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Sample records for drug residues

  1. Distribution of veterinary drug residues among muscles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sets tolerances for veterinary drug residues in muscle, but does not specify which muscle should be sampled for analysis. The goal of this research was to determine if antibiotic residue levels are dependent on muscle type. In this study, penicillin G (Pen G) d...

  2. Residues of veterinary drugs at injection sites.

    PubMed

    Reeves, P T

    2007-02-01

    Residues of veterinary drugs have potential implications for human food safety and international trade in animal-derived food commodities. A particular concern is the slow depletion of residues of some injectable formulations from the site of administration. Licensing authorities have adopted different approaches to the human food safety assessment of injection site residues. European agencies apply the maximum residue limit (MRL) for muscle to muscle at the injection site and specify a withdrawal period sufficient to ensure the ingestion of a 300 g portion of muscle, if comprised entirely of injection site tissue, does not exceed the acceptable daily intake. The agencies in Australia, Canada and the USA also exclude injection site residues from the MRL-setting process. These agencies evaluate the risk to consumers posed by potential acute manifestations resulting from the infrequent ingestion of injection site residues based on acute dietary exposure considerations. While all of these approaches protect the safety of consumers, the adoption of different approaches has potential implications for residue surveillance programs in the international trade in meat. In particular, when an exporting country establishes standards for residues at injection sites based on acute dietary exposure considerations and the importing country assesses these residues against the MRL for muscle, the unnecessary condemnation of meat and disruption to market access may result. The latter may represent a potential economical impost to the exporting country. An internationally harmonized approach to the risk analysis of residues of veterinary drugs at injection sites, which protects the safety of consumers and facilitates the international trade in meat, is needed.

  3. Residual methamphetamine in decontaminated clandestine drug laboratories.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Glen; Daniell, William; Treser, Charles

    2009-03-01

    This pilot cross-sectional study examined three previously decontaminated residential clandestine drug laboratories (CDLs) in Washington State to determine the distribution and magnitude of residual methamphetamine concentrations relative to the state decontamination standard. A total of 159 discrete random methamphetamine wipe samples were collected from the three CDLs, focusing on the master bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen at each site. Additional samples were collected from specific non-random locations likely to be contacted by future residents (e.g., door knobs and light switches). Samples were analyzed for methamphetamine by EPA method 8270 for semivolatile organic chemicals. Overall, 59% of random samples and 75% of contact point samples contained methamphetamine in excess of the state decontamination standard (0.1 micro g/100 cm(2)). At each site, methamphetamine concentrations were generally higher and more variable in rooms where methamphetamine was prepared and used. Even compared with the less stringent standard adopted in Colorado (0.5 micro g/100cm(2)), a substantial number of samples at each site still demonstrated excessive residual methamphetamine (random samples, 25%; contact samples, 44%). Independent oversight of CDL decontamination in residential structures is warranted to protect public health. Further research on the efficacy of CDL decontamination procedures and subsequent verification of methods is needed.

  4. 76 FR 51038 - Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  5. 77 FR 72254 - New Animal Drugs; Updating Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs in Food

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 500, 520, 522, 524, 529, 556, and 558 RIN 0910-AG17 New Animal Drugs; Updating Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs in Food AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  6. 21 CFR 530.24 - Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... drug residue quantification. 530.24 Section 530.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...-Producing Animals § 530.24 Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification. (a... extralabel use drug residues above the safe levels established under § 530.22 for extralabel use of an...

  7. Health concerns and management of select veterinary drug residues.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E; Dedonder, Keith; Kissell, Lindsey; Mzyk, Danielle; Marmulak, Tara; Smith, Geof; Tell, Lisa; Gehring, Ronette; Davis, Jennifer; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to review the potential adverse health effects in humans if exposed to residues of selected veterinary drugs used in food-producing animals. Our other objectives are to briefly inform the reader of why many of these drugs are or were approved for use in livestock production and how drug residues can be mitigated for these drugs. The selected drugs include several antimicrobials, beta agonists, and phenylbutazone. The antimicrobials continue to be of regulatory concern not only because of their acute adverse effects but also because their use as growth promoters have been linked to antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore, nitroimidazoles and arsenicals are no longer approved for use in food animals in most jurisdictions. In recent years, the risk assessment and risk management of beta agonists, have been the focus of national and international agencies and this manuscript attempts to review the pharmacology of these drugs and regulatory challenges. Several of the drugs selected for this review can cause noncancer effects (e.g., penicillins) and others are potential carcinogens (e.g., nitroimidazoles). This review also focuses on how regulatory and independent organizations manage the risk of these veterinary drugs based on data from human health risk assessments.

  8. Residues of antibacterial drugs in honey from the Italian market.

    PubMed

    Baggio, A; Gallina, A; Benetti, C; Mutinelli, F

    2009-01-01

    Antibacterial drugs are used worldwide for the control of American and, less often, European foulbrood. Their administration is mostly uncontrolled and applied without approved protocols and instructions for use as well as precautionary recommendations. Consequently, this practice is responsible for the contamination of beehive products and contributes to the problem of food safety. According to this situation, 4672 analyses were carried out on 5303 honeys collected from 2001 to 2007. These samples were investigated for antibacterial residues of tetracyclines, sulphonamides, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and tylosin. Honeys were classified according to their origin: imported honey and honey from the Italian market. In the last group (only for samples collected from 2001 to 2004), another type of honey was distinguished: that of local honey. A total of 6.3% of all samples were positive for the antibacterial drugs analysed; in particular, 6.8% of imported honeys and 6.1% of honeys on the Italian market. Only 1.7% of local honey had antibacterial residues. These results are indicative of a rather frequent presence of antibacterial drug residues in both Italian and imported honeys. Furthermore, the data showed that among the active substances analysed, sulphonamides are the most used antibacterial substance followed by tetracyclines, streptomycin, tylosin, and chloramphenicol. Finally, a continuous monitoring programme is needed, accompanied by an education programme to beekeepers on proper hive management.

  9. 21 CFR 556.1 - General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food. 556.1 Section 556.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD General Provisions § 556.1 General considerations; tolerances...

  10. 21 CFR 556.1 - General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food. 556.1 Section 556.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD General Provisions § 556.1 General considerations; tolerances...

  11. Estimating provisional acceptable residues for extralabel drug use in livestock.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E; Martín-Jiménez, T; Craigmill, A L; Riviere, J E

    1999-06-01

    In 1996, the United States Congress passed legislation (Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act, AMDUCA), which allows some veterinary or human drugs to be used off label in food-producing animals. In order to implement this Act and protect the U.S. consumer, tolerances or safe concentrations are required before a withdrawal time can be estimated for extralabel drug use. Use of foreign MRLs to satisfy these data needs may not be applicable because of differences in safety standards between the U.S. and other countries. This paper presents strategies that can be used to derive equivalent safe concentrations, referred to as provisional acceptable residues (PARs), that may then be used to estimate drug withdrawal times. Health-based methods are proposed for calculating a PAR for a tissue. Procedure A partitions 50% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) to edible tissues and reserves the remainder for milk. Procedure B equally partitions the ADI into all edible tissues. Procedure C partitions 50% of the ADI to milk and equally partitions the remaining 50% ADI into edible tissues. Simulations were performed for florfenicol, tetracycline, dexamethasone, azaperone, ivermectin, eprinomectin, and doramectin. In general, these simulations resulted in derivation of conservative PARs, which did not result in daily intakes of residues greater than the health-based ADI. These simulations demonstrated that provided the safe concentrations or equivalent PARs are based on rigorous toxicology safety data (e.g., NOELs, ADIs), the safety of food animal products will not be compromised. It is proposed that these PARs can be used for estimating withdrawal times after extralabel drug use or inadvertent exposure to an environmental contaminant where no approved withdrawal time exists. Finally, implementing similar transparent methods could have a positive impact on international harmonization and trade.

  12. 75 FR 45640 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a...

  13. Improved measurement of drug exposure in the brain using drug-specific correction for residual blood

    PubMed Central

    Fridén, Markus; Ljungqvist, Helena; Middleton, Brian; Bredberg, Ulf; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge associated with the determination of the unbound brain-to-plasma concentration ratio of a drug (Kp,uu,brain), is the error associated with correction for the drug in various vascular spaces of the brain, i.e., in residual blood. The apparent brain vascular spaces of plasma water (Vwater, 10.3 μL/g brain), plasma proteins (Vprotein, 7.99 μL/g brain), and the volume of erythrocytes (Ver, 2.13 μL/g brain) were determined and incorporated into a novel, drug-specific correction model that took the drug-unbound fraction in the plasma (fu,p) into account. The correction model was successfully applied for the determination of Kp,uu,brain for indomethacin, loperamide, and moxalactam, which had potential problems associated with correction. The influence on correction of the drug associated with erythrocytes was shown to be minimal. Therefore, it is proposed that correction for residual blood can be performed using an effective plasma space in the brain (Veff), which is calculated from the measured fu,p of the particular drug as well as from the estimates of Vwater and Vprotein, which are provided in this study. Furthermore, the results highlight the value of determining Kp,uu,brain with statistical precision to enable appropriate interpretation of brain exposure for drugs that appear to be restricted to the brain vascular spaces. PMID:19756019

  14. 21 CFR 530.24 - Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN ANIMALS Specific Provisions Relating to Extralabel Use of Animal and Human Drugs in Food-Producing Animals § 530.24 Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification....

  15. 77 FR 3653 - Import Tolerances for Residues of Unapproved New Animal Drugs in Food

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... countries and present in imported, animal-derived food and food products, as well as procedures to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 10, 20, 25, and 510 RIN 0910-AF78 Import Tolerances for Residues of Unapproved New Animal Drugs in Food AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...

  16. 21 CFR 556.1 - General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... drug, has been shown to induce cancer in man or animal; however, such drug will not adversely affect... present—in which case a tolerance for negligible residue is required; or (3) The drug induces cancer when... indistinguishable from normal tissue constituents—in which case the establishment of a tolerance is not required. (b...

  17. 21 CFR 556.1 - General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... drug, has been shown to induce cancer in man or animal; however, such drug will not adversely affect... present—in which case a tolerance for negligible residue is required; or (3) The drug induces cancer when... indistinguishable from normal tissue constituents—in which case the establishment of a tolerance is not required. (b...

  18. Pharmaceutical residues in the drinking water supply: modeling residue concentrations in surface waters of drugs prescribed in the United States.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Brandt-Rauf, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Pharmaceutical residues and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWC) have been shown to survive conventional water-treatment processes and persist in potable water supplies. To estimate the geographical distribution of the Predicted Environmental Concentration (PEC) of selected drugs prescribed by office based physicians in the United States (US), after non-metabolized residues have been excreted and processed in wastewater treatment plants. The geographical distribution of the PEC in surface waters of pharmaceutical residues was calculated, in four regions of the US. Prescription drug data was obtained from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). The PEC of three drugs prescribed by office based physicians in the US between 1998 and 2000 was compared to the concentrations of these pharmaceuticals found in a surface water characterization project conducted by the United States Geological Survey between 1999 and 2000. There were 803,185,420 medications prescribed by office-based physicians in the US between 1998 and 2000. Relief of pain, hormonal, cardiovascular and antimicrobial medications followed very similar prescription patterns, both in terms of quantity and geographical distribution. Together these four types of medications account for more than half of the medications prescribed between 1998 and 2000. The concentration of pharmaceutical residues found in the drinking water supply was not significantly correlated to the PEC of pharmaceuticals prescribed by office-based physicians. The geographical distribution of medications prescribed by office based physicians in the US underlines the need to implement effective public health strategies.

  19. 75 FR 75482 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Solvents in Animal Drug Products; Questions and Answers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Solvents in Animal... guidance for industry 211 entitled ``Residual Solvents in Animal Drug Products; Questions and Answers... Chapter Residual Solvents that applies to both human and veterinary drugs and to compendial and...

  20. 21 CFR 530.24 - Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure for announcing analytical methods for...-Producing Animals § 530.24 Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification. (a) FDA may issue an order announcing a specific analytical method or methods for the quantification of...

  1. 21 CFR 530.24 - Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure for announcing analytical methods for...-Producing Animals § 530.24 Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification. (a) FDA may issue an order announcing a specific analytical method or methods for the quantification of...

  2. 21 CFR 530.24 - Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure for announcing analytical methods for...-Producing Animals § 530.24 Procedure for announcing analytical methods for drug residue quantification. (a) FDA may issue an order announcing a specific analytical method or methods for the quantification of...

  3. DIGRE: Drug-Induced Genomic Residual Effect Model for Successful Prediction of Multidrug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Tang, H; Li, Y; Zhong, R; Wang, T; Wong, STC; Xiao, G; Xie, Y

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug regimens are a promising strategy for improving therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects, especially for complex disorders such as cancer. However, the use of multidrug therapies is very challenging, due to a lack of understanding of the mechanisms of drug interactions. We herein present a novel computational approach—Drug-Induced Genomic Residual Effect (DIGRE) Computational Model—to predict drug combination effects by explicitly modeling drug response curves and gene expression changes after drug treatments. The prediction performance of DIGRE was evaluated using two datasets: (i) OCI-LY3 B-lymphoma cells treated with 14 different drugs and (ii) MCF breast cancer cells treated with combinations of gefitinib and docetaxel at different doses. In both datasets, the predicted drug combination effects significantly correlated with the experimental results. The results indicated the model was useful in predicting drug combination effects, which may greatly facilitate the discovery of new, effective multidrug therapies. PMID:26225227

  4. False-positive outcome and drug residue in milk samples over withdrawal times.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Jin, J H; Kondo, F

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to identify false-positive outcomes and drug residues in milk samples over withdrawal times and to determine whether the positive results were caused by drug residues or natural inhibitors. A total of 73 milk samples over withdrawal times after the last intramammary infusion were collected from each treated quarter of cows and tested using the Delvotest SP assay. Reading time was 150, 165, and 180 min, and results of samples were recorded according to the color of the well containing the control milk sample. There were 24, 20, and 12 positive samples at the reading times of 150, 165, and 180 min, respectively. All 24 positive milk samples were heated at 82 degrees C for 5 min and retested to verify that the positive results were caused by drug residues or natural inhibitors. Twenty-one samples that exhibited positive results were negative after heat treatment, and drug residues were not identified by LacTek and Charm tests. However, 3 samples that exhibited positive results from heat treatment of 82 degrees C were positive for drugs. In our study, most positive results (89%) in the milk samples over withdrawal times were false-positive results by natural inhibitors. Moreover, the heat treatment is a fast, simple, and inexpensive method to remove false-positive results and has no effect on positive samples containing drugs. We suggest that heat treatment before screening tests is an effective way to reduce false-positive results in the milk samples.

  5. 77 FR 16806 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety, USDA. ACTION... discussed at the 20th Session of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods (CCRVDF) of... Science & Policy, Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation, HFV-100, FDA, Center for Veterinary Medicine,...

  6. Targeting Non-Catalytic Cysteine Residues Through Structure-Guided Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Kenneth K; Turner, David M; Renslo, Adam R; Arkin, Michelle R

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of non-catalytic cysteine residues with small molecules is drawing increased attention from drug discovery scientists and chemical biologists. From a biological perspective, genomic and proteomic studies have revealed the presence of cysteine mutations in several oncogenic proteins, suggesting both a functional role for these residues and also a strategy for targeting them in an 'allele specific' manner. For the medicinal chemist, the structure-guided design of cysteine- reactive molecules is an appealing strategy to realize improved selectivity and pharmacodynamic properties in drug leads. Finally, for chemical biologists, the modification of cysteine residues provides a unique means to probe protein structure and allosteric regulation. Here, we review three applications of cysteinemodifying small molecules: 1) the optimization of existing drug leads, 2) the discovery of new lead compounds, and 3) the use of cysteine-reactive molecules as probes of protein dynamics. In each case, structure-guided design plays a key role in determining which cysteine residue(s) to target and in designing compounds with the proper geometry to enable both covalent interaction with the targeted cysteine and productive non-covalent interactions with nearby protein residues.

  7. Targeting Non-Catalytic Cysteine Residues Through Structure-Guided Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hallenbeck, Kenneth K.; Turner, David M.; Renslo, Adam R.; Arkin, Michelle R.

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of non-catalytic cysteine residues with small molecules is drawing increased attention from drug discovery scientists and chemical biologists. From a biological perspective, genomic and proteomic studies have revealed the presence of cysteine mutations in several oncogenic proteins, suggesting both a functional role for these residues and also a strategy for targeting them in an ‘allele specific’ manner. For the medicinal chemist, the structure-guided design of cysteine-reactive molecules is an appealing strategy to realize improved selectivity and pharmacodynamic properties in drug leads. Finally, for chemical biologists, the modification of cysteine residues provides a unique means to probe protein structure and allosteric regulation. Here, we review three applications of cysteine-modifying small molecules: 1) the optimization of existing drug leads, 2) the discovery of new lead compounds, and 3) the use of cysteine-reactive molecules as probes of protein dynamics. In each case, structure-guided design plays a key role in determining which cysteine residue(s) to target and in designing compounds with the proper geometry to enable both covalent interaction with the targeted cysteine and productive non-covalent interactions with nearby protein residues. PMID:27449257

  8. Norepinephrine transporter function and desipramine: residual drug effects versus short-term regulation.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Gregory A; Jia, Weihong; Li, Jing; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Mandela, Prashant; Pan, Jun

    2005-04-30

    Previous research has shown that exposure of norepinephrine transporter (NET)-expressing cells to desipramine (DMI) downregulates the norepinephrine transporter, although changes in the several transporter parameters do not demonstrate the same time course. Exposures to desipramine for <1 day reduces only radioligand binding and uptake capacity while transporter-immunoreactivity is unaffected. Recent demonstration of persistent drug retention in cells following desipramine exposures raises the possibility that previous reported changes in the norepinephrine transporter may be partly accountable by residual drug. In this study, potential effects of residual desipramine on norepinephrine transporter binding and uptake were re-evaluated following exposures of PC12 cells to desipramine using different methods to remove residual drug. Using a method that minimizes residual drug, exposure of intact PC12 cells to desipramine for 4h had no effect on uptake capacity or [(3)H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter, while exposures for > or =16 h reduced uptake capacity. Desipramine-induced reductions in binding to the transporter required >24 h or greater periods of desipramine exposure. This study confirms that uptake capacity of the norepinephrine transporter is reduced earlier than changes in radioligand binding, but with a different time course than originally shown. Special pre-incubation procedures are required to abolish effects of residual transporter inhibitor when studying inhibitor-induced transporter regulation.

  9. In Vivo Selection of Resistant E. coli after Ingestion of Milk with Added Drug Residues

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Richard Van Vleck; Siler, Julie D.; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho; Warnick, Lorin D.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a major global threat to modern medicine. In vitro studies have shown that very low concentrations of drugs, as frequently identified in the environment, and in foods and water for human and animal consumption, can select for resistant bacteria. However, limited information is currently available on the in vivo impact of ingested drug residues. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of feeding preweaned calves milk containing antimicrobial drug residues (below the minimum inhibitory concentration), similar to concentrations detected in milk commonly fed to dairy calves, on selection of resistant fecal E. coli in calves from birth to weaning. At birth, thirty calves were randomly assigned to a controlled feeding trial where: 15 calves were fed raw milk with no drug residues (NR), and 15 calves were fed raw milk with drug residues (DR) by adding ceftiofur, penicillin, ampicillin, and oxytetracycline at final concentrations in the milk of 0.1, 0.005, 0.01, and 0.3 µg/ml, respectively. Fecal samples were rectally collected from each calf once a week starting at birth prior to the first feeding in the trial (pre-treatment) until 6 weeks of age. A significantly greater proportion of E. coli resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, streptomycin and tetracycline was observed in DR calves when compared to NR calves. Additionally, isolates from DR calves had a significant decrease in susceptibility to ceftriaxone and ceftiofur when compared to isolates from NR calves. A greater proportion of E. coli isolates from calves in the DR group were resistant to 3 or more antimicrobial drugs when compared to calves in the ND group. These findings highlight the role that low concentrations of antimicrobial drugs have on the evolution and selection of resistance to multiple antimicrobial drugs in vivo. PMID:25506918

  10. Determination of anthelmintic drug residues in milk using UPLC-MS/MS with rapid polarity switching

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new UPLC-MS/MS (ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry) method was developed and validated to detect 38 anthelmintic drug residues, consisting of benzimidazoles, avermectins and flukicides. A modified QuEChERS-type extraction method was developed with an added...

  11. Assessment of antibacterial drug residues in milk for consumption in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Rama, Adem; Lucatello, Lorena; Benetti, Cristiana; Galina, Guglielmo; Bajraktari, Drita

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of drug residues in the raw milk collected from individual farms and milk collection points during 2009-2010 in six different major regions of Kosovo (Prishtinë, Gjilan, Mitrovicë, Pejë, Gjakovë, Prizren). In the present study, a total of 1734 raw milk samples were collected, and qualitatively screened with two different tests, the Delvotest SP assay and an enzyme-linked receptor-binding assay (SNAP). Overall, 106 (6.11%) out of 1734 samples examined with Delvotest SP contained possible drug residues (5.12% and 7.51% of samples from 2009 and 2010, respectively). All suspect samples were further analyzed by three distinct enzyme-linked receptor-binding assays specific for β-lactams (new β-lactam test), tetracyclines (SNAP tetracycline test), and sulfonamides (SNAP sulfamethazine test). Only the new SNAP β-lactam test detected residues in 40 out of 52 samples in 2009 and 54 out of 54 suspect samples in 2010. A confirmatory method based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to confirm the presence of β-lactam drug residues in samples detected by the enzyme-linked receptor-binding assay. Amoxicillin, penicillin G, and cloxacillin were the most frequently detected residues and were in a concentration range between 2.1 μg/kg and 1973 μg/kg. Seventeen of the positive samples exceeded the maximum residue levels for one or more β-lactam drug. The highest number of positive milk samples came from the Pejë Region (58.8%) and Gjakovë Region (23.5%), and the lowest number of positive samples originated from Gjilan (5.88%), with no positive samples detected in two regions, Mitrovicë and Prizren. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The effect of cooking on veterinary drug residues in food: nicarbazin (dinitrocarbanilide component).

    PubMed

    Tarbin, J A; Bygrave, J; Bigwood, T; Hardy, D; Rose, M; Sharman, M

    2005-11-01

    The change of concentration of residues of the marker compound for the anti-coccidial drug nicarbazin, N,N'-bis(4-nitrophenyl)urea (dinitrocarbanilide, DNC), was investigated in model oil and aqueous solutions and in chicken muscle and egg. In model aqueous solutions, DNC decreased rapidly in concentration upon heating followed by a much more gradual decomposition. The curves produced when this information was plotted were not typical of exponential decay. In model cooking oil solutions, DNC generally showed a slower decrease in concentration over time when compared with aqueous solutions. DNC residues in egg were stable to microwave cooking and residues in chicken muscle were stable to stewing and microwaving. Other cooking procedures led to a decrease in amount of DNC by 22% to 48% of the total amount of analyte present. Only a small amount (<2%) of residue leached with juices which exuded as the food was cooked.

  13. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea. PMID:27433102

  14. An Overview on Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Antimicrobial Drug Residues in Animal-Derived Food

    PubMed Central

    Majdinasab, Marjan; Yaqub, Mustansara; Rahim, Abdur; Catanante, Gaelle; Hayat, Akhtar; Marty, Jean Louis

    2017-01-01

    Anti-microbial drugs are widely employed for the treatment and cure of diseases in animals, promotion of animal growth, and feed efficiency. However, the scientific literature has indicated the possible presence of antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food, making it one of the key public concerns for food safety. Therefore, it is highly desirable to design fast and accurate methodologies to monitor antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food. Legislation is in place in many countries to ensure antimicrobial drug residue quantities are less than the maximum residue limits (MRL) defined on the basis of food safety. In this context, the recent years have witnessed a special interest in the field of electrochemical biosensors for food safety, based on their unique analytical features. This review article is focused on the recent progress in the domain of electrochemical biosensors to monitor antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food. PMID:28837093

  15. An Overview on Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Antimicrobial Drug Residues in Animal-Derived Food.

    PubMed

    Majdinasab, Marjan; Yaqub, Mustansara; Rahim, Abdur; Catanante, Gaelle; Hayat, Akhtar; Marty, Jean Louis

    2017-08-24

    Anti-microbial drugs are widely employed for the treatment and cure of diseases in animals, promotion of animal growth, and feed efficiency. However, the scientific literature has indicated the possible presence of antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food, making it one of the key public concerns for food safety. Therefore, it is highly desirable to design fast and accurate methodologies to monitor antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food. Legislation is in place in many countries to ensure antimicrobial drug residue quantities are less than the maximum residue limits (MRL) defined on the basis of food safety. In this context, the recent years have witnessed a special interest in the field of electrochemical biosensors for food safety, based on their unique analytical features. This review article is focused on the recent progress in the domain of electrochemical biosensors to monitor antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food.

  16. Novel in vitro systems for prediction of veterinary drug residues in ovine milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    González-Lobato, L; Real, R; Herrero, D; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Marqués, M M; Alvarez, A I; Merino, G

    2014-01-01

    A new in vitro tool was developed for the identification of veterinary substrates of the main drug transporter in the mammary gland. These drugs have a much higher chance of being concentrated into ovine milk and thus should be detectable in dairy products. Complementarily, a cell model for the identification of compounds that can inhibit the secretion of drugs into ovine milk, and thus reduce milk residues, was also generated. The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) is responsible for the concentration of its substrates into milk. The need to predict potential drug residues in ruminant milk has prompted the development of in vitro cell models over-expressing ABCG2 for these species to detect veterinary drugs that interact with this transporter. Using these models, several substrates for bovine and caprine ABCG2 have been found, and differences in activity between species have been reported. However, despite being of great toxicological relevance, no suitable in vitro model to predict substrates of ovine ABCG2 was available. New MDCKII and MEF3.8 cell models over-expressing ovine ABCG2 were generated for the identification of substrates and inhibitors of ovine ABCG2. Five widely used veterinary antibiotics (marbofloxacin, orbifloxacin, sarafloxacin, danofloxacin and difloxacin) were discovered as new substrates of ovine ABCG2. These results were confirmed for the bovine transporter and its Y581S variant using previously generated cell models. In addition, the avermectin doramectin was described as a new inhibitor of ruminant ABCG2. This new rapid assay to identify veterinary drugs that can be concentrated into ovine milk will potentially improve detection and monitoring of veterinary drug residues in ovine milk and dairy products.

  17. Quantification of residual solvents in antibody drug conjugates using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Medley, Colin D; Kay, Jacob; Li, Yi; Gruenhagen, Jason; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik P

    2014-11-19

    The detection and quantification of residual solvents present in clinical and commercial pharmaceutical products is necessary from both patient safety and regulatory perspectives. Head-space gas chromatography is routinely used for quantitation of residual solvents for small molecule APIs produced through synthetic processes; however residual solvent analysis is generally not needed for protein based pharmaceuticals produced through cultured cell lines where solvents are not introduced. In contrast, antibody drug conjugates and other protein conjugates where a drug or other molecule is covalently bound to a protein typically use solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N,N‑dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or propylene glycol (PG) to dissolve the hydrophobic small molecule drug for conjugation to the protein. The levels of the solvent remaining following the conjugation step are therefore important to patient safety as these parental drug products are introduced directly into the patients bloodstream. We have developed a rapid sample preparation followed by a gas chromatography separation for the detection and quantification of several solvents typically used in these conjugation reactions. This generic method has been validated and can be easily implemented for use in quality control testing for clinical or commercial bioconjugated products.

  18. Residual antimalarial concentrations before treatment in patients with malaria from Cambodia: indication of drug pressure.

    PubMed

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Genton, Blaise; Zanolari, Boris; Mercier, Thomas; Duong, Socheat; Beck, Hans-Peter; Olliaro, Piero; Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Ariey, Frédéric

    2010-10-01

    The Thai-Cambodian border has been known as the origin of antimalarial drug resistance for the past 30 years. There is a highly diverse market for antimalarials in this area, and improved knowledge of drug pressure would be useful to target interventions aimed at reducing inappropriate drug use. Baseline samples from 125 patients with falciparum malaria recruited for 2 in vivo studies (in Preah Vihear and Pursat provinces) were analyzed for the presence of 14 antimalarials in a single run, by means of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Half of the patients had residual drug concentrations above the lower limit of calibration for at least 1 antimalarial at admission. Among the drugs detected were the currently used first-line drugs mefloquine (25% and 35% of patients) and piperaquine (15% of patients); the first-line drug against vivax malaria, chloroquine (25% and 41% of patients); and the former first-line drug, quinine (5% and 34% patients). The findings demonstrate that there is high drug pressure and that many people still seek treatment in the private and informal sector, where appropriate treatment is not guaranteed. Promotion of comprehensive behavioral change, communication, community-based mobilization, and advocacy are vital to contain the emergence and spread of parasite resistance against new antimalarials.

  19. Veterinary drug residues in domestic and imported foods of animal origin in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, JeongWoo; Park, Hae-Chul; Gedi, Vinayakumar; Park, Su-Jeong; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Cho, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Kwang-Jick; Lim, Chae-Mi

    2015-01-01

    The Korean National Residue Programme comprises three different approaches for evaluating domestic and imported foods of animal origin: monitoring, surveillance/enforcement and an exploratory test programme. Monitoring and surveillance/enforcement testing programmes are routinely implemented by 17 Provincial Veterinary Services for domestic products and regional offices of the Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency (QIA) for imported products. The exploratory project conducted at QIA headquarters is designed to test substances that are not included in monitoring and enforcement testing programmes. Here, we carried out exploratory testing for determining the presence of 42 veterinary drugs that have no established Korean maximum residue limits and analysed their levels simultaneously, in a total of 3108 samples of domestic and imported animal-origin foods. Of the tested drugs, acetylsalicylic, paracetamol, clopidol, diclazuril, amprolium, toltrazuril and its metabolites (toltrazuril sulphone and toltrazuril sulphoxide) and phenylbutazone and its metabolites (oxyphenylbutazone) were detected.

  20. Residual activity of anticoccidial drugs in chickens after withdrawal of medicated feeds.

    PubMed

    McDougald, L R; Seibert, B P

    1998-01-31

    Seven anticoccidial drugs commonly used in poultry (diclazuri), monensin, salinomycin, halofuginone, nicarbazin, robenidine, amprolium, and lasalocid) were tested for residual activity after withdrawal. In each test, the products were given at the recommended level to cages of 10 broiler chickens. Oral inoculation with coccidia was given after withdrawal of medication. Birds pretreated with 1 ppm of diclazuril and inoculated with Eimeria tenella after drug withdrawal had normal weight gain and very low lesion scores. Residual activity depleted gradually over several days, as shown by higher lesion scores when medication was withdrawn for up to 3 days before inoculation. Similar results were observed when young birds were inoculated with a mixture of E. tenella, E. maxima and E. acervulina, and also when birds were given diclazuril to market weight (6 weeks of age) and inoculated with a mixture of six species of Eiméria (The above species plus E. brunetti, E. mitis, and E. necatrix) after withdrawal of medication for 2 days. In contrast, there was no evidence of residual anticoccidial activity with nicarbazin, halofuginone, lasalocid, amprolium, salinomycin or monensin. Overall, the residual activity was unique to diclazuril.

  1. Assessment of antimicrobial drug residues in beef in Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omeiza, Gabriel K; Ajayi, Itopa E; Ode, Okwoche J

    2012-01-01

    Drugs administered to food-producing animals close to the time of slaughter often result in prohibited antimicrobial residues in the animal tissues at slaughter. Evidence based on the Premi® test confirmed the occurrence of antimicrobial drug residues in 89.3% of kidney and urine samples from cattle slaughtered within Abuja town where the residents rely heavily on beef as a source of protein. The administration of antibiotics close to the time of slaughter by marketers/herd owners and transporters was found to be significantly (p<0.05) higher when compared with butchers and abattoir workers. The practice of administering antibiotics to animals close to the time of slaughter was believed to be profit-motivated. The research suggests that awareness campaigns amongst the stakeholders, the enactment of appropriate laws for the control of antibiotic use and the empowerment of veterinary public health practitioners in food regulatory agencies as some of the strategies which may positively reduce the risk of antimicrobial drug residues in food animals in Nigeria.

  2. Effective management tools for participants at Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs meetings.

    PubMed

    Kay, Jack F

    2016-05-01

    The Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food (CCRVDF) fulfils a number of functions revolving around standard setting. The core activities of the CCRVDF include agreeing priorities for assessing veterinary drug residues, recommending maximum residue limits for veterinary drugs in foods of animal origin, considering methods of sampling and analyses, and developing codes of practice. Draft standards are developed and progress through an agreed series of steps common to all Codex Alimentarius Commission Committees. Meetings of the CCRVDF are held at approximately 18-month intervals. To ensure effective progress is made with meetings at this frequency, the CCRVDF makes use of a number of management tools. These include circular letters to interested parties, physical and electronic drafting groups between plenary sessions, meetings of interested parties immediately prior to sessions, as well as break out groups within sessions and detailed discussions within the CCRVDF plenary sessions. A range of these approaches is required to assist advances within the standards setting process and can be applied to other Codex areas and international standard setting more generally. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Toxic metals and organochlorine pesticides residue in single herbal drugs used in important ayurvedic formulation - 'Dashmoola'.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vartika; Kakkar, Poonam; Singh, Jyotsna; Misra, Chetna; Kumar, Santosh; Mehrotra, Shanta

    2008-08-01

    Herbal formulations are getting popularity throughout the world and commercialized extensively for various medicinal properties. WHO has emphasized the need for quality assurance of herbal products, including testing of heavy metals and pesticides residues. 'Dashmoola', a popular herbal formulation, with immunomodulator and febrifugal properties, consists of ten single root drugs. In view of WHO guidelines, single herbal drugs used in 'Dashmoola', were collected from different places of India for testing heavy metals and persistent pesticides residue. Although use of roots in 'Dashmoola' is prescribed in original ayurvedic literature but now many pharmacies use stem in place of roots. Therefore, in the present study both roots and stems were selected for estimation of six heavy metals namely arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni). Apart from these, the organochlorine pesticides residue viz. different metabolites of DDT, DDE, isomers of HCH and alpha-endosulfan were checked in total 40 samples of single crude drugs. Heavy metals except Hg, were present in most of the samples. In few samples Pb and Cd concentration were beyond the WHO permissible limits. Although alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH were present in almost all the samples, but other pesticides were not detected in these samples. DDT and DDE were found only in two samples.

  4. Multicomponent mesofluidic system for the detection of veterinary drug residues based on competitive immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2010-10-01

    An automated multicomponent mesofluidic system (MCMS) based on biorecognitions carried out on meso-scale glass beads in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channels was developed. The constructed MCMS consisted of five modules: a bead introduction module, a bioreaction module, a solution handling module, a liquid driving module, and a signal collection module. The integration of these modules enables the assay to be automated and reduces it to a one-step protocol. The MCMS has successfully been applied toward the detection of veterinary drug residues in animal-derived foods. The drug antigen-coated beads (varphi250 microm) were arrayed in the PDMS channels (varphi300 microm). The competitive immunoassay was then carried out on the surface of the glass beads. After washing, the Cy3-labeled secondary antibody was introduced to probe the antigen-antibody complex anchored to the beads. The fluorescence intensity of each bead was measured and used to determine the residual drug concentration. The MCMS is highly sensitive, with its detection limits ranging from 0.02 (salbutamol) to 3.5 microg/L (sulfamethazine), and has a short assay time of 45 min or less. The experimental results demonstrate that the MCMS proves to be an economic, efficient, and sensitive platform for multicomponent detection of compound residues for contamination in foods or the environment.

  5. A contribution to safety assessment of veterinary drug residues: in vitro/ex vivo studies on the intestinal toxicity and transport of covalently bound residues.

    PubMed

    Klee, S; Baumung, I; Kluge, K; Ungemach, F R; Horne, E; O'Keeffe, M; De Angelis, I; Vignoli, A L; Zucco, F; Stammati, A

    1999-06-01

    1. The gastrointestinal fate of protein-bound residues of the model compound furazolidone (FZD) was investigated in vitro and ex vivo. Protein-bound residues were generated in rat liver microsomes, isolated by solvent extraction and digested with 0.5% hydrochloric acid and Pronase E. 2. During digestion, 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), the side chain of furazolidone, was partly released from bound residues. 3. The absorption of free AOZ and digested protein-bound residues was tested in isolated perfused rat gut segments (IPGS) and in the intestinal cell line Caco-2. Free AOZ was transfered both in the IPGS model and in Caco-2 monolayer cultures, while no indications for passage of bound residues were obtained. 4. No acute toxicity of AOZ or digested food residues respectively was observed in gut segments and Caco-2 cells at concentrations that were substantially above maximum residue levels to be expected in food of animal origin after administration of therapeutic doses. 5. The results demonstrate that digestive processes can alter the chemical nature of drug residues and yield degradation products that may be bioavailable for the consumer. Thus, the covalent binding of xenobiotics to macromolecular tissue constituents cannot necessarily be regarded as an irreversible endpoint of residue bioavailability and toxicity.

  6. The persistence of illicit drug smoke residues and their recovery from common household surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Julie L

    2017-04-01

    Third-hand smoke is the residue remaining on surfaces during smoking events. It is composed of particles and vapours that form upon heating. The phrase 'third-hand smoke' is primarily used to describe nicotine and other chemicals from cigarettes, but any residues formed from the smoking of various substances could be classified similarly. There has been an increasing body of research on third-hand smoke from cigarettes in the last decade, but little has been done in regards to understanding the persistence of particles and vapours from illicit drugs. In this work, small samples of cocaine and methamphetamine were volatilized to produce an illicit drug smoke that was collected onto various surface materials and left exposed to ambient conditions over 672 h (four weeks). Chemical analyses by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of residues on silicon, plastic, laminate, and artificial leather surfaces indicated a rapid decrease in recovery of the parent molecule, with varied formation of decomposition products over the first 168 h of exposure. Measurable amounts of the parent molecule were still present after 672 h, exhibiting a strong persistence of these drugs on various household materials. This is important in a forensic science context, as third-hand smoke residues could provide a viable source of trace evidence previously not utilized. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. [Do pharmaceutical waste and drug residue pose a risk to public health?].

    PubMed

    Haguenoer, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Recently, awareness has developed of the environmental consequences of drug waste and disposal. These residues are identified as coming from either diffuse sources, the most significant of which is via the discharge of these residues in urine and feces, and thus the sewage system and water contains these drug remnants and their metabolites, or from point sources, sometimes with very high levels of concentration in waste from chemical and pharmaceutical industries, health care settings, but also from intensive livestock farming and aquaculture. Depending on their physical chemistry properties, these substances are more or less naturally biodegradable and easily treated in sewage purification plants. The effectiveness of these treatment processes is highly random and unpredictable, but is overall around 60%, nevertheless with variations of 2-99% according to the molecules. The silt from these treatment plants, sometimes very rich in lipophilic substances is on occasion reused for agricultural application as fertilizer, paving the way for a possible contamination of crops. Furthermore, the use of veterinary drugs in animals can lead to soil contamination either directly or through manure and slurry. The contamination can equally reach and affect surface water, groundwater and sometimes the water intended for human consumption. The National academy of Pharmacy has established some general recommendations on the proper use of drugs, environmental monitoring and surveillance, risk assessment for humans and the environment, prevention and the need for prevention. Several categories of drugs are more worrying: cancer treatments, antibiotics as well as transfers of anti-bio-resistance, and hormonal derivatives which has been previously demonstrated to contribute, along with other molecules, to detrimental effects on endocrines.

  8. Protonation of a glutamate residue modulates the dynamics of the drug transporter EmrE.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using NMR spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate with the resistance phenotype for wild-type EmrE and the E14D mutant as a function of pH. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the pH gradient across the inner membrane of E. coli may be used on a mechanistic level to shift the equilibrium of the transporter in favor of an inward-open resting conformation poised for drug binding.

  9. Protonation of a Glutamate Residue Modulates the Dynamics of the Drug Transporter EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate with the resistance phenotype for EmrE and the E14D mutant as a function of pH. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the pH gradient across the inner membrane of E. coli may be used on a mechanistic level to shift the equilibrium of the transporter in favor of an inward-open resting conformation poised for drug binding. PMID:26751516

  10. [Simple determination of residual anticoccidial drugs (diclazuril and nicarbazin) in chicken tissues by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Kanda, Maki; Ushiyama, Keiko; Igusa, Kyoko; Murayama, Mitsunori; Horie, Masakazu; Hirokado, Masako; Miyazaki, Tomoyuki

    2003-04-01

    A simple and rapid determination of anticoccidial drug residues, diclazuril (DCZ) and nicarbazin (NCZ), in chicken tissues has been developed. DCZ and NCZ were extracted with acetonitrile from chicken liver, muscle, and fat. The extract was rinsed with n-hexane saturated with acetonitrile and then evaporated. The residue was dissolved in 1.4 mL of acetonitrile-methanol (1:1), then 1.0 mL of n-hexane saturated with acetonitrile-methanol (1:1) was added, and the mixture was partitioned by the addition of 0.6 mL of water. DCZ and NCZ in the aqueous layers were determined by HPLC on an Xterra RP-18 column with acetonitrile-0.5% ammonium acetate containing 0.01 mol/L tetra-n-butylammonium hydrogen sulfate (43:57) as the mobile phase. The mean recoveries (n = 5) of DCZ and NCZ spiked in chicken tissues at the maximum residue levels were 92.0-95.6% (CV 2.4-3.0%) and 87.3-89.4% (CV 1.7-2.8%), respectively. The detection limits of DCZ and NCZ were 0.01 and 0.004 microgram/g, respectively.

  11. EU sampling strategies for the detection of veterinary drug residues in aquaculture species: are they working?

    PubMed

    Morris, D J; Gray, A J; Kay, J F; Gettinby, G

    2012-08-01

    Over the past 50 years, the culture of aquatic species in controlled conditions to enhance production has grown in importance and now provides nearly 50% of the world's seafood supply. In part, this expansion has been made possible by the use of antibiotics, antifungals, and other veterinary medicines to control disease and improve welfare. Despite guidelines being available, the sampling programmes for drug residue surveillance of aquaculture products recommended by the CODEX Alimentarius Commission were withdrawn in 2008 and put under review. Directive 96/23/EC sets out legislation to govern how sampling programmes for drug residue surveillance should be conducted within the EU. This directive applies both to produce raised within the EU and also imported products from third countries. This communication examines the existing EU sampling regimen for aquaculture products and comments on its possible application in a global context. We examine UK statutory sampling data that, while indicating the effectiveness of the directive, also suggests that the directive may lead to unnecessary sampling. Regarding imports, examination of the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) database using process control charts and statistical modelling suggests that the sampling regimen described in the directive is effective but not sufficiently flexible for the range of aquaculture practices that exist. Limitations of the directive, datasets, and practices are further discussed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Development of veterinary drug residue controls by the Codex Alimentarius Commission: a review.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Richard L

    2008-12-01

    Within the Codex Alimentarius, transparency is and has been an important consideration with regard to how and why actions and decisions are made in providing stakeholders with sufficient information and clarity on matters of interest and decision-making. This review focuses on the development of analytical methods performance criteria for measuring veterinary drug residues in food-producing animals for the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods. It describes the initial development as well as the evolution and refinement of analytical method performance criteria as well as method validation criteria from its first meeting to the present. Reference is routinely made to published Codex, Food and Agriculture of the United Nations (FAO) reports, guidance documents and manuals as well as those of other relevant analytical method standard-setting organizations with regard to analytical method performance relevant to Codex Alimentarius food safety standards development. Key Codex decisions that have substantially impacted on analytical methods-related issues are described and the subsequent outcomes. It is a reasoned conclusion that the refinement of analytical method performance criteria and validation is an ongoing process that must continuously adapt to present and future scientific issues and decisions within the Codex Alimentarius Commission and its subsidiary bodies as well as relevant analytical standard-setting organizations.

  13. Veterinary drug residues in seafood inspected by the European Union, United States, Canada, and Japan from 2000 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Love, David C; Rodman, Sarah; Neff, Roni A; Nachman, Keeve E

    2011-09-01

    Veterinary drugs are used to treat or prevent a wide array of production-related diseases in aquaculture. Residues of these drugs in seafood products may pose risks to consumers, prompting governments to set drug residue tolerance levels and inspect seafood for violations of these standards. This study characterizes veterinary drug inspection policies and violations among four inspecting bodies (European Union (E.U.), United States (U.S.), Canada, and Japan), using government-collected veterinary drug violation data from 2000 to 2009. Most veterinary drug violations were detected in species that are commonly farm-raised. Asian seafood products, including shrimp and prawns, catfish (or fish sold as catfish), crab, tilapia, eel, and Chilean salmon were most frequently in violation of veterinary drug residue standards. Vietnam had the greatest number of violations among exporting countries. Concentrations of most veterinary drugs in seafood found in violation did not differ between inspecting bodies that reported drug concentrations. Transparency in seafood inspection reporting varied widely among inspecting bodies. Estimation of violations in the untested fraction of seafood was precluded by a lack of information from inspecting bodies regarding the distinction between targeted and random sampling. Increased transparency could facilitate a more rigorous characterization of public health risks from consuming imported seafood.

  14. A simulation model for the prediction of tissue:plasma partition coefficients for drug residues in natural casings.

    PubMed

    Haritova, Aneliya Milanova; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2010-09-01

    Tissue residues arise from the exposure of animals to undesirable substances in animal feed materials and drinking water and to the therapeutic or zootechnical use of veterinary medicinal products. In the framework of this study, an advanced toxicokinetic model was developed to predict the likelihood of residue disposition of licensed veterinary products in natural casings used as envelope for a variety of meat products, such as sausages. The model proved suitable for the calculation of drug concentrations in the muscles of pigs, cattle and sheep, the major species of which intestines are used. On the basis of drug concentrations in muscle tissue, the model allowed a prediction of intestinal concentrations and residues in the intestines that remained equal to or below the concentrations in muscle tissue, the major consumable product of slaughter animals. Subsequently, residues in intestines were found to be below the maximum residue limit value for muscle tissue when drugs were used according to prescribed procedures, including the application of appropriate withdrawal times. Considering the low consumption of natural casings (which represents only about 1-2% of the weight of a normal sausage), it was concluded that the exposure to drug residues from casings is negligible.

  15. Multi-residue screening of prioritised human pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs and bactericides in sediments and sludge.

    PubMed

    Langford, Katherine H; Reid, Malcolm; Thomas, Kevin V

    2011-08-01

    A robust multi-residue method was developed for the analysis of a selection of pharmaceutical compounds, illicit drugs and personal care product bactericides in sediments and sludges. Human pharmaceuticals were selected for analysis in Scottish sewage sludge and freshwater sediments based on prescription, physico-chemical and occurrence data. The method was suitable for the analysis of the selected illicit drugs amphetamine, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, and methamphetamine, the pharmaceuticals atenolol, bendroflumethiazide, carbamazepine, citalopram, diclofenac, fluoxetine, ibuprofen, and salbutamol, and the bactericides triclosan and triclocarban in sewage sludge and freshwater sediment. The method provided an overall recovery of between 56 and 128%, RSDs of between 2 and 19% and LODs of between 1 and 50 ng g(-1). Using the methodology the human pharmaceuticals atenolol, carbamazepine and citalopram and the bactericides triclosan and triclocarban were detected in Scottish sewage sludge. The illicit drugs cocaine, its metabolite benzoylecgonine, amphetamine and methamphetamine were not detected in any of the samples analysed. Triclosan and triclocarban were present at the highest concentrations with triclocarban detected in all but one sample and showing a pattern of co-occurrence in both sludge and sediment samples.

  16. Veterinary drugs residues: a review of the latest analytical research on sample preparation and LC-MS based methods.

    PubMed

    Mainero Rocca, Lucia; Gentili, Alessandra; Pérez-Fernández, Virginia; Tomai, Pierpaolo

    2017-02-22

    The world population is increasing day by day and as a result there is a growing demand for food. Inevitably livestock and crops become intensive and require an increasing use of adjuvants. Even the logic of the extreme profit acts as an engine and often leads to fraudulent use of drugs, pesticides etc. Particularly, veterinary drugs can pose a real risk to human health if their residues are allowed to enter the food chain. Parent drugs and their metabolites can occur in foodstuffs individually or as multicomponent mixtures with enhanced adverse effects. In order to protect consumer safety, European Union has established lists of forbidden substances, maximum residue limits for authorized drugs and precise criteria to perform confirmation analyses as well as to interpret the related results. Moreover, the scientific community has been involved in drugs analysis for a long time and residues have been investigated in almost all fields. Nevertheless, due to their nature and potential danger, the rule of the 'best available technique' should be always applied. Following this principle, this review examines the procedures and techniques applied to monitor pharmaceutical products of major concern (i.e. anthelmintics, NSAIDs, corticosteroids, coccidiostats etc.) in foods of animal origin, discussing advances over the past five years and future trends in the food safety field. Our goal was both to keep attention focused on a up-to-date topic and to provide a selection of the most relevant papers recently published regarding drug residues in foodstuffs.

  17. Immunology-Based Techniques for the Detection of Veterinary Drug Residues in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Milagro; Toldrá, Fidel

    Veterinary drugs are used in farm animals, via the feed or the drinking water, to prevent the outbreak of diseases or even for the treatment of diseases. However, the growth of animals may be promoted through the use of hormones and antibiotics. Depending on the type of residue and the application and washing conditions, these substances or its metabolites may remain in meat and other foods of animal origin and may cause adverse effects on consumers’ health. This is the main reason why its use is strictly regulated or even banned (case of the European Union) in different countries. Antibiotics typically used for growth promotion include chloramphenicol, nitrofurans, and enrofloxacin but others like sulphonamides, macrolides etc. may also be used (Reig & Toldrá, 2007).

  18. Dielectric properties of residual water in amorphous lyophilized mixtures of sugar and drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moznine, R.; Smith, G.; Polygalov, E.; Suherman, P. M.; Broadhead, J.

    2003-02-01

    Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy was used to investigate the properties of residual water in lyophilized formulations of a proprietary tri-phosphate drug containing a sugar (trehalose, lactose or sucrose) or dextran. The dielectric properties of each formulation were determined in the frequency range (0.1 Hz-0.1 MHz) and temperature range (30°C-Tg). The temperature dependence of the relaxation times for all samples showed Arrhenuis behaviour, from which the activation energy was derived. Proton hopping through the hydrogen-bonded network (clusters) of water molecules was suggested as the principle mode of charge transport. Significant differences in dielectric relaxation kinetics and activation energy were observed for the different formulations, which were found to correlate with the amount of monophosphate degradation product.

  19. The effect of cooking on veterinary drug residues in food: 3. Sulphamethazine (sulphadimidine).

    PubMed

    Rose, M D; Farrington, W H; Shearer, G

    1995-01-01

    The heat stability of sulphamethazine was investigated. The drug was shown to be stable in boiling water at 100 degrees C. In cooking oil at 260 degrees C, losses were observed, indicating a half-life of about 5 min. At 180 degrees C in cooking oil, sulphamethazine was unstable with a half-life of about 2 h. The effect of a range of cooking processes (boiling, roasting, grilling, frying, pressure cooking and microwaving) on sulphamethazine residues in incurred animal tissue was studied. Once allowance for weight loss during cooking had been made no net unaccountable change in concentration of sulphamethazine was observed in any of the cooking processes investigated. During frozen storage, sulphamethazine residues were found to be stable over a period of 3 months. It was found during this investigation that the method used for analysis which involved acid extraction converted the N4-metabolites to parent sulphamethazine, and hence only sulphamethazine was measured. Sulphamethazine was found to be evenly distributed in the raw incurred tissue used for analysis. Migration from the tissue into the surrounding liquid or meat juices was observed during the cooking process. The findings of this investigation show that surveillance data obtained from measurements on raw tissue are applicable for use in consumer exposure and dietary intake calculations, but only if an acidic extraction method which converts the N4-metabolites to parent sulphamethazine is used for the surveillance. This may not however conform to current Maximum Residue Limit legislation which refers to total parent sulphonamides. Different methods of analysis for sulphonamides are likely to give rise to inter-laboratory variation.

  20. The effect of cooking on veterinary drug residues in food: 4. Oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Rose, M D; Bygrave, J; Farrington, W H; Shearer, G

    1996-04-01

    The heat stability of oxytetracycline (OTC) in water and vegetable oil was investigated. Results showed that the drug was unstable in water at 100 degrees C with a half-life of about 2 min, but more stable in oil at 180 degrees C where the half-life was about 8 min. The effect of a range of cooking processes including microwaving, boiling, roasting, grilling, braising and frying on OTC residues in incurred animal tissues was investigated. Substantial net reductions in OTC of 35-94% were observed, with temperature during cooking having the largest impact on the loss. Migration from the tissue into the surrounding liquid or meat juices was observed during the cooking processes. Diode-array analysis of heat-treated OTC standard solutions indicated that no individual closely related compound such as 4-epioxytetracycline, alpha- or beta-apooxytetracycline formed a significant proportion of the breakdown products. OTC was not evenly distributed throughout the tissue, but the effects of this were minimized by selecting adjacent samples for cooking and for the raw control. The findings of this investigation showed that the effect of cooking on residues of OTC should be considered before data obtained from measurements on raw tissue are used for consumer exposure estimates and dietary intake calculations.

  1. Zopiclone as positive control in studies examining the residual effects of hypnotic drugs on driving ability.

    PubMed

    Verster, Joris C; Spence, D Warren; Shahid, Azmeh; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Roth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Zopiclone (7.5 mg) is frequently used as a positive control in studies that examine the residual effects of hypnotic drugs on driving ability and related skills. This review summarizes studies examining the effects of zopiclone, and discusses its usefulness as a comparator drug for investigations of residual effects of novel sleep medication. A literature review (Pubmed and Embase) was conducted searching for studies that tested zopiclone on driving. Cross references were checked for additional papers. Eight studies utilizing the standardized on-the-road driving test consistently showed that in the morning following bedtime administration zopiclone (7.5 mg) significantly impaired driving performance. A total of 191 healthy volunteers were tested after placebo and zopiclone (7.5 mg). Meta analyses showed no significant differences in driving performance after zopiclone (7.5 mg) between adult and elderly healthy volunteers. The combined effect size (ES) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for healthy volunteers was 0.782 (0.620, 0.944). Relative to placebo, an average increment of 3.0 cm in Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP) was observed when treated with zopiclone (7.5 mg). This deviation was higher than the increment in SDLP reported for drivers with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05% (+2.4 cm). Results from driving simulators and psychometric tests are consistent with the on-road driving test results. In conclusion, zopiclone (7.5 mg) is a reliable positive control, that consistently shows significant and meaningful impairment on the on-the-road driving test.

  2. Simultaneous and rapid detection of multiple pesticide and veterinary drug residues by suspension array technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Gao, Zhixian; Ma, Hongwei; Su, Pu; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ou, Guorong

    2013-03-15

    Suspension array technology is proposed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of seven kinds of pesticide and veterinary drug residues, namely, atrazine, chloramphenicol, carbaryl, clenbuterol, 17-β-estradiol, imidacloprid, and tylosin. The assay is simple and can be accomplished within 2h without repeated pumping and washing steps unlike conventional suspension arrays. The hapten-protein conjugate-coated beads bind to their complementary biotinylated antibodies using a competitive immunoassay format. The coefficients of determination R(2) for six targets were greater than 0.992, whereas that for atrazine was 0.961, which indicate good logistic correlations. The dynamic ranges for the seven targets in the 7-plex assay ranged from 2 log units to 4 log units(1.60×10(0)-1.64×10(3), 5.12×10(-2)-1.60×10(2), 1.00×10(0)-3.13×10(3), 4.00×10(-1)-4.10×10(2), 4.00×10(-1)-4.10×10(2), 5.12×10(-2)-1.60×10(2), and 2.00×10(0)-4.00×10(2)ngmL(-1)). The minimum detection concentrations of chloramphenicol, carbaryl, clenbuterol and 17-β-estradiol in the suspension array (0.05, 1.00, 0.40 and 0.40 ng mL(-1)) were lower than the corresponding limits of detection (0.25, 6.60, 24.23 and 13.96 ng mL(-1)) of using an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Environmental scanning electron microscope was employed to characterize the bead surface, which directly confirmed the reactions on the beads. The suspension array is more flexible and feasible than ELISA for the fast quantitative analysis of pesticide and veterinary drug residues.

  3. Residual Neurocognitive Features of Long-Term Ecstasy Users With Minimal Exposure to Other Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, John H.; Sherwood, Andrea R.; Hudson, James I.; Gruber, Staci; Kozin, David; Pope, Harrison G.

    2010-01-01

    Aims In field studies assessing cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users, there are several frequent confounding factors that might plausibly bias the findings toward an overestimate of ecstasy-induced neurocognitive toxicity. We designed an investigation seeking to minimize these possible sources of bias. Design We compared illicit ecstasy users and non-users while 1) excluding individuals with significant lifetime exposure to other illicit drugs or alcohol; 2) requiring that all participants be members of the “rave” subculture; and 3) testing all participants with breath, urine, and hair samples at the time of evaluation to exclude possible surreptitious substance use. We compared groups with adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family-of-origin variables, and childhood history of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We provide significance levels without correction for multiple comparisons. Setting Field study. Participants Fifty-two illicit ecstasy users and 59 non-users, age 18-45. Measurements Battery of 15 neuropsychological tests tapping a range of cognitive functions. Findings We found little evidence of decreased cognitive performance in ecstasy users, save for poorer strategic-self-regulation, possibly reflecting increased impulsivity. However this finding might have reflected a premorbid attribute of ecstasy users, rather than a residual neurotoxic effect of the drug. Conclusions In a study designed to minimize limitations found in many prior investigations, we failed to demonstrate marked residual cognitive effects in ecstasy users. This finding contrasts with many previous findings—including our own—and emphasizes the need for continued caution in interpreting field studies of cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users. PMID:21205042

  4. Residual neurocognitive features of long-term ecstasy users with minimal exposure to other drugs.

    PubMed

    Halpern, John H; Sherwood, Andrea R; Hudson, James I; Gruber, Staci; Kozin, David; Pope, Harrison G

    2011-04-01

    In field studies assessing cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users, there are several frequent confounding factors that might plausibly bias the findings toward an overestimate of ecstasy-induced neurocognitive toxicity. We designed an investigation seeking to minimize these possible sources of bias. We compared illicit ecstasy users and non-users while (1) excluding individuals with significant life-time exposure to other illicit drugs or alcohol; (2) requiring that all participants be members of the 'rave' subculture; and (3) testing all participants with breath, urine and hair samples at the time of evaluation to exclude possible surreptitious substance use. We compared groups with adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family-of-origin variables and childhood history of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We provide significance levels without correction for multiple comparisons. Field study. Fifty-two illicit ecstasy users and 59 non-users, aged 18-45 years. Battery of 15 neuropsychological tests tapping a range of cognitive functions. We found little evidence of decreased cognitive performance in ecstasy users, save for poorer strategic self-regulation, possibly reflecting increased impulsivity. However, this finding might have reflected a pre-morbid attribute of ecstasy users, rather than a residual neurotoxic effect of the drug. In a study designed to minimize limitations found in many prior investigations, we failed to demonstrate marked residual cognitive effects in ecstasy users. This finding contrasts with many previous findings-including our own-and emphasizes the need for continued caution in interpreting field studies of cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Drug residues and endocrine disruptors in drinking water: risk for humans?

    PubMed

    Touraud, Evelyne; Roig, Benoit; Sumpter, John P; Coetsier, Clémence

    2011-11-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in the environment raises many questions about risk to the environment and human health. Environmental exposure has been largely studied, providing to date a realistic picture of the degree of contamination of the environment by pharmaceuticals and hormones. Conversely, little information is available regarding human exposure. NSAIDS, carbamazepine, iodinated contrast media, β-blockers, antibiotics have been detected in drinking water, mostly in the range of ng/L. it is questioned if such concentrations may affect human health. Currently, no consensus among the scientific community exists on what risk, if any, pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors pose to human health. Future European research will focus, on one hand, on genotoxic and cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs and, on the other hand, on the induction of genetic resistance by antibiotics. This review does not aim to give a comprehensive overview of human health risk of drug residues and endocrine disruptors in drinking water but rather highlight important topics of discussion. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. A direct droplet digital PCR method for quantification of residual DNA in protein drugs produced in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq; Fantuzzo, Rebecca; Mercorelli, Suzanne; Cullen, Constance

    2016-05-10

    Yeast cells, in particular Pichia pastoris, are the host cell of choice for manufacturing several protein therapeutic agents in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and the residual DNA after the purification process of the drug must be monitored to ensure drug purity and safety. Currently, real-time PCR (qPCR) based methods are widely employed for quantification of host residual DNA. At the same time the digital PCR technology is coming into prominence with promise of higher sensitivity. Here we report a method where the protein drug is directly added to the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) reaction including yeast-specific primers and fluorescent-tagged probe and nanoliter-sized droplets are generated. The droplets are then subjected to PCR followed by analysis for fluorescence. This Pichia residual DNA direct ddPCR method for yeast can be used to test higher amount of drug compared to the corresponding qPCR method thereby increasing sensitivity, retaining high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with three batches of a recombinant human IgG1-Fc-based drug (RP-1) and with commercially available human insulin, both manufactured in yeast cells. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol by eliminating DNA extraction or protease digestion and eliminates use of DNA standards in day-to-day running of the method.

  7. Drug residues in urban water: A database for ecotoxicological risk management.

    PubMed

    Destrieux, Doriane; Laurent, François; Budzinski, Hélène; Pedelucq, Julie; Vervier, Philippe; Gerino, Magali

    2017-12-31

    Human-use drug residues (DR) are only partially eliminated by waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), so that residual amounts can reach natural waters and cause environmental hazards. In order to properly manage these hazards in the aquatic environment, a database is made available that integrates the concentration ranges for DR, which cause adverse effects for aquatic organisms, and the temporal variations of the ecotoxicological risks. To implement this database for the ecotoxicological risk assessment (ERA database), the required information for each DR is the predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs), along with the predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). The risk assessment is based on the ratio between the PNECs and the PECs. Adverse effect data or PNECs have been found in the publicly available literature for 45 substances. These ecotoxicity test data have been extracted from 125 different sources. This ERA database contains 1157 adverse effect data and 287 PNECs. The efficiency of this ERA database was tested with a data set coming from a simultaneous survey of WWTPs and the natural environment. In this data set, 26 DR were searched for in two WWTPs and in the river. On five sampling dates, concentrations measured in the river for 10 DR could pose environmental problems of which 7 were measured only downstream of WWTP outlets. From scientific literature and measurements, data implementation with unit homogenisation in a single database facilitates the actual ecotoxicological risk assessment, and may be useful for further risk coming from data arising from the future field survey. Moreover, the accumulation of a large ecotoxicity data set in a single database should not only improve knowledge of higher risk molecules but also supply an objective tool to help the rapid and efficient evaluation of the risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 75 FR 48928 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... adoption of food standards, codes of practice, and other guidelines developed by its committees, and by... Food Safety and Inspection Service Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food AGENCY: Office of the Acting Under Secretary for Food Safety, USDA...

  9. 21 CFR 556.1 - General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... drug, has been shown to induce cancer in man or animal; however, such drug will not adversely affect... new animal drugs in food. 556.1 Section 556.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR...

  10. The effect of cooking on veterinary drug residues in food: 2. levamisole.

    PubMed

    Rose, M D; Argent, L C; Shearer, G; Farrington, W H

    1995-01-01

    The heat stability of levamisole was investigated. Results obtained indicated that the drug was stable in boiling water at 100 degrees C, but unstable at 260 degrees C in cooking oil, with a half-life of about 5 minutes. The effect of cooking (microwaving, boiling, roasting, grilling and frying) on levamisole residues in a range of fortified and incurred tissue was studied. No evidence of instability was obtained in any of the cooking methods investigated. Most observed net changes fell within the limits of the precision of the method once allowance for weight loss during cooking was made to counter an apparent increase in concentration. Roasting was the only method of cooking where a net loss of levamisole was observed. Insufficient juices were produced to permit analysis in this instance. The net loss of levamisole in the cooked tissue was similar to that found with other cooking methods, where the levamisole lost was found in the cooking liquid or juices. An assessment of homogeneity of the incurred tissue used in the investigation was made. The pig muscle was found not to be homogeneous with larger differences seen between different areas of the animal than within the same muscle. The findings of this investigation showed that data obtained from measurements on raw tissue are suitable for use in consumer exposure estimates and dietary intake calculations.

  11. Comparison of veterinary drug residue results in animal tissues by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole ... use of a commercial lipid removal product

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Veterinary drug residues in animal-derived foods must be monitored to ensure food safety, verify proper veterinary practices, enforce legal limits in domestic and imported foods, and other purposes. A common goal in drug residue analysis in foods is to achieve acceptable monitoring results for as m...

  12. Determination of pesticides and veterinary drug residues in food by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    Masiá, Ana; Suarez-Varela, Maria Morales; Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin; Picó, Yolanda

    2016-09-14

    Monitoring of pesticides and veterinary drug residues is required to enforce legislation and guarantee food safety. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the prevailing technique for assessing both types of residues because LC offers a versatile and universal separation mechanism suitable for non-gas chromatography (GC) amenable and the majority of GC-amenable compounds. This characteristic becomes more relevant when LC is coupled to MS because the high sensitivity and specificity of the detector allows to apply generic sample preparation procedures, which simultaneously extract a wide variety of residues with different physico-chemical properties. Determination of metabolites and degradation products, non-target suspected screening of an increasing number of residues, and even unknowns identification are also becoming inherent LC-MS advantages thanks to the latest advances. For routine analysis and, in particular, for official surveillance purposes in food control, analytical methods properly validated following strict guidelines are needed. After a brief introduction and an outline of the legislation applicable around the world, aspects such as improvement of specificity of high-throughput methods, resolution and mass accuracy of identification strategies and quantitative accuracy are critically reviewed in this article. In them, extraction, separation and determination are emphasized. The main objective is to offer an assessment of the state of the art and identify research needs and future trends in determining pesticide and veterinary drug residues in food by LC-MS.

  13. Analysis of veterinary drug residues in fish and shrimp composites collected during the Canadian Total Diet Study, 1993-2004.

    PubMed

    Tittlemier, S A; Van de Riet, J; Burns, G; Potter, R; Murphy, C; Rourke, W; Pearce, H; Cao, X L; Dabekai, R W; Dufresne, G

    2007-01-01

    Thirty shrimp, marine fish, freshwater fish, and canned fish composite samples collected and prepared as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study were analysed for 39 different veterinary drug residues. The analyses were undertaken to obtain baseline data that could be used to estimate the dietary exposure of Canadians to these residues. The most frequently observed residue was AOZ (four out of 30 samples), the metabolite of furazolidone, at a range of 0.50 to 2.0 ng g(-1) wet weight. Other residues detected included enrofloxacin (three samples; 0.3-0.73 ng g(-1)), leucomalachite green (three samples; 0.73-1.2 ng g(-1)), oxolinic acid (two samples; 0.3-4.3 ng g(-1)), AMOZ (the metabolite of furaltadone; one sample; 0.40 ng g(-1)), chloramphenicol (one sample; 0.40 ng g(-1)), and SEM (the metabolite of nitrofurazone; one sample; 0.8 ng g(-1)). The results of this survey indicate that Canadians are exposed to low ng g-1 concentrations of some banned and unapproved veterinary drug residues via the consumption of certain fish and shrimp.

  14. A direct qPCR method for residual DNA quantification in monoclonal antibody drugs produced in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq

    2015-11-10

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the host cell of choice for manufacturing of monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and must be controlled and monitored in order to ensure drug purity and safety. A conventional method for quantification of host residual DNA in drug requires extraction of DNA from the mAb drug substance with subsequent quantification of the extracted DNA using real-time PCR (qPCR). Here we report a method where the DNA extraction step is eliminated prior to qPCR. In this method, which we have named 'direct resDNA qPCR', the mAb drug substance is digested with a protease called KAPA in a 96-well PCR plate, the protease in the digest is then denatured at high temperature, qPCR reagents are added to the resultant reaction wells in the plate along with standards and controls in other wells of the same plate, and the plate subjected to qPCR for analysis of residual host DNA in the samples. This direct resDNA qPCR method for CHO is sensitive to 5.0fg of DNA with high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with four mAbs drug, two IgG1 and two IgG4. Both the purified drug substance as well as a number of process intermediate samples, e.g., bioreactor harvest, Protein A column eluate and ion-exchange column eluates were tested. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol, reduces time of analysis and leads to increased assay sensitivity and development of automated high-throughput methods.

  15. GLP principles and their role in supporting pharmacokinetic and residue depletion studies for drug registration and licensing.

    PubMed

    Croubels, Siska; De Backer, Patrick; Devreese, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) is a quality system concerned with the organizational process and the conditions under which non-clinical health and environmental safety studies are planned, performed, monitored, recorded, archived, and reported. This paper focuses on the GLP principles applicable for veterinary drug registration and licensing purposes. First, a general overview of the GLP requirements is given, followed by a more specific comparison and discussion of the analytical method validation parameters and acceptance criteria of different international guidelines applied in the context of veterinary drug pharmacokinetic and residue depletion studies. Finally, some needs with respect to method validation and new developments in pharmacokinetic and residue depletion studies are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Distribution of phthalates, pesticides and drug residues in the dissolved, particulate and sedimentary phases from transboundary rivers (France-Belgium).

    PubMed

    Net, Sopheak; Rabodonirina, Suzanah; Sghaier, Rafika Ben; Dumoulin, David; Chbib, Chaza; Tlili, Ines; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-07-15

    Various drug residues, pesticides and phthalates are ubiquitous in the environment. Their presence in the environment has attracted considerable attention due to their potential impacts on ecosystem functioning and on public health. In this work, 14 drug residues, 24 pesticides and 6 phthalates have been quantified in three matrices (in the dissolved phase, associated to suspended solid matter (SSM), and in sediment) collected from fifteen watercourses and rivers located in a highly industrialized zone at the cross-border area of Northern France and Belgium. The extractions have been carried out using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for solid matrices (SSM and sediment) and using solid phase extraction (SPE) for liquid matrix. The final extract was analyzed using GC-MS technique. Among the three classes of compounds, phthalates have been found at highest level compared to pesticides and drug residues. The Σ6PAE concentrations were ranging from 17.2±2.58 to 179.1±26.9μgL(-1) in dissolved phase, from 2.9±0.4 to 21.1±3.2μgL(-1) in SSM and from 1.1±0.2 to 11.9±1.8μgg(-1)dw in sediment. The Σ14drug residue concentrations were lower than 1.3μgL(-1) in the dissolved phases, lower than 30ngL(-1) associated to SSM and from nondetectable levels to 60.7±9.1ngg(-1)dw in sediment. For pesticides, all compounds were below the LOQ values in dissolved phase and in sediment, and only EPTC could be quantified in SSM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-residue determination of 115 veterinary drugs and pharmaceutical residues in milk powder, butter, fish tissue and eggs using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dasenaki, Marilena E; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2015-06-23

    A simple and sensitive multi-residue method for the determination of 115 veterinary drugs and pharmaceuticals, belonging in more than 20 different classes, in butter, milk powder, egg and fish tissue has been developed. The method involves a simple generic solid-liquid extraction step (solvent extraction, SE) with 0.1% formic acid in aqueous solution of EDTA 0.1% (w/v)-acetonitrile (ACN)-methanol (MeOH) (1:1:1, v/v) with additional ultrasonic-assisted extraction. Precipitation of lipids and proteins was promoted by subjecting the extracts at very low temperature (-23°C) for 12h. Further cleanup with hexane ensures fat removal from the matrix. Analysis was performed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Two separate runs were performed for positive and negative ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Particular attention was devoted to extraction optimization: different sample-to-extracting volume ratios, different concentrations of formic acid in the extraction solvent and different ultrasonic extraction temperatures were tested in butter, egg and milk powder samples. The method was also applied in fish tissue samples. It was validated, on the basis of international guidelines, for all four matrices. Quantitative analysis was performed by means of standard addition calibration. For over 80% of the analytes, the recoveries were between 50% and 120% in all matrices studied, with RSD values in the range of 1-18%. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) ranged from 0.008 μg kg(-1) (oxfendazole in butter) to 3.15 μg kg(-1) (hydrochlorthiazide in egg). The evaluated method provides reliable screening, quantification, and identification of 115 veterinary drug and pharmaceutical residues in foods of animal origin and has been successfully applied in real samples.

  18. Surface wipe sampling for antineoplastic (chemotherapy) and other hazardous drug residue in healthcare settings: Methodology and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas H; Zock, Matthew D; Snow, Amy H

    2016-09-01

    Surface wipe sampling for various hazardous agents has been employed in many occupational settings over the years for various reasons such as evaluation of potential dermal exposure and health risk, source determination, quality or cleanliness, compliance, and others. Wipe sampling for surface residue of antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings is currently the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review published studies of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs, to summarize the methods in use by various organizations and researchers, and to provide some basic guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling for these drugs in healthcare settings.  Recommendations on wipe sampling methodology from several government agencies and organizations were reviewed. Published reports on wipe sampling for hazardous drugs in numerous studies were also examined. The critical elements of a wipe sampling program and related limitations were reviewed and summarized.  Recommendations and guidance are presented concerning the purposes of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in the healthcare setting, technical factors and variables, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The reporting and interpretation of wipe sample results is also discussed.  It is recommended that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled consider wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug "safe handling" program. Although no standards exist for acceptable or allowable surface concentrations for these drugs in the healthcare setting, wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall safety program. A comprehensive safe-handling program for antineoplastic drugs may

  19. Surface Wipe Sampling for Antineoplastic (Chemotherapy) and Other Hazardous Drug Residue in Healthcare Settings: Methodology and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Thomas H.; Zock, Matthew D.; Snow, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Surface wipe sampling for various hazardous agents has been employed in many occupational settings over the years for various reasons such as evaluation of potential dermal exposure and health risk, source determination, quality or cleanliness, compliance, and others. Wipe sampling for surface residue of antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings is currently the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review published studies of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs, to summarize the methods in use by various organizations and researchers, and to provide some basic guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling for these drugs in healthcare settings. Methods Recommendations on wipe sampling methodology from several government agencies and organizations were reviewed. Published reports on wipe sampling for hazardous drugs in numerous studies were also examined. The critical elements of a wipe sampling program and related limitations were reviewed and summarized. Results Recommendations and guidance are presented concerning the purposes of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in the healthcare setting, technical factors and variables, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The reporting and interpretation of wipe sample results is also discussed. Conclusions It is recommended that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled consider wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug ‘safe handling’ program. Although no standards exist for acceptable or allowable surface concentrations for these drugs in the healthcare setting, wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall the safety program. A comprehensive safe-handling program

  20. Characterizing chronic and acute health risks of residues of veterinary drugs in food: latest methodological developments by the joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives.

    PubMed

    Boobis, Alan; Cerniglia, Carl; Chicoine, Alan; Fattori, Vittorio; Lipp, Markus; Reuss, Rainer; Verger, Philippe; Tritscher, Angelika

    2017-07-10

    The risk assessment of residues of veterinary drugs in food is a field that continues to evolve. The toxicological end-points to be considered are becoming more nuanced and in light of growing concern about the development of antimicrobial resistance, detailed analysis of the antimicrobial activity of the residues of veterinary drugs in food is increasingly incorporated in the assessment. In recent years, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has refined its approaches to provide a more comprehensive and fit-for-purpose risk assessment. This publication describes in detail the consideration of acute and chronic effects, the estimation of acute and chronic dietary exposure, current approaches for including microbiological endpoints in the risk assessment, and JECFA's considerations for the potential effects of food processing on residues from veterinary drugs. JECFA now applies these approaches in the development of health-based guidance values (i.e. safe exposure levels) for residues of veterinary drugs. JECFA, thus, comprehensively addresses acute and chronic risks by using corresponding estimates for acute and chronic exposure and suitable correction for the limited bioavailability of bound residues by the Gallo-Torres model. On a case-by-case basis, JECFA also considers degradation products that occur from normal food processing of food containing veterinary drug residues. These approaches will continue to be refined to ensure the most scientifically sound basis for the establishment of health-based guidance values for veterinary drug residues.

  1. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Seventy-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues of food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including extrapolation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) to minor species, MRLs for veterinary drug residues in honey, MRLs relating to fish and fish species, dietary exposure assessment methodologies, the decision-tree approach to the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs and guidance for JECFA experts. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicology and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (derquantel, monepantel), three antiparasitic agents (emanectin benzoate, ivermectin, lasalocid sodium), one antibacterial, antifungal and anthelminthic agent (gentian violet), a production aid (recombinant bovine somatotropins) and an adrenoceptor agonist and growth promoter (zilpaterol hydorchloride). Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs)) and proposed MRLs.

  2. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in foods and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers standards for the performance of studies, residues at the injection site, and several initiatives to promote transparency of the process for setting Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (moxidectin and tiabendazole), eight antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, danofloxacin, dihydrostreptomycin, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, gentamicin and spiramycin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and two insecticides (cyfluthrin and fluazuron). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRL's and further toxicological studies and other information required.

  3. Measurement of residual solvents in a drug substance by a purge-and-trap method.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Miklós

    2008-08-05

    The purge-and-trap (P&T) gas extraction method combined with gas chromatography was studied for its suitability for quantitative residual solvents determination in a water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Some analytical method performance characteristics were investigated, namely, the repeatability, the accuracy and the detection limit of determination. The results show that the P&T technique is--as expected--more sensitive than the static headspace, thus it can be used for the determination of residual solvents pertaining to the ICH Class 1 group. It was found that it could be an alternative sample preparation method besides the static headspace (HS) method.

  4. Analytical quality assurance in veterinary drug residue analysis methods: matrix effects determination and monitoring for sulfonamides analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Rübensam, Gabriel; Jank, Louise; Barreto, Fabiano; Peralba, Maria do Carmo Ruaro; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Silvia Díaz-Cruz, M; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    In residue analysis of veterinary drugs in foodstuff, matrix effects are one of the most critical points. This work present a discuss considering approaches used to estimate, minimize and monitoring matrix effects in bioanalytical methods. Qualitative and quantitative methods for estimation of matrix effects such as post-column infusion, slopes ratios analysis, calibration curves (mathematical and statistical analysis) and control chart monitoring are discussed using real data. Matrix effects varying in a wide range depending of the analyte and the sample preparation method: pressurized liquid extraction for liver samples show matrix effects from 15.5 to 59.2% while a ultrasound-assisted extraction provide values from 21.7 to 64.3%. The matrix influence was also evaluated: for sulfamethazine analysis, losses of signal were varying from -37 to -96% for fish and eggs, respectively. Advantages and drawbacks are also discussed considering a workflow for matrix effects assessment proposed and applied to real data from sulfonamides residues analysis.

  5. Development and validation of a streamlined method designed to detech residues of 62 veterinary drugs in bovine kidney using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the USA, the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) conducts the National Residue Program designed to monitor veterinary drug and other chemical residues in beef and other slaughtered food animals. Currently, FSIS uses a 7-plate bioassay in the laboratory to screen f...

  6. Access channel residues Ser315 and Asp137 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) control peroxidatic activation of the pro-drug isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Zhu, Janan; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidatic activation of the anti-tuberculosis pro-drug isoniazid by Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is regulated by gating residues of a heme access channel. The steric restriction at the bottleneck of this channel is alleviated by replacement of residue Asp137 with Ser, according to crystallographic and kinetic studies. PMID:24185282

  7. 76 FR 57907 - Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs in Food; Progesterone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... the allowable incremental increase for residues of progesterone in edible tissues of cattle and sheep... food-producing animals. Progesterone is approved for use in subcutaneous implants used for increased... assessment, and the updated allowable incremental increase limits for cattle tissues based on the revised...

  8. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Eighty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including MRLs for generic fish species, acute reference doses (ARfDs) for veterinary drugs, an approach for dietary exposure assessment of compounds used for multiple purposes (i.e veterinary drugs and pesticides), dietary exposure assessment for less-than-lifetime exposure, and the assessment of short-term (90-day and 12-month) studies in dogs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two insecticides (diflubenzuron and teflubenzuron), an antiparasitic agent (ivermectin), an ectoparasiticide (sisapronil) and a β2-adrenoceptor agonist (zilpaterol hydrochloride). In addition, the Committee considered issues raised in concern forms from the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods on lasalocid sodium, an antiparasitic agent. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs), ARfDs and proposed MRLs.

  9. Drug residues recovered in feed after various feedlot mixer truck cleanout procedures.

    PubMed

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Sit, Dan; Gibbons, Nicole; Ramogida, Caterina; Hendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of two methods of equipment cleanout, sequencing or flushing, for reducing drug carryover in feedlot mixer trucks. Feed samples were collected from total mixed rations before and after various feed mixer equipment cleanout procedures. Medicated rations contained either 11 ppm of tylosin or 166 or 331 ppm of chlortetracycline. There were no differences between sequencing and flushing or between flushing with dry barley and flushing with barley silage in the median proportion of drug recovered in the next ration. A larger drug reduction was achieved using flush material at a volume of 10 versus 5% of the mixer capacity and mixing the flush material for 3 versus 4 min. Regardless of the drug or prescription concentrations in the total mixed rations or the equipment cleanout procedure used, concentrations of chlortetracycline and tylosin recovered were very low.

  10. Closantel plasma and milk disposition in dairy goats: assessment of drug residues in cheese and ricotta.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, S; Lifschitz, A; Sallovitz, J; Nejamkin, P; Lloberas, M; Manazza, J; Lanusse, C; Imperiale, F

    2014-12-01

    Closantel (CLS) is currently used in programs for the strategic control of gastrointestinal nematodes. CLS is extralabel used in different dairy goat production systems. From available data in dairy cows, it can be concluded that residues of CLS persist in milk. The current work evaluated the concentration profiles of CLS in plasma and milk from lactating orally treated dairy goats to assess the residues pattern in dairy products such as cheese and ricotta. Six (6) female Saanen dairy goats were treated orally with CLS administered at 10 mg/kg. Blood and milk samples were collected between 0 and 36 days post-treatment. The whole milk production was collected at 1, 4, 7, and 10 days post-treatment to produce soft cheese and ricotta. CLS concentrations in plasma, milk, cheese, whey, and ricotta were determined by HPLC. The concentrations of CLS measured in plasma were higher than those measured in milk at all sampling times. However, the calculated withdrawal time for CLS in milk was between 39 and 43 days postadministration to dairy goats. CLS residual concentrations in cheese (between 0.93 and 1.8 μg/g) were higher than those measured in the milk used for its production. CLS concentrations in ricotta were sixfold higher than those in the milk and 20-fold higher than those in the whey used for its production. The persistent and high residual concentrations of CLS in the milk and in the cheese and ricotta should be seriously considered before issuing any recommendation on the extralabel use of CLS in dairy goat farms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Sixty-sixth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of JECFA, including compounds without an ADI or MRL; recommendations on principles and methods in derivation of MRLs, including a new procedure for estimating chronic dietary intakes; the use of a spreadsheet-based procedure for the statistical evaluation of residue depletion data; a revised approach for the derivation of microbiological ADIs; and the Committee's review of and comments on documents provided by the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: three antimicrobial agents (colistin, erythromycin, flumequine), two production aids (melengestrol acetate, ractopamine hydrochloride), an insecticide (trichlorfon (metrifonate)) and an anthelminthic (triclabendazole). In addition, the attempt by the Committee to use tylosin as an example to investigate if evaluations are possible based on published data in the absence of data submissions from sponsors is described. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes and proposed maximum residue limits.

  12. Global connectivity of hub residues in Oncoprotein structures encodes genetic factors dictating personalized drug response to targeted Cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Venky; Aravamudan, Murali

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy and mechanisms of therapeutic action are largely described by atomic bonds and interactions local to drug binding sites. Here we introduce global connectivity analysis as a high-throughput computational assay of therapeutic action – inspired by the Google page rank algorithm that unearths most “globally connected” websites from the information-dense world wide web (WWW). We execute short timescale (30 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with high sampling frequency (0.01 ps), to identify amino acid residue hubs whose global connectivity dynamics are characteristic of the ligand or mutation associated with the target protein. We find that unexpected allosteric hubs – up to 20Å from the ATP binding site, but within 5Å of the phosphorylation site – encode the Gibbs free energy of inhibition (ΔGinhibition) for select protein kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics. We further find that clinically relevant somatic cancer mutations implicated in both drug resistance and personalized drug sensitivity can be predicted in a high-throughput fashion. Our results establish global connectivity analysis as a potent assay of protein functional modulation. This sets the stage for unearthing disease-causal exome mutations and motivates forecast of clinical drug response on a patient-by-patient basis. We suggest incorporation of structure-guided genetic inference assays into pharmaceutical and healthcare Oncology workflows. PMID:25465236

  13. Global connectivity of hub residues in Oncoprotein structures encodes genetic factors dictating personalized drug response to targeted Cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundararajan, Venky; Aravamudan, Murali

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy and mechanisms of therapeutic action are largely described by atomic bonds and interactions local to drug binding sites. Here we introduce global connectivity analysis as a high-throughput computational assay of therapeutic action - inspired by the Google page rank algorithm that unearths most ``globally connected'' websites from the information-dense world wide web (WWW). We execute short timescale (30 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with high sampling frequency (0.01 ps), to identify amino acid residue hubs whose global connectivity dynamics are characteristic of the ligand or mutation associated with the target protein. We find that unexpected allosteric hubs - up to 20Å from the ATP binding site, but within 5Å of the phosphorylation site - encode the Gibbs free energy of inhibition (ΔGinhibition) for select protein kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics. We further find that clinically relevant somatic cancer mutations implicated in both drug resistance and personalized drug sensitivity can be predicted in a high-throughput fashion. Our results establish global connectivity analysis as a potent assay of protein functional modulation. This sets the stage for unearthing disease-causal exome mutations and motivates forecast of clinical drug response on a patient-by-patient basis. We suggest incorporation of structure-guided genetic inference assays into pharmaceutical and healthcare Oncology workflows.

  14. Understanding Functional Residues of the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn

    2010-01-01

    The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor that mediates numerous physiological processes in response to marijuana and other psychoactive compounds is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and shares common structural features with many rhodopsin class GPCRs. For the rational development of therapeutic agents targeting the CB1 receptor, understanding of the ligand-specific CB1 receptor interactions responsible for unique G protein signals is crucial. For a more than a decade, a combination of mutagenesis and computational modeling approaches has been successfully employed to study the ligand-specific CB1 receptor interactions. In this review, after a brief discussion about recent advances in understanding of some structural and functional features of GPCRs commonly applicable to the CB1 receptor, the CB1 receptor functional residues reported from mutational studies are divided into three different types, ligand binding (B), receptor stabilization (S) and receptor activation (A) residues, to delineate the nature of the binding pockets of anandamide, CP55940, WIN55212-2 and SR141716A and to describe the molecular events of the ligand-specific CB1 receptor activation from ligand binding to G protein signaling. Taken these CB1 receptor functional residues, some of which are unique to the CB1 receptor, together with the biophysical knowledge accumulated for the GPCR active state, it is possible to propose the early stages of the CB1 receptor activation process that not only provide some insights into understanding molecular mechanisms of receptor activation but also are applicable for identifying new therapeutic agents by applying the validated structure-based approaches, such as virtual high throughput screening (HTS) and fragment-based approach (FBA). PMID:20370713

  15. Albendazole-related drug residues in milk and their fate during cheesemaking, ripening, and storage.

    PubMed

    Fletouris, D J; Botsoglou, N A; Psomas, I E; Mantis, A I

    1998-11-01

    The level and nature of the albendazole residues in milk of treated cows were determined as a function of the time of milking (12-h intervals), and the fate of those residues during cheesemaking, ripening, and storage was examined when the obtained milk was used for making Teleme cheese. Ion-pair liquid chromatographic analysis with fluorescence detection showed that the albendazole sulfoxide metabolite reached its maximum (523 +/- 199 micrograms/kg) at the 1st milking and declined below the detection limit by the 4th milking. The sulfone metabolite attained its highest level (812 +/- 99 micrograms/kg) more slowly (at the 2nd milking) and declined below detection limit by the 13th milking. The 2-aminosulfone metabolite, which was present in the milk obtained at the 1st milking, reached its maximum (128 +/- 36 micrograms/kg) at the 3rd milking, and slowly declined to a level below detection limit by the 15th milking. Whey and cheese analysis revealed that about 70% of each major metabolite initially present in milk could be distributed in the whey. The remaining 30% occurred in the cheese at residue levels higher than those initially present in the milk of the 1st or 2nd milking (688 versus 445 or 450 versus 230 micrograms/kg for albendazole sulfoxide; 890 versus 608 or 1502 versus 783 micrograms/kg for albendazole sulfone; 19 versus 15 or 161 versus 105 micrograms/kg for albendazole 2-aminosulfone). Ripening and storage of the cheeses made from milks from the 1st or 2nd milkings results in a decrease of the sulfoxide metabolite (to 225 or 206 micrograms/kg), an increase of the sulfone metabolite (to 1,181 or 1,893 micrograms/kg), and no effect on the 2-aminosulfone metabolite.

  16. Source discrimination of drug residues in wastewater: The case of salbutamol.

    PubMed

    Depaolini, Andrea Re; Fattore, Elena; Cappelli, Francesca; Pellegrino, Raffaele; Castiglioni, Sara; Zuccato, Ettore; Fanelli, Roberto; Davoli, Enrico

    2016-06-15

    Analytical methods used for pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse in sewage play a fundamental role in wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) studies. Here quantitative analysis of drug metabolites in raw wastewaters is used to determine consumption from general population. Its great advantage in public health studies is that it gives objective, real-time data about community use of chemicals, highlighting the relationship between environmental and human health. Within a WBE study on salbutamol use in a large population, we developed a procedure to distinguish human metabolic excretion from external source of contamination, possibly industrial, in wastewaters. Salbutamol is mainly excreted as the sulphate metabolite, which is rapidly hydrolyzed to the parent compound in the environment, so this is currently not detected. When a molecule is either excreted un-metabolized or its metabolites are unstable in the environment, studies can be completed by monitoring the parent compound. In this case it is mandatory to assess whether the drug in wastewater is present because of population use or because of a specific source of contamination, such as industrial manufacturing waste. Because commercial salbutamol mainly occurs as a racemic mixture and is stereoselective in the human metabolism, the enantiomeric relative fraction (EFrel) in wastewater samples should reflect excretion, being unbalanced towards one of two enantiomers, if the drug is of metabolic origin. The procedure described involves chiral analysis of the salbutamol enantiomers by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and calculation of EFrel, to detect samples where external contamination occurs. Samples were collected daily between October and December 2013 from the Milano Nosedo wastewater treatment plant. Carbamazepine and atenolol were measured in the sewage collector, as "control" drugs. Salbutamol EFrel was highly consistent in all samples during this three-month period, but a limited

  17. [Study of simultaneous determination of residual veterinary drugs including tetracycline antibiotics in milk and dairy products].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Emiko; Shibuya, Takahiro; Kurokawa, Chieko; Inoue, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Miyazaki, Motonobu

    2009-10-01

    It is considered to be difficult to detect tetracycline antibiotics in all-at-once simultaneous analysis with other drugs by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, because tetracycline antibiotics chelate with bivalent metal ions such as calcium in samples. Therefore, we studied simultaneous determination of tetracycline antibiotics after removal of calcium with disodium ethylenediaminotetraacetate (EDTA-2Na). Tetracycline antibiotics could be assayed in all-at-once analysis by adding EDTA-2Na during the extraction procedure. It was possible to determine 65 veterinary drugs in milk, 70 in yogurt, 59 in whipped cream, 67 in cheese and 60 in ice cream. Recovery ranged from 70 to 120%, with a coefficient of variation of less than 25% and with a quantification limit of 0.01 microg/g (S/N>or=10).

  18. Investigation of the role of environmental contamination in the occurrence of residues of the veterinary drug phenylbutazone in cattle.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul; Fodey, Terence L; Smyth, Wesley G; Crooks, Steven R H

    2017-04-01

    Phenylbutazone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug licensed for use in horses to treat musculoskeletal disorders. It is not permitted in the European Union for use in animals destined for the food chain. Official statistics provided by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) show that 0.18% of bovines tested in the European Union between 2008 and 2014 for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were non-compliant, with phenylbutazone representing over 28% of these. Anecdotal evidence suggests animals that have not been treated with the drug may have produced non-compliant samples, possibly through some form of contamination. In this study, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometric detection was applied to bovine plasma samples to determine if detectable residues (CCα = 0.28 ng ml(-1)) may occur in untreated animals as a result of environmental contamination through normal farming practice. The study demonstrates that waste from animals treated with phenylbutazone, and spread on an area of pasture, can contaminate untreated bovines grazing the pasture many weeks later. It was determined that this contamination, which can persist over a significant period, may be due to the ingestion of as little as 30 μg phenylbutazone by a 500 kg bullock.

  19. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  20. Direct analyte-probed nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry of drug residues from latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Kristina; Wiley, Rachel; Waverka, Kristin; Fox, James; Dziekonski, Eric; Verbeck, Guido F

    2013-07-01

    Here, we present a method of extracting drug residues from fingerprints via Direct Analyte-Probed Nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DAPNe-NSI-MS). This instrumental technique provides higher selectivity and lower detection limits over current methods, greatly reducing sample preparation, and does not compromise the integrity of latent fingerprints. This coupled to Raman microscopy is an advantageous supplement for location and identification of trace particles. DAPNe uses a nanomanipulator for extraction and differing microscopies for localization of chemicals of interest. A capillary tip with solvent of choice is placed in a nanopositioner. The surface to be analyzed is placed under a microscope, and a particle of interest is located. Using a pressure injector, the solvent is injected onto the surface where it dissolves the analyte, and then extracted back into the capillary tip. The solution is then directly analyzed via NSI-MS. Analyses of caffeine, cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, and ecstasy have been performed successfully.

  1. A novel combination of drug therapy to protect residual hearing post cochlear implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Adrien A; Roell, Jonathan; Shaikh, Noah; Telischi, Fred F; Bauer, Blake; Guardiola, Mateo; Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas; Rivera, Ileana; Mittal, Jeenu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions A cocktail combining NAC, Mannitol, and Dexamethasone may be used to prevent loss of residual hearing post-implantation. There is a window of opportunity to treat the cochlea before the onset of cell death in HCs. Objective Inner ear trauma caused by cochlear implant electrode insertion trauma (EIT) initiates multiple molecular mechanisms in hair cells (HCs) or support cells (SCs), resulting in initiation of programmed cell death within the damaged tissues of the cochlea, which leads to loss of residual hearing. In earlier studies L-N-acetylcysteine (L-NAC), Mannitol, and dexamethasone have been shown independently to protect the HCs loss against different types of inner ear trauma. These three molecules have different otoprotective effects. The goal of this preliminary study is to test the efficacy of a combination of these molecules to enhance the otoprotection of HCs against EIT. Methods OC explants were dissected from P-3 rats and placed in serum-free media. Explants were divided into control and experimental groups. (1) untreated controls; (2) EIT. Experimental group: (1) EIT + L-NAC (5, 2, or 1 mM); (2) EIT + Mannitol (100, 50, or 10 mM); (3) EIT + Dex (20, 10, or 5 μg/mL); (4) EIT + L-NAC + Mannitol + Dex. After EIT was caused in an in-vitro model of CI, explants were cultured in media containing L-NAC alone, Mannitol alone, or Dex alone at decreasing concentrations. Concentrations of L-NAC, Mannitol, and Dex that showed 50% protection of hair cell loss individually were used as a combination in experimental group 4. Results There was an increase of total hair cell (THC) loss in the EIT OC explants when compared with control group HC counts or the tri-therapy cochlea. This study defined the dosage of L-NAC, Mannitol, and Dex for the survival of 50% protection of hair cells in vitro. Their combination provided close to 96% protection, demonstrating an additive effect.

  2. Development and Validation of a Gas Chromatography Method for Quality Control of Residual Solvents in Azilsartan Bulk Drugs.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jin; Min, Jie; Yan, Feng; Xu, Wen-Ya; Shi, Shuang; Wang, Si-Lin

    2017-04-01

    A new gas chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of six organic residual solvents (acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, ethanol, acetone, 2-propanol and ethyl acetate) in azilsartan bulk drug is described. The chromatographic determination was achieved on an OV-624 capillary column employing programmed temperature within 21 min. The validation was carried out according to International Conference on Harmonization validation guidelines. The method was shown to be specific (no interference in the blank solution), sensitive (Limit of detection can achieve 1.5 μg/mL), precise (relative standard deviation of repeatability and intermediate precision ≤5.0%), linear (r≥ 0.999), accurate (recoveries range from 98.8% to 107.8%) and robust (carrier gas flow from 2.7 to 3.3 mL/min, initial oven temperature from 35°C to 45°C, temperature ramping rate from 19°C/min to 21°C/min, final oven temperature from 145°C to 155°C, injector temperature from 190°C to 210°C and detector temperature from 240°C to 260°C did not significantly affect the system suitability, test parameters and peak areas). This extensively validated method has been applied to the determination of residual solvents in real azilsartan bulk samples. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Reliability of veterinary drug residue confirmation: high resolution mass spectrometry versus tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2015-01-26

    Confirmation of suspected residues has been a long time domain of tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ). The currently most widely used confirmation strategy relies on the use of two selected reaction monitoring signals (SRM). The details of this confirmation procedure are described in detail in the Commission Decision 93/256/EC (CD). On the other hand, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is nowadays increasingly used for trace analysis. Yet its utility for confirmatory purposes has not been well explored and utilized, since established confirmation strategies like the CD do not yet include rules for modern HRMS technologies. It is the focus of this paper to evaluate the likelihood of false positive and false negative confirmation results, when using a variety of HRMS based measurement modes as compared to conventional QqQ mass spectrometry. The experimental strategy relies on the chromatographic separation of a complex blank sample (bovine liver extract) and the subsequent monitoring of a number of dummy transitions respectively dummy accurate masses. The term "dummy" refers to precursor and derived product ions (based on a realistic neutral loss) whose elemental compositions (CxHyNzOdCle) were produced by a random number generator. Monitoring a large number of such hypothetical SRM's, or accurate masses inevitably produces a number of mass traces containing chromatographic peaks (false detects) which are caused by eluting matrix compounds. The number and intensity of these peaks were recorded and standardized to permit a comparison among the two employed MS technologies. QqQ performance (compounds which happen to produce a response in two SRM traces at identical retention time) was compared with a number of different HRMS(1) and HRMS(2) detection based modes. A HRMS confirmation criterion based on two full scans (an unfragmented and an all ion fragmented) was proposed. Compared to the CD criteria, a significantly lower probability of false

  4. Veterinary Drugs and Growth Promoters Residues in Meat and Processed Meats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Milagro; Toldrá, Fidel

    Veterinary drugs, which comprise a large number of different types of substances, are generally intended for therapeutic (to control infectious diseases) and prophylactic (to prevent against infections) purposes in farm animals. Other substances with growth promoting effect may exert antimicrobial effect against the microbial flora in the gut to take maximum profit of nutrients in the feed or by affecting the animal’s metabolism. Most of these substances are orally active and can be administered either in the feed or in the drinking water. Other active hormones are applied in the form of small implants into the subcutaneous tissue of the ears. These are slow release (several weeks or months) devices and the ears are discarded at the slaughter. Growth promoters allow a better efficiency in the feed conversion rate. The net effect is an increased protein deposition, partly due to muscle proteases inhibition (Fiems, Buts, Boucque, Demeyer, & Cottyn, 1990), usually linked to fat utilization (Brockman & Laarveld, 1986). The result is a leaner meat (Lone, 1997) with some toughness derived from the production of connective tissue and collagen crosslinking (Miller, Judge, Diekman, Hudgens, & Aberle, 1989; Miller, Judge, & Schanbacher, 1990). Some recent fraudulent practices, consisting of the use of a kind of “cocktails” or mixtures of several substances like β-agonists and corticosteroids at very low amounts (Monsón et al., 2007), are difficult to detect with modern analytical instrumentation. They try to obtain a synergistic effect for a similar growth promotion with lower probability of detection by official control laboratories (Reig & Toldrá, 2007).

  5. Hepatotoxicity of Pentavalent Antimonial Drug: Possible Role of Residual Sb(III) and Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kelly C.; Morais-Teixeira, Eliane; Reis, Priscila G.; Silva-Barcellos, Neila M.; Salaün, Pascal; Campos, Paula P.; Dias Corrêa-Junior, José; Rabello, Ana; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Pentavalent antimonial drugs such as meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime [Glu; Sanofi-Aventis, São Paulo, Brazil]) produce severe side effects, including cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, during the treatment of leishmaniasis. We evaluated the role of residual Sb(III) in the hepatotoxicity of meglumine antimoniate, as well as the protective effect of the antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) during antimonial chemotherapy in a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis. BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania infantum were treated intraperitoneally at 80 mg of Sb/kg/day with commercial meglumine antimoniate (Glu) or a synthetic meglumine antimoniate with lower Sb(III) level (MA), in association or not with AA (15 mg/kg/day), for a 20-day period. Control groups received saline or saline plus AA. Livers were evaluated for hepatocytes histological alterations, peroxidase activity, and apoptosis. Increased proportions of swollen and apoptotic hepatocytes were observed in animals treated with Glu compared to animals treated with saline or MA. The peroxidase activity was also enhanced in the liver of animals that received Glu. Cotreatment with AA reduced the extent of histological changes, the apoptotic index, and the peroxidase activity to levels corresponding to the control group. Moreover, the association with AA did not affect the hepatic uptake of Sb and the ability of Glu to reduce the liver and spleen parasite loads in infected mice. In conclusion, our data supports the use of pentavalent antimonials with low residue of Sb(III) and the association of pentavalent antimonials with AA, as effective strategies to reduce side effects in antimonial therapy. PMID:24189251

  6. Structural characterization of fragment ions by electrospray ionization and Q-TOF mass spectrometry to support regulatory analysis of veterinary drug residues in foods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RATIONALE: Monitoring of veterinary drug residues in foods is often conducted using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results have high economic stakes for producers, but the ions monitored are usually selected due to signal intensities without structural interpretation. ...

  7. Ruggedness testing and validation of a practical analytical method for > 100 veterinary drug residues in bovine muscle by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, optimization, extension, and validation of a streamlined, qualitative and quantitative multiclass, multiresidue method was conducted to monitor great than100 veterinary drug residues in meat using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). I...

  8. An update discussion on the current assessment of the safety of veterinary antimicrobial drug residues in food with regard to their impact on the human intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Cerniglia, Carl E; Pineiro, Silvia A; Kotarski, Susan F

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract ecosystem consists of complex and diverse microbial communities that have now been collectively termed the intestinal microbiome. Recent scientific breakthroughs and research endeavours have increased our understanding of the important role the intestinal microbiome plays in human health and disease. The use of antimicrobial new animal drugs in food-producing animals may result in the presence of low levels of drug residues in edible foodstuffs. There is concern that antimicrobial new animal drugs in or on animal-derived food products at residue-level concentrations could disrupt the colonization barrier and/or modify the antimicrobial resistance profile of human intestinal bacteria. Therapeutic doses of antimicrobial drugs have been shown to promote shifts in the intestinal microbiome, and these disruptions promote the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. To assess the effects of antimicrobial new animal drug residues in food on human intestinal bacteria, many national regulatory agencies and international committees follow a harmonized process, VICH GL36(R), which was issued by a trilateral organization of the European Union, the USA, and Japan called the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH). The guidance describes a general approach currently used by national regulatory agencies and international committees to assess the effects of antimicrobial new animal drug residues in animal-derived food on human intestinal bacteria. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this current approach as part of the antimicrobial new animal drug approval process in participating countries, give insights on the microbiological endpoints used in this safety evaluation, and discuss the availability of new information. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Recovery from rapamycin: drug-insensitive activity of yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) supports residual proliferation that dilutes rapamycin among progeny cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie K; Burgess, Karl E V; Gray, Joseph V

    2014-09-19

    The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a key conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth. The xenobiotic rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of the yeast complex. Surprisingly, the EGO complex, a nonessential in vivo activator of TORC1, is somehow required for yeast cells to recover efficiently from a period of treatment with rapamycin. Why? Here, we found that rapamycin is only a partial inhibitor of TORC1. We confirmed that saturating amounts of rapamycin do not fully inhibit proliferation of wild-type cells, and we found that the residual proliferation in the presence of the drug is dependent on the EGO complex and on the activity of TORC1. We found that this residual TORC1-dependent proliferation is key to recovery from rapamycin treatment. First, the residual proliferation rate correlates with the ability of cells to recover from treatment. Second, the residual proliferation rate persists long after washout of the drug and until cells recover. Third, the total observable pool of cell-associated rapamycin is extremely stable and decreases only with increasing cell number after washout of the drug. Finally, consideration of the residual proliferation rate alone accurately and quantitatively accounts for the kinetics of recovery of wild-type cells and for the nature and severity of the ego- mutant defect. Overall, our results revealed that rapamycin is a partial inhibitor of yeast TORC1, that persistence of the drug limits recovery, and that rapamycin is not detoxified by yeast but is passively diluted among progeny cells because of residual proliferation.

  10. The Role of Minimal Residual Disease Testing in Myeloma Treatment Selection and Drug Development: Current Value and Future Applications.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kenneth C; Auclair, Daniel; Kelloff, Gary J; Sigman, Caroline C; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Farrell, Ann T; Gormley, Nicole J; Kumar, Shaji K; Landgren, Ola; Munshi, Nikhil C; Cavo, Michele; Davies, Faith E; Di Bacco, Alessandra; Dickey, Jennifer S; Gutman, Steven I; Higley, Howard R; Hussein, Mohamad A; Jessup, J Milburn; Kirsch, Ilan R; Little, Richard F; Loberg, Robert D; Lohr, Jens G; Mukundan, Lata; Omel, James L; Pugh, Trevor J; Reaman, Gregory H; Robbins, Michael D; Sasser, A Kate; Valente, Nancy; Zamagni, Elena

    2017-08-01

    Treatment of myeloma has benefited from the introduction of more effective and better tolerated agents, improvements in supportive care, better understanding of disease biology, revision of diagnostic criteria, and new sensitive and specific tools for disease prognostication and management. Assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) in response to therapy is one of these tools, as longer progression-free survival (PFS) is seen consistently among patients who have achieved MRD negativity. Current therapies lead to unprecedented frequency and depth of response, and next-generation flow and sequencing methods to measure MRD in bone marrow are in use and being developed with sensitivities in the range of 10(-5) to 10(-6) cells. These technologies may be combined with functional imaging to detect MRD outside of bone marrow. Moreover, immune profiling methods are being developed to better understand the immune environment in myeloma and response to immunomodulatory agents while methods for molecular profiling of myeloma cells and circulating DNA in blood are also emerging. With the continued development and standardization of these methodologies, MRD has high potential for use in gaining new drug approvals in myeloma. The FDA has outlined two pathways by which MRD could be qualified as a surrogate endpoint for clinical studies directed at obtaining accelerated approval for new myeloma drugs. Most importantly, better understanding of MRD should also contribute to better treatment monitoring. Potentially, MRD status could be used as a prognostic factor for making treatment decisions and for informing timing of therapeutic interventions. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 3980-93. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Homology modeling and docking analyses of M. leprae Mur ligases reveals the common binding residues for structure based drug designing to eradicate leprosy.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Anusuya; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2012-06-01

    Multi drug resistance capacity for Mycobacterium leprae (MDR-Mle) demands the profound need for developing new anti-leprosy drugs. Since most of the drugs target a single enzyme, mutation in the active site renders the antibiotic ineffective. However, structural and mechanistic information on essential bacterial enzymes in a pathway could lead to the development of antibiotics that targets multiple enzymes. Peptidoglycan is an important component of the cell wall of M. leprae. The biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan represents important targets for the development of new antibacterial drugs. Biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is a multi-step process that involves four key Mur ligase enzymes: MurC (EC:6.3.2.8), MurD (EC:6.3.2.9), MurE (EC:6.3.2.13) and MurF (EC:6.3.2.10). Hence in our work, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the above Mur ligases using homology modeling method and analyzed its common binding features. The residues playing an important role in the catalytic activity of each of the Mur enzymes were predicted by docking these Mur ligases with their substrates and ATP. The conserved sequence motifs significant for ATP binding were predicted as the probable residues for structure based drug designing. Overall, the study was successful in listing significant and common binding residues of Mur enzymes in peptidoglycan pathway for multi targeted therapy.

  12. Analysis of pesticide and veterinary drug residues in baby food by liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Romero-González, Roberto; Luis Martínez, Vidal José; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Pesticide and veterinary drug residues have been simultaneously determined in several baby foods as meat, fish and vegetable-based baby food. A generic extraction method without clean-up step was applied. Moreover, the use of a representative matrix for proper quantification of all target compounds was studied and the best results were obtained when vegetable-based baby food was used as representative matrix, allowing the reliable quantification of more than 300 compounds. The method was validated and good recoveries were obtained for most of compounds at concentrations higher than 50 µg kg(-1). Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.5 to 50 µg kg(-1), whereas limits of quantification (LOQ) were established between 10 and 100 µg kg(-1). Limits of identification (LOIs) ranged from 0.5 to 50 µg kg(-1). This method was applied to the analysis of 46 different baby food samples and no positive samples were found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Profiling of residual breast cancers after neoadjuvant chemotherapy identifies DUSP4 deficiency as a mechanism of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Balko, Justin M; Cook, Rebecca S; Vaught, David B; Kuba, María G; Miller, Todd W; Bhola, Neil E; Sanders, Melinda E; Granja-Ingram, Nara M; Smith, J Joshua; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Salter, Janine; Dowsett, Mitch; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; González-Angulo, Ana M; Mills, Gordon B; Pinto, Joseph A; Gómez, Henry L; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2012-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) induces a pathological complete response (pCR) in ~30% of patients with breast cancer. However, many patients have residual cancer after chemotherapy, which correlates with a higher risk of metastatic recurrence and poorer outcome than those who achieve a pCR. We hypothesized that molecular profiling of tumors after NAC would identify genes associated with drug resistance. Digital transcript counting was used to profile surgically resected breast cancers after NAC. Low concentrations of dual specificity protein phosphatase 4 (DUSP4), an ERK phosphatase, correlated with high post-NAC tumor cell proliferation and with basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) status. BLBC had higher DUSP4 promoter methylation and gene expression patterns of Ras-ERK pathway activation relative to other breast cancer subtypes. DUSP4 overexpression increased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, whereas DUSP4 depletion dampened the response to chemotherapy. Reduced DUSP4 expression in primary tumors after NAC was associated with treatment-refractory high Ki-67 scores and shorter recurrence-free survival. Finally, inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) synergized with docetaxel treatment in BLBC xenografts. Thus, DUSP4 downregulation activates the Ras-ERK pathway in BLBC, resulting in an attenuated response to anti-cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22683778

  14. Analysis of veterinary drug residues in frog legs and other aquacultured species using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Clark, Susan B; Storey, Joseph M; Carr, Justin R

    2012-05-09

    A liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry method was developed to analyze veterinary drug residues in frog legs and other aquacultured species. Samples were extracted using a procedure based on a method developed for the analysis of fluoroquinolones (FQs) in fish. Briefly, the tissue was extracted with dilute acetic acid and acetonitrile with added sodium chloride. After centrifugation, the extracts were evaporated and reconstituted in mobile phase. A molecular weight cutoff filter was used to clean up the final extract. A set of target compounds, including trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, quinolones, and FQs, was used to validate the method. Screening of residues was accomplished by collecting TOF (MS¹) data and comparing the accurate mass and retention times of compounds to a database containing information for veterinary drugs. An evaluation of the MS data in fortified frog legs indicated that the target compounds could be consistently detected at the level of concern. The linearity and recoveries from matrix were evaluated for these analytes to estimate the amount of residue present. MS/MS data were also generated from precursor ions, and the mass accuracy of the product ions for each compound was compared to theoretical values. When the method was used to analyze imported frog legs, many of these residues were found in the samples, often in combination and at relatively high concentrations (>10 ng/g). The data from these samples were also evaluated for nontarget analytes such as residue metabolites and other chemotherapeutics.

  15. Evaluation of infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy measurement and locally weighted partial least-squares for rapid analysis of residual drug substances in cleaning processes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tajima, Takahiro; Kano, Manabu; Kim, Sanghong; Hasebe, Shinji; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Nakagami, Hiroaki

    2012-04-17

    The usefulness of infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS) for the rapid measurement of residual drug substances without sampling was evaluated. In order to realize the highly accurate rapid measurement, locally weighted partial least-squares (LW-PLS) with a new weighting technique was developed. LW-PLS is an adaptive method that builds a calibration model on demand by using a database whenever prediction is required. By adding more weight to samples closer to a query, LW-PLS can achieve higher prediction accuracy than PLS. In this study, a new weighting technique is proposed to further improve the prediction accuracy of LW-PLS. The root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of the IR-RAS spectra analyzed by LW-PLS with the new weighting technique was compared with that analyzed by PLS and locally weighted regression (LWR). The RMSEP of LW-PLS with the proposed weighting technique was about 36% and 14% smaller than that of PLS and LWR, respectively, when ibuprofen was a residual drug substance. Similarly, LW-PLS with the weighting technique was about 39% and 24% better than PLS and LWR in RMSEP, respectively, when magnesium stearate was a residual excipient. The combination of IR-RAS and LW-PLS with the proposed weighting technique is a very useful rapid measurement technique of the residual drug substances.

  16. Quantification of residual enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in feathers of broiler chickens by high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence after oral administration of the drugs

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Griselda; Marin, Gustavo H.; Errecalde, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Enrofloxacin (ENR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) are drugs used in poultry feeding. In general, feathers that are incorporated in the food chain as a protein source for animal feed, have residues of these drugs. In order to study the pharmacokinetic of ENR/CIP residues in feathers of broiler chickens, to calculate the waiting times for these drugs, before human consumption, we developed the present research. Feathers of broiler chickens were enriched with ENR/CIP. After adding acetone, the mix was agitated and centrifuged and supernatant evaporated under nitrogen. The dry residue was suspended in a tetrahydrofuran solution and the supernatant was injected into the chromatographic system for analysis. Animals showed high levels of ENR/CIP in their feathers after administration of 10 mg/kg enrofloxacin dissolved in drinking water for 5 days. Both compounds were detected in feathers during 9 days. The analytical method developed in this paper to determine ENR and CIP in feathers of broiler chicken showed good linearity, selectivity, accuracy and precision in the analysis conditions. This technique could have important applications in the studies on residues of ENR/CIP in feathers, since the effect of this component in animal diets has not been considered yet. PMID:26955603

  17. Ampicillin and amoxicillin residue detection in milk, using microbial receptor assay (Charm II) and liquid chromatography methods, after extra-label administration of the drugs to lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K L; Moats, W A; Rushing, J E; Wesen, D P; Papich, M G

    1996-01-01

    A microbial receptor assay method (MRAM; Charm II test) for beta-lactam antibiotics and a liquid chromatography (LC) method with a detection limit of 2 to 5 ppb were evaluated for detection of ampicillin or amoxicillin residues in milk samples from individual cows. The MRAM was compared to the LC in 2 respects. Measured concentrations of drugs were compared, as well as the classification of samples relative to the FDA tolerance value of 10 ppb. A total of 6 clinically normal lactating Holstein cows were used per drug. Ampicillin trihydrate or amoxicillin trihydrate was administered at an extra-label dosage of 22 mg/kg of body weight, IM, once to each of 6 cows/drug. Milk samples were collected at milkings prior to and for 156 hours after drug administration. Drug concentrations in milk samples from individual cows were determined by use of the MRAM and LC tests. Additionally, the classification of milk samples relative to the presence or absence of residues above the FDA tolerance value was determined. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on derived milk drug concentrations. Concentration of ampicillin in milk samples from all cows was < 10 ppb by the MRAM and LC methods by the fourth milking (48 hours) after treatment with ampicillin. Values were < 10 ppb by both methods for all cows treated with amoxicillin by the sixth milking (72 hours) after treatment. For individual milk samples, significant differences were found between test methods in the proportion of positive (failing) tests; the MRAM had a higher proportion of presumptive positives. Even at an extra-label dosage of 22 mg/kg, IM, milk residues > 10 ppb (the FDA tolerance value) were not detected beyond the label milk withholding times for ampicillin (48 hours) and amoxicillin (96 hours). When used for testing milk of individual cows by the control point procedure, the MRAM had a tendency to give presumptive positive test results for milk samples containing < 10 ppb ampicillin or amoxicillin as

  18. Wide-Scope Screening Method for Multiclass Veterinary Drug Residues in Fish, Shrimp, and Eel Using Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Storey, Joseph M; Lohne, Jack J; Andersen, Wendy C; Burger, Robert; Johnson, Aaron S; Madson, Mark R

    2017-01-13

    A screening method for veterinary drug residues in fish, shrimp, and eel using LC with a high-resolution MS instrument has been developed and validated. The method was optimized for over 70 test compounds representing a variety of veterinary drug classes. Tissues were extracted by vortex mixing with acetonitrile acidified with 2% acetic acid and 0.2% p-toluenesulfonic acid. A centrifuged portion of the extract was passed through a novel solid phase extraction cartridge designed to remove interfering matrix components from tissue extracts. The eluent was then evaporated and reconstituted for analysis. Data were collected with a quadrupole-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer using both nontargeted and targeted acquisition methods. Residues were detected on the basis of the exact mass of the precursor and a product ion along with isotope pattern and retention time matching. Semiquantitative data analysis compared MS(1) signal to a one-point extracted matrix standard at a target testing level. The test compounds were detected and identified in salmon, tilapia, catfish, shrimp, and eel extracts fortified at the target testing levels. Fish dosed with selected analytes and aquaculture samples previously found to contain residues were also analyzed. The screening method can be expanded to monitor for an additional >260 veterinary drugs on the basis of exact mass measurements and retention times.

  19. 78 FR 37202 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... Science and Policy, Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation, HFV-100, Food and Drug Administration, Center... food safety news and information. This service is available at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events...

  20. Development and Validation of a Multiclass Method for Analysis of Veterinary Drug Residues in Milk Using Ultrahigh Performance Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Quadrupole Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Leung, Daniel; Chow, Willis; Chang, James; Wong, Jon W

    2015-10-21

    This paper presents the development and validation of a multiclass method for the analysis of veterinary drug residues in milk using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap). The 12 classes of veterinary drugs (a total of 125) included in this study were endectocides, fluoroquinolones, ionophores, macrolides, nitroimidazole, NSAIDs, β-lactams, penicillins, phenicols, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and aminoglycosides. Veterinary drug residues in milk were extracted using a modified salting-out supported liquid extraction (SOSLE) method, which entailed the precipitation of milk proteins using an extraction buffer (oxalic acid and EDTA, pH 3) and acetonitrile, a salting-out acetonitrile/water phase separation using ammonium sulfate, and solid-phase extraction (SPE) using polymeric reversed-phase sorbent cartridges. The final extracts were concentrated and reconstituted into a buffer solution and analyzed using UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The developed method was validated using a nested experimental design to evaluate the method performance characteristics, such as overall recovery, intermediate precision, and measurement uncertainty. The method was able to quantify or screen up to 105 veterinary drugs from 11 different classes, except aminoglycosides. The limits of quantification were as low as 1.0 μg/kg, with an analytical range from 1.0 to 100.0 μg/kg in milk.

  1. Qualitative and Quantitative Drug residue analyses: Florfenicol in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and supermarket meat by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shanoy C; Subbiah, Seenivasan; Gentles, Angella; Austin, Galen; Stonum, Paul; Brooks, Tiffanie A; Brooks, Chance; Smith, Ernest E

    2016-10-15

    A method for confirmation and detection of Florfenicol amine residues in white-tailed deer tissues was developed and validated in our laboratory. Tissue samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up on sorbent (Chem-elut) cartridges. Liguid chromatography (LC) separation was achieved on a Zorbax Eclipse plus C18 column with gradient elution using a mobile phase composed of ammonium acetate in water and methanol at a flow rate of 300μL/min. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out using liquid chromatography - heated electrospray ionization(HESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) interface. The limits of detection (LODs) for HESI and APCI probe were 1.8ng/g and 1.4ng/g respectively. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for HESI and APCI probe were 5.8ng/g and 3.4ng/g respectively. Mean recovery values ranged from 79% to 111% for APCI and 30% to 60% for HESI. The validated method was used to determine white-tailed deer florfenicol tissue residue concentration 10-days after exposure. Florfenicol tissue residues concentration ranged from 0.4 to 0.6μg/g for liver and 0.02-0.05μg/g for muscle and a trace in blood samples. The concentration found in the tested edible tissues were lower than the maximum residual limit (MRL) values established by the federal drug administration (FDA) for bovine tissues. In summary, the resulting optimization procedures using the sensitivity of HESI and APCI probes in the determination of florfenicol in white-tailed deer tissue are the most compelling conclusions in this study, to the extent that we have applied this method in the evaluation of supermarket samples drug residue levels as a proof of principle. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Active site acidic residues and structural analysis of modelled human aromatase: A potential drug target for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, J. Narashima; Nagaraju, M.; Sastry, G. Madhavi; Rao, A. Raghuram; Sastry, G.␣Narahari

    2005-12-01

    This study sheds new light on the role of acidic residues present in the active site cavity of human aromatase. Eight acidic residues (E129, D222, E245, E302, D309, E379, D380 and D476) lining the cavity are identified and studied using comparative modeling, docking, molecular dynamics as well as statistical techniques. The structural environment of these acidic residues is studied to assess the stability of the corresponding carboxylate anions. Results indicate that the environment of the residues E245, E302 and D222 is most suitable for carboxylate ion formation in the uncomplexed form. However, the stability of D309, D222 and D476 anions is seen to increase on complexation to steroidal substrates. In particular, the interaction between D309 and T310, which assists proton transfer, is found to be formed following androgen/nor-androgen complexation. The residue D309 is found to be clamped in the presence of substrate which is not observed in the case of the other residues although they exhibit changes in properties following substrate binding. Information entropic analysis indicates that the residues D309, D222 and D476 have more conformational flexibility compared to E302 and E245 prior to substrate binding. Interaction similar to that between D476 and D309, which is expected to assist androgen aromatization, is proposed between E302 and E245. The inhibition of aromatase activity by 4-hydroxy androstenedione (formestane) is attributed to a critical hydrogen bond formation between the hydroxy moiety and T310/D309 as well as the large distance from D476. The results corroborate well with earlier site directed mutagenesis studies.

  3. Analytical method for fast screening and confirmation of multi-class veterinary drug residues in fish and shrimp by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kang, Wonjae; Choi, Yong Seok; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-01

    A multi-class, multi-residue analytical method based on LC-MS/MS detection was developed for the screening and confirmation of 28 veterinary drug and metabolite residues in flatfish, shrimp and eel. The chosen veterinary drugs are prohibited or unauthorised compounds in Korea, which were categorised into various chemical classes including nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, sulfones, quinolones, macrolides, phenothiazines, pyrethroids and others. To achieve fast and simultaneous extraction of various analytes, a simple and generic liquid extraction procedure using EDTA-ammonium acetate buffer and acetonitrile, without further clean-up steps, was applied to sample preparation. The final extracts were analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The method was validated for each compound in each matrix at three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 ng g(-1)) in accordance with Codex guidelines (CAC/GL 71-2009). For most compounds, the recoveries were in the range of 60-110%, and precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was in the range of 5-15%. The detection capabilities (CCβs) were below or equal to 5 ng g(-1), which indicates that the developed method is sufficient to detect illegal fishery products containing the target compounds above the residue limit (10 ng g(-1)) of the new regulatory system (Positive List System - PLS).

  4. Development and qualification of a high sensitivity, high throughput Q-PCR assay for quantitation of residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediate and drug substance samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Meng; Menesale, Emily; Lu, Tongjun; Magliola, Aeona; Bergelson, Svetlana

    2014-11-01

    Methods of high sensitivity, accuracy and throughput are needed for quantitation of low level residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediates and drug substances of therapeutic proteins. In this study, we designed primer/probe sets targeting repetitive Alu repeats or Alu-equivalent sequences in the human, Chinese hamster and murine genomes. When used in quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCRs), these primer/probe sets showed high species specificity and gave significantly higher sensitivity compared to those targeting the low copy number GAPDH gene. This allowed for detection of residual host cell DNA of much lower concentrations and, for some samples, eliminated the need for DNA extraction. By combining the high sensitivity Alu Q-PCR with high throughput automated DNA extraction using an automated MagMAX magnetic particle processor, we successfully developed and qualified a highly accurate, specific, sensitive and efficient method for the quantitation of residual host cell DNA in process intermediates and drug substances of multiple therapeutic proteins purified from cells of multiple species. Compared to the previous method using manual DNA extraction and primer/probe sets targeting the GAPDH gene, this new method increased our DNA extraction throughput by over sevenfold, and lowered the lower limit of quantitation by up to eightfold.

  5. Survey of residual tetracycline antibiotics and sulfa drugs in kidneys of diseased animals in the Aichi Prefecture, Japan (1995-1999).

    PubMed

    Oka, Hisao; Ito, Yuko; Goto, Tomomi; Minami, Tamae; Yamamoto, Isao; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Yoshihisa; Tsuruta, Masukiyo; Hayashi, Itsuki

    2003-01-01

    Animal kidneys were collected in order to survey the incidence of tetracycline (TC) antibiotics and sulfa (SA) drug residues in slaughtered animals that did not pass inspection for human consumption by the Japanese Food Sanitation Law and the Meat Inspection Law at the slaughterhouses in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, from April 1995 to March 2000. The kidneys were analyzed by AOAC Official Method 995.09 for TCs and our previously reported liquid chromatographic method for SAs. Among 292 animals (94 cattle and 198 pigs), 106 (36.6%) and 41 (14.0%) contained TCs and SAs, respectively, including chlortetracycline, 59 (20.2%); oxytetracycline, 47 (16.1%); sulfamonomethoxine, 35 (12.0%); sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethoxazole, each 2 (0.7%); and sulfamerazine and sulfisoxazole, each 1 (0.3%). A small number of animals (5 cattle and 9 pigs) contained more than one drug residue. The frequency of residue detections was significantly higher for TCs than SAs in both cattle and pig kidneys (p < 0.001).

  6. Vanadate trapping of nucleotide at the ATP-binding sites of human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein exposes different residues to the drug-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2002-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein uses ATP to transport a wide variety of structurally unrelated cytotoxic compounds out of the cell. In this study, we used cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and cross-linking studies to identify residues that are exposed to the drug-binding site upon vanadate trapping. In the absence of nucleotides, C222(TM4) was cross-linked to C868(TM10) and C872(TM10); C306(TM5) was cross-linked to C868(TM10), C872(TM10), C945(TM11), C982(TM12), and C984(TM12); and C339(TM6) was cross-linked to C868(TM10), C872(TM10), C942(TM11), C982(TM12), and C985(TM12). These cysteines are in the middle of the predicted transmembrane (TM) segments and form the drug-binding site. Cross-linking between 332C(TM6) and cysteines introduced at the extracellular side of other TM segments was also done. In the absence of nucleotides, residues 332C and 856C on the extracellular side of TMs 6 and 10, respectively, were cross-linked with a 13-Å cross-linker (M8M, 3,6-dioxaoctane-1,8-diyl bismethanethiosulfonate). ATP plus vanadate inhibited cross-linking between 332C(TM6) and 856C(TM10) as well as those in the drug-binding site. Instead, vanadate trapping promoted cross-linking between 332C(TM6) and 976C(TM12) with a 10-Å cross-linker (M6M, 1,6-hexanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate). When ATP hydrolysis was allowed to proceed, then 332C(TM12) could form a disulfide bond with 975C(TM12). The cross-linking pattern of 332C(TM6) with residues in TM10 and TM12 indicates that the drug-binding site undergoes dynamic and relatively large conformational changes, and that different residues are exposed to the drug-binding site during the resting phase, upon vanadate trapping and at the completion of the catalytic cycle. PMID:11891276

  7. Structural characterization of product ions by electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to support regulatory analysis of veterinary drug residues in foods Part 2: Benzimidazoles nitromidaz.....

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RATIONALE: Analysis for identification and quantification of regulated veterinary drug residues in foods are usually achieved by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The instrument method requires the selection of characteristic ions, but structure elucidation is seldom perform...

  8. Magnetic solid-phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for the determination of polyether antibiotics and s-triazine drug residues in animal food with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxing; Xie, Shuyu; Ni, Tengteng; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Xu; Pan, Yuanhu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Cheng, Guyue; Qu, Wei; Liu, Zhenli; Tao, Yanfei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-04-12

    Carbon nanotubes-magnetic nanoparticles, comprising ferroferric oxide nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, were prepared through a simple one-step synthesis method and subsequently applied to magnetic solid-phase extraction for the determination of polyether antibiotic and s-triazine drug residues in animal food coupled with liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The components within the nanocomposites endowed the material with high extraction performance and manipulative convenience. Compared with carbon nanotubes, the as-prepared carbon nanotubes-magnetic nanoparticles showed better extraction and separation efficiencies for polyether antibiotics and s-triazine drugs thanks to the contribution of the iron-containing magnetic nanoparticles. Various experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency had been investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the good linearity ranging from 1 to 200 μg/kg for diclazuril, toltrazuril, toltrazuril sulfone, lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, narasin, nanchangmycin and maduramicin, low limits of detection ranging from 1 to 5 μg/kg, and satisfactory spiked recoveries (77.1-91.2%, with the inter relative standard deviation values from 4.0 to 12.2%) were shown. It was confirmed that this novel method was an efficient pretreatment and enrichment procedure and could be successfully applied for extraction and determination of polyether and s-triazine drug residues in complex matrices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Per-residue energy decomposition pharmacophore model to enhance virtual screening in drug discovery: a study for identification of reverse transcriptase inhibitors as potential anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Cele, Favourite N; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Soliman, Mahmoud Es

    2016-01-01

    A novel virtual screening approach is implemented herein, which is a further improvement of our previously published "target-bound pharmacophore modeling approach". The generated pharmacophore library is based only on highly contributing amino acid residues, instead of arbitrary pharmacophores, which are most commonly used in the conventional approaches in literature. Highly contributing amino acid residues were distinguished based on free binding energy contributions obtained from calculation from molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. To the best of our knowledge; this is the first attempt in the literature using such an approach; previous approaches have relied on the docking score to generate energy-based pharmacophore models. However, docking scores are reportedly unreliable. Thus, we present a model for a per-residue energy decomposition, constructed from MD simulation ensembles generating a more trustworthy pharmacophore model, which can be applied in drug discovery workflow. This work is aimed at introducing a more rational approach to the field of drug design, rather than comparing the validity of this approach against those previously reported. We recommend additional computational and experimental work to further validate this approach. This approach was used to screen for potential reverse transcriptase inhibitors using the pharmacophoric features of compound GSK952. The complex was subjected to docking, thereafter, MD simulation confirmed the stability of the system. Experimentally determined inhibitors with known HIV-reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity were used to validate the protocol. Two potential hits (ZINC46849657 and ZINC54359621) showed a significant potential with regard to free binding energy. Reported results obtained from this work confirm that this new approach is favorable in the future of the drug design industry.

  10. Development, validation and different approaches for the measurement uncertainty of a multi-class veterinary drugs residues LC-MS method for feeds.

    PubMed

    Valese, Andressa Camargo; Molognoni, Luciano; de Souza, Naielly Coelho; de Sá Ploêncio, Leandro Antunes; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Barreto, Fabiano; Daguer, Heitor

    2017-05-15

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous residues analysis of 62 veterinary drugs in feeds by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry has been developed and validated in accordance to Commission Decision 657/2002/EC. Additionally, limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantitation (LOQ), matrix effects and measurement uncertainty were also assessed. Extraction was performed for all analytes and respective internal standards in a single step and chromatographic separation was achieved in only 12min. LOQ were set to 0.63-5.00μgkg(-1) (amphenicols), 0.63-30.00μgkg(-1) (avermectins), 0.63μgkg(-1) (benzimidazoles), 0.25-200.00μgkg(-1) (coccidiostats), 0.63-200.00μgkg(-1) (lincosamides and macrolides), 0.25-5.00μgkg(-1) (nitrofurans), 0.63-20.00μgkg(-1) (fluoroquinolones and quinolones), 15.00μgkg(-1) (quinoxaline), 0.63-7.50μgkg(-1) (sulfonamides), 0.63-20.00μgkg(-1) (tetracyclines), 0.25μgkg(-1) (β-agonists), and 30.00μgkg(-1) (β-lactams). The top-down approach was adequate for the calculation of measurement uncertainty for all analytes, except the banned substances, which should be rather assessed by the bottom-up approach. Routine analysis of different types of feeds was then carried out. An interesting profile of residues of veterinary drugs among samples was revealed, enlightening the need for stricter control in producing animals. Among the total of 27 feed samples, 20 analytes could be detected/quantified, ranging from trace levels to very high concentrations. A high throughput screening/confirmatory method for the residue analysis of several veterinary drugs in feeds was proposed as a helpful control tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Per-residue energy decomposition pharmacophore model to enhance virtual screening in drug discovery: a study for identification of reverse transcriptase inhibitors as potential anti-HIV agents

    PubMed Central

    Cele, Favourite N; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Soliman, Mahmoud ES

    2016-01-01

    A novel virtual screening approach is implemented herein, which is a further improvement of our previously published “target-bound pharmacophore modeling approach”. The generated pharmacophore library is based only on highly contributing amino acid residues, instead of arbitrary pharmacophores, which are most commonly used in the conventional approaches in literature. Highly contributing amino acid residues were distinguished based on free binding energy contributions obtained from calculation from molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. To the best of our knowledge; this is the first attempt in the literature using such an approach; previous approaches have relied on the docking score to generate energy-based pharmacophore models. However, docking scores are reportedly unreliable. Thus, we present a model for a per-residue energy decomposition, constructed from MD simulation ensembles generating a more trustworthy pharmacophore model, which can be applied in drug discovery workflow. This work is aimed at introducing a more rational approach to the field of drug design, rather than comparing the validity of this approach against those previously reported. We recommend additional computational and experimental work to further validate this approach. This approach was used to screen for potential reverse transcriptase inhibitors using the pharmacophoric features of compound GSK952. The complex was subjected to docking, thereafter, MD simulation confirmed the stability of the system. Experimentally determined inhibitors with known HIV-reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity were used to validate the protocol. Two potential hits (ZINC46849657 and ZINC54359621) showed a significant potential with regard to free binding energy. Reported results obtained from this work confirm that this new approach is favorable in the future of the drug design industry. PMID:27114700

  12. [Simultaneous determination of residual veterinary drugs in livestock products and fish by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kajita, Hiroko; Hatakeyama, Eriko

    2008-01-01

    A rapid multiresidue method was developed for determination of 98 veterinary drugs in livestock products and fish by LC/MS/MS. The drugs were extracted with methanol, and the extracted solution was diluted with water. The methanol concentration was adjusted to 50%, and finally the diluted solution was filtered through a microfiltration membrane (0.02 microm diameter pore size) prior to LC/MS/MS. Recoveries of 87 drugs from 4 foods (milk, egg, rainbow trout and cattle muscle) fortified at 0.2 microg/g were in the range of 50-150% with a coefficient of variation (%) of less than 20%. The values obtained by this method from livestock products containing antibiotics were similar to those obtained by the official methods. This proposed method is expected to be useful as a multiresidue analysis method for screening of veterinary drugs in livestock products and fish.

  13. Determination of small halogenated carboxylic acid residues in drug substances by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection following derivatization with nitro-substituted phenylhydrazines.

    PubMed

    Hou, Desheng; Fan, Jingjing; Han, Lingfei; Ruan, Xiaoling; Feng, Feng; Liu, Wenyuan; Zheng, Feng

    2016-03-18

    A method for the determination of small halogenated carboxylic acid (HCA) residues in drug substances is urgently needed because of the potential of HCAs for genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in humans. We have now developed a simple method, involving derivatization followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), for the determination of six likely residual HCAs (monochloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, 2-chloropropionic acid, 2-bromopropionic acid and 3-chloropropionic acid) in drug substances. Different nitro-substituted phenylhydrazines (NPHs) derivatization reagents were systematically compared and evaluated. 2-Nitrophenylhydrazine hydrochloride (2-NPH·HCl) was selected as the most suitable choice since its derivatives absorb strongly at 392 nm, a region of the spectrum where most drug substances and impurities absorb very weakly. During the derivatization process, the commonly used catalyst, pyridine, caused rapid dechlorination or chlorine substitution of α-halogenated derivatives. To avoid these unwanted side reactions, a reliable derivatization method that did not use pyridine was developed. Reaction with 2-NPH·HCl using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride as coupling agent in acetonitrile-water (70:30) at room temperature for 2h gave complete reaction and avoided degradation products. The derivatives were analyzed, without any pretreatment, using gradient HPLC with detection in the near visible region. Organic acids commonly found in drug substances and other impurities did not interfere with the analysis. Good linearity (r>0.999) and low limits of quantitation (0.05-0.12 μg mL(-1)) were obtained. The mean recoveries were in the range of 80-115% with RSD <5.81% except for 3-CPA in ibuprofen which was 78.5%. The intra- and inter-day precisions were expressed as RSD <1.98% and <4.39%, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used for the residue

  14. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for the determination of ten macrolide drugs residues in animal muscles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuqin; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Qingying; Zhang, Meiyu; Meng, Chenying; Li, Jiufeng; He, Limin

    2016-10-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of the residues of ten macrolide drugs in swine, cattle and chicken muscles samples. The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized using tylosin as a template and methacrylic acid as a functional monomer. Samples were extracted with sodium borate buffer solution and ethyl acetate, and purified by the MIP cartridge. The results showed that the cartridge exhibited good recognition performance for macrolides, and better purification effect than the traditional solid-phase extraction cartridges. Recoveries of analytes at three spiking levels 1, 5 and 20μgkg(-1) ranged from 60.7% to 100.3% with the relative standard deviations less than 14%. The limits of detection of the method were between 0.1 and 0.4μgkg(-1). The method is useful for the routine monitoring of the residues of macrolide drugs in animal muscles.

  15. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I.-Jung; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-02-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP’s RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus.

  16. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Klátyik, Szandra; Bohus, Péter; Darvas, Béla; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    Chemical substances applied in animal husbandry or veterinary medicine and in crop protection represent substantial environmental loads, and their residues occur in food and feed products. Product approval is governed differently in these two sectors in the European Union (EU), and the occurrence of veterinary drug (VD) and pesticide residues indicated by contamination notification cases in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed of the EU also show characteristic differences. While the initial high numbers of VD residues reported in 2002 were successfully suppressed to less than 100 cases annually by 2006 and on, the number of notification cases for pesticide residues showed a gradual increase from a low (approximately 50 cases annually) initial level until 2005 to more than 250 cases annually after 2009, with a halt occurring only in 2016. Main notifiers of VD residues include Germany, Belgium, the UK, and Italy (63, 59, 42, and 31 notifications announced, respectively), and main consigning countries of non-compliances are Vietnam, India, China, and Brazil (88, 50, 34, and 23 notifications, respectively). Thus, countries of South and Southeast Asia are considered a vulnerable point with regard to VD residues entering the EU market. Unintended side effects of VDs and plant protection products may be caused not only by the active ingredients but also by various additives in these preparations. Adjuvants (e.g., surfactants) and other co-formulants used in therapeutic agents and feed additives, as well as in pesticide formulations have long been considered as inactive ingredients in the aspects of the required main biological effect of the pharmaceutical or pesticide, and in turn, legal regulations of the approval and marketing of these additives specified significantly less stringent risk assessment requirements, than those specified for the active ingredients. However, numerous studies have shown additive, synergistic, or antagonistic side effects between the

  17. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Klátyik, Szandra; Bohus, Péter; Darvas, Béla; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    Chemical substances applied in animal husbandry or veterinary medicine and in crop protection represent substantial environmental loads, and their residues occur in food and feed products. Product approval is governed differently in these two sectors in the European Union (EU), and the occurrence of veterinary drug (VD) and pesticide residues indicated by contamination notification cases in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed of the EU also show characteristic differences. While the initial high numbers of VD residues reported in 2002 were successfully suppressed to less than 100 cases annually by 2006 and on, the number of notification cases for pesticide residues showed a gradual increase from a low (approximately 50 cases annually) initial level until 2005 to more than 250 cases annually after 2009, with a halt occurring only in 2016. Main notifiers of VD residues include Germany, Belgium, the UK, and Italy (63, 59, 42, and 31 notifications announced, respectively), and main consigning countries of non-compliances are Vietnam, India, China, and Brazil (88, 50, 34, and 23 notifications, respectively). Thus, countries of South and Southeast Asia are considered a vulnerable point with regard to VD residues entering the EU market. Unintended side effects of VDs and plant protection products may be caused not only by the active ingredients but also by various additives in these preparations. Adjuvants (e.g., surfactants) and other co-formulants used in therapeutic agents and feed additives, as well as in pesticide formulations have long been considered as inactive ingredients in the aspects of the required main biological effect of the pharmaceutical or pesticide, and in turn, legal regulations of the approval and marketing of these additives specified significantly less stringent risk assessment requirements, than those specified for the active ingredients. However, numerous studies have shown additive, synergistic, or antagonistic side effects between the

  18. 76 FR 16290 - Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs in Food; 2-Acetylamino-5-Nitrothiazole; Buquinolate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...; Prednisolone; Prednisone; Progesterone; Propylparaben; and Salicylic Acid AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...) and as Sec. 556.550 (40 FR 13802 at 13956). 12. Salicylic acid (Sec. 556.590). In 2005, FDA acknowledged the voluntary withdrawal of approval of salicylic acid for use in cattle under NADA 010-481...

  19. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of anticancer drug residues and their mixtures in experimental model with zebrafish liver cells.

    PubMed

    Novak, Matjaž; Žegura, Bojana; Modic, Barbara; Heath, Ester; Filipič, Metka

    2017-12-01

    Anticancer drugs enter aquatic environment predominantly via hospital and municipal wastewater effluents where they may, due to their genotoxic potential, cause adverse environmental effects even at very low doses. In this study we evaluated cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of two widely used anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) as individual compounds and in a complex mixture together with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) because these four drugs have been frequently detected in an oncological ward effluents. As an experimental model we used zebrafish liver cell (ZFL) line. The cytotoxicity was determined with the MTS assay and genotoxicity with the comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay that measure the formation of DNA strand breaks and genomic instability, respectively. CP and IF exerted low cytotoxicity towards ZFL cells. Both compounds induced DNA strand breaks and genomic instability, however at relatively high concentrations that are not relevant for the contamination of aquatic environment. The mixture of CP, IF, 5-FU and CDDP was tested at maximal detected concentrations of each drug as determined in the effluents from the oncological ward. The mixture was not cytotoxic and did not induce genomic instability, but it induced significant increase in the formation of DNA strand breaks at concentrations of individual compounds that were several orders of magnitude lower from those that were effective when tested as individual compounds. The results indicate that such mixtures of anticancer drugs may pose a threat to aquatic organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations and contribute to the accumulating evidence that it is not always possible to predict adverse effects of complex mixtures based on the toxicological data for individual compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural characterization of product ions by electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to support regulatory analysis of veterinary drug residues in foods.

    PubMed

    Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Nuñez, Alberto; Lehotay, Steven J; Lightfield, Alan R

    2014-05-30

    Monitoring of veterinary drug residues in foods is often conducted using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Results have high economic stakes for producers, but the ions monitored are usually selected due to signal intensities without structural interpretation. In this study, the ion transitions were characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The 62 veterinary drugs from the LC/MS/MS method consisted of sulfonamides, β-lactams, phenicols, macrolides, tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and corticosteroids. They were individually infused into a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer using electrospray ionization (ESI) operated in positive mode. The MS and collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS spectra for each analyte were obtained for structural elucidation. The Q-TOF instrument was calibrated to obtain a mass accuracy error <5 ppm for the MS and MS/MS spectra. The use of high-resolution ESI-Q-TOF-MS for the generation of the MS/MS product ions allowed for the determination of chemical formulae for the analytes, some of which led to new findings. Assigned structures were based on rational interpretation of the most stable possible products with comparison with the scientific literature. In difficult cases, isotopically labeled drugs or hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange experiments were used to help confirm the structures of the product ions. The use of ESI-Q-TOF-MS in this study has allowed structure elucidation of 186 MS/MS product ions previously selected for the LC/MS/MS analysis of 62 veterinary drugs. This serves to reduce the chances of false positives and negatives in the monitoring program, and provides justification and defense in regulatory enforcement actions. Published in 2014. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Validation of a streamlined multiclass, multiresidue method for determination of veterinary drug residues in bovine muscle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marilyn J; Lehotay, Steven J; Lightfield, Alan R

    2015-06-01

    Multiclass, multiresidue methods are becoming increasingly popular in regulatory monitoring programs due to their increased analytical scope and laboratory efficiency. In this work, we report the development and validation of a new high-throughput analytical method to monitor up to 131 veterinary drug residues, representing at least 13 different classes, in bovine muscle. This novel method streamlined sample preparation to <15 min/sample/analyst, or a batch of 40-60 pre-homogenized samples in <3 h/analyst, through the combination of dispersive solid-phase extraction with in-vial filtration (a new technique known as filter-vial d-SPE). The use of an enhanced sensitivity state-of-the-art tandem mass spectrometer led to <10 ng/g limits of quantification for nearly all drug analytes with injection of 0.17 mg of equivalent sample. Positive and negative switching in electrospray ionization was applied to cover all analytes in an 11-min liquid chromatographic separation. In the 3-day validation study, 100 of the drugs met quantification criteria of 70-120% recoveries and Horwitz Ratio ≤1.0, and the remaining analytes could still be screened at regulatory target levels. In the validation study involving >11,400 analyte results for spiked samples, the rate of false negatives for identification purposes was <5%, and no false positives occurred at appreciable concentrations.

  2. Safety analysis of occupational exposure of healthcare workers to residual contaminations of cytotoxic drugs using FMECA security approach.

    PubMed

    Le, Laetitia Minh Mai; Reitter, Delphine; He, Sophie; Bonle, Franck Té; Launois, Amélie; Martinez, Diane; Prognon, Patrice; Caudron, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Handling cytotoxic drugs is associated with chemical contamination of workplace surfaces. The potential mutagenic, teratogenic and oncogenic properties of those drugs create a risk of occupational exposure for healthcare workers, from reception of starting materials to the preparation and administration of cytotoxic therapies. The Security Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) was used as a proactive method to assess the risks involved in the chemotherapy compounding process. FMECA was carried out by a multidisciplinary team from 2011 to 2016. Potential failure modes of the process were identified based on the Risk Priority Number (RPN) that prioritizes corrective actions. Twenty-five potential failure modes were identified. Based on RPN results, the corrective actions plan was revised annually to reduce the risk of exposure and improve practices. Since 2011, 16 specific measures were implemented successively. In six years, a cumulative RPN reduction of 626 was observed, with a decrease from 912 to 286 (-69%) despite an increase of cytotoxic compounding activity of around 23.2%. In order to anticipate and prevent occupational exposure, FMECA is a valuable tool to identify, prioritize and eliminate potential failure modes for operators involved in the cytotoxic drug preparation process before the failures occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gold-plating of Mylar lift films to capitalize on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for chemical extraction of drug residues.

    PubMed

    Fox, James D; Waverka, Kristin N; Verbeck, Guido F

    2012-03-10

    The method of residue extraction through electrostatic lifting provides a distinctive mode of performing ultra-trace analysis. These lifts provide a medium for analyte extraction via nanomanipulation-coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry (NSI-MS). This method of extraction can be coupled to Raman spectroscopy for supplemental verification of analytes using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The gold surface used for SERS provides an enhanced effect on peak signal intensity allowing ultra-trace amounts to be detected more effectively. The aim of this research is to utilize gold-coated films with electrostatic lifting in order to collect latent materials and analyze chemicals of interest contained in them via SERS. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of bi-functionalized mesoporous silicas as reversed phase/cation-exchange mixed-mode sorbents for multi-residue solid phase extraction of veterinary drug residues in meat samples.

    PubMed

    Casado, Natalia; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Sierra, Isabel

    2017-04-01

    A SBA-15 type mesoporous silica was synthesized and bi-functionalized with octadecylsilane (C18) or octylsilane (C8), and sulfonic acid (SO3(-)) groups in order to obtain materials with reversed-phase/strong cation-exchange mixed-mode retention mechanism. The resulting hybrid materials (SBA-15-C18-SO3(-) and SBA-15-C8-SO3(-)) were comprehensively characterized. They showed high surface area, high pore volume and controlled porous size. Elemental analysis of the materials revealed differences in the amount of C18 and C8. SBA-15-C18-SO3(-) contained 0.19mmol/g of C18, while SBA-15-C8-SO3(-) presented 0.54mmol/g of C8. The SO3(-) groups anchored to the silica surface of the pore walls were 0.20 and 0.09mmol/g, respectively. The bi-functionalized materials were evaluated as SPE sorbents for the multi-residue extraction of 26 veterinary drug residues in meat samples using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector (UHPLC-MS/MS). Different sorbent amounts (100 and 200mg) and organic solvents were tested to optimize the extraction procedure. Both silicas showed big extraction potential and were successful in the extraction of the target analytes. The mixed-mode retention mechanism was confirmed by comparing both silicas with SBA-15 mesoporous silica mono-functionalized with C18 and C8. Best results were achieved with 200mg of SBA-15-C18-SO3(-) obtaining recoveries higher than 70% for the majority of analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Microtubule-damaging drugs triggered bcl2 phosphorylation-requirement of phosphorylation on both serine-70 and serine-87 residues of bcl2 protein.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Haldar, S

    1998-10-01

    Specifically anti-microtubule agents such as taxol, vincristine, vinblastine and dolastatin can trigger Bcl2 phosphorylation at G2-M phase of the cell cycle in malignant cells derived from a variety of human cancers. In this study, the status of Bcl2 phosphorylation was investigated in response to more antimicrotubule agents such as colchicine, colcemid or podophyllotoxin. Although these agents are not currently used for cancer therapy, they were able to trigger Bcl2 phosphorylation with simultaneous apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously, by using extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies we determined that mutation of serine-70 to alanine could not completely abrogate taxol induced Bcl2 phosphorylation. Studies reported here clearly indicate that serine-87 residue along with serine-70 of Bcl2 protein are necessary for microtubule damaging drug induced phosphorylation.

  6. Development of high-throughput multi-residue method for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs monitoring in swine muscle by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Castilhos, Tamara S; Barreto, Fabiano; Meneghini, Leonardo; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    A reliable and simple method for the detection and quantification of residues of 14 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a metamizole metabolite in swine muscle was developed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The samples were extracted with acetonitrile (ACN) in solid-liquid extraction followed by a low-temperature partitioning (LLE-LTP) process at -20 ± 2°C. After evaporation to dryness, the residue was reconstituted with hexane and a mixture of water:acetonitrile (1:1). LC separation was achieved on a reversed-phase (RP18) column with gradient elution using water (phase A) and ACN (phase B) both containing 1 mmol l(-)(1) ammonium acetate (NH4COO) with 0.025% acetic acid. Analysis was carried out on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode using an electrospray interface in negative and positive mode in a single run. Method validation was performed according to the criteria of Commission Decision No. 2002/657/EC. The matrix effect and linearity were evaluated. Decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), accuracy and repeatability of the method are also reported. The proposed method proved to be simple, easy and adequate for high-throughput analysis and was applied to routine analysis by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply.

  7. Multi-residue analysis of eight thioamphetamine designer drugs in human urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nieddu, Maria; Boatto, Gianpiero; Pirisi, Maria Antonietta; Baralla, Elena

    2009-10-01

    An analytical procedure for the simultaneous determination in human urine of several thioamphetamine designer drugs (2C-T and ALEPH series) is reported. The quantitative analysis was performed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and has been fully validated. The mass spectrometer was operated in positive-ion, selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. In order to minimize interferences with matrix components and to preconcentrate target analytes, solid-phase extraction was introduced in the method as a clean-up step. The entire method was validated for selectivity, linearity, precision and accuracy. The method turned out to be specific, sensitive, and reliable for the analysis of amphetamine derivatives in urine samples. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 1 to 100 ng mL(-1) for all drugs with correlation coefficients that exceeded 0.996. The lower limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) ranged from 1.2 to 4.9 ng mL(-1) and from 3.2 to 9.6 ng mL(-1), respectively.

  8. The gatekeeper residue and beyond: homologous calcium-dependent protein kinases as drug development targets for veterinarian Apicomplexa parasites.

    PubMed

    Keyloun, Katelyn R; Reid, Molly C; Choi, Ryan; Song, Yifan; Fox, Anna M W; Hillesland, Heidi K; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Vidadala, RamaSubbaRao; Merritt, Ethan A; Lau, Audrey O T; Maly, Dustin J; Fan, Erkang; Barrett, Lynn K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Ojo, Kayode K

    2014-09-01

    Specific roles of individual CDPKs vary, but in general they mediate essential biological functions necessary for parasite survival. A comparative analysis of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of Neospora caninum, Eimeria tenella and Babesia bovis calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) together with those of Plasmodium falciparum, Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii was performed by screening against 333 bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs). Structural modelling and experimental data revealed that residues other than the gatekeeper influence compound-protein interactions resulting in distinct sensitivity profiles. We subsequently defined potential amino-acid structural influences within the ATP-binding cavity for each orthologue necessary for consideration in the development of broad-spectrum apicomplexan CDPK inhibitors. Although the BKI library was developed for specific inhibition of glycine gatekeeper CDPKs combined with low inhibition of threonine gatekeeper human SRC kinase, some library compounds exhibit activity against serine- or threonine-containing CDPKs. Divergent BKI sensitivity of CDPK homologues could be explained on the basis of differences in the size and orientation of the hydrophobic pocket and specific variation at other amino-acid positions within the ATP-binding cavity. In particular, BbCDPK4 and PfCDPK1 are sensitive to a larger fraction of compounds than EtCDPK1 despite the presence of a threonine gatekeeper in all three CDPKs.

  9. Atomic modelling and systematic mutagenesis identify residues in multiple drug binding sites that are essential for drug resistance in the major Candida transporter Cdr1.

    PubMed

    Nim, Shweta; Lobato, Lucia Gonzalez; Moreno, Alexis; Chaptal, Vincent; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-11-01

    The ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporter Cdr1 (Candida drug resistance 1) protein (Cdr1p) of Candida albicans, shows promiscuity towards the substrate it exports and plays a major role in antifungal resistance. It has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) comprising of six transmembrane helices (TMH) that envisage and confer the substrate specificity and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), interconnected by extracellular loops (ECLs) and intracellular loops (ICLs) Cdr1p. This study explores the diverse substrate specificity spectrum to get a deeper insight into the structural and functional features of Cdr1p. By screening with the variety of compounds towards an in-house TMH 252 mutant library of Cdr1p, we establish new substrates of Cdr1p. The localization of substrate-susceptible mutants in an ABCG5/G8 homology model highlights the common and specific binding pockets inside the membrane domain, where rhodamines and tetrazoliums mainly engage the N-moiety of Cdr1p, binding between TMH 2, 11 and surrounded by TMH 1, 5. Whereas, tin chlorides involve both N and C moieties located at the interface of TMH 2, 11, 1 and 5. Further, screening of the in house TMH mutant library of Cdr1p displays the TMH12 interaction with tetrazolium chloride, trimethyltin chloride and a Ca(2+) ionophore, A23187. In silico localization reveals a binding site at the TMH 12, 9 and 10 interface, which is widely exposed to the lipid interface. Together, for the first time, our study shows the molecular localization of Cdr1p substrates-binding sites and demonstrates the participation of TMH12 in a peripheral drug binding site.

  10. Rapid analysis of animal drug residues by microcolumn solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption-ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-11-01

    A new approach was developed for the rapid and quantitative determination of an anthelmintic drug, phenothiazine, in milk. The technique involves a simple extraction procedure using a C{sub 18} microcolumn disc, followed by thermal desorption of the analyte from the disc directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer. The compounds are selectively ionized by isobutane chemical ionization and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. With this approach, 10 ppb detection limits were achieved with as little as 100 {mu}L mild and only 10 min of analysis time. This approach was used to analyze samples of milk taken from a cow administered a one-time therapeutic dose of phenothiazine. The target compound could be detected at 56 post-dosage, corresponding to a concentration of 30 ppb. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum Molecular Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance in a Residual Malaria Focus Area in Sabah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Abd Razak, Mohd Ridzuan; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Sastu, Umi Rubiah; Imwong, Mallika; Muniandy, Prem Kumar; Saat, Muhammad Nor Farhan; Muhammad, Amirrudin; Jelip, Jenarun; Tikuson, Moizin; Yusof, Norsalleh; Rundi, Christina; Mudin, Rose Nani; Syed Mohamed, Ami Fazlin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and fansidar (sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, SP) were widely used for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum for several decades in Malaysia prior to the introduction of Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) in 2008. Our previous study in Kalabakan, located in south-east coast of Sabah showed a high prevalence of resistance to CQ and SP, suggesting the use of the treatment may no longer be effective in the area. This study aimed to provide a baseline data of antimalarial drug resistant markers on P. falciparum isolates in Kota Marudu located in the north-east coast of Sabah. Mutations on genes associated with CQ (pfcrt and pfmdr1) and SP (pfdhps and pfdhfr) were assessed by PCR amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Mutations on the kelch13 marker (K13) associated with artemisinin resistance were determined by DNA sequencing technique. The assessment of pfmdr1 copy number variation associated with mefloquine resistant was done by real-time PCR technique. A low prevalence (6.9%) was indicated for both pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y mutations. All P. falciparum isolates harboured the pfdhps A437G mutation. Prevalence of pfdhfr gene mutations, S108N and I164L, were 100% and 10.3%, respectively. Combining the different resistant markers, only two isolates were conferred to have CQ and SP treatment failure markers as they contained mutant alleles of pfcrt and pfmdr1 together with quintuple pfdhps/pfdhfr mutation (combination of pfdhps A437G+A581G and pfdhfr C59R+S108N+I164L). All P. falciparum isolates carried single copy number of pfmdr1 and wild type K13 marker. This study has demonstrated a low prevalence of CQ and SP resistance alleles in the study area. Continuous monitoring of antimalarial drug efficacy is warranted and the findings provide information for policy makers in ensuring a proper malaria control. PMID:27788228

  12. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum Molecular Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance in a Residual Malaria Focus Area in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norahmad, Nor Azrina; Mohd Abd Razak, Mohd Ridzuan; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Sastu, Umi Rubiah; Imwong, Mallika; Muniandy, Prem Kumar; Saat, Muhammad Nor Farhan; Muhammad, Amirrudin; Jelip, Jenarun; Tikuson, Moizin; Yusof, Norsalleh; Rundi, Christina; Mudin, Rose Nani; Syed Mohamed, Ami Fazlin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and fansidar (sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, SP) were widely used for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum for several decades in Malaysia prior to the introduction of Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) in 2008. Our previous study in Kalabakan, located in south-east coast of Sabah showed a high prevalence of resistance to CQ and SP, suggesting the use of the treatment may no longer be effective in the area. This study aimed to provide a baseline data of antimalarial drug resistant markers on P. falciparum isolates in Kota Marudu located in the north-east coast of Sabah. Mutations on genes associated with CQ (pfcrt and pfmdr1) and SP (pfdhps and pfdhfr) were assessed by PCR amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Mutations on the kelch13 marker (K13) associated with artemisinin resistance were determined by DNA sequencing technique. The assessment of pfmdr1 copy number variation associated with mefloquine resistant was done by real-time PCR technique. A low prevalence (6.9%) was indicated for both pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y mutations. All P. falciparum isolates harboured the pfdhps A437G mutation. Prevalence of pfdhfr gene mutations, S108N and I164L, were 100% and 10.3%, respectively. Combining the different resistant markers, only two isolates were conferred to have CQ and SP treatment failure markers as they contained mutant alleles of pfcrt and pfmdr1 together with quintuple pfdhps/pfdhfr mutation (combination of pfdhps A437G+A581G and pfdhfr C59R+S108N+I164L). All P. falciparum isolates carried single copy number of pfmdr1 and wild type K13 marker. This study has demonstrated a low prevalence of CQ and SP resistance alleles in the study area. Continuous monitoring of antimalarial drug efficacy is warranted and the findings provide information for policy makers in ensuring a proper malaria control.

  13. High-throughput screening of pesticide and veterinary drug residues in baby food by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Chu, Xiaogang; Ling, Yun; Huang, Junrong; Chang, James

    2014-06-20

    A new analytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous analysis of 333 pesticide and veterinary drug residues in baby food. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize a generic extraction method. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI Q-Orbitrap) was used for the separation and detection of all the analytes. The method was validated by taking into consideration the guidelines specified in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and SANCO/12571/2013. The extraction recoveries were in a range of 79.8-110.7%, with coefficient of variation <8.3%. The 333 compounds behave dynamic in the range 0.1-1000μgkg(-1) concentration, with correlation coefficient >0.99. The limits of detection for the analytes are in the range 0.01-5.35μgkg(-1). The limits of quantification for the analytes are in the range 0.01-9.27μgkg(-1). This method has been successfully applied on screening of pesticide and veterinary drugs in ninety-three commercial baby food samples, and tilmicosin, fenbendazole, tylosin tartrate and thiabendazole were detected in some samples tested in this study. The present study is very useful for fast screening of different food contaminants.

  14. Dietary intake estimates as a means to the harmonization of maximum residue levels for veterinary drugs. II. Proposed application to the Free Trade Agreement between the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, S C; Vilim, A; Lambert, G; Yong, M S; Brynes, S D

    1996-10-01

    The Free Trade Agreement between the United States and Canada (FTA) went into effect January 1, 1989. To implement certain provisions of the agreement on technical regulations and standards, the United States Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, Health and Welfare Canada's Bureau of Veterinary Drugs, and Agriculture Canada established the Working Group on Veterinary Drug Tolerances. The progress of the working group and its continuing efforts to harmonize tolerances for approximately 15 veterinary drugs are discussed. This paper proposes use of the toxicologically determined acceptable daily intake (ADI) for the drug as the safety standard for reaching conclusions on the acceptability of residues in meat for human consumption. Specifically, the "equivalence" of different MRLs for the same veterinary drug would be determined by considering whether they are likely to result in dietary residues that exceed the other country's ADI for the drug. Estimates are made for the veterinary drugs lasalocid, fenbendazole, morantel tartrate, halofuginone, and tilmicosin. Based on these estimates, the U.S. and Canadian MRLs for each drug would be considered equivalent for trade purposes.

  15. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  16. Simultaneous detection of antibiotics and other drug residues in the dissolved and particulate phases of water by an off-line SPE combined with on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS: Method development and application.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Ines; Caria, Giovanni; Ouddane, Baghdad; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Ternane, Riadh; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Net, Sopheak

    2016-09-01

    Due to their widespread use in human and animal healthcare, antibiotics and other drug residues are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Given their potential impacts on ecosystem functioning and public health, the quantification of environmental drug residues has become a necessity. Various analysis techniques have been found to be suitable for reliable detection of such compounds. However, quantification can be difficult because these compounds are present at trace or ultra-trace levels. Consequently, the accuracy of environmental analyses depends on both the efficiency and the robustness of the extraction and quantification method. In this work, an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS was applied to the simultaneous extraction and quantification of 26 pharmaceutical products, including 18 antibiotics, dissolved in a water phase. Optimal conditions were determined and then applied to assess the contamination level of the targeted drug residues in water collected from four sites in Northern France: a river, the input and output of an aerated lagoon, and a wastewater treatment plant. Drug residues associated with suspended solid matter (SSM) were also quantified in this work using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) combined with an on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS system in order to complete an assessment of the degree of total background pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-residue analysis of drugs of abuse in wastewater and surface water by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baker, David R; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2011-03-25

    A new-multi residue method was developed for the environmental monitoring of 65 stimulants, opiod and morphine derivatives, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, dissociative anaesthetics, drug precursors, human urine indicators and their metabolites in wastewater and surface water. The proposed analytical methodology offers rapid analysis for a large number of compounds, with low limits of quantification and utilises only one solid-phase extraction-ultra performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) method, thus overcoming the drawbacks of previously published procedures. The method employed solid phase extraction with the usage of Oasis MCX sorbent and subsequent ultra performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry. The usage of a 1.7 μm particle size column (1 mm×150 mm) resulted in very low flow rates (0.04 mLmin(-1)), and as a consequence gave good sensitivity, low mobile phase consumption and short retention times for all compounds (from 2.9 to 23.1 min). High SPE recoveries (>60%) were obtained for the majority of compounds. The mean correlation coefficients of the calibration curves were typically higher than 0.997 and showed good linearity in the range 0-1000 μgL(-1). The method limits of detection ranged from 0.1 ngL(-1) for compounds including cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norbenzoylecgonine and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD to 100 ngL(-1) for caffeine. Method quantification limits ranged from 0.5 to 154.2 ngL(-1). Intra- and inter-day repeatabilities were on average less than 10%. The method accuracy range was within -33.1 to 30.1%. The new multi-residue method was used to analyse drugs of abuse in wastewater and river water in the UK environment. Of the targeted 65 compounds, 46 analytes were detected at levels above the method quantification limit (MQL) in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent, 43 in WWTP effluent and 36 compounds in river water. Copyright

  18. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (<1000 Daltons) fluorescent substrates, its ability to transport large (>1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Investigation on the mechanism for the binding and drug resistance of wild type and mutations of G86 residue in HIV-1 protease complexed with Darunavir by molecular dynamic simulation and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Run-Ning; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Residue Gly86 is considered as the highly conversed residue in the HIV-1 protease. In our work, the detailed binding free energies for the wild-type (WT) and mutated proteases binding to the TMC-114 are estimated to investigate the protein-inhibitor binding and drug resistance mechanism by molecule dynamic simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The binding affinities between the mutants and inhibitor are different than that in the wild-type complex and the major resistance to Darunavir (DRV) of G86A and G86S originate from the electrostatic energy and entropy, respectively. Furthermore, free energy decomposition analysis for the WT and mutated complexes on the basis of per-residue indicates that the mutagenesis influences the energy contribution of the residue located at three regions: active site region (residue 24-32), the flap region, and the region around the mutated residue G86 (residue 79-88), especially the flap region. Finally, further hydrogen bonds and structure analysis are carried out to detect the relationship between the energy and conformation. In all, the G86 mutations change the flap region's conformation. The experimental results are in good agreement with available results.

  20. Development of a simple multi-residue determination method of 80 veterinary drugs in Oplegnathus punctatus by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Gao, Xin; Tang, Zhixu; Luo, Xin; Wu, Miaomiao; Xu, Jiachao; Fu, Xiaoting

    2017-09-18

    A simple, rapid and sensitive multi-residue analytical method was developed and validated for 80 veterinary drugs in Oplegnathus punctatus using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The analytes belong to 12 different families include benzimidazoles, β-lactams, lincosamides, macrolides, nitromidazoles, quinolones, sulfonamides and trimethoprim, tetracyclines, triphenylmethane dyes, amphenicols, nonsteroidal estrogens and steroid hormones. The sample preparation was optimized base on QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) procedure. A very simple and sufficient preparation procedure without salting-out and complex clean-up process was studied. It had been proved that water in the extract was helpful for extracting hydrophilic compounds and precipitating the lipids during the subsequent cleaning process. In addition, an appropriate percent of methanol was necessary to some analytes. Finally, a mixture of acetonitrile, methanol and water (3:1:1, v/v/v) which include 1% acetic acid and 10mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt 2-hydrate was selected as the extraction solvent, and the clean-up step consisted of a low temperature procedure and two times of high-speed centrifugation to deproteinize and remove lipids. The detection and quantification of all compounds were performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry in positive and negative ion mode. This methodology was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and SANTE/11945/2015. The recoveries ranged from 60.74%-109.85% with relative standard deviations (RSDs)<20%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.25-25ug/kg, for the analytes which the MRL or MRPL had been established in fish tissue, the LOQs were all lower than their own legal tolerances. The values of decision limit (CCα) and detection capability

  1. Hybrid Receptor-Bound/MM-GBSA-Per-residue Energy-Based Pharmacophore Modelling: Enhanced Approach for Identification of Selective LTA4H Inhibitors as Potential Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Appiah-Kubi, Patrick; Soliman, Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase has been identified as an enzyme with dual anti- and pro-inflammatory role, thus, the conversion of leukotriene to leukotriene B4 in the initiation stage of inflammation and the removal of the chemotactic Pro-Gly-Pro tripeptide. These findings make leukotriene A4 hydrolase an attractive drug target: suggesting an innovative approach towards the identification and design of novel class of compounds that can selectively inhibit leukotriene B4 synthesis while sparing the aminopeptidase activity. Previous inhibitors block the dual activity of the enzyme. Recently, a small lead molecule inhibitor denoted as ARM1 has been identified to block the hydrolase activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase whilst sparing the aminopeptidase activity. In this study, a hybrid receptor-bound/MM-GBSA-per-residue energy based pharmacophore modeling approach was implemented to identify potential selective hydrolase inhibitors of leukotriene A4 hydrolase. In this approach, active site residues that favorably contributed to the binding of the bound conformation of ARM1 were derived from MD ensembles and MM/GBSA thermodynamic calculations. These residues were then mapped to key pharmacophore features of ARM1. The generated pharmacophore model was used to search the ZINC database for 3D structures that match the pharmacophore. Five new compounds have been identified and proposed as potential epoxide hydrolase selective inhibitors of leukotriene A4 hydrolase. Molecular docking and MM/GBSA analyses revealed that, these top five lead-like compounds ZINC00142747, ZINC94260794, ZINC01382396, ZINC02508448, and ZINC53994447 showed better binding affinities to the hydrolase active site pocket compared to ARM1. Per-residue energy decomposition analysis revealed that amino acid residues Phe314, Tyr378, Pro382, Trp311, Val367, and Ala377 are key residues critical in the selective inhibition of these hits. Information highlighted in this study may guide the the design the next

  2. Residual Cap

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-10

    This MOC image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions

  3. Development and validation of a multiclass method for the quantification of veterinary drug residues in honey and royal jelly by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Zhang, Jinzhen; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Jinhui; Li, Yi

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to develop an analytical method for the analysis of a wide range of veterinary drugs in honey and royal jelly. A modified sample preparation procedure based on the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) method was developed, followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination. Use of the single sample preparation method for analysis of 42 veterinary drugs becomes more valuable because honey and royal jelly belong to completely different complex matrices. Another main advantage of the proposed method is its ability to identify and quantify 42 veterinary drugs with higher sensitivity than reference methods of China. This work has shown that the reported method was demonstrated to be convenient and reliable for the quick monitoring of veterinary drugs in honey and royal jelly samples.

  4. Multi-residue analysis of pesticides, plant hormones, veterinary drugs and mycotoxins using HILIC chromatography - MS/MS in various food matrices.

    PubMed

    Danezis, G P; Anagnostopoulos, C J; Liapis, K; Koupparis, M A

    2016-10-26

    One of the recent trends in Analytical Chemistry is the development of economic, quick and easy hyphenated methods to be used in a field that includes analytes of different classes and physicochemical properties. In this work a multi-residue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 28 xenobiotics (polar and hydrophilic) using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography technique (HILIC) coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology. The scope of the method includes plant growth regulators (chlormequat, daminozide, diquat, maleic hydrazide, mepiquat, paraquat), pesticides (cyromazine, the metabolite of the fungicide propineb PTU (propylenethiourea), amitrole), various multiclass antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides quinolones, kasugamycin and mycotoxins (aflatoxin B1, B2, fumonisin B1 and ochratoxin A). Isolation of the analytes from the matrix was achieved with a fast and effective technique. The validation of the multi-residue method was performed at the levels: 10 μg/kg and 100 μg/kg in the following representative substrates: fruits-vegetables (apples, apricots, lettuce and onions), cereals and pulses (flour and chickpeas), animal products (milk and meat) and cereal based baby foods. The method was validated taking into consideration EU guidelines and showed acceptable linearity (r ≥ 0.99), accuracy with recoveries between 70 and 120% and precision with RSD ≤ 20% for the majority of the analytes studied. For the analytes that presented accuracy and precision values outside the acceptable limits the method still is able to serve as a semi-quantitative method. The matrix effect, the limits of detection and quantification were also estimated and compared with the current EU MRLs (Maximum Residue Levels) and FAO/WHO MLs (Maximum Levels) or CXLs (Codex Maximum Residue Limits). The combined and expanded uncertainty of the method for each analyte per substrate, was also estimated.

  5. Chitosan from shrimp shells: A renewable sorbent applied to the clean-up step of the QuEChERS method in order to determine multi-residues of veterinary drugs in different types of milk.

    PubMed

    Arias, Jean Lucas de Oliveira; Schneider, Antunielle; Batista-Andrade, Jahir Antonio; Vieira, Augusto Alves; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2018-02-01

    Clean extracts are essential in LC-MS/MS, since the matrix effect can interfere in the analysis. Alternative materials which can be used as sorbents, such as chitosan in the clean-up step, are cheap and green options. In this study, chitosan from shrimp shell waste was evaluated as a sorbent in the QuEChERS method in order to determine multi-residues of veterinary drugs in different types of milk, i. e., fatty matrices. After optimization, the method showed correlation coefficients above 0.99, LOQs ranged between 1 and 50μgkg(-1) and recoveries ranged between 62 and 125%, with RSD<20% for all veterinary drugs in all types of milk under study. The clean-up step which employed chitosan proved to be effective, since it reduced both the matrix effect (from values between -40 and -10% to values from -10 to +10%) and the extract turbidity (up to 95%). When the proposed method was applied to different milk samples, residues of albendazole (49μgkg(-1)), sulfamethazine (

  6. Application of a hybrid ordered mesoporous silica as sorbent for solid-phase multi-residue extraction of veterinary drugs in meat by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casado, Natalia; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-08-12

    A quick, sensitive and selective analytical reversed-phase multi-residue method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ion-trap mass spectrometry detector (UHPLC-IT-MS/MS) operating in both positive and negative ion mode was developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 veterinary drug residues (β-blockers, β-agonists and Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)) in meat samples. The sample treatment involved a liquid-solid extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. SBA-15 type mesoporous silica was synthetized and modified with octadecylsilane, and the resulting hybrid material (denoted as SBA-15-C18) was applied and evaluated as SPE sorbent in the purification of samples. The materials were comprehensively characterized, and they showed a high surface area, high pore volume and a homogeneous distribution of the pores. Chromatographic conditions and extraction procedure were optimized, and the method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method detection limits (MDLs) and the method quantification limits (MQLs) were determined for all the analytes in meat samples and found to range between 0.01-18.75μg/kg and 0.02-62.50μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries for 15 of the target analytes ranged from 71 to 98%. In addition, for comparative purpose SBA-15-C18 was evaluated towards commercial C18 amorphous silica. Results revealed that SBA-15-C18 was clearly more successful in the multi-residue extraction of the 23 mentioned analytes with higher recovery values. The method was successfully tested to analyze prepacked preparations of mince bovine meat. Traces of propranolol, ketoprofen and diclofenac were detected in some samples.

  7. Drug residues store in the body following cessation of use: impacts on neuroendocrine balance and behavior--use of the Hubbard sauna regimen to remove toxins and restore health.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marie; LoPresti, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    For decades, scientists have investigated the environmental and human health effects of synthetic chemicals. A growing body of research has illuminated the spectrum of consequences deriving from our reliance these substances and their proliferation in air, water, soil and the food chain. Of particular concern is the fact that residues of many man-made chemicals are now detectible in virtually every person. A key to a chemical's tendency to persist in tissues once it has entered the body is its lipophilicity. Substances that are poorly soluble in water and quite soluble in fat have relatively free access, via lipid-rich cellular membranes, to the cells of all organs including the ability to cross the blood-brain and placental barriers. Substantial data exist demonstrating that in addition to pollutants, drugs and their metabolites dispose to tissues high in fat content, including brain and adipose. While their characteristic lipophilicity permits drugs and medications to reach target tissues, thereby producing therapeutic effects in the present, current perceptions of risk may be ignoring the possibility that adipose accumulations of illicit drugs and pharmaceuticals may lead to future patterns of ill health similar to those associated with exposure to other categories of xenobiotic chemicals. Empirical data are beginning to characterize the myriad regulatory functions of adipose hormones, including roles in cravings, cognitive function, energy level, and inflammation as well as changes in adipose hormone levels associated with drug use. Included in this data are the observation that a rehabilitative treatment intervention introduced by L. Ron Hubbard in 1978 to aid in the broad elimination of chemicals from body stores improves symptoms common to both chemical exposure and drug addiction. The regimen, which includes exercise, sauna bathing, and vitamin and mineral supplementation, is utilized by nearly 70 drug rehabilitation and medical practices in over 20

  8. A long hangover from party drugs: residual proteomic changes in the hippocampus of rats 8 weeks after γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or their combination.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; Kashem, Mohammed A; Matsumoto, Izuru; Hunt, Glenn E; McGregor, Iain S

    2010-07-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) are popular party drugs that are used for their euphoric and prosocial effects, and sometimes in combination. Both drugs increase markers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus and can cause lasting impairments in hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. To gain further information on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these effects, the current study examined residual changes in hippocampal protein expression measured 8 weeks after chronic administration of GHB (500mg/kg), MDMA (5mg/kg) or their combination (GHB/MDMA). The drugs were administered once a day for 10 days in an environment with an elevated ambient temperature of 28 degrees C. Results showed significant changes in protein expression, relative to controls, in all three groups: MDMA and GHB given alone caused residual changes in 8 and 5 proteins respectively, while the GHB/MDMA combination significantly changed 6 proteins. The altered proteins had roles in neuroplasticity, neuroprotection, intracellular signalling and cytoskeletal function. The largest change (-4.3-fold) was seen in the MDMA group with the protein C-crk: a protein implicated in learning-related neuroplasticity. The second largest change (3.0-fold) was seen in the GHB group in Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), a protein that protects against oxidative stress. Two cytoskeletal proteins (Tubulin Folding Cofactor B and Tropomyosin-alpha-3 chain) and one plasticity related protein (Neuronal Pentraxin-1 NP1) were similarly changed in both the MDMA and the GHB groups, while two intracellular signalling proteins (alpha-soluble NSF-attachment protein and subunits of the V-type proton ATPase) were changed in both the MDMA/GHB and the MDMA groups. These results provide some insight into the molecular pathways possibly underlying the lasting cognitive deficits arising from GHB and/or MDMA use.

  9. Determination of Residual Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Aqueous Sample Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Khoeini Sharifabadi, Malihe; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Waqif Husain, Syed; Mehdinia, Ali; Aberoomand-Azar, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    A simple and sensitive solid-phase extraction method for separation and preconcentration of trace amount of four nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (naproxen, indomethacin, diclofenac, and ibuprofen) using Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide has been developed. For this purpose, the surface of MNPs was modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant. Effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of drugs including the pH, amount of salt, shaking time, eluent type, the volume of solvent, amount of adsorbent, sample volume, and the time of desorption were investigated and optimized. Methanol has been used as desorption solvent and the extracts were analysed on a reversed-phase octadecyl silica column using 0.02 M phosphate-buffer (pH = 6.02) acetonitrile (65 : 35 v/v) as the mobile phase and the effluents were measured at 202 nm with ultraviolet detector. The relative standard deviation (RSD%) of the method was investigated at three concentrations (25, 50, and 200 ng/mL) and was in the range of 3.98–9.83% (n = 6) for 50 ng/mL. The calibration curves obtained for studied drugs show reasonable linearity (R2 > 0.99) and the limit of detection (LODs) ranged between 2 and 7 ng/mL. Finally, the proposed method has been effectively employed in extraction and determination of the drugs in biological and environmental samples. PMID:24982923

  10. Distribution of Penicillin G Residues in Culled Dairy Cow Muscles: Implications for Residue Monitoring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sets tolerances for veterinary drug residues in muscle, but does not specify which type of muscle should be analyzed. In order to determine if antibiotic residue levels are dependent on muscle type, 7 culled dairy cows were dosed with Penicillin G (Pen G) from ...

  11. Validation and uncertainties evaluation of an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS for the quantification of drug residues in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Brieudes, V; Lardy-Fontan, S; Lalere, B; Vaslin-Reimann, S; Budzinski, H

    2016-01-01

    The present work describes the development and validation of a reference method conducted at the French National Institute of Metrology (LNE) for the quantitative determination of psychoactive compounds in the dissolved fraction of surface waters. More specifically an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS based method has been implemented for the characterization of a broad range of analytes belonging to different classes of psychotropic drugs such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants, stimulants, opiates and opioids, anticonvulsants, anti-dementia drugs, analgesics as well as the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in the low ng L(-1) range of concentration. Full validation of the method was performed following procedures described by the French standard NF T90-210. Limits of quantification between 0.14 and 3.54 ng L(-1) were obtained. Method recoveries from 71 to 123% were observed with standard deviation below 10% in intermediate precision conditions. Accuracy was determined for every compound: measurement errors were between -4 and +1% and standard deviations in intermediate precision conditions were included within a 1-9% interval. Finally, measurement uncertainties were evaluated following the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). Expanded uncertainties (k=2) ranged from 2% for carbamazepine, EDDP (2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine) and venlafaxine to 17% for diazepam. The validated method was implemented to Seine river surface waters demonstrating its fitness for purpose. All compounds were detected and 22 out of 25 analytes were quantified. More specifically, measured concentration ranged from 0.39 ng L(-1) for MDMA (3,4-methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine) to 182 ng L(-1) for gabapentine.

  12. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  13. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in Candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca2+ did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport. PMID:26220356

  14. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca(2+) did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

  15. Wide-scope analysis of pesticide and veterinary drug residues in meat matrices by high resolution MS: detection and identification using Exactive-Orbitrap.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Romero-González, Roberto; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Génin, Eric; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    A multiresidue and multiclass method for the simultaneous determination of more than 350 compounds including pesticides, biopesticides and veterinary drugs in different meat matrices (beef, pork and chicken) by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap MS has been developed. In the present study, the determination of fragments was accomplished as an essential tool for a reliable identification of compounds using high resolution MS. To obtain these fragments, different strategies have been carried out in order to ensure an appropriate fragment assignment and identification. The analytical method is suitable for qualitative analysis, and it was also evaluated for quantitative analysis. Generic extraction conditions were optimized, obtaining adequate recovery and precision values for most of the studied analytes (>290). The limits of detection ranged from 2 to 16 µg kg(-1). Limits of quantification were 10 µg kg(-1) with the exception of few compounds with a higher value (50 or 100 µg kg(-1)). Limits of identification were also established, and they ranged from 2 to 150 µg kg(-1). This method was applied to the analysis of 18 meat samples and some veterinary drugs as enrofloxacin and sulfadiazine were detected and further identified/quantified (with triple quadrupole) in two different samples at 33 µg kg(-1) and trace levels, respectively. No pesticides were detected in the analyzed samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  17. Multi-residue screening of veterinary drugs in egg, fish and meat using high-resolution liquid chromatography accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peters, R J B; Bolck, Y J C; Rutgers, P; Stolker, A A M; Nielen, M W F

    2009-11-13

    The last 2 years multi-compound methods are gaining ground as screening methods. In this study a high-resolution liquid chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HRLC-ToF-MS) is tested for the screening of about 100 veterinary drugs in three matrices, meat, fish and egg. While the results are satisfactory for 70-90% of the veterinary drugs, a more efficient sample preparation or extract purification is required for quantitative analysis of all analytes in more difficult matrices like egg. The average mass measurement error of the ToF-MS for the veterinary drugs spiked at concentrations ranging from 4 to 400 microg/kg, is 3.0 ppm (median 2.5 ppm) with little difference between the three matrices, but slightly decreases with increasing concentration. The SigmaFit value, a new feature for isotope pattern matching, also decreases with increasing concentration and, in addition, shows an increase with increasing matrix complexity. While the average SigmaFit value is 0.04, the median is 0.01 indicating some high individual deviations. As with the mass measurement error, the highest deviations are found in those regions of the chromatogram where most compounds elute from the column, be it analytes or matrix compounds. The median repeatability of the method ranges from 8% to 15%, decreasing with increasing concentration, while the median reproducibility ranges from 15% to 20% with little difference between matrices and concentrations. The median accuracy is in between 70% and 100% with a few compounds showing higher values due to matrix interference. The squared regression coefficient is >0.99 for 92% of the compounds showing a good overall linearity for most compounds. The detection capability, CCbeta, is within 2 times the associated validation level for >90% of the compounds studied. By changing a few conditions in the analyses protocol and analysing a number of blank samples, it was determined that the method is robust as well as specific. Finally

  18. Rapid determination of 88 veterinary drug residues in milk using automated TurborFlow online clean-up mode coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-xia; Yang, Ji-zhou; Wang, Zhao-xing; Wang, Cai-juan; Liu, Ya-feng; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    A novel method based on TurborFlow online solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been established for simultaneous screening and confirmation of 88 wide-range veterinary drugs belonging to eight families (20 sulfonamides, 7 macrolides, 15 quinolones, 8 penicillins, 13 benzimidazoles, 4 tetracyclines, 2 sedatives, and 19 hormones) in milk. The preparation method consists of sample dilution and ultrasonic extraction, followed by an automated turbulent flow cyclone chromatography sample clean-up system. The detection was achieved in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM). The total run time was within 39 min, including automated extraction, analytical chromatography and re-equilibration of the turboflow system. The optimization of different experimental parameters including extraction, purification, separation, and detection were evaluated separately in this study. The developed method was validated and good performing characteristics were obtained. The linear regression coefficients (R(2)) of matrix-match calibration standard curves established for quantification were higher than 0.9930. The limits of detection (LOD) were in the range of 0.2-2.0 μg/kg given by signal-noise ratio ≥3 (S/N) and the limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N≥10) ranged between 0.5 μg/kg and 10 μg/kg. Average recoveries of spiked target compounds with different levels were between 63.1% and 117.4%, with percentage relative standard deviations (RSD) in the range of 3.3-17.6%. The results indicated that the developed method has great potential for the routine laboratory analysis of large numbers of samples on measuring different classes of compounds. In comparison to traditional procedures, the automated sample clean-up ensures rapid, effective, sensitive analyses of veterinary drugs in milk.

  19. Multi-residue quantification of veterinary drugs in milk with a novel extraction and cleanup technique: salting out supported liquid extraction (SOSLE).

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2014-04-11

    A quantitative liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of more than one hundred compounds belonging to a variety of veterinary drug classes in bovine milk. Salting out supported liquid extraction (SOSLE), a novel extraction and cleanup technique, was introduced to ensure high extraction efficiency and good sample cleanup. The high salt (ammonium sulfate) concentration in the aqueous donor phase permits supported liquid/liquid extraction (SLE) with a relative polar organic acceptor phase (acetonitrile). This is different from traditional SLE, in which the need for phase separation results in the selection of organic solvents with intermediate polarities (e.g., ethyl acetate or dichloromethane). Hence, SOSLE is more efficient in recovering polar analytes than conventional SLE. SOSLE was also compared to classical approaches like solid phase extraction, QuEChERS and ultra-filtration. The proposed technique resulted in extracts of equal or superior cleanliness and with higher average recoveries than those obtained with QuEChERS or SPE. The recovery (median for all compounds) was 73% for QuEChERS, 83% for SPE and 91% for SOSLE. The most significant improvements were observed for polar analytes (penicillines, quinolones and tetracyclines) which are hardly recovered by QuEChERS. The chromatographic separation and detection was based on an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography Q-Orbitrap system (Q-Exactive plus). The developed analytical method has been validated (based on the commission decision 2002/957/EC) as required for quantitative veterinary drug methods.

  20. Simultaneous multi-residue determination of twenty one veterinary drugs in poultry litter by modeling three-way liquid chromatography with fluorescence and absorption detection data.

    PubMed

    Teglia, Carla M; Peltzer, Paola M; Seib, Silvia N; Lajmanovich, Rafael C; Culzoni, María J; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2017-05-15

    A method for the simultaneous investigation of twenty one veterinary active ingredients in poultry litter based on MCR-ALS modeling of three-way liquid chromatography with fluorescence and UV detection data is presented. The chromatographic procedure was optimized in terms of both the nature of the organic solvent and the pH of the mobile phase to maximize the resolution of the analytes. In order to improve the simultaneous extraction efficiency of the twenty one veterinary drugs, a simplex-centroid design with combinations of the three components of the extracting mixture, i.e. MeOH, ACN and sodium phosphate buffer 10mmolL(-1) pH =3.50, was carried out. The second-order advantage was exploited in the analysis of highly complex samples containing unmodeled components. The qualitative and quantitative results showed that the application of MCR-ALS was appropriate to resolve highly overlapped peaks in the presence of unknown matrix compounds. Limits of quantification, relative errors of prediction (REP) and average recoveries ranging from 0.02 to 0.61µgg(-1), 3.09-9.35% and 91.0-105.6%, respectively, were obtained. Eventually, the method was successfully applied to the determination of active ingredients in five poultry litter samples collected from different poultry livestock in Argentina.

  1. A fabric phase sorptive extraction-High performance liquid chromatography-Photo diode array detection method for the determination of twelve azole antimicrobial drug residues in human plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Marcello; Kabir, Abuzar; Innosa, Denise; Lopatriello, Teresa; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a novel fabric phase sorptive extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (FPSE-HPLC-PDA) method for the simultaneous extraction and analysis of twelve azole antimicrobial drug residues that include ketoconazole, terconazole, voriconazole, bifonazole, clotrimazole, tioconazole, econazole, butoconazole, miconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and itraconazole in human plasma and urine samples. The selected azole antimicrobial drugs were well resolved by using a Luna C18 column (250mm×4.6mm; 5μm particle size) in gradient elution mode within 36min. The analytical method was calibrated and validated in the range from 0.1 to 8μg/mL for all the drug compounds. Blank human plasma and urine were used as the sample matrix for the analysis; while benzyl-4-hydroxybenzoate was used as the internal standard (IS). The limit of quantification of the FPSE-HPLC-PDA method was found as 0.1μg/mL and the weighted-matrix matched standard calibration curves of the drugs showed a good linearity upto a concentration of 8μg/mL. The parallelism tests were also performed to evaluate whether overrange sample can be analyzed after dilution, without compromising the analytical performances of the validated method. The intra- and inter-day precision (RSD%) values were found ≤13.1% and ≤13.9%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day trueness (bias%) values were found in the range from -12.1% to 10.5%. The performances of the validated FPSE-HPLC-PDA were further tested on real samples collected from healthy volunteers after a single dose administration of itraconazole and miconazole. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first FPSE extraction procedure applied on plasma and urine samples for the simultaneous determination of twelve azole drugs possessing a wide range of logKow values (extending from 0.4 for fluconazole to 6.70 of butoconazole) and could be adopted as a rapid and robust green analytical tool for clinical and

  2. Metabolic Disposition of Osimertinib in Rats, Dogs, and Humans: Insights into a Drug Designed to Bind Covalently to a Cysteine Residue of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Paul A; Cantarini, Mireille V; Collier, Jo; Frewer, Paul; Martin, Scott; Pickup, Kathryn; Ballard, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies were conducted to determine the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of osimertinib and key metabolites AZ5104 and AZ7550. Osimertinib was designed to covalently bind to epidermal growth factor receptors, allowing it to achieve nanomolar cellular potency (Finlay et al., 2014). Covalent binding was observed in incubations of radiolabeled osimertinib with human and rat hepatocytes, human and rat plasma, and human serum albumin. Osimertinib, AZ5104, and AZ7550 were predominantly metabolized by CYP3A. Seven metabolites were detected in human hepatocytes, also observed in rat or dog hepatocytes at similar or higher levels. After oral administration of radiolabeled osimertinib to rats, drug-related material was widely distributed, with the highest radioactivity concentrations measured at 6 hours postdose in most tissues; radioactivity was detectable in 42% of tissues 60 days postdose. Concentrations of [(14)C]-radioactivity in blood were lower than in most tissues. After the administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg of radiolabeled osimertinib to healthy male volunteers, ∼19% of the dose was recovered by 3 days postdose. At 84 days postdose, mean total radioactivity recovery was 14.2% and 67.8% of the dose in urine and feces. The most abundant metabolite identified in feces was AZ5104 (∼6% of dose). Osimertinib accounted for ∼1% of total radioactivity in the plasma of non-small cell lung cancer patients after 22 days of 80-mg osimertinib once-daily treatment; the most abundant circulatory metabolites were AZ7550 and AZ5104 (<10% of total osimertinib-related material). Osimertinib is extensively distributed and metabolized in humans and is eliminated primarily via the fecal route.

  3. A critical assessment of the performance criteria in confirmatory analysis for veterinary drug residue analysis using mass spectrometric detection in selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Bjorn J A; Meijer, Thijs; Wegh, Robin; Mol, Hans G J; Smyth, Wesley G; Armstrong Hewitt, S; van Ginkel, Leen; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-05-01

    Besides the identification point system to assure adequate set-up of instrumentation, European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC includes performance criteria regarding relative ion abundances in mass spectrometry and chromatographic retention time. In confirmatory analysis, the relative abundance of two product ions, acquired in selected reaction monitoring mode, the ion ratio should be within certain ranges for confirmation of the identity of a substance. The acceptable tolerance of the ion ratio varies with the relative abundance of the two product ions and for retention time, CD 2002/657/EC allows a tolerance of 5%. Because of rapid technical advances in analytical instruments and new approaches applied in the field of contaminant testing in food products (multi-compound and multi-class methods) a critical assessment of these criteria is justified. In this study a large number of representative, though challenging sample extracts were prepared, including muscle, urine, milk and liver, spiked with 100 registered and banned veterinary drugs at levels ranging from 0.5 to 100 µg/kg. These extracts were analysed using SRM mode using different chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometers from different vendors. In the initial study, robust data was collected using four different instrumental set-ups. Based on a unique and highly relevant data set, consisting of over 39 000 data points, the ion ratio and retention time criteria for applicability in confirmatory analysis were assessed. The outcomes were verified based on a collaborative trial including laboratories from all over the world. It was concluded that the ion ratio deviation is not related to the value of the ion ratio, but rather to the intensity of the lowest product ion. Therefore a fixed ion ratio deviation tolerance of 50% (relative) is proposed, which also is applicable for compounds present at sub-ppb levels or having poor ionisation efficiency. Furthermore, it was observed that retention time

  4. Multi-class, multi-residue analysis of trace veterinary drugs in milk by rapid screening and quantification using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqian; Li, Xiang; Liu, Xiaomao; Zhang, Jinjie; Cao, Yanzhong; Shi, Zhihong; Sun, Hanwen

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid multi-class multi-residue analytical method was developed for the screening and quantification of veterinary drugs in milk by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). A total of 90 veterinary drugs investigated belonged to almost 20 classes including lincomycins, macrolides, sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-agonists, β-lactams, sedatives, β-receptor antagonists, sex hormones, glucocorticoids, nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, nitrofurans, and some others. A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) procedure was developed for the sample preparation without the solid-phase extraction step. The linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility of the method were fully validated. The response of the detector was linear for each target compound in a wide concentration range with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9973 to 0.9999 (among them R(2)>0.999 for 73 of 90 analytes). The range of the limit of quantification for these compounds in the milk ranged from 0.10 to 17.30μg/kg. The repeatability and reproducibility were in the range of 2.11 to 9.62% and 2.76 to 13.9%, respectively. The average recoveries ranged from 72.62 to 122.2% with the RSD (n=6) of 1.30 to 9.61% at 3 concentration levels. For the screening method, the data of the precursor and product ions of the target analytes were simultaneously acquired under the all ions MS/MS mode in a single run. An accurate mass database for the confirmation and identification of the target compounds was established. The applicability of the screening method was verified by applying to real milk samples. The proposed analytical method allows the identification and confirmation of the target veterinary drugs at trace levels employing quick analysis time. Certain veterinary drugs were detected in some cases. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  5. Multi-residue method for the determination of basic/neutral pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in surface water by solid-phase extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk-Hordern, B; Dinsdale, R M; Guwy, A J

    2007-08-17

    The paper presents the development and validation of a new multi-residue method for the determination of 28 basic/neutral pharmaceuticals (antiepileptics, antibacterial drugs, beta-blockers, analgesics, lipid-regulating agents, bronchodilators, histamine-2-blockers, anti-inflammatory agents, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-II antagonists and antidepressants) and illicit drugs in surface water with the usage of a new technique: ultra performance liquid chromatography-positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The usage of the novel UPLC system with 1.7 microm particle size and 1mm internal diameter column allowed for low mobile phase flow rates (0.07 mL min(-1)) and short retention times (from 1.3 to 15.5 min) for all compounds analysed. As a result, a fast and cost-effective method was developed. SPE with the usage of Oasis MCX strong cation-exchange mixed-mode polymeric sorbent was chosen for pharmaceuticals extraction from environmental samples. The influence of matrix-assisted ion suppression and low SPE recovery on the sensitivity of the method was studied. The instrumental limits of quantification varied from 0.2 to 10 microg L(-1). The method limits of quantification were at low nanogram per litre levels and ranged from 0.3 to 50 ng L(-1). The instrumental and method intra- and inter-day repeatabilities were on average less than 10%. The method was applied for the determination of pharmaceuticals in Rivers Taff (UK) and Warta (Poland). Fifteen compounds were determined in river water at levels ranging from single nanograms to single micrograms per litre.

  6. LC-MS/MS methods for albendazole analysis in feed and its metabolite residues in fish fillet and a leaching study in feed after an alternative procedure for drug incorporation.

    PubMed

    Busatto, Zenaís; da Silva, Agnaldo Fernando Baldo; de Freitas, Osvaldo; Paschoal, Jonas Augusto Rizzato

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of analytical methods for the quantification of albendazole (ABZ) in fish feed and ABZ and its main known metabolites (albendazole sulfoxide, albendazole sulfone and albendazole aminosulfone) in fish fillet employing LC-MS/MS. In order to assess the reliability of the analytical methods, evaluation was undertaken as recommended by related guides proposed by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture for analytical method validation. The calibration curve for ABZ quantification in feed showed adequate linearity (r > 0.99), precision (CV < 1.03%) and trueness ranging from 99% to 101%. The method for ABZ residues in fish fillet involving the QuEChERS technique for sample extraction had adequate linearity (r > 0.99) for all analytes, precision (CV < 13%) and trueness around 100%, with CCα < 122 ng g(-)(1) and CCβ < 145 ng g(-)(1). Besides, by aiming to avoid the risk of ABZ leaching from feed into the aquatic environment during fish medication via the oral route, a promising procedure for drug incorporation in the feed involving coating feed pellets with ethyl cellulose polymer containing ABZ was also evaluated. The medicated feed had good homogeneity (CV < 3%) and a lower release of ABZ (< 0.2%) from feed to water when the medicated feed stayed in the water for up to 15 min.

  7. 21 CFR 500.86 - Marker residue and target tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.86 Marker residue and target tissue. (a) For each edible tissue, the sponsor shall... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marker residue and target tissue. 500.86 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 500.86 - Marker residue and target tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.86 Marker residue and target tissue. (a) For each edible tissue, the sponsor shall... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marker residue and target tissue. 500.86 Section...

  9. 21 CFR 500.86 - Marker residue and target tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.86 Marker residue and target tissue. (a) For each edible tissue, the sponsor shall... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marker residue and target tissue. 500.86 Section...

  10. 21 CFR 500.86 - Marker residue and target tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.86 Marker residue and target tissue. (a) For each edible tissue, the sponsor shall... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marker residue and target tissue. 500.86 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 500.86 - Marker residue and target tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.86 Marker residue and target tissue. (a) For each edible tissue, the sponsor shall... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marker residue and target tissue. 500.86 Section...

  12. Impact of six versus 12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with drug-eluting stent implantation after risk stratification with the residual SYNTAX score: Results from a secondary analysis of the I-LOVE-IT 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Miaohan; Li, Yi; Li, Jing; Xu, Kai; Jing, Quanmin; Dong, Shaohong; Jin, Zhe; Zhao, Pitian; Xu, Bo; Han, Yaling

    2017-03-01

    The optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation remains undetermined, especially for those at high risk of cardiac events postprocedure. This study was aimed to investigate the impact of 6 versus 12 months of DAPT after DES implantation based on risk stratification with the residual SYNTAX score (rSS). A total of 2737 patients in the I-LOVE-IT 2 trial were grouped according to rSS status (low rSS [rSS = 0, n = 1474] versus high rSS [rSS > 0, n = 1263]) and DAPT duration (6 months vs. 12 months). The primary endpoint was 12-month target lesion failure (TLF), and the major secondary endpoints were 12-month net adverse clinical events (NACE) and major bleeding. Incidences of TLF (5.2 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.01) and NACE (9.2 vs. 13.4%, P < 0.001) at 12 months were significantly higher in patients with high rSSs compared with patients with low rSSs. Landmark analysis showed that, in patients with high rSS, 12-month DAPT was associated with slightly lower risks of TLF (3.0% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.08) and NACE (7.0 vs. 4.4%, P = 0.054) compared with 6-month DAPT within 6 to 12 months after PCI. Patients with different DAPT durations had similar risks of bleeding both in the low and high rSS groups. Patients with high rSSs have an increased risk of TLF and NACE at 12 months after DES implantation. Twelve-month DAPT might be superior to 6-month DAPT in patients with high rSS for reducing adverse events within 6 to 12 months after PCI without excessive risk of bleeding. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 9 CFR 318.20 - Use of animal drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of animal drugs. 318.20 Section... General § 318.20 Use of animal drugs. Animal drug residues are permitted in meat and meat food products if such residues are from drugs which have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and any such...

  14. 9 CFR 318.20 - Use of animal drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of animal drugs. 318.20 Section... General § 318.20 Use of animal drugs. Animal drug residues are permitted in meat and meat food products if such residues are from drugs which have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and any such...

  15. 9 CFR 318.20 - Use of animal drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of animal drugs. 318.20 Section... General § 318.20 Use of animal drugs. Animal drug residues are permitted in meat and meat food products if such residues are from drugs which have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and any such...

  16. Residual gravimetric method to measure nebulizer output.

    PubMed

    Vecellio None, Laurent; Grimbert, Daniel; Bordenave, Joelle; Benoit, Guy; Furet, Yves; Fauroux, Brigitte; Boissinot, Eric; De Monte, Michele; Lemarié, Etienne; Diot, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a residual gravimetric method based on weighing dry filters to measure the aerosol output of nebulizers. This residual gravimetric method was compared to assay methods based on spectrophotometric measurement of terbutaline (Bricanyl, Astra Zeneca, France), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurement of tobramycin (Tobi, Chiron, U.S.A.), and electrochemical measurements of NaF (as defined by the European standard). Two breath-enhanced jet nebulizers, one standard jet nebulizer, and one ultrasonic nebulizer were tested. Output produced by the residual gravimetric method was calculated by weighing the filters both before and after aerosol collection and by filter drying corrected by the proportion of drug contained in total solute mass. Output produced by the electrochemical, spectrophotometric, and HPLC methods was determined after assaying the drug extraction filter. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between the residual gravimetric method (x axis) and assay methods (y axis) in terms of drug mass output (y = 1.00 x -0.02, r(2) = 0.99, n = 27). We conclude that a residual gravimetric method based on dry filters, when validated for a particular agent, is an accurate way of measuring aerosol output.

  17. Comparison of veterinary drug residue results in animal tissues by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole or quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry after different sample preparation methods, including use of a commercial lipid removal product.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Lehotay, Steven J; Stevens, Joan; Zweigenbaum, Jerry

    2017-04-01

    Veterinary drug residues in animal-derived foods must be monitored to ensure food safety, verify proper veterinary practices, enforce legal limits in domestic and imported foods, and for other purposes. A common goal in drug residue analysis in foods is to achieve acceptable monitoring results for as many analytes as possible, with higher priority given to the drugs of most concern, in an efficient and robust manner. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has implemented a multiclass, multi-residue method based on sample preparation using dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) for cleanup and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QQQ) for analysis of >120 drugs at regulatory levels of concern in animal tissues. Recently, a new cleanup product called "enhanced matrix removal for lipids" (EMR-L) was commercially introduced that used a unique chemical mechanism to remove lipids from extracts. Furthermore, high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q/TOF) for (U)HPLC detection often yields higher selectivity than targeted QQQ analyzers while allowing retroactive processing of samples for other contaminants. In this study, the use of both d-SPE and EMR-L sample preparation and UHPLC-QQQ and UHPLC-Q/TOF analysis methods for shared spiked samples of bovine muscle, kidney, and liver was compared. The results showed that the EMR-L method provided cleaner extracts overall and improved results for several anthelmintics and tranquilizers compared to the d-SPE method, but the EMR-L method gave lower recoveries for certain β-lactam antibiotics. QQQ vs. Q/TOF detection showed similar mixed performance advantages depending on analytes and matrix interferences, with an advantage to Q/TOF for greater possible analytical scope and non-targeted data collection. Either combination of approaches may be used to meet monitoring purposes, with an edge in efficiency to d-SPE, but greater instrument robustness and less matrix effects when

  18. Salinomycin residues and their ionophoricity in pig tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Dimenna, G.P.; Lyon, F.S.; Creegan, J.A. ); Wright, G.J. ); Wilkes, L.C. ); Johnson, D.E.; Szymanski, T. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of pretreatment with medicated feed on ({sup 14}C) salinomycin residue levels in pig tissues was studied. Pigs were fed unmedicated feed or feed medicated with salinomycin at 41 ppm in the diet for 29 days and then dosed with ({sup 14}C)salinomycin for 8 days. Total drug residue levels were below quantifiable limits of detection of kidney, fat, and muscle but at the tolerance limit of 1,800 ppb for liver. In liver, pretreatment tended to lower total residue levels, and unchanged ({sup 14}C)salinomycin accounted for <1% of the total drug residue. Approximately 15-20% of the total drug residue in liver was bound. Ionophoric activity in extracts of livers from the treated pigs was minimal, and only 2 of the 12 treated samples had ionophoric activity more than twice that obtained from the controls.

  19. The joint food and agriculture organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and its role in the evaluation of the safety of veterinary drug residues in foods.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, James D

    2005-09-22

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the evaluation of food additives at the international level through the establishment of an expert committee or committees. These committees evaluated the safety of food additives present as residues resulting from the use of pesticides or veterinary pharmaceuticals. The results of these meetings include international harmonization on acceptable daily intake of these compounds and the maximum residue limit that is permitted to be present within any food of animal or plant origin. The decisions rendered by these committees provide a key element in the elimination of international trade barriers associated with products intended for human consumption.

  20. Utilization of oak residues

    Treesearch

    Richard C. Allison

    1971-01-01

    Residues should be thought of as a raw material for specific uses rather than as a waste. Fines and solid wood residues are usually kept separated in waste-collection system, but species are rarely kept separated. The properties of each species dictate what uses can be made of them. Quantity, location, cost, moisture content, physical size, and presence of foreign...

  1. 21 CFR 173.250 - Methyl alcohol residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methyl alcohol residues. 173.250 Section 173.250... CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.250 Methyl alcohol residues. Methyl alcohol may be present in the following foods under the conditions specified: (a) In...

  2. 21 CFR 173.250 - Methyl alcohol residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl alcohol residues. 173.250 Section 173.250... CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.250 Methyl alcohol residues. Methyl alcohol may be present in the following foods under the conditions specified: (a) In...

  3. 21 CFR 173.250 - Methyl alcohol residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methyl alcohol residues. 173.250 Section 173.250... and Related Substances § 173.250 Methyl alcohol residues. Methyl alcohol may be present in the... specifies the presence of methyl alcohol and provides for the use of the hops extract only as prescribed...

  4. 21 CFR 173.250 - Methyl alcohol residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methyl alcohol residues. 173.250 Section 173.250... CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.250 Methyl alcohol residues. Methyl alcohol may be present in the following foods under the conditions specified: (a) In...

  5. 21 CFR 173.250 - Methyl alcohol residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methyl alcohol residues. 173.250 Section 173.250... CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.250 Methyl alcohol residues. Methyl alcohol may be present in the following foods under the conditions specified: (a) In...

  6. The 49th annual Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Romano, Joe

    2013-03-13

    The papers in this special issue of Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry were originally presented at the 49th annual Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop (FPRW). The FPRW is an annual meeting for scientists specializing in trace level analysis of pesticides, veterinary drug residues, and other chemical contaminants in food, animal feed, and environmental samples.

  7. Residues of oxytetracycline in cultured rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sharafati-Chaleshtori, R; Mardani, G; Rafieian-Kopaei, M; Sharafati-Chaleshtori, A; Drees, F

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, antibiotics are widely used in aquatic animals to control and treatment of infections or as food supplement for growth increase and animal output. With increasing use of veterinary drugs in food production, there is global consideration about the consumption of antimicrobial residues in aquatic foods and their effects on human health. This study was aimed to evaluate the Oxytetracycline (OTC) residues in Rainbow trout meat in Shahre-kord (Iran) markets before and after frying. After randomized collection of 50 samples of fish in Shahre-kord markets in a six months period were examined. The prepared samples were examined for OTC residues using HPLC analytical method before and after frying. Results showed that 3 (6%) of the samples before frying and 12 (24%) after frying were having lower than Maximum residual limits (MRLs) in Codex alimentarius. However, mean OTC residues before and after frying samples were above MRLs. The mean amounts of OTC were 2260 +/- 1090 and 1110 +/- 930 ng g(-1) before and after frying, respectively. These findings show that the frying of fish reduces OTC residual. Nevertheless, the usage of OTC should be reduced to an acceptable level in fishery industry.

  8. TENORM: Coal Combustion Residuals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burning coal in boilers to create steam for power generation and industrial applications produces a number of combustion residuals. Naturally radioactive materials that were in the coal mostly end up in fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag.

  9. Fixed drug eruption to sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is a common adverse effect seen with various drugs notably antibiotics, antiepileptics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein we report a case of Sitagliptin induced fixed drug eruption in a 46 year old female who developed circumscribed, erythematous macules all over the body within one week of initiation of Sitagliptin. The lesions resolved with residual hyperpigmentation on cessation of the drug. The diagnosis was confirmed by an oral provocation test which led to a reactivation of the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fixed drug eruption to Sitagliptin reported in the literature.

  10. Determination of tricaine residues in fish by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nochetto, Cristina B; Reimschuessel, Renate; Gieseker, Charles; Cheely, Christie-Sue; Carson, Mary C

    2009-01-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), as an anesthetic drug for select aquaculture species. It was approved for use as a handling aid with a 3 week withdrawal time. The drug is rapidly metabolized and excreted; therefore, CVM approved its use without requiring a regulatory method for drug residues in tissues. However, there are concerns that the drug may be used to sedate fish during transport to slaughter. A regulatory method will enable monitoring for unsafe residues of this drug resulting from extralabel use. We present a quantitative method, using LC at a target level of 0.1 mg/kg (ppm), for three different farmed species: salmon (Salmo salar); tilapia (Oreochromis spp.); and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The assay begins with an acetonitrile extraction, followed by filtration and mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction cleanup. The extracts are analyzed by reversed-phase LC with UV detection at 320 nm. The method was validated by using fish fillets with incurred residues, control fish fillets, and fish fillets fortified at half the target level, the target level, and twice the target level (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 ppm, respectively). For all species, accuracy is > or =80% and the RSD is < or =10%. The method complies with CVM performance criteria for the determination of veterinary drug residues.

  11. 77 FR 39895 - New Analytic Methods and Sampling Procedures for the United States National Residue Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the Department of Health and Human Services are the Federal... health. FDA, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, establishes tolerances or action levels for... identify all food safety hazards, including drug residues, pesticide residues, and chemical contaminants...

  12. Forest Residues Bundling Project

    Treesearch

    U.S. Forest Service

    2007-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, the U.S. Forest Service conducted an evaluation of biomass bundling for forest residue extraction. This CD provides a report of the project results, a video documentary project record, and a collection of images from the project. Additional information is available at:

  13. Drug Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days ... occur the first time you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can ...

  14. [China's crop residues resources evaluation].

    PubMed

    Xie, Guanghui; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ren, Lantian

    2010-07-01

    The availability of crop residues in China is reviewed in this article. The definition of crop residues is clarified as the total byproducts of field production and processing industry thereafter, and methodology for evaluating crop residues is discussed. Based on literature, the progress on the crop residue assessment is addressed. The annual field crops residues in China from 1991 to 1999 were estimated between 6.0-6.8 hundred million tons, while the data for the process residues were not available. From 2000 to 2007, the annual crop residues were estimated between 5.9-7.3 hundred million tons, while the processing residues at the range of 0.9-1.1 hundred million tons. The reasons for the significant variations are due to the disagreement on crop residue definition, different, even inaccurate residue to grain ratio data used in the estimations, and the lacking of clear understanding on the statistical analysis and grain outputs related to the crop residue evaluation. With the complete statistic analysis method, the author's group evaluated the residues in 2006 and 2007 to be 7.4 hundred million tones in total, including 6.5 hundred million tons for field crop residues and 0.9 hundred million tons for process residues. Moreover, the geographic distribution of the field crop residues was analyzed based on the harvest indices (HI) tested within the near five years.

  15. TYPES AND QUANTITIES OF LEFTOVER DRUGS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Pharmaceuticals designed for humans and animals often remain unused. Leftover and accumulated drugs represent suboptimal delivery of health care and environmentally unsound disposal, which can pose exposure risks for humans and wildlife.OBJECTIVES: A major unknown with respect to drugs as pollutants is what fractions of drug residues occurring in the ambient environment result from discarding leftover drugs. To gauge the significance of leftover drugs as potential pollutants, data are needed on the types, quantities, and frequencies with which drugs accumulate. Absence of this data has prevented assessments of the significance of drug accumulation and disposal as a contributing source of drug residues in the environment.METHODS: One particular source of drug accumulation is those drugs that become

  16. The ASCE Residuals Transport Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Albertson, O.E.; Bizier, P.A.; Brown, J.; Koch, C.; Sadick, T.

    1999-07-01

    This presentation will highlight the ASCE Residuals Transport Manual, which has been published by ASCE this year. This document, which represents the state of the art in information on residuals transport, is designed to be used by both the active practitioner, as well as for instructional purposes. The authors will present the various chapters which cover the following topics: Conveyance of Water and Wastewater Residuals, Rheology, Sludge Characteristics, Quality and Quantity, Overview of Residuals Conveyance Devices, Pumping of Viscous Sludges and Slurries, Transport of Thickened Residuals, Conveyance of Dewatered Residuals, Transport of Granular and Compactable Residuals, and Case Studies. The Objective of the Transport Monograph is to summarize in one concise volume the general state of knowledge regarding residuals transport from both water and wastewater residuals. The presentation will cover each chapter and will review the pertinent information contained in the manual.

  17. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  18. Residual Neuromuscular Blockade.

    PubMed

    Plummer-Roberts, Anna L; Trost, Christina; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an update on residual neuromuscular blockade for nurse anesthetists. The neuromuscular junction, pharmacology for producing and reversing neuromuscular blockade, monitoring sites and methods, and patient implications relating to incomplete reversal of neuromuscular blockade are reviewed. Overall recommendations include using multiple settings when employing a peripheral nerve stimulator for monitoring return of neuromuscular function and administering pharmacologic reversal when the train-of-four ratio is below 0.9.

  19. Examination of Residuals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-01-01

    observations have been made to test a prediction of the theory. Another example would be an experiment on extrasensory perception ; most people believe that...to have the same n and v and yet differ perceptibly in the properties of their residuals. This will be illustrated by two examples with very small n...logarithmically. In recording sensory perceptions or value judgments arbitrary numerical scores are sometimes used, and on the face of it these might as well be

  20. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  1. Residue depletion of ivermectin in broiler poultry.

    PubMed

    Mestorino, Nora; Buldain, Daniel; Buchamer, Andrea; Gortari, Lihuel; Daniele, Martín; Marchetti, María Laura

    2017-04-01

    Helminth infections are widespread in the poultry industry. There is evidence of extra-label use of some drugs, such as ivermectin (IVM), in broiler poultry. Pharmacokinetic and residual studies of IVM in poultry, however, are rather scarce. Our aim was to determine time restrictions for broiler chickens fed with balanced feed mixed with IVM for 21 days, and thus achieve acceptable residual levels for consumption as established by the European Union. Sixty 1-day-old chicks were fed with food supplemented with IVM at 5 mg kg(-1) feed for 21 days. Groups of six treated animals were sacrificed at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 20 and 28 days after treatment. Liver, skin/fat, kidney and muscle samples were obtained. IVM were determined by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection after automatic solid-phase extraction with SPE C18 cartridges. The highest concentrations were measured in the liver, which is logical given that IVM is a drug that undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism. The optimal withdrawal time for edible tissues of these animals to stay within the permitted residual levels were: 12 days for liver, 8 days for skin/fat, 0 days for muscle and 10 days for kidney.

  2. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  3. Residual tumor cells are unique cellular targets in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Glas, Martin; Rath, Barbara H; Simon, Matthias; Reinartz, Roman; Schramme, Anja; Trageser, Daniel; Eisenreich, Ramona; Leinhaas, Anke; Keller, Mihaela; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Garbe, Stephan; Steinfarz, Barbara; Pietsch, Torsten; Steindler, Dennis A; Schramm, Johannes; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Brüstle, Oliver; Scheffler, Björn

    2010-08-01

    Residual tumor cells remain beyond the margins of every glioblastoma (GBM) resection. Their resistance to postsurgical therapy is considered a major driving force of mortality, but their biology remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, residual tumor cells were derived via experimental biopsy of the resection margin after standard neurosurgery for direct comparison with samples from the routinely resected tumor tissue. In vitro analysis of proliferation, invasion, stem cell qualities, GBM-typical antigens, genotypes, and in vitro drug and irradiation challenge studies revealed these cells as unique entities. Our findings suggest a need for characterization of residual tumor cells to optimize diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  4. Short communication: Macrocyclic lactone residues in butter from Brazilian markets.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Fabio; Marsico, Eliane Teixeira; Conte-Júnior, Carlos Adam; de Almeida Furtado, Leonardo; Brasil, Taila Figueredo; Pereira Netto, Annibal Duarte

    2015-06-01

    Macrocyclic lactones (ML) are commonly used in drug formulations for the treatment of parasites in cattle. In Brazil, except for drugs (or formulations) with long-term (half-life) effects, ML are registered for use in bovines. Indiscriminate use of ML may result in the presence of residues in milk and dairy products due to their lipophilic properties and thermal stability. This study applied a method of liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection, recently developed and validated for the determination of residues of abamectin, doramectin, ivermectin, and moxidectin in butter. The method was applied to 38 samples of commercial butter purchased in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between June and September 2013, analyzed in triplicate. Ivermectin was detected in 89.5% of the samples, with concentrations between 0.3 and 119.4 µg/kg; 76.3% of the samples contained doramectin (0.6 to 64.7 µg/kg) and 55.2% contained abamectin (0.7 to 4.5 µg/kg). Most butter samples (76.3%) contained residues of more than 1 ML; however, no residues of moxidectin were detected. The results showed a high incidence of the presence of avermectins in butter samples. Butter is not included in the Brazilian National Plan for Control of Residues and Contaminants in Animal Products. As ML residues concentrate in lipophilic compounds, butter and other fatty dairy products should be screened for the presence of ML residues.

  5. Wood Residue Distribution Simulator (WORDS)

    Treesearch

    Douglas A. Eza; James W. McMinn; Peter E. Dress

    1984-01-01

    Successful development of woody biomass for energy will depend on the distribution of local supply and demand within subregions, rather than on the total inventory of residues. The Wood Residue Distribution Simulator (WORDS) attempts to find a least-cost allocation of residues from local sources of supply to local sources of demand, given the cost of the materials,...

  6. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  7. Residual Viremia in Treated HIV+ Individuals

    DOE PAGES

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2016-01-06

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively controls HIV infection, suppressing HIV viral loads. However, some residual virus remains, below the level of detection, in HIV-infected patients on ART. Furthermore, the source of this viremia is an area of debate: does it derive primarily from activation of infected cells in the latent reservoir, or from ongoing viral replication? Our observations seem to be contradictory: there is evidence of short term evolution, implying that there must be ongoing viral replication, and viral strains should thus evolve. The phylogenetic analyses, and rare emergent drug resistance, suggest no long-term viral evolution, implying that virus derived frommore » activated latent cells must dominate. We use simple deterministic and stochastic models to gain insight into residual viremia dynamics in HIV-infected patients. Our modeling relies on two underlying assumptions for patients on suppressive ART: that latent cell activation drives viral dynamics and that the reproductive ratio of treated infection is less than 1. Nonetheless, the contribution of viral replication to residual viremia in patients on ART may be non-negligible. However, even if the portion of viremia attributable to viral replication is significant, our model predicts (1) that latent reservoir re-seeding remains negligible, and (2) some short-term viral evolution is permitted, but long-term evolution can still be limited: stochastic analysis of our model shows that de novo emergence of drug resistance is rare. Thus, our simple models reconcile the seemingly contradictory observations on residual viremia and, with relatively few parameters, recapitulates HIV viral dynamics observed in patients on suppressive therapy.« less

  8. Residual Viremia in Treated HIV+ Individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2016-01-06

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively controls HIV infection, suppressing HIV viral loads. However, some residual virus remains, below the level of detection, in HIV-infected patients on ART. Furthermore, the source of this viremia is an area of debate: does it derive primarily from activation of infected cells in the latent reservoir, or from ongoing viral replication? Our observations seem to be contradictory: there is evidence of short term evolution, implying that there must be ongoing viral replication, and viral strains should thus evolve. The phylogenetic analyses, and rare emergent drug resistance, suggest no long-term viral evolution, implying that virus derived from activated latent cells must dominate. We use simple deterministic and stochastic models to gain insight into residual viremia dynamics in HIV-infected patients. Our modeling relies on two underlying assumptions for patients on suppressive ART: that latent cell activation drives viral dynamics and that the reproductive ratio of treated infection is less than 1. Nonetheless, the contribution of viral replication to residual viremia in patients on ART may be non-negligible. However, even if the portion of viremia attributable to viral replication is significant, our model predicts (1) that latent reservoir re-seeding remains negligible, and (2) some short-term viral evolution is permitted, but long-term evolution can still be limited: stochastic analysis of our model shows that de novo emergence of drug resistance is rare. Thus, our simple models reconcile the seemingly contradictory observations on residual viremia and, with relatively few parameters, recapitulates HIV viral dynamics observed in patients on suppressive therapy.

  9. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims.

  10. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. Live animal tests have the potential to allow verification that an individual animal is free of drug residues before sale for h...

  11. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. This work describes adaptation and evaluation of rapid screening tests to detect drug residues in serum and urine. Medicated herd animals had...

  12. residue and shunting pinholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Nima E.

    2014-09-01

    The present work considers two observable phenomena through the experimental fabrication and electrical characterization of the rf-sputtered CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells that extremely reduce the overall conversion efficiency of the device: CdCl2 residue on the surface of the semiconductor and shunting pinholes. The former happens through nonuniform treatment of the As-deposited solar cells before annealing at high temperature and the latter occurs by shunting pinholes when the cell surface is shunted by defects, wire-like pathways or scratches on the metallic back contact caused from the external contacts. Such physical problems may be quite common in the experimental activities and reduce the performance down to 4-5 % which leads to dismantle the device despite its precise fabrication. We present our electrical characterization on the samples that received wet CdCl2 surface treatment (uniform or nonuniform) and are damaged by the pinholes.

  13. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  14. Experimental determination of residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1991-01-01

    Residual stresses in finished parts have often been regarded as factors contributing to premature part failure and geometric distortions. Currently, residual stresses in welded structures and railroad components are being investigated. High residual stresses formed in welded structures due primarily to the differential contractions of the weld material as it cools and solidifies can have a profound effect on the surface performance of the structure. In railroad wheels, repeated use of the brakes causes high residual stresses in the rims which may lead to wheel failure and possible derailment. The goals of the study were: (1) to develop strategies for using x-ray diffraction to measure residual stress; (2) to subject samples of Inconel 718 to various mechanical and heat treatments and to measure the resulting stress using x-ray diffraction; and (3) to measure residual stresses in ferromagnetic alloys using magnetoacoustics.

  15. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  16. Estimating Community Drug Abuse by Wastewater Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zuccato, Ettore; Chiabrando, Chiara; Castiglioni, Sara; Bagnati, Renzo; Fanelli, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Background The social and medical problems of drug abuse are a matter of increasing global concern. To tackle drug abuse in changing scenarios, international drug agencies need fresh methods to monitor trends and patterns of illicit drug consumption. Objective We tested a sewage epidemiology approach, using levels of excreted drug residues in wastewater, to monitor collective use of the major drugs of abuse in near real time. Methods Selected drug target residues derived from use of cocaine, opiates, cannabis, and amphetamines were measured by mass spectrometry in wastewater collected at major sewage treatment plants in Milan (Italy), Lugano (Switzerland), and London (United Kingdom). The amounts of drug residues conveyed to the treatment plants, reflecting the amounts collectively excreted with urine, were used to estimate consumption of the active parent drugs. Results Reproducible and characteristic profiles of illicit drug use were obtained in the three cities, thus for the first time quickly revealing changes in local consumption (e.g., cocaine consumption rose significantly on weekends in Milan). Profiles of local drug consumption based on waste-water measurements are in line with national annual prevalence estimates. Conclusions Patterns and trends of drug abuse in local communities can be promptly monitored by this tool, a convenient new complement to more complex, lengthy survey methods. In principle, searching the sewage for excreted compounds relevant to public health issues appears to have the potential to become a convenient source of real-time epidemiologic information. PMID:18709161

  17. Estimating community drug abuse by wastewater analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuccato, Ettore; Chiabrando, Chiara; Castiglioni, Sara; Bagnati, Renzo; Fanelli, Roberto

    2008-08-01

    The social and medical problems of drug abuse are a matter of increasing global concern. To tackle drug abuse in changing scenarios, international drug agencies need fresh methods to monitor trends and patterns of illicit drug consumption. We tested a sewage epidemiology approach, using levels of excreted drug residues in wastewater, to monitor collective use of the major drugs of abuse in near real time. Selected drug target residues derived from use of cocaine, opiates, cannabis, and amphetamines were measured by mass spectrometry in wastewater collected at major sewage treatment plants in Milan (Italy), Lugano (Switzerland), and London (United Kingdom). The amounts of drug residues conveyed to the treatment plants, reflecting the amounts collectively excreted with urine, were used to estimate consumption of the active parent drugs. Reproducible and characteristic profiles of illicit drug use were obtained in the three cities, thus for the first time quickly revealing changes in local consumption (e.g., cocaine consumption rose significantly on weekends in Milan). Profiles of local drug consumption based on waste-water measurements are in line with national annual prevalence estimates. Patterns and trends of drug abuse in local communities can be promptly monitored by this tool, a convenient new complement to more complex, lengthy survey methods. In principle, searching the sewage for excreted compounds relevant to public health issues appears to have the potential to become a convenient source of real-time epidemiologic information.

  18. SWIR hyperspectral imaging detector for surface residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Mangold, Paul; Gomer, Nathaniel; Klueva, Oksana; Treado, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    ChemImage has developed a SWIR Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) sensor which uses hyperspectral imaging for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of surface residues. Existing detection technologies often require close proximity for sensing or detecting, endangering operators and costly equipment. Furthermore, most of the existing sensors do not support autonomous, real-time, mobile platform based detection of threats. The SWIR HSI sensor provides real-time standoff detection of surface residues. The SWIR HSI sensor provides wide area surveillance and HSI capability enabled by liquid crystal tunable filter technology. Easy-to-use detection software with a simple, intuitive user interface produces automated alarms and real-time display of threat and type. The system has potential to be used for the detection of variety of threats including chemicals and illicit drug substances and allows for easy updates in the field for detection of new hazardous materials. SWIR HSI technology could be used by law enforcement for standoff screening of suspicious locations and vehicles in pursuit of illegal labs or combat engineers to support route-clearance applications- ultimately to save the lives of soldiers and civilians. In this paper, results from a SWIR HSI sensor, which include detection of various materials in bulk form, as well as residue amounts on vehicles, people and other surfaces, will be discussed.

  19. Microwave emission and crop residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to determine the significance of crop residues or stubble in estimating the emission of the underlying soil. Observations using truck-mounted L and C band passive microwave radiometers showed that for dry wheat and soybeans the dry residue caused negligible attenuation of the background emission. Green residues, with water contents typical of standing crops, did have a significant effect on the background emission. Results for these green residues also indicated that extremes in plant structure, as created using parallel and perpendicular stalk orientations, can cause very large differences in the degree of attenuation.

  20. Microwave emission and crop residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to determine the significance of crop residues or stubble in estimating the emission of the underlying soil. Observations using truck-mounted L and C band passive microwave radiometers showed that for dry wheat and soybeans the dry residue caused negligible attenuation of the background emission. Green residues, with water contents typical of standing crops, did have a significant effect on the background emission. Results for these green residues also indicated that extremes in plant structure, as created using parallel and perpendicular stalk orientations, can cause very large differences in the degree of attenuation.

  1. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  2. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids ... more: Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Research Report on Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs Research Report on Methamphetamine Research ...

  3. Chemical modifications of therapeutic proteins induced by residual ethylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Louise; Sloey, Christopher; Zhang, Zhongqi; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Kim, Hyojin; Ren, Da; Kanapuram, Sekhar

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is widely used in sterilization of drug product primary containers and medical devices. The impact of residual EtO on protein therapeutics is of significant interest in the biopharmaceutical industry. The potential for EtO to modify individual amino acids in proteins has been previously reported. However, specific identification of EtO adducts in proteins and the effect of residual EtO on the stability of therapeutic proteins has not been reported to date. This paper describes studies of residual EtO with two therapeutic proteins, a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Peg-GCSF) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) formulated with human serum albumin (HSA). Peg-GCSF was filled in an EtO sterilized delivery device and incubated at accelerated stress conditions. Glu-C peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO reacted with Peg-GCSF and resulted in EtO modifications at two methionine residues (Met-127 and Met-138). In addition, tryptic peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO in plastic vials reacted with HSA in EPO formulation at Met-328 and Cys-34. This paper details the work conducted to understand the effects of residual EtO on the chemical stability of protein therapeutics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  5. Taking inventory of woody residuals

    Treesearch

    David McKeever

    2003-01-01

    USDA Forest Service analysis finds 104 million tons of woody residuals available for recovery in the U.S., with wood in MSW and C&D debris streams comprising 28 million tons. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service conducts a variety of analyses to estimate the quantity of woody residuals in the United States. Its Forest Products Laboratory in Madison,...

  6. Residue-based scattering factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    A glob is defined as a group of atoms in the crystal which can be chosen in various ways. Globs themselves can be used as scattering elements in the theory of structure determination, just as atoms are used at present. In this paper, amino-acid residues are chosen to form globs and empirical formulas for residue-based scattering factors have been developed.

  7. Residual strains in conduit arteries.

    PubMed

    Rachev, A; Greenwald, S E

    2003-05-01

    Residual strains and stresses are those that exist in a body when all external loads are removed. Residual strains in arteries can be characterized by the opening angle of the sector-like cross-section which arises when an unloaded ring segment is radially cut. A review of experimental methods for measuring residual strains and the main results about the variation of the opening angle with arterial localization, age, smooth muscle activity, mechanical environment and certain vascular pathologies are presented and discussed. It is shown that, in addition to their well-established ability to homogenize the stress field in the arterial wall, residual strains make arteries more compliant and thereby improve their performance as elastic reservoirs and ensure more effective local control of the arterial lumen by smooth muscle cells. Finally, evidence that, in some cases, residual strains remain in arteries even after they have been cut radially is discussed.

  8. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  9. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, N

    2009-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity represents an immune-mediated reaction to a drug. Although several drug hypersensitivity reactions are confined to the skin and rather mild, some may be life threatening and also involve further organs such as liver, kidney and bone marrow. The exact pathogenesis of many drug hypersensitivity reactions is still obscure. In this review the concepts on how small molecular drugs can activate the immune system are discussed and the hapten, prohapten and p-i concept are explained. Furthermore, the classification of drug hypersensitivity reactions and some common and severe clinical manifestations of drug-induced T cell mediated reactions are presented.

  10. Residual effects of intranasal methamphetamine on sleep, mood, and performance

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Audrey; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Gunderson, Erik W.; Marrone, Gina; Silver, Rae; Foltin, Richard W.; Hart, Carl L.

    2008-01-01

    Although intranasal methamphetamine abuse has increased, there are no published data investigating the residual effects of the drug under controlled conditions. Thus, the current study examined the residual effects of single-dose intranasal methamphetamine administration on a broad range of behavioral and physiological measures. Non-treatment seeking methamphetamine abusers (n = 11) completed this two-week, in-patient, within-participant, double-blind study. The study consisted of 4 two-day blocks of sessions; each block was separated by at least 24 hrs. At approximately 1000 hrs, on the first day of each block, participants received one of four intranasal methamphetamine doses (0, 12, 25, 50 mg/70 kg). Lights were turned out at 2300 hrs that evening and sleep measures were assessed. On the morning of the second day of each block, methamphetamine plasma levels, cardiovascular measures, mood, subjective reports of the previous evening's sleep, and psychomotor performance were assessed to determine residual drug effects. The larger methamphetamine doses (25 and 50 mg) markedly disrupted subjective measures of that night's sleep and some indices of next-day mood, but only the largest dose (50 mg) dose decreased objective measures of that night's sleep and increased next-day physiological measures. Methamphetamine did not produce any negative residual effects on early next-day performance. Future studies should assess methamphetamine-related residual effects following repeated doses administered over consecutive days. PMID:18078723

  11. Analysis of fenbendazole residues in bovine milk by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Brandon, David L; Bates, Anne H; Binder, Ronald G; Montague, William C; Whitehand, Linda C; Barker, Steven A

    2002-10-09

    Fenbendazole residues in bovine milk were analyzed by ELISAs using two monoclonal antibodies. One monoclonal antibody (MAb 587) bound the major benzimidazole anthelmintic drugs, including fenbendazole, oxfendazole, and fenbendazole sulfone. The other (MAb 591) was more specific for fenbendazole, with 13% cross-reactivity with the sulfone and no significant binding to the sulfoxide metabolite. The limit of detection of the ELISA method in the milk matrix was 7 ppb for MAb 587 and 3 ppb for MAb 591. Fenbendazole was administered in feed, drench, and paste form to three groups of dairy cattle. Milk was collected immediately before dosing and then every 12 h for 5 days. The ELISA indicated that residue levels varied widely among individual cows in each group. Fenbendazole levels peaked at approximately 12-24 h and declined rapidly thereafter. Metabolites were detected at much higher levels than the parent compound, peaked at approximately 24-36 h, and declined gradually. Residue levels were undetectable by 72 h. The ELISA data correlated well with the total residues determined by chromatographic analysis, but the use of the two separate ELISAs did not afford an advantage over ELISA with the single, broadly reactive MAb 587. The ELISA method could be used to flag high-residue samples in on-site monitoring of fenbendazole in milk and is a potential tool for studying drug pharmacokinetics.

  12. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: MAGNETIC TAPE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Magnetic Tape Manufacturing source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Magnetic Tape Manufacturing source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  13. Electromagnetic zonal flow residual responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, Peter J.; Parra, Felix I.; Pusztai, István

    2017-08-01

    The collisionless axisymmetric zonal flow residual calculation for a tokamak plasma is generalized to include electromagnetic perturbations. We formulate and solve the complete initial value zonal flow problem by retaining the fully self-consistent axisymmetric spatial perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields. Simple expressions for the electrostatic, shear and compressional magnetic residual responses are derived that provide a fully electromagnetic test of the zonal flow residual in gyrokinetic codes. Unlike the electrostatic potential, the parallel vector potential and the parallel magnetic field perturbations need not relax to flux functions for all possible initial conditions.

  14. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: INDUSTRIAL PROCESS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Industrial Process Cooling Towers source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Industrial Process Cooling Towers source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  15. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  16. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  17. [Drug allergy].

    PubMed

    Pichler, W J

    1994-01-01

    Drug allergies can cause a great variety of symptoms and can thus imitate various diseases, like in previous times the lues. Drug allergies can be classified into three subgroups, which differ in their pathophysiology and require different diagnostic steps: firstly, classical drug allergies which are directed to the drug itself, a reactive compound of it or some contamination of the drug; secondly, pseudoallergic reactions which are caused by nonimmune mediated degranulation of mast cells and basophils; and thirdly, autoimmune reactions in which the drug elicits an immune reaction to autologous structures. A very detailed (criminalistic) history has the highest priority for the clarification of a suspected drug-allergic reaction; in addition, skin tests, serological tests and the lymphocyte transformation test might be useful. One should differentiate between tests which imitate the drug-elicited allergic reaction (i.e. Coombs test in drug induced hemolytic anemia) and tests which solely indicate a sensitization, these tests should be interpreted accordingly.

  18. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  19. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  20. Prediction of residue-residue contact matrix for protein-protein interaction with Fisher score features and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H; Sun, Bilin

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play essential roles in many biological processes. Acquiring knowledge of the residue-residue contact information of two interacting proteins is not only helpful in annotating functions for proteins, but also critical for structure-based drug design. The prediction of the protein residue-residue contact matrix of the interfacial regions is challenging. In this work, we introduced deep learning techniques (specifically, stacked autoencoders) to build deep neural network models to tackled the residue-residue contact prediction problem. In tandem with interaction profile Hidden Markov Models, which was used first to extract Fisher score features from protein sequences, stacked autoencoders were deployed to extract and learn hidden abstract features. The deep learning model showed significant improvement over the traditional machine learning model, Support Vector Machines (SVM), with the overall accuracy increased by 15% from 65.40% to 80.82%. We showed that the stacked autoencoders could extract novel features, which can be utilized by deep neural networks and other classifiers to enhance learning, out of the Fisher score features. It is further shown that deep neural networks have significant advantages over SVM in making use of the newly extracted features.

  1. Drugs used in child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    Between 2000 and 2008, the American Association of Poison Control Centers recorded 1439 cases in which drugs or alcohol were used to mistreat children under 7 years of age, representing an average of 160 reports per year. Median age was 2 years, and 57% of victims were boys. The substances included psychotropic drugs, analgesics, cold remedies, alcohol, and illicit drugs. 18 children died, while 32 children experienced life-threatening effects or residual disability. It is not clear whether these results can be extrapolated to the French population. In France, a yearly survey of the Centres for Evaluation and Information on Pharmacodependence (CEIP) identified 162 cases of "chemical submission", 3 of which involved children. In practice, it is often difficult to recognise when a child is being maltreated, especially when medications, illicit drugs or alcohol are used. Taking into consideration the known adverse effect profile of a drug may provide a clue, help to limit harms to the child and allow appropriate management.

  2. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a ...

  3. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  4. Drugs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs for fever, cough, stuffy nose, runny nose, diarrhea, and allergies are common drugs which are especially helpful during times of illness. All medications should be kept out of the reach of children.

  5. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  6. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  7. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    PubMed Central

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; D’Andrea, Daniel; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the assessment of the intra-molecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect inter-domain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9. PMID:23760879

  8. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  9. Multiple myeloma, immunotherapy and minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Kusenda, J; Kovarikova, A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable heterogeneous hematological malignancy in which relapse is characterized by re-growth of residual tumor and immune suppression with a complex biology that affects many aspects of the disease and its response to treatment. The bone marrow microenvironment, including immune cells, plays a central role in MM pathogenesis, survival, and drug resistance. The advances in basic and translational research, introduction of novel agents, particularly combination therapies, improved indicators of quality of life and survival. Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) has revolutionized monitoring of treatment response in MM. The importance of MFC methodology will be further strengthened by the ongoing international standardization efforts. Results of MRD testing provide unique and clinically important information and demonstrated the prognostic significance of MRD in patients, leading to regulate treatment intensity in many contemporary protocols. In this review, we will summarize the principal approaches in MM immunotherapy, focusing how new agents have potential in the treatment of MM and application of MRD detection by MFC as a surrogate endpoint would allow quicker evaluation of treatment outcomes and rapid identification of effective new therapies.

  10. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  11. Quality control of residual solvent content in polymeric microparticles.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Kalpana; Athawale, Rajani B; Singh, Sarabjit

    2015-01-01

    Organic solvents are the innate part of pharmaceutical industry, playing vital role in the bulk drug substance as well as finished product manufacturing. Even though they are used for various crucial purposes, they still lack therapeutic beneficial effect and can be toxic if present in unacceptable limits in final product. Hence, their concentration must be regulated in the final pharmaceutical formulation. With the major development in the market of polymeric microparticles in past few decades, drug product manufacturers are paying more attention towards the development of new techniques for reducing residual solvent content of microparticles. This article sheds light on the importance of removal of organic volatile impurities from the formulation and its regulatory aspects. It also highlights how residual solvent affects various physicochemical characteristics of polymeric microparticles and suggests certain solutions as per the current state of art for limiting organic solvent content in the final product.

  12. Rapid depletion of marbofloxacin residues in rabbit after therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ligabue, Matteo; Lucchetti, Dario; Catone, Tiziana; Fabrizi, Laura; Marvasi, Luigi; Zaghini, Anna; Coni, Ettore

    2005-11-01

    Although rabbit meat production represents a very small percentage of the world meat market, this percentage has been growing continuously during the last 30 years. Rabbit is considered a minor food species, and therefore no drugs are specifically registered for this animal. This situation encourages rabbit farmers to make off-label use of antibacterial drugs authorized for food-producing animal species other than rabbits. In the present study, the distribution and elimination of the fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent marbofloxacin in rabbit muscle, liver, and kidney was investigated. Marbofloxacin was chosen as a representative of a new generation of antibacterial drugs active against most gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and mycoplasms; it is well tolerated and has short elimination times in bovine and swine species. Rabbits were treated with marbofloxacin at 2 mg kg of body weight(-1) for 5 days. Residual concentrations in liver, kidney, and muscle tissues were determined posttreatment with high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. Marbofloxacin was rapidly distributed and eliminated from rabbit tissues. Concentrations were higher in the liver and kidney than in muscle. However, 48 h after the end of treatment, marbofloxacin concentrations dropped below the maximum residue level fixed for this antibacterial drug in cattle and pigs. Considering the efficacy of marbofloxacin for the treatment of the most common rabbit diseases, its tolerability, and its short elimination time as verified in the present study, use of this antibacterial drug could be extended to therapeutic treatment of rabbits.

  13. Evaluation of a Bacillus stearothermophilus tube test as a screening tool for anticoccidial residues in poultry.

    PubMed

    Shitandi, Anakalo; Oketch, Aila; Mahungu, Symon

    2006-06-01

    A Bacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis C953 tube test was evaluated for its ability in detecting the residue of selected anticoccidial drugs in poultry, specially sulfamethazine, furazolidone, and amprolium. Various concentrations of each drug were injected into chicken liver and kidney tissues and these tissues were tested to determine the drug detection limits for each drug. The detection limit was defined as the drug concentration at which 95 % of the test results were interpreted as positive. The limits of detection in liver tissue were 0.35 microgram/ml for furazolidone, 0.70 microgram/ml for sulfamethazine and 7.80 microgram/ml for amprolium. In kidney tissues, they were 0.30 microgram/ml for furazolidone, 0.54 microgram/ml for sulfamethazine, and 7.6 microgram/ml for amprolium. It was concluded that this tube test could be used to screen for the residue of these three drugs in poultry.

  14. Evaluation of a Bacillus stearothermophilus tube test as a screening tool for anticoccidial residues in poultry

    PubMed Central

    Oketch, Aila; Mahungu, Symon

    2006-01-01

    A Bacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis C953 tube test was evaluated for its ability in detecting the residue of selected anticoccidial drugs in poultry, specically sulfamethazine, furazolidone, and amprolium. Various concentrations of each drug were injected into chicken liver and kidney tissues and these tissues were tested to determine the drug detection limits for each drug. The detection limit was defined as the drug concentration at which 95% of the test results were interpreted as positive. The limits of detection in liver tissue were 0.35 µg/ml for furazolidone, 0.70 µg/ml for sulfamethazine and 7.80 µg/ml for amprolium. In kidney tissues, they were 0.30 µg/ml for furazolidone, 0.54 µg/ml for sulfamethazine, and 7.6 µg/ml for amprolium. It was concluded that this tube test could be used to screen for the residue of these three drugs in poultry. PMID:16645344

  15. 9 CFR 318.20 - Use of animal drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of animal drugs. 318.20 Section 318.20 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... General § 318.20 Use of animal drugs. Animal drug residues are permitted in meat and meat food products if...

  16. 9 CFR 318.20 - Use of animal drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of animal drugs. 318.20 Section 318.20 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... General § 318.20 Use of animal drugs. Animal drug residues are permitted in meat and meat food products if...

  17. Hydrothermal carbonization of agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ivo; Blöhse, Dennis; Ramke, Hans-Günter

    2013-08-01

    The work presented in this article addresses the application of hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) to produce a solid fuel named HTC-Biochar, whose characteristics are comparable to brown coal. Several batch HTC experiments were performed using agricultural residues (AR) as substrates, commonly treated in farm-based biogas plants in Germany. Different AR were used in different combinations with other biomass residues. The biogas potential from the resulting process water was also determined. The combination of different AR lead to the production of different qualities of HTC-Biochars as well as different mass and energy yields. Using more lignocellulosic residues lead to higher mass and energy yields for the HTC-Biochar produced. Whilst residues rich in carbohydrates of lower molecular weight such as corn silage and dough residues lead to the production of a HTC-Biochar of better quality and more similar to brown coal. Process water achieved a maximum of 16.3 L CH4/kg FM (fresh matter).

  18. Effect of cooking on enrofloxacin residues in chicken tissue.

    PubMed

    Lolo, M; Pedreira, S; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B I; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A; Fente, C

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different cooking processes (microwaving, roasting, boiling, grilling and frying) on naturally incurred enrofloxacin residues in chicken muscle. Enrofloxacin and its metabolite, ciprofloxacin, were analysed using a validated LC-MS method with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ), respectively, of 2 and 5 ng g-1 quinolones in muscle samples. The method was shown to be linear over the range 5-500 ng g-1. Mean intra-day relative standard deviation (RSD) at a concentration of 50 ng g-1 (n = 6) was 6%; inter-day RSD was 12%. A recovery study demonstrated that 65-101%, of the drug and metabolite could be recovered from the tissue. The RSD with naturally incurred roasted chicken breast was 9.18% at a concentration of 11 +/- 1.01 ng g-1 (n = 6). In water, enrofloxacin remained stable for 3 h when heated at 100 degrees C. It was concluded that residue data from raw tissue are valid for estimation of consumer exposure to this drug, as well as the ADI calculations because cooking procedures did not affect enrofloxacin residues, which remained stable during heating. However, there was an apparent decrease in quinolone concentration in tissue because some was lost by exudation into the liquid used for cooking. Conversely, for a cooking procedure with water loss, there was an apparent increase in residue concentration.

  19. Detecting ketamine in beverage residues: Application in date rape detection.

    PubMed

    Albright, Jessica A; Stevens, Sarah A; Beussman, Douglas J

    2012-05-01

    Ketamine can be used to facilitate date-rape when unknowingly spiked into a victim's beverage. If a biological sample is not available from the victim, the beverage container might be the only remaining source of forensic evidence. We present a rapid, simple analysis method for the detection of ketamine in wet or dry beverage residues based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Wet residues consist of the final few drops (<1 ml) in a container while dry residues are the remains once all liquid has evaporated. By using LC-MS, which readily handles aqueous samples, often no derivatization or sample extraction is needed, thus reducing analysis time and lab technician involvement. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides an enhancement in both selectivity and sensitivity. We have studied a range of beverages and determined limits of detection between 1.2 × 10-3 and 1.3 × 10-4 mg/ml, compared to 0.21-0.85 mg/ml used in most date-rape scenarios. This paper represents the first published report of using LC-MS/MS for the analysis of beverage residues for the presence of a date-rape drug. This method could replace the current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and provide a faster, more selective method for the analysis of date-rape drugs, requiring virtually no sample preparation.

  20. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  1. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: SYNTHETIC ORGANIC ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate. Update 9/19/2006: Proposed Rule June 14, 2006 - Risk Assessment complete September 2005 and only available in the Docket.

  2. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  3. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  4. Pesticide residues in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Lentza-Rizos, C; Avramides, E J

    1995-01-01

    The attacks of pests and diseases and the presence of weeds make it necessary to apply pesticides to olive trees to ensure crop protection. Residues of these compounds may remain and contaminate the oil produced. For the analysis of pesticide residues in olive oil, the most common methods are multiresidue methods for fatty substrates, based on partitioning between hexane or light petroleum and acetonitrile. Recently, other methods have been applied, such as ready-to-use, disposable minicolumns or direct injection of oil into a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with a precolumn with an oil recovery tank. Although several pesticides are registered in oil-producing countries for use on olive trees, available literature on the level and fate of residues is very limited. However, it is clear that fat-soluble pesticides tend to concentrate in the oil, both after full coverage and bait spraying, and their use close to harvest should therefore be avoided. Because it is sometimes necessary to use such pesticides late in autumn because of their effectiveness in cases of severe attack, residue trials should be carried out to determine the residue concentration in oil and to set a reasonable preharvest safety interval. Data produced by such trials would permit the establishment of MRLs (tolerances) in olive oil to cover cases where the residues, although relatively high, are not of toxicological significance for consumers (risk assessment). Such is the case with corn oil and the fat-soluble insecticide methyl pirimiphos, registered in the U.S. for use on corn. The U.S. EPA tolerance for methyl pirimiphos in corn is 8 mg/kg, whereas it is 11 times higher (88 mg/kg) for corn oil because it is known to concentrate in the oil. Similar provisions for olive oil, based on data from residue trials according to Good Agricultural Practice, the long-term toxicity of each pesticide as expressed by its ADI for man, and olive oil consumption patterns, would facilitate international trade

  5. Collection of sugarcane crop residue for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Eiland, B.R.; Clayton, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    Crop residue left after sugarcane harvesting was recovered using a forage harvester and a large round baler. The quantity, bulk density and moisture content of the crop residue was determined in four fields. Crop residue from 7 ha was burned in boilers at a sugar mill. Samples of this residue were tested by a laboratory and compared to sugarcane bagasse.

  6. Residual Structures in Latent Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2010-01-01

    Several alternatives are available for specifying the residual structure in latent growth curve modeling. Two specifications involve uncorrelated residuals and represent the most commonly used residual structures. The first, building on repeated measures analysis of variance and common specifications in multilevel models, forces residual variances…

  7. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  8. Drug shortage.

    PubMed

    Conde, Crystal

    2011-10-01

    Calcium gluconate, neostigmine, propofol, epinephrine, furosemide, and a host of sterile injectables, as well as antibiotics and other medications, are among the drugs on an expansive list of shortages tracked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A record 246 drugs were in short supply as of June, according to FDA. That figure has many Texas physicians worried about potential risks to patient safety and quality of care.

  9. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  10. Choosing forest residues management alternatives.

    Treesearch

    John M. Pierovich; Richard C. Smith

    1973-01-01

    Forest residues management involves disposal, modification, or utilization of wood products. The costs and benefits of the several alternatives available to forest managers must be evaluated in relation to land management goals and constraints in four areas: (1) unused wood fiber, (2) conflagrations, (3) impairment of forest resources, and (4) opposition to treatment...

  11. Residual Stresses in Ground Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-13

    stress near the surface can be lower. The level of residual stress is also strongly affected by carbon,’3 which influences the microplastic behaviour of...1966, Vol. 14, 99-104. 14. C. 3. )4cMahon: “ Microplastic Behaviour in Iron” in Mv. in Mater . S d . Res., Vol. 2, 121-140, Interscience, New York

  12. Managing woodwaste: Yield from residue

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, E.; Rayner, S.

    1993-12-31

    Historically, the majority of sawmill waste has been burned or buried for the sole purpose of disposal. In most jurisdictions, environmental legislation will prohibit, or render uneconomic, these practices. Many reports have been prepared to describe the forest industry`s residue and its environmental effect; although these help those looking for industry-wide or regional solutions, such as electricity generation, they have limited value for the mill manager, who has the on-hands responsibility for generation and disposal of the waste. If the mill manager can evaluate waste streams and break them down into their usable components, he can find niche market solutions for portions of the plant residue and redirect waste to poor/no-return, rather than disposal-cost, end uses. In the modern mill, residue is collected at the individual machine centre by waste conveyors that combine and mix sawdust, shavings, bark, etc. and send the result to the hog-fuel pile. The mill waste system should be analyzed to determine the measures that can improve the quality of residues and determine the volumes of any particular category before the mixing, mentioned above, occurs. After this analysis, the mill may find a niche market for a portion of its woodwaste.

  13. Potential hazards of fumigant residues.

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, L

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of fumigants (primarily ethylene dibromide, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, ethylene oxide, symdibromotetetrachloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorovos, carbon tetrachloride, methyl bromide) as well as their degradation products in foodstuffs and soil have been examined mainly in regard to the potential mutagenicity of their residues. PMID:789068

  14. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content Drugs Home Drugs Find information on FDA-approved HIV/ ... infection drugs and investigational HIV/AIDS drugs. Search Drugs Search drug Search Icon What's this? Close Popup ...

  15. Results of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholding periods for flunixin and ceftiofur in heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animals would be useful for drug residue avoidance programs. Simple inhibition tests used at slaughter do not detect some drug tolerance concentrations such as those for flunixin and ceftiofur-metabolites. This experim...

  16. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Search by Drug Name, Active Ingredient, or Application Number Enter at ...

  17. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  18. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  19. Protein Structure Network-based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongjie; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although structure-based drug design (SBDD) has become an indispensable tool in drug discovery for a long time, it continues to pose major challenges to date. With the advancement of "omics" techniques, systems biology has enriched SBDD into a new era, called polypharmacology, in which multi-targets drug or drug combination is designed to fight complex diseases. As a preliminary tool in systems biology, protein structure networks (PSNs) treat a protein as a set of residues linked by edges corresponding to the intramolecular interactions existing in folded structures between the residues. The PSN offers a computationally efficient tool to study the structure and function of proteins, and thus may facilitate structurebased drug design. Herein, we provide an overview of recent advances in PSNs, from predicting functionally important residues, to charactering protein-protein interactions and allosteric communication paths. Furthermore, we discuss potential pharmacological applications of PSN concepts and tools, and highlight the application to two families of drug targets, GPCRs and Hsp90. Although the application of PSNs as a framework for computer-aided drug discovery has been limited to date, we put forward the potential utility value in the near future and propose the PSNs could also serve as a new tool for polypharmacology research.

  20. Caspase-3 binds diverse P4 residues in peptides as revealed by crystallography and structural modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Bin; Fu, Guoxing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2009-03-31

    Caspase-3 recognition of various P4 residues in its numerous protein substrates was investigated by crystallography, kinetics, and calculations on model complexes. Asp is the most frequent P4 residue in peptide substrates, although a wide variety of P4 residues are found in the cellular proteins cleaved by caspase-3. The binding of peptidic inhibitors with hydrophobic P4 residues, or no P4 residue, is illustrated by crystal structures of caspase-3 complexes with Ac-IEPD-Cho, Ac-WEHD-Cho, Ac-YVAD-Cho, and Boc-D(OMe)-Fmk at resolutions of 1.9-2.6 {angstrom}. The P4 residues formed favorable hydrophobic interactions in two separate hydrophobic regions of the binding site. The side chains of P4 Ile and Tyr form hydrophobic interactions with caspase-3 residues Trp206 and Trp214 within a non-polar pocket of the S4 subsite, while P4 Trp interacts with Phe250 and Phe252 that can also form the S5 subsite. These interactions of hydrophobic P4 residues are distinct from those for polar P4 Asp, which indicates the adaptability of caspase-3 for binding diverse P4 residues. The predicted trends in peptide binding from molecular models had high correlation with experimental values for peptide inhibitors. Analysis of structural models for the binding of 20 different amino acids at P4 in the aldehyde peptide Ac-XEVD-Cho suggested that the majority of hydrophilic P4 residues interact with Phe250, while hydrophobic residues interact with Trp206, Phe250, and Trp214. Overall, the S4 pocket of caspase-3 exhibits flexible adaptation for different residues and the new structures and models, especially for hydrophobic P4 residues, will be helpful for the design of caspase-3 based drugs.

  1. Anthelmintics residues in raw milk. Assessing intake by a children population.

    PubMed

    Tsiboukis, D; Sazakli, E; Jelastopulu, E; Leotsinidis, M

    2013-01-01

    Anthelmintics, such as benzimidazoles and probenzimidazoles, are veterinary drugs used against endoparasites in food producing animals. A number of these drugs are considered responsible for embryotoxicity and teratogenicity. The residue levels of Albendazole, Febantel, Fenbendazole, Mebendazole and some of their metabolites (Albendazole sulphoxide, Albendazole sulphone, Fenbendazole sulfone) were assessed in 123 (42 goat, 69 sheep, 12 bovine) raw milk samples collected from all farms throughout Southern Greece. Sample analysis was performed by HPLC with Diode Array Detector. A high percentage (27.6%) of the samples examined was found to be positive for the investigated compounds. In 14 samples (11.4%), the residues' concentration exceeded the established Maximum Residue Limits. Estimated Daily Intakes were calculated for a population of 723 children aged 10-12 years. Data on milk consumption were obtained by personal interview through a 7-day food frequency questionnaire. The maximum Estimated Daily Intakes for the anthelmintic residues, concerning raw milk, did not exceed the current Acceptable Daily Intake.

  2. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  3. Limits of adaptation, residual interferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokry, Miroslav (Editor); Erickson, J. C., Jr.; Goodyer, Michael J.; Mignosi, Andre; Russo, Giuseppe P.; Smith, J.; Wedemeyer, Erich H.; Newman, Perry A.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of determining linear residual wall interference appear to be well established theoretically; however they need to be validated, for example by comparative studies of test data on the same model in different adaptive-wall wind tunnels as well as in passive, ventilated-wall tunnels. The GARTEur CAST 7 and the CAST 10/DOA 2 investigations are excellent examples of such comparative studies. Results to date in both one-variable and two-variable methods for nonlinear wall interference indicate that a great deal more research and validation are required. The status in 2D flow is advanced over that in 3D flow as is the case generally with adaptive-wall development. Nevertheless, it is now well established that for transonic testing with extensive supercritical flow present, significant wall interference is likely to exist in conventional ventilated test sections. Consequently, residual correction procedures require further development hand-in-hand with further adaptive-wall development.

  4. 40 CFR 180.185 - DCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances for the combined residues of the herbicide dimethyl... residues of the herbicide dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) and its metabolites monomethyl... residues. Tolerances are established for the combined indirect or inadvertent residues of the...

  5. 40 CFR 180.185 - DCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances for the combined residues of the herbicide dimethyl... residues of the herbicide dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) and its metabolites monomethyl... residues. Tolerances are established for the combined indirect or inadvertent residues of the...

  6. 40 CFR 180.185 - DCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances for the combined residues of the herbicide dimethyl... residues of the herbicide dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) and its metabolites monomethyl... residues. Tolerances are established for the combined indirect or inadvertent residues of the...

  7. 40 CFR 180.185 - DCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances for the combined residues of the herbicide dimethyl... residues of the herbicide dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) and its metabolites monomethyl... residues. Tolerances are established for the combined indirect or inadvertent residues of the...

  8. 40 CFR 180.185 - DCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances for the combined residues of the herbicide dimethyl... residues of the herbicide dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) and its metabolites monomethyl... residues. Tolerances are established for the combined indirect or inadvertent residues of the...

  9. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O`Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination.

  10. Electromechanical Apparatus Measures Residual Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.; Flom, Yury

    1993-01-01

    Nondestructive test exploits relationship between stress and eddy-current-probe resistance. Yields data on residual stress or strain in metal tension/compression specimen (stress or strain remaining in specimen when no stress applied from without). Apparatus is assembly of commercial equipment: tension-or-compression testing machine, eddy-current probe, impedance gain-and-phase analyzer measuring impedance of probe coil, and desktop computer, which controls other equipment and processes data received from impedance gain-and-phase analyzer.

  11. Pesticidal residues in animal tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Menzie, C.M.; Adomaitis, V.A.; Reichel, W.L.

    1960-01-01

    Tests with penned starlings, rats, pheasants, and ducks indicated that each species differs in sensitivity to the various pesticides. Residues in tissues are proportional to the degree of exposure during area treatment and they are also found in animals shot six or more months after treatment. The presence of more than 20-30 ppm of DDT, 20 ppm of chlordan, and 6-20 ppm of heptachlor epoxide in quail tissues indicated that the birds had ingested lethal dosages of the pesticides.

  12. Electromechanical Apparatus Measures Residual Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.; Flom, Yury

    1993-01-01

    Nondestructive test exploits relationship between stress and eddy-current-probe resistance. Yields data on residual stress or strain in metal tension/compression specimen (stress or strain remaining in specimen when no stress applied from without). Apparatus is assembly of commercial equipment: tension-or-compression testing machine, eddy-current probe, impedance gain-and-phase analyzer measuring impedance of probe coil, and desktop computer, which controls other equipment and processes data received from impedance gain-and-phase analyzer.

  13. [Club drugs].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse.

  14. Persistence of residues in milk following antibiotic treatment of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E H; Jones, G M; McGilliard, M L

    1988-08-01

    A study was conducted to determine the persistence of antibiotic residues in milk beyond the recommended withdrawal period. Composite milk samples (n = 122) were collected from 58 lactating dairy cows in the university herd receiving antibiotic treatments for any reason but only when administered as a single drug. Samples were obtained 72 h posttreatment and sampling continued every 24 h until result for antibiotic residue was negative by the Bacillus stearothermophilus disc assay. The antibiotic (n = 7) administered accounted for significant variation in drug persistence; however, route of administration, case number (for cows treated for more than one episode), number of days treated, animal's body weight, lactation number, and daily milk production did not affect drug persistence. Chi-square analysis indicated that 21% of milk samples were positive for residues beyond the recommended withholding period. Milk samples from cows treated with cephapirin and penicillin were the only samples that exceeded recommended withdrawal times. Often doses administered exceeded label directions.

  15. Geotechnical characteristics of residual soils

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Residual soils are products of chemical weathering and thus their characteristics are dependent upon environmental factors of climate, parent material, topography and drainage, and age. These conditions are optimized in the tropics where well-drained regions produce reddish lateritic soils rich in iron and aluminum sesquioxides and kaolinitic clays. Conversely, poorly drained areas tend towards montmorillonitic expansive black clays. Andosols develop over volcanic ash and rock regions and are rich in allophane (amorphous silica) and metastable halloysite. The geological origins greatly affect the resulting engineering characteristics. Both lateritic soils and andosols are susceptible to property changes upon drying, and exhibit compaction and strength properties not indicative of their classification limits. Both soils have been used successfully in earth dam construction, but attention must be given to seepage control through the weathered rock. Conversely, black soils are unpopular for embankments. Lateritic soils respond to cement stabilization and, in some cases, lime stabilization. Andosols should also respond to lime treatment and cement treatments if proper mixing can be achieved. Black expansive residual soils respond to lime treatment by demonstrating strength gains and decreased expansiveness. Rainfall induced landslides are typical of residual soil deposits.

  16. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained <500 ppM americium and <2500 ppM magnesium. The process operates by sorbing PuCl/sub 6//sup 2 -/ from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO/sub 3/-4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO/sub 3/ precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed.

  17. Drug excipients.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Antal, István

    2006-01-01

    The therapeutical use of drugs involves the application of dosage forms, serving as carrier systems together with several excipients to deliver the active ingredient to the site of action. Drug delivery technology combines an understanding of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology with the skill of formulation, aiming the preparation of improved pharmaceuticals. The recently introduced Biopharmaceutical Classification System provides guidance for dosage form design, taking the molecular and physico-chemical properties of drugs into consideration through their solubility and permeability characteristics. Pharmaceutical excipients used for oral dosage form have been traditionally assumed as being inert. However, recent experience and new results have shown that they can interact with the active drug ingredient, affecting its dissolution, absorption and bioavailability. Classification of the excipients is based on their role in the pharmaceutical formulation and on their interactions influencing drug delivery, based on their chemical and physico-chemical properties. The main classes are the antioxidants, coating materials, emulgents, taste- and smell-improvers, ointment bases, conserving agents, consistency-improvers and disintegrating materials. Some of the excipients may serve multiple purposes; for example, methylcellulose is a coating material, is applied in the preparation of suspensions, to increase viscosity, as a disintegrating agent or binder in tablets. The aim of this paper is to review the drug-excipients with respect to their chemistry, importance and interactions altering the pharmacokinetics of the drug substances. Emphasis will be given to two major classes of excipients: the antioxidants and disintegrants (substances facilitating disintegration of the drug tablets in the gastro-intestinal tract). Details will be given on the mechanisms through which they can alter drug effectiveness and tolerance, and control their application. Examples and references

  18. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  19. Prediction of Flunixin Tissue Residue Concentrations in Livers from Diseased Cattle.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Baynes, R E; Tell, L A; Riviere, J E

    2013-10-25

    Flunixin, a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was a leading cause of violative residues in cattle. The objective of this analysis was to explore how the changes in pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters that may be associated with diseased animals affect the predicted liver residue of flunixin in cattle. Monte Carlo simulations for liver residues of flunixin were performed using the PK model structure and relevant PK parameter estimates from a previously published population PK model for flunixin in cattle. The magnitude of a change in the PK parameter value that resulted in a violative residue issue in more than one percent of a cattle population was compared. In this regard, elimination clearance and volume of distribution affected withdrawal times. Pathophysiological factors that can change these parameters may contribute to the occurrence of violative residues of flunixin.

  20. Prediction of flunixin tissue residue concentrations in livers from diseased cattle.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Baynes, R E; Tell, L A; Riviere, J E

    2013-12-01

    Flunixin, a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was a leading cause of violative residues in cattle. The objective of this analysis was to explore how the changes in pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters that may be associated with diseased animals affect the predicted liver residue of flunixin in cattle. Monte Carlo simulations for liver residues of flunixin were performed using the PK model structure and relevant PK parameter estimates from a previously published population PK model for flunixin in cattle. The magnitude of a change in the PK parameter value that resulted in a violative residue issue in more than one percent of a cattle population was compared. In this regard, elimination clearance and volume of distribution affected withdrawal times. Pathophysiological factors that can change these parameters may contribute to the occurrence of violative residues of flunixin.

  1. 77 FR 9528 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; N-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; N... Register of November 25, 2011 (76 FR 72617), codifying a method of detection for residues of n-methyl-2... issued a final rule codifying a method of detection for residues of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone in edible...

  2. Drug dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... and sometimes intense feelings of well-being, elation, happiness, excitement, and joy. These include heroin, opium, codeine, ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Drug Abuse Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  3. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... Medicine Abuse Electronic Cigarettes (e-Cigarettes) Fentanyl Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana Marijuana as Medicine MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) ...

  4. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  5. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescription drug misuse? Also known as: Opioids: Hillbilly Heroin, Oxy, OC, Oxycotton, Percs, Happy Pills, Vikes Depressants: ... opioid receptors—the same receptors that respond to heroin . These receptors are found on nerve cells in ...

  6. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  7. Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... and household aerosol products. Due to the toxic nature of these substances, users may develop brain damage. ... manufactured or pharmaceutical drugs. Due to the toxic nature of inhalants, users may develop brain damage of ...

  8. Drug abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... home or in interpersonal relationships Problems with the law Physical risks that come with using drugs in ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  9. Pesticide residues in essential oils: evaluation of a database.

    PubMed

    Klier, B; Knödler, M; Peschke, J; Riegert, U; Steinhoff, B

    2015-01-01

    In the context of a revision of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) general monograph Essential oils (2098), the need to include a test for pesticides is being discussed. According to published literature, some oils, mainly those produced by cold pressing (e.g. citrus oils), can contain relevant amounts of pesticide residues, whereas distilled oils showed positive findings in only a few cases. Recent evaluation of a database containing 127 517 sets of data compiled over 8 years, showed positive results in 1 150 cases (0.90 per cent), and the limits of Ph. Eur. general chapter 2.8.13 Pesticide residues or Regulation (EC) 396/2005, both applicable to herbal drugs, were exceeded in 392 cases (0.31 per cent, equivalent to 34.1 per cent of the positive results), particularly in cases of oils produced by cold pressing. From these results, it can be concluded that a general test on pesticides in the Ph. Eur. general monograph on essential oils is not required for most oils used in medicinal products. Therefore, it is proposed to limit the testing of essential oils for pesticide residues to those cases where potential residues are more of a concern, either due to the type of production process or to those processes where pesticides are actively used during cultivation of the plant (e.g. as documented according to Good Agricultural and Collection Practice (GACP)). Furthermore, in order to assess any potential risk, an approach using the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) can be made.

  10. PESTICIDE RESIDUE RECOVERIES FROM SURFACE WIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors with a primary source resulting from residue deposition on household surfaces. Accurate measurements of surface residues is essential for estimating exposure from different routes. Various procedures have been developed ...

  11. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  12. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  13. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  14. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  15. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  16. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  17. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  18. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  19. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  20. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  1. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  2. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  3. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  4. Interpretation on Recycling Plastics from Shredder Residue

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is considering an interpretation of its regulations that would generally allow for recycling of plastic separated from shredder residue under the conditions described in the Voluntary Procedures for Recycling Plastics from Shredder Residue.

  5. PESTICIDE RESIDUE RECOVERIES FROM SURFACE WIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors with a primary source resulting from residue deposition on household surfaces. Accurate measurements of surface residues is essential for estimating exposure from different routes. Various procedures have been developed ...

  6. Residual sleepiness in sleep apnea patients treated by continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Gasa, Merce; Tamisier, Renaud; Launois, Sandrine H; Sapene, Marc; Martin, Francis; Stach, Bruno; Grillet, Yves; Levy, Patrick; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2013-08-01

    Hypoxic brain damage might explain persistent sleepiness in some continuous positive airway pressure-compliant obstructive sleep apnea called residual excessive sleepiness. Although continuous positive airway pressure may not be fully efficient in treating this symptom, wake-promoting drug prescription in residual excessive sleepiness is no longer allowed by the European Medicines Agency. The aim of this study is to describe residual excessive sleepiness phenotypes in a large prospective sample of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Residual excessive sleepiness was defined by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score ≥ 11. Eligible patients from the French National Sleep Registry attending follow-up continuous positive airway pressure visits numbered 1047. Patients using continuous positive airway pressure < 3 h (n = 275), with residual apnea-hypopnea index > 15 h⁻¹ (n = 31) or with major depression were excluded (n = 150). Residual excessive sleepiness prevalence in continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea was 13% (18% for those with an initial Epworth Sleepiness Scale score > 11), and significantly decreased with continuous positive airway pressure use (9% in ≥ 6 h night⁻¹ continuous positive airway pressure users, P < 0.005). At the time of diagnosis, patients with residual excessive sleepiness had worse subjective appreciation of their disease (general health scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and fatigue score), and complained more frequently of continuous positive airway pressure side-effects. Residual excessive sleepiness prevalence was lower in severe obstructive sleep apnea than in moderate obstructive sleep apnea (11% when AHI > 30 h⁻¹ versus 18% when AHI 15-30, P < 0.005). There was no relationship between residual excessive sleepiness and body mass index, cardiovascular co-morbidities or diabetes. Continuous positive airway pressure improved symptoms in the whole population, but to a lower extent in patients with

  7. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  8. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Before the arrival of modern pharmacotherapy, drug hypersensitivity reactions were virtually unknown. Toxicity from the many plant-, animal- and inorganic material-derived remedies must have been much more common. One famous example is the intoxications from mercury, which has been used in many ailments, but particularly for the treatment of syphilis. It was only in the 19th century when more and more active principles from e.g. plants were identified, and when the observations of skin reactions became more prevalent. In 1877, Heinrich Köbner used for the first time the term 'drug exanthema' (Arznei-Exanthem). Since then, many different types of exanthemas from the mild macular-papular forms to the severe life-threatening bullous exanthemas such as toxic epidermal necrolysis have been observed from numerous drugs. The systematic investigation of severe drug reactions has only started in the second half of the 20th century, parallel to the increasing knowledge in immunology. Drug hypersensitivity reactions still remain one of the most challenging problems in allergology due to their manifold clinical manifestations and their very diverse pathophysiology. The introduction of new drugs and in turn the emergence of new hypersensitivity reactions will remain a challenge in the future. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  10. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues. ...

  11. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues. ...

  12. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Residue Effects Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The PCB Residue Effects (PCBRes) Database was developed to assist scientists and risk assessors in correlating PCB and dioxin-like compound residues with toxic effects. The purpose is to develop PCB critical residue values for fish, mammals and birds, especially as these relate to aquatic and aquatic-dependent species.

  13. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  14. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  15. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  16. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  17. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  18. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  19. Recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Iven, V G

    1998-04-01

    The war against substance abuse continues in today's society and the sports world often seems to be in the middle of all the attention, especially among the media. New recreational drugs arrive on the scene from time to time, much like GHB, but the predominant substances of abuse continue to be marijuana, cocaine, and alcohol. As research evolves in efforts to stay current and determine any potential performance effects of new substances, the literature has changed very little regarding the more common recreational drug and their effects on athletic participation. New studies are emerging comparing recreational drug use among athletes versus nonathletes. Findings include differences among these groups regarding individual sports, team sports, contact versus noncontact sports, and gender-specific sports. Higher risk-taking behavior contribute to these findings and is known to be more prevalent among an athletic population. Overall, illicit drug use in America in 1996 remained about the same as in 1995 after rising steadily since the early 1990s. About 13 million Americans used drugs at least monthly in 1996, up slightly from 12.8 million in 1995. Teenage drug and alcohol use fell to 9% in 1996, down from 10.9% in 1995. Attempts to recognize the early signs of substance abuse and identify those athletes "at risk" of experimenting with elicit drugs are paramount to the optimal treatment response program. The preparticipation examination remains the best initial format for establishing a sound physician-patient relationship. A thorough history including risk factors, family history, and personnel tendencies toward substance abuse should be obtained followed by an ongoing relationship between the athlete and his team physician. The better rapport between the athlete and team physician, the higher likelihood of early recognition of a developing substance abuse problem. Likewise, the earliest intervention usually leads to the most optimal treatment response.

  20. Drug misuse.

    PubMed

    Waller, T

    1992-12-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Structure-based methods for predicting target mutation-induced drug resistance and rational drug design to overcome the problem.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance has become one of the biggest challenges in drug discovery and/or development and has attracted great research interests worldwide. During the past decade, computational strategies have been developed to predict target mutation-induced drug resistance. Meanwhile, various molecular design strategies, including targeting protein backbone, targeting highly conserved residues and dual/multiple targeting, have been used to design novel inhibitors for combating the drug resistance. In this article we review recent advances in development of computational methods for target mutation-induced drug resistance prediction and strategies for rational design of novel inhibitors that could be effective against the possible drug-resistant mutants of the target.

  2. Survey of animal drugs with carcinogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A

    1984-01-01

    Residues of animal drugs with carcinogenic potential cannot always be avoided in food. The risk/benefit evaluation of carcinogenic drugs used in food-producing animals is a scientifically unresolved problem. Nonetheless, a pragmatic solution taking into account such drugs' putative mechanisms of action, their relative potency, and their significance in the prevention and therapy of disease must and can be achieved. While it is unlikely that a new animal drug possessing overt carcinogenic properties would pass the approval process practiced in most countries today, a number of carcinogenic drugs for use in food-producing animals are currently on the market. Their re-evaluation from the viewpoint of human food safety is necessary, particularly if they are genotoxic (for example nitrofurans, nitroimidazoles, quinoxaline-di-N-oxides). The carcinogenicity of hormonally active animal drugs, none of which has genotoxic potential, is believed to be related to their hormonal action. Thus, the establishment of a threshold level for these drugs and their residues appears possible. It is difficult to evaluate certain other nongenotoxic animal drugs which are carcinogenic at very high dose levels and in one species only. No carcinogenic substance, regardless of its hypothetical mechanism of action, should be used in food-producing animals for which a very significant therapeutic benefit has not been demonstrated.

  3. Managing residual limb hyperhidrosis in wounded warriors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Kentosh, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Residual limb dermatologic problems are a common concern among young active traumatic amputee patients who strive to maintain an active lifestyle. Hyperhidrosis of residual limbs is a recognized inciting factor that often contributes to residual limb dermatoses and is driven by the design of the prosthetic liner covering the residual limb. Treatment of hyperhidrosis in this population presents a unique challenge. Several accepted treatments of hyperhidrosis can offer some relief but have been limited by lack of results or side-effect profiles. Microwave thermal ablation has presented an enticing potential for residual limb hyperhidrosis.

  4. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  5. Intercompatibility of residual fuel blends

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Asher, J.; Krenis, G.; Luria, D.

    1995-04-01

    It is a well known fact that two fuel oils, thermally stable by themselves, may produce sludge of asphaltenic nature when blended together. Settling out of asphaltenes from the fuel medium will result in strainer and burner plugging, causing serious operational difficulties in industrial and marine fuel systems. It was the aim of the present study to establish criteria for the phenomenon of incompatibility. The parameters which influence thermal stability of the blend were assessed, and an attempt was made to predict possible separation of asphaltenes from fuel oil mixtures. Fuel oils originating from Brazil, France, Hong-Kong, Greece, U.S.A., Japan as well as locally (Israel) produced residual fuels were mixed. Thermal stability of the blend was determined by ASTM D-4740 method. In some cases, total sediment was measured by ASTM D-4870. Blends of fuels were stored at 50{degrees}C to assess the effect of elevated temperatures on thermal stability. It was found that most of the blends were compatible though composed of fuels originating from different refineries. Density, Pour Point, Sulfur content and Xylene Number served as useful tools for predicting the thermal stability of residual fuel blends.

  6. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  7. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  8. Residual number processing in dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia - a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts - is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia.

  9. Residual number processing in dyscalculia☆

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia – a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts – is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia. PMID:24266008

  10. Drug legalization, harm reduction, and drug policy.

    PubMed

    DuPont, R L; Voth, E A

    1995-09-15

    The current U.S. policy options on drug use are reviewed in the context of the history of drug policy in the United States. A restrictive drug policy is a deterrent to drug use and helps reduce drug-related costs and societal problems. Although legalization or decriminalization of drugs might reduce some of the legal consequences of drug use, increased drug use would result in harmful consequences.

  11. Residual symptoms in elderly major depression remitters.

    PubMed

    Gastó, C; Navarro, V; Catalán, R; Portella, M J; Marcos, T

    2003-07-01

    To assess residual symptoms in severe geriatric major depression in remission, and to determine baseline clinical and sociodemographic predictors of residual symptoms in remitters. A total of 108 elderly patients with unipolar major depression were evaluated and treated naturalistically for 9 months so as to record the predictors of residual symptoms in remitters. In order to reduce the likelihood of confusing residual symptoms with normal effects of age, 30 control subjects were also monitored. Seventy-nine patients (73.1%) were considered remitters and 82.3% of remitters showed residual symptoms. Medical burden, chronic stress and subjective social support were the only variables which predicted the severity of residual symptoms in remitters. Residual symptoms in elderly patients with major depression in remission should not only be attributed exclusively to intrinsic factors of the illness or the age of the individual patient, but also to external factors.

  12. An essential tyrosine residue of Aspergillus polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Stratilová, E; Dzúrová, M; Markovic, O; Jörnvall, H

    1996-03-11

    Based on strict conservation of a tyrosine residue in 24 polygalacturonases, tyrosine modification was assessed in two different forms of the Aspergillus enzyme. The second subform was unknown in structure but submitted to sequence analysis and was found also to have the conserved tyrosine residue. Results of chemical modifications are consistent in showing inactivation of the proteins with all tyrosine-reactive agents tested, acetic anhydride, N-acetyl imidazole, and tetranitromethane. Furthermore, after acetylation, regeneration of enzyme activity was possible with hydroxylamine. Spectrophotometric pH titration showed that one accessible tyrosine residue is ionized at pH 9.3-9.5, whereas the remaining, masked residues are all ionized at pH 10.5. It is concluded that one tyrosine residue is catalytically important, in agreement with the inactivation and reactivation data, that this residue is accessible, and that it is likely to correspond to the strictly conserved residue observed in all forms.

  13. Quantitation of the residual DNA from rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Dai, Huixia; Liu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Liping; Pang, Jianlei; Ou, Jiquan; Yang, Daichang

    2014-04-01

    Residual DNA in recombinant protein pharmaceuticals can potentially cause safety issues in clinical applications; thus, maximum residual limit has been established by drug safety authorities. Assays for residual DNA in Escherichia coli, yeast, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell expression systems have been established, but no rice residual DNA assay for rice expression systems has been designed. To develop an assay for the quantification of residual DNA that is produced from rice seed, we established a sensitive assay using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on the 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. We found that a 40-cycle qPCR exhibited a linear response when the template concentration was in the range of 2×10(4) to 0.2pg of DNA per reaction in TaqMan and SYBR Green I assays. The amplification efficiency was 103 to 104%, and the amount of residual DNA from recombinant human serum albumin from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA) was less than 3.8ng per dosage, which was lower than that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Our results indicate that the current purification protocol could efficiently remove residual DNA during manufacturing and processing. Furthermore, this protocol could be viable in other cereal crop endosperm expression systems for developing a residual DNA quantitation assay using the highly conserved 5S rRNA gene of the crops.

  14. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  15. Designing and screening of universal drug from neem (Azadirachta indica) and standard drug chemicals against influenza virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aftab; Javed, Muhammad Rizwan; Rao, Abdul Qayyum; Husnain, Tayyab

    2016-12-16

    Different strains of influenza virus are affecting a large number of people worldwide. Many synthetic antiviral medicines are available for influenza virus in the market. But still there is a need for the development of universal drugs against these strains of influenza virus. For this purpose conserved residues within the influenza virus nucleoprotein have been retrieved. The drugs, previously known to have antiviral properties, were screened to identify the best candidate universal drug against Influenza virus strains. Compounds from leaf extracts of neem, were also screened to identify the natural drugs without side effects. Molecular docking identified three potential compounds (Nimbaflavone, Rutin, and Hyperoside) having perfect binding with reported conserved residues (ASP302, SER50) of influenza virus nucleoprotein that is involved in the binding of drugs. Further analysis showed Hyperoside as a universal drug against various influenza strains. Some chemical drugs were also evaluated through screening against nucleoprotein. The results showed six drugs (OMS, CBX, LGH, Naproxen, BMS-883559, and BMS-885838) which were interacting with same conserved residues (ASP302, TYR52, SER50, GLY288, SER376, and ARG99) as were found in the case of neem phytochemicals. Hyperoside from neem leaf extract along with drugs LGH, Naproxen, BMS-885838, and BMS-883559 showed best interactions with conserved residues of nucleoprotein. The compound Hyperoside from neem leaf extract along with drugs LGH, Naproxen, BMS-885838, and BMS-883559 showed best interactions with conserved residues of nucleoprotein. So these compounds have been identified for their potential against influenza strains to be utilized as a universal drug.

  16. Study Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... think clearly, and be alert. Doctors recommend that teens get about 9 hours of sleep per night. Exercise . Get blood pumping the natural ... Date reviewed: July 2015 previous 1 • 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Homework Help How Much Sleep Do I Need? Prescription Drug Abuse How to ...

  17. Drug Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  18. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  19. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  20. Determination of pymetrozine residues in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Talebi, K; Ghazizadeh Ahsaii, H

    2006-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the residues of pymetrozin in cucumber under field conditions. Plots of cucumber (cv. Daminus) were sprayed with pymetrozine (Chess, WG50) at two different rates; 0.5 and 1.0 kg/ha. Samples were collected 2 hours and 1, 2, 3, and 4 days after spraying and pymetrozin residues were determined using high performance liquid chromatography with UV detector. Two hours after spraying, the residues was 0.326 mg/kg for 0.5 kg/ha treatment. The residues decreased to 0.013 mg/kg on the third day and no residue was detected four days after spraying. In 1.0 kg/ha treatment, the residue was 0.627 mg/kg, two hours after spraying, which decreased to 0.028 mg/kg, on the third day, but no residues was found in samples which collected four days after spraying. In farm plots which received 0.5 kg/ha pymetrozine, the residues in peels and peeled cucumber were 0.359 and 0.308 mg/kg respectively, two hours after spraying, but in plots which sprayed at 1.0 kg/ha, the residues were 0.648 and 0.609 mg/kg respectively. Furthermore the residues in peels showed a significant difference with those of peeled and unpeeled cucumber under field conditions.

  1. Examining factors that influence the effectiveness of cleaning antineoplastic drugs from drug preparation surfaces: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Chua, Prescillia Ps; Danyluk, Quinn; Astrakianakis, George

    2014-06-01

    Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs has been documented to result in various adverse health effects. Despite the implementation of control measures to minimize exposure, detectable levels of drug residual are still found on hospital work surfaces. Cleaning these surfaces is considered as one means to minimize the exposure potential. However, there are no consistent guiding principles related to cleaning of contaminated surfaces resulting in hospitals to adopt varying practices. As such, this pilot study sought to evaluate current cleaning protocols and identify those factors that were most effective in reducing contamination on drug preparation surfaces. Three cleaning variables were examined: (1) type of cleaning agent (CaviCide®, Phenokil II™, bleach and chlorhexidine), (2) application method of cleaning agent (directly onto surface or indirectly onto a wipe) and (3) use of isopropyl alcohol after cleaning agent application. Known concentrations of antineoplastic drugs (either methotrexate or cyclophosphamide) were placed on a stainless steel swatch and then, systematically, each of the three cleaning variables was tested. Surface wipes were collected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine the percent residual of drug remaining (with 100% being complete elimination of the drug). No one single cleaning agent proved to be effective in completely eliminating all drug contamination. The method of application had minimal effect on the amount of drug residual. In general, application of isopropyl alcohol after the use of cleaning agent further reduced the level of drug contamination although measureable levels of drug were still found in some cases.

  2. Treatment intensification does not reduce residual HIV-1 viremia in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Dinoso, J B; Kim, S Y; Wiegand, A M; Palmer, S E; Gange, S J; Cranmer, L; O'Shea, A; Callender, M; Spivak, A; Brennan, T; Kearney, M F; Proschan, M A; Mican, J M; Rehm, C A; Coffin, J M; Mellors, J W; Siliciano, R F; Maldarelli, F

    2009-06-09

    In HIV-1-infected individuals on currently recommended antiretroviral therapy (ART), viremia is reduced to <50 copies of HIV-1 RNA per milliliter, but low-level residual viremia appears to persist over the lifetimes of most infected individuals. There is controversy over whether the residual viremia results from ongoing cycles of viral replication. To address this question, we conducted 2 prospective studies to assess the effect of ART intensification with an additional potent drug on residual viremia in 9 HIV-1-infected individuals on successful ART. By using an HIV-1 RNA assay with single-copy sensitivity, we found that levels of viremia were not reduced by ART intensification with any of 3 different antiretroviral drugs (efavirenz, lopinavir/ritonavir, or atazanavir/ritonavir). The lack of response was not associated with the presence of drug-resistant virus or suboptimal drug concentrations. Our results suggest that residual viremia is not the product of ongoing, complete cycles of viral replication, but rather of virus output from stable reservoirs of infection.

  3. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  4. Optical systolic array processor using residue arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Casasent, D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of residue arithmetic to increase the accuracy and reduce the dynamic range requirements of optical matrix-vector processors is evaluated. It is determined that matrix-vector operations and iterative algorithms can be performed totally in residue notation. A new parallel residue quantizer circuit is developed which significantly improves the performance of the systolic array feedback processor. Results are presented of a computer simulation of this system used to solve a set of three simultaneous equations.

  5. Studies Of Residual Flexibility And Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1995-01-01

    Collection of reports presents theoretical and experimental studies in which concept of residual flexibility applied to modal vibration testing and verification of mathematical models of vibrations of flexible structure constrained by another structure. "Residual flexibility" denotes that part of interface flexibility due to mode shapes out of frequency range of test. Studies directed toward assessing residual-flexibility approach as substitute for fixed-base vibrational testing of payloads installed in spacecraft.

  6. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  7. Organochlorine residues in finfish from Maryland waters 1976-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, M.; Topping, J.J.

    1985-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticide and herbicide levels were monitored in samples of a variety of edible finfish harvested from the Maryland section of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries over a five-year period (1976-80). Qualitative and quantitative information was obtained for the various polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), heptachlor, alpha-BHC, chlordane, DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlorepoxide, lindane, mirex, methoxychlor, aldrin, toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene, kepone and dacthal. In addition to analyses of the flesh of the animals, organochlorine residue levels were determined in roe or gonad tissue of several samples. Striped bass, white perch and yellow perch samples showed significantly higher concentrations of certain of these substances in roe or gonad tissue, especially PCB's, chlordane, DDD and dieldrin. Significantly higher levels of six organochlorine residues were found in the gonad tissue of striped bass; however, similar studies on gonad tissue of American Shad, harvested from the same region, show no such enhancement. Rather, the reverse is true; levels of certain organochlorine residues are higher in flesh tissue. All mean values, and virtually all individual values of organochlorine concentrations in the edible portion of the fish were within the U.S. Food and Drug Administration guideline, where such guidelines have been established.

  8. Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

    2010-06-29

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  9. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L [Rigby, ID; Kenney, Kevin L [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Christopher T [Idaho Falls, ID; Hess, J Richard [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  10. Identification of kinetically hot residues in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Demirel, M. C.; Atilgan, A. R.; Jernigan, R. L.; Erman, B.; Bahar, I.

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent studies called attention to the presence of kinetically important residues underlying the formation and stabilization of folding nuclei in proteins, and to the possible existence of a correlation between conserved residues and those participating in the folding nuclei. Here, we use the Gaussian network model (GNM), which recently proved useful in describing the dynamic characteristics of proteins for identifying the kinetically hot residues in folded structures. These are the residues involved in the highest frequency fluctuations near the native state coordinates. Their high frequency is a manifestation of the steepness of the energy landscape near their native state positions. The theory is applied to a series of proteins whose kinetically important residues have been extensively explored: chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, cytochrome c, and related C2 proteins. Most of the residues previously pointed out to underlie the folding process of these proteins, and to be critically important for the stabilization of the tertiary fold, are correctly identified, indicating a correlation between the kinetic hot spots and the early forming structural elements in proteins. Additionally, a strong correlation between kinetically hot residues and loci of conserved residues is observed. Finally, residues that may be important for the stability of the tertiary structure of CheY are proposed. PMID:9865946

  11. Optimal drug use and rational drug policy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Geoffrey F

    2011-12-01

    The Müller & Schumann (M&S) view of drug use is courageous and compelling, with radical implications for drug policy and research. It implies that most nations prohibit most drugs that could promote happiness, social capital, and economic growth; that most individuals underuse rather than overuse drugs; and that behavioral scientists could use drugs more effectively in generating hypotheses and collaborating empathically.

  12. [Studies on residue on ignition test in JP].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Teruyuki; Umeyama, Yumi; Hirata, Kaoru; Koda, Shigetaka

    2002-01-01

    The Residue on Ignition Test specified in General Tests, Japanese Pharmacopeia is a method to measure the weight of the residual substance not volatilized when the sample is ignited under a constant condition. Generally, this test is intended to determine the content of inorganic substances contained as impurities in an organic substance, and, occasionally, to determine the amount of inorganic substances contained as components in an organic substance. Our laboratories have adopted this test method for the above two purposes in the case of the quality control for drug substances, synthetic intermediates, starting materials in the course of drug development. Some validation studies have been conducted for this test in order to clarify the quantitation limit in the case of an application for the former purpose, and trueness and precision in the case of the latter purpose. Consequently, the quantitation limit was determined as around 0.50 mg. The amount of sample should be determined based on this quantitation limit (mg) and the level of quantitation limit (%) or that of specification limit (%) should be considered from the view point of each testing purpose. The test method was also confirmed to have a good trueness and precision as the determination method for an alkaline salt, such as sodium, potassium or calcium salt, of organic compounds, as long as the test is operated with great care not to scatter the content out of crucible during ignition to incineration.

  13. Veterinary drugs: disposition, biotransformation and risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fink-Gremmels, J; van Miert, A S

    1994-12-01

    Veterinary drugs may only be produced, distributed and administered after being licensed. This implies that, prior to marketing, a critical evaluation of the pharmaceutical quality, the clinical efficacy and the over-all pharmacological and toxicological properties of the active substances will be performed by national and/or supranational authorities. However, despite a sophisticated legal (harmonized) framework, a number of factors involved in residue formation and safety assessment remain unpredictable or dependant on the current 'state of the art' in the understanding of molecular pharmacology and toxicology. For example, drug disposition and residue formation in the target animal species may be influenced by a broad variety of physiological parameters including age, sex and diet, as well as by pathological conditions especially the acute phase response to infection. These factors affect both drug disposition and metabolite formation. Furthermore, current thinking in toxicological risk assessment is influenced by recent developments in molecular toxicology and thus by an increased but still incomplete understanding of the interaction of a toxic compound with the living organism. General recognized principles in the evaluation of potential toxicants are applied in the recommendation of withdrawal times and the establishment of maximum residue limits (MRL values). Apart from toxicological-based assessment, increasing awareness is directed to other than toxicological responses, especially the potential risk of effects of antimicrobial residues on human gastrointestinal microflora. Thus, the methodology of risk assessment is discussed in the context of the recently established legal framework within the European Union.

  14. Subcutaneous implants for long-acting drug therapy in laboratory animals may generate unintended drug reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael; Tyler, Betty M.; DeTolla, Louis; Zhao, Ming; Kobrin, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background: Long-acting therapy in laboratory animals offers advantages over the current practice of 2-3 daily drug injections. Yet little is known about the disintegration of biodegradable drug implants in rodents. Objective: Compare bioavailability of buprenorphine with the biodegradation of lipid-encapsulated subcutaneous drug pellets. Methods: Pharmacokinetic and histopathology studies were conducted in BALB/c female mice implanted with cholesterol-buprenorphine drug pellets. Results: Drug levels are below the level of detection (0.5 ng/mL plasma) within 4-5 days of implant. However, necroscopy revealed that interstitial tissues begin to seal implants within a week. Visual inspection of the implant site revealed no evidence of inflammation or edema associated with the cholesterol-drug residue. Chemical analyses demonstrated that the residues contained 10-13% of the initial opiate dose for at least two weeks post implant. Discussion: The results demonstrate that biodegradable scaffolds can become sequestered in the subcutaneous space. Conclusion: Drug implants can retain significant and unintended reservoirs of drugs. PMID:24459402

  15. Minimal residual disease in cancer therapy--Small things make all the difference.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Sohvi; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) is a major hurdle in the eradication of malignant tumors. Despite the high sensitivity of various cancers to treatment, some residual cancer cells persist and lead to tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Obvious reasons for residual disease include mechanisms of secondary therapy resistance, such as the presence of mutant cells that are insensitive to the drugs, or the presence of cells that become drug resistant due to activation of survival pathways. In addition to such unambiguous resistance modalities, several patients with relapsing tumors do not show refractory disease and respond again when the initial therapy is repeated. These cases cannot be explained by the selection of mutant tumor cells, and the precise mechanisms underlying this clinical drug resistance are ill-defined. In the current review, we put special emphasis on cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms that may explain mechanisms of MRD that are independent of secondary therapy resistance. In particular, we show that studying genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), which highly resemble the disease in humans, provides a complementary approach to understand MRD. In these animal models, specific mechanisms of secondary resistance can be excluded by targeted genetic modifications. This allows a clear distinction between the selection of cells with stable secondary resistance and mechanisms that result in the survival of residual cells but do not provoke secondary drug resistance. Mechanisms that may explain the latter feature include special biochemical defense properties of cancer stem cells, metabolic peculiarities such as the dependence on autophagy, drug-tolerant persisting cells, intratumoral heterogeneity, secreted factors from the microenvironment, tumor vascularization patterns and immunosurveillance-related factors. We propose in the current review that a common feature of these various mechanisms is cancer cell dormancy. Therefore, dormant cancer

  16. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  17. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  18. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  19. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats.

  20. Fgd residues: a commercial opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    Juzwiak, J.H.; Smith, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on actual operating experience in the handling and processing of ash and FGD by-products by Conversion Systems at the Orlando Utility Commission Stanton Energy Center at Orlando, Florida. The discussion discloses how the Poz-O-Tec stabilization technology, the most widely used disposal technology for wet FGD sludge, has been modified and improved to maximize the by-product recycling and produce the most cost effective disposal option. Recently, CSI has directed 100% of the Stanton Facility FGD stabilization production into the generation of the commercial aggregate called Poz-O-Lite Aggregate. This aggregate product is used in the manufacture of concrete block, replacing ordinary crushed stone. CSI has been able to develop this reuse application using the low permeability and superior strength of the stabilized material. The utility also benefits from the stabilized material which is not recycled as it offers opportunity for co-disposal of other combustion residues from some of the utility's oil fired plants in cells that are lined and then capped with the stabilized material. In summary, virtually all production of the by-products, from combustion or flue gas desulfurization at the Stanton Energy Center are now being used for commercial application, except that specifically required as liners for the disposal of other materials on site.

  1. Assessment of secondary crop residues. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashare, E.; Leuschner, A.P.; West, C.E.; Langton, B.

    1981-03-01

    This report is the first of three reports assessing the feasibility of converting secondary agricultural residues to energy in the form of either methane gas or ethyl alcohol. Secondary agricultural residues are defined in this study as those residues resulting from biomass processing to produce primary products; e.g., whey from cheese processing, vegetable processing wastes, residues from paper pulping, etc. This report summarizes the first two phases of this study, data compilation, and evaluation. Subsequent reports will analyze the technical and economic feasibility of converting these residues to energy and the implementability of this technology. The industries for which data has been compiled in this report include vegetable, fruit, seafood, meat, poultry, and dairy processing and the pulp, paper, and paperboard industry. The data collected include raw product input, final processed product output, residue types, and quantity, residue concentration, biodegradability, seasonality of production, and geographic distribution of processing facilities. In general, these industries produce a relatively solid residue ranging in total solids concentration from 10 to 50% and a dilute liquid residue with an organic content (measured as COD or BOD) ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand mg/l. Due to the significant quantities of residues generated in each of the industries, it appears that the potential exists for generating a substantial quantity of energy. For a particular industry this quantity of energy can range from only one percent upwards to nearly thirty-five percent of the total processing energy required. The total processing energy required for the industries included in this study is approximately 2.5 quads per year. The potential energy which can be generated from these industrial residues will be 0.05 to 0.10 quads per year or approximately 2 to 4 percent of the total demand.

  2. Use of Combined Uncertainty of Pesticide Residue Results for Testing Compliance with Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs).

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Slate, Andrew; Whitaker, Thomas B; Suszter, Gabriella; Ambrus, Árpád

    2015-05-13

    The uncertainty of pesticide residue levels in crops due to sampling, estimated for 106 individual crops and 24 crop groups from residue data obtained from supervised trials, was adjusted with a factor of 1.3 to accommodate the larger variability of residues under normal field conditions. Further adjustment may be necessary in the case of mixed lots. The combined uncertainty of residue data including the contribution of sampling is used for calculation of an action limit, which should not be exceeded when compliance with maximum residue limits is certified as part of premarketing self-control programs. On the contrary, for testing compliance of marketed commodities the residues measured in composite samples should be greater than or equal to the decision limit calculated only from the combined uncertainty of the laboratory phase of the residue determination. The options of minimizing the combined uncertainty of measured residues are discussed. The principles described are also applicable to other chemical contaminants.

  3. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  4. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Month Approvals, tentative approvals, and supplements Original New Drug Approvals (NDAs and BLAs) by Month All applications ... FDA. Does not include tentative approvals. Original Abbreviated New Drug Approvals (ANDAs) by Month Generic Drug Approvals. Does ...

  5. Discrete structural features among interface residue-level classes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) is essential for molecular functions in biological cells. Investigation on protein interfaces of known complexes is an important step towards deciphering the driving forces of PPIs. Each PPI complex is specific, sensitive and selective to binding. Therefore, we have estimated the relative difference in percentage of polar residues between surface and the interface for each complex in a non-redundant heterodimer dataset of 278 complexes to understand the predominant forces driving binding. Results Our analysis showed ~60% of protein complexes with surface polarity greater than interface polarity (designated as class A). However, a considerable number of complexes (~40%) have interface polarity greater than surface polarity, (designated as class B), with a significantly different p-value of 1.66E-45 from class A. Comprehensive analyses of protein complexes show that interface features such as interface area, interface polarity abundance, solvation free energy gain upon interface formation, binding energy and the percentage of interface charged residue abundance distinguish among class A and class B complexes, while electrostatic visualization maps also help differentiate interface classes among complexes. Conclusions Class A complexes are classical with abundant non-polar interactions at the interface; however class B complexes have abundant polar interactions at the interface, similar to protein surface characteristics. Five physicochemical interface features analyzed from the protein heterodimer dataset are discriminatory among the interface residue-level classes. These novel observations find application in developing residue-level models for protein-protein binding prediction, protein-protein docking studies and interface inhibitor design as drugs. PMID:26679043

  6. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  7. Measurment Of Residual Stress In Ferromagnetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Grainger, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic (MAC) and magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) techniques combined to provide complete characterization of residual stresses in ferromagnetic structural materials. Combination of MAC and MAE techniques makes it possible to characterize residual tension and compression without being limited by surface conditions and unavailability of calibration standards. Significant in field of characterization of materials as well as detection of fatigue failure.

  8. Residuals Management and Water Pollution Control Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    This pamphlet addresses the problems associated with residuals and water quality especially as it relates to the National Water Pollution Control Program. The types of residuals and appropriate management systems are discussed. Additionally, one section is devoted to the role of citizen participation in developing management programs. (CS)

  9. 40 CFR 158.2290 - Residue chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pesticide may be used in a food-handling establishment unless data including, but not limited to... show that residues will not occur in food or feed. 4. If an antimicrobial pesticide may be applied to a... residues of concern, as part of programs to monitor pesticides in the U.S. food supply. 12. Data are...

  10. 40 CFR 158.2290 - Residue chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pesticide may be used in a food-handling establishment unless data including, but not limited to... show that residues will not occur in food or feed. 4. If an antimicrobial pesticide may be applied to a... residues of concern, as part of programs to monitor pesticides in the U.S. food supply. 12. Data are...

  11. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue. ...

  12. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue. ...

  13. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue. ...

  14. Crop Residues: The Rest of the Story

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent scientific publication stated that to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, the most permanent and rapid solution would be to sink crop residues to the ocean floor where they would be buried in deep ocean sediments. However, mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations by removing crop residu...

  15. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  16. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  17. Does Bt Corn Really Produce Tougher Residues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bt corn hybrids produce insecticidal proteins that are derived from a bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis. There have been concerns that Bt corn hybrids produce residues that are relatively resistant to decomposition. We conducted four experiments that examined the decomposition of corn residues und...

  18. Residuals Management and Water Pollution Control Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    This pamphlet addresses the problems associated with residuals and water quality especially as it relates to the National Water Pollution Control Program. The types of residuals and appropriate management systems are discussed. Additionally, one section is devoted to the role of citizen participation in developing management programs. (CS)

  19. Residue decomposition of submodel of WEPS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Residue Decomposition submodel of the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) simulates the decrease in crop residue biomass due to microbial activity. The decomposition process is modeled as a first-order reaction with temperature and moisture as driving variables. Decomposition is a function of ...

  20. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM RESIDUES

    DOEpatents

    Schaap, W.B.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for the recovery of uranium from insoluble oxide residues resistant to repeated leaching with mineral acids. The residue is treated with gaseous hydrogen fluoride, then with hydrogen and again with hydrogen fluoride, preferably at 500 to 700 deg C, prior to the mineral acid leaching.

  1. Processing hardwood bark residues by screening

    Treesearch

    David M. Emanuel

    1978-01-01

    Most of the hardwood bark residues removed by floating-cutterhead or rosserhead debarkers can be processed into acceptable bark products by screening alone. And by prescreening bark residues, operators of bark processing plants can use smaller hammermills than otherwise are required, thus lowering investment and energy costs.

  2. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  3. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  4. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  5. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  6. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  7. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  8. 48 CFR 1450.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 1450.104 Section 1450.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104 Residual powers....

  9. Residue management: Back to the roots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Addressing the issues of climate change and sustainable biomass feedstocks have soil as a common theme. Managing crop residues is directly related to soil management. Understanding how soil and crop residue management interact provides insight on how to assure agricultural soil can serve as a carbon...

  10. Multi-state complex angular momentum residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylwe, Karl-Erik

    2006-09-01

    A relation between a multi-state complex angular momentum (CAM) pole residue and the corresponding CAM-state wavefunction is derived for a real symmetric potential matrix. The result generalizes a residue formula available for single-channel atomical collision systems and it is based on a diagonalization of the S matrix together with the use of exact Wronskian relations.

  11. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  12. 40 CFR 240.208 - Residue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residue. 240.208 Section 240.208 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.208 Residue. ...

  13. Residue contact-count potentials are as effective as residue-residue contact-type potentials for ranking protein decoys

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Dan M; Filippis, Ioannis; Stehr, Henning; Duarte, Jose; Lappe, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background For over 30 years potentials of mean force have been used to evaluate the relative energy of protein structures. The most commonly used potentials define the energy of residue-residue interactions and are derived from the empirical analysis of the known protein structures. However, single-body residue 'environment' potentials, although widely used in protein structure analysis, have not been rigorously compared to these classical two-body residue-residue interaction potentials. Here we do not try to combine the two different types of residue interaction potential, but rather to assess their independent contribution to scoring protein structures. Results A data set of nearly three thousand monomers was used to compare pairwise residue-residue 'contact-type' propensities to single-body residue 'contact-count' propensities. Using a large and standard set of protein decoys we performed an in-depth comparison of these two types of residue interaction propensities. The scores derived from the contact-type and contact-count propensities were assessed using two different performance metrics and were compared using 90 different definitions of residue-residue contact. Our findings show that both types of score perform equally well on the task of discriminating between near-native protein decoys. However, in a statistical sense, the contact-count based scores were found to carry more information than the contact-type based scores. Conclusion Our analysis has shown that the performance of either type of score is very similar on a range of different decoys. This similarity suggests a common underlying biophysical principle for both types of residue interaction propensity. However, several features of the contact-count based propensity suggests that it should be used in preference to the contact-type based propensity. Specifically, it has been shown that contact-counts can be predicted from sequence information alone. In addition, the use of a single-body term allows

  14. Drug Infusion Systems: Technologies, Performance, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uoo R; Peterfreund, Robert A; Lovich, Mark A

    2017-02-16

    This review aims to broadly describe drug infusion technologies and raise subtle but important issues arising from infusion therapy that can potentially lead to patient instability and morbidity. Advantages and disadvantages of gravity-dependent drug infusion are described and compared with electromechanical approaches for precise control of medication infusion, including large-volume peristaltic and syringe pumps. This review discusses how drugs and inert carriers interact within infusion systems and outlines several complexities and potential sources of drug error. Major topics are (1) the importance of the infusion system dead volume; (2) the quantities of coadministered fluid and the concept of microinfusion; and (3) future directions for drug infusion.The infusion system dead volume resides between the point where drug and inert carrier streams meet and the patient's blood. The dead volume is an often forgotten reservoir of drugs, especially when infusion flows slow or stop. Even with medications and carriers flowing, some mass of drug always resides within the dead volume. This reservoir of drug can be accidentally delivered into patients. When dose rate is changed, there can be a significant lag between intended and actual drug delivery. When a drug infusion is discontinued, drug delivery continues until the dead volume is fully cleared of residual drug by the carrier. When multiple drug infusions flow together, a change in any drug flow rate transiently affects the rate of delivery of all the others. For all of these reasons, the use of drug infusion systems with smaller dead volumes may be advantageous.For critically ill patients requiring multiple infusions, the obligate amount of administered fluid can contribute to volume overload. Recognition of the risk of overload has given rise to microinfusion strategies wherein drug solutions are highly concentrated and infused at low rates. However, potential risks associated with the dead volume may be magnified

  15. Analysis of pirlimycin residues in beef muscle, milk and honey by a biotin-streptavidin-amplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food contamination caused by veterinary drug residues is a world-wide public health concern and requires continuous monitoring. In this paper, we describe a biotin–streptavidin-amplified ELISA (BA-ELISA) for detecting pirlimycin residues in beef, milk, and honey. The IC50 value of the BA-ELISA was...

  16. Simultaneous screening analysis of 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid and quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid residues in edible animal tissues by a competitive indirect immunoassay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunoassays contribute greatly to veterinary drug residue analysis and food safety, but there are no reported immunoassays on simultaneously detecting MQCA and QCA, the marker residues for carbadox and olaquindox. It is extremely difficult to produce broad-specificity antibodies that bind both res...

  17. New Method for the Analysis of Flukicide and Other Anthelmintic Residues in Bovine Milk and Liver using LC-MS/MS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) multi-residue method for the simultaneous quantification and identification of 38 residues of the most widely used anthelmintic veterinary drugs (including benzimidazoles, macrocyclic lactones, and flukicides) in milk and liver has been d...

  18. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  19. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polybrominated ion-exchange resin (as a source of bromine) under the supervision of trained personnel. (2... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food...

  20. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  1. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  2. Acute and residual interactive effects of repeated administrations of oral methamphetamine and alcohol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Gunderson, Erik W.; Levin, Frances R.; Foltin, Richard W.; Hart, Carl L.

    2011-01-01

    Although methamphetamine and alcohol are commonly used together in a binge-like pattern, there is a dearth of empirical data investigating the repeated effects of this drug combination. The current study examined acute and residual mood, performance, and physiological effects of methamphetamine alone, alcohol alone, and the combination. Nine adult male volunteers completed this 20-day within-participant, residential laboratory study. During four 5-day blocks of sessions, participants were administered oral methamphetamine (0, 10 mg) combined with alcohol (0, 0.375, 0.75 g/kg) three times (day 2: AM, day 2: PM, and day 3: PM). Breath alcohol concentrations, cardiovascular, subjective, and cognitive/psychomotor performance effects were assessed before drug administration and repeatedly thereafter. Subjective and objective sleep measures were also assessed; residual effects were assessed on days 3–5 of each block. Following the first drug administration, the methamphetamine–alcohol combination produced greater elevations of heart rate and ratings of “good drug effect” compared to either drug alone. Methamphetamine attenuated alcohol-related performance decrements and feelings of intoxication, whereas alcohol attenuated methamphetamine-related sleep disruptions. By the third administration, many of these effects were significantly diminished, suggesting that participants developed tolerance. Few residual effects were observed. These data show that methamphetamine combined with alcohol produced a profile of effects that was different from the effects of either drug alone. The largely positive effects of the drug combination (i.e., greater euphoria, and fewer performance and sleep disruptions) might explain why these drugs are often used in combination. PMID:21748253

  3. Computational Prediction of Hot Spot Residues

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2013-01-01

    Most biological processes involve multiple proteins interacting with each other. It has been recently discovered that certain residues in these protein-protein interactions, which are called hot spots, contribute more significantly to binding affinity than others. Hot spot residues have unique and diverse energetic properties that make them challenging yet important targets in the modulation of protein-protein complexes. Design of therapeutic agents that interact with hot spot residues has proven to be a valid methodology in disrupting unwanted protein-protein interactions. Using biological methods to determine which residues are hot spots can be costly and time consuming. Recent advances in computational approaches to predict hot spots have incorporated a myriad of features, and have shown increasing predictive successes. Here we review the state of knowledge around protein-protein interactions, hot spots, and give an overview of multiple in silico prediction techniques of hot spot residues. PMID:22316154

  4. Process for treatment of residual gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nolden, K.

    1980-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

  5. An Analysis of Central Residues Between Ligand-Bound and Ligand-Free Protein Structures Based on Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Amala, Arumugam; Emerson, Isacc Arnold

    2017-08-01

    Depiction of protein structures as networks of interacting residues has enabled us to understand the structure and function of the protein. Previous investigations on closeness centrality have identified protein functional sites from three- dimensional structures. It is well recognized that ligand binding to a receptor protein induces a wide range of structural changes. An interesting question is how central residues function during conformational changes triggered during ligand binding? The aim of this study is to comprehend at what extent central residues change during ligand binding to receptor proteins. To determine this, we examined 37 pairs of protein structures consisting of ligand-bound and ligand-free forms. These protein structures were modelled as an undirected network and significant central residues were obtained using residue centrality measures. In addition to these, the basic network parameters were also analysed. On analysing the residue centrality measures, we observed that 60% of central residues were common in both the ligand-bound and ligand-free states. The geometry of the central residues revealed that they were situated closer to the protein center of the mass. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of central residues in amino acids substitutions and in the evolution itself. The closeness centrality was also analyzed among different protein domain sizes and the values gradually declined from single-domains to multi-domain proteins suggesting that the network has potential for hierarchical organization. Betweenness centrality measure was also used to determine the central residues and 31% of these residues were common between the holo/apo states. Findings reveal that central residues play a significant role in determining the functional properties of proteins. These results have implications in predicting binding/active site residues, specifically in the context of drug designing, if additional information concerning ligand binding is

  6. Recycling of auto shredder residue.

    PubMed

    Nourreddine, Menad

    2007-01-31

    Currently, about 75% of end-of-life vehicle's (ELV) total weight is recycled in EU countries. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residues (ASR) or auto fluff, is disposed of as landfill because of its complexity. It is a major challenge to reduce this percentage of obsolete cars. The European draft directive states that by the year 2006, only 15% of the vehicle's weight can be disposed of at landfill sites and by 2015, this will be reduced to 5%. The draft directive states that a further 10% can be incinerated. The quantities of shredder fluff are likely to increase in the coming years. This is because of the growing number of cars being scrapped, coupled with the increase in the amount of plastics used in cars. In Sweden, some current projects are focusing on recycling of ASR material. In this paper some different alternatives for using this material are reported. The hypothetical injection of ASR into a blast furnace concentrating on ASR's effect to some blast furnace (BF) parameters has been completed using a blast furnace mass balance model. As a result, in principle, ASR can be used as reducing agent in the BF process if certain conditions are met. The particle size of ASR material must be controlled to ensure optimal gasification of the material in the raceway. Regarding the chemical composition of ASR, the non-ferrous content can affect the pig iron quality, which is difficult to rectify at a later point. The most attractive recycling alternative is to use the products obtained from pyrolysis of ASR in appropriate metallurgical processes.

  7. Detection of toxic heavy metals and pesticide residue in herbal plants which are commonly used in the herbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mruthyumjaya Meda; Kumarmeena, Ajay; Galib

    2011-10-01

    Herbal formulations are getting popular throughout the world and commercialized extensively for various medicinal properties. WHO has emphasized the need for quality assurance of herbal products, including testing of heavy metals and pesticides residues. In view of WHO guidelines, single herbal drugs used in herbal formulations were collected from local market, for testing heavy metals and persistent pesticides residue. Therefore, in the present case, we have examined few local samples of certain herbs viz. Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica, and Withania somnifera. The present studies were selected for estimation of four heavy metals namely Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury. Apart from these, pesticide residue Viz. Organochlorine pesticides, Organophosphorus pesticides, and Pyrethroids were analyzed in the four samples of single crude drugs. Heavy metals and pesticide residue were found below detection limits in all the samples.

  8. A Novel, Unusually Efficacious Duocarmycin Carbamate Prodrug That Releases No Residual Byproduct

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Amanda L.; Duncan, Katharine K.; Parelkar, Nikhil K.; Weir, Scott J.; Vielhauer, George A.; Boger, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    A unique heterocyclic carbamate prodrug of seco-CBI-indole2 that releases no residual byproduct is reported as a new member of a class of hydrolyzable prodrugs of the duocarmycin and CC-1065 family of natural products. The prodrug was designed to be activated by hydrolysis of a carbamate releasing the free drug without the cleavage release of a traceable extraneous group. Unlike prior carbamate prodrugs examined that are rapidly cleaved in vivo, the cyclic carbamate was found to be exceptionally stable to hydrolysis under both chemical and biological conditions providing a slow, sustained release of the exceptionally potent free drug. An in vivo evaluation of the prodrug found that its efficacy exceeded that of the parent drug, that its therapeutic window of efficacy versus toxicity is much larger than the parent drug, and that its slow free drug release permitted the safe and efficacious use of doses 150-fold higher than the parent compound. PMID:22650244

  9. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  10. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... immediate or delayed. What Is an Allergy to Medication/Drugs? Allergies to drugs/medications are complicated, because ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  15. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using extreme learning machines with the information of spatial neighbour residues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Wenjuan; Gao, Qiang; Xiong, Congcong

    2014-08-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming increasingly important for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. For each interface residue or target residue to be predicted, the authors extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatial neighbor residues, that is, the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). Here, feature selection is performed using random forests to avoid over-fitting. Thereafter, the extreme learning machine is employed to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. By the 5-fold cross validation in the training set, their method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.1% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.459, and outperforms some alternative machine learning methods in the comparison study. Furthermore, their method achieves ACC of 76.8% and MCC of 0.401 in the independent test set, and is more effective than the major existing hot spot predictors. Their prediction method offers a powerful tool for uncovering candidate residues in the studies of alanine scanning mutagenesis for functional protein interaction sites.

  16. Non-local residue-residue contacts in proteins are more conserved than local ones.

    PubMed

    Noivirt-Brik, Orly; Hazan, Gershon; Unger, Ron; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-02-01

    Non-covalent residue-residue contacts drive the folding of proteins and stabilize them. They may be local-i.e. involve residues that are close in sequence, or non-local. It has been suggested that, in most proteins, local contacts drive protein folding by providing crucial constraints of the conformational space, thus allowing proteins to fold. We compared residues that are involved in local contacts to residues that are involved in non-local contacts and found that, in most proteins, residues in non-local contacts are significantly more conserved evolutionarily than residues in local contacts. Moreover, non-local contacts are more structurally conserved: a contact between positions that are distant in sequence is more likely to exist in many structural homologues compared with a contact between positions that are close in sequence. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of protein folding and may allow for better prediction of critical intra-chain contacts.

  17. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  18. Antioxidant properties of roasted coffee residues.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wen-Jye; Wang, Bor-Sen; Chang, Lee-Wen; Duh, Pin-Der

    2005-04-06

    The antioxidant activity of roasted coffee residues was evaluated. Extraction with four solvents (water, methanol, ethanol, and n-hexane) showed that water extracts of roasted coffee residues (WERCR) produced higher yields and gave better protection for lipid peroxidation. WERCR showed a remarkable protective effect on oxidative damage of protein. In addition, WERCR showed scavenging of free radicals as well as the reducing ability and to bind ferrous ions, indicating that WERCR acts as both primary and secondary antioxidants. The HPLC analyses showed that phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and nonphenolic compounds [caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfuraldehyde] remained in roasted coffee residues. These compounds showed a protective effect on a liposome model system. The concentrations of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds in roasted coffee residues were 8,400 and 20,400 ppm, respectively. In addition, the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) remaining in roasted coffee residues were believed to show antioxidant activity. These data indicate that roasted coffee residues have excellent potential for use as a natural antioxidant source because the antioxidant compounds remained in roasted coffee residues.

  19. Prediction of machining induced residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod, Monangi; Reddy, Yarkareddy Gopi; Prakash Marimuthu, K.

    2017-07-01

    Whenever a component is machined, residual stresses are induced in it. These residual stresses induced in the component reduce its fatigue life, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. Thus it is important to predict and control the machining-induced residual stress. A lot of research is being carried out in this area in the past decade. This paper aims at prediction of residual stresses during machining of Ti-6Al-4V. A model was developed and under various combinations of cutting conditions such as, speed, feed and depth of cut, the behavior of residual stresses were simulated using Finite Element Model. The present work deals with the development of thermo-mechanical model to predict the machining induced residual stresses in Titanium alloy. The simulation results are compared with the published results. The results are in good agreement with the published results. Future work involves optimization or the cutting parameters that effect the machining induced residual stresses. The results obtained were validated with previous work.

  20. DrugCentral: online drug compendium

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Oleg; Holmes, Jayme; Knockel, Jeffrey; Bologa, Cristian G.; Yang, Jeremy J.; Mathias, Stephen L.; Nelson, Stuart J.; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2017-01-01

    DrugCentral (http://drugcentral.org) is an open-access online drug compendium. DrugCentral integrates structure, bioactivity, regulatory, pharmacologic actions and indications for active pharmaceutical ingredients approved by FDA and other regulatory agencies. Monitoring of regulatory agencies for new drugs approvals ensures the resource is up-to-date. DrugCentral integrates content for active ingredients with pharmaceutical formulations, indexing drugs and drug label annotations, complementing similar resources available online. Its complementarity with other online resources is facilitated by cross referencing to external resources. At the molecular level, DrugCentral bridges drug-target interactions with pharmacological action and indications. The integration with FDA drug labels enables text mining applications for drug adverse events and clinical trial information. Chemical structure overlap between DrugCentral and five online drug resources, and the overlap between DrugCentral FDA-approved drugs and their presence in four different chemical collections, are discussed. DrugCentral can be accessed via the web application or downloaded in relational database format. PMID:27789690

  1. Drug Preferences of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harford, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Examined drug preferences of a group of active multiple drug abusers referred for treatment. Nearly half the respondents preferred drugs other than type they most frequently used. Preferences were related to method of administration. Results suggest preference is one among several determinants of drug use. (Author/BEF)

  2. Determination of florfenicol residues in broiler meat and liver samples using RP-HPLC with UV-visible detection.

    PubMed

    Nasim, Asma; Aslam, Bilal; Javed, Ijaz; Ali, Asghar; Muhammad, Faqir; Raza, Ahmad; Sindhu, Zia-ud-Din

    2016-03-15

    Broilers are vulnerable to various types of microorganisms, including Salmonella, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in multiple infections. Broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs such as florfenicol (FF) are widely used in the treatment of such infections. Suspected residues of these drugs in body tissues of treated birds can be passed to humans through meat consumption and thus lead to serious ill effects on human health. The present study was designed to estimate the presence of FF residues in broiler meat and liver samples. The mean residual concentrations of FF in broiler meat and liver samples were 311.42 ± 186.56 and 2585.44 ± 1759.71 µg kg(-1) respectively, which are higher than their respective maximum residual limits (MRLs). The results showed that 126 and 24 samples were FF-positive and FF-negative respectively. Of the positive samples, 84 and 42 samples were above and below the MRL respectively. The results indicate the presence of FF residues in broiler meat and liver samples. Usage of this contaminated meat causes resistance in consumers and poses a public health threat. Thus there is a need to educate farmers about the ill effects of residual drugs on human health and their withdrawal times in poultry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. UniDrug-Target: A Computational Tool to Identify Unique Drug Targets in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chanumolu, Sree Krishna; Rout, Chittaranjan; Chauhan, Rajinder S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Targeting conserved proteins of bacteria through antibacterial medications has resulted in both the development of resistant strains and changes to human health by destroying beneficial microbes which eventually become breeding grounds for the evolution of resistances. Despite the availability of more than 800 genomes sequences, 430 pathways, 4743 enzymes, 9257 metabolic reactions and protein (three-dimensional) 3D structures in bacteria, no pathogen-specific computational drug target identification tool has been developed. Methods A web server, UniDrug-Target, which combines bacterial biological information and computational methods to stringently identify pathogen-specific proteins as drug targets, has been designed. Besides predicting pathogen-specific proteins essentiality, chokepoint property, etc., three new algorithms were developed and implemented by using protein sequences, domains, structures, and metabolic reactions for construction of partial metabolic networks (PMNs), determination of conservation in critical residues, and variation analysis of residues forming similar cavities in proteins sequences. First, PMNs are constructed to determine the extent of disturbances in metabolite production by targeting a protein as drug target. Conservation of pathogen-specific protein's critical residues involved in cavity formation and biological function determined at domain-level with low-matching sequences. Last, variation analysis of residues forming similar cavities in proteins sequences from pathogenic versus non-pathogenic bacteria and humans is performed. Results The server is capable of predicting drug targets for any sequenced pathogenic bacteria having fasta sequences and annotated information. The utility of UniDrug-Target server was demonstrated for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv). The UniDrug-Target identified 265 mycobacteria pathogen-specific proteins, including 17 essential proteins which can be potential drug targets. Conclusions

  4. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues.

    PubMed

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology.

  5. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology. PMID:27366642

  6. Diazinon residues in insects from sprayed tobacco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Beyer, W.N.; Kolbe, E.

    1982-01-01

    Pooled samples of tobacco hornworms collected from a field sprayed with 0.84 kg/ha of diazinon were analyzed for residues at various intervals after application. No residues of the toxic metabolite diazoxon were detected (sensitivity 0.5 ppm) in any sample. Only one sample exceeded 1.0 ppm of the parent compound and was collected 4 hours after spraying. Residues declined over time (P<0.01) and none were detected (sensitivity 0.1 ppm) 18 days after spraying. the potential hazard to birds eating these insects appeared to be minimal.

  7. Residual entanglement of accelerated fermions is useful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Mehrnoosh; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein; Rahimi, Robabeh; Mehri-Dehnavi, Hossein

    2017-08-01

    The non-vanishing residual entanglement, between the fermionic modes in the infinite acceleration limit, does not violate CHSH inequality, therefore it is not non-local. In this paper, we study the usefulness of the residual fermionic entanglement in single mode approximation and beyond single mode approximation. It is shown that there are some cases where the CHSH inequality is not violated by the residual entanglement, but the state is useful for quantum teleportation. Conditions for the violation of the CHSH inequality in terms of the ;presence probability; of the particle in different Rindler regions are given for the state to be useful for teleportation and superdense coding.

  8. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: PCE DRY CLEANERS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessement for the Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaners source category. For stationary sources, section 112(f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate additional standards. The purpose of this document is to describe the methodology and results of teh residual risk assessment performed for the Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaners source category. The results of this analysis will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  9. Biomass energy from crop and forest residues.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, D; Moran, M A; Fast, S; Weber, G; Bukantis, R; Balliett, L; Boveng, P; Cleveland, C; Hindman, S; Young, M

    1981-06-05

    Residues remaining after the harvest of crop and forestry products are being proposed as a substantial energy source for the nation. An estimated 22 percent of the residues might be utilized, providing a renewable source of high-grade energy with the potential of supplying 1 percent of the current U.S. gasoline consumption as ethanol or 4 percent of the total electrical energy used. These net energy benefits are limited by high energy costs to collect, transport, and process the residues. Environmental threats include soil erosion, water runoff, and nutrient loss.

  10. [Residues of tetracycline and quinolones in wild fish living around a salmon aquaculture center in Chile].

    PubMed

    Fortt Z, Antonia; Cabello C, Felipe; Buschmann R, Alejandro

    2007-02-01

    The presence of residues of tetracycline, quinolones and antiparasitic drugs was investigated in wild fish captured around salmon aquaculture pens in Cochamó, Region X, Chile. Residues of both antibiotics were found in the meta [corrected] of two species of wild fish that are consumed by humans, robalo (Elginops maclovinus) and cabrilla (Sebastes capensis) [corrected] These findings suggest that the antibiotic usage in salmon aquaculture in Chile has nvironmental implications that may affect human and animal health. More studies are needed in Chile to determine the relevance of these findings for human and animal health and the environment to regulate this use of antibiotics.

  11. Persistence of oxytetracycline residues in milk after the intrauterine treatment of lactating cows for endometritis.

    PubMed

    Tan, X; Huang, Y-J; Jiang, Y-W; Hu, S-H

    2007-10-27

    Milk samples were collected at one day intervals after the last dose from 31 cows that had received an intrauterine infusion of oxytetracycline once daily between one and five times. The tetrazolium chloride assay was used to determine whether there were significant residues of the antibiotic in the samples. A single treatment resulted in residues for between one and eight days, and the period tended to be longer in the cows that had received more than one dose. Of the 31 cows, six remained tetracycline-positive for more than five days after their last dose of the drug.

  12. Assessment of antimicrobial usage and residues in commercial chicken eggs from smallholder poultry keepers in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Nonga, H E; Simon, C; Karimuribo, E D; Mdegela, R H

    2010-08-01

    Occurrence of antimicrobial residues in commercial chicken eggs was determined in Morogoro municipality between January and February 2007. Twenty smallholder farmers were interviewed on the types of antimicrobials, reasons of use and their awareness on antimicrobial withdrawal period. Seventy egg samples were collected for qualitative antimicrobial drug residues analysis by use of agar well diffusion and Delvotest SP assays. It was found that farmers use antimicrobial drugs as prophylaxis and treatment of common chicken diseases namely fowl typhoid (85%), infectious bursa disease (Gumboro) (65%) infectious coryza (65%), collibacilosis (55%), coccidiosis (54%), Newcastle disease (50%), helminthosis (20%) and fowl pox (15%). Antimicrobials accounted for 85% of the drugs commonly used. It was also found that 65% of the farmers treat their chicken themselves. The common drugs were oxytetracycline (75%), egg booster (50%), amprolium (35%), sulphamethoxypyridazine (35%), sulphanilamide (25%), chlortetracyclines (10%), chloramphenicol (10%), sulphadiazine-trimethoprim (20%), duoxycycline (20%), sulphadiazine (25%) and flumequine (10%). Eighty per cent of the farmers had knowledge on antimicrobial withdrawal period sold eggs before withdrawal period and almost 85% were unaware of possible effects of antimicrobial residues in humans. All 70 eggs were positive to antimicrobial residues by Delvotest kit, but 21.4% positive with agar well diffusion test. It was concluded that the presence of antimicrobial residues in table eggs could be of public health significance to the egg consumers in Morogoro municipality.

  13. Human Food Safety Implications of Variation in Food Animal Drug Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Vahl, Christopher I; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-06-15

    Violative drug residues in animal-derived foods are a global food safety concern. The use of a fixed main metabolite to parent drug (M/D) ratio determined in healthy animals to establish drug tolerances and withdrawal times in diseased animals results in frequent residue violations in food-producing animals. We created a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for representative drugs (ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, flunixin, and sulfamethazine) in cattle and swine based on extensive published literature. Simulation results showed that the M/D ratio was not a fixed value, but a time-dependent range. Disease changed M/D ratios substantially and extended withdrawal times; these effects exhibited drug- and species-specificity. These results challenge the interpretation of violative residues based on the use of the M/D ratio to establish tolerances for metabolized drugs.

  14. Human Food Safety Implications of Variation in Food Animal Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Vahl, Christopher I.; Riviere, Jim E.

    2016-01-01

    Violative drug residues in animal-derived foods are a global food safety concern. The use of a fixed main metabolite to parent drug (M/D) ratio determined in healthy animals to establish drug tolerances and withdrawal times in diseased animals results in frequent residue violations in food-producing animals. We created a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for representative drugs (ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, flunixin, and sulfamethazine) in cattle and swine based on extensive published literature. Simulation results showed that the M/D ratio was not a fixed value, but a time-dependent range. Disease changed M/D ratios substantially and extended withdrawal times; these effects exhibited drug- and species-specificity. These results challenge the interpretation of violative residues based on the use of the M/D ratio to establish tolerances for metabolized drugs. PMID:27302389

  15. Predicting Drug-Target Interactions Using Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shinhyuk; Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2013-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting drug-target interactions have become important in drug research because they can help to reduce the time, cost, and failure rates for developing new drugs. Recently, with the accumulation of drug-related data sets related to drug side effects and pharmacological data, it has became possible to predict potential drug-target interactions. In this study, we focus on drug-drug interactions (DDI), their adverse effects () and pharmacological information (), and investigate the relationship among chemical structures, side effects, and DDIs from several data sources. In this study, data from the STITCH database, from drugs.com, and drug-target pairs from ChEMBL and SIDER were first collected. Then, by applying two machine learning approaches, a support vector machine (SVM) and a kernel-based L1-norm regularized logistic regression (KL1LR), we showed that DDI is a promising feature in predicting drug-target interactions. Next, the accuracies of predicting drug-target interactions using DDI were compared to those obtained using the chemical structure and side effects based on the SVM and KL1LR approaches, showing that DDI was the data source contributing the most for predicting drug-target interactions. PMID:24278248

  16. Insight into Pleiotropic Drug Resistance ATP-binding Cassette Pump Drug Transport through Mutagenesis of Cdr1p Transmembrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Kapoor, Khyati; Goyal, Neha; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Lynn, Andrew M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The fungal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p), responsible for clinically significant drug resistance, is composed of two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). We have probed the nature of the drug binding pocket by performing systematic mutagenesis of the primary sequences of the 12 transmembrane segments (TMSs) found in the TMDs. All mutated proteins were expressed equally well and localized properly at the plasma membrane in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but some variants differed significantly in efflux activity, substrate specificity, and coupled ATPase activity. Replacement of the majority of the amino acid residues with alanine or glycine yielded neutral mutations, but about 42% of the variants lost resistance to drug efflux substrates completely or selectively. A predicted three-dimensional homology model shows that all the TMSs, apart from TMS4 and TMS10, interact directly with the drug-binding cavity in both the open and closed Cdr1p conformations. However, TMS4 and TMS10 mutations can also induce total or selective drug susceptibility. Functional data and homology modeling assisted identification of critical amino acids within a drug-binding cavity that, upon mutation, abolished resistance to all drugs tested singly or in combinations. The open and closed Cdr1p models enabled the identification of amino acid residues that bordered a drug-binding cavity dominated by hydrophobic residues. The disposition of TMD residues with differential effects on drug binding and transport are consistent with a large polyspecific drug binding pocket in this yeast multidrug transporter. PMID:23824183

  17. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2015-10-27

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs.

  18. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B.; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S.

    2015-01-01

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs. PMID:26503701

  19. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A Jill

    2008-04-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal function; all of these may change from patient to patient or even in the same patient depending on the clinical status. However, CRRT modalities are generally more efficient than intermittent hemodialysis at drug removal, in some cases approximating or even exceeding normal renal function, resulting in a significant risk of subtherapeutic dosing if conventional hemodialysis dosing recommendations are followed. This annotated bibliography provides a summary of publications analyzing drug removal during CRRT, including CRRT settings and drug clearance values found in each study. Caution is warranted as findings from one study may not be generalizable to all patients due to the many factors that influence drug removal. Serum drug concentrations should be monitored when available, and patient clinical status is exceedingly important for following expected and unexpected responses to drug therapies. Reviews on general drug dosing calculations in CRRT are available elsewhere.

  20. Towards structure-based protein drug design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lai, Luhua

    2011-10-01

    Structure-based drug design for chemical molecules has been widely used in drug discovery in the last 30 years. Many successful applications have been reported, especially in the field of virtual screening based on molecular docking. Recently, there has been much progress in fragment-based as well as de novo drug discovery. As many protein-protein interactions can be used as key targets for drug design, one of the solutions is to design protein drugs based directly on the protein complexes or the target structure. Compared with protein-ligand interactions, protein-protein interactions are more complicated and present more challenges for design. Over the last decade, both sampling efficiency and scoring accuracy of protein-protein docking have increased significantly. We have developed several strategies for structure-based protein drug design. A grafting strategy for key interaction residues has been developed and successfully applied in designing erythropoietin receptor-binding proteins. Similarly to small-molecule design, we also tested de novo protein-binder design and a virtual screen of protein binders using protein-protein docking calculations. In comparison with the development of structure-based small-molecule drug design, we believe that structure-based protein drug design has come of age.

  1. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs will be essential tools at all stages of malaria elimination along the path towards eradication, including the early control or “attack” phase to drive down transmission and the later stages of maintaining interruption of transmission, preventing reintroduction of malaria, and eliminating the last residual foci of infection. Drugs will continue to be used to treat acute malaria illness and prevent complications in vulnerable groups, but better drugs are needed for elimination-specific indications such as mass treatment, curing asymptomatic infections, curing relapsing liver stages, and preventing transmission. The ideal malaria eradication drug is a coformulated drug combination suitable for mass administration that can be administered in a single encounter at infrequent intervals and that results in radical cure of all life cycle stages of all five malaria species infecting humans. Short of this optimal goal, highly desirable drugs might have limitations such as targeting only one or two parasite species, the priorities being Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The malaria research agenda for eradication should include research aimed at developing such drugs and research to develop situation-specific strategies for using both current and future drugs to interrupt malaria transmission. PMID:21311580

  2. CancerDR: cancer drug resistance database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Kumar, Shailesh; Gautam, Ankur; Kapoor, Pallavi; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapies are limited by the development of drug resistance, and mutations in drug targets is one of the main reasons for developing acquired resistance. The adequate knowledge of these mutations in drug targets would help to design effective personalized therapies. Keeping this in mind, we have developed a database "CancerDR", which provides information of 148 anti-cancer drugs, and their pharmacological profiling across 952 cancer cell lines. CancerDR provides comprehensive information about each drug target that includes; (i) sequence of natural variants, (ii) mutations, (iii) tertiary structure, and (iv) alignment profile of mutants/variants. A number of web-based tools have been integrated in CancerDR. This database will be very useful for identification of genetic alterations in genes encoding drug targets, and in turn the residues responsible for drug resistance. CancerDR allows user to identify promiscuous drug molecules that can kill wide range of cancer cells. CancerDR is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdr/

  3. Effect of residual solvent in polymer adhesive matrix on release and skin permeation of scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Anders, Kunst; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    The effects of varying level of residual solvent on the release and permeation of scopolamine from two different polyacrylate matrices through excised mouse skin has been determined. Matrices of the drug-in-adhesive type were prepared having different contents of residual ethyl acetate or heptane adjusted via the drying time at 30°C in a forced-convection oven. The neutral DuroTak 87-4098 showed no effects of residual ethyl acetate on either release or permeation, but was influenced by residual heptane. An increase in release rate from the matrix occurred with an enhancing effect on permeation. The self-curing DuroTak 87-2677 showed effects of residual heptane on both release and permeation. Both solvents were lost from the matrix on contact with an aqueous acceptor medium, although to different extents. Levels of residual ethyl acetate or heptane that fall below the ICH guideline (0.5% w/w) had, however, only a minor, yet measurable, effect on scopolamine release and skin uptake compared with higher solvent levels.

  4. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Still a Work in Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico; Capelli, Debora; Gottardi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Minimal residual disease evaluation refers to a series of molecular and immunophenotypical techniques aimed at detecting submicroscopic disease after therapy. As such, its application in acute myeloid leukemia has greatly increased our ability to quantify treatment response, and to determine the chemosensitivity of the disease, as the final product of the drug schedule, dose intensity, biodistribution, and the pharmakogenetic profile of the patient. There is now consistent evidence for the prognostic power of minimal residual disease evaluation in acute myeloid leukemia, which is complementary to the baseline prognostic assessment of the disease. The focus for its use is therefore shifting to individualize treatment based on a deeper evaluation of chemosensitivity and residual tumor burden. In this review, we will summarize the results of the major clinical studies evaluating minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia in adults in recent years and address the technical and practical issues still hampering the spread of these techniques outside controlled clinical trials. We will also briefly speculate on future developments and offer our point of view, and a word of caution, on the present use of minimal residual disease measurements in “real-life” practice. Still, as final standardization and diffusion of the methods are sorted out, we believe that minimal residual disease will soon become the new standard for evaluating response in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28587190

  5. Keys to a drug-free workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Joseph J.; Fortuna, Patricia B.

    1997-01-01

    What does it take to establish a drug free work place. Are technologies available other than urine testing for pre- employment screening and monitoring of employees. Various methods are now available to screen for illicit drug residues on items handled by individuals. The residues can be acquired from the surfaces of items such as telephones, door knobs, steering wheels, lockers, clothing, identification cards, etc. Test kits are also available for urine testing at NIDA threshold levels. Analysis of hair, saliva, and sweat is now possible. How good ar these methods and kits. What value are they to the public. What are the legal concerns facing employers. What do the screening test show. These questions and others are addressed in this paper. The authors review for the reader how drug abuse by US workers costs businesses. The paper then addresses the various aspects of the DOT regulations to determine why urine analysis (UA) is insufficient to eliminate drug abuse. The authors present applications of screening technologies in addition to UA. Finally, the authors provide a conclusion of findings and recommendations for businesses that truly want or need drug free work places.

  6. Image-based Measurement of Post-Swallow Residue: The Normalized Residue Ratio Scale

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, William G.; Smith, Zachary M.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2012-01-01

    Post-swallow residue is considered a sign of swallowing impairment. Existing methods for capturing post-swallow residue (perceptual and quantitative) have inherent limitations. We employed several different perceptual and quantitative (ratio) methods for measuring post-swallow residue on the same 40 swallows and addressed the following questions: (1) Do perceptual and quantitative methods demonstrate good agreement? (2) What differences in precision are apparent by measurement method (one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and circumscribed area ratios)? (3) Do residue ratios agree strongly with residue area measures that are anatomically normalized? Based on the findings of this series of questions, a new method for capturing residue is proposed: the Normalized Residue Ratio Scale (NRRS). The NRRS is a continuous measurement that incorporates both the ratio of residue relative to the available pharyngeal space and the residue proportionate to the size of the individual. A demonstration of this method is presented to illustrate the added precision of the NRRS measurement in comparison to other approaches for measuring residue severity. PMID:23089830

  7. Recovery of transuranics from process residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Process residues are generated at both the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during aqueous chemical and pyrochemical operations. Frequently, process operations will result in either impure products or produce residues sufficiently contaminated with transuranics to be nondiscardable as waste. Purification and recovery flowsheets for process residues have been developed to generate solutions compatible with subsequent Purex operations and either solid or liquid waste suitable for disposal. The ''scrub alloy'' and the ''anode heel alloy'' are examples of materials generated at RFP which have been processed at SRP using the developed recovery flowsheets. Examples of process residues being generated at SRP for which flowsheets are under development include LECO crucibles and alpha-contaminated hydraulic oil.

  8. Quantifying logging residue - before the fact

    SciTech Connect

    Bones, J.T.

    1982-06-01

    Tree biomass estimation, which is being integrated into the U.S. Forest Service Renewable Resources Evaluation Program, will give foresters the ability to estimate the amount of logging residues they might expect from harvested treetops and branches and residual rough, rotten, and small trees before the actual harvest. With planning, and increased demand for such timber products as pulpwood and fuelwood, product recovery could be increased by up to 43 percent in softwood stands and 99% in hardwoods. Recovery levels affect gross product receipts and site preparation costs. An example of product recovery and residue generation is presented for three harvesting options in Pennsylvania hardwood stands. Under the whole-tree harvesting option, 46% more product was recovered than in single product harvesting, and logging residue levels were reduced by 58%.

  9. Properties of Rasch residual fit statistics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Margaret; Adams, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the residual-based fit statistics commonly used in Rasch measurement. In particular, the paper analytically examines some of the theoretical properties of the residual-based fit statistics with a view to establishing the inferences that can be made using these fit statistics. More specifically, the relationships between the distributional properties of the fit statistics and sample size are discussed; some research that erroneously concludes that residual-based fit statistics are unstable is reviewed; and finally, it is analytically illustrated that, for dichotomous items, residual-based fit statistics provide a measure of the relative slope of empirical item characteristic curves. With a clear understanding of the theoretical properties of the fit statistics, the use and limitations of these statistics can be placed in the right light.

  10. Residual strength of damaged marine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Dhruba J.; Nappi, Natale S.; Wiernicki, Christopher J.

    1994-09-01

    Traditionally assessment of ship's longitudinal strength has been made by comparing the elastic stresses at the deck or bottom shell to fractions of the material yield strength. This results in high reserve capacity due to inherent redundancies in ship structures. Residual strength, which is defined as the strength of the structure after damage, has rarely been considered either during design or at the time of repair. In this report, key elements required to undertake an engineering analysis to evaluate the residual strength have been identified. Emphasis has been placed on assessing the residual strength of marine structures damaged due to normal operating loads. Methods available to industry for evaluation of damage such as, fracture and ultimate strength have been summarized. An example problem, illustrating the application of an integrated approach to residual strength assessment on a particular ship type, is presented.

  11. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  12. Ultrasonics used to measure residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to measure residual stress in metal structures. By using this method, various forms of wave propagation in metals are possible, and more thorough analysis of complex geometric structures may be had.

  13. Study of Selected Petroleum Refining Residuals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The document describes EPA's approach to conducting the industry study required by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)/EPA consent decree and characterizes the study residuals and how they are managed.

  14. [Comparative study of drug efficacy and drug additives between generic drugs and original drugs].

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiromi; Yoshii, Michiko; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we tested three kinds of sleeping drugs, consisting mainly of triazolam, brotizolam, and flunitrazepam, to compare the drug efficacy of generic drugs with that of original drugs. After these drugs were administered orally to mice, drug efficacy was evaluated in terms of ambulation, onset time of sleep, and duration of sleep in the open field test. For all kinds of sleep-inducing drugs, the drug efficacy of most generic drugs is not necessarily equal to that of the original drug. The main reason for the difference appears to be due to differences in the rate of absorption of the main drug. Any other differences between an original drug and a generic drug are caused by drug additives, the crystal form of the main drug, the formulation, and so on. In this study, the formulation was not the reason for the differences because all of the drugs were pulverized in a mortar and had no special coating. The drug additives for all the drugs are listed and the drug efficacy compared. Unfortunately, the information was not sufficient to shed any light on the differences in drug efficacy. For effective drug therapy, more information on drug additives should be provided.

  15. [Dynamic monitoring risk of anti-hepatoma new drug development].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Fan, Wei; Li, Hong-Fa; Man, Shu-Li; Liu, Zhen; Gao, Wen-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Risk monitoring of new Chinese patent anti-hepatoma drugs is tracking recognized risks and residual risks, identifying emerging risk and ensure the implementation of the plan, estimating the process of reducing effectiveness. The paper is mainly through understanding the status of Chinese patent anti-hepatoma drugs, the content, characteristic and analysis method of dynamic risk monitoring, and then select the risk control indicators, collect risk information. Finally, puts forward the thought of anti-hepatoma drugs listed evaluation in our country, and try to establish the model of dynamic risk management of anti-hepatoma drugs.

  16. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  17. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  18. RESIDUAL STRESS IN HARDENED STEEL CYLINDERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ultimate strength of the steel and in some instances caused cracking, and (4) stress patterns of interrupted quench specimens were not consistent enough to warrant a conclusion. (Author)...A study was conducted to (1) measure residual stress in hardened steel solid cylinders, (2) correlate the stress values with heat treatments, and (3...develop a dissolution technique. Residual stress patterns for 12 solid cylinders of 4160 steel, heat treated by various methods, were determined

  19. GLC determination of quinaldine residue in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Sills, J.B.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of quinaldine residue in various fish tissues is described. Homogenized tissues are extracted wi th hexane-ethyl ether, the extracts are concentrated by partitioning through O.IN sulfuric acid, and the residues are measured by alkali Harne ionization gas chromatography. Muscle tissues containing from 0.01 to 10.0 ppm quinaldine were successfully analyzed with recoveries from 75 to 100%.

  20. Drug treatment of hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Chanson, P; Borson-Chazot, F; Chabre, O; Estour, B

    2007-06-01

    Medical treatment of hyperprolactinemia is based upon use of dopamine agonists (DA): bromocriptine, lisuride, quinagolide and cabergoline. In over 80% of cases, these drugs induce normal prolactinemia and ovulatory cycles. In resistant cases, the DA should be changed. Tolerance may occasionally be poor, particularly with bromocriptine, which appears less well-tolerated than quinagolide and than cabergoline above all. In the event of intolerance to a given DA, another should be tried. In patients with macroprolactinoma treated with DA, MRI monitoring should be carried out after 3 months of treatment to verify tumor size reduction, then after 1 year, yearly for the next 5 years and once every 5 years if adenoma size is stable. In cases of microprolactinoma, control under treatment is pointless. MRI may be performed after 1 year and then after 5 years. Once normal prolactin levels have been achieved, attempts may be made to stop the treatment. When a prolonged treatment is interrupted, especially with cabergoline, progressive increase in serum prolactin and return of hyperprolactinemia symptoms are seen in only around 20-30% of cases, particularly when residual adenoma exists after prolonged treatment. Nevertheless, prolactin levels should continue to be monitored after discontinuation of DA, possibly with MRI monitoring, since prolactin levels may rise again after a number of months or years. When normal prolactin levels have been achieved with DA, another solution consists in reducing the dose or dosing frequency of DA in steps to the lowest effective dose consistent with maintenance of normal prolactin levels and stable adenoma size. For drug-induced hyperprolactinemia, where the causative medication cannot be withdrawn, it is often pointless and possibly even dangerous to administer a DA. It is therefore necessary to check for absence of pituitary adenoma and where necessary, begin treatment with sex steroids so as to ensure satisfactory impregnation with sex