosis is likely to be susceptible for the duration of 20 months. Drugs are chosen with a stepwise selection process through five groups on the basis of efficacy, safety, and cost. Clinical phase III trials on new regimen are ongoing that could prove transformative against MDR-TB, by being shorter (six months), simpler (an all-oral regimen) and safer than current standard therapy. It is fundamental that the adoption of the new drugs is done responsibly to avoid inappropriate use. Concentration of in-patient MDR-TB treatment in specialized centers could be considered in countries with low numbers of cases in order to provide appropriate clinical case management and to prevent emergence of drug resistance. PMID:27403268

  20. New Antituberculosis Drugs: From Clinical Trial to Programmatic Use.

    PubMed

    Gualano, Gina; Capone, Susanna; Matteelli, Alberto; Palmieri, Fabrizio

    2016-06-24

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases is challenging because it relies on second-line drugs that are less potent and more toxic than those used in the clinical management of drug-susceptible TB. Moreover, treatment outcomes for MDR-TB are generally poor compared to drug sensitive disease, highlighting the need for of new drugs. For the first time in more than 50 years, two new anti-TB drugs were approved and released. Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diarylquinoline compound that showed durable culture conversion at 24 weeks in phase IIb trials. Delamanid is the first drug of the nitroimidazole class to enter clinical practice. Similarly to bedaquiline results of phase IIb studies showed increased sputum-culture conversion at 2 months and better final treatment outcomes in patients with MDR-TB. Among repurposed drugs linezolid and carbapenems may represent a valuable drug to treat cases of MDR and extensively drug-resistant TB. The recommended regimen for MDR-TB is the combination of at least four drugs to which M. tuberculosis is likely to be susceptible for the duration of 20 months. Drugs are chosen with a stepwise selection process through five groups on the basis of efficacy, safety, and cost. Clinical phase III trials on new regimen are ongoing that could prove transformative against MDR-TB, by being shorter (six months), simpler (an all-oral regimen) and safer than current standard therapy. It is fundamental that the adoption of the new drugs is done responsibly to avoid inappropriate use. Concentration of in-patient MDR-TB treatment in specialized centers could be considered in countries with low numbers of cases in order to provide appropriate clinical case management and to prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  1. New Antituberculosis Drugs: From Clinical Trial to Programmatic Use.

    PubMed

    Gualano, Gina; Capone, Susanna; Matteelli, Alberto; Palmieri, Fabrizio

    2016-06-24

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases is challenging because it relies on second-line drugs that are less potent and more toxic than those used in the clinical management of drug-susceptible TB. Moreover, treatment outcomes for MDR-TB are generally poor compared to drug sensitive disease, highlighting the need for of new drugs. For the first time in more than 50 years, two new anti-TB drugs were approved and released. Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diarylquinoline compound that showed durable culture conversion at 24 weeks in phase IIb trials. Delamanid is the first drug of the nitroimidazole class to enter clinical practice. Similarly to bedaquiline results of phase IIb studies showed increased sputum-culture conversion at 2 months and better final treatment outcomes in patients with MDR-TB. Among repurposed drugs linezolid and carbapenems may represent a valuable drug to treat cases of MDR and extensively drug-resistant TB. The recommended regimen for MDR-TB is the combination of at least four drugs to which M. tuberculosis is likely to be susceptible for the duration of 20 months. Drugs are chosen with a stepwise selection process through five groups on the basis of efficacy, safety, and cost. Clinical phase III trials on new regimen are ongoing that could prove transformative against MDR-TB, by being shorter (six months), simpler (an all-oral regimen) and safer than current standard therapy. It is fundamental that the adoption of the new drugs is done responsibly to avoid inappropriate use. Concentration of in-patient MDR-TB treatment in specialized centers could be considered in countries with low numbers of cases in order to provide appropriate clinical case management and to prevent emergence of drug resistance. PMID:27403268

  2. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. disease-modifying drugs.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs, meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  3. Toward a complete dataset of drug-drug interaction information from publicly available sources.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, Serkan; Horn, John; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Stan, Johann; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Vilar, Santiago; Brochhausen, Mathias; Samwald, Matthias; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Although potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) are a significant source of preventable drug-related harm, there is currently no single complete source of PDDI information. In the current study, all publically available sources of PDDI information that could be identified using a comprehensive and broad search were combined into a single dataset. The combined dataset merged fourteen different sources including 5 clinically-oriented information sources, 4 Natural Language Processing (NLP) Corpora, and 5 Bioinformatics/Pharmacovigilance information sources. As a comprehensive PDDI source, the merged dataset might benefit the pharmacovigilance text mining community by making it possible to compare the representativeness of NLP corpora for PDDI text extraction tasks, and specifying elements that can be useful for future PDDI extraction purposes. An analysis of the overlap between and across the data sources showed that there was little overlap. Even comprehensive PDDI lists such as DrugBank, KEGG, and the NDF-RT had less than 50% overlap with each other. Moreover, all of the comprehensive lists had incomplete coverage of two data sources that focus on PDDIs of interest in most clinical settings. Based on this information, we think that systems that provide access to the comprehensive lists, such as APIs into RxNorm, should be careful to inform users that the lists may be incomplete with respect to PDDIs that drug experts suggest clinicians be aware of. In spite of the low degree of overlap, several dozen cases were identified where PDDI information provided in drug product labeling might be augmented by the merged dataset. Moreover, the combined dataset was also shown to improve the performance of an existing PDDI NLP pipeline and a recently published PDDI pharmacovigilance protocol. Future work will focus on improvement of the methods for mapping between PDDI information sources, identifying methods to improve the use of the merged dataset in PDDI NLP algorithms

  4. Toward a complete dataset of drug-drug interaction information from publicly available sources.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, Serkan; Horn, John; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Stan, Johann; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Vilar, Santiago; Brochhausen, Mathias; Samwald, Matthias; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Although potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) are a significant source of preventable drug-related harm, there is currently no single complete source of PDDI information. In the current study, all publically available sources of PDDI information that could be identified using a comprehensive and broad search were combined into a single dataset. The combined dataset merged fourteen different sources including 5 clinically-oriented information sources, 4 Natural Language Processing (NLP) Corpora, and 5 Bioinformatics/Pharmacovigilance information sources. As a comprehensive PDDI source, the merged dataset might benefit the pharmacovigilance text mining community by making it possible to compare the representativeness of NLP corpora for PDDI text extraction tasks, and specifying elements that can be useful for future PDDI extraction purposes. An analysis of the overlap between and across the data sources showed that there was little overlap. Even comprehensive PDDI lists such as DrugBank, KEGG, and the NDF-RT had less than 50% overlap with each other. Moreover, all of the comprehensive lists had incomplete coverage of two data sources that focus on PDDIs of interest in most clinical settings. Based on this information, we think that systems that provide access to the comprehensive lists, such as APIs into RxNorm, should be careful to inform users that the lists may be incomplete with respect to PDDIs that drug experts suggest clinicians be aware of. In spite of the low degree of overlap, several dozen cases were identified where PDDI information provided in drug product labeling might be augmented by the merged dataset. Moreover, the combined dataset was also shown to improve the performance of an existing PDDI NLP pipeline and a recently published PDDI pharmacovigilance protocol. Future work will focus on improvement of the methods for mapping between PDDI information sources, identifying methods to improve the use of the merged dataset in PDDI NLP algorithms

  5. ‘RE:fine drugs’: an interactive dashboard to access drug repurposing opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Moosavinasab, Soheil; Patterson, Jeremy; Strouse, Robert; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Regan, Kelly; Payne, Philip R. O.; Huang, Yungui; Lin, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    The process of discovering new drugs has been extremely costly and slow in the last decades despite enormous investment in pharmaceutical research. Drug repurposing enables researchers to speed up the process of discovering other conditions that existing drugs can effectively treat, with low cost and fast FDA approval. Here, we introduce ‘RE:fine Drugs’, a freely available interactive website for integrated search and discovery of drug repurposing candidates from GWAS and PheWAS repurposing datasets constructed using previously reported methods in Nature Biotechnology. ‘RE:fine Drugs’ demonstrates the possibilities to identify and prioritize novelty of candidates for drug repurposing based on the theory of transitive Drug–Gene–Disease triads. This public website provides a starting point for research, industry, clinical and regulatory communities to accelerate the investigation and validation of new therapeutic use of old drugs. Database URL: http://drug-repurposing.nationwidechildrens.org PMID:27189611

  6. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms. PMID:26392756

  7. Toward an optimized therapy for tuberculosis? Drugs in clinical trials and in preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenkun; Lienhardt, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be one of the greatest challenges in the global public health arena. Current therapeutic agents against TB are old and inadequate, particularly in the face of many new challenges. Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) has become prevalent in many parts of the world and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is rapidly emerging. There are few or essentially no effective drugs available to treat these drug-resistant forms of TB. TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has become another major problem in areas with high prevalence of HIV infection. Simultaneous treatment of TB and HIV is difficult due to the severe drug-drug interactions between the first-line rifamycin-containing TB therapy and antiretroviral agents. However, there have been some encouraging developments in TB drug research and development within the past decade. At present there are 6 compounds, including 3 novel agents, in late stages of clinical development. There are even larger numbers of compounds and projects in the TB drug pipeline at the discovery stage and in early stages of clinical development, mainly targeting treatment shortening and drug resistance. Despite these encouraging developments, the current TB drug pipeline is not sufficient to address the multitude of challenges inherent in the current standard of TB therapy. A stronger TB drug pipeline and a new paradigm for the development of novel TB drug combinations are needed.

  8. Clinical applications of biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gurman, Pablo; Miranda, Oscar R; Clayton, Kevin; Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of devices to micrometer and nanometer scales, combined with the use of biocompatible and functional materials, has created new opportunities for the implementation of drug delivery systems. Advances in biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery platforms promise a new generation of capabilities for the treatment of acute conditions and chronic illnesses, which require high adherence to treatment, in which temporal control over the pharmacokinetic profiles is critical. In addition, clinical conditions that require a combination of drugs with specific pharmacodynamic profiles and local delivery will benefit from drug delivery microdevices. This review provides a summary of various clinical applications for state-of-the-art controlled drug delivery microdevices, including cancer, endocrine and ocular disorders, and acute conditions such as hemorrhagic shock. Regulatory considerations for clinical translation of drug delivery microdevices are also discussed. Drug delivery microdevices promise a remarkable gain in clinical outcomes and a substantial social impact. A review of articles covering the field of microdevices for drug delivery was performed between January 1, 1990, and January 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine.

  9. World Antimalarial Resistance Network I: clinical efficacy of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Price, Ric N; Dorsey, Grant; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Barnes, Karen I; Baird, J Kevin; d'Alessandro, Umberto; Guerin, Philippe J; Laufer, Miriam K; Naidoo, Inbarani; Nosten, François; Olliaro, Piero; Plowe, Christopher V; Ringwald, Pascal; Sibley, Carol H; Stepniewska, Kasia; White, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of antimalarial drug trials in the last ten years provides the opportunity to launch a concerted global surveillance effort to monitor antimalarial drug efficacy. The diversity of clinical study designs and analytical methods undermines the current ability to achieve this. The proposed World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN) aims to establish a comprehensive clinical database from which standardised estimates of antimalarial efficacy can be derived and monitored over time from diverse geographical and endemic regions. The emphasis of this initiative is on five key variables which define the therapeutic response. Ensuring that these data are collected at the individual patient level in a consistent format will facilitate better data management and analytical practices, and ensure that clinical data can be readily collated and made amenable for pooled analyses. Such an approach, if widely adopted will permit accurate and timely recognition of trends in drug efficacy. This will guide not only appropriate interventions to deal with established multidrug resistant strains of malaria, but also facilitate prompt action when new strains of drug resistant plasmodia first emerge. A comprehensive global database incorporating the key determinants of the clinical response with in vitro, molecular and pharmacokinetic parameters will bring together relevant data on host, drug and parasite factors that are fundamental contributors to treatment efficacy. This resource will help guide rational drug policies that optimize antimalarial drug use, in the hope that the emergence and spread of resistance to new drugs can be, if not prevented, at least delayed.

  10. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics of drug-induced esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Jeong, Ji Bong; Kim, Ji Won; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Chang, Mee Soo; Im, Jong Pil; Kang, Hyoun Woo; Shin, Cheol Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate clinical, endoscopic and pathological characteristics of drug-induced esophagitis. METHODS: Data for patients diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis from April 2002 to May 2013 was reviewed. Patients diagnosed with malignancy, viral or fungal esophagitis were excluded. Clinical, endoscopic and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis were analyzed. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis. Their mean age was 43.9 ± 18.9 years and 35.9% were male. Common symptoms were chest pain (71.8%), odynophagia (38.5%) and dysphagia (29.5%). The endoscopic location was in the middle third of esophagus in 78.2%. Endoscopic findings were ulcer (82.1%), erosion (17.9%), ulcer with bleeding (24.4%), coating with drug material (5.1%), impacted pill fragments (3.8%) and stricture (2.6%). Kissing ulcers were observed in 43.6%. The main causative agents were antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. All the patients were treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or sucralfate, and the causative drugs were discontinued. Nineteen patients with drug-induced esophagitis were followed up with endoscopy and revealed normal findings, scars or healing ulcers. CONCLUSION: Drug-induced esophagitis mainly presents as chest pain, odynophagia and dysphagia, and may be successfully treated with PPIs and discontinuation of the causative drug. Kissing ulcers were observed in 43.6%. PMID:25152603

  11. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormones.

    PubMed

    Svalheim, Sigrid; Sveberg, Line; Mochol, Monika; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known to have endocrine side effects in both men and women. These can affect fertility, sexuality, thyroid function, and bone health, all functions of major importance for well-being and quality of life. The liver enzyme inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs), like phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine, and also valproate (VPA), a non-EIAED, are most likely to cause such side effects. AED treatment can alter the levels of different sex hormones. EIAEDs increase sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women. Over time, this elevation can lead to lower levels of bioactive testosterone and estradiol, which may cause menstrual disturbances, sexual problems, and eventually reduced fertility. VPA can cause weight gain in both men and women. In women, VPA can also lead to androgenization with increased serum testosterone concentrations, menstrual disturbances, and polycystic ovaries. Lamotrigine has not been shown to result in endocrine side effects. The newer AEDs have not yet been thoroughly studied, but case reports indicate that some of these drugs could also be suspected to cause such effects if endocrine changes commence after treatment initiation. It is important to be aware of possible endocrine side effects of AEDs as they can have a major impact on quality of life, and are, at least partly, reversible after AED discontinuation.

  12. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormones.

    PubMed

    Svalheim, Sigrid; Sveberg, Line; Mochol, Monika; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known to have endocrine side effects in both men and women. These can affect fertility, sexuality, thyroid function, and bone health, all functions of major importance for well-being and quality of life. The liver enzyme inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs), like phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine, and also valproate (VPA), a non-EIAED, are most likely to cause such side effects. AED treatment can alter the levels of different sex hormones. EIAEDs increase sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women. Over time, this elevation can lead to lower levels of bioactive testosterone and estradiol, which may cause menstrual disturbances, sexual problems, and eventually reduced fertility. VPA can cause weight gain in both men and women. In women, VPA can also lead to androgenization with increased serum testosterone concentrations, menstrual disturbances, and polycystic ovaries. Lamotrigine has not been shown to result in endocrine side effects. The newer AEDs have not yet been thoroughly studied, but case reports indicate that some of these drugs could also be suspected to cause such effects if endocrine changes commence after treatment initiation. It is important to be aware of possible endocrine side effects of AEDs as they can have a major impact on quality of life, and are, at least partly, reversible after AED discontinuation. PMID:25797888

  13. Developing a Molecular Roadmap of Drug-Food Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map. PMID:25668218

  14. Comprehensive non-clinical respiratory evaluation of promising new drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Dennis J. . E-mail: dennis.j.murphy@GSK.com

    2005-09-01

    The need to evaluate the potential for new drugs to produce adverse effects on respiratory function in non-clinical safety assessment is based on the known effects of drugs from a variety of pharmacological/therapeutic classes on the respiratory system, the life-threatening consequences of respiratory dysfunction, and compliance with world-wide regulatory safety guidelines. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the functional disorders of the respiratory system and to present the strategy and techniques considered to be most appropriate for detecting and characterizing drug-induced respiratory disorders in non-clinical safety studies.

  15. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  16. Herb–drug interactions: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this overview of systematic reviews (SRs) is to evaluate critically the evidence regarding interactions between herbal medicinal products (HMPs) and synthetic drugs. METHODS Four electronic databases were searched to identify relevant SRs. RESULTS Forty‐six SRs of 46 different HMPs met our inclusion criteria. The vast majority of SRs were of poor methodological quality. The majority of these HMPs were not associated with severe herb–drug interactions. Serious herb–drug interactions were noted for Hypericum perforatum and Viscum album. The most severe interactions resulted in transplant rejection, delayed emergence from anaesthesia, cardiovascular collapse, renal and liver toxicity, cardiotoxicity, bradycardia, hypovolaemic shock, inflammatory reactions with organ fibrosis and death. Moderately severe interactions were noted for Ginkgo biloba, Panax ginseng, Piper methysticum, Serenoa repens and Camellia sinensis. The most commonly interacting drugs were antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. CONCLUSION The majority of the HMPs evaluated in SRs were not associated with drug interactions with serious consequences. However, the poor quality and the scarcity of the primary data prevent firm conclusions. PMID:22670731

  17. Kinetic analysis of drug-protein interactions by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-10-01

    Information on the kinetics of drug-protein interactions is of crucial importance in drug discovery and development. Several methods based on affinity chromatography have been developed in recent years to examine the association and dissociation rates of these processes. These techniques include band-broadening measurements, the peak decay method, peak fitting methods, the split-peak method, and free fraction analysis. This review will examine the general principles and applications of these approaches and discuss their use in the characterization, screening and analysis of drug-protein interactions in the body. PMID:26724332

  18. Prescription Drug Abuse & Diversion: Role of the Pain Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, Khary K.; March, Samantha J.; Inciardi, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the role that South Florida pain management clinics may be playing in the abuse and diversion of prescription drugs. This study explores 1) the characteristics and practices of pain clinics that may be facilitating the drug-seeking endeavors of prescription drug abusers and 2) the drug-seeking behaviors of prescription drug abusers who use pain clinics as a primary source for drugs. Thirty in-depth interviews were conducted with prescription drug abusers in South Florida. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and codes were generated based on thematic analyses of the data. Using grounded theory strategies, the analysis revealed six main themes: “pill mills”, on-site pharmacies, liberal prescribing habits, “sponsoring” drug diversion, pain doctor/pharmacy shopping, and faking symptoms/documentation. These findings should provide insights for law enforcement, regulatory agencies, and industry as they attempt to develop appropriate policy initiatives and recommendations for best practices. PMID:21278927

  19. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:22837724

  20. Dendrimers in anticancer drug delivery: mechanism of interaction of drug and dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N K

    2016-11-01

    Dendrimers represents a novel class of macromolecules, which are derived from branches upon branches type structural design. Dendrimers are emerging as promising drug-delivery molecule because of their extraordinary properties including membrane interaction, monodispersity, well-defined size, shape and molecular weight, etc. Drugs interact with dendrimers in three ways; (a) physical encapsulation, (b) electrostatic interactions, and (c) covalent conjugations. Due to compact, globular structure and availability of interior cavity spaces and multiple surface functional groups, drug molecules can be encapsulated both in the interior of the dendrimers (physical encapsulation) as well as attached to the surface functional groups (covalent conjugations).

  1. [Antiarrhythmic drug allapinin: review of results of clinical investigation].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, S F; Dzhakhangirov, F N

    2002-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic drug allapinin has been used in clinical practice for a long time but data of investigation of its effects and mechanism of action are scanty. The aim of this review is to summarize results of clinical studies of allapinin supplementing them with personal unpublished data. The review embraces pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drug, its efficacy in the treatment of various cardiac rhythm disturbances and side effects. The conclusion is made that clinical application of allapinin as class 1C antiarrhythmic drug according to Vaughan-Williams classification should be guided by general recommendations concerning indications and contraindications for this class of antiarrhythmic drugs. Special feature of allapinin is its high efficacy for prevention of attacks of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  2. Prediction of Drug Indications Based on Chemical Interactions and Chemical Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guohua; Lu, Yin; Lu, Changhong; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Discovering potential indications of novel or approved drugs is a key step in drug development. Previous computational approaches could be categorized into disease-centric and drug-centric based on the starting point of the issues or small-scaled application and large-scale application according to the diversity of the datasets. Here, a classifier has been constructed to predict the indications of a drug based on the assumption that interactive/associated drugs or drugs with similar structures are more likely to target the same diseases using a large drug indication dataset. To examine the classifier, it was conducted on a dataset with 1,573 drugs retrieved from Comprehensive Medicinal Chemistry database for five times, evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation, yielding five 1st order prediction accuracies that were all approximately 51.48%. Meanwhile, the model yielded an accuracy rate of 50.00% for the 1st order prediction by independent test on a dataset with 32 other drugs in which drug repositioning has been confirmed. Interestingly, some clinically repurposed drug indications that were not included in the datasets are successfully identified by our method. These results suggest that our method may become a useful tool to associate novel molecules with new indications or alternative indications with existing drugs. PMID:25821813

  3. Challenges and guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Abida; Parveen, Bushra; Parveen, Rabea; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) has defined herbal medicines as finished labeled medicinal product that contain an active ingredient, aerial, or underground parts of the plant or other plant material or combinations. According to a report of WHO, about 80% of the world population is reported to rely on traditional medicine for their primary health care needs. Even in the developed countries, complementary or alternative medicine is gaining popularity. A report of a global survey on national policy on traditional medicine and regulation of herbal medicines indicated that about 50 countries including China, Japan, and Germany already have their national policy and laws on regulations of traditional medicines. Herbal drugs possess a long history of its use and better patient tolerance. These are cheaper and easily available in countries like India due to rich agro culture conditions. However, reckless utilization of resources threatens the sustainability of several plant species. Traditional medicines are governed by the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940 and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules of 1945. In 1959, the Government of India amended the Drugs and Cosmetics Act to include drugs that are derived from traditional Indian medicine. In 1993, the guidelines for the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines developed by an expert committee directed that the procedures laid down by the office of the Drug Controller General of India for allopathic drugs should be followed for all traditional and herbal products to enter into clinical trials for any therapeutic condition. However, there are certain loop holes in the clinical trials of herbal drugs as the lack of stringent bylaws and regulations. Hence, a deep insight of important challenges and major regulatory guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs and botanicals is discussed in the present communication. There is lack of scientific evidence to evaluate safety and efficacy of herbal drugs. The quality of the trial drug

  4. Challenges and guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Abida; Parveen, Bushra; Parveen, Rabea; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) has defined herbal medicines as finished labeled medicinal product that contain an active ingredient, aerial, or underground parts of the plant or other plant material or combinations. According to a report of WHO, about 80% of the world population is reported to rely on traditional medicine for their primary health care needs. Even in the developed countries, complementary or alternative medicine is gaining popularity. A report of a global survey on national policy on traditional medicine and regulation of herbal medicines indicated that about 50 countries including China, Japan, and Germany already have their national policy and laws on regulations of traditional medicines. Herbal drugs possess a long history of its use and better patient tolerance. These are cheaper and easily available in countries like India due to rich agro culture conditions. However, reckless utilization of resources threatens the sustainability of several plant species. Traditional medicines are governed by the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940 and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules of 1945. In 1959, the Government of India amended the Drugs and Cosmetics Act to include drugs that are derived from traditional Indian medicine. In 1993, the guidelines for the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines developed by an expert committee directed that the procedures laid down by the office of the Drug Controller General of India for allopathic drugs should be followed for all traditional and herbal products to enter into clinical trials for any therapeutic condition. However, there are certain loop holes in the clinical trials of herbal drugs as the lack of stringent bylaws and regulations. Hence, a deep insight of important challenges and major regulatory guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs and botanicals is discussed in the present communication. There is lack of scientific evidence to evaluate safety and efficacy of herbal drugs. The quality of the trial drug

  5. Discovery and explanation of drug-drug interactions via text mining.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Garten, Yael; Altman, Russ B

    2012-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can occur when two drugs interact with the same gene product. Most available information about gene-drug relationships is contained within the scientific literature, but is dispersed over a large number of publications, with thousands of new publications added each month. In this setting, automated text mining is an attractive solution for identifying gene-drug relationships and aggregating them to predict novel DDIs. In previous work, we have shown that gene-drug interactions can be extracted from Medline abstracts with high fidelity - we extract not only the genes and drugs, but also the type of relationship expressed in individual sentences (e.g. metabolize, inhibit, activate and many others). We normalize these relationships and map them to a standardized ontology. In this work, we hypothesize that we can combine these normalized gene-drug relationships, drawn from a very broad and diverse literature, to infer DDIs. Using a training set of established DDIs, we have trained a random forest classifier to score potential DDIs based on the features of the normalized assertions extracted from the literature that relate two drugs to a gene product. The classifier recognizes the combinations of relationships, drugs and genes that are most associated with the gold standard DDIs, correctly identifying 79.8% of assertions relating interacting drug pairs and 78.9% of assertions relating noninteracting drug pairs. Most significantly, because our text processing method captures the semantics of individual gene-drug relationships, we can construct mechanistic pharmacological explanations for the newly-proposed DDIs. We show how our classifier can be used to explain known DDIs and to uncover new DDIs that have not yet been reported.

  6. Drug–drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. Areas covered This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. Expert opinion We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse. PMID:25539046

  7. An Approximate Matching Method for Clinical Drug Names

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Lee; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan E.; Nguyen, Thang; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To develop an approximate matching method for finding the closest drug names within existing RxNorm content for drug name variants found in local drug formularies. Methods: We used a drug-centric algorithm to determine the closest strings between the RxNorm data set and local variants which failed the exact and normalized string matching searches. Aggressive measures such as token splitting, drug name expansion and spelling correction are used to try and resolve drug names. The algorithm is evaluated against three sets containing a total of 17,164 drug name variants. Results: Mapping of the local variant drug names to the targeted concept descriptions ranged from 83.8% to 92.8% in three test sets. The algorithm identified the appropriate RxNorm concepts as the top candidate in 76.8%, 67.9% and 84.8% of the cases in the three test sets and among the top three candidates in 90–96% of the cases. Conclusion: Using a drug-centric token matching approach with aggressive measures to resolve unknown names provides effective mappings to clinical drug names and has the potential of facilitating the work of drug terminology experts in mapping local formularies to reference terminologies. PMID:22195172

  8. Intrapartum Magnesium Sulfate and the Potential for Cardiopulmonary Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sarah C.; Stockmann, Chris; Balch, Alfred; Clark, Erin A.S.; Kamyar, Manijeh; Varner, Michael; Korgenski, E. Kent; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Spigarelli, Michael G.; Sherwin, Catherine M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the frequency of possible cardiopulmonary drug-drug interactions among pregnant women who received intrapartum magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). Methods Pregnant women admitted to an Intermountain Healthcare facility between January 2009 and October 2011 were studied if they received one or more doses of MgSO4. Concomitant medications were electronically queried from an electronic health records system. Adverse events were identified using administrative discharge codes. The frequency of cardiopulmonary drug-drug interactions was compared among women who did, and did not, receive aminoglycoside antibiotics, antacids / laxatives, calcium channel blockers, corticosteroids, diuretics, neuromuscular blocking agents, and vitamin D analogs, all of which are contraindicated for patients receiving MgSO4. Results Overall, 683 women received intrapartum MgSO4 during the study period. A total of 219 MgSO4 potentially interacting drugs were identified among 155 (23%) unique patients. The most commonly identified potentially interacting agents included calcium channel blockers (26%), diuretics (25%), and antacids / laxatives (19%). Longer hospital stays were significantly associated with increasing numbers of MgSO4 interacting drugs (P<0.001). Three of 53 (6%) women who received furosemide experienced a cardiac arrest, compared to 0 of 618 (0%) women who did not receive furosemide (Fisher’s Exact Test P<0.001). Conclusion Intrapartum administration of drugs that interact with MgSO4 is common and associated with prolonged hospital stays and potentially cardiopulmonary drug-drug interactions. Caution is warranted when prescribing MgSO4 in combination with known interacting medications. PMID:24487252

  9. Study of warfarin utilization in hospitalized patients: analysis of possible drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Camargo, Helen Palmira Miranda; Obreli-Neto, Paulo Roque; Girotto, Edmarlon; Pereira, Leonardo Regis Leira

    2016-10-01

    Background Drug-drug interactions in patients taking warfarin may contribute to a higher risk of adverse events. Objective To identify and evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of potential DDIs with warfarin. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a Brazilian tertiary hospital. The electronic prescriptions of the patients receiving warfarin between January 2004 and December 2010 were analyzed. Socio-demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables were collected. Warfarin drug-drug interactions were classified as either risk A, B, C, D, or X according to the Lexi-Interact™ Online database. Results A total of 3048 patients were identified who were prescribed warfarin. Of the 154,161 total drug prescriptions issued, 42,120 (27.3 %) were for warfarin. Evaluation of the prescriptions showed that 63.1 and 0.1 % of patients received concomitant drugs classified as having class D or X risk. It was found that 20,539 (48.7 %) prescriptions had at least one drug with a D or X risk. Patients were prescribed an average of 1.4 (±0.4) concomitant medications with a class D or X warfarin-DDI risk, the most frequent being acetylsalicylic acid and amiodarone. Conclusion The results demonstrate a high prevalence of concomitant drug prescriptions with the potential for clinically relevant DDIs with warfarin, the most frequent being acetylsalicylic acid and amiodarone. PMID:27365092

  10. Drug–drug interactions during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Jennifer J.; Burton, James R.; Everson, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for HCV infection represents a major advance in treatment. The NS3 protease inhibitors, boceprevir and telaprevir, were the first DAAs to receive regulatory approval. When combined with PEG-IFN and ribavirin, these agents increase rates of sustained virologic response in HCV genotype 1 to ~70%. However, this treatment regimen is associated with several toxicities. In addition, both boceprevir and telaprevir are substrates for and inhibitors of the drug transporter P-glycoprotein and the cytochrome P450 enzyme 3A4 and are, therefore, prone to clinically relevant drug interactions. Several new DAAs for HCV are in late stages of clinical development and are likely to be approved in the near future. These include the protease inhibitors, simeprevir and faldaprevir, the NS5A inhibitor, daclatasvir, and the nucleotide polymerase inhibitor, sofosbuvir. Herein, we review the clinical pharmacology and drug interactions of boceprevir, telaprevir and these investigational DAAs. Although boceprevir and telaprevir are involved in many interactions, these interactions are manageable if health-care providers proactively identify and adjust treatments. Emerging DAAs seem to have a reduced potential for drug interactions, which will facilitate their use in the treatment of HCV. PMID:23817323

  11. Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia: incidence, clinical features, laboratory testing, and pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DIIT) is a relatively uncommon adverse reaction caused by drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that react with platelet membrane glycoproteins only when the implicated drug is present. Although more than 100 drugs have been associated with causing DIIT, recent reviews of available data show that carbamazepine, eptifibatide, ibuprofen, quinidine, quinine, oxaliplatin, rifampin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and vancomycin are probably the most frequently implicated. Patients with DIIT typically present with petechiae, bruising, and epistaxis caused by an acute, severe drop in platelet count (often to <20,000 platelets/pL). Diagnosis of DIIT is complicated by its similarity to other non-drug-induced immune thrombocytopenias, including autoimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness, and must be differentiated by temporal association of exposure to a candidate drug with an acute, severe drop in platelet count. Treatment consists of immediate withdrawal of the implicated drug. Criteria for strong evidence of DIIT include (1) exposure to candidate drug-preceded thrombocytopenia; (2) sustained normal platelet levels after discontinuing candidate drug; (3) candidate drug was only drug used before onset of thrombocytopenia or other drugs were continued or reintroduced after resolution of thrombocytopenia, and other causes for thrombocytopenia were excluded; and (4) reexposure to the candidate drug resulted in recurrent thrombocytopenia. Flow cytometry testing for DDAbs can be useful in confirmation of a clinical diagnosis, and monoclonal antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing can be used to determine the platelet glycoprotein target(s), usually GPIIb/IIIa or GPIb/IX/V, but testing is not widely available. Several pathogenic mechanisms for DIIT have been proposed, including hapten, autoantibody, neoepitope, drug-specific, and quinine-type drug mechanisms. A recent proposal

  12. Personalizing Drug Selection Using Advanced Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, John; Spencer, Malik; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Zhang, Kejian; Vinks, Alexander A.; Glauser, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing an advanced pharmacogenetics clinical decision support at one of the United States’ leading pediatric academic medical centers. This system, called CHRISTINE, combines clinical and genetic data to identify the optimal drug therapy when treating patients with epilepsy or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. In the discussion a description of clinical decision support systems is provided, along with an overview of neurocognitive computing and how it is applied in this setting. PMID:19898682

  13. A Single Kernel-Based Approach to Extract Drug-Drug Interactions from Biomedical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijia; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian; Li, Yanpeng

    2012-01-01

    When one drug influences the level or activity of another drug this is known as a drug-drug interaction (DDI). Knowledge of such interactions is crucial for patient safety. However, the volume and content of published biomedical literature on drug interactions is expanding rapidly, making it increasingly difficult for DDIs database curators to detect and collate DDIs information manually. In this paper, we propose a single kernel-based approach to extract DDIs from biomedical literature. This novel kernel-based approach can effectively make full use of syntactic structural information of the dependency graph. In particular, our approach can efficiently represent both single subgraph topological information and the relation of two subgraphs in the dependency graph. Experimental evaluations showed that our single kernel-based approach can achieve state-of-the-art performance on the publicly available DDI corpus without exploiting multiple kernels or additional domain resources. PMID:23133662

  14. Computing with evidence part II: an evidential approach to predicting metabolic drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Richard; Collins, Carol; Horn, John; Kalet, Ira

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel experiment that we conducted with the Drug Interaction Knowledge-base (DIKB) to determine which combinations of evidence enable a rule-based theory of metabolic drug-drug interactions to make the most optimal set of predictions. The focus of the experiment was a group of 16 drugs including six members of the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor family (statins). The experiment helped identify evidence-use strategies that enabled the DIKB to predict significantly more interactions present in a validation set than the most rigorous strategy developed by drug experts with no loss of accuracy. The best-performing strategies included evidence types that would normally be of lesser predictive value but that are often more accessible than more rigorous types. Our experimental methods represent a new approach to leveraging the available scientific evidence within a domain where important evidence is often missing or of questionable value for supporting important assertions. PMID:19539050

  15. Pharmacogenomics in clinical drug development and potential for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amelia W

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata, alopecia totalis, and alopecia universalis likely represent a constellation of related diseases with similar, yet distinct heritability markers. There is currently no known curative therapy that works universally for all patients. Pharmacogenomic research enables the pharmaceutical industry to understand variability of patient responses to drugs during clinical drug development and during post-marketing surveillance. Understanding the genetic basis for patient response/non-response can enable the development of individualized therapies for those patients with an inherited basis for altered response to drug therapy. There are multiple examples of drugs that now contain a recommendation for genetic testing before dosing in their drug labels, directing clinicians to obtain genetic information for each individual patient in order to help direct drug therapy. PMID:24326549

  16. Mechanisms Underlying Food-Drug Interactions: Inhibition of Intestinal Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively. PMID:22884524

  17. Assessment of non-linear combination effect terms for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Schropp, Johannes; Jusko, William J

    2016-10-01

    Drugs interact with their targets in different ways. A diversity of modeling approaches exists to describe the combination effects of two drugs. We investigate several combination effect terms (CET) regarding their underlying mechanism based on drug-receptor binding kinetics, empirical and statistical summation principles and indirect response models. A list with properties is provided and the interrelationship of the CETs is analyzed. A method is presented to calculate the optimal drug concentration pair to produce the half-maximal combination effect. This work provides a comprehensive overview of typically applied CETs and should shed light into the question as to which CET is appropriate for application in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models to describe a specific drug-drug interaction mechanism. PMID:27638639

  18. A graph kernel based on context vectors for extracting drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Hongfei; Zhao, Zhehuan; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The clinical recognition of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a crucial issue for both patient safety and health care cost control. Thus there is an urgent need that DDIs be extracted automatically from biomedical literature by text-mining techniques. Although the top-ranking DDIs systems explore various features of texts, these features can't yet adequately express long and complicated sentences. In this paper, we present an effective graph kernel which makes full use of different types of contexts to identify DDIs from biomedical literature. In our approach, the relations among long-range words, in addition to close-range words, are obtained by the graph representation of a parsed sentence. Context vectors of a vertex, an iterative vectorial representation of all labeled nodes adjacent and nonadjacent to it, adequately capture the direct and indirect substructures' information. Furthermore, the graph kernel considering the distance between context vectors is used to detect DDIs. Experimental results on the DDIExtraction 2013 corpus show that our system achieves the best detection and classification performance (F-score) of DDIs (81.8 and 68.4, respectively). Especially for the Medline-2013 dataset, our system outperforms the top-ranking DDIs systems by F-scores of 10.7 and 12.2 in detection and classification, respectively.

  19. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanisms lead to drug failure because of inability to reach the desired target at a sufficient concentration. This perspective reviews the leading strategies that aim to improve drug delivery to brain tumors and their likelihood to change clinical practice. The English literature was searched for defined search items. Strategies that use systemic delivery and those that use local delivery are critically reviewed. In addition, challenges posed for drug delivery by combined treatment with anti-angiogenic therapy are outlined. To impact clinical practice and to achieve more than just a limited local control, new drugs and delivery systems must adhere to basic clinical expectations. These include, in addition to an antitumor effect, a verified favorable adverse effects profile, easy introduction into clinical practice, feasibility of repeated or continuous administration, and compatibility of the drug or delivery system with any tumor size and brain location. PMID:23502426

  20. Drug-resin drug interactions in patients with delayed gastric emptying: What is optimal time window for drug administration?

    PubMed

    Camilleri, M

    2016-08-01

    Most drug-drug interactions involve overlap or competition in drug metabolic pathways. However, there are medications, typically resins, whose function is to bind injurious substances such as bile acids or potassium within the digestive tract. The objective of this article is to review the functions of the stomach and the kinetics of emptying of different food forms or formulations to make recommendations on timing of medication administration in order to avoid intragastric drug interactions. Based on the profiles and kinetics of emptying of liquid nutrients and homogenized solids, a window of 3 h between administration of a resin drug and another 'target' medication would be expected to allow a median of 80% of medications with particle size <1 mm to empty from the stomach and, hence, avoid potential interaction such as binding of the 'target' medication within the stomach. PMID:26987693

  1. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  2. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A; Haines, Jonathan L; Crawford, Dana C

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  3. High-priority drug–drug interactions for use in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Amrita A; Bell, Douglas; Yoshida, Eileen; Doole, John; Czochanski, Melissa; Middleton, Blackford; Bates, David W

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a set of high-severity, clinically significant drug–drug interactions (DDIs) for use in electronic health records (EHRs). Methods A panel of experts was convened with the goal of identifying critical DDIs that should be used for generating medication-related decision support alerts in all EHRs. Panelists included medication knowledge base vendors, EHR vendors, in-house knowledge base developers from academic medical centers, and both federal and private agencies involved in the regulation of medication use. Candidate DDIs were assessed by the panel based on the consequence of the interaction, severity levels assigned to them across various medication knowledge bases, availability of therapeutic alternatives, monitoring/management options, predisposing factors, and the probability of the interaction based on the strength of evidence available in the literature. Results Of 31 DDIs considered to be high risk, the panel approved a final list of 15 interactions. Panelists agreed that this list represented drugs that are contraindicated for concurrent use, though it does not necessarily represent a complete list of all such interacting drug pairs. For other drug interactions, severity may depend on additional factors, such as patient conditions or timing of co-administration. Discussion The panel provided recommendations on the creation, maintenance, and implementation of a central repository of high severity interactions. Conclusions A set of highly clinically significant drug-drug interactions was identified, for which warnings should be generated in all EHRs. The panel highlighted the complexity of issues surrounding development and implementation of such a list. PMID:22539083

  4. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Framework for Quantitative Prediction of an Herb–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, S J; Gufford, B T; Dua, R; Fediuk, D J; Graf, T N; Scarlett, Y V; Frederick, K S; Fisher, M B; Oberlies, N H; Paine, M F

    2014-01-01

    Herb–drug interaction predictions remain challenging. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to improve prediction accuracy of potential herb–drug interactions using the semipurified milk thistle preparation, silibinin, as an exemplar herbal product. Interactions between silibinin constituents and the probe substrates warfarin (CYP2C9) and midazolam (CYP3A) were simulated. A low silibinin dose (160 mg/day × 14 days) was predicted to increase midazolam area under the curve (AUC) by 1%, which was corroborated with external data; a higher dose (1,650 mg/day × 7 days) was predicted to increase midazolam and (S)-warfarin AUC by 5% and 4%, respectively. A proof-of-concept clinical study confirmed minimal interaction between high-dose silibinin and both midazolam and (S)-warfarin (9 and 13% increase in AUC, respectively). Unexpectedly, (R)-warfarin AUC decreased (by 15%), but this is unlikely to be clinically important. Application of this PBPK modeling framework to other herb–drug interactions could facilitate development of guidelines for quantitative prediction of clinically relevant interactions. PMID:24670388

  5. The status of platinum anticancer drugs in the clinic and in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wheate, Nial J; Walker, Shonagh; Craig, Gemma E; Oun, Rabbab

    2010-09-21

    Since its approval in 1979 cisplatin has become an important component in chemotherapy regimes for the treatment of ovarian, testicular, lung and bladder cancers, as well as lymphomas, myelomas and melanoma. Unfortunately its continued use is greatly limited by severe dose limiting side effects and intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Over the last 30 years, 23 other platinum-based drugs have entered clinical trials with only two (carboplatin and oxaliplatin) of these gaining international marketing approval, and another three (nedaplatin, lobaplatin and heptaplatin) gaining approval in individual nations. During this time there have been more failures than successes with the development of 14 drugs being halted during clinical trials. Currently there are four drugs in the various phases of clinical trial (satraplatin, picoplatin, Lipoplatin and ProLindac). No new small molecule platinum drug has entered clinical trials since 1999 which is representative of a shift in focus away from drug design and towards drug delivery in the last decade. In this perspective article we update the status of platinum anticancer drugs currently approved for use, those undergoing clinical trials and those discontinued during clinical trials, and discuss the results in the context of where we believe the field will develop over the next decade. PMID:20593091

  6. Theory and practice of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Parchment, Ralph E; Doroshow, James H

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies is enhanced by proof of mechanism of action as well as proof of concept, which relate molecular pharmacodynamics to efficacy via changes in cancer cell biology and physiology resulting from drug action on its intended target. Here, we present an introduction to the field of clinical pharmacodynamics, its medical and laboratory aspects, and its practical incorporation into clinical trials. We also describe key success factors that are useful for judging the quality of clinical pharmacodynamic studies, including biopsy quality and suitability, specimen handling, assay fitness-for-purpose, and reagent quality control. This introduction provides not only context for the following articles in this issue, but also an appreciation of the role of well-conducted clinical pharmacodynamic studies in oncology drug development. PMID:27663474

  7. Extraction of pharmacokinetic evidence of drug-drug interactions from the literature.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Lourenço, Anália; Wu, Heng-Yi; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and a subject of intense scientific interest. Biomedical literature mining can aid DDI research by extracting evidence for large numbers of potential interactions from published literature and clinical databases. Though DDI is investigated in domains ranging in scale from intracellular biochemistry to human populations, literature mining has not been used to extract specific types of experimental evidence, which are reported differently for distinct experimental goals. We focus on pharmacokinetic evidence for DDI, essential for identifying causal mechanisms of putative interactions and as input for further pharmacological and pharmacoepidemiology investigations. We used manually curated corpora of PubMed abstracts and annotated sentences to evaluate the efficacy of literature mining on two tasks: first, identifying PubMed abstracts containing pharmacokinetic evidence of DDIs; second, extracting sentences containing such evidence from abstracts. We implemented a text mining pipeline and evaluated it using several linear classifiers and a variety of feature transforms. The most important textual features in the abstract and sentence classification tasks were analyzed. We also investigated the performance benefits of using features derived from PubMed metadata fields, various publicly available named entity recognizers, and pharmacokinetic dictionaries. Several classifiers performed very well in distinguishing relevant and irrelevant abstracts (reaching F1≈0.93, MCC≈0.74, iAUC≈0.99) and sentences (F1≈0.76, MCC≈0.65, iAUC≈0.83). We found that word bigram features were important for achieving optimal classifier performance and that features derived from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms significantly improved abstract classification. We also found that some drug-related named entity recognition tools and dictionaries led to slight but significant improvements, especially in

  8. 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine drug interactions. Screening for inhibitors in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Rajaonarison, J F; Lacarelle, B; Catalin, J; Placidi, M; Rahmani, R

    1992-01-01

    Zidovudine is a widely used antiretroviral drug active against human immunodeficiency virus. The drug interactions of this compound, which are primarily eliminated as a glucuronide, have not yet been extensively studied. Because zidovudine is frequently combined with other drugs, complete knowledge of interactions is essential to optimize AIDS therapy. We therefore screened the effect of 55 molecules, representative of 20 different therapeutic classes, on 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) glucuronidation by human liver microsomes. We demonstrate that many drugs caused more than 15% inhibition of AZT glucuronidation in vitro, whereas major antibiotics (ceftazidine, isoniazid, aminoglycosides, macrolides, and sulfamides), antivirals (2',3'-dideoxycytidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, and acyclovir), flucytosine, metronidazole, acetaminophen, and ranitidine had no effect. For compounds that appeared to inhibit AZT glucuronidation, extrapolation to the clinical situation must take into account both the in vitro apparent Ki values and the usual expected plasma level for the coadministered drug. By considering these parameters, this work indicates that clinically relevant inhibition of AZT glucuronidation may be observed with the following drugs: cefoperazone, penicillin G, amoxicilin, piperacillin, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, miconazole, rifampicin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid, quinidine, phenylbutazone, ketoprofen, probenecid, and propofol. Complementary clinical and pharmacokinetic studies should be performed to validate these assumptions.

  9. Doxazosin-carrageenan interactions: a novel approach for studying drug-polymer interactions and relation to controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Matej; Baumgartner, Saša; Kos, Petra; Kogej, Ksenija

    2011-12-12

    When a cationic drug like doxazosin mesylate (DM) is incorporated into matrix tablets made of anionic polyelectrolytes carrageenans (CARRs) of different types (κ-, ι-, λ-CARR), DM-CARR interactions have a strong impact on drug release. To investigate these interactions, special DM ion-selective membrane electrode was made and applied for construction of binding isotherms. Isotherms were treated by the Zimm-Bragg theory and cooperative binding model. It was demonstrated that binding of doxazosin cations, DH(+), to CARRs is cooperative. It starts at very low drug concentrations with strong electrostatic interactions followed by aggregation of DH(+) ions. Hydrophobic interactions between bound DH(+) substantially contribute to the extent of binding. The strength of interactions increases with increasing negative charge of CARRs. At saturation, the number of DM molecules bound per repeat unit depends on the charge and steric distribution of binding sites on CARRs. Drug release rates of DM from CARR matrices were in accordance with the cooperativity binding constants: the weakest binding resulted in the fastest release. However it was proven that prolonged drug release is possible only by several processes running simultaneously, i.e., by swelling and erosion of CARR matrices on one side and electrostatic interactions and cooperativity effects on the other.

  10. Challenges in the clinical assessment of novel tuberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kelly E; Phillips, Patrick P J; Nahid, Payam; Hoelscher, Michael

    2016-07-01

    To tackle the global TB epidemic effectively, novel treatment strategies are critically needed to shorten the duration of TB therapy and treat drug-resistant TB. Drug development for TB, stymied for decades, has enjoyed a renaissance over the past several years. However, the development of new TB regimens is hindered by the limitations in our understanding and use of preclinical models; the paucity of accurate, early surrogate markers of cure, and challenges in untangling the individual contributions of drugs to multidrug regimens in a complex, multi-compartment disease. Lack of profit motive, advocacy, and imagination has contributed mightily to the dearth of drugs we have on the shelf to treat this ancient disease. Areas that will speed the development of new regimens for TB include novel murine and in vitro pharmacodynamics models, clinical endpoints that are not culture-based, innovative clinical trial designs, and an infusion of much-needed funding. PMID:26827911

  11. Assessing Natural Product-Drug Interactions: An End-to-End Safety Framework.

    PubMed

    Roe, Amy L; Paine, Mary F; Gurley, Bill J; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Jordan, Scott; Griffiths, James C

    2016-04-01

    The use of natural products (NPs), including herbal medicines and other dietary supplements, by North Americans continues to increase across all age groups. This population has access to conventional medications, with significant polypharmacy observed in older adults. Thus, the safety of the interactions between multi-ingredient NPs and drugs is a topic of paramount importance. Considerations such as history of safe use, literature data from animal toxicity and human clinical studies, and NP constituent characterization would provide guidance on whether to assess NP-drug interactions experimentally. The literature is replete with reports of various NP extracts and constituents as potent inhibitors of drug metabolizing enzymes, and transporters. However, without standard methods for NP characterization or in vitro testing, extrapolating these reports to clinically-relevant NP-drug interactions is difficult. This lack of a clear definition of risk precludes clinicians and consumers from making informed decisions about the safety of taking NPs with conventional medications. A framework is needed that describes an integrated robust approach for assessing NP-drug interactions; and, translation of the data into formulation alterations, dose adjustment, labelling, and/or post-marketing surveillance strategies. A session was held at the 41st Annual Summer Meeting of the Toxicology Forum in Colorado Springs, CO, to highlight the challenges and critical components that should be included in a framework approach.

  12. Drug Conjugates Such as Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs), Immunotoxins and Immunoliposomes Challenge Daily Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Janthur, Wolf-Dieter; Cantoni, Nathan; Mamot, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Drug conjugates have been studied extensively in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models but to date only a few compounds have progressed to the clinical setting. This situation is now changing with the publication of studies demonstrating a significant impact on clinical practice and highlighting the potential of this new class of targeted therapies. This review summarizes the pharmacological and molecular background of the main drug conjugation systems, namely antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), immunotoxins and immunoliposomes. All these compounds combine the specific targeting moiety of an antibody or similar construct with the efficacy of a toxic drug. The aim of this strategy is to target tumor cells specifically while sparing normal tissue, thus resulting in high efficacy and low toxicity. Recently, several strategies have been investigated in phase I clinical trials and some have entered phase III clinical development. This review provides a detailed overview of various strategies and critically discusses the most relevant achievements. Examples of the most advanced compounds include T-DM1 and brentuximab vedotin. However, additional promising strategies such as immunotoxins and immunoliposmes are already in clinical development. In summary, targeted drug delivery by drug conjugates is a new emerging class of anti-cancer therapy that may play a major role in the future. PMID:23443108

  13. Access to orphan drugs despite poor quality of clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Alain G; Van Wilder, Philippe B

    2011-01-01

    AIM We analysed the Belgian reimbursement decisions of orphan drugs as compared with those of innovative drugs for more common but equally severe diseases, with special emphasis on the quality of clinical evidence. METHODS Using the National Health Insurance Agency administrative database, we evaluated all submitted orphan drug files between 2002 and 2007. A quality analysis of the clinical evidence in the orphan reimbursement files was performed. The evaluation reports of the French ‘Haute Autorité de Santé’, including the five-point scale parameter ‘Service Médical Rendu (SMR), were examined to compare disease severity. Chi-squared tests (at P < 0.05 significance level) were used to compare the outcome of the reimbursement decisions between orphan and non-orphan innovative medicines. RESULTS Twenty-five files of orphan drugs and 117 files of non-orphan drugs were evaluated. Twenty-two of 25 (88%) submissions of orphan drugs were granted reimbursement as opposed to 74 of the 117 (63%) non-orphan innovative medicines (P = 0.02). Only 52% of the 25 orphan drug files included a randomized controlled trial as opposed to 84% in a random control sample of 25 non-orphan innovative submissions (P < 0.01). The duration of drug exposure was in most cases far too short in relation to the natural history of the disease. CONCLUSIONS Orphan drug designation predicts reimbursement despite poor quality of clinical evidence. The evidence gap at market authorization should be reduced by post-marketing programmes, in which the centralized regulatory and the local reimbursement authorities collaborate in an efficient way across the European Union member states. PMID:21395641

  14. Clinically Relevant Genetic Variations in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In the field of pharmacogenetics, we currently have a few markers to guide physicians as to the best course of therapy for patients. For the most part, these genetic variants are within a drug metabolizing enzyme that has a large effect on the degree or rate at which a drug is converted to its metabolites. For many drugs, response and toxicity are multi-genic traits and understanding relationships between a patient's genetic variation in drug metabolizing enzymes and the efficacy and/or toxicity of a medication offers the potential to optimize therapies. This review will focus on variants in drug metabolizing enzymes with predictable and relatively large impacts on drug efficacy and/or toxicity; some of these drug/gene variant pairs have impacted drug labels by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The challenges in identifying genetic markers and implementing clinical changes based on known markers will be discussed. In addition, the impact of next generation sequencing in identifying rare variants will be addressed. PMID:21453273

  15. Translating Clinical Findings into Knowledge in Drug Safety Evaluation - Drug Induced Liver Injury Prediction System (DILIps)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhichao; Shi, Qiang; Ding, Don; Kelly, Reagan; Fang, Hong; Tong, Weida

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant concern in drug development due to the poor concordance between preclinical and clinical findings of liver toxicity. We hypothesized that the DILI types (hepatotoxic side effects) seen in the clinic can be translated into the development of predictive in silico models for use in the drug discovery phase. We identified 13 hepatotoxic side effects with high accuracy for classifying marketed drugs for their DILI potential. We then developed in silico predictive models for each of these 13 side effects, which were further combined to construct a DILI prediction system (DILIps). The DILIps yielded 60–70% prediction accuracy for three independent validation sets. To enhance the confidence for identification of drugs that cause severe DILI in humans, the “Rule of Three” was developed in DILIps by using a consensus strategy based on 13 models. This gave high positive predictive value (91%) when applied to an external dataset containing 206 drugs from three independent literature datasets. Using the DILIps, we screened all the drugs in DrugBank and investigated their DILI potential in terms of protein targets and therapeutic categories through network modeling. We demonstrated that two therapeutic categories, anti-infectives for systemic use and musculoskeletal system drugs, were enriched for DILI, which is consistent with current knowledge. We also identified protein targets and pathways that are related to drugs that cause DILI by using pathway analysis and co-occurrence text mining. While marketed drugs were the focus of this study, the DILIps has a potential as an evaluation tool to screen and prioritize new drug candidates or chemicals, such as environmental chemicals, to avoid those that might cause liver toxicity. We expect that the methodology can be also applied to other drug safety endpoints, such as renal or cardiovascular toxicity. PMID:22194678

  16. Companion diagnostics for targeted cancer drugs - clinical and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Dana; Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US Food and Drug Administration has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity, they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world. PMID:24904822

  17. iNR-Drug: predicting the interaction of drugs with nuclear receptors in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue-Nong; Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-03-19

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are closely associated with various major diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, and osteoporosis. Therefore, NRs have become a frequent target for drug development. During the process of developing drugs against these diseases by targeting NRs, we are often facing a problem: Given a NR and chemical compound, can we identify whether they are really in interaction with each other in a cell? To address this problem, a predictor called "iNR-Drug" was developed. In the predictor, the drug compound concerned was formulated by a 256-D (dimensional) vector derived from its molecular fingerprint, and the NR by a 500-D vector formed by incorporating its sequential evolution information and physicochemical features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition, and the prediction engine was operated by the SVM (support vector machine) algorithm. Compared with the existing prediction methods in this area, iNR-Drug not only can yield a higher success rate, but is also featured by a user-friendly web-server established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-Drug/, which is particularly useful for most experimental scientists to obtain their desired data in a timely manner. It is anticipated that the iNR-Drug server may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the current approach may be easily extended to study the interactions of drug with other targets as well.

  18. The use of in vitro methods to predict in vivo pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, K A; Ghosh, R

    2001-09-01

    With the dramatic change underway in the process of drug discovery and development it has become increasingly important to define, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the dispositional features of new chemical entities (NCEs) as early in the process as possible. To that end strategies have emerged that are designed to enable reasonable predictions about a NCE's absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, systemic bioavailability and likelihood for significant pre-systemic clearance, character of metabolic processing both within the gastrointestinal tract and the liver, in vivo pharmacokinetics (PK), and likelihood for clinically significant interactions with other drugs. To some extent these strategies have embraced interspecies allometric scaling in which findings in animals are extrapolated to predict outcomes in humans. However, a greater emphasis in recent years has been placed on predicting human PK and the likelihood of clinically significant drug-drug interactions for NCEs solely from in vitro experiments. These general strategies have been methodologically streamlined so that hundreds or even thousands of experiments on a given NCE can be conducted within several days. Dispositional data from these pre-clinical experiments is useful for rapidly identifying potential marketing advantages for NCEs, and for screening out those substances that should not be placed into more expensive and labor-intensive animal experiments or brought to clinical trial. The key issue in these strategies is the accuracy with which pre-clinical findings predict clinical outcomes. Based largely on retrospective analyses the current state of the art exhibits a high percentage of useful predictions. However, there are many examples in which the prediction of either human PK or clinical drug-drug interactions from pre-clinical data has failed. The reasons for inaccurate predictions are manifold, and may include the actual in vitro methodology used, inappropriate model selection, and

  19. 76 FR 50484 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  20. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Background Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Objective Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Methods Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. Results One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). Conclusions The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive

  1. Acaricide, Fungicide and Drug Interactions in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Reed M.; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D.; Ellis, Marion D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Methodology/Principal Findings Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Conclusions/Significance Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an

  2. Laboratory testing of clinically approved drugs against Balamuthia mandrillaris.

    PubMed

    Kalsoom, Huma; Baig, Abdul Mannan; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2014-09-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a free-living protist pathogen that can cause life-threatening granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Given the lack of effective available drugs against B. mandrillaris encephalitis with a mortality rate of more than 90%, here we screened drugs, targeting vital cellular receptors and biochemical pathways, that are already in approved clinical use for their potential clinical usefulness. Amoebicidal assays were performed by incubating B. mandrillaris with drugs (3 × 10(5) cells/0.5 mL/well) in phosphate buffered saline for 24 h and viability was determined using Trypan blue exclusion staining. For controls, amoebae were incubated with the solvent alone. To determine whether effects are reversible, B. mandrillaris were pre-exposed to drugs for 24 h, washed twice, and incubated with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier as food source, for up to 48 h. Of the ten drugs tested, amlodipine, apomorphine, demethoxycurcumin, haloperidol, loperamide, prochlorperazine, procyclidine, and resveratrol showed potent amoebicidal effects, while amiodarone and digoxin exhibited minimal effectiveness. When pre-treated with these drugs, no viable trophozoites re-emerged, suggesting that drugs destroyed parasite irreversibly. Based on the in vitro assay, amlodipine, apomorphine, demethoxycurcumin, haloperidol, loperamide, prochlorperazine, procyclidine, and resveratrol are potential antimicrobials for further testing against B. mandrillaris encephalitis. These findings may provide novel strategies for therapy but further research is needed to determine clinical usefulness of aforementioned drugs against granulomatous amoebic encephalitis caused by B. mandrillaris, and other free-living amoebae, such as Acanthamoeba spp., and Naegleria fowleri. PMID:24875138

  3. Anticholinergic Accumulation: A Slumbering Interaction between Drugs and Food Supplements.

    PubMed

    Vrolijk, Misha F; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Jansen, Eugène H J M; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2015-12-01

    Many compounds display anticholinergic effects which might give rise to cognitive impairment and even delirium. These side effects are caused by their ability to bind to muscarinic receptors in our brain. Especially with combination of compounds, these serious effects are seen. This phenomenon, known as anticholinergic accumulation, is especially seen in the elderly. A classification of drugs for anticholinergic side effects has been made based on clinical observations, the ACB score. Here, we aimed to substantiate this classification by comparing the affinity of numerous drugs for the muscarinic receptors to the ACB score. Additionally, a number of supplements were screened. The affinity of the compounds was determined by their ability to displace the radioligand [(3)H]pirenzepine of the muscarinic receptor induced by these compounds. Our results show that the affinity of a compound for the muscarinic receptors correlated with its ACB score. Also food supplements appeared to bind to these muscarinic receptors. Moreover, several drug-drug, supplement-supplement and supplement-drug combinations had an affinity that is higher than the affinity of single compounds. This explains the phenomenon of anticholinergic accumulation. In conclusion, care should be taken to drug-drug and supplement-drug combinations with respect to anticholinergic accumulation.

  4. Anticholinergic Accumulation: A Slumbering Interaction between Drugs and Food Supplements.

    PubMed

    Vrolijk, Misha F; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Jansen, Eugène H J M; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2015-12-01

    Many compounds display anticholinergic effects which might give rise to cognitive impairment and even delirium. These side effects are caused by their ability to bind to muscarinic receptors in our brain. Especially with combination of compounds, these serious effects are seen. This phenomenon, known as anticholinergic accumulation, is especially seen in the elderly. A classification of drugs for anticholinergic side effects has been made based on clinical observations, the ACB score. Here, we aimed to substantiate this classification by comparing the affinity of numerous drugs for the muscarinic receptors to the ACB score. Additionally, a number of supplements were screened. The affinity of the compounds was determined by their ability to displace the radioligand [(3)H]pirenzepine of the muscarinic receptor induced by these compounds. Our results show that the affinity of a compound for the muscarinic receptors correlated with its ACB score. Also food supplements appeared to bind to these muscarinic receptors. Moreover, several drug-drug, supplement-supplement and supplement-drug combinations had an affinity that is higher than the affinity of single compounds. This explains the phenomenon of anticholinergic accumulation. In conclusion, care should be taken to drug-drug and supplement-drug combinations with respect to anticholinergic accumulation. PMID:26119520

  5. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic.

  6. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic. PMID:25655830

  7. Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) clinical pipeline: a review.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, Ingrid; Blanc, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Biological therapies play an increasing role in cancer treatment, although the number of naked antibodies showing clinical efficacy as single agent remains limited. One way to enhance therapeutic potential of antibodies is to conjugate them to small molecule drugs. This combination is expected to bring together the benefits of highly potent drugs on the one hand and selective binders of specific tumor antigens on the other hand. However, designing an ADC is more complex than a simple meccano game, requiring thoughtful combination of antibody, linker, and drugs in the context of a target and a defined cancer indication. Lessons learned from the first-generation antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) and improvement of the technology guided the design of improved compounds which are now in clinical trials. Brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris(®)), an anti-CD30 antibody conjugated to a potent microtubule inhibitor for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphomas, is the only marketed ADC today. A total of 27 ADC are currently undergoing clinical trials in both hematological malignancies and solid tumor indications. Among them, T-DM1 (trastuzumab emtansine), an ADC comprised of trastuzumab conjugated to DM1, via a non-cleavable linker, is showing very promising results in phase III for the treatment of HER2-positive refractory/relapsed metastatic breast cancer. Other compounds, such as CMC-544, SAR3419, CDX-011, PSMA-ADC, BT-062, and IMGN901 currently in clinical trials, targeting varied antigens and bearing different linker and drugs, contribute to the learning curve of ADC, as do the discontinued ADC. Current challenges include improvement of the therapeutic index, linked to a careful selection of the targets, a better understanding of ADC mechanism of action, the management and understanding of ADC off-target toxicities, as well as the selection of appropriate clinical settings (patient selection, dosing regimen) where these molecules can bring highest

  8. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. PMID:26927160

  9. iNR-Drug: Predicting the Interaction of Drugs with Nuclear Receptors in Cellular Networking

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue-Nong; Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are closely associated with various major diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, and osteoporosis. Therefore, NRs have become a frequent target for drug development. During the process of developing drugs against these diseases by targeting NRs, we are often facing a problem: Given a NR and chemical compound, can we identify whether they are really in interaction with each other in a cell? To address this problem, a predictor called “iNR-Drug” was developed. In the predictor, the drug compound concerned was formulated by a 256-D (dimensional) vector derived from its molecular fingerprint, and the NR by a 500-D vector formed by incorporating its sequential evolution information and physicochemical features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition, and the prediction engine was operated by the SVM (support vector machine) algorithm. Compared with the existing prediction methods in this area, iNR-Drug not only can yield a higher success rate, but is also featured by a user-friendly web-server established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-Drug/, which is particularly useful for most experimental scientists to obtain their desired data in a timely manner. It is anticipated that the iNR-Drug server may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the current approach may be easily extended to study the interactions of drug with other targets as well. PMID:24651462

  10. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  11. Clinical Care of the HIV-Infected Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and chemical dependency, both of which are complicated by and intertwined with mental illness, are complex, overlapping spheres that adversely influence each other and the overall clinical outcomes of the affected individual [1]. Each disorder individually impacts tens of millions of people, with explosive epidemics described worldwide. Drug users have increased age matched morbidity and mortality for a number of medical and psychiatric conditions. HIV/AIDS, with its immunosuppressed states and direct virologic effects, exacerbate morbidity and mortality further among HIV-infected drug users. This article addresses the adverse consequences of HIV/AIDS, drug injection, the secondary comorbidities of both, and the impact of immunosuppression on presentation of disease as well as approaches to managing the HIV-infected drug user. PMID:17502234

  12. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  13. Fatal hydrocodone overdose in a child: pharmacogenetics and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Parvaz; Hildebrandt, Doris; Gong, Inna Y; Schwarz, Ute I; Ciszkowski, Catherine; Ross, Colin J D; Sistonen, Johanna; Carleton, Bruce C; Hayden, Michael R; Lauwers, Albert E; Koren, Gideon

    2010-10-01

    Fatal opioid toxicity occurred in a developmentally delayed child aged 5 years 9 months who was inadvertently administered high doses of hydrocodone for a respiratory tract infection. The concentration of hydrocodone in postmortem blood was in the range associated with fatality; however, hydromorphone, a major metabolite catalyzed by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6), was not detected when using mass spectrometry. Genetic analysis revealed that the child had a reduced capability to metabolize the drug via the CYP2D6 pathway (CYP2D6*2A/*41). Coadministration of clarithromycin (a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitor) for an ear infection and valproic acid for seizures since birth further prevented drug elimination from the body. This case highlights the interplay between pharmacogenetic factors, drug-drug interactions, and dose-related toxicity in a child.

  14. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Fang; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the unprecedented progresses of biomedical nanotechnology during the past few decades, conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been involved into smart DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. Benefiting from the response to specific internal or external triggers, those well-defined nanoplatforms can increase the drug targeting efficacy, in the meantime, reduce side effects/toxicities of payloads, which are key factors for improving patient compliance. In academic field, variety of smart DDSs have been abundantly demonstrated for various intriguing systems, such as stimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, metals/metal oxides, and exosomes. However, these nanoplatforms are lack of standardized manufacturing method, toxicity assessment experience, and clear relevance between the pre-clinical and clinical studies, resulting in the huge difficulties to obtain regulatory and ethics approval. Therefore, such relatively complex stimulus-sensitive nano-DDSs are not currently approved for clinical use. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of smart nanoplatforms for targeting drug delivery. Furthermore, the clinical translation obstacles faced by these smart nanoplatforms have been reviewed and discussed. We also present the future directions and perspectives of stimuli-sensitive DDS in clinical applications. PMID:27375781

  15. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Fang; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the unprecedented progresses of biomedical nanotechnology during the past few decades, conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been involved into smart DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. Benefiting from the response to specific internal or external triggers, those well-defined nanoplatforms can increase the drug targeting efficacy, in the meantime, reduce side effects/toxicities of payloads, which are key factors for improving patient compliance. In academic field, variety of smart DDSs have been abundantly demonstrated for various intriguing systems, such as stimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, metals/metal oxides, and exosomes. However, these nanoplatforms are lack of standardized manufacturing method, toxicity assessment experience, and clear relevance between the pre-clinical and clinical studies, resulting in the huge difficulties to obtain regulatory and ethics approval. Therefore, such relatively complex stimulus-sensitive nano-DDSs are not currently approved for clinical use. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of smart nanoplatforms for targeting drug delivery. Furthermore, the clinical translation obstacles faced by these smart nanoplatforms have been reviewed and discussed. We also present the future directions and perspectives of stimuli-sensitive DDS in clinical applications. PMID:27375781

  16. Adverse Drug Event Ontology: Gap Analysis for Clinical Surveillance Application.

    PubMed

    Adam, Terrence J; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug event identification and management are an important patient safety problem given the potential for event prevention. Previous efforts to provide structured data methods for population level identification of adverse drug events have been established, but important gaps in coverage remain. ADE identification gaps contribute to suboptimal and inefficient event identification. To address the ADE identification problem, a gap assessment was completed with the creation of a proposed comprehensive ontology using a Minimal Clinical Data Set framework incorporating existing identification approaches, clinical literature and a large set of inpatient clinical data. The new ontology was developed and tested using the National Inpatient Sample database with the validation results demonstrating expanded ADE identification capacity. In addition, the newly proposed ontology elements are noted to have significant inpatient mortality, above median inpatient costs and a longer length of stay when compared to existing ADE ontology elements and patients without ADE exposure.

  17. Adverse Drug Event Ontology: Gap Analysis for Clinical Surveillance Application

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Terrence J.; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug event identification and management are an important patient safety problem given the potential for event prevention. Previous efforts to provide structured data methods for population level identification of adverse drug events have been established, but important gaps in coverage remain. ADE identification gaps contribute to suboptimal and inefficient event identification. To address the ADE identification problem, a gap assessment was completed with the creation of a proposed comprehensive ontology using a Minimal Clinical Data Set framework incorporating existing identification approaches, clinical literature and a large set of inpatient clinical data. The new ontology was developed and tested using the National Inpatient Sample database with the validation results demonstrating expanded ADE identification capacity. In addition, the newly proposed ontology elements are noted to have significant inpatient mortality, above median inpatient costs and a longer length of stay when compared to existing ADE ontology elements and patients without ADE exposure. PMID:26306223

  18. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment. PMID:23889048

  19. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment.

  20. Use of PET Imaging to Evaluate Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Langer, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Several membrane transporters belonging to the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) families can transport drugs and drug metabolites and thereby exert an effect on drug absorption, distribution, and excretion, which may potentially lead to transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Some transporter-mediated DDIs may lead to changes in organ distribution of drugs (eg, brain, liver, kidneys) without affecting plasma concentrations. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive imaging method that allows studying of the distribution of radiolabeled drugs to different organs and tissues and is therefore the method of choice to quantitatively assess transporter-mediated DDIs on a tissue level. There are 2 approaches to how PET can be used in transporter-mediated DDI studies. When the drug of interest is a potential perpetrator of DDIs, it may be administered in unlabeled form to assess its influence on tissue distribution of a generic transporter-specific PET tracer (probe substrate). When the drug of interest is a potential victim of DDIs, it may be radiolabeled with carbon-11 or fluorine-18 and used in combination with a prototypical transporter inhibitor (eg, rifampicin). PET has already been used both in preclinical species and in humans to assess the effects of transporter-mediated DDIs on drug disposition in different organ systems, such as brain, liver, and kidneys, for which examples are given in the present review article. Given the growing importance of membrane transporters with respect to drug safety and efficacy, PET is expected to play an increasingly important role in future drug development. PMID:27385172

  1. Pharmacology and Clinical Drug Candidates in Redox Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Ana I.; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Seredenina, Tamara; Kaludercic, Nina; Robledinos-Anton, Natalia; Di Lisa, Fabio; Stocker, Roland; Ghezzi, Pietro; Jaquet, Vincent; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is suggested to be a disease mechanism common to a wide range of disorders affecting human health. However, so far, the pharmacotherapeutic exploitation of this, for example, based on chemical scavenging of pro-oxidant molecules, has been unsuccessful. Recent Advances: An alternative emerging approach is to target the enzymatic sources of disease-relevant oxidative stress. Several such enzymes and isoforms have been identified and linked to different pathologies. For some targets, the respective pharmacology is quite advanced, that is, up to late-stage clinical development or even on the market; for others, drugs are already in clinical use, although not for indications based on oxidative stress, and repurposing seems to be a viable option. Critical Issues: For all other targets, reliable preclinical validation and drug ability are key factors for any translation into the clinic. In this study, specific pharmacological agents with optimal pharmacokinetic profiles are still lacking. Moreover, these enzymes also serve largely unknown physiological functions and their inhibition may lead to unwanted side effects. Future Directions: The current promising data based on new targets, drugs, and drug repurposing are mainly a result of academic efforts. With the availability of optimized compounds and coordinated efforts from academia and industry scientists, unambiguous validation and translation into proof-of-principle studies seem achievable in the very near future, possibly leading towards a new era of redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1113–1129. PMID:26415051

  2. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction assessment between LCZ696, an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, and hydrochlorothiazide, amlodipine, or carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsiu-Ling; Langenickel, Thomas Heiko; Greeley, Michael; Roberts, John; Zhou, Wei; Pal, Parasar; Rebello, Sam; Rajman, Iris; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2015-11-01

    LCZ696 is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor in development for treatments of hypertension and heart failure indications. In 3 separate studies, pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) potential was assessed when LCZ696 was coadministered with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), amlodipine, or carvedilol. The studies used a open-label, single-sequence, 3-period, crossover design in healthy subjects. Blood samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (AHU377, LBQ657, and valsartan), HCTZ, amlodipine, or carvedilol (R[+]- and S[-]-carvedilol) for statistical analysis. When coadministered LCZ696 with HCTZ, the 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of AUCtau,ss of HCTZ and that of LBQ657 were within a 0.80-1.25 interval, whereas HCTZ Cmax,ss decreased by 26%, LBQ657 Cmax,ss increased by 19%, and the AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of valsartan increased by 14% and 16%, respectively. Pharmacokinetics of amlodipine, R(+)- and S(-)-carvedilol, or LBQ657 were not altered after coadministration of LCZ696 with amlodipine or carvedilol. Coadministration of LCZ696 400 mg once daily (qd) with HCTZ 25 mg qd, amlodipine 10 mg qd, or carvedilol 25 mg twice a day (bid) had no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. LCZ696, HCTZ, amlodipine, and carvedilol were safe and well tolerated when given alone or concomitantly in the investigated studies. PMID:27137712

  3. An Overview of the Evidence and Mechanisms of Herb–Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fasinu, Pius S.; Bouic, Patrick J.; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Despite the lack of sufficient information on the safety of herbal products, their use as alternative and/or complementary medicine is globally popular. There is also an increasing interest in medicinal herbs as precursor for pharmacological actives. Of serious concern is the concurrent consumption of herbal products and conventional drugs. Herb–drug interaction (HDI) is the single most important clinical consequence of this practice. Using a structured assessment procedure, the evidence of HDI presents with varying degree of clinical significance. While the potential for HDI for a number of herbal products is inferred from non-human studies, certain HDIs are well established through human studies and documented case reports. Various mechanisms of pharmacokinetic HDI have been identified and include the alteration in the gastrointestinal functions with consequent effects on drug absorption; induction and inhibition of metabolic enzymes and transport proteins; and alteration of renal excretion of drugs and their metabolites. Due to the intrinsic pharmacologic properties of phytochemicals, pharmacodynamic HDIs are also known to occur. The effects could be synergistic, additive, and/or antagonistic. Poor reporting on the part of patients and the inability to promptly identify HDI by health providers are identified as major factors limiting the extensive compilation of clinically relevant HDIs. A general overview and the significance of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic HDI are provided, detailing basic mechanism, and nature of evidence available. An increased level of awareness of HDI is necessary among health professionals and drug discovery scientists. With the increasing number of plant-sourced pharmacological actives, the potential for HDI should always be assessed in the non-clinical safety assessment phase of drug development process. More clinically relevant research is also required in this area as current information on HDI is insufficient for clinical

  4. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Prieto, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance. PMID:25071580

  5. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Prieto, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance.

  6. The interaction of encapsulated pharmaceutical drugs with a silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Morais, Everton C; Correa, Gabriel G; Brambilla, Rodrigo; Radtke, Claudio; Baibich, Ione Maluf; dos Santos, João Henrique Z

    2013-03-01

    A series of seven drugs, namely, fluoxetine, gentamicin, lidocaine, morphine, nifedipine, paracetamol and tetracycline, were encapsulated. The encapsulated systems were characterized using a series of complementary techniques: Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffusive reflectance spectroscopy in the UV-vis region (DRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). According to the DRS spectra, most of the encapsulated systems showed a band shift of the maximum absorption when compared with the corresponding bare pharmaceutical. Additionally, after encapsulation, the drugs exhibited infrared band shifts toward higher wavenumbers, which in turn provided insight into potential sites for interaction with the silica framework. The amine group showed a band shift in the spectra of almost all the drugs (except nifedipine and tetracycline). This finding indicates the possibility of a hydrogen bonding interaction between the drug and the silica via electron donation from the amine group to the silica framework. XPS confirmed this interaction between the pharmaceuticals and the silica through the amine group. A correlation was observed between the textural characteristics of the solids and the spectroscopic data, suggesting that the amine groups from the pharmaceuticals were more perturbed upon encapsulation. PMID:23261562

  7. Assessment of cognitive safety in clinical drug development

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Jonathan P.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Mander, Adrian P.; Adusei, Gabriel; Zavitz, Kenton H.; Blackwell, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is increasingly recognised as an important potential adverse effect of medication. However, many drug development programmes do not incorporate sensitive cognitive measurements. Here, we review the rationale for cognitive safety assessment, and explain several basic methodological principles for measuring cognition during clinical drug development, including study design and statistical analysis, from Phase I through to postmarketing. The crucial issue of how cognition should be assessed is emphasized, especially the sensitivity of measurement. We also consider how best to interpret the magnitude of any identified effects, including comparison with benchmarks. We conclude by discussing strategies for the effective communication of cognitive risks. PMID:26610416

  8. Exploring the interaction between Salvia miltiorrhiza and human serum albumin: Insights from herb-drug interaction reports, computational analysis and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin; Ai, Ni; Xu, Donghang; Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-05-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) binding is one of important pharmacokinetic properties of drug, which is closely related to in vivo distribution and may ultimately influence its clinical efficacy. Compared to conventional drug, limited information on this transportation process is available for medicinal herbs, which significantly hampers our understanding on their pharmacological effects, particularly when herbs and drug are co-administrated as polytherapy to the ailment. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of Salvia miltiorrhiza-Warfarin interaction. Since Warfarin is highly HSA bound in the plasma with selectivity to site I, it is critical to evaluate the possibility of HSA-related herb-drug interaction. Herein an integrated approach was employed to analyze the binding of chemicals identified in S. miltiorrhiza to HSA. Molecular docking simulations revealed filtering criteria for HSA site I compounds that include docking score and key molecular determinants for binding. For eight representative ingredients from the herb, their affinity and specificity to HSA site I was measured and confirmed fluorometrically, which helps to improve the knowledge of interaction mechanisms between this herb and HSA. Our results indicated that several compounds in S. miltiorrhiza were capable of decreasing the binding constant of Warfarin to HSA site I significantly, which may increase free drug concentration in vivo, contributing to the herb-drug interaction observed clinically. Furthermore, the significance of HSA mediated herb-drug interactions was further implied by manual mining on the published literatures on S. miltiorrhiza.

  9. Exploring the interaction between Salvia miltiorrhiza and human serum albumin: Insights from herb-drug interaction reports, computational analysis and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xin; Ai, Ni; Xu, Donghang; Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-05-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) binding is one of important pharmacokinetic properties of drug, which is closely related to in vivo distribution and may ultimately influence its clinical efficacy. Compared to conventional drug, limited information on this transportation process is available for medicinal herbs, which significantly hampers our understanding on their pharmacological effects, particularly when herbs and drug are co-administrated as polytherapy to the ailment. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of Salvia miltiorrhiza-Warfarin interaction. Since Warfarin is highly HSA bound in the plasma with selectivity to site I, it is critical to evaluate the possibility of HSA-related herb-drug interaction. Herein an integrated approach was employed to analyze the binding of chemicals identified in S. miltiorrhiza to HSA. Molecular docking simulations revealed filtering criteria for HSA site I compounds that include docking score and key molecular determinants for binding. For eight representative ingredients from the herb, their affinity and specificity to HSA site I was measured and confirmed fluorometrically, which helps to improve the knowledge of interaction mechanisms between this herb and HSA. Our results indicated that several compounds in S. miltiorrhiza were capable of decreasing the binding constant of Warfarin to HSA site I significantly, which may increase free drug concentration in vivo, contributing to the herb-drug interaction observed clinically. Furthermore, the significance of HSA mediated herb-drug interactions was further implied by manual mining on the published literatures on S. miltiorrhiza.

  10. Drug Development and Challenges for Neuromuscular Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    El Mouelhi, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Drug development process faces many challenges, including those encountered in clinical trials for neuromuscular diseases. Drug development is a lengthy and highly costly process. Out of 10 compounds entering first study in man (phase 1), only one compound reaches the market after an average of 14 years with a cost of $2.7 billion. Nevertheless, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, prescription drugs constituted only 9 % of each health care dollar spent in USA in 2013. Examples of challenges encountered in neuromuscular clinical trials include lack of validated patient-reported outcome tools, blinding issues, and the use of placebo in addition to lack of health authority guidance for orphan diseases. Patient enrollment challenge is the leading cause of missed clinical trial deadlines observed in about 80 % of clinical trials, resulting in delayed availability of potentially life-saving therapies. Another specific challenge introduced by recent technology is the use of social media and risk of bias. Sharing personal experiences while in the study could easily introduce bias among patients that would interfere with accurate interpretation of collected data. To minimize this risk, recent neuromuscular studies incorporate as an inclusion criterion the patient's agreement not to share any of study experiences through social media with other patients during the study conduct. Consideration of these challenges will allow timely response to the high unmet medical needs for many neuromuscular diseases. PMID:26691331

  11. Potential herb-drug interaction in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases during integrated traditional and Western medicine treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Long

    2015-01-01

    The combination of herbs and drugs is one of the most important approaches in the prevention and treatment of diseases in the integrated traditional and Western medicine (ITWM). While most medical practices have proved that the combination of herbs and drugs led to a clinical efficacy that was often superior to merely using only one of them; results from some studies have triggered adverse reactions to such an approach. Since few herb-drug interaction studies were carried out during treatments combining herbs and drugs, it really restricts the development of treatment and treatment theory of the combination of herbs and drugs. Given that herb-drug interactions may occur through the main pathway of cytochrome P450 enzymes and transporters; then to exhaustively study the role and impact of herbs in drug metabolism, as well as to establish a corresponding database, is of great significance for guiding the rational combination of herbs and drugs. When the herb-drug interaction information platform is implemented, we would get at ease a reasonable herb-drug prescription to achieve a better outcome, reduce dosage of some expensive drugs preserving the same efficacy, or even reduce some side effects of particular drugs; which might also promote the dynamic combination of Chinese and Western medicine, and accelerate the theory development of ITWM.

  12. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions and Drug Repositioning via Network-Based Inference

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Lu, Weiqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Zhou, Weixing; Huang, Jin; Tang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Drug-target interaction (DTI) is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI), target-based similarity inference (TBSI) and network-based inference (NBI). Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning. PMID:22589709

  13. Exploiting the lactose-GM3 interaction for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Bavireddi, Harikrishna; Gade, Madhuri; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2015-05-01

    Protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions as a means to target the cell surface for therapeutic applications have been extensively investigated. However, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCIs) have largely been overlooked. Here, we investigate the concept of CCI-mediated drug delivery. Lactose-functionalized β-cyclodextrin (L-β-CD) hosting doxorubicin (Dox) was evaluated for site-specific delivery to cancer cells via interaction with GM3 , a cell-surface carbohydrate. The host-guest complex was evaluated in B16 melanoma cells, which express exceptionally high levels of GM3 , and acute monocytic leukemia (THP-1) and mouse fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells, which lack GM3 on the cell surface. Doxorubicin (Dox) was delivered more efficiently into B16 cells compared with NIH-3T3 and THP-1 cells. In B16 cells pretreated with sialidase or sodium periodate, thus preventing CCI formation, drug uptake was significantly decreased. Taken together, the results of these studies strongly support CCI-mediated uptake via the GM3 -lactose interaction as the mechanism of controlled drug delivery.

  14. Transport characteristics and transporter-based drug-drug interactions of TM-25659, a novel TAZ modulator.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Koo; Kwon, Mihwa; Ahn, Jin Hee; Kim, Nak Jung; Bae, Myung-Ae; Song, Im-Sook

    2014-04-01

    The in vitro metabolic stability and transport mechanism of TM-25659, a novel TAZ modulator, was investigated in human hepatocytes and human liver microsomes (HLMs) based on the preferred hepatobiliary elimination in rats. In addition, the in vitro transport mechanism and transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions were evaluated using oocytes and MDCKII cells overexpressing clinically important drug transporters. After a 1 h incubation in HLMs, 92.9 ± 9.5% and 95.5 ± 11.6% of the initial TM-25659 remained in the presence of NADPH and UDPGA, respectively. Uptake of TM-25659 readily accumulated in human hepatocytes at 37 ºC (i.e. 6.7-fold greater than that at 4 ºC), in which drug transporters such as OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were involved. TM-25659 had a significantly greater basal to apical transport rate (5.9-fold) than apical to basal transport rate in the Caco-2 cell monolayer, suggesting the involvement of an efflux transport system. Further studies using inhibitors of efflux transporters and overexpressing cells revealed that MRP2 was involved in the transport of TM-25659. These results, taken together, suggested that TM-25659 can be actively influxed into hepatocytes and undergo biliary excretion without substantial metabolism. Additionally, TM-25659 inhibited the transport activities of OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 with IC50 values of 36.3 and 25.9 μm, respectively. TM-25659 (100 μm) increased the accumulation of the probe substrate by 160% and 213%, respectively, through the inhibition of efflux function of P-gp and MRP2. In conclusion, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, P-gp and MRP2 might be major transporters responsible for the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction of TM-25659, although their contribution to in vivo pharmacokinetics needs to be further investigated.

  15. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  16. Assessment of Potential Herb-Drug Interactions among Nigerian Adults with Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ezuruike, Udoamaka; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that patients with diabetes do not rely only on prescription drugs for their disease management. The use of herbal medicines is one of the self-management practices adopted by these patients, often without the knowledge of their healthcare practitioners. This study assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions (HDIs) amongst Nigerian adult diabetic patients. This was done through a literature analysis of the pharmacokinetic profile of their herbal medicines and prescription drugs, based on information obtained from 112 patients with type-2 diabetes attending two secondary health care facilities in Nigeria. Fifty percent of the informants used herbal medicines alongside their prescription drugs. Worryingly, 60% of the patients taking herbal medicines did not know their identity, thus increasing the risk of unidentified HDIs. By comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of eight identified herbs taken by the patients for the management of diabetes against those of the prescription drugs, several scenarios of potential HDIs were identified and their clinical relevance is discussed. The lack of clinical predictors points toward cultural factors as the influence for herb use, making it more difficult to identify these patients and in turn monitor potential HDIs. In identifying these possible interactions, we have highlighted the need for healthcare professionals to promote a proactive monitoring of patients' use of herbal medicines. PMID:27559312

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Antiretroviral Drugs in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, John C.; Erlandson, Kristine Mace

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy has enabled HIV infected persons to reach older ages in high numbers. Hepatic and renal changes that normally occur with advancing age occur earlier and with higher incidence in HIV-infected individuals. A limited number of prospective controlled studies have demonstrated small reductions (17% to 41%) in lopinavir, atazanavir, and lamivudine clearance in older versus younger adults. A much larger number of retrospective studies in adults (age range ~20 to 60 years), including all antiretroviral drugs, have evaluated age as a covariate for pharmacokinetics. Most studies did not detect substantial associations between drug exposures and age. Areas Covered This review summarizes antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics in older persons. The authors review articles from PubMed (search terms: elderly, antiretroviral, pharmacokinetics) in addition to the bibliographies of those selected. Expert Opinion The evidence to date does not support major pharmacokinetic changes in adults between ~20 and 60 years of age. However, additional prospective, well-controlled studies are needed in more persons > 60 years, including those with frailty and comorbidities, with assessment of unbound drug clearance, and incorporation of adherence, pharmacogenetics, and concomitant medications. Until then, guidelines for drug-drug interactions and dosing in renal and hepatic impairment should be followed in older HIV infected individuals. PMID:23514375

  18. Drug-drug interaction studies: regulatory guidance and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Chu, Xiaoyan; Gibson, Christopher; Cui, Donghui; Yee, Ka Lai; Ballard, Jeanine; Cabalu, Tamara; Hochman, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have issued new guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which outline comprehensive recommendations on a broad range of in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential. This paper aims to provide an overview of these new recommendations and an in-depth scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding some of the recommended approaches in emerging areas, particularly, transporters and complex DDIs. We present a number of theoretical considerations and several case examples to demonstrate complexities in applying (1) the proposed transporter decision trees and associated criteria for studying a broad spectrum of transporters to derive actionable information and (2) the recommended model-based approaches at an early stage of drug development to prospectively predict DDIs involving time-dependent inhibition and mixed inhibition/induction of drug metabolizing enzymes. We hope to convey the need for conducting DDI studies on a case-by-case basis using a holistic scientifically based interrogative approach and to communicate the need for additional research to fill in knowledge gaps in these areas where the science is rapidly evolving to better ensure the safety and efficacy of new therapeutic agents. PMID:23543602

  19. A clinical perspective on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Gilhotra, Ritu M; Ikram, Mohd; Srivastava, Sunny; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucoadhesion can be defined as a state in which two components, of which one is of biological origin, are held together for extended periods of time by the help of interfacial forces. Among the various transmucosal routes, buccal mucosa has excellent accessibility and relatively immobile mucosa, hence suitable for administration of retentive dosage form. The objective of this paper is to review the works done so far in the field of mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems (MBDDS), with a clinical perspective. Starting with a brief introduction of the mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, oral mucosa, and the theories of mucoadhesion, this article then proceeds to cover the works done so far in the field of MBDDS, categorizing them on the basis of ailments they are meant to cure. Additionally, we focus on the various patents, recent advancements, and challenges as well as the future prospects for mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems. PMID:24683406

  20. Developments of mass spectrometry-based technologies for effective drug development linked with clinical proteomes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Noboru; Bando, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Haruhiko; Marko-Varga, György; Nishimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    A strong demand in drug discovery and development today is to overcome "Big Gaps" encountered by differences in species and races, to accelerate effective developments in cost and time, and to meet medical needs. Moreover, drugs of various types have emerged which cover middle-size molecules and polymers rather than conventional small molecules. Upon those challenges, mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, which will be described in this paper, will play an increasingly important role, among which the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) platform will be powerful as rapid and molecule-based analysis more than ever. nanoPore Optical Interferometry (nPOI) newly introduced can detect even weak interactions in protein-protein and protein-compound, and can be connected directly to LC/MS/MS for identification of binding molecular species, which will be quite useful for affinity ranking and high-throughput interaction screening. Imaging MS provides the molecular information and spatial distribution of targeted molecules within a tissue specimen. MS-based clinical proteomics utilizing clinical specimens and empowered by advanced bioinformatics can attain both key protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with major protein players responsible for functional mechanisms of a disease subtype. An integration of those MS-based technologies will deliver a seamless platform of drug development from molecules identified in human clinical specimens. PMID:26782309

  1. Interfacial inhibition of macromolecular interactions: nature's paradigm for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2005-03-01

    One of nature's strategies for interfering with molecular interactions is to trap macromolecules in transition states with their partners in dead-end complexes that are unable to complete their biological function. This type of inhibition, which we refer to as "interfacial inhibition", is illustrated by two natural inhibitors, brefeldin A (BFA) and camptothecin (CPT), whose modes of action have been elucidated fully in structural studies. Interfacial inhibition occurs at the protein-protein interface in the case of BFA and at the protein-DNA interface in the case of CPT. In both systems, the drugs take advantage of transient structural and energetic conditions created by the macromolecular complex, which give rise to "hot-spots" for drug binding. In addition to these examples, several natural compounds such as forskolin, tubulin inhibitors and immunophilins target protein interfaces. We propose that interfacial inhibition is a paradigm for the discovery of drugs that interfere with macromolecular complexes.

  2. [Interactions and adverse drug reactions: how to obtain information].

    PubMed

    Fattinger, K E

    1999-04-15

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are common. They may mimick many other diseases. It is therefore important to consider always ADR as possible causes for new complaints. Interactions are less common but they may also be the source of serious problems. First informations on both topics are commonly found in the Swiss Drug Compendium ("Arzneimittel-Kompendium der Schweiz") and in the accompanying "Grundlagen der Pharmakotherapie". Further information is found in several standard text books, on new substances eventually also via the internet. Rare side-effects require a Medline-search or eventually consultation of the WHO-database on ADR. Several institutions in Switzerland provide information on ADR (an index is found in an annex of the "Arzneimittel-Kompendium der Schweiz"). It is essential for drug safety monitoring that every physician communicates observation of ADR. PMID:10355337

  3. Membrane Assays to Characterize Interaction of Drugs with ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Zsolt; Rajnai, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Tünde; Jakab, Katalin Tauberné; Kurunczi, Anita; Gémes, Katalin; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Fülöp, Ferenc; Tóth, Gábor K; Czerwinski, Maciej; Loewen, Greg; Krajcsi, Peter

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) [P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1)] can affect the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of drugs making it important to identify compounds that interact with ABCB1. The ATPase assay and vesicular transport (VT) assay are membrane based assays that can be used to measure the interaction of compounds with ABCB1 at a lower cost and higher throughput compared to cellular-based assays and therefore can be used earlier in the drug development process. To that end, we tested compounds previously identified as ABCB1 substrates and inhibitors for interaction with ABCB1 using the ATPase and VT assays. All compounds tested interacted with ABCB1 in both the ATPase and VT assays. All compounds previously identified as ABCB1 substrates activated ABCB1-mediated ATPase activity in the ATPase assay. All compounds previously identified as ABCB1 inhibitors inhibited the ABCB1-mediated transport in the VT assay. Interestingly, six of the ten compounds previously identified as ABCB1 inhibitors activated the basal ATPase activity in activation assays suggesting that the compounds are substrates of ABCB1 but can inhibit ABCB1 in inhibition assays. Importantly, for ATPase activators the EC50 of activation correlated with the IC50 values from the VT assay showing that interactions of compounds with ABCB1 can be measured with similar levels of potency in either assay. For ATPase nonactivators the IC50 values from the ATPase inhibition and VT inhibition assay showed correlation. These results demonstrate the utility of membrane assays as tools to detect and rank order drug-transporter interactions. PMID:25926125

  4. Translation of the Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) for Implementation in Outpatient Drug Treatment Clinics.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Margaret R; Kostick, Kristin; Li, Jianghong; Dunn, Jennifer; McLaughlin, Paul; Richmond, Phil; Choudhury, Shonali; Obidoa, Chinekwu; Mosher, Heather; Martinez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literature increasingly calls for studies to translate evidence-based interventions into real-world contexts balancing fidelity to the original design and fit to the new setting. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) is a health promotion intervention originally designed to train active drug users to become Peer Health Advocates. A theoretically driven approach was used to adapt RAP to fit implementation in outpatient methadone treatment clinics and pilot it with clinic patients. Ethnographic observations and process tracking documented the RAP translation and pilot experience, and clinic and community characteristics relevant to program implementation. Clinic administrators, staff, and patients were interviewed on their values, capacities, interest in RAP, perceived challenges of implementing RAP in drug treatment clinics, and experiences during the pilot. Findings indicated that RAP core components can be met when implemented in these settings and RAP can fit with the goals, interests, and other programs of the clinic. Balancing fidelity and fit requires recognition of the mutual impacts RAP and the clinic have on each other, which generate new interactions among staff and require ongoing specification of RAP to keep abreast of clinic and community changes. Collaboration of multiple stakeholders significantly benefited translation and pilot processes.

  5. Tamoxifen and depression: drug interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Katherine S; Adams, Katie; Breden Crouse, Ericka L

    2013-09-01

    This case describes a 76-year-old African-American female with a history of depression, breast cancer, and hypothyroidism admitted to the inpatient geriatric psychiatry unit for an electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) evaluation. She had one previous episode of depression, which began after a lumpectomy in 2007. Her home medication regimen included tamoxifen 20 mg daily. This case highlights the incidence of depression in persons with breast cancer, examines the controversy of tamoxifen-induced depression, and evaluates antidepressant considerations regarding potentially efficacy-reducing cytochrome P450 2D6 drug interactions with tamoxifen. The pharmacy team played an active role in educating the medical team regarding tamoxifen drug interactions. After many discussions, the patient was ultimately treated with mirtazapine 15 mg at bedtime, in addition to ECT. PMID:24007891

  6. Interaction of the antiarrhythmic drug procainamide with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1995-01-01

    Several hypotheses link the molecular mechanism of action of the antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) that belong to class I to non-specific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of sodium channels in the membrane of the myocardium. Procainamide (PROC), one of the least lipophilic drugs of this group, was induced to interact with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimirystoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), liposomes of DMPC and human erythrocytes. The perturbing effects of PROC upon these systems were respectively determined by X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that PROC exerted very little effect upon DMPC and DMPE even at such a high concentration as 10 mM. However, at therapeutical plasma concentrations, PROC induced shape changes in vitro to red cells. PMID:7766259

  7. The anticancer drug cisplatin interacts with the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Hernández, P; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2000-01-01

    Drugs which exert their effects by interacting with DNA cause structural and functional membrane alterations which may be essential for growth inhibition by these agents. This paper describes the interaction of cisplatin with the human erythrocyte membrane and models constituted by bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and diacylphosphatidylserine (DAPS), representative of phospholipid classes located in the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane, and of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), a class present in its outer monolayer. Cisplatin ability to perturb DMPE, DAPS and DMPC bilayer structures was determined by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. Electron microscopy disclosed that human erythrocytes incubated with 35 microM cisplatin, which is its therapeutical concentration in serum, developed cup-shaped forms (stomatocytes). According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this means that the drug is inserted into the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane, a conclusion supported by the studies on model systems. PMID:10928560

  8. The chlordiazepoxide/pentylenetetrazol discrimination: characterization of drug interactions and homeostatic responses to drug challenges.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, R C; Holohean, A M; Criado, J R; Harland, R D; Hunter, G A; Holloway, F A

    1988-01-01

    Rats were trained to discriminate chlordiazepoxide (CDP) from pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in a two-lever food motivated discrimination task. Training drug doses were adjusted until subjects emitted approximately 50% of their responses on each of the two drug-appropriate levers during saline injection tests. Tests that followed injection of CDP/PTZ combinations illustrated a reciprocal antagonism between the two drugs. Saline-injection tests that followed large dose injections of CDP revealed a period of predominantly PTZ-appropriate responding that persisted after the initial period of predominantly CDP-appropriate responding. These data are interpreted to suggest that, unlike some other drugs that have been shown to antagonize the behavioral and CNS effects of benzodiazepines, the interoceptive stimulus generated by PTZ occupies a position opposite to that of CDP along some single affective continuum. In addition, these data suggest that drug/drug (DD) discriminations are capable of characterizing the interactions between training drugs. Finally, the data suggest that the CDP/PTZ discrimination is a sensitive detector of bidirectional shifts in interoceptive stimulus state along the CDP/PTZ continuum. PMID:3147473

  9. Interaction of drugs with bovine and human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, Anna

    2002-09-01

    The study on the interaction of antithyroid drugs: 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (Methimazole, MMI) and 6 n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) with two kinds of serum albumin: bovine (BSA) and human (HSA) has been undertaken. Fluorescence emission spectra of serum albumin in the presence of MMI or PTU, recorded at the excitation wavelengths 280 and 295 nm, clearly show that the studied drugs act as quenchers. A decrease in fluorescence intensity at 340 or 350 nm, when excited at 280 or 295 nm, respectively, is attributed to changes in the environment of the protein fluorophores caused to the presence of the ligand. The 295 nm lights excites tryptophan residues, while the 280 nm lights excites both tryptophan and tyrosine residues. A comparison of quenching effects, when protein is excited at 295 and 280 nm, reveals that the tryptophanyl group interacts with the ligand. The differences in interactions of pyrimidine derivatives with HSA and BSA were observed using spectrofluorimetry technique. As the HSA structure contains only one tryptophanyl residue (Trp 214), while BSA has two ones (Trp 135 and Trp 214), the similar decrease of fluorescence points at the subdomain IIA, where Trp 214 was located, as a binding site of the studied drugs.

  10. Metabolism-related pharmacokinetic drug−drug interactions with tyrosine kinase inhibitors: current understanding, challenges and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Yi Ling; Ho, Han Kiat; Chan, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Drug−drug interactions (DDIs) occur when a patient's response to the drug is modified by administration or co-exposure to another drug. The main cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme, CYP3A4, is implicated in the metabolism of almost all of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Therefore, there is a substantial potential for interaction between TKIs and other drugs that modulate the activity of this metabolic pathway. Cancer patients are susceptible to DDIs as they receive many medications, either for supportive care or for treatment of toxicity. Differences in DDI outcomes are generally negligible because of the wide therapeutic window of common drugs. However for anticancer agents, serious clinical consequences may occur from small changes in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Therefore, the objective of this review is to highlight the current understanding of DDIs among TKIs, with a focus on metabolism, as well as to identify challenges in the prediction of DDIs and provide recommendations. PMID:25125025

  11. Potential drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roblek, Tina; Trobec, Katja; Mrhar, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polypharmacy is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but little is known about the prevalence and significance of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This study evaluates DDIs in hospitalized patients. Material and methods We retrospectively screened medical charts over a 6-month period for diagnosis of chronic HF and/or COPD. Potential DDIs were evaluated using Lexi-Interact software. Results Seven hundred and seventy-eight patients were included in the study (median age 75 years, 61% men). The median number of drugs on admission and discharge was 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 4–9) and 7 (IQR 5–), respectively (p = 0.10). We recorded 6.5 ±5.7 potential DDIs per patient on admission and 7.2 ±5.6 on discharge (p = 0.2). From admission to discharge, type-C and type-X potential DDIs increased (p < 0.05 for both). Type X interactions were rare (< 1%), with the combination of a β-blocker and a β2 agonist being the most common (64%). There were significantly more type-C and type-D potential DDIs in patients with chronic HF as compared to patients with COPD (p < 0.001). Patients with concomitant chronic HF and COPD had more type-C and type-X potential DDIs when compared to those with individual disease (p < 0.005). An aldosterone antagonist and ACE inhibitor/ARB were prescribed to 3% of chronic HF patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/(min × 1.73 m2). Conclusions The DDIs are common in patients with chronic HF and/or COPD, but only a few appear to be of clinical significance. The increase in potential DDIs from admission to discharge may reflect better guideline implementation rather than poor clinical practice. PMID:25395943

  12. Local Drug-Drug Interaction of Donepezil with Cilostazol at Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2) Increases Drug Accumulation in Heart.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryota; Shinozaki, Kohki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical reports indicate that cardiotoxicity due to donepezil can occur after coadministration with cilostazol. We speculated that the concentration of donepezil in heart tissue might be increased as a result of interaction with cilostazol at efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2), which are expressed in many tissues including the heart, and our study tested this hypothesis. First, donepezil was confirmed to be a substrate of both BCRP and P-glycoprotein in transporter-transfected cells in vitro. Cilostazol inhibited BCRP and P-glycoprotein with half-inhibitory concentrations of 130 nM and 12.7 μM, respectively. Considering the clinically achievable unbound plasma concentration of cilostazol (about 200 nM), it is plausible that BCRP-mediated transport of donepezil would be affected by cilostazol in vivo. Indeed, in an in vivo rat study, we found that coadministration of cilostazol significantly increased the concentrations of donepezil in the heart and brain, where BCRP functions as a part of the blood-tissue barrier, whereas the plasma concentration of donepezil was unaffected. In addition, in vitro accumulation of donepezil in heart tissue slices of rats was significantly increased in the presence of cilostazol. These results indicate that donepezil-cilostazol interaction at BCRP may be clinically relevant in heart and brain tissues. In other words, the tissue distribution of drugs can be influenced by drug-drug interaction (DDI) at efflux transporters in certain tissues (local DDI) without any apparent change in plasma concentration (systemic DDI).

  13. iDrug: a web-accessible and interactive drug discovery and design platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The progress in computer-aided drug design (CADD) approaches over the past decades accelerated the early-stage pharmaceutical research. Many powerful standalone tools for CADD have been developed in academia. As programs are developed by various research groups, a consistent user-friendly online graphical working environment, combining computational techniques such as pharmacophore mapping, similarity calculation, scoring, and target identification is needed. Results We presented a versatile, user-friendly, and efficient online tool for computer-aided drug design based on pharmacophore and 3D molecular similarity searching. The web interface enables binding sites detection, virtual screening hits identification, and drug targets prediction in an interactive manner through a seamless interface to all adapted packages (e.g., Cavity, PocketV.2, PharmMapper, SHAFTS). Several commercially available compound databases for hit identification and a well-annotated pharmacophore database for drug targets prediction were integrated in iDrug as well. The web interface provides tools for real-time molecular building/editing, converting, displaying, and analyzing. All the customized configurations of the functional modules can be accessed through featured session files provided, which can be saved to the local disk and uploaded to resume or update the history work. Conclusions iDrug is easy to use, and provides a novel, fast and reliable tool for conducting drug design experiments. By using iDrug, various molecular design processing tasks can be submitted and visualized simply in one browser without installing locally any standalone modeling softwares. iDrug is accessible free of charge at http://lilab.ecust.edu.cn/idrug. PMID:24955134

  14. Senior Nursing Students' Participation in a Community Research Project: Effect on Student Self-Efficacy and Knowledge Concerning Drug Interactions Arising from Self-Medication in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neafsey, Patricia J.; Shellman, Juliette

    2002-01-01

    Of 13 nursing students in a community nursing clinical project, 7 worked with older adults who received instruction about drug interaction. Compared to the six whose patients did not receive instruction, these students achieved greater knowledge and self-efficacy scores related to drug interaction. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  15. Quantitative Prediction of Drug–Drug Interactions Involving Inhibitory Metabolites in Drug Development: How Can Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Mao, J; Lin, J; Yu, H; Peters, S; Shebley, M

    2016-01-01

    This subteam under the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group (Innovation and Quality Consortium) investigated the quantitative role of circulating inhibitory metabolites in drug–drug interactions using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Three drugs with major circulating inhibitory metabolites (amiodarone, gemfibrozil, and sertraline) were systematically evaluated in addition to the literature review of recent examples. The application of PBPK modeling in drug interactions by inhibitory parent–metabolite pairs is described and guidance on strategic application is provided. PMID:27642087

  16. Best practices for the use of itraconazole as a replacement for ketoconazole in drug-drug interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichuan; Bello, Akintunde; Dresser, Mark J; Heald, Donald; Komjathy, Steven Ferenc; O'Mara, Edward; Rogge, Mark; Stoch, S Aubrey; Robertson, Sarah M

    2016-02-01

    Ketoconazole has been widely used as a strong cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A (CYP3A) inhibitor in drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. However, the US Food and Drug Administration has recommended limiting the use of ketoconazole to cases in which no alternative therapies exist, and the European Medicines Agency has recommended the suspension of its marketing authorizations because of the potential for serious safety concerns. In this review, the Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Development's Clinical Pharmacology Leadership Group (CPLG) provides a compelling rationale for the use of itraconazole as a replacement for ketoconazole in clinical DDI studies and provides recommendations on the best practices for the use of itraconazole in such studies. Various factors considered in the recommendations include the choice of itraconazole dosage form, administration in the fasted or fed state, the dose and duration of itraconazole administration, the timing of substrate and itraconazole coadministration, and measurement of itraconazole and metabolite plasma concentrations, among others. The CPLG's recommendations are based on careful review of available literature and internal industry experiences.

  17. A Review of Pharmacological Interactions Between HIV or HCV Medications and Opioid Agonist Therapy: Implications and Management for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Moody, David E.; Altice, Frederick L.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Global access to opioid agonist therapy and HIV/HCV treatment is expanding but when used concurrently, problematic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions may occur. Review of articles from 1966 into 2012 in Medline using the following keywords: HIV, AIDS, HIV therapy, HCV, HCV therapy, antiretroviral therapy, HAART, drug interactions, methadone, and buprenorphine. Additionally, abstracts from national and international meetings and a review of conference proceedings were conducted; selected reports were reviewed as well. The metabolism of both opioid and antiretroviral therapies, description of their known interactions, and clinical implications and management of these interactions are reviewed. Important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions affecting either methadone or HIV medications have been demonstrated within each class of antiretroviral agents. Drug interactions between methadone, buprenorphine and HIV medications are known and may have important clinical consequences. Clinicians must be alert to these interactions and have a basic knowledge regarding their management. PMID:23656339

  18. Effects of drug-carrier interactions on drug dissolution from binary and ternary matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Zafar

    For nearly five decades, pharmaceutical researchers have studied solid solutions of drugs in polymers as a potential means to enhance the dissolution of drugs with poor aqueous solubility. This has become of greater importance in recent years because most new potential drug compounds (new chemical entities) exhibit poor water solubility and present great challenges to scientists who must design dosage forms from which the drugs are bioavailable. During the formulation of a solid solution, the drug undergoes physical but not chemical alterations that increase its chemical potential in the formulation relative to that of the pure drug in its stable form. This increased chemical potential is responsible for enhanced dissolution as well as physical instabilities, such as amorphous to crystalline conversions and precipitation within the solid state. The chemical potential is derived from the Gibbs free energy, so it is reasonable to explain the behavior of solid solution systems in terms of thermodynamics. Solid solutions and dispersions have been extensively studied by pharmaceutical scientists, both with regard to manufacturing aspects and the proposal of various models in attempts to explain the physical bases for how these systems work. Recently, Dave and Bellantone proposed a model based on the thermodynamic changes resulting from the formulation of binary solid solutions of a drug in the polymer PVP. Their model introduced a modification of the F-H theory, which was used to quantify the drug-polymer interaction energies and calculate the entropy of mixing of the drug and polymer. In this work, the model of Dave and Bellantone was extended to include three-component systems, consisting of one drug mixed in a carrier matrix consisting of mixture of two polymers or a polymer and a surfactant. For this research, solid solutions were formed using various drug weight fractions in the formulations. The study focused on the following points: (1) Prepare solid solution

  19. Evaluation of the use of static and dynamic models to predict drug-drug interaction and its associated variability: impact on drug discovery and early development.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Schroeder, Patricia E; Giri, Nagdeep; Dolgos, Hugues

    2012-08-01

    Simcyp, a population-based simulator, is widely used for evaluating drug-drug interaction (DDI) risks in healthy and disease populations. We compare the prediction performance of Simcyp with that of mechanistic static models using different types of inhibitor concentrations, with the aim of understanding their strengths/weaknesses and recommending the optimal use of tools in drug discovery/early development. The inclusion of an additional term in static equations to consider the contribution of hepatic first pass to DDIs (AUCR(hfp)) has also been examined. A second objective was to assess Simcyp's estimation of variability associated with DDIs. The data set used for the analysis comprises 19 clinical interactions from 11 proprietary compounds. Except for gut interaction parameters, all other input data were identical for Simcyp and static models. Static equations using an unbound average steady-state systemic inhibitor concentration (I(sys)) and a fixed fraction of gut extraction and neglecting gut extraction in the case of induction interactions performed better than Simcyp (84% compared with 58% of the interactions predicted within 2-fold). Differences in the prediction outcomes between the static and dynamic models are attributable to differences in first-pass contribution to DDI. The inclusion of AUCR(hfp) in static equations leads to systematic overprediction of interaction, suggesting a limited role for hepatic first pass in determining inhibition-based DDIs for our data set. Our analysis supports the use of static models when elimination routes of the victim compound and the role of gut extraction for the victim and/or inhibitor in humans are not well defined. A fixed variability of 40% of predicted mean area under the concentration-time curve ratio is recommended.

  20. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Premnath

    2016-01-01

    Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT) for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH) has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017. PMID:27141471

  1. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Premnath

    2016-01-01

    Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT) for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH) has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017. PMID:27141471

  2. Handling Temporality of Clinical Events for Drug Safety Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Asker, Lars; Boström, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Using longitudinal data in electronic health records (EHRs) for post-marketing adverse drug event (ADE) detection allows for monitoring patients throughout their medical history. Machine learning methods have been shown to be efficient and effective in screening health records and detecting ADEs. How best to exploit historical data, as encoded by clinical events in EHRs is, however, not very well understood. In this study, three strategies for handling temporality of clinical events are proposed and evaluated using an EHR database from Stockholm, Sweden. The random forest learning algorithm is applied to predict fourteen ADEs using clinical events collected from different lengths of patient history. The results show that, in general, including longer patient history leads to improved predictive performance, and that assigning weights to events according to time distance from the ADE yields the biggest improvement. PMID:26958278

  3. Developability assessment of clinical drug products with maximum absorbable doses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Rose, John P; Van Gelder, Jan

    2012-05-10

    Maximum absorbable dose refers to the maximum amount of an orally administered drug that can be absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Maximum absorbable dose, or D(abs), has proved to be an important parameter for quantifying the absorption potential of drug candidates. The purpose of this work is to validate the use of D(abs) in a developability assessment context, and to establish appropriate protocol and interpretation criteria for this application. Three methods for calculating D(abs) were compared by assessing how well the methods predicted the absorption limit for a set of real clinical candidates. D(abs) was calculated for these clinical candidates by means of a simple equation and two computer simulation programs, GastroPlus and an program developed at Eli Lilly and Company. Results from single dose escalation studies in Phase I clinical trials were analyzed to identify the maximum absorbable doses for these compounds. Compared to the clinical results, the equation and both simulation programs provide conservative estimates of D(abs), but in general D(abs) from the computer simulations are more accurate, which may find obvious advantage for the simulations in developability assessment. Computer simulations also revealed the complex behavior associated with absorption saturation and suggested in most cases that the D(abs) limit is not likely to be achieved in a typical clinical dose range. On the basis of the validation findings, an approach is proposed for assessing absorption potential, and best practices are discussed for the use of D(abs) estimates to inform clinical formulation development strategies.

  4. Concept of interactions between consumable substances in Ayurveda with special reference to foods and drugs.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Chaudhari, Supriyo; Chattopadhyay, Abichal

    2013-01-01

    Ayurvedic medicines are available in the market as over-the-counter products. Today people use prescription and nonprescription medicines along with Ayurvedic medicines for quick relief from ailments. In the ancient texts of Ayurveda, the concept of interactions with various examples of food interactions and food-drug interactions are mentioned. Recent studies and publications reported drug interactions of Ayurveda medicines and modern drugs. In the present review article, the concept of interactions mentioned in the Ayurvedic texts along with the examples of food interactions, food-drug interactions and the recent research work and publications indicating the interactions of the Ayurvedic drugs and drug interactions of Ayurvedic medicines and modern drugs are compiled. This will help the consumer of the prescription and nonprescription medicines with the Ayurvedic medicines to be cautious about the probable interactions. PMID:23740680

  5. Repurposing Clinical Molecule Ebselen to Combat Drug Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Without a doubt, our current antimicrobials are losing the battle in the fight against newly-emerged multidrug-resistant pathogens. There is a pressing, unmet need for novel antimicrobials and novel approaches to develop them; however, it is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to develop new antimicrobials. One strategy to reduce the time and cost associated with antimicrobial innovation is drug repurposing, which is to find new applications outside the scope of the original medical indication of the drug. Ebselen, an organoselenium clinical molecule, possesses potent antimicrobial activity against clinical multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, the activity of ebselen against Gram-positive pathogens exceeded those activities determined for vancomycin and linezolid, drugs of choice for treatment of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ebselen at which 90% of clinical isolates of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus were inhibited (MIC90) were found to be 0.5 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Ebselen showed significant clearance of intracellular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in comparison to vancomycin and linezolid. We demonstrated that ebselen inhibits the bacterial translation process without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, ebselen was found to exhibit excellent activity in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans MRSA-infected whole animal model. Finally, ebselen showed synergistic activities with conventional antimicrobials against MRSA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ebselen, with its potent antimicrobial activity and safety profiles, can be potentially used to treat multidrug resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections alone or in combination with other antibiotics and should be further clinically evaluated. PMID:26222252

  6. Interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2008-03-01

    Chronic usage of Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) leads to gastrointestinal toxicity and clinical evidences point the cause to direct interactions between NSAIDs and phospholipid membranes. Also, NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipid vesicles are shown to be safer and therapeutically more effective than unmodified ones. Our initial experiments and simulations on the partitioning of Aspirin and Ibuprofen clearly indicate role played by the drug structure in drug-membrane interactions. Those results motivated systematic molecular dynamics simulations of membranes with NSAIDs of different size, structure and pKa values. Our results suggest high partition coefficients for these NSAIDs in the membrane compared to water and thinning effect on the bilayer. Our small angle neutron scattering and reflectivity studies on DMPC-Ibuprofen systems indicate that the drug affects both ˜5 nm thick bilayer and overall ˜100 nm diameter vesicle, indicating that NSAIDs affect vesicles on various length scales. We will discuss the structural perturbations to membranes due to NSAIDs at clinically relevant molar ratios and their implications on the use of vesicles as delivery vehicles for NSAIDs.

  7. [Consideration of clinical development for new anticancer drugs on Japan, proposal from approval reviewer].

    PubMed

    Urano, Tsutomu

    2007-02-01

    There become problems about a delay on clinical development of anticancer drug in Japan and drug lag. I consider causes and solutions of the problems from a position of drug approval reviewer. I think the drug lag may cause by stating later state in global clinical development or stagnation of clinical trial activities. To prevail against drug lag,it is necessary to attend to multinational clinical studies,and to mature Japanese clinical trial environment and post-market planning. Then, I believe that the most important point is to make a start on early stage of global clinical development.

  8. [Consideration of clinical development for new anticancer drugs on Japan, proposal from approval reviewer].

    PubMed

    Urano, Tsutomu

    2007-02-01

    There become problems about a delay on clinical development of anticancer drug in Japan and drug lag. I consider causes and solutions of the problems from a position of drug approval reviewer. I think the drug lag may cause by stating later state in global clinical development or stagnation of clinical trial activities. To prevail against drug lag,it is necessary to attend to multinational clinical studies,and to mature Japanese clinical trial environment and post-market planning. Then, I believe that the most important point is to make a start on early stage of global clinical development. PMID:17301550

  9. The pre-clinical discovery of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease is characterized by the progressive loss of cells in the brain and spinal cord that leads to debilitation and death in 3–5 years. Only one therapeutic drug, Riluzole, has been approved for ALS and that drug improves survival by 2–3 months. The need for new therapeutics, either that can postpone or slow the progression of the motor deficits and prolong survival, is still a strong unmet medical need. Areas Covered Although there are a number of drugs currently in clinical trials for ALS, this review provides an overview of the most promising biological targets and preclinical strategies that are currently being developed and deployed. The list of targets for ALS was compiled from a variety of websites including: individual companies that have ALS programs, and the author’s experience. Expert Opinion Progress is being made in the identification of possible new therapeutics for ALS with recent efforts in: understanding the genetic causes of the disease, susceptibility factors, and the development of additional preclinical animal models. However, many challenges remain in the identification of new ALS therapeutics including: the use of relevant biomarkers, the need for earlier diagnosis of the disease, and additional animal models. Multiple strategies need to be tested, in the clinic, in order to determine what will be effective in patients. PMID:22646982

  10. SAR analysis of new anti-TB drugs currently in pre-clinical and clinical development.

    PubMed

    Poce, Giovanna; Cocozza, Martina; Consalvi, Sara; Biava, Mariangela

    2014-10-30

    Despite enormous efforts have been made in the hunt for new drugs, tuberculosis (TB) still remains the first bacterial cause of mortality worldwide, causing an estimated 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths in 2012. Multi-drug resistant-TB strains no longer respond to first-line drugs and are inexorably spreading with an estimated 650,000 cases as well as extensively-drug resistant-TB strains, which are resistant to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the second-line drugs, with 60,000 cases. Thus the discovery and development of new medicines is a major keystone for tuberculosis treatment and control. After decades of dormancy in the field of TB drug development, recent efforts from various groups have generated a promising TB drug pipeline. Several new therapeutic agents are concurrently studied in clinical trials together with much activity in the hittolead and lead optimization stages. In this article we will review the recent advances in TB drug discovery with a special focus on structure activity relationship studies of the most advanced compound classes. PMID:25173852

  11. Targeted screen for human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases inhibitors and the evaluation of potential drug-drug interactions with zafirlukast.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shingo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Kutsuno, Yuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Itoh, Tomoo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes is a major mechanism in drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A number of cases of DDIs via inhibition of UDP-glucuronosyltranseferases (UGTs) have been reported, although the changes in pharmacokinetics are relatively small in comparison with drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450s. Most of the past studies have investigated hepatic UGTs, although recent studies have revealed a significant contribution of UGTs in the small intestine to drug clearance. To evaluate potential DDIs caused by inhibition of intestinal UGTs, we assessed inhibitory effects of 578 compounds, including drugs, xenobiotics, and endobiotics, on human UGT1A8 and UGT1A10, which are major contributors to intestinal glucuronidation. We identified 29 inhibitors by monitoring raloxifene glucuronidation with recombinant UGTs. All of the inhibitors potently inhibited UGT1A1 activity, as well. We found that zafirlukast is a potent general inhibitor of UGT1As and a moderate inhibitor of UGT2Bs because it monitors 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronidation by recombinant UGTs. However, zafirlukast did not potently inhibit diclofenac glucuronidation, suggesting that the inhibitory effects might be substrate specific. Inhibitory effects of zafirlukast on some UGT substrates were further investigated in human liver and human small intestine microsomes in order to evaluate potential DDIs. The R values (the ratios of intrinsic clearance with and without an inhibitor) revealed that zafirlukast has potential to cause clinical DDIs in the small intestine. Although we could not identify specific UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 inhibitors, zafirlukast was identified as a general inhibitor for UGTs in vitro. The present study suggests that the inhibition of UGT in the small intestine would be an underlying mechanism for DDIs. PMID:25834030

  12. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman had been treated with high-dose simvastatin for several years. After systemic treatment with the antifungal agent itraconazole, she developed muscle pain and highly elevated levels of creatine kinase and myoglobin. Muscle biopsy was compatible with statin-associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole antifungal agents such as itraconazole and posaconazole. If antifungal treatment is indicated in a patient using a CYP3A4-metabolised statin, we recommend (1) topical administration of the antifungal agent if possible, (2) the use of a non-CYP3A4-inhibiting antifungal drug such as terbinafine or (3) temporary discontinuation of statin treatment. PMID:27605198

  13. Pharmacokinetic interaction of some antitubercular drugs with caraway: implications in the enhancement of drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Sachin, B S; Monica, P; Sharma, S C; Satti, N K; Tikoo, M K; Tikoo, A K; Suri, K A; Gupta, B D; Johri, R K

    2009-04-01

    This study deals with the pharmacokinetic interaction of selected anti-TB drugs with a natural product (CC-1a) derived from caraway (Carum carvi, L.) seed. CC-1a, chemically standardized butanolic fraction, enhanced the plasma levels of rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid in Wistar rat, resulting in increased bioavailability indices (C(max) and AUC) of the drugs. Moreover, a 40% reduced dose regimen of these drugs, which additionally contained CC-1a, was equivalent in terms of C(max) and AUC to a normal dose regimen. A permeation-enhancing property of CC-1a across small intestinal absorptive surface was found to be a contributing factor in its bioavailability enhancing profile.

  14. The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) for efficient target analysis and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Liang, Chunguang; Nilla, Santosh; Cecil, Alexander; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) has been designed to provide fast, tailored information on drugs and their protein networks including indications, protein targets and side-targets. Starting queries include compound, target and protein interactions and organism-specific protein families. Furthermore, drug name, chemical structures and their SMILES notation, affected proteins (potential drug targets), organisms as well as diseases can be queried including various combinations and refinement of searches. Drugs and protein interactions are analyzed in detail with reference to protein structures and catalytic domains, related compound structures as well as potential targets in other organisms. DrumPID considers drug functionality, compound similarity, target structure, interactome analysis and organismic range for a compound, useful for drug development, predicting drug side-effects and structure–activity relationships. Database URL: http://drumpid.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de PMID:27055828

  15. Nanostructured lipid carriers: Promising drug delivery systems for future clinics.

    PubMed

    Beloqui, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Almeida, António J; Préat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the number of studies describing nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs)-based formulations has been dramatically increased. The raise in NLC exploitation is essentially due to defeated barriers within the technological process of lipid-based nanoparticles' formulation and increased knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of transport of NLCs via different routes of administration. This review article aims to give an overview on the current state of the art of NLC as controlled drug delivery systems for future clinics through novel NLC applications providing examples of successfull outcomes. The reported data clearly illustrate the promise of these nanoparticles for novel treatments in the near future. From the Clinical Editor: The understanding of the nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC)-based formulations has improved with continuing research recently. The result has seen an increase in the use of these in the clinical setting. In this comprehensive review, the authors discussed the current state and major challenges in the use of nanostructured lipid carriers as controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:26410277

  16. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of the selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024(Enobosarm) with itraconazole, rifampin, probenecid, celecoxib and rosuvastatin.

    PubMed

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2016-08-01

    GTx-024 (also known as enobosarm) is a first in class selective androgen receptor modulator being developed for diverse indications in oncology. Preclinical studies of GTx-024 supported the evaluation of several potential drug-drug interactions in a clinical setting. A series of open-label Phase I GTx-024 drug-drug interaction studies were designed to interrogate potential interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor (itraconazole), a CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin), a pan-UGT inhibitor (probenecid), a CYP2C9 substrate (celecoxib) and a BCRP substrate (rosuvastatin). The plasma pharmacokinetics of GTx-024, its major metabolite (GTx-024 glucuronide), and each substrate were characterized in detail. Itraconazole administration had no effect on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics. Likewise, GTx-024 administration did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of celecoxib or rosuvastatin. Rifampin administration had the largest impact on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics of any co-administered agent and reduced the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) by 23 % and the area under the curve (AUC∞) by 43 %. Probenecid had a complex interaction with GTx-024 whereby both GTx-024 plasma levels and GTx-024 glucuronide plasma levels (AUC∞) were increased by co-administration of the UGT inhibitor (50 and 112 %, respectively). Overall, GTx-024 was well tolerated and poses very little risk of generating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions.

  17. Progress of drug-loaded polymeric micelles into clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-28

    Targeting tumors with long-circulating nano-scaled carriers is a promising strategy for systemic cancer treatment. Compared with free small therapeutic agents, nanocarriers can selectively accumulate in solid tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, which is characterized by leaky blood vessels and impaired lymphatic drainage in tumor tissues, and achieve superior therapeutic efficacy, while reducing side effects. In this way, drug-loaded polymeric micelles, i.e. self-assemblies of amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a hydrophobic core as a drug reservoir and a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrophilic shell, have demonstrated outstanding features as tumor-targeted nanocarriers with high translational potential, and several micelle formulations are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent efforts in the development of these polymeric micelles and their performance in human studies, as well as our recent progress in polymeric micelles for the delivery of nucleic acids and imaging. PMID:24993430

  18. Drug-drug Interaction between Pravastatin and Gemfibrozil (Antihyperlipidemic) with Gliclazide (Antidiabetic) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sultanpur, Cm; Satyanarayana, S; Reddy, Ns; Kumar, Ke; Kumar, S

    2010-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a condition of increased blood glucose level in the body. Antihyperlipidemic drugs like statins and fibrates are widely used for prophylactic treatment in dyslipideamia and atherosclerosis. Diabetic dislipidemia exists with increased triglycerides, low HDL and high LDL levels. Hence, with oral hypoglycemic drugs, the addition of a lipid-lowering drug is necessary for controlling dislipidemia. In such a situation, there may be chances of drug-drug interactions between antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic drugs. The present study is planned to evaluate the safety of gliclazide (antidiabetic) in the presence of pravastatin and gemfibrozil (antihyperlpidemic) in rats. Studies in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats were conducted with oral doses of gliclazide and their combination with pravastatin and gemfibrozil, with an adequate washout period in between the treatments. Blood samples were collected in rats by retroorbital puncture at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h. All the blood samples were analyzed for glucose by GOD -POD. Gliclazide (½ TD) produced hypoglycemic activity in normal and diabetic rats, with peak activity at 2 and 8 h. Pravastatin (TD) + gemfibrozil (TD) combination treatment increased the hypoglycemic effect of gliclazide in normal rats or diabetic rats when administered together. The interaction observed due to inhibition of both the enzymes (CYP 450 2C9 and CYP 450 3A4) responsible for the metabolism of gliclazide showed increased half-life, which was seen in the present study. Because concomitant administration of gliclazide with provastatin and gemfibrozil in diabetes is associated with atherosclerosis, it should be contraindicated or used with caution.

  19. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rinner, Christoph; Grossmann, Wilfried; Sauter, Simone Katja; Wolzt, Michael; Gall, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Shared electronic health records (EHRs) systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI) and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems. PMID:26682218

  20. Extracting Drug-Drug Interaction from the Biomedical Literature Using a Stacked Generalization-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Linna; Yang, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhehuan; Lin, Hongfei; Li, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection is particularly important for patient safety. However, the amount of biomedical literature regarding drug interactions is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective approach for the automatic extraction of DDI information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present a Stacked Generalization-based approach for automatic DDI extraction. The approach combines the feature-based, graph and tree kernels and, therefore, reduces the risk of missing important features. In addition, it introduces some domain knowledge based features (the keyword, semantic type, and DrugBank features) into the feature-based kernel, which contribute to the performance improvement. More specifically, the approach applies Stacked generalization to automatically learn the weights from the training data and assign them to three individual kernels to achieve a much better performance than each individual kernel. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve a better performance of 69.24% in F-score compared with other systems in the DDI Extraction 2011 challenge task. PMID:23785452

  1. Clinical Features and Drug Characteristics of Patients with Generalized Fixed Drug Eruption in the West of Iran (2005–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Kavoussi, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour; Derakhshandeh, Katayoun; Moradi, Alireza; Ebrahimi, Ali; Rashidian, Harif; Kavoussi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background. Generalized fixed drug eruption is a specific variant of fixed drug eruption with multifocal lesions. Diagnosis of this drug reaction is straightforward, but occasionally recognition of the causative drug is not possible. This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical features and culprit drugs in generalized fixed drug eruptions in the west of Iran. Method. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 30 patients with criteria of generalized fixed drug eruption over 9 years. Demographic, clinical, and drug intake information were collected. Results. Out of 30 patients (17 females and 13 males) with the mean age of 26.67 ± 10.21 years, 28 (93.3%) and 2 (6.7%) cases had plaque and bullous clinical presentation, respectively. Upper limbs were the most common (90%) site of involvement. The antibiotic group, especially cotrimoxazole (26.1%), was reported to be the most common offending drug, but the causative drug was not determined in 7 (23.3%) patients. Conclusion. Many cases of generalized fixed drug eruption firstly presented as limited lesions and led to generalized lesion due to repeated intake of the causative drug. No causative drug was found in some patients, which might be associated with concurrent intake of several drugs, multiple FDE, and peculiarity of the patch test. PMID:26783389

  2. Transcription factors as targets for DNA-interacting drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2003-06-01

    Gene expression, both tissue specific or inducible, is controlled at the level of transcription by various transcription factors interacting with specific sequences of DNA. Anticancer drugs and other potential therapeutic agents alter interactions of regulatory proteins with DNA by a variety of different mechanisms. The main ones, considered in the review, are: i) competition for the transcription factor DNA binding sequences by drugs that interact non-covalently with DNA (e.g. anthracyclines, acridines, actinomycin D, pyrrole antibiotics and their polyamide derivatives); ii) covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents (e.g. nitrogen mustards, cisplatin) that prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences, or that result in multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which hijack the transcription factors, thus decreasing their availability in the nucleus; iii) competition with binding sites on the transcription factors by synthetic oligonucleotides or peptide nucleic acids in an antigene strategy. The latter compounds may also compete for binding sites on regulatory proteins, acting as decoys to lower their active concentration in the cell. In this review, we have summarized recent advances which have been made towards understanding the above mechanisms by which small molecules interfere with the function of transcription factors. PMID:12678680

  3. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    PubMed Central

    Pignatello, R.; Musumeci, T.; Basile, L.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy. PMID:21430952

  4. Role of Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (hOCT1) Polymorphisms in Lamivudine (3TC) Uptake and Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Minuesa, Gerard; Keller, Thorsten; Erkizia, Itziar; Koepsell, Hermann; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2016-01-01

    Lamivudine (3TC), a drug used in the treatment of HIV infection, needs to cross the plasma membrane to exert its therapeutic action. Human Organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1), encoded by the SLC22A1 gene, is the transporter responsible for its uptake into target cells. As SLC22A1 is a highly polymorphic gene, the aim of this study was to determine how SNPs in the OCT1-encoding gene affected 3TC internalization and its interaction with other co-administered drugs. HEK293 cells stably transfected with either the wild type form or the polymorphic variants of hOCT1 were used to perform kinetic and drug-drug interaction studies. Protein co-immunoprecipitation was used to assess the impact of selected polymorphic cysteines on the oligomerization of the transporter. Results showed that 3TC transport efficiency was reduced in all polymorphic variants tested (R61C, C88R, S189L, M420del, and G465R). This was not caused by lack of oligomerization in case of variants located at the transporter extracellular loop (R61C and C88R). Drug-drug interaction measurements showed that co-administered drugs [abacavir (ABC), zidovudine (AZT), emtricitabine (FTC), tenofovir diproxil fumarate (TDF), efavirenz (EFV) and raltegravir (RAL)], differently inhibited 3TC uptake depending upon the polymorphic variant analyzed. These data highlight the need for accurate analysis of drug transporter polymorphic variants of clinical relevance, because polymorphisms can impact on substrate (3TC) translocation but even more importantly they can differentially affect drug-drug interactions at the transporter level. PMID:27445813

  5. Role of Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (hOCT1) Polymorphisms in Lamivudine (3TC) Uptake and Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Minuesa, Gerard; Keller, Thorsten; Erkizia, Itziar; Koepsell, Hermann; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2016-01-01

    Lamivudine (3TC), a drug used in the treatment of HIV infection, needs to cross the plasma membrane to exert its therapeutic action. Human Organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1), encoded by the SLC22A1 gene, is the transporter responsible for its uptake into target cells. As SLC22A1 is a highly polymorphic gene, the aim of this study was to determine how SNPs in the OCT1-encoding gene affected 3TC internalization and its interaction with other co-administered drugs. HEK293 cells stably transfected with either the wild type form or the polymorphic variants of hOCT1 were used to perform kinetic and drug-drug interaction studies. Protein co-immunoprecipitation was used to assess the impact of selected polymorphic cysteines on the oligomerization of the transporter. Results showed that 3TC transport efficiency was reduced in all polymorphic variants tested (R61C, C88R, S189L, M420del, and G465R). This was not caused by lack of oligomerization in case of variants located at the transporter extracellular loop (R61C and C88R). Drug-drug interaction measurements showed that co-administered drugs [abacavir (ABC), zidovudine (AZT), emtricitabine (FTC), tenofovir diproxil fumarate (TDF), efavirenz (EFV) and raltegravir (RAL)], differently inhibited 3TC uptake depending upon the polymorphic variant analyzed. These data highlight the need for accurate analysis of drug transporter polymorphic variants of clinical relevance, because polymorphisms can impact on substrate (3TC) translocation but even more importantly they can differentially affect drug-drug interactions at the transporter level. PMID:27445813

  6. Measuring Drug Metabolism Kinetics and Drug-Drug Interactions Using Self-Assembled Monolayers for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lyndsey L; Berns, Eric J; Bugga, Pradeep; George, Alfred L; Mrksich, Milan

    2016-09-01

    The competition of two drugs for the same metabolizing enzyme is a common mechanism for drug-drug interactions that can lead to altered kinetics in drug metabolism and altered elimination rates in vivo. With the prevalence of multidrug therapy, there is great potential for serious drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. In an effort to prevent adverse drug reactions, the FDA mandates the evaluation of the potential for metabolic inhibition by every new chemical entity. Conventional methods for assaying drug metabolism (e.g., those based on HPLC) have been established for measuring drug-drug interactions; however, they are low-throughput. Here we describe an approach to measure the catalytic activity of CYP2C9 using the high-throughput technique self-assembled monolayers for matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry. We measured the kinetics of CYP450 metabolism of the substrate, screened a set of drugs for inhibition of CYP2C9 and determined the Ki values for inhibitors. The throughput of this platform may enable drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions to be interrogated at a scale that cannot be achieved with current methods. PMID:27467208

  7. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Katie J.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94. M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water–metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrAA90) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone–gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94 cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge–enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone–enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrAA90V and GyrAD94G. 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug–enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis. PMID:26792518

  8. Lipid-Drug Interaction and Colligative Properties in Phospholipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Banerjee; Bennouna; Ferreira-Marques; Ruysschaert; Caspers

    1999-11-01

    Imipramine penetration into the lipid core of a membrane was demonstrated through measurements on lipid monolayers (surface pressure and surface potential). The surface pressure measurements allow us to calculate the intrinsic binding constant (partition coefficient) for the lipid-Imipramine interaction. This latter value is in correct agreement with the results obtained by electrophoretic mobility measurements on liposomes. In addition, it was observed that the same mole fraction of "lipid-soluble drug" (Chlorpromazine or Imipramine) incorporated in a given lipidic phase (DPPC) induced the same shift in the transition temperature. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Text mining for pharmacovigilance: Using machine learning for drug name recognition and drug-drug interaction extraction and classification.

    PubMed

    Ben Abacha, Asma; Chowdhury, Md Faisal Mahbub; Karanasiou, Aikaterini; Mrabet, Yassine; Lavelli, Alberto; Zweigenbaum, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacovigilance (PV) is defined by the World Health Organization as the science and activities related to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem. An essential aspect in PV is to acquire knowledge about Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs). The shared tasks on DDI-Extraction organized in 2011 and 2013 have pointed out the importance of this issue and provided benchmarks for: Drug Name Recognition, DDI extraction and DDI classification. In this paper, we present our text mining systems for these tasks and evaluate their results on the DDI-Extraction benchmarks. Our systems rely on machine learning techniques using both feature-based and kernel-based methods. The obtained results for drug name recognition are encouraging. For DDI-Extraction, our hybrid system combining a feature-based method and a kernel-based method was ranked second in the DDI-Extraction-2011 challenge, and our two-step system for DDI detection and classification was ranked first in the DDI-Extraction-2013 task at SemEval. We discuss our methods and results and give pointers to future work. PMID:26432353

  10. Use of "big data" in drug discovery and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Taglang, Guillaume; Jackson, David B

    2016-04-01

    Oncology is undergoing a data-driven metamorphosis. Armed with new and ever more efficient molecular and information technologies, we have entered an era where data is helping us spearhead the fight against cancer. This technology driven data explosion, often referred to as "big data", is not only expediting biomedical discovery, but it is also rapidly transforming the practice of oncology into an information science. This evolution is critical, as results to-date have revealed the immense complexity and genetic heterogeneity of patients and their tumors, a sobering reminder of the challenge facing every patient and their oncologist. This can only be addressed through development of clinico-molecular data analytics that provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms controlling the biological and clinical response to available therapeutic options. Beyond the exciting implications for improved patient care, such advancements in predictive and evidence-based analytics stand to profoundly affect the processes of cancer drug discovery and associated clinical trials.

  11. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  12. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict drug-drug interactions involving inhibitory metabolite: a case study of amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Mao, Jialin; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation of drug-drug interaction (DDI) involving circulating inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs has recently drawn more attention from regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies. Here, using amiodarone (AMIO) as an example, we demonstrate the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to assess how a potential inhibitory metabolite can contribute to clinically significant DDIs. Amiodarone was reported to increase the exposure of simvastatin, dextromethorphan, and warfarin by 1.2- to 2-fold, which was not expected based on its weak inhibition observed in vitro. The major circulating metabolite, mono-desethyl-amiodarone (MDEA), was later identified to have a more potent inhibitory effect. Using a combined "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach, a PBPK model was built to successfully simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of AMIO and MDEA, particularly their accumulation in plasma and liver after a long-term treatment. The clinical AMIO DDIs were predicted using the verified PBPK model with incorporation of cytochrome P450 inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA. The closest prediction was obtained for CYP3A (simvastatin) DDI when the competitive inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA was considered, for CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan) DDI when the competitive inhibition from AMIO and the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from MDEA were incorporated, and for CYP2C9 (warfarin) DDI when the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from AMIO and the competitive inhibition from MDEA were considered. The PBPK model with the ability to simulate DDI by considering dynamic change and accumulation of inhibitor (parent and metabolite) concentration in plasma and liver provides advantages in understanding the possible mechanism of clinical DDIs involving inhibitory metabolites.

  13. Pralatrexate Monitoring Using a Commercially Available Methotrexate Assay to Avoid Potential Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Jordan P; Vrontikis, Alaina; Sedillo, Courtney; Halwani, Ahmad S; Gilreath, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Pralatrexate (PDX) is a folate antagonist structurally similar to methotrexate (MTX). Unlike MTX, it is currently not known whether PDX exhibits delayed clearance and heightened toxicity in the setting of fluid overload. A specific serum assay for PDX is not commercially available. To our knowledge, we report the first case using an MTX serum assay as a surrogate for PDX concentrations to avoid a potential drug-drug interaction with pralatrexate. We describe a 76-year-old man with refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma who began therapy with weekly PDX 15 mg/m(2) intravenous infusions on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. He subsequently developed mucositis, a moderate right-sided pleural effusion, and peripheral edema over the next 5 weeks. Aggressive diuresis with furosemide was initiated, which was then withheld the day before his next PDX dose to avoid a potential drug-drug interaction between PDX and furosemide. His baseline MTX/PDX concentration (measured prior to administration of the cycle 2, week 2 PDX dose) was less than 0.20 μmol/L (i.e., undetectable). After PDX administration, his 1-hour peak MTX/PDX concentration increased to 0.58 μmol/L. Aggressive diuresis was withheld until his MTX/PDX concentration was undetectable, 43.5 hours later. PDX is more potent than MTX and displays similar pharmacokinetic properties. PDX concentrations using the serum MTX assay reflect lower values than those reported from PDX-specific assays in clinical studies. Because PDX is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of uncommon malignancies, it is unlikely that a specific assay will be commercially developed. We propose that the MTX serum assay has merit for use in determining when to reinstate possible interacting drug therapies such as loop diuretics.

  14. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

    2016-02-01

    The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions. PMID

  15. Multidrug PLA-PEG filomicelles for concurrent delivery of anticancer drugs-The influence of drug-drug and drug-polymer interactions on drug loading and release properties.

    PubMed

    Jelonek, Katarzyna; Li, Suming; Kaczmarczyk, Bożena; Marcinkowski, Andrzej; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Musiał-Kulik, Monika; Kasperczyk, Janusz

    2016-08-20

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of drug-drug and drug-polymer interactions on drug loading and release properties of multidrug micelles. Three hydrophobic drugs-paclitaxel (Ptx), 17-AAG and rapamycin (Rap) were incorporated in poly(l-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) filomicelles. Double loaded micelles containing Ptx and 17-AAG were used for the sake of comparison. (1)H NMR confirmed the effective incorporation of the various drugs in micelles, and HPLC allowed to determine the drug loading contents. FTIR was used to evaluate interactions between particular drugs and between drugs and copolymer. Ptx and 17-AAG present similar loading efficiencies in double loaded micelles probably due to interactions of drugs with each other and also with the copolymer. In contrast, unequal drug loading properties are observed for triple loaded micelles. Rapamycin shows very weak interactions with the copolymer, and displays the lowest loading efficiency. In vitro release of drugs from micelles was realized in pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline at 37°C, and monitored by HPLC. Similar release profiles are observed for the three drugs: a strong burst followed by slower release. Nevertheless, Ptx release from micelles is significantly slower as compared to 17-AAG and Rap, probably due to interactions of NH and OH groups of Ptx with the carbonyl group of PLA. In vitro cytotoxicity of Ptx/17-AAG/Rap loaded micelles and a mixture of free drugs was determined. Drug loaded micelles exhibit advantageous effect of prolonged drug release and cytotoxic activity against Caco-2 cells, which makes them a promising solution for simultaneous drug delivery to solid tumors. Therefore, understanding of interactions within multidrug micelles should be a valuable approach for the development of concurrent delivery systems of anticancer drugs with tailored properties. PMID:27346726

  16. Illy: clinical and public health implications of a street drug.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Gail; McCausland, Julie B; Tarabar, Asim F; Degutis, Linda C

    2006-12-01

    We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients presenting to an emergency department with suspected use of a street drug known as "illy" to identify the active ingredient in "illy" and describe the clinical presentation and outcomes associated with its use. Vital signs, mental status, restraint use, and urine toxicology (UT) results were recorded. Patients were interviewed about drug use patterns and co-ingestants. Fifty-nine patients (89.9% males) with a mean age of 22 years (SD +/- 4.37) were enrolled over a 34-month period. UT was obtained in 61% of patients; of these 91.7% tested positive for phencyclidine (PCP). Seventy-eight percent of patients were discharged, (15.3%) required psychiatric evaluation; 3 were admitted, one died in the ED. Patients reported concurrent drug use (54%) and at-risk drinking (50%). PCP is likely the active component of "illy". Most patients require observation and supportive care only, however major complications including death may occur.

  17. Salivary Secretory Disorders, Inducing Drugs, and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Rius, Jaume; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Farré, Magí

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salivary secretory disorders can be the result of a wide range of factors. Their prevalence and negative effects on the patient's quality of life oblige the clinician to confront the issue. Aim: To review the salivary secretory disorders, inducing drugs and their clinical management. Methods: In this article, a literature search of these dysfunctions was conducted with the assistance of a research librarian in the MEDLINE/PubMed Database. Results: Xerostomia, or dry mouth syndrome, can be caused by medication, systemic diseases such as Sjögren's Syndrome, glandular pathologies, and radiotherapy of the head and neck. Treatment of dry mouth is aimed at both minimizing its symptoms and preventing oral complications with the employment of sialogogues and topical acting substances. Sialorrhea and drooling, are mainly due to medication or neurological systemic disease. There are various therapeutic, pharmacologic, and surgical alternatives for its management. The pharmacology of most of the substances employed for the treatment of salivary disorders is well-known. Nevertheless, in some cases a significant improvement in salivary function has not been observed after their administration. Conclusion: At present, there are numerous frequently prescribed drugs whose unwanted effects include some kind of salivary disorder. In addition, the differing pathologic mechanisms, and the great variety of existing treatments hinder the clinical management of these patients. The authors have designed an algorithm to facilitate the decision making process when physicians, oral surgeons, or dentists face these salivary dysfunctions. PMID:26516310

  18. The anticancer drug adriamycin interacts with the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Hernández, P; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1999-01-01

    Adriamycin is an aminoglycosidic anthracycline antibiotic widely used in the treatment of cancer. Increasing reports point to the involvement of cell membranes in its mechanism of action. The interaction of adriamycin with human erythrocytes was investigated in order to determine the membrane binding sites and the resultant structural perturbation. Electron microscopy revealed that red cells incubated with the therapeutical concentration of the drug in human plasma changed their discoid shape to both stomatocytes and echinocytes. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this means that adriamycin was incorporated into either the inner or outer leaflets of the erythrocyte membrane. To explain this unusual result, the drug was incubated with molecular models. One of them consisted of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) multilayers, representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner leaflets of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that adriamycin interaction perturbed the polar head and acyl chain regions of both lipids. Fluorescence spectroscopy on another model, consisting of DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV), confirmed the X-ray results in that adriamycin fluidized its hydrophobic moiety. It is concluded that adriamycin incorporates into both erythrocyte leaflets affecting its membrane structure. PMID:10349743

  19. Drug delivery from injectable calcium phosphate foams by tailoring the macroporosity-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, David; Canal, Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2015-01-01

    In this work, novel injectable calcium phosphate foams (CPFs) were combined with an antibiotic (doxycycline) to design an innovative dosage form for bone regeneration. The material structure, its drug release profile and antibiotic activity were investigated, while its clinical applicability was assessed through cohesion and injectability tests. Doxycycline had a clear effect on both the micro and macro structure of the CPFs, owing to its role as a nucleating agent of hydroxyapatite and to a drying effect on the paste. Doxycycline-loaded CPFs presented interconnected macroporosity, which increased drug availability compared with calcium phosphate cements, and was a critical parameter controlling the release kinetics which followed a non-Fickian diffusion model. Up to 55% (1mg) of the drug was released progressively in 5days, the percentage released being proportional to the macroporosity of the CPFs. All doxycycline-containing foams had immediate cohesion and were injectable. Moreover, antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Thus, in addition to enhancing osteoconduction and material resorption, macroporosity enables tuning of the local delivery of drugs from injectable calcium phosphates. PMID:25448345

  20. Drug delivery from injectable calcium phosphate foams by tailoring the macroporosity-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, David; Canal, Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2015-01-01

    In this work, novel injectable calcium phosphate foams (CPFs) were combined with an antibiotic (doxycycline) to design an innovative dosage form for bone regeneration. The material structure, its drug release profile and antibiotic activity were investigated, while its clinical applicability was assessed through cohesion and injectability tests. Doxycycline had a clear effect on both the micro and macro structure of the CPFs, owing to its role as a nucleating agent of hydroxyapatite and to a drying effect on the paste. Doxycycline-loaded CPFs presented interconnected macroporosity, which increased drug availability compared with calcium phosphate cements, and was a critical parameter controlling the release kinetics which followed a non-Fickian diffusion model. Up to 55% (1mg) of the drug was released progressively in 5days, the percentage released being proportional to the macroporosity of the CPFs. All doxycycline-containing foams had immediate cohesion and were injectable. Moreover, antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Thus, in addition to enhancing osteoconduction and material resorption, macroporosity enables tuning of the local delivery of drugs from injectable calcium phosphates.

  1. In vitro investigations into the roles of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the disposition and drug interactions of dolutegravir, a HIV integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Reese, Melinda J; Savina, Paul M; Generaux, Grant T; Tracey, Helen; Humphreys, Joan E; Kanaoka, Eri; Webster, Lindsey O; Harmon, Kelly A; Clarke, James D; Polli, Joseph W

    2013-02-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) is a potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with a distinct resistance profile and a once-daily dose regimen that does not require pharmacokinetic boosting. This work investigated the in vitro drug transport and metabolism of DTG and assessed the potential for clinical drug-drug interactions. DTG is a substrate for the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Its high intrinsic membrane permeability limits the impact these transporters have on DTG's intestinal absorption. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 is the main enzyme responsible for the metabolism of DTG in vivo, with cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 being a notable pathway and UGT1A3 and UGT1A9 being only minor pathways. DTG demonstrated little or no inhibition (IC(50) values > 30 μM) in vitro of the transporters Pgp, BCRP, multidrug resistance protein 2, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1/3, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, or the drug metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 3A4, UGT1A1, or 2B7. Further, DTG did not induce CYP1A2, 2B6, or 3A4 mRNA in vitro using human hepatocytes. DTG does inhibit the renal OCT2 (IC(50) = 1.9 μM) transporter, which provides a mechanistic basis for the mild increases in serum creatinine observed in clinical studies. These in vitro studies demonstrate a low propensity for DTG to be a perpetrator of clinical drug interactions and provide a basis for predicting when other drugs could result in a drug interaction with DTG. PMID:23132334

  2. Detection of potential drug-drug interactions for outpatients across hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Min-Hui; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-02-01

    The National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) has adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards) as health cards to carry patients' medication histories across hospitals in Taiwan. The aims of this study are to enhance a computerized physician order entry system to support drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking based on a patient's medication history stored in his/her NHI-IC card. For performance evaluation, we developed a transaction tracking log to keep track of every operation on NHI-IC cards. Based on analysis of the transaction tracking log from 1 August to 31 October 2007, physicians read patients' NHI-IC cards in 71.01% (8,246) of patient visits; 33.02% (2,723) of the card reads showed at least one medicine currently being taken by the patient, 82.94% of which were prescribed during the last visit. Among 10,036 issued prescriptions, seven prescriptions (0.09%) contained at least one drug item that might interact with the currently-taken medicines stored in NHI-IC cards and triggered pop-up alerts. This study showed that the capacity of an NHI-IC card is adequate to support DDI checking across hospitals. Thus, the enhanced computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system can support better DDI checking when physicians are making prescriptions and provide safer medication care, particularly for patients who receive medication care from different hospitals. PMID:24473112

  3. Interaction of zanamivir with DNA and RNA: Models for drug DNA and drug RNA bindings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Kahangi, Fatemeh Ghoreyshi; Azizi, Ebrahim; Zebarjad, Nader; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2007-03-01

    Zanamivir (ZAN) is the first of a new generation of influenza virus-specific drugs known as neuraminidase inhibitors, which acts by interfering with life cycles of influenza viruses A and B. It prevents the virus spreading infection to other cells by blocking the neuraminidase enzyme present on the surface of the virus. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA complexes with zanamivir in aqueous solution, using constant DNA or RNA concentration (12.5 mM) and various zanamivir/polynucleotide ( P) ratios of 1/20, 1/10, 1/4, and 1/2. FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopy are used to determine the drug external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of zanamivir-DNA and RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Structural analysis showed major interaction of zanamivir with G-C (major groove) and A-T (minor groove) base pairs and minor perturbations of the backbone PO 2 group with overall binding constants of Kzanamivir-DNA = 1.30 × 10 4 M -1 and Kzanamivir-RNA = 1.38 × 10 4 M -1. The drug interaction induces a partial B to A-DNA transition, while RNA remains in A-conformation.

  4. Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug-drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided.

  5. A proposed clinical and biological interpretation of mediated interaction.

    PubMed

    Ikram, M Arfan; VanderWeele, Tyler J

    2015-10-01

    Understanding of causal pathways in epidemiology involves the concepts of direct and indirect effects. Recently, causal mediation analysis has been formalized to quantify these direct and indirect effects in the presence of exposure-mediator interaction and even allows for four-way decomposition of the total effect: controlled direct effect, reference interaction, mediated interaction, pure indirect effect. Whereas the other three effects can be intuitively conceptualized, mediated interaction is often considered a nuisance in statistical analysis. In this paper, we focus on mediated interaction and contrast it against pure mediation. We also propose a clinical and biological interpretation of mediated interaction using three hypothetical examples. With these examples we aim to make researchers aware that mediated interaction can actually provide important clinical and biological information.

  6. Ultrasound and Microbubble Guided Drug Delivery: Mechanistic Understanding and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Machtaler, Steven; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound mediated drug delivery using microbubbles is a safe and noninvasive approach for spatially localized drug administration. This approach can create temporary and reversible openings on cellular membranes and vessel walls (a process called “sonoporation”), allowing for enhanced transport of therapeutic agents across these natural barriers. It is generally believed that the sonoporation process is highly associated with the energetic cavitation activities (volumetric expansion, contraction, fragmentation, and collapse) of the microbubble. However, a thorough understanding of the process was unavailable until recently. Important progress on the mechanistic understanding of sonoporation and the corresponding physiological responses in vitro and in vivo has been made. Specifically, recent research shed light on the cavitation process of microbubbles and fluid motion during insonation of ultrasound, on the spatio-temporal interactions between microbubbles and cells or vessel walls, as well as on the temporal course of the subsequent biological effects. These findings have significant clinical implications on the development of optimal treatment strategies for effective drug delivery. In this article, current progress in the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery and its implications for clinical translation is discussed. PMID:24372231

  7. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  8. Clinical impact of serum proteins on drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Felix; Elsadek, Bakheet

    2012-07-20

    Among serum proteins albumin and transferrin have attracted the most interest as drug carriers in the past two decades. Prior to that, their potential use was overshadowed by the advent of monoclonal antibodies that was initiated by Milstein and Koehler in 1975. Meanwhile intensive pursuit of exploiting transferrin, but above all albumin as an exogenous or endogenous carrier protein for treating various diseases, primarily cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes and hepatitis has resulted in several marketed products and numerous clinical trials. While the use of transferrin has clinically been primarily restricted to immunotoxins, albumin-based drug delivery systems ranging from albumin drug nanoparticles, albumin fusion protein, prodrugs and peptide derivatives that bind covalently to albumin as well as physically binding antibody fragments and therapeutically active peptides are in advanced clinical trials or approved products. For treating diabetes, Levemir and Victoza that are myristic acid derivatives of human insulin or glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) act as long-acting peptides by binding to the fatty acid binding sites on circulating albumin to control glucose levels. Levemir from Novo Nordisk has already developed into a blockbuster since its market approval in 2004. Abraxane, an albumin paclitaxel nanoparticle as a water-soluble galenic formulation avoiding the use of cremophor/ethanol, transports paclitaxel through passive targeting as an albumin paclitaxel complex to the tumor site and is superior to conventional Taxol against metastatic breast cancer. INNO-206, an albumin-binding doxorubicin prodrug that also accumulates in solid tumors due to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect but releases the parent drug through acid cleavage, either intra- or extracellularly, is entering phase II studies against sarcoma. An expanding field is the use of albumin-binding antibody moieties which do not contain the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion

  9. Drug-target interaction prediction by random walk on the heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Ming-Xi; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Predicting potential drug-target interactions from heterogeneous biological data is critical not only for better understanding of the various interactions and biological processes, but also for the development of novel drugs and the improvement of human medicines. In this paper, the method of Network-based Random Walk with Restart on the Heterogeneous network (NRWRH) is developed to predict potential drug-target interactions on a large scale under the hypothesis that similar drugs often target similar target proteins and the framework of Random Walk. Compared with traditional supervised or semi-supervised methods, NRWRH makes full use of the tool of the network for data integration to predict drug-target associations. It integrates three different networks (protein-protein similarity network, drug-drug similarity network, and known drug-target interaction networks) into a heterogeneous network by known drug-target interactions and implements the random walk on this heterogeneous network. When applied to four classes of important drug-target interactions including enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, NRWRH significantly improves previous methods in terms of cross-validation and potential drug-target interaction prediction. Excellent performance enables us to suggest a number of new potential drug-target interactions for drug development.

  10. Enhancing Extraction of Drug-Drug Interaction from Literature Using Neutral Candidates, Negation, and Clause Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Diaz, Alberto; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Supervised biomedical relation extraction plays an important role in biomedical natural language processing, endeavoring to obtain the relations between biomedical entities. Drug-drug interactions, which are investigated in the present paper, are notably among the critical biomedical relations. Thus far many methods have been developed with the aim of extracting DDI relations. However, unfortunately there has been a scarcity of comprehensive studies on the effects of negation, complex sentences, clause dependency, and neutral candidates in the course of DDI extraction from biomedical articles. Results Our study proposes clause dependency features and a number of features for identifying neutral candidates as well as negation cues and scopes. Furthermore, our experiments indicate that the proposed features significantly improve the performance of the relation extraction task combined with other kernel methods. We characterize the contribution of each category of features and finally conclude that neutral candidate features have the most prominent role among all of the three categories. PMID:27695078

  11. Clinical development of new drug-radiotherapy combinations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ricky A; Plummer, Ruth; Stock, Julie K; Greenhalgh, Tessa A; Ataman, Ozlem; Kelly, Stephen; Clay, Robert; Adams, Richard A; Baird, Richard D; Billingham, Lucinda; Brown, Sarah R; Buckland, Sean; Bulbeck, Helen; Chalmers, Anthony J; Clack, Glen; Cranston, Aaron N; Damstrup, Lars; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Forster, Martin D; Golec, Julian; Hagan, Russell M; Hall, Emma; Hanauske, Axel-R; Harrington, Kevin J; Haswell, Tom; Hawkins, Maria A; Illidge, Tim; Jones, Hazel; Kennedy, Andrew S; McDonald, Fiona; Melcher, Thorsten; O'Connor, James P B; Pollard, John R; Saunders, Mark P; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Smitt, Melanie; Staffurth, John; Stratford, Ian J; Wedge, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    In countries with the best cancer outcomes, approximately 60% of patients receive radiotherapy as part of their treatment, which is one of the most cost-effective cancer treatments. Notably, around 40% of cancer cures include the use of radiotherapy, either as a single modality or combined with other treatments. Radiotherapy can provide enormous benefit to patients with cancer. In the past decade, significant technical advances, such as image-guided radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton therapy enable higher doses of radiotherapy to be delivered to the tumour with significantly lower doses to normal surrounding tissues. However, apart from the combination of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy with radiotherapy, little progress has been made in identifying and defining optimal targeted therapy and radiotherapy combinations to improve the efficacy of cancer treatment. The National Cancer Research Institute Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) formed a Joint Working Group with representatives from academia, industry, patient groups and regulatory bodies to address this lack of progress and to publish recommendations for future clinical research. Herein, we highlight the Working Group's consensus recommendations to increase the number of novel drugs being successfully registered in combination with radiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with cancer. PMID:27245279

  12. [Clinical profile of the new antiarrhythmic drug dronedarone].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Lewalter, T; Pittrow, D; Duray, G; Goette, A; Brachmann, J; Hohnloser, S H

    2010-03-01

    The new antiarrhythmic drug dronedarone (SR 33 589) is a benzofuran derivative structurally similar to amiodarone, however is noniodinated. The additional methansulfonylgroup renders it less lipophilic, with a substantially shorter half-life, compared to the parent compound. The electrophysiological properties of both agents are similar with inhibition of Na+, K+, and Ca++ currents (all Vaughan-Williams classes). The agent has been evaluated in a large clinical study program. The daily dose of dronedarone 800 mg has been shown (DAFNE) to be effective and well tolerated. In two design-identical randomised clinical trials (EURIDIS and ADONIS trial) the efficacy of dronedarone to maintain sinus rhythm in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation/flutter was shown to be clearly superior to placebo. The ERATO study showed the rate control properties of dronedarone. In the ATHENA morbidity/mortality study, the combined endpoint death or hospitalisation due to cardiovascular events occurred significantly less often in the dronedarone group compared to the placebo group. Particularly due to its beneficial effects on clinical outcomes such as cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in the context of high tolerability dronedarone appears to be a promising new antiarrhythmic compound.

  13. [Severe or life-threatening interactions between antiretrovirals and non-HIV drugs].

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Christian; Tuset, Montserrat; Miró, Jose M; Gatell, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has helped to improved control of the HIV infection, and has led to a progressively older population with the infection having a life expectancy quite similar to that of the general population. On the other hand, it is also known that HIV infection, even in patients with undetectable viral loads and good immunity, carries an increased cardiovascular risk, as well as an increased incidence of certain cancers. Therefore, the majority of HIV-infected patients receive several drugs (either prescribed by the physician or self-administered) combined with antiretrovirals. This article reviews the interactions between antiretrovirals and other drugs that can cause significant damage to patients, or even be life-threatening and of whom clinicians, especially those not directly treating HIV-infected patients, should be aware. A review is also presented on the implications of interactions between antiretrovirals and other drugs in special situations, such as the co-administration with cytostatics, immunesuppressants used in solid organ transplantation, or patients receiving new treatments for hepatitisC. Generally, combinations with two nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors and raltegravir (or in the near future, dolutegravir) are those with less potential for clinically significant interactions. PMID:24913990

  14. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    NAGANO, Kazuya; TSUTSUMI, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony–stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis–related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance–related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will

  15. A Review of the Toxicity of HIV Medications II: Interactions with Drugs and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Products.

    PubMed

    Stolbach, Andrew; Paziana, Karolina; Heverling, Harry; Pham, Paul

    2015-09-01

    For many patients today, HIV has become a chronic disease. For those patients who have access to and adhere to lifelong antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, the potential for drug-drug interactions has become a real and life-threatening concern. It is known that most ARV drug interactions occur through the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway. Medications for comorbid medical conditions, holistic supplements, and illicit drugs can be affected by CYP inhibitors and inducers and have the potential to cause harm and toxicity. Protease inhibitors (PIs) tend to inhibit CYP3A4, while most non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) tend to induce the enzyme. As such, failure to adjust the dose of co-administered medications, such as statins and steroids, may lead to serious complications including rhabdomyolysis and hypercortisolism, respectively. Similarly, gastric acid blockers can decrease several ARV absorption, and warfarin doses may need to be adjusted to maintain therapeutic concentrations. Illicit drugs such as methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") in combination with PIs lead to increased toxicity, while the concomitant administration of sedative drugs such as midazolam and alprazolam in patients taking PIs can result in prolonged sedation, delayed recovery, and increased length of stay. Even supplements like St. John's Wort can alter PI concentrations. In theory, any drug that is metabolized by CYP has potential for a pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction with all PIs, cobicistat, and most NNRTIs. When adding a new medication to an ARV regimen, use of a drug-drug interaction software and/or consultation with a clinical pharmacist/pharmacologist or HIV specialist is recommended. PMID:26036354

  16. Medicinal importance of grapefruit juice and its interaction with various drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Jawad; Imam, Sardar Z

    2007-01-01

    Grapefruit juice is consumed widely in today's health conscious world as a protector against cardiovascular diseases and cancers. It has however, been found to be an inhibitor of the intestinal cytochrome P – 450 3A4 system, which is responsible for the first pass metabolism of many drugs. The P – glycoprotein pump, found in the brush border of the intestinal wall which transports many of these cytochrome P – 450 3A4 substrates, has also been implicated to be inhibited by grapefruit juice. By inhibiting these enzyme systems, grapefruit juice alters the pharmacokinetics of a variety of medications, leading to elevation of their serum concentrations. Most notable are its effects on the calcium channel antagonist and the statin group of drugs. In the case of many drugs, the increased serum concentration has been found to be associated with increased frequency of dose dependent adverse effects. In this review, we have discussed the phytochemistry of grapefruit juice, the various drugs involved in the drug – grapefruit juice eraction with their mechanisms of action and have presented the clinical implications of these interactions. PMID:17971226

  17. Inhibition of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes by Canagliflozin and Dapagliflozin: Implications for Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Chau, Nuy; Rowland, Andrew; Miners, John O

    2015-10-01

    Canagliflozin (CNF) and dapagliflozin (DPF) are the first sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors to be approved for clinical use. Although available evidence excludes clinically significant inhibition of cytochromes P450, the effects of CNF and DPF on human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are unknown. Here, we report the inhibition of human recombinant UGTs by CNF and DPF, along with the Ki values for selected recombinant and human liver microsomal UGTs. CNF inhibited all UGT1A subfamily enzymes, but the greatest inhibition was observed with UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10 (IC50 values ≤ 10 µM). DPF similarly inhibited UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10, with IC50 values ranging from 39 to 66 µM. In subsequent kinetic studies, CNF inhibited recombinant and human liver microsomal UGT1A9; Ki values ranged from 1.4 to 3.0 µM, depending on the substrate (propofol/4-methylumbelliferone) enzyme combination. Ki values for CNF inhibition of UGT1A1 were approximately 3-fold higher. Consistent with the activity screening data, DPF was a less potent inhibitor of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9. The Ki for DPF inhibition of UGT1A1 was 81 µM, whereas the Ki values for inhibition of UGT1A9 ranged from 12 to 15 µM. Based on the in vitro Ki values and plasma concentrations reported in the literature, DPF may be excluded as a perpetrator of DDIs arising from inhibition of UGT enzymes, but CNF inhibition of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 in vivo cannot be discounted. Since the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors share common structural features, notably a glycoside moiety, investigation of drugs in this class for effects on UGT to identify (or exclude) potential drug-drug interactions is warranted.

  18. Evaluation of drug interaction potential of Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah) and its constituents

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Vamshi K.; Dale, Olivia R.; Awortwe, Charles; Ali, Zulfiqar; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Walker, Larry A.; Khan, Shabana I.

    2014-01-01

    Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah) is a popular herb in Malaysia that has been traditionally used in a number of women’s health applications such as to improve libido, relieve postmenopausal symptoms, and to facilitate or hasten delivery in childbirth. In addition, the constituents of this plant have been reported to possess anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical studies have indicated that cytochrome P450s (CYPs), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and Pregnane X receptor (PXR) are the three main modulators of drug-drug interactions which alter the absorption, distribution, and metabolism of drugs. Given the widespread use of Kacip Fatimah in dietary supplements, the current study focuses on determining the potential of its constituents to affect the activities of CYPs, P-gp, or PXR using in vitro assays which may provide useful information toward the risk of herb-drug interaction with concomitantly used drugs. Six compounds isolated from the roots of L. pumila (2 saponins and 4 alkyl phenols) were tested, in addition to the methanolic extract. The extract of L. pumila showed a significant time dependent inhibition (TDI) of CYP3A4, reversible inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19 and a weak inhibition of 1A2 and 2D6 as well as an inhibition of P-gp and rifampicin-induced PXR activation. The alkyl phenols inhibited CYP3A4 (TDI), CYP2C9, and 2C19 (reversible) while saponins inhibited P-gp and PXR. In conclusion, L. pumila and its constituents showed significant modulation of all three regulatory proteins (CYPs, P-gp, and PXR) suggesting a potential to alter the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of conventional drugs if used concomitantly. PMID:25152732

  19. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction study of ranolazine and metformin in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zack, Julia; Berg, Jolene; Juan, Axel; Pannacciulli, Nicola; Allard, Martine; Gottwald, Mildred; Zhang, Heather; Shao, Yongwu; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Jochelson, Phil

    2015-03-01

    Ranolazine and metformin may be frequently co-administered in subjects with chronic angina and co-morbid type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The potential for a drug-drug interaction was explored in two phase 1 clinical studies in subjects with T2DM to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of metformin 1000 mg BID when administered with ranolazine 1000 mg BID (Study 1, N = 28) or ranolazine 500 mg BID (Study 2, N = 25) as compared to metformin alone. Co-administration of ranolazine 1000 mg BID with metformin 1000 mg BID resulted in 1.53- and 1.79-fold increases in steady-state metformin Cmax and AUCtau , respectively; co-administration of ranolazine 500 mg BID with metformin 1000 mg BID resulted in 1.22- and 1.37-fold increases in steady-state metformin Cmax and AUCtau , respectively. Co-administration of ranolazine and metformin was well tolerated in these T2DM subjects, with no serious adverse events or drug-related adverse events leading to discontinuation. The most common adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, and dizziness. These findings are consistent with a dose-related interaction between ranolazine and metformin, and suggest that a dose adjustment of metformin may not be required with ranolazine 500 mg BID; whereas, the metformin dose should not exceed 1700 mg of total daily dose when using ranolazine 1000 mg BID. PMID:27128216

  20. Clinically Relevant Transmitted Drug Resistance to First Line Antiretroviral Drugs and Implications for Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Susana; Guillot, Vicente; Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Stella, Natalia; Peña, Alejandro; Delgado, Rafael; Córdoba, Juan; Aguilera, Antonio; Vidal, Carmen; García, Federico; CoRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. Methods We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain) between 2007–2011. Using the Stanford algorithm “Low-level resistance”, “Intermediate resistance” and “High-level resistance” categories were considered as “Resistant”. Results 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8–7.7)], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9–9.0)]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8–2.9) vs. 3.6% (2.9–4.3) by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4–1.1) vs. 1.7% (1.2–2.2)], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8–5.3) vs. 3.7% (3.0–4.7)]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p = 0.02). Conclusions Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations. PMID:24637804

  1. Mitigation of adverse interactions in pairs of clinical practice guidelines using constraint logic programming.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Michalowski, Martin; Farion, Ken; Hing, Marisela Mainegra; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new method to mitigate (identify and address) adverse interactions (drug-drug or drug-disease) that occur when a patient with comorbid diseases is managed according to two concurrently applied clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). A lack of methods to facilitate the concurrent application of CPGs severely limits their use in clinical practice and the development of such methods is one of the grand challenges for clinical decision support. The proposed method responds to this challenge. We introduce and formally define logical models of CPGs and other related concepts, and develop the mitigation algorithm that operates on these concepts. In the algorithm we combine domain knowledge encoded as interaction and revision operators using the constraint logic programming (CLP) paradigm. The operators characterize adverse interactions and describe revisions to logical models required to address these interactions, while CLP allows us to efficiently solve the logical models - a solution represents a feasible therapy that may be safely applied to a patient. The mitigation algorithm accepts two CPGs and available (likely incomplete) patient information. It reports whether mitigation has been successful or not, and on success it gives a feasible therapy and points at identified interactions (if any) together with the revisions that address them. Thus, we consider the mitigation algorithm as an alerting tool to support a physician in the concurrent application of CPGs that can be implemented as a component of a clinical decision support system. We illustrate our method in the context of two clinical scenarios involving a patient with duodenal ulcer who experiences an episode of transient ischemic attack.

  2. [The importance of clinical data management in improvement of drug evaluation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of clinical data is drawing more attention in drug development in China, the clinical data management is not good enough in the clinical trials right now. With the development of internet and progress of information technology, especially with the setup of the state innovation strategy for drug development, it is necessary and urgent to improve the clinical data quality. Good data quality is the primary basis of technical evaluation of drug at the marketing authorization. So Center for Drug Evaluation of CFDA has made some endeavors to enhance data management in the clinical trials in recent years. This article is focused on these aspects of data managment. PMID:26911033

  3. [The importance of clinical data management in improvement of drug evaluation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of clinical data is drawing more attention in drug development in China, the clinical data management is not good enough in the clinical trials right now. With the development of internet and progress of information technology, especially with the setup of the state innovation strategy for drug development, it is necessary and urgent to improve the clinical data quality. Good data quality is the primary basis of technical evaluation of drug at the marketing authorization. So Center for Drug Evaluation of CFDA has made some endeavors to enhance data management in the clinical trials in recent years. This article is focused on these aspects of data managment.

  4. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence.

    PubMed

    El Rawas, Rana; Saria, Alois

    2016-03-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug's effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or "agonistic" versus the hostile or "antagonistic" social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence.

  5. 78 FR 35937 - Food and Drug Administration Decisions for Investigational Device Exemption Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Decisions for Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Investigations; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... revised and is being reissued for comment because the Food and Drug Administration Safety and...

  6. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2014-12-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents-molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs-provide opportunities both to improve health-care access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns.

  7. Theoretical and experimental investigation of drug-polymer interaction and miscibility and its impact on drug supersaturation in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) have the potential to offer higher apparent solubility and bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. Knowledge of the solid state drug-polymer solubility/miscibility and their mutual interaction are fundamental requirements for the effective design and development of such systems. To this end, we have carried out a comprehensive investigation of various ASD systems of dipyridamole and cinnarizine in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) at different drug loadings. Theoretical and experimental examinations (by implementing binary and ternary Flory-Huggins (F-H) theory) related to drug-polymer interaction/miscibility including solubility parameter approach, melting point depression method, phase diagram, drug-polymer interaction in the presence of moisture and the effect of drug loading on interaction parameter were performed. The information obtained from this study was used to predict the stability of ASDs at different drug loadings and under different thermal and moisture conditions. Thermal and moisture sorption analysis not only provided the composition-dependent interaction parameter but also predicted the composition dependent miscibility. DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA systems have shown molecular level mixing over the complete range of drug loading. For CNZ-PVP, the presence of a single Tg at lower drug loadings (10, 20 and 35%w/w) indicates the formation of solid solution. However, drug recrystallization was observed for samples with higher drug weight fractions (50 and 65%w/w). Finally, the role of polymer in maintaining drug supersaturation has also been explored. It has been found that drug-polymer combinations capable of hydrogen-bonding in the solution state (DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA) are more effective in preventing drug crystallization compared to the drug-polymer systems without such interaction (CNZ-PVP). The DPM-PAA system outperformed all other ASDs in various stability conditions (dry-state, in

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of drug-polymer interaction and miscibility and its impact on drug supersaturation in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) have the potential to offer higher apparent solubility and bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. Knowledge of the solid state drug-polymer solubility/miscibility and their mutual interaction are fundamental requirements for the effective design and development of such systems. To this end, we have carried out a comprehensive investigation of various ASD systems of dipyridamole and cinnarizine in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) at different drug loadings. Theoretical and experimental examinations (by implementing binary and ternary Flory-Huggins (F-H) theory) related to drug-polymer interaction/miscibility including solubility parameter approach, melting point depression method, phase diagram, drug-polymer interaction in the presence of moisture and the effect of drug loading on interaction parameter were performed. The information obtained from this study was used to predict the stability of ASDs at different drug loadings and under different thermal and moisture conditions. Thermal and moisture sorption analysis not only provided the composition-dependent interaction parameter but also predicted the composition dependent miscibility. DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA systems have shown molecular level mixing over the complete range of drug loading. For CNZ-PVP, the presence of a single Tg at lower drug loadings (10, 20 and 35%w/w) indicates the formation of solid solution. However, drug recrystallization was observed for samples with higher drug weight fractions (50 and 65%w/w). Finally, the role of polymer in maintaining drug supersaturation has also been explored. It has been found that drug-polymer combinations capable of hydrogen-bonding in the solution state (DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA) are more effective in preventing drug crystallization compared to the drug-polymer systems without such interaction (CNZ-PVP). The DPM-PAA system outperformed all other ASDs in various stability conditions (dry-state, in

  9. Influence of gold(I) complexes involving adenine derivatives on major drug-drug interaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Zdeněk; Novotná, Aneta; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-12-01

    A series of considerably anti-inflammatory active gold(I) mixed-ligand complexes, involving the benzyl-substituted derivatives of N6-benzyladenine (HLn) and triphenylphosphine (PPh3) as ligands and having the general formula [Au(Ln)(PPh3)]·xH2O (1-4; n=1-4 and x=0-1), was evaluated for the ability to influence the expression of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 and transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid (GR) and aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) receptors in primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. In both tests, evaluating the ability of the complexes to modulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in primary human hepatocytes and influence the transcriptional activity of AhR and GR in the reporter cell lines, no negative influence on the major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and their signaling pathway (through GR and AhR receptors) was observed. These positive findings revealed another substantial evidence that could lead to utilization of the complexes as effective and relatively safe drugs for the treatment of hard-to-treat inflammation-related diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, comparable or even better than clinically used gold-containing drug Auranofin. PMID:24157406

  10. Evaluation of food-drug interaction of guava leaf tea.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Suzuki, Katsuya; Iwadate-Iwata, Emi; Kato, Ikuo; Uchida, Kazumi; Onoue, Masaharu

    2013-02-01

    Guava leaf tea (GLT) contains guava leaf polyphenol (Gvpp), which regulates the absorption of dietary carbohydrate from the intestines. Borderline diabetics, who are at high risk of development of diabetes, take GLT to suppress a rapid increase of blood sugar level after meals. However, patients with diabetes in whom diabetic drugs or warfarin as a blood thinner are prescribed also take GLT with the expectation of glycemic control. Therefore, we studied whether GLT had potential for inhibition or induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and an influence on the action of warfarin. Extract of guava leaf (GvEx) consists of carbohydrate and polyphenols, which are Gvpp, quercetin, and ellagic acid. These polyphenols, but not GvEx, showed a certain level of inhibition of human-cDNA-expressed CYPs. In a comparison of GLT and grapefruit juice, GLT showed weaker inhibition of CYP activities and of midazolam 1'-hydroxylation than grapefruit juice. Furthermore, neither liver weight nor CYP3A expression in the liver was changed in rats that received GvEx for 90 days compared with the control group. When rats were concomitantly treated with GLT and warfarin, the prolongation of clotting time of blood by warfarin was not influenced. These data suggest that GLT is unlikely to interact with drugs.

  11. Drug-Like Protein–Protein Interaction Modulators: Challenges and Opportunities for Drug Discovery and Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Kuenemann, Melaine A; Poyet, Jean-Luc; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto; Labbé, Céline; Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental processes in living cells are largely controlled by macromolecular interactions and among them, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have a critical role while their dysregulations can contribute to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. Although PPIs were considere