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Sample records for drug shows positive

  1. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  2. Cuba shows jump in HIV positives.

    PubMed

    Cuba experienced a substantial increase in the number of HIV cases in 1996 due primarily to a growth of foreign tourism and an increase in prostitution, health officials said. The Juventud Rebelde newspaper said that since HIV/AIDS testing began in 1985, government-run hospitals and clinics have detected 1609 HIV-positive cases. In 1995 the total was reported at 1196, meaning that 413 new cases were detected in 1996. This compared with only 97 new cases reported during 1995. HIV infection among the island's 11 million inhabitants has remained relatively low due to a massive testing program and a public health infrastructure that provides universal and free medical treatment. Cuba was a pioneer in the use of interferon on those testing HIV-positive. Cuba produces its own interferon, which prolongs the life expectancy of patients, and also reagents for AIDS testing. There are special sanitariums for AIDS patients in most of Cuba's 12 provinces. Cuban adults who test HIV-positive are required to enter the sanitarium in a policy reminiscent of the way tuberculosis patients were tested in the US earlier in this century. Officials said the isolation of patients in sanitariums has been somewhat relaxed over past years by introducing greater flexibility in allowing persons who are considered reliable to live at home or make prolonged visits.

  3. Drug Trio Shows Major Promise Against Myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 19 percent. The drug, which is given by infusion, latches onto a specific protein on myeloma cells ... and Drug Administration, the most common ones include infusion-related reactions, fatigue, nausea, back pain and fever. ...

  4. For Problem Drinkers, Experimental Drug Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism assessed the drug in a 12-week clinical ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Medicines Recent Health News Related ...

  5. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse Could your kids be at risk for substance ... drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents ...

  6. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTIAIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A. CONCRETE ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN POSITION, SHOWING CORAL RUBBLE BERM, VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Anti-Aircraft Gun Position, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  8. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  9. 4. VENTILATION FAN SHOWING RELATIVE POSITION IN THE AIR TUNNEL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VENTILATION FAN SHOWING RELATIVE POSITION IN THE AIR TUNNEL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  10. 4. INTERIOR, SHOWING HOIST IN POSITION NEXT TO WINDOW FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR, SHOWING HOIST IN POSITION NEXT TO WINDOW FOR VIEWING TAILINGS PILE, SLOT IN FRONT WALL FOR VIEWING HEADFRAME. - A. D. Wilcox Drift Mine, Boiler Cabin, Linda Creek near Dalton Highway, Bettles, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, AK

  11. 38. VIEW SHOWING 'CATFISH' SILO ELEVATOR IN UP POSITION, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. VIEW SHOWING 'CATFISH' SILO ELEVATOR IN UP POSITION, LOOKING NORTHWEST Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 19. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING BRIDGE IN CLOSED POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING BRIDGE IN CLOSED POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Niantic Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  13. 1. OBLIQUE VIEW, NORTH AND EAST SIDES. VIEW SHOWS POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OBLIQUE VIEW, NORTH AND EAST SIDES. VIEW SHOWS POSITION OF BUILDING UNDER LEG OF TOWER 33. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, PERS Support Storage Building, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  14. New Drug Shows Promise for Rare Blood Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159626.html New Drug Shows Promise for Rare Blood Cancers Organ ... exist for people with advanced mastocytosis. So the new findings are "a real advance," said Hromas, who ...

  15. Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise for Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159834.html Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise for Parkinson's Disease Medication was generally found safe, and study ... initial signs of promise for advanced cases of Parkinson's disease, researchers are reporting. Experts stressed that the ...

  16. Emerging Trends in Contextual Learning Show Positive Results for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WorkAmerica, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This issue focuses on contextual learning (CL), in which students master rigorous academic content in real-world or work-based learning experiences. "Emerging Trends in CL Show Positive Results for Students" discusses CL as an important strategy for improving student achievement. It describes: how CL raises the bar for all students, challenging…

  17. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  18. Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. The two (2) arms act as simple spans, a small amount of negative bending is accommodated by the continous top and bottom truss chords due to a continuous condition. Note the inclined end post of each of the simple spans, the operator's house, center/pivot pier and the pivotal pole-line pole placed atop of bridge. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  19. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  20. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  1. Showing partial side view of swing bridge in open position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing bridge in open position. The operator's house is in the center of the truss bridge, directly over the center/pivot stone masonry pier. Note the two (2) center supports with the truss loads being delivered to the drum by a system of distributing girders. The swing bridge revolved on a cylindrical drum supported by rollers running on a circular track on the center/pivot pier. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  2. HIV-positive plaintiff must show job transfer caused harm.

    PubMed

    1998-08-21

    A teacher in the De Kalb County School District has argued that the district discriminated against him when they transferred him to a different job because he is HIV-positive. The teacher was transferred from a psychoeducational class that was limited to aggressive and violent special-needs students to a classroom of students with milder behavioral disorders. The district offered to pay for the additional training that was necessary for the new position and granted the teacher a grace period in which to complete the training. A Federal district judge ruled in favor of the teacher in a bench trial, but the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals stated that the lower court failed to show that the job transfer constituted an adverse employment action in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The appeals court further indicated that there was insufficient evidence to determine whether the teacher did or did not benefit from taking the additional classes, which could result in making him more employable. The appeals court also questioned the trial judge's conclusion that the teacher's HIV-seropositivity posed only a remote and theoretical risk to the aggressive students.

  3. [New drugs with positive effects on bones].

    PubMed

    Zofková, I; Kanceva, R L

    1997-07-30

    The paper concerns the nontraditional treatment of osteoporosis using endogenous substances regulating bone metabolism, and also new drugs. NO in high concentrations decreases the activity of osteoclasts, scavenges superoxides which destroy connective tissue, and activates 1 alpha-hydroxylase in kidneys. Bone metabolism is effectively influenced by donors of NO or by modulators of NO synthase. Osteoclastic function is also inhibited by vitamin K. The administration of the vitamin is indicated in osteoporotic patients with proven vitamin K deficiency. Antiestrogens (tamoxifen), ipriflavon and analogues of wortmannin have antiresorptive activity. Under certain conditions parathyroid hormone (PTH) is anabolic for bone. The positive effect on bone was confirmed with the subcutaneous administration of small doses of PTH simulating physiologic pulsatile secretion, as well as the intact somatotropin-IGF-I (insulin like growth factor-I) axis. PTH is extremely useful, especially in osteoporosis induced by hypoestrinism. Somatotropin (GH) also has an anabolic effect on bone. The hormone stimulates bone metabolism with a prevalence of formation due to direct action on bone, as well as by means of IGF-I. Further growth factors with positive osteoprotic effect are TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta), FGF (fibroblast growth factor) and calcium conserving dihomogammalinoleic acid. Magnesium influences bone in different ways. It activates osteoblasts, increases bone mineralization, and enhances the sensitivity of target tissues (incl. bone) to PTH and 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3, Under certain conditions however, magnesium can stimulate bone resorption. A more potent factor than magnesium is stroncium, which not only activates osteoblats but decreases the number of osteoclasts, thus abolishing bone resorption and enhancing formation. Bicarbonates are also favourable for bone. NaHCO3 together with potassium citrate stimulates osteoblasts and enhances bone mineralisation. In the

  4. Delamanid Coadministered with Antiretroviral Drugs or Antituberculosis Drugs Shows No Clinically Relevant Drug-Drug Interactions in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Charles; Petersen, Carolyn; Paccaly, Anne; Shoaf, Susan E.; Patil, Shiva; Geiter, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Delamanid is a medicinal product approved for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential drug-drug interactions between delamanid and antiretroviral drugs, including ritonavir, a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, and selected anti-TB drugs, including rifampin, a strong inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes. Multiple-dose studies were conducted in parallel groups of healthy subjects. Plasma samples were analyzed for delamanid, delamanid metabolite, and coadministered drug concentrations, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were determined. The magnitude of the interaction was assessed by the ratio of the geometric means and 90% confidence intervals. Coadministration of delamanid with tenofovir or efavirenz did not affect the PK characteristics of delamanid. Coadministration of Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) with delamanid resulted in an approximately 25% higher delamanid area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to the end of the dosing interval (AUCτ). Tenofovir, efavirenz, lopinavir, and ritonavir exposure were not affected by delamanid. Coadministration of delamanid with the TB drugs (ethambutol plus Rifater [rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid]) resulted in lower delamanid exposures (47 and 42% for the AUCτ and Cmax [maximum concentration of a drug in plasma] values, respectively), as well as decreased exposure of three primary metabolites (approximately 30 to 50% lower AUCτ values). Delamanid did not affect rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid exposure; the ethambutol AUCτ and Cmax values were about 25% higher with delamanid coadministration. The lack of clinically significant drug-drug interactions between delamanid and selected antiretroviral agents (including the strong CYP inhibitor ritonavir) and a combination of anti-TB drugs was demonstrated. Although there was a decrease in the delamanid concentrations when coadministered with ethambutol plus Rifater, this is likely related to

  5. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  6. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  7. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  8. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  9. 49 CFR 219.605 - Positive drug test results; procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Positive drug test results; procedures. 219.605... Programs § 219.605 Positive drug test results; procedures. (a) [Reserved] (b) Procedures for administrative handling by the railroad in the event a specimen provided under this subpart is reported as positive by...

  10. Validation of the POSIT: Comparing Drug Using and Abstaining Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, James A.; Richardson, Brad; Spears, Julie; Rembert, Julia K.

    1998-01-01

    The Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) is validated by comparing 42 drug-using and -abstaining youth on several social and behavioral characteristics. All 10 POSIT domain scores for drug users are greater than those for abstainers. Construct validity is established by comparing POSIT domain scores with other instruments.…

  11. Drug Shows Promise Against MS in Mouse Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... a news release from the American Academy of Neurology. A healthy immune system has T cells and ... findings showed. Dr. Paul Wright is chair of neurology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N. ...

  12. Postmortem urine immunoassay showing false-positive phencyclidine reactivity in a case of fatal tramadol overdose.

    PubMed

    Hull, Mindy J; Griggs, David; Knoepp, Stewart M; Smogorzewska, Agata; Nixon, Andrea; Flood, James G

    2006-12-01

    This is a report of postmortem false-positive reactivity using an enzyme-multiplied urine phencyclidine (PCP) immunoassay (EMIT II+) due to a single-agent fatal tramadol overdose. An autopsy of a 42-year-old male who died alone at home revealed no identifiable lethal anatomic abnormalities, thus leading to toxicologic analysis. Femoral blood was obtained for drug testing by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and showed a tramadol level of 14.0 mg/L, 2 orders of magnitude greater than the therapeutic range (0.1 to 0.3 mg/L). Urine was also obtained and EMIT II+ immunoassay revealed positivity for PCP at 88 mAU/min. However, confirmatory testing by HPLC failed to identify PCP in either the urine or serum. To verify the suspicion that this was a false-positive PCP result, stock solutions of tramadol and its major metabolite (O-desmethyltramadol) at concentrations of 100 mg/L in 10% methanol/H2O were compared with a blank solution (10% methanol/H2O) for EMIT II+ PCP reactivity and demonstrated reactivities of 44 mAU/min and 27 mAU/min, respectively. While these individual results were below the cutoff reactivity for a positive EMIT II+ PCP result (ca. 85 mAU/min), they were much more reactive than the blank calibrator (set at 0 mAU/min). Therefore, we conclude that the immunoreactivity of tramadol and its metabolites in aggregate is responsible for the PCP immunoassay interference and false-positive result.

  13. Is a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy a predictive factor for positive allergy tests to anaesthetics?

    PubMed Central

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman-Ionica, Nadia; Hagau, Denisa; Tranca, Sebastian; Sfichi, Manuela; Longrois, Dan

    2012-01-01

    AIMS International recommendations stipulate not performing screening skin tests to a drug in the absence of a clinical history consistent with that specific drug allergy. Nevertheless, two publications showed that a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy was the only predictive factor for a positive skin test when screening for allergy to anaesthetic drugs was done. We selected from a surgical population 40 volunteers with a prior history of allergy to non-anaesthetic drugs in order to analyse the prevalence of positive allergy tests to anaesthetics. METHODS The selected adult patients were tested for 11 anaesthetic drugs using in vivo tests: skin prick (SPT) and intradermal (IDT) tests and in vitro tests: the basophil activation test (BAT) and detection of drug-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). RESULTS The prevalence for the positive SPT and IDT was 1.6% and 5.8% respectively. The result of flow cytometry agreed with the SPT in five out of seven positive SPT (71%). IgEs confirmed two positive SPT with corresponding positive BAT. Ten per cent of the patients had a positive prick test to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). For midazolam none of the SPT was positive, but 11 patients had positive IDT nonconfirmed by BAT. CONCLUSION The prevalence of positive in vivo and in vitro allergy tests to NMBAs is higher in our study population. This could be an argument for pre-operative SPT to NMBAs for the surgical population with reported non-anaesthetic drug allergies. A larger prospective study is needed to validate changes in clinical practice. PMID:21988224

  14. Drug Failure: The Theoretical Position of the Drop-Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Charles B.

    This paper examines the theoretical position of the person who drops out of illegal drug use. A person was considered a drop-out if he admittedly no longer used any or all the drugs in the following categories: marijuana, hallucinogens, speed, downers, and inhalants. A purposive sample was drawn to capture as many people fitting this criterion as…

  15. Drug treatments for schizophrenia: pragmatism in trial design shows lack of progress in drug design.

    PubMed

    Cheng, F; Jones, P B

    2013-09-01

    Aims. The introduction of second generation antipsychotic (SGA) medication over a decade ago led to changes in prescribing practices; these drugs have eclipsed their predecessors as treatments for schizophrenia. However, the metabolic side effects of these newer antipsychotics have been marked and there are increasing concerns as to whether these novel drugs really are superior to their predecessors in terms of the balance between risks and benefits. In this article, we review the literature regarding comparisons between first generation antipsychotic (FGA) and SGA in terms of clinical effectiveness. Methods. Large (n > 150) randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness (efficacy and side effects) of FGA and SGA medications other than clozapine were reviewed, as were meta-analyses that included smaller studies. Results. The superiority in efficacy and reduced extrapyramidal side effects (EPSE) of SGAs is modest, especially when compared with low-dose FGAs. However, the high risk of weight gain and other metabolic disturbances associated with certain SGAs such as olanzapine is markedly higher than the risk with FGAs at the doses used in the trials. Conclusions. The efficacy profiles of various FGAs and SGAs are relatively similar, but their side effects vary between and within classes. Overall, large pragmatic trials of clinical effectiveness indicate that the care used in prescribing and managing drug treatments to ensure tolerability may be more important than the class of drug used.

  16. Camera position east of CO172CE6, showing more of north and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Camera position east of CO-172-CE-6, showing more of north and east sides of middle east wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Camera position east of CO172CE8, showing east sides of two ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Camera position east of CO-172-CE-8, showing east sides of two most eastern wings and north side of most eastern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Positive urgency predicts illegal drug use and risky sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Zapolski, Tamika C B; Cyders, Melissa A; Smith, Gregory T

    2009-06-01

    There are several different personality traits that dispose individuals to engage in rash action. One such trait is positive urgency: the tendency to act rashly when experiencing extremely positive affect. This trait may be relevant for college student risky behavior, because it appears that a great deal of college student risky behavior is undertaken during periods of intensely positive mood states. To test this possibility, the authors conducted a longitudinal study designed to predict increases in risky sexual behavior and illegal drug use over the course of the first year of college (n=407). In a well-fitting structural model, positive urgency predicted increases in illegal drug use and risky sexual behavior, even after controlling for time 1 (T1) involvement in both risky behaviors, biological sex, and T1 scores on four other personality dispositions to rash action. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical implications of this finding. PMID:19586152

  19. A multifunctional drug combination shows highly potent therapeutic efficacy against human cancer xenografts in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Jun; Zheng, Yan-Bo; Li, Yi; Wu, Shu-Ying; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role during tumor development. Integrated combination of drugs that target tumor microenvironment is a promising approach to anticancer therapy. Here, we report a multifunctional combination of low-cytotoxic drugs composed of dipyridamole, bestatin and dexamethasone (DBDx) which mainly acts on the tumor microenvironment shows highly potent antitumor efficacy in vivo. In mouse hepatoma H22 model, the triple drug combination showed synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy. The combination indices of various combinations of the triple drugs were between 0.2 and 0.5. DBDx inhibited the growth of a panel of human tumor xenografts and showed no obvious systemic toxicity. At tolerated doses, DBDx suppressed the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402, HepG2, and lung adenocarcinoma A549 xenografts by 94.5%, 93.7% and 96.9%, respectively. Clonogenic assay demonstrated that DBDx showed weak cytotoxicity. Western blot showed that Flk1 and Nos3 were down-regulated in the DBDx-treated group. Proteomic analysis showed that DBDx mainly affected the metabolic process and immune system process; in addition, the angiogenesis and VEGF signaling pathway were also affected. Conclusively, DBDx, a multifunctional drug combination of three low-cytotoxic drugs, shows synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy evidently mediated by the modulation of tumor microenvironment. Based on its low-cytotoxic attributes and its broad-spectrum antitumor therapeutic efficacy, this multifunctional combination might be useful in the treatment of cancers, especially those refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics.

  20. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients show a characteristic necrotizing perifascicular myositis.

    PubMed

    Mescam-Mancini, Lénaig; Allenbach, Yves; Hervier, Baptiste; Devilliers, Hervé; Mariampillay, Kuberaka; Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Gherardi, Romain; Mezin, Paulette; Preusse, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Benveniste, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies can be classified as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, sporadic inclusion body myositis or non-specific myositis. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients are assigned to either polymyositis or dermatomyositis suggesting overlapping pathological features. We aimed to determine if anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive myopathy has a specific morphological phenotype. In a series of 53 muscle biopsies of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, relevant descriptive criteria defining a characteristic morphological pattern were identified. They were tested in a second series of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients and compared to 63 biopsies from patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. In anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, necrotic fibres, which strongly clustered in perifascicular regions, were frequently observed. Sarcolemmal complement deposition was detected specifically in perifascicular areas. Inflammation was mainly located in the perimysium and around vessels in 90.6%. Perimysial fragmentation was observed in 90% of cases. Major histocompatibility complex class I staining was diffusely positive, with a perifascicular reinforcement. Multivariate analysis showed that criteria defining perifascicular pathology: perifascicular necrosis, atrophy, and perimysial fragmentation allow the distinction of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, among patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients displayed perifascicular necrosis, whereas dermatomyositis patients exhibited perifascicular atrophy. PMID:26198592

  1. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients show a characteristic necrotizing perifascicular myositis.

    PubMed

    Mescam-Mancini, Lénaig; Allenbach, Yves; Hervier, Baptiste; Devilliers, Hervé; Mariampillay, Kuberaka; Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Gherardi, Romain; Mezin, Paulette; Preusse, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Benveniste, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies can be classified as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, sporadic inclusion body myositis or non-specific myositis. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients are assigned to either polymyositis or dermatomyositis suggesting overlapping pathological features. We aimed to determine if anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive myopathy has a specific morphological phenotype. In a series of 53 muscle biopsies of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, relevant descriptive criteria defining a characteristic morphological pattern were identified. They were tested in a second series of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients and compared to 63 biopsies from patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. In anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, necrotic fibres, which strongly clustered in perifascicular regions, were frequently observed. Sarcolemmal complement deposition was detected specifically in perifascicular areas. Inflammation was mainly located in the perimysium and around vessels in 90.6%. Perimysial fragmentation was observed in 90% of cases. Major histocompatibility complex class I staining was diffusely positive, with a perifascicular reinforcement. Multivariate analysis showed that criteria defining perifascicular pathology: perifascicular necrosis, atrophy, and perimysial fragmentation allow the distinction of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, among patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients displayed perifascicular necrosis, whereas dermatomyositis patients exhibited perifascicular atrophy.

  2. IET. Tank building (TAN627). Plans, elevation, details. shows position of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Tank building (TAN-627). Plans, elevation, details. shows position of tanks within building and concrete supports. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-627-A&S 420. Date: Fabruary 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0627-00-693-106975 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Camera position east of CO172CE7, showing north and east sides ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Camera position east of CO-172-CE-7, showing north and east sides of the two most eastern wings. Note three wall anchors on north side of most eastern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Consequences of a false-positive mammography result: drug consumption before and after screening.

    PubMed

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Bæksted, Christina; Vejborg, Ilse; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-05-01

    Background Previous research showed women experiencing false-positive mammograms to have greater anxiety about breast cancer than women with normal mammograms. To elucidate psychological effects of false-positive mammograms, we studied impact on drug intake. Methods We calculated the ratio of drug use for women with false-positive versus women with normal mammograms, before and after the event, using population-based registers, 1997-2006. The ratio of the ratios (RRR) assessed the impact. Results Before the test, 40.3% of women from the false-positive group versus 36.2% from the normal group used anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs. There was no difference in use of beta blockers. Hormone therapy was used more frequently by the false-positive, 36.6% versus 28.7%. The proportion of women using anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs increased with 19% from the before to the after period in the false-positive group, and with 16% in the normal group, resulting in an RRR of 1.02 (95% CI 0.92-1.14). RRR was 1.03 for beta blockers, 0.97 for hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) Drugs used to mitigate mood disorders were used more frequently by women with false-positive than by women with normal mammograms already before the screening event, while the changes from before to after screening were similar for both groups. The results point to the importance of control for potential selection in studies of screening effects.

  5. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors show positive staining for somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A).

    PubMed

    Houang, Michelle; Clarkson, Adele; Sioson, Loretta; Elston, Marianne S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Dray, Michael; Ranchere-Vince, Dominique; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valerie; de la Fouchardiere, Arnaud; Gill, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with tumors that secrete phosphaturic hormones, most notably fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). The majority of tumors associated with this syndrome show stereotypical histological features and are now known as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors (PMTs). We postulated that immunohistochemistry for somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) could be used to definitively identify PMTs or other tumors that cause TIO. Immunohistochemistry for FGF23 and SSTR2A was performed on 15 tumors from 14 patients with a definite diagnosis of TIO. All showed positive staining for both markers. While FGF23 staining was quite focal in some tumors, SSTR2A showed diffuse strong expression. In 40 control tumors not known to be associated with the clinical or biochemical features of TIO, FGF23 expression was found in 2 cases (one aneurysmal bone cyst and one osteosarcoma). SSTR2A expression was found in 9 control tumors (4 synovial sarcomas, 2 hemangiomas, 2 aneurysmal bone cysts and one osteosarcoma). Only one tumor (an aneurysmal bone cyst) showed positive staining for both FGF23 and SSTR2A. SSTR2A also commonly stained neoplastic and non-neoplastic endothelial cells. We conclude that neither FGF23 nor SSTR2A expression are specific for the diagnosis of PMT. However both stains are highly sensitive. Because of its diffuse strong expression and widespread availability, immunohistochemistry for SSTR2A is useful to confirm the diagnosis of PMT in an appropriate setting particularly if material is limited. Negative staining can serve as an excellent rule out test for this diagnosis. PMID:24060005

  6. FOXP2 targets show evidence of positive selection in European populations.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Qasim; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Chen, Yuan; Xue, Yali; Hu, Min; Vernes, Sonja C; Fisher, Simon E; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-05-01

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a highly conserved transcription factor that has been implicated in human speech and language disorders and plays important roles in the plasticity of the developing brain. The pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXP2 in modern populations suggests that it has been the target of positive (Darwinian) selection during recent human evolution. In our study, we searched for evidence of selection that might have followed FOXP2 adaptations in modern humans. We examined whether or not putative FOXP2 targets identified by chromatin-immunoprecipitation genomic screening show evidence of positive selection. We developed an algorithm that, for any given gene list, systematically generates matched lists of control genes from the Ensembl database, collates summary statistics for three frequency-spectrum-based neutrality tests from the low-coverage resequencing data of the 1000 Genomes Project, and determines whether these statistics are significantly different between the given gene targets and the set of controls. Overall, there was strong evidence of selection of FOXP2 targets in Europeans, but not in the Han Chinese, Japanese, or Yoruba populations. Significant outliers included several genes linked to cellular movement, reproduction, development, and immune cell trafficking, and 13 of these constituted a significant network associated with cardiac arteriopathy. Strong signals of selection were observed for CNTNAP2 and RBFOX1, key neurally expressed genes that have been consistently identified as direct FOXP2 targets in multiple studies and that have themselves been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders involving language dysfunction.

  7. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Show Reduced Specificity and Less Positive Events in Mental Time Travel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing-jie; Liu, Lu-lu; Cui, Ji-fang; Wang, Ya; Chen, An-tao; Li, Feng-hua; Wang, Wei-hong; Zheng, Han-feng; Gan, Ming-yuan; Li, Chun-qiu; Shum, David H. K.; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Mental time travel refers to the ability to recall past events and to imagine possible future events. Schizophrenia (SCZ) patients have problems in remembering specific personal experiences in the past and imagining what will happen in the future. This study aimed to examine episodic past and future thinking in SCZ spectrum disorders including SCZ patients and individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) proneness who are at risk for developing SCZ. Thirty-two SCZ patients, 30 SPD proneness individuals, and 33 healthy controls participated in the study. The Sentence Completion for Events from the Past Test (SCEPT) and the Sentence Completion for Events in the Future Test were used to measure past and future thinking abilities. Results showed that SCZ patients showed significantly reduced specificity in recalling past and imagining future events, they generated less proportion of specific and extended events compared to healthy controls. SPD proneness individuals only generated less extended events compared to healthy controls. The reduced specificity was mainly manifested in imagining future events. Both SCZ patients and SPD proneness individuals generated less positive events than controls. These results suggest that mental time travel impairments in SCZ spectrum disorders and have implications for understanding their cognitive and emotional deficits. PMID:27507958

  8. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Show Reduced Specificity and Less Positive Events in Mental Time Travel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Jie; Liu, Lu-Lu; Cui, Ji-Fang; Wang, Ya; Chen, An-Tao; Li, Feng-Hua; Wang, Wei-Hong; Zheng, Han-Feng; Gan, Ming-Yuan; Li, Chun-Qiu; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2016-01-01

    Mental time travel refers to the ability to recall past events and to imagine possible future events. Schizophrenia (SCZ) patients have problems in remembering specific personal experiences in the past and imagining what will happen in the future. This study aimed to examine episodic past and future thinking in SCZ spectrum disorders including SCZ patients and individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) proneness who are at risk for developing SCZ. Thirty-two SCZ patients, 30 SPD proneness individuals, and 33 healthy controls participated in the study. The Sentence Completion for Events from the Past Test (SCEPT) and the Sentence Completion for Events in the Future Test were used to measure past and future thinking abilities. Results showed that SCZ patients showed significantly reduced specificity in recalling past and imagining future events, they generated less proportion of specific and extended events compared to healthy controls. SPD proneness individuals only generated less extended events compared to healthy controls. The reduced specificity was mainly manifested in imagining future events. Both SCZ patients and SPD proneness individuals generated less positive events than controls. These results suggest that mental time travel impairments in SCZ spectrum disorders and have implications for understanding their cognitive and emotional deficits. PMID:27507958

  9. Zinc-positive boutons in the cerebral cortex of lizards show glutamate immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guijarro, F J; Soriano, E; Del Rio, J A; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1991-10-01

    Zinc-positive boutons, originating in the medial cortex of lizards, exhibit glutamate immunoreactivity. This finding supports the presumed homology between lizard zinc-positive boutons and the hippocampal mossy fibres of mammals, which are also glutamate-immunoreactive and zinc-positive. Zinc-positive boutons of lizards contain a chelatable pool of zinc located in the hippocampal mossy fibres of mammals. These synaptic systems also contain glutamate, which indicates a possible simultaneous action of zinc and glutamate during synaptic transmission.

  10. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza, More Information Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  11. Upper airway collapse during drug induced sleep endoscopy: head rotation in supine position compared with lateral head and trunk position.

    PubMed

    Safiruddin, Faiza; Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; de Vries, Nico

    2015-02-01

    Drug induced sedated sleep endoscopy (DISE) is often employed to determine the site, severity and pattern of obstruction in patients with sleep apnea. DISE is usually performed in supine position. We recently showed that the obstruction pattern is different when DISE is performed in lateral position. In this study, we compared the outcomes of DISE performed in supine position with head rotated, with the outcomes of DISE performed with head and trunk in lateral position. The Prospective study design was used in the present study. Sixty patients with OSA (44 male; mean apnea hypopnea index (AHI) 20.8 ± 17.5 events/h) underwent DISE under propofol sedation. Patients were placed in lateral position, and the upper airway collapse was evaluated. The patients were then placed in supine position with the head rotated to the right side. DISE outcomes were scored using the VOTE classification system. In lateral position, nine patients (15.0%) had a complete antero-posterior (A-P) collapse at the level of the velum, nine had a partial A-P collapse. During head rotation and trunk in supine position, at the level of the velum, four patients (6.7%) had a complete A-P collapse, while two patients (3.3%) had a partial A-P collapse. For all other sites, the patterns of collapse were not significantly different between head rotation and lateral position. During DISE, rotation of the head in supine position, and lateral head and trunk position present similar sites, severity and patterns of upper airway collapse, with the exception of collapse at the level of the velum. Here the severity of A-P collapse is less severe during head rotation than in lateral head and trunk position. PMID:25142078

  12. Upper airway collapse during drug induced sleep endoscopy: head rotation in supine position compared with lateral head and trunk position.

    PubMed

    Safiruddin, Faiza; Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; de Vries, Nico

    2015-02-01

    Drug induced sedated sleep endoscopy (DISE) is often employed to determine the site, severity and pattern of obstruction in patients with sleep apnea. DISE is usually performed in supine position. We recently showed that the obstruction pattern is different when DISE is performed in lateral position. In this study, we compared the outcomes of DISE performed in supine position with head rotated, with the outcomes of DISE performed with head and trunk in lateral position. The Prospective study design was used in the present study. Sixty patients with OSA (44 male; mean apnea hypopnea index (AHI) 20.8 ± 17.5 events/h) underwent DISE under propofol sedation. Patients were placed in lateral position, and the upper airway collapse was evaluated. The patients were then placed in supine position with the head rotated to the right side. DISE outcomes were scored using the VOTE classification system. In lateral position, nine patients (15.0%) had a complete antero-posterior (A-P) collapse at the level of the velum, nine had a partial A-P collapse. During head rotation and trunk in supine position, at the level of the velum, four patients (6.7%) had a complete A-P collapse, while two patients (3.3%) had a partial A-P collapse. For all other sites, the patterns of collapse were not significantly different between head rotation and lateral position. During DISE, rotation of the head in supine position, and lateral head and trunk position present similar sites, severity and patterns of upper airway collapse, with the exception of collapse at the level of the velum. Here the severity of A-P collapse is less severe during head rotation than in lateral head and trunk position.

  13. Valproic Acid Increases CD133 Positive Cells that Show Low Sensitivity to Cytostatics in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mohamed Ashraf; Hraběta, Jan; Groh, Tomáš; Procházka, Pavel; Doktorová, Helena; Eckschlager, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a well-known antiepileptic drug that exhibits antitumor activities through its action as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. CD133 is considered to be a cancer stem cell marker in several tumors including neuroblastoma. CD133 transcription is strictly regulated by epigenetic modifications. We evaluated the epigenetic effects of treatment with 1mM VPA and its influence on the expression of CD133 in four human neuroblastoma cell lines. Chemoresistance and cell cycle of CD133+ and CD133− populations were examined by flow cytometry. We performed bisulfite conversion followed by methylation-sensitive high resolution melting analysis to assess the methylation status of CD133 promoters P1 and P3. Our results revealed that VPA induced CD133 expression that was associated with increased acetylation of histones H3 and H4. On treatment with VPA and cytostatics, CD133+ cells were mainly detected in the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and they showed less activated caspase-3 compared to CD133− cells. UKF-NB-3 neuroblastoma cells which express CD133 displayed higher colony and neurosphere formation capacities when treated with VPA, unlike IMR-32 which lacks for CD133 protein. Induction of CD133 in UKF-NB-3 was associated with increased expression of phosphorylated Akt and pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct-4 and Sox2. VPA did not induce CD133 expression in cell lines with methylated P1 and P3 promoters, where the CD133 protein was not detected. Applying the demethylating agent 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine to the cell lines with methylated promoters resulted in CD133 re-expression that was associated with a drop in P1 and P3 methylation level. In conclusion, CD133 expression in neuroblastoma can be regulated by histone acetylation and/or methylation of its CpG promoters. VPA can induce CD133+ cells which display high proliferation potential and low sensitivity to cytostatics in neuroblastoma. These results give new insight into the possible

  14. Valproic Acid Increases CD133 Positive Cells that Show Low Sensitivity to Cytostatics in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed Ashraf; Hraběta, Jan; Groh, Tomáš; Procházka, Pavel; Doktorová, Helena; Eckschlager, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a well-known antiepileptic drug that exhibits antitumor activities through its action as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. CD133 is considered to be a cancer stem cell marker in several tumors including neuroblastoma. CD133 transcription is strictly regulated by epigenetic modifications. We evaluated the epigenetic effects of treatment with 1mM VPA and its influence on the expression of CD133 in four human neuroblastoma cell lines. Chemoresistance and cell cycle of CD133+ and CD133- populations were examined by flow cytometry. We performed bisulfite conversion followed by methylation-sensitive high resolution melting analysis to assess the methylation status of CD133 promoters P1 and P3. Our results revealed that VPA induced CD133 expression that was associated with increased acetylation of histones H3 and H4. On treatment with VPA and cytostatics, CD133+ cells were mainly detected in the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and they showed less activated caspase-3 compared to CD133- cells. UKF-NB-3 neuroblastoma cells which express CD133 displayed higher colony and neurosphere formation capacities when treated with VPA, unlike IMR-32 which lacks for CD133 protein. Induction of CD133 in UKF-NB-3 was associated with increased expression of phosphorylated Akt and pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct-4 and Sox2. VPA did not induce CD133 expression in cell lines with methylated P1 and P3 promoters, where the CD133 protein was not detected. Applying the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine to the cell lines with methylated promoters resulted in CD133 re-expression that was associated with a drop in P1 and P3 methylation level. In conclusion, CD133 expression in neuroblastoma can be regulated by histone acetylation and/or methylation of its CpG promoters. VPA can induce CD133+ cells which display high proliferation potential and low sensitivity to cytostatics in neuroblastoma. These results give new insight into the possible

  15. Valproic Acid Increases CD133 Positive Cells that Show Low Sensitivity to Cytostatics in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed Ashraf; Hraběta, Jan; Groh, Tomáš; Procházka, Pavel; Doktorová, Helena; Eckschlager, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a well-known antiepileptic drug that exhibits antitumor activities through its action as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. CD133 is considered to be a cancer stem cell marker in several tumors including neuroblastoma. CD133 transcription is strictly regulated by epigenetic modifications. We evaluated the epigenetic effects of treatment with 1mM VPA and its influence on the expression of CD133 in four human neuroblastoma cell lines. Chemoresistance and cell cycle of CD133+ and CD133- populations were examined by flow cytometry. We performed bisulfite conversion followed by methylation-sensitive high resolution melting analysis to assess the methylation status of CD133 promoters P1 and P3. Our results revealed that VPA induced CD133 expression that was associated with increased acetylation of histones H3 and H4. On treatment with VPA and cytostatics, CD133+ cells were mainly detected in the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and they showed less activated caspase-3 compared to CD133- cells. UKF-NB-3 neuroblastoma cells which express CD133 displayed higher colony and neurosphere formation capacities when treated with VPA, unlike IMR-32 which lacks for CD133 protein. Induction of CD133 in UKF-NB-3 was associated with increased expression of phosphorylated Akt and pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct-4 and Sox2. VPA did not induce CD133 expression in cell lines with methylated P1 and P3 promoters, where the CD133 protein was not detected. Applying the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine to the cell lines with methylated promoters resulted in CD133 re-expression that was associated with a drop in P1 and P3 methylation level. In conclusion, CD133 expression in neuroblastoma can be regulated by histone acetylation and/or methylation of its CpG promoters. VPA can induce CD133+ cells which display high proliferation potential and low sensitivity to cytostatics in neuroblastoma. These results give new insight into the possible

  16. Legal Position of School Personnel -- Drugs and Narcotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    California educators have been given broad discretionary powers to control students who misuse drugs or narcotics, and to develop drug education programs. This paper outlines and discusses legislation dealing with disciplinary actions against drug offenders, and delineates school responsibilities for developing and implementing effective drug…

  17. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  18. Fatal Crashes from Drivers Testing Positive for Drugs in the U.S., 1993–2010

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, Jim P.; Pagán, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Illegal drug use is a persistent problem, prescription drug abuse is on the rise, and there is clinical evidence that drug use reduces driving performance. This study describes trends in characteristics of drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes who test positive for drugs. Methods We used the Fatality Analysis Reporting System—a census of motor vehicle crashes resulting in at least one fatality on U.S. public roads—to investigate suspected drug use for the period 1993–2010. Results Drugged drivers who were tested for drug use accounted for 11.4% of all drivers involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes in 2010. Drugged drivers are increasingly likely to be older drivers, and the percentage using multiple drugs increased from 32.6% in 1993 to 45.8% in 2010. About half (52.4%) of all drugged drivers used alcohol, but nearly three-quarters of drivers testing positive for cocaine also used alcohol. Prescription drugs accounted for the highest fraction of drugs used by drugged drivers in fatal crashes in 2010 (46.5%), with much of the increase in prevalence occurring since the mid-2000s. Conclusions The profile of a drugged driver has changed substantially over time. An increasing share of these drivers is now testing positive for prescription drugs, cannabis, and multiple drugs. These findings have implications for developing interventions to address the changing nature of drug use among drivers in the U.S. PMID:24982537

  19. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringström, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  20. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 µM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl(-) and the decreased HCO3 (-) concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na-K-2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  1. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  2. Design or screening of drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease: what shows the most promise?

    PubMed Central

    Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endemic in Latin America, Chagas disease is now becoming a serious global health problem, and yet has no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry and remains incurable. In 2012, two antimycotic drugs inhibitors of fungal sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) – posaconazole and ravuconazole – entered clinical trials. Availability of the X-ray structure of the orthologous enzyme from the causative agent of the disease, protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, determined in complexes with posaconazole as well as with several experimental protozoa-specific CYP51 inhibitors opens an excellent opportunity to improve the situation. Areas covered This article summarizes the information available in PubMed and Google on the outcomes of treatment of the chronic Chagas disease. It also outlines the major features of the T. cruzi CYP51 structure and the possible structure-based strategies for rational design of novel T. cruzi specific drugs. Expert opinion There is no doubt that screenings for alternative drug-like molecules as well as mining the T. cruzi genome for novel drug targets are of great value and might eventually lead to groundbreaking discoveries. However, all newly identified molecules must proceed through the long, expensive and low-yielding drug optimization process, and all novel potential drug targets must be validated in terms of their essentiality and druggability. CYP51 is already a well-validated and highly successful target for clinical and agricultural antifungals. With minimal investments into the final stages of their development/trials, T. cruzi-specific CYP51 inhibitors can provide an immediate treatment for Chagas disease, either on their own or in combination with the currently available drugs. PMID:24079515

  3. NIH-supported trial drug shows benefit in children with previously treated cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Young patients with some types of advanced cancer, for whom standard treatment had failed, had their tumors disappear during treatment with a drug that both targets and blocks a protein associated with their disease. These findings are from a Phase I, mul

  4. Sexual Risk Taking among HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users: Contexts, Characteristics, and Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kelly R.; Purcell, David; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Halkitis, Perry N.; Gomez, Cynthia A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) (N = 161) were recruited to complete a qualitative interview and a quantitative survey about sexual behavior and transmission risk. We identified two contexts in which exposure encounters occurred most commonly for HIV-positive IDUs: in intimate serodiscordant relationships and in the drug/sex economy.…

  5. Positively charged polyethylenimines enhance nasal absorption of the negatively charged drug, low molecular weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianzhi; Hussain, Alamdar; Bai, Shuhua; Khalil, Ikramy A; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2006-10-27

    This study tests the hypothesis that positively charged polyethylenimines (PEIs) enhance nasal absorption of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) by reducing the negative surface charge of the drug molecule. Physical interactions between PEIs and LMWH were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, particle size analysis, conductivity measurements, zeta potential analysis, and azure A assay. The efficacy of PEIs in enhancing nasal absorption of LMWH was studied by administering LMWH formulated with PEI into the nose of anesthetized rats and monitoring drug absorption by measuring plasma anti-factor Xa activity. The metabolic stability of LMWH was evaluated by incubating the drug in rat nasal mucosal homogenates. FTIR spectra of the LMWH-PEI formulation showed a shift in peak position compared to LMWH or PEI alone. Decreases in conductivity, zeta potential and the amount of free LMWH in the PEI-LMWH formulation, as revealed by azure A assay, suggest that PEIs possibly neutralize the negative surface charge of LMWH. The efficacy of PEI in enhancing the bioavailability of nasally administered LMWH can be ranked as PEI-1000 kDa>or=PEI-750 kDa>PEI-25 kDa. When PEI-1000 kDa was used at a concentration of 0.25%, there was a 4-fold increase in both the absolute and relative bioavailabilities of LMWH compared to the control formulation. Overall, these results indicate that polyethylenimines can be used as potential carriers for nasally administered LMWHs. PMID:17023085

  6. AQ4N: an alkylaminoanthraquinone N-oxide showing bioreductive potential and positive interaction with radiation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, S. R.; Hejmadi, M. V.; McIntyre, I. A.; McAleer, J. J.; Patterson, L. H.

    1995-01-01

    AQ4N (1,4-bis([2-(dimethylamino-N-oxide)ethyl]amino)5,8-dihydroxy- anthracene-9,10-dione) is a novel alkylaminoanthraquinone N-oxide which, on reduction, forms a stable DNA affinic cytotoxic compound AQ4. The in vivo anti-tumour efficacy of AQ4N was investigated in B6D2F1 mice bearing the T50/80 mammary carcinoma. The effect of the drug was evaluated in combination with hypobaric hypoxia and with radiation (single and multiple fractions). Systemic toxicity was assessed by weight loss post treatment. This was low for AQ4N and was less than that obtained with the bioreductive drugs, RSU 1069 (1-[3-aziridinyl-2-hydroxypropyl]-2-nitroimidazole) and SR 4233 (Tirapazamine, 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxide). The anti-tumour effect of AQ4N was potentiated in vivo by combination with hypobaric hypoxia with a dose enhancement ratio of 5.1. This is consistent with the proposal that AQ4N was reduced in vivo to AQ4, resulting in enhanced anti-tumour toxicity. When AQ4N (200 mg kg-1) was combined with single dose radiation (12 Gy) the drug was shown to have an additive interaction with radiation. This was obtained even if the drug was administered from 4 days before to 6 h after radiation treatment. Equivalent anti-tumour activity was also shown when both AQ4N (200 mg kg-1) and radiation (5 x 3 Gy) were administered in fractionated schedules. In conclusion, AQ4N shows significant potential as a bioreductive drug for combination with fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:7599069

  7. Positive family relationships and religious affiliation as mediators between negative environment and illicit drug symptoms in American Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mansoo; Stiffman, Arlene R

    2010-07-01

    The present study tests how positive family relationships and religious affiliation mediate between negative familial and social environments, and adolescent illicit drug abuse/dependence symptoms. The theoretical framework is based on an integration of two theories: the ecological model of human development (Bronfenbrenner, 1979) and the social development model (Hawkins & Weis, 1985). We used a stratified random sample of 401 American Indian adolescents. A path analysis tested the integrative theoretical model. Findings showed that positive family relationships mediated the negative impact of addicted family members, violence victimization, and negative school environment on illicit drug abuse/dependence symptoms. Religious affiliation mediated the negative effect of deviant peers on positive family relationships. Intervention and prevention efforts may benefit from promoting positive family relationships and religious affiliation to reduce the impact of complex familial and social problems on illicit drug symptoms.

  8. Bronchoscopic Investigation of Atypical Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Showing Viral Lung Involvement.

    PubMed

    Hase, Isano; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Sakuma, Hideo; Kaneko, Fumio; Watanabe, Yuzuru; Fujiu, Koichi; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Ishii, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of atypical drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) involving serological reactivation of cytomegalovirus induced by carbamazepine with pulmonary and skin manifestations. These lesions were not present on admission, but developed on virus reactivation as indicated by the presence of inclusion bodies and multinucleated giant cells in alveolar cells with CD8(+) T lymphocyte infiltration on a transbronchial lung biopsy. Although the precise mechanism of DIHS remains unknown, this case suggests the crucial role of viral reactivation in pulmonary lesions in DIHS. PMID:27629969

  9. Positive-charged solid lipid nanoparticles as paclitaxel drug delivery system in glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Riganti, Chiara; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Filice, Gaetano; Corona, Silvia; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of behenic acid were prepared with the coacervation technique. Generally, spherical shaped SLN with mean diameters in the range 300–600 nm were obtained. The introduction of charged molecules, such as stearylamine and glycol chitosan into the formulation allowed to obtain positive SLN with Zeta potential in the 8-20 mV range and encapsulation efficiency in the 25–90% range.Blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, tested in vitro through hCMEC/D3 cells monolayer, showed a significantly increase in the permeation of Coumarin-6, used as model drug, when vehicled in SLN. Positive-charged SLN do not seem to enhance permeation although stearylamine-positive SLN resulted the best permeable formulation after 24 h.Cytotoxicity studies on NO3 glioblastoma cell line demonstrated the maintenance of cytotoxic activity of all paclitaxel-loaded SLN that was always unmodified or greater compared with free drug. No difference in cytotoxicity was noted between neutral and charged SLN.Co-culture experiments with hCMEC/D3 and different glioblastoma cells evidenced that, when delivered in SLN, paclitaxel increased its cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells.

  10. Neuropsychological functioning in HIV-positive African-American women with a history of drug use.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, K. I.; Campbell, A.; Hawkins, P.; Madhere, S.; Johnson, K.; Takushi-Chinen, R.

    1998-01-01

    This preliminary investigation examined neuropsychological performance in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative African-American women with a history of drug use. The study population was comprised of 10 HIV-negative, 9 asymptomatic HIV-positive, 13 symptomatic HIV-positive, and 10 acquired immunodeficiency virus (AIDS) patients. A neuropsychological battery designed to assess attention, psychomotor processing, verbal memory, and visual memory was administered to participants. No evidence of HIV-related cognitive impairment was found in patients in the early stages of HIV infection. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant deficits in psychomotor processing and verbal recall in persons with AIDS. These individuals showed greater difficulty in tasks requiring maintained attention and performed poorly on measures of immediate and delayed verbal recall. In contrast, HIV status was not related to visual memory, verbal recognition, or the number of errors made during a verbal recall task. The pattern of cognitive deficits observed in persons with AIDS resembles that commonly associated with subcortical pathology. The cognitive deficits observed were not related to depression or recentness of drug use. PMID:9828581

  11. Dysphoric students show higher use of the observer perspective in their retrieval of positive versus negative autobiographical memories

    PubMed Central

    Nelis, Sabine; Debeer, Elise; Holmes, Emily A.; Raes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are retrieved as images from either a field perspective or an observer perspective. The observer perspective is thought to dull emotion. Positive affect is blunted in depressed mood. Consequently, are positive events recalled from an observer perspective in depressed mood? We investigated the relationship between memory vantage perspective and depressive symptoms in a student sample. Participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams & Broadbent, 1986) and assessed the perspective accompanying each memory. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and the Responses to Positive Affect questionnaire (RPA; Feldman, Joormann, & Johnson, 2008) were administered. The results showed a small positive association between depressive symptoms and the use of an observer perspective for positive autobiographical memories, but not for negative memories. Furthermore, comparing a subgroup with clinically significant symptom levels (dysphoric students) with non-dysphoric individuals revealed that dysphoric students used an observer perspective more for positive memories compared with negative memories. This was not the case for non-dysphoric students. The observer perspective in dysphorics was associated with a dampening cognitive style in response to positive experiences. PMID:23083015

  12. Different policy outcomes of the new drugs and currently listed drugs under the positive list system in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Kyung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Mi-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Four years have passed since the positive list system was implemented in South Korea. The system was received well because it has fulfilled its intended objective of enhancing the cost-effectiveness of new drugs. With regard to currently listed drugs, however, debate has lingered since the reevaluation of the cost-effectiveness by therapeutic group. This study intended to review the lessons learned and compromises reached in implementing an evidence-based national formulary. Currently listed drugs are very different from new drugs. In terms of effectiveness, the level of existing evidence tends to be lower for currently listed drugs. Also, the evaluation plan was quite delayed because of the vast amount of literature. In the political decision-making process, a coalition was formed by the pharmaceutical companies with physicians, and the government had difficulty responding because of the strong resistance against the reevaluation of currently listed drugs. Although idealistic, it was an attempt to apply the same standard of cost-effectiveness for currently listed drugs as that for new drugs. To successfully implement the system, however, some factors that need to be considered were limitation of available evidence on currently listed drugs and specific strategies employed against political resistance. PMID:22265054

  13. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique.

  14. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique. PMID:24986836

  15. Differences in treatment outcome between male alcohol dependent offenders of domestic violence with and without positive drug screens.

    PubMed

    Easton, Caroline J; Mandel, Dolores; Babuscio, Theresa; Rounsaville, Bruce J; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2007-10-01

    Men who are violent toward their partners tend to have a dual problem with alcohol and drug use, yet little is known about differences between men with single rather than dual problems. This study was one of the first to evaluate differences between alcohol dependent men who were arrested for Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) with and without concurrent illicit drug use. Seventy-eight participants were randomly assigned to manual-guided group behavioral therapies (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Twelve Step Facilitation) and assessed across 12 weeks of treatment. Despite denying drug use at baseline, thirty-two clients (43%) tested positive for illicit drug use (cocaine and marijuana) during the 12 weeks of treatment. The study specifically addressed whether there were differences between clients using alcohol only versus individuals using both alcohol + drugs in terms of 1) baseline characteristics; 2) treatment compliance (e.g., attendance and substance use during treatment; and 3) treatment outcomes (alcohol, drug use, anger management, and aggression at the completion of treatment). The results showed that there were comparatively few differences between the alcohol versus the alcohol + drug using groups at baseline. Regarding treatment compliance and retention, alcohol + drug using participants attended significantly fewer sessions, had significantly fewer percent days abstinence from alcohol use, significantly more total days of positive breathalyzer results. Regarding treatment outcomes across anger management and aggression scores, the alcohol + drug using participants had significantly more impairments in anger management styles from pre- to post-treatment. However, there were no differences between the groups across verbal or physical aggression. Both groups improved in their verbal aggression from pre- to post-treatment. The findings suggest that alcohol dependent men who continue to use illicit drugs may require additional interventions to effectively

  16. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  17. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M; Simões, Bruno M; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B; Carrascosa, José L; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-02-12

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully  apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  18. Sensitization to petrolatum: an unusual cause of false-positive drug patch-tests.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, G; Schmutz, J L; Trechot, Ph; Commun, N; Barbaud, A

    2004-09-01

    We report on an unexpected sensitization to petrolatum diagnosed with the occurrence of multiple nonrelevant and false-positive drug patch-tests performed while investigating a patient suffering from many cutaneous adverse drug reactions. All the positive drug patch-tests were prepared with GILBERT vaseline. This petrolatum reaction is positive as it was tested with five other brands of petrolatums a few months later. As the same petrolatums, but from different batches were tested, patch-tests with GILBERT petrolatum were doubtful, while other petrolatums were positive. White petrolatum is a mixture of semisolid hydrocarbons of the methane series. The sensitizing impurities of petrolatum are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g. phenanthrene derivatives. The purity of petrolatum depends on both the petroleum stock and on the production and packaging methods. Even if rare, contact sensitization to petrolatum can disturb the interpretation of drug patch-tests. It is necessary in the interpretation of drug patch-tests to test both in petrolatum and other vehicles and with all the different petrolatums used in preparing the material for drug patch-tests. So, it is essential to advise the patients sensitized to petrolatum to remove all the topical drugs, such as all the cosmetics, which contain petrolatum in their formulation.

  19. Prediction of positive food effect: Bioavailability enhancement of BCS class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siddarth; Polli, James E

    2016-06-15

    High-throughput screening methods have increased the number of poorly water-soluble, highly permeable drug candidates. Many of these candidates have increased bioavailability when administered with food (i.e., exhibit a positive food effect). Food is known to impact drug bioavailability through a variety of mechanisms, including drug solubilization and prolonged gastric residence time. In vitro dissolution media that aim to mimic in vivo gastrointestinal (GI) conditions have been developed to lessen the need for fed human bioequivalence studies. The objective of this work was to develop an in vitro lipolysis model to predict positive food effect of three BCS Class II drugs (i.e., danazol, amiodarone and ivermectin) in previously developed lipolysis media. This in vitro lipolysis model was comparatively benchmarked against FeSSIF and FaSSIF media that were modified for an in vitro lipolysis approach, as FeSSIF and FaSSIF are widely used in in vitro dissolution studies. The in vitro lipolysis model accurately predicted the in vivo positive food effect for three model BCS class II drugs. The in vitro lipolysis model has potential use as a screening test of drug candidates in early development to assess positive food effect.

  20. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  1. Genome Wide Nucleosome Mapping for HSV-1 Shows Nucleosomes Are Deposited at Preferred Positions during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F.; Chen, Eric Z.; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  2. Brain viral burden, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in HAART-treated HIV positive injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter; Bell, Jeanne E

    2014-02-01

    The long-term impact of chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on brain status in injecting drug users (IDU) treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is unknown. Viral persistence in the brain with ongoing neuroinflammation may predispose to Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated the brains of ten HAART-treated individuals (six IDU and four non-DU), compared with ten HIV negative controls (six IDU and four non-DU). HIV DNA levels in brain tissue were correlated with plasma and lymphoid tissue viral loads, cognitive status, microglial activation and Tau protein and amyloid deposition. Brain HIV proviral DNA levels were low in most cases but higher in HIV encephalitis (n = 2) and correlated significantly with levels in lymphoid tissue (p = 0.0075), but not with those in plasma. HIV positive subjects expressed more Tau protein and amyloid than HIV negative controls (highest in a 58 year old), as did IDU, but brain viral loads showed no relation to Tau and amyloid. Microglial activation linked significantly to HIV positivity (p = 0.001) and opiate abuse accentuated these microglial changes (p = 0.05). This study confirms that HIV DNA persists in brains despite HAART and that opiate abuse adds to the risk of brain damage in HIV positive subjects. Novel findings in this study show that (1) plasma levels are not a good surrogate indicator of brain status, (2) viral burden in brain and lymphoid tissues is related, and (3) while Tau and amyloid deposition is increased in HIV positive IDU, this is not specifically related to increased HIV burden within the brain.

  3. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue.

  4. In vitro susceptibility of 137 Candida sp. isolates from HIV positive patients to several antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Magaldi, S; Mata, S; Hartung, C; Verde, G; Deibis, L; Roldán, Y; Marcano, C

    2001-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis caused by various species of Candida is one of the most common infections in HIV seropositive or AIDS patients. Drug resistance among these yeasts is an increasing problem. We studied the frequency of resistance profile to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and terbinafine of 137 isolates of Candida sp. From HIV positive or AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at Instituto de Inmunología, U.C.V. and the Hospital "Jose Ignacio Baldó", Caracas Venezuela, using the well diffusion susceptibility test (Magaldi et al.). We found that nearly 10% of C. albicans isolates were primarily fluconazole resistant, 45% of C. albicans isolates from patients with previous treatment were resistant to fluconazole, of which 93% showed cross-resistance to itraconazole, and even about 30% of C. tropicalis (n = 13) were resistant to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. To this respect, several recent reports have been described antifungal cross-resistance among azoles. Therefore, we consider that C. tropicalis should be added to the growing list of yeast in which antifungal drug resistance is common. This report could be useful for therapeutic aspect in AIDS patients with oral candidiasis.

  5. Regions with higher Medicare Part D spending show better drug adherence, but not lower medicare costs for two diseases.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Shoemaker, J Samantha; Dai, Mingliang; Davidoff, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    A quarter-century of research on geographic variation in Medicare costs has failed to find any positive association between high spending and better health outcomes. We conducted this study using a 5 percent random sample of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes or heart failure in 2006 and 2007 to see whether there was any correlation between geographic variation in Part D spending and good medication-taking behavior-and, if so, whether that correlation resulted in reduced Medicare Parts A and B spending on diabetes and heart failure treatments. We found that beneficiaries residing in areas characterized by higher adjusted drug spending had significantly more "therapy days"-days with recommended medications on hand-than did beneficiaries in lower-spending areas. However, we did not find that this factor translated into short-term savings in Medicare treatment costs for these two diseases. This result might not be surprising, since returns from medication adherence can take years to manifest. At the same time, discovering which regional factors are responsible for differences in drug spending and medication practices should be a high priority. If the observed differences are related to poor physician communication or lack of good care coordination, then appropriately designed policy tools-including accountable care organizations, medical homes, and provider quality reporting initiatives-might help address them.

  6. Bacterial vaginosis and inflammatory response showed association with severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-positive women.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Sobrinho, Juçara Maria; Rabelo-Santos, Silvia Helena; Fugueiredo-Alves, Rosane Ribeiro; Derchain, Sophie; Sarian, Luis Otávio Z; Pitta, Denise R; Campos, Elisabete A; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Vaginal infections may affect susceptibility to and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and chronic inflammation has been linked to carcinogenesis. This study aimed to evaluate the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and inflammatory response (IR) with the severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-infected women. HPV DNA was amplified using PGMY09/11 primers and genotyping was performed using a reverse line blot hybridization assay in 211 cervical samples from women submitted to excision of the transformation zone. The bacterial flora was assessed in Papanicolaou stained smears, and positivity for BV was defined as ≥ 20% of clue cells. Present inflammatory response was defined as ≥ 30 neutrophils per field at 1000× magnification. Age higher than 29 years (OR:1.91 95% CI 1.06-3.45), infections by the types 16 and/or 18 (OR:1.92 95% CI 1.06-3.47), single or multiple infections associated with types 16 and/or 18 (OR: 1.92 CI 95% 1.06-3.47), BV (OR: 3.54 95% CI 1.62-7.73) and IR (OR: 6.33 95% CI 3.06-13.07) were associated with severity of cervical neoplasia (CIN 2 or worse diagnoses), while not smoking showed a protective effect (OR: 0.51 95% CI 0.26-0.98). After controlling for confounding factors, BV(OR: 3.90 95% CI 1.64-9.29) and IR (OR: 6.43 95% CI 2.92-14.15) maintained their association with the severity of cervical neoplasia. Bacterial vaginosis and inflammatory response were independently associated with severity of cervical neoplasia in HPV-positive women, which seems to suggest that the microenvironment would relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia. PMID:26644228

  7. Molecular characterization of Iranian wheat stripe virus shows its taxonomic position as a distinct species in the genus Tenuivirus.

    PubMed

    Heydarnejad, J; Barclay, W S; Izadpanah, K; Hunter, F R; Gooding, M J

    2006-02-01

    The full lengths of three genome segments of Iranian wheat stripe virus (IWSV) were amplified by reverse transcription (RT) followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer complementary to tenuivirus conserved terminal sequences. The segments were sequenced and found to comprise 3469, 2337, and 1831 nt, respectively. The gene organization of these segments is similar to that of other known tenuiviruses, each displaying an ambisense coding strategy. IWSV segments, however, are different from those of other viruses with respect to the number of nucleotides and deduced amino acid sequence for each ORF. Depending on the segment, the first 16-22 nt at the 5' end and the first 16 nt at the 3' end are highly conserved among IWSV and rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), rice stripe virus (RSV) and maize stripe virus (MStV). In addition, the first 15-18 nt at the 5' end are complementary to the first 16-18 nt at the 3' end. Phylogenetic analyses showed close similarity and a common ancestor for IWSV, RHBV, and Echinochloa hoja blanca virus (EHBV). These findings confirm the position of IWSV as a distinct species in the genus Tenuivirus. PMID:16328148

  8. Developing and implementing a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in prison-based drug treatment: Project BRITE.

    PubMed

    Burdon, William M; St De Lore, Jef; Prendergast, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or noncompliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:22185038

  9. Developing and Implementing a Positive Behavioral Reinforcement Intervention in Prison-Based Drug Treatment: Project BRITE

    PubMed Central

    Burdon, William M.; De Lore, Jef St.; Prendergast, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or non-compliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:22185038

  10. Developing and implementing a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in prison-based drug treatment: Project BRITE.

    PubMed

    Burdon, William M; St De Lore, Jef; Prendergast, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or noncompliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention.

  11. Cigarette smoking and drug use among a nationally representative sample of HIV-positive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pacek, Lauren R.; Harrell, Paul T.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Among HIV-positive populations, the prevalence of cigarette smoking remains disproportionately high and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Little is known about this topic among HIV-positive persons in the general population. Methods Data came from the 2005–2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) public use data files. Unadjusted and adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses explored the associations between sociodemographic, drug and alcohol use, and drug and/or alcohol treatment characteristics with smoking status among HIV-positive individuals (n=349). Results More than 40% of the sample was current smokers. In adjusted analyses, females (aRRR=0.11, 95% CI=0.03–0.41) and participants who had never been married (aRRR=0.19, 95% CI=0.05–0.58), were morel likely to be former smokers than never smokers. Females (aRRR=0.37, 95% CI=0.14–0.96) and individuals older than age 35 (aRRR=0.37, 95% CI=0.16–0.89) were less likely to be current smokers than never smokers. Conversely, previously married persons (aRRR=5.72, 95% CI=1.40–23.31), participants reporting binge drinking (aRRR=5.96, 95% CI=2.27–15.64), and lifetime drug or alcohol treatment (aRRR=5.12, 95% CI=2.09–12.55) were more likely to be current smokers than never smokers. Conclusions Findings help confirm the high prevalence of smoking among HIV-positive persons suggesting the need for integrated substance use and smoking cessation treatment among HIV-positives. Scientific significance The present findings have implications for the development and implementation of targeted smoking cessation programs for HIV-positive smokers. PMID:25065609

  12. Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV positive patients in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Post, Frank A; Grint, Daniel; Werlinrud, Anne Marie; Panteleev, Alexander; Riekstina, Vieja; Malashenkov, Evgeniy A; Skrahina, Alena; Duiculescu, Dan; Podlekareva, Daria; Karpov, Igor; Bondarenko, Vasiliy; Chentsova, Nelly; Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Miro, Jose M

    2014-03-01

    Observational data from Eastern Europe on the management and outcome of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in HIV positive populations remain sparse in the English-language literature. We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes of 55 patients who were diagnosed with HIV and MDR TB in Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2006 to 89 patients whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were susceptible to isoniazid and rifampicin. Patients with HIV and MDR TB were young and predominantly male with high rates of intravenous drug use, imprisonment and hepatitis C co-infection. Eighty-four per cent of patients with MDR TB had no history of previous TB drug exposure suggesting that the majority of MDR TB resulted from transmission of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The use of non-standardized tuberculosis treatment was common, and the use of antiretroviral therapy infrequent. Compared to those with susceptible tuberculosis, patients with MDR TB were less likely to achieve cure or complete tuberculosis treatment (21.8% vs. 62.9%, p < 0.0001), and they were more likely to die (65.5% vs. 27.0%, p < 0.0001). Our study documents suboptimal management and poor outcomes in HIV positive patients with MDR TB. Implementation of WHO guidelines, rapid TB diagnostics and TB drug susceptibility testing for all patients remain a priority in this region. PMID:24247067

  13. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients.

  14. Psychosocial stress enhances non-drug-related positive memory retrieval in male abstinent heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Yan; Shi, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Lu, Lin

    2010-11-12

    Stress exposure in addicted individuals is known to provoke drug craving, presumably through a memory-like process, but less is known about the effects of stress on non-drug-related affective memory retrieval per se in such individuals, which is likely to provide important insights into therapy for relapse. In present study, we explored the effect of stress on retrieval of neutral and emotionally valenced (positive and negative) words in abstinent heroin addicts. In present study, 28 male inpatient abstinent heroin addicts and 20 sex-, age-, education- and economic status-matched healthy control participants were assessed for 24h delayed recall of valenced and neutral word lists on two occasions 4 weeks apart-once in a nonstress control condition, once after exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test in a counterbalanced design. In addition, attention, working memory, blood pressure, heart rate and salivary cortisol were assessed. We found acute stress at the time of word list recall enhanced retrieval of positively valenced words, but no effect on negative and neutral word retrieval in abstinent heroin addicts was observed. No changes were detected for attention and working memory. The stressor induced a significant increase in salivary free cortisol, blood pressure and heart rate. Stress can enhance non-drug-related positive memory in abstinent heroin addicts. Our findings will provide richer information in understanding dysregulation of their emotional memory processing under stress and hopefully provide insight into designing improved treatments for drug addiction.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment for HIV-positive drug users in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Ohinmaa, Arto; Duong, Anh Thuy; Do, Nhan Thi; Nguyen, Long Thanh; Mills, Steve; Houston, Stan; Jacobs, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is efficacious in reducing drug use that may improve HIV/AIDS care and treatment outcomes. This study evaluated the incremental cost-effectiveness of MMT for HIV-positive drug users from the perspective of health service providers. A sample of 370 HIV-positive drug users (age: mean ± SD: 29.5 ± 5.9 years; 95.7% male) taking MMT in multi-sites was assessed at baseline, three, six and nine months. Costs of MMT services were analyzed and converted to the year 2009. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were modeled from changes in health-related quality of life of patients using the modified World Health Organization Quality of Life - Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). Inverse probability-of-treatment weights, constructed using propensity score of non-responses, were applied to adjust for potential confounding. Over nine months, MMT substantially improved QALYs of HIV/AIDS patients (0.076 QALY [0.066-0.084]). The increments in QALY were large and stabilized in those patients taking antiretroviral treatment and abstinent to drug use. For one QALY gained, the MMT program would cost US$3745.3, approximately 3.2 times Vietnam GDP per capita in 2009. The cost-effectiveness of MMT intervention was robust against HIV advanced status or co-morbidity, e.g., TB treatment, but it might not be cost-effective for those patients who continued to use drug. Findings of this study indicate that providing MMT for HIV-positive drug users is a cost-effective intervention in Vietnam. Integrating MMT to HIV/AIDS care and treatment services would be beneficial in injection-driven HIV epidemics.

  16. Etoricoxib-induced fixed drug eruption with positive lesional patch tests.

    PubMed

    Calistru, Ana Maria; Cunha, Ana Paula; Nogueira, Ana; Azevedo, Filomena

    2011-06-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is most commonly associated with antibiotics, anticonvulsants, and nonnarcotic analgens, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the newer cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors have been rarely reported to cause FDE. We report the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian woman with erythematous pruritic plaques on the neck, left forearm, and second finger of the right hand, healing with hyperpigmentation and recurring in the same locations. The patient was sporadically taking oral etoricoxib 90 mg for her back pain and noticed the relation between administration of the drug and skin lesions, the time interval decreasing progressively from 1 week to 30 minutes. No other signs, symptoms, or drug intake was mentioned. The patch tests with etoricoxib 1% and 5% in petrolatum were positive at the location of the lesions and negative on the back (nonlesional skin). Standard European and NSAID series were negative. Patch tests of 10 healthy controls with etoricoxib 1% and 5% in petrolatum were negative. After the avoidance of the drug, no relapse was mentioned. The patch test was reliable for the diagnosis of FDE, avoiding the need for subsequent oral provocation testing and therefore preventing the possible adverse effects. Despite being regarded as a safe drug, the occurrence of cutaneous adverse reactions to etoricoxib should be considered, especially in the setting of its increasing use in pain control.

  17. Comparative study on toxoplasma serology among HIV positive and HIV negative illicit drug users in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Jamshidian, Ramin; Salmanzadeh, Shokrolah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is a common parasitic infection in human around the world and can cause life-threatening encephalitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected host. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of toxoplasma infection in illicit drug users (IDUs) with and without HIV infection in Iran. Methods: This study was carried out on 84 IDUs (42 HIV positive as case group and 42 HIV negative subjects as control group) from 2008 to 2009. Serum samples were tested for T. gondii IgG antibodies by Enzym linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Based on the company brochure kit, the test was defined positive if the antibody titer was 3 IU/ml or more. The data from these two groups were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of HIV positive cases was 34.4±8.6 and for HIV negative cases was 35.9±9.3 year. The mean age and distribution of sex in both groups were equal. The frequency of toxoplasma-IgG in HIV positive and HIV negative was 73.8% and 81%, respectively (p=0.19). Conclusion: The results show that prevalence of toxoplasmosis infection in the illicit drug users with HIV positive or negative is equal. PMID:24294474

  18. Combination of pedCAT® for 3D Imaging in Standing Position With Pedography Shows No Statistical Correlation of Bone Position With Force/Pressure Distribution.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan; Hahn, Sarah; Naef, Issam; Merschin, David

    2016-01-01

    pedCAT(®) (CurveBeam, Warrington, PA) is a technology for 3-dimensional (3D) imaging with full weightbearing that has been proved to exactly visualize the 3D bone position. For the present study, a customized pedography sensor (Pliance; Novel, Munich, Germany) was inserted into the pedCAT(®). The aim of our study was to analyze the correlation of the bone position and force/pressure distribution. A prospective consecutive study of 50 patients was performed, starting July 28, 2014. All patients underwent a pedCAT(®) scan and simultaneous pedography with full weightbearing in the standing position. The following parameters were measured on the pedCAT(®) image for the right foot by 3 different investigators 3 times: lateral talo-first metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, and minimum height of the fifth metatarsal base, second to fifth metatarsal heads, and medial sesamoid. From the pedography data, the following parameters were defined using the standardized software algorithm: midfoot contact area, maximum force of midfoot, maximum force of midfoot lateral, maximum force of entire foot, and maximum pressure of first to fifth metatarsal. The values of the corresponding pedCAT(®) and pedographic parameters were correlated (Pearson). The intra- and interobserver reliability of the pedCAT(®) measurements were sufficient (analysis of variance, p > .8 for each, power >0.8). No sufficient correlation was found between the pedCAT(®) and pedographic parameters (r < 0.05 or r > -0.38).3D bone position did not correlate with the force and pressure distribution under the foot sole during simultaneous pedCAT(®) scanning and pedography. Thus, the bone positions measured with pedCAT(®) do not allow conclusions about the force and pressure distribution. However, the static pedographic parameters also do not allow conclusions about the 3D bone position.one position and force/pressure distribution are important parameters for diagnostics, planning, and follow

  19. Challenges facing HIV-positive persons who use drugs and their families in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Tuan, Le Anh

    2015-01-01

    It is hypothesized that persons who use drugs (PWUD) in Vietnam who are also HIV-positive may face additional challenges in psychosocial outcomes, and these challenges may extend to their family members. In this study, we examined depressive symptoms, stigma, social support, and caregiver burden of HIV-positive PWUD and their family members, compared to the outcomes of HIV-negative PWUD and their family members. Baseline, 3-month, and 6-month assessment data were gathered from 83 PWUD and 83 family members recruited from four communes in Phú Thọ Province, Vietnam. For PWUD, although we observed a general decline in overall stigma over time for both groups, HIV-positive PWUD consistently reported significantly higher overall stigma for all three periods. Depressive symptoms among family members in both groups declined over time; however, family members of HIV-positive PWUD reported higher depressive symptoms across all three periods. In addition, family members of HIV-positive PWUD reported lower levels of tangible support across all three periods. Caregiver burden among family members of HIV-positive PWUD increased significantly over time, whereas the reported burden among family members of HIV-negative PWUD remained relatively unchanged. The findings highlight the need for future interventions for PWUD and family members, with targeted and culturally specific strategies to focus on the importance of addressing additional stigma experienced by PWUD who are HIV-positive. Such challenges may have direct negative impact on their family members' depressive symptoms, tangible support, and caregiver burden.

  20. Homelessness and psychological distress as contributors to antiretroviral nonadherence in HIV-positive injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Valverde, Eduardo

    2005-05-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral medications are required to maximize therapeutic benefits and viral suppression. Injecting drug use (IDU) is associated with decreased adherence levels, unstable living conditions and mental health problems. Despite the prevalence of these nonadherence risks in HIV-positive IDUs, little study has been conducted to date to assess the impact of homelessness and psychological distress on adherence in this population. The present study evaluated the effects of housing status (homeless/marginally housed versus nonhomeless) and psychological distress, measured via depression, anxiety and perceived stress, on self-reported adherence in 58 HIV-positive IDUs. Results from this study indicated that homeless/marginally housed HIV-positive IDUs reported higher levels of anxiety and perceived stress than their nonhomeless counterparts. The groups reported similar levels of depression. However, only depression was significantly related to adherence. Housing status, drug or alcohol use, and other demographic variables including gender, race/ethnicity, and years of education, were not associated with adherence. This study also found a relatively high rate of adherence in homeless/marginally housed IDUs with more than half (63%) reporting perfect (100%) adherence levels. Findings from this study suggest that when evaluating patient readiness for antiretroviral medications, current housing may not need to be the primary concern. Rather, depression may be a more potent indicator of nonadherence than homelessness for HIV-positive IDUs. PMID:15916495

  1. How does tuberculosis relate to HIV positive and HIV negative drug users?

    PubMed Central

    Keizer, S.; Langendam, M.; van Deutekom, H.; Coutinho, R.; van Ameijden, E. J C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1) To compare the incidence of active tuberculosis in HIV positive and HIV negative drug users. (2) To describe the main characteristics of the tuberculosis cases.
DESIGN—A prospective study was performed from 1986 to 1996 as part of an ongoing cohort study of HIV infection in Amsterdam drug users.
METHODS—Data from the cohort study, including HIV serostatus and CD4-cell numbers, were completed with data from the tuberculosis registration of the tuberculosis department of the Amsterdam Municipal Health Service. Analyses were carried out with person time and survival methods.
RESULTS—Of 872 participants, 24 persons developed culture confirmed tuberculosis during a total follow up period of 4000 person years (0.60 per 100 py, 95% CI: 0.40, 0.90). Nineteen cases were HIV positive (1.54 per 100 py, 95% CI: 0.86, 2.11) and five HIV negative (0.18 per 100 py, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.43). Multivariately HIV infection (relative risk: 12.9; 95% CI: 3.4, 48.8) and age above 33 years (RR: 6.8; 95% CI: 1.3, 35.0, as compared with age below 27) increased the risk for tuberculosis substantially. Additional findings were: (1) 13 of 22 pulmonary tuberculosis cases (59%) were detected by half yearly radiographic screening of the chest; (2) tuberculosis occurred relatively early in the course of HIV infection at a mean CD4 cell number of 390/µl; (3) an estimated two thirds of the incidence of tuberculosis observed among HIV positive cases was caused by reactivation; (4) all but one patient completed the tuberculosis treatment.
CONCLUSION—HIV infection increases the risk for active tuberculosis in Amsterdam drug users 13-fold. The incidence of tuberculosis in HIV negative drug users is still six times higher than in the overall Amsterdam population. In the absence of contact tracing and screening with tuberculin skin tests, periodic chest radiographic screening contributes substantially to early casefinding of active tuberculosis in

  2. A female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin showing positive O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yun, Min Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu

    2016-07-01

    Female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin (FATWO) is a rare disease entity that arises from the mesonephric duct system. FATWO is different than other gynecological cancers in terms of embryology. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with malignant FATWO. The patient underwent explorative laparotomy and surgical staging after a frozen section revealed malignancy. Detailed examination of the pathologic findings were consistent with FATWO. Counseling and further testing were provided to the patient to assess the risk of germline mutation and epigenetic change. An O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene methylation test was positive, and all other tests were normal. This is the first study to report a case of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation with FATWO in Korea. PMID:27462603

  3. A female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin showing positive O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yun, Min Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin (FATWO) is a rare disease entity that arises from the mesonephric duct system. FATWO is different than other gynecological cancers in terms of embryology. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with malignant FATWO. The patient underwent explorative laparotomy and surgical staging after a frozen section revealed malignancy. Detailed examination of the pathologic findings were consistent with FATWO. Counseling and further testing were provided to the patient to assess the risk of germline mutation and epigenetic change. An O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene methylation test was positive, and all other tests were normal. This is the first study to report a case of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation with FATWO in Korea. PMID:27462603

  4. Screening pharmaceuticals for possible carcinogenic effects: initial positive results for drugs not previously screened

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gary D.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Chan, James; Quesenberry, Charles P; Habel, Laurel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We screened commonly used prescription drugs for possible carcinogenic effects. Methods In a large health care program we identified 105 commonly used drugs, not previously screened. Recipients were followed for up to 12½ years for incident cancer. Nested case-control analyses of 55 cancer sites and all combined included up to ten matched controls per case, with lag of at least two years between drug dispensing and cancer. Positive associations entailed a relative risk (RR) of 1.50, with p≤ 0.01 and higher risk for three or more, than for one prescription. Evaluation included further analyses, searches of the literature, and clinical judgment. Results There were 101 associations of interest for 61 drugs. Sixty-six associations were judged to have involved substantial confounding. We found evidence that of the remaining 35, the following associations may not be due to chance: sulindac with gallbladder cancer and leukemia, hyoscyamine with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, nortriptyline with esophageal and hepatic cancer, oxazepam with lung cancer, both fluoxetine and paroxetine with testicular cancer, hydrochlorothiazide with renal and lip cancer, and nifedipine with lip cancer. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that further studies are indicated regarding sulindac, hyoscyamine, nortriptyline, oxazepam, fluoxetine, paroxetine, hydrochlorothiazide and nifedipine. PMID:19582585

  5. The positive correlation between DJ-1 and β-catenin expression shows prognostic value for patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Fang, Mao; Zhang, Meng; Li, Weiping; Guan, Hong; Sun, Yanhua; Xie, Siming; Zhong, Xueyun

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between DJ-1 and β-catenin, and its impact on the prognosis for glioma patients has not been fully understood. This study determined the effect of DJ-1 on β-catenin and the prognostic significance of this interaction in glioma patients. We collected tumor specimens from 88 glioma patients and determined the expression of DJ-1, β-catenin and PTEN by using immunohistochemical staining. The involvement of DJ-1 and β-catenin in glioma cell lines was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. High DJ-1 expression (37.5%) and high β-catenin expression (34.1%) in glioma specimens were significantly associated with high grade and poor prognosis in glioma patients. However, only high levels of DJ-1 (P = 0.014) was a strong independent prognostic factor, correlated with a reduced overall survival time. In vitro DJ-1 expression was positively correlated with the expression levels of β-catenin and p-Akt, and negatively correlated with PTEN expression in U87, U251 MG, SWO-38 and SHG44 human glioma cell lines. After the knockdown of DJ-1, Akt, p-Akt or β-catenin expression levels were not affected in the PTEN-null cell lines (U87 and U251 MG). However, in the SWO-38 cell line, which has wild-type PTEN protein, the level of PTEN increased while Akt/p-Akt and β-catenin levels were reduced. Furthermore, β-catenin staining weakened in SWO-38 cells after DJ-1 levels decreased according to immunocytochemical analysis. In conclusion, DJ-1 and β-catenin may contribute to the development and recurrence of glioma and are valuable prognostic factors for glioma patients. DJ-1 may regulate β-catenin expression via PTEN and p-Akt.

  6. The central nervous system of sea cucumbers (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) shows positive immunostaining for a chordate glial secretion

    PubMed Central

    Mashanov, Vladimir S; Zueva, Olga R; Heinzeller, Thomas; Aschauer, Beate; Naumann, Wilfried W; Grondona, Jesus M; Cifuentes, Manuel; Garcia-Arraras, Jose E

    2009-01-01

    Background Echinoderms and chordates belong to the same monophyletic taxon, the Deuterostomia. In spite of significant differences in body plan organization, the two phyla may share more common traits than was thought previously. Of particular interest are the common features in the organization of the central nervous system. The present study employs two polyclonal antisera raised against bovine Reissner's substance (RS), a secretory product produced by glial cells of the subcomissural organ, to study RS-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of sea cucumbers. Results In the ectoneural division of the nervous system, both antisera recognize the content of secretory vacuoles in the apical cytoplasm of the radial glia-like cells of the neuroepithelium and in the flattened glial cells of the non-neural epineural roof epithelium. The secreted immunopositive material seems to form a thin layer covering the cell apices. There is no accumulation of the immunoreactive material on the apical surface of the hyponeural neuroepithelium or the hyponeural roof epithelium. Besides labelling the supporting cells and flattened glial cells of the epineural roof epithelium, both anti-RS antisera reveal a previously unknown putative glial cell type within the neural parenchyma of the holothurian nervous system. Conclusion Our results show that: a) the glial cells of the holothurian tubular nervous system produce a material similar to Reissner's substance known to be synthesized by secretory glial cells in all chordates studied so far; b) the nervous system of sea cucumbers shows a previously unrealized complexity of glial organization. Our findings also provide significant clues for interpretation of the evolution of the nervous system in the Deuterostomia. It is suggested that echinoderms and chordates might have inherited the RS-producing radial glial cell type from the central nervous system of their common ancestor, i.e., the last common ancestor of all the

  7. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  8. Effects of drugs that potentiate GABA on extinction of positively-reinforced operant behaviour.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Julian C; Shaw, David; McCabe, Ciara; Reynolds, David S; Dawson, Gerard R

    2004-05-01

    Extinction following positively reinforced operant conditioning reduces response frequency, at least in part through the aversive or frustrative effects of non-reinforcement. According to J.A. Gray's theory, non-reinforcement activates the behavioural inhibition system which in turn causes anxiety. As predicted, anxiolytic drugs including benzodiazepines affect the operant extinction process. Recent studies have shown that reducing GABA-mediated neurotransmission retards extinction of aversive conditioning. We have shown in a series of studies that anxiolytic compounds that potentiate GABA facilitate extinction of positively reinforced fixed-ratio operant behaviour in C57B1/6 male mice. This effect does not occur in the early stages of extinction, nor is it dependent on cumulative effects of the compound administered. Potentiation of GABA at later stages has the effect of increasing sensitivity to the extinction contingency and facilitates the inhibition of the behaviour that is no longer required. The GABAergic hypnotic, zolpidem, has the same selective effects on operant extinction in this procedure. The effects of zolpidem are not due to sedative action. There is evidence across our series of experiments that different GABA-A subtype receptors are involved in extinction facilitation and anxiolysis. Consequently, this procedure may not be an appropriate model for anxiolytic drug action, but it may be a useful technique for analysing the neural bases of extinction and designing therapeutic interventions in humans where failure to extinguish inappropriate behaviours can lead to pathological conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

  9. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients < 21 years old referred for EDS. MSLT results were divided into those with (1) (−) urine drug screens, (2) urine drug screens (+) for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or THC plus other drugs, and (3) urine drug screens (+) for drugs other than THC. Groups were compared with Fisher exact tests or one-way ANOVA. Results: 38 (10%) urine drug tests were (+): 14 for THC and 24 for other drugs. Forty-three percent of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (−) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients < 13 years old. Conclusion: Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ≥ 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):93–99. PMID:25348245

  10. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tyler S; Jacob, Christopher G; Silva, Joana C; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dondorp, Arjen M; Fukuda, Mark; Noedl, Harald; Nyunt, Myaing Myaing; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Hien, Tran Tinh; Plowe, Christopher V; Cummings, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tyler S; Jacob, Christopher G; Silva, Joana C; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dondorp, Arjen M; Fukuda, Mark; Noedl, Harald; Nyunt, Myaing Myaing; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Hien, Tran Tinh; Plowe, Christopher V; Cummings, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25514047

  12. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tyler S.; Jacob, Christopher G.; Silva, Joana C.; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Fukuda, Mark; Noedl, Harald; Nyunt, Myaing Myaing; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Hien, Tran Tinh; Plowe, Christopher V.; Cummings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25514047

  13. Dual Fatty Acid Synthase and HER2 Signaling Blockade Shows Marked Antitumor Activity against Breast Cancer Models Resistant to Anti-HER2 Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Blancafort, Adriana; Giró-Perafita, Ariadna; Oliveras, Glòria; Palomeras, Sònia; Turrado, Carlos; Campuzano, Òscar; Carrión-Salip, Dolors; Massaguer, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Palafox, Marta; Gómez-Miragaya, Jorge; González-Suárez, Eva; Puig, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) leads to apoptosis of HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells. The hypothesis is that blocking FASN, in combination with anti-HER2 signaling agents, would be an effective antitumor strategy in preclinical HER2+ breast cancer models of trastuzumab and lapatinib resistance. We developed and molecularly characterized in vitro HER2+ models of resistance to trastuzumab (SKTR), lapatinib (SKLR) and both (SKLTR). The cellular interactions of combining anti-FASN polyphenolic compounds (EGCG and the synthetic G28UCM) with anti-HER2 signaling drugs (trastuzumab plus pertuzumab and temsirolimus) were analyzed. Tumor growth inhibition after treatment with EGCG, pertuzumab, temsirolimus or the combination was evaluated in two in vivo orthoxenopatients: one derived from a HER2+ patient and another from a patient who relapsed on trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapy. SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR showed hyperactivation of EGFR and p-ERK1/2 and PI3KCA mutations. Dual-resistant cells (SKLTR) also showed hyperactivation of HER4 and recovered levels of p-AKT compared with mono-resistant cells. mTOR, p-mTOR and FASN expression remained stable in SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR. In vitro, anti-FASN compounds plus pertuzumab showed synergistic interactions in lapatinib- and dual- resistant cells and improved the results of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab co-treatment. FASN inhibitors combined with temsirolimus displayed the strongest synergistic interactions in resistant cells. In vivo, both orthoxenopatients showed strong response to the antitumor activity of the combination of EGCG with pertuzumab or temsirolimus, without signs of toxicity. We showed that the simultaneous blockade of FASN and HER2 pathways is effective in cells and in breast cancer models refractory to anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:26107737

  14. Dual fatty acid synthase and HER2 signaling blockade shows marked antitumor activity against breast cancer models resistant to anti-HER2 drugs.

    PubMed

    Blancafort, Adriana; Giró-Perafita, Ariadna; Oliveras, Glòria; Palomeras, Sònia; Turrado, Carlos; Campuzano, Òscar; Carrión-Salip, Dolors; Massaguer, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Palafox, Marta; Gómez-Miragaya, Jorge; González-Suárez, Eva; Puig, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) leads to apoptosis of HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells. The hypothesis is that blocking FASN, in combination with anti-HER2 signaling agents, would be an effective antitumor strategy in preclinical HER2+ breast cancer models of trastuzumab and lapatinib resistance. We developed and molecularly characterized in vitro HER2+ models of resistance to trastuzumab (SKTR), lapatinib (SKLR) and both (SKLTR). The cellular interactions of combining anti-FASN polyphenolic compounds (EGCG and the synthetic G28UCM) with anti-HER2 signaling drugs (trastuzumab plus pertuzumab and temsirolimus) were analyzed. Tumor growth inhibition after treatment with EGCG, pertuzumab, temsirolimus or the combination was evaluated in two in vivo orthoxenopatients: one derived from a HER2+ patient and another from a patient who relapsed on trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapy. SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR showed hyperactivation of EGFR and p-ERK1/2 and PI3KCA mutations. Dual-resistant cells (SKLTR) also showed hyperactivation of HER4 and recovered levels of p-AKT compared with mono-resistant cells. mTOR, p-mTOR and FASN expression remained stable in SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR. In vitro, anti-FASN compounds plus pertuzumab showed synergistic interactions in lapatinib- and dual- resistant cells and improved the results of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab co-treatment. FASN inhibitors combined with temsirolimus displayed the strongest synergistic interactions in resistant cells. In vivo, both orthoxenopatients showed strong response to the antitumor activity of the combination of EGCG with pertuzumab or temsirolimus, without signs of toxicity. We showed that the simultaneous blockade of FASN and HER2 pathways is effective in cells and in breast cancer models refractory to anti-HER2 therapies.

  15. A Retrospective Analysis of Urine Drugs of Abuse Immunoassay True Positive Rates at a National Reference Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Sadler, Aaron J; Genzen, Jonathan R

    2016-03-01

    Urine drug screens are commonly performed to identify drug use or monitor adherence to drug therapy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the true positive and false positive rates of one of our in-house urine drug screen panels. The urine drugs of abuse panel studied consists of screening by immunoassay then positive immunoassay results were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Reagents from Syva and Microgenics were used for the immunoassay screen. The screen was performed on a Beckman AU5810 random access automated clinical analyzer. The percent of true positives for each immunoassay was determined. Agreement with previously validated GC-MS or LC-MS-MS confirmatory methods was also evaluated. There were 8,825 de-identified screening results for each of the drugs in the panel, except for alcohol (N = 2,296). The percent of samples that screened positive were: 10.0% for amphetamine/methamphetamine/3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 12.8% for benzodiazepines, 43.7% for opiates (including oxycodone) and 20.3% for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The false positive rate for amphetamine/methamphetamine was ∼14%, ∼34% for opiates (excluding oxycodone), 25% for propoxyphene and 100% for phencyclidine and MDMA immunoassays. Based on the results from this retrospective study, the true positive rate for THC drug use among adults were similar to the rate of illicit drug use in young adults from the 2013 National Survey; however, our positivity rate for cocaine was higher than the National Survey. PMID:26668238

  16. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Mobley, Lee R.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987–1995) and late period (1996–2005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  17. Therapeutic siRNA for drug-resistant HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ngamcherdtrakul, Worapol; Castro, David J.; Morry, Jingga; Reda, Moataz M.; Gray, Joe W.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2016-01-01

    HER2 is overexpressed in about 20% of breast cancers and contributes to poor prognosis. Unfortunately, a large fraction of patients have primary or acquired resistance to the HER2-targeted therapy trastuzumab, thus a multi-drug combination is utilized in the clinic, putting significant burden on patients. We systematically identified an optimal HER2 siRNA from 76 potential sequences and demonstrated its utility in overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance to trastuzumab and lapatinib in 18 HER2-positive cancer cell lines. We provided evidence that the drug-resistant cancer maintains dependence on HER2 for survival. Importantly, cell lines did not readily develop resistance following extended treatment with HER2 siRNA. Using our recently developed nanoparticle platform, systemic delivery of HER2 siRNA to trastuzumab-resistant tumors resulted in significant growth inhibition. Moreover, the optimal HER2 siRNA could also silence an exon 16 skipped HER2 splice variant reported to be highly oncogenic and linked to trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26894975

  18. Personalized drug combinations to overcome trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thuy; Sliwkowski, Mark X.; Claret, Francois X.

    2014-01-01

    HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer accounts for 18%–20% of all breast cancer cases and has the second poorest prognosis among breast cancer subtypes. Trastuzumab, the first Food and Drug Administration-approved targeted therapy for breast cancer, established the era of personalized treatment for HER2+ metastatic disease. It is well tolerated and improves overall survival and time-to-disease progression; with chemotherapy, it is part of the standard of care for patients with HER2+ metastatic disease. However, many patients do not benefit from it because of resistance. Substantial research has been performed to understand the mechanism of trastuzumab resistance and develop combination strategies to overcome the resistance. In this review, we provide insight into the current pipeline of drugs used in combination with trastuzumab and the degree to which these combinations have been evaluated, especially in patients who have experienced disease progression on trastuzumab. We conclude with a discussion of the current challenges and future therapeutic approaches to trastuzumab-based combination therapy. PMID:25065528

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults in Malawi.

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, J J; Dzinjalamala, F K; Dimba, A; Waterhouse, D; Davies, G; Zijlstra, E E; Molyneux, M E; Molyneux, E M; Ward, S

    2015-10-01

    Limited data address the impact of HIV coinfection on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antituberculosis drugs in sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 47 Malawian adults underwent rich pharmacokinetic sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h postdose. Of the subjects, 51% were male, their mean age was 34 years, and 65% were HIV-positive with a mean CD4 count of 268 cells/μl. Antituberculosis drugs were administered as fixed-dose combinations (150 mg rifampin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol) according to recommended weight bands. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (rifampin and pyrazinamide) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (isoniazid and ethambutol). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and analysis of variance of log-transformed summary parameters. The pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows (median [interquartile range]): for rifampin, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of 4.129 μg/ml (2.474 to 5.596 μg/ml), area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-∞) of 21.32 μg/ml · h (13.57 to 28.60 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 2.45 h (1.86 to 3.08 h); for isoniazid, Cmax of 3.97 μg/ml (2.979 to 4.544 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 22.5 (14.75 to 34.59 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 3.93 h (3.18 to 4.73 h); for pyrazinamide, Cmax of 34.21 μg/ml (30.00 to 41.60 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 386.6 μg/ml · h (320.0 to 463.7 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 6.821 h (5.71 to 8.042 h); and for ethambutol, Cmax of 2.278 μg/ml (1.694 to 3.098 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 20.41 μg/ml · h (16.18 to 26.27 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 7.507 (6.517 to 8.696 h). The isoniazid PK data analysis suggested that around two-thirds of the participants were slow acetylators. Dose, weight, and weight-adjusted dose were not significant predictors of PK exposure, probably due to weight-banded dosing. In this first pharmacokinetic study of antituberculosis drugs in Malawian adults, measures of

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Dzinjalamala, F. K.; Dimba, A.; Waterhouse, D.; Davies, G.; Zijlstra, E. E.; Molyneux, M. E.; Molyneux, E. M.; Ward, S.

    2015-01-01

    Limited data address the impact of HIV coinfection on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antituberculosis drugs in sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 47 Malawian adults underwent rich pharmacokinetic sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h postdose. Of the subjects, 51% were male, their mean age was 34 years, and 65% were HIV-positive with a mean CD4 count of 268 cells/μl. Antituberculosis drugs were administered as fixed-dose combinations (150 mg rifampin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol) according to recommended weight bands. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (rifampin and pyrazinamide) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (isoniazid and ethambutol). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and analysis of variance of log-transformed summary parameters. The pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows (median [interquartile range]): for rifampin, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of 4.129 μg/ml (2.474 to 5.596 μg/ml), area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–∞) of 21.32 μg/ml · h (13.57 to 28.60 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 2.45 h (1.86 to 3.08 h); for isoniazid, Cmax of 3.97 μg/ml (2.979 to 4.544 μg/ml), AUC0–24 of 22.5 (14.75 to 34.59 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 3.93 h (3.18 to 4.73 h); for pyrazinamide, Cmax of 34.21 μg/ml (30.00 to 41.60 μg/ml), AUC0–24 of 386.6 μg/ml · h (320.0 to 463.7 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 6.821 h (5.71 to 8.042 h); and for ethambutol, Cmax of 2.278 μg/ml (1.694 to 3.098 μg/ml), AUC0–24 of 20.41 μg/ml · h (16.18 to 26.27 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 7.507 (6.517 to 8.696 h). The isoniazid PK data analysis suggested that around two-thirds of the participants were slow acetylators. Dose, weight, and weight-adjusted dose were not significant predictors of PK exposure, probably due to weight-banded dosing. In this first pharmacokinetic study of antituberculosis drugs in Malawian adults, measures of

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults in Malawi.

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, J J; Dzinjalamala, F K; Dimba, A; Waterhouse, D; Davies, G; Zijlstra, E E; Molyneux, M E; Molyneux, E M; Ward, S

    2015-10-01

    Limited data address the impact of HIV coinfection on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antituberculosis drugs in sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 47 Malawian adults underwent rich pharmacokinetic sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h postdose. Of the subjects, 51% were male, their mean age was 34 years, and 65% were HIV-positive with a mean CD4 count of 268 cells/μl. Antituberculosis drugs were administered as fixed-dose combinations (150 mg rifampin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol) according to recommended weight bands. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (rifampin and pyrazinamide) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (isoniazid and ethambutol). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and analysis of variance of log-transformed summary parameters. The pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows (median [interquartile range]): for rifampin, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of 4.129 μg/ml (2.474 to 5.596 μg/ml), area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-∞) of 21.32 μg/ml · h (13.57 to 28.60 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 2.45 h (1.86 to 3.08 h); for isoniazid, Cmax of 3.97 μg/ml (2.979 to 4.544 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 22.5 (14.75 to 34.59 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 3.93 h (3.18 to 4.73 h); for pyrazinamide, Cmax of 34.21 μg/ml (30.00 to 41.60 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 386.6 μg/ml · h (320.0 to 463.7 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 6.821 h (5.71 to 8.042 h); and for ethambutol, Cmax of 2.278 μg/ml (1.694 to 3.098 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 20.41 μg/ml · h (16.18 to 26.27 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 7.507 (6.517 to 8.696 h). The isoniazid PK data analysis suggested that around two-thirds of the participants were slow acetylators. Dose, weight, and weight-adjusted dose were not significant predictors of PK exposure, probably due to weight-banded dosing. In this first pharmacokinetic study of antituberculosis drugs in Malawian adults, measures of

  2. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  3. The human tyrosine kinase Kit and its gatekeeper mutant T670I, show different kinetic properties: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Kissova, Miroslava; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-10-01

    The tyrosine kinase Kit, a receptor for Stem Cell Factor, is involved, among others, in processes associated to cell survival, proliferation and migration. Upon physiological conditions, the activity of Kit is tightly regulated. However, primary mutations that lead to its constitutive activation are the causal oncogenic driver of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). GISTs are known to be refractory to conventional therapies but the introduction of Imatinib, a selective inhibitor of tyrosine kinases Abl and Kit, significantly ameliorated the treatment options of GISTs patients. However, the acquisition of secondary mutations renders Kit resistant towards all available drugs. Mutation involving gatekeeper residues (such as V654a and T670I) influence both the structure and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Therefore, detailed knowledge of the enzymatic properties of the mutant forms, in comparison with the wild type enzyme, is an important pre-requisite for the rational development of specific inhibitors. In this paper we report a thorough kinetic analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the Kit kinase and its gatekeeper mutated form T670I. Our results revealed the different mechanisms of action of these two enzymes and may open a new avenue for the future design of specific Kit inhibitors. PMID:27527414

  4. Cancer Drugs Provide Positive Value In Nine Countries, But The United States Lags In Health Gains Per Dollar Spent.

    PubMed

    Salas-Vega, Sebastian; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-05-01

    Cancer drugs account for a growing share of health care expenditure, raising questions about how much value is gained from their use. We used a proprietary international data set to examine real-world cancer drug consumption and expenditure in the period 2004-14 in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States and to explore the value obtained. Even after adjusting for population and epidemiological factors, we found that the United States spent more than the other countries on cancer drugs, yet it often had lower utilization. All nine countries-most notably France and Japan-witnessed an improvement in neoplasm-related years of potential life lost, which suggests that although the costs of drugs have risen, their therapeutic benefits have increased as well. Net economic value derived from cancer drug expenditures appears to have remained positive, with base-case analyses indicating that the United States obtained an estimated $32.6 billion in net positive return from cancer drug care in 2014. However, the United States lags behind other countries in health gains obtained per dollar spent on cancer drugs, which suggests an opportunity to improve value in the oncology drug market. PMID:27140987

  5. Cancer Drugs Provide Positive Value In Nine Countries, But The United States Lags In Health Gains Per Dollar Spent.

    PubMed

    Salas-Vega, Sebastian; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-05-01

    Cancer drugs account for a growing share of health care expenditure, raising questions about how much value is gained from their use. We used a proprietary international data set to examine real-world cancer drug consumption and expenditure in the period 2004-14 in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States and to explore the value obtained. Even after adjusting for population and epidemiological factors, we found that the United States spent more than the other countries on cancer drugs, yet it often had lower utilization. All nine countries-most notably France and Japan-witnessed an improvement in neoplasm-related years of potential life lost, which suggests that although the costs of drugs have risen, their therapeutic benefits have increased as well. Net economic value derived from cancer drug expenditures appears to have remained positive, with base-case analyses indicating that the United States obtained an estimated $32.6 billion in net positive return from cancer drug care in 2014. However, the United States lags behind other countries in health gains obtained per dollar spent on cancer drugs, which suggests an opportunity to improve value in the oncology drug market.

  6. Determination of drug resistance and virus typology in HIV-1-positive pediatric patients in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yoldaş, Ozlem; Ağaçfidan, Ali; Lübke, Nadine; Somer, Ayper; Hançerli, Selda; Verheyen, Jens; Kaiser, Rolf; Akgül, Baki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of drug resistance of HIV-1 in pediatric patients from Istanbul, Turkey. Genotypic drug resistance testing revealed transmission of drug resistance from mother to child in 20%. Due to rising numbers of children with HIV-1, baseline resistance testing is recommended for Turkey.

  7. Multi-drug resistant oral Candida species isolated from HIV-positive patients in South Africa and Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Abrantes, Pedro Miguel; McArthur, Carole P; Africa, Charlene Wilma Joyce

    2014-06-01

    Candida species are a common cause of infection in immune-compromised HIV-positive individuals, who are usually treated with the antifungal drug, fluconazole, in public hospitals in Africa. However, information about the prevalence of drug resistance to fluconazole and other antifungal agents on Candida species is very limited. This study examined 128 Candida isolates from South Africa and 126 Cameroonian Candida isolates for determination of species prevalence and antifungal drug susceptibility. The isolates were characterized by growth on chromogenic and selective media and by their susceptibility to 9 antifungal drugs tested using the TREK™ YeastOne9 drug panel (Thermo Scientific, USA). Eighty-three percent (82.8%) of South African isolates were Candida albicans (106 isolates), 9.4% were Candida glabrata (12 isolates), and 7.8% were Candida dubliniensis (10 isolates). Of the Cameroonian isolates, 73.02% were C. albicans (92 isolates); 19.05% C. glabrata (24 isolates); 3.2% Candida tropicalis (4 isolates); 2.4% Candida krusei (3 isolates); 1.59% either Candida kefyr, Candida parapsilopsis, or Candida lusitaneae (2 isolates); and 0.79% C. dubliniensis (1 isolate). Widespread C. albicans resistance to azoles was detected phenotypically in both populations. Differences in drug resistance were seen within C. glabrata found in both populations. Echinocandin drugs were more effective on isolates obtained from the Cameroon than in South Africa. A multiple-drug resistant C. dubliniensis strain isolated from the South African samples was inhibited only by 5-flucytosine in vitro on the YO9 panel. Drug resistance among oral Candida species is common among African HIV patients in these 2 countries. Regional surveillance of Candida species drug susceptibility should be undertaken to ensure effective treatment for HIV-positive patients.

  8. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis.

  9. A Tree-Ring Based Reconstruction (1725-present) of the Position of the Summer North Atlantic Jet Shows a 20th Century Northward Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouet, V.; Babst, F.

    2014-12-01

    The position and strength of the Northern Hemisphere polar jet are important modulators of mid-latitude weather extremes and the societal, ecosystem, and economic damage related to them. The position of the North Atlantic jet (NAJ) controls the location of the Atlantic storm track and anomalies in the NAJ position have been related to temperature and precipitation extremes over Europe. In summer, a southern NAJ regime can result in floods in the British Isles (BRIT) and increasing odds of heat waves in the northeastern Mediterranean (NEMED). Variability in the amplitude and speed of the Northern Hemisphere jet stream is hotly debated as a potential mechanism linking recent mid-latitude weather extremes to anthropogenic warming. However, the hypothesis of jet stream variability as a possible mechanism linking Arctic amplification to mid-latitude weather extremes is largely based on data sets with limited temporal extent that do not warrant robust results from a statistical significance perspective. Here, we combined two summer temperature-sensitive tree-ring records from BRIT and NEMED to reconstruct interannual variability in the latitudinal position of the summer NAJ back to 1725. The two well-replicated temperature proxies counter-correlate significantly over the full period and thus illustrate the temperature dipole generated by anomalous NAJ positions. Positive extremes in the NAJ reconstruction correspond to heatwaves recorded in the historical Central England temperature record and negative extremes correspond to reconstructed fire years in Greece. The reconstruction shows a northward shift in the latitudinal NAJ position since the 1930s that is most pronounced in the northern NAJ extremes, suggesting a more frequent occurrence of BRIT hot summers in the 20th century compared to previous centuries.

  10. Amorphous stabilization and dissolution enhancement of amorphous ternary solid dispersions: combination of polymers showing drug-polymer interaction for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Dev; Chauhan, Harsh; Atef, Eman

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the combined effect of two polymers showing drug-polymer interactions on amorphous stabilization and dissolution enhancement of indomethacin (IND) in amorphous ternary solid dispersions. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced stability and dissolution of IND in amorphous ternary systems was studied by exploring the miscibility and intermolecular interactions between IND and polymers through thermal and spectroscopic analysis. Eudragit E100 and PVP K90 at low concentrations (2.5%-40%, w/w) were used to prepare amorphous binary and ternary solid dispersions by solvent evaporation. Stability results showed that amorphous ternary solid dispersions have better stability compared with amorphous binary solid dispersions. The dissolution of IND from the ternary dispersion was substantially higher than the binary dispersions as well as amorphous drug. Melting point depression of physical mixtures reveals that the drug was miscible in both the polymers; however, greater miscibility was observed in ternary physical mixtures. The IR analysis confirmed intermolecular interactions between IND and individual polymers. These interactions were found to be intact in ternary systems. These results suggest that the combination of two polymers showing drug-polymer interaction offers synergistic enhancement in amorphous stability and dissolution in ternary solid dispersions.

  11. Malnutrition in a population of HIV-positive and HIV-negative drug users living in Chennai, South India

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Alice M.; Bhatnagar, Tarun; Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan; Dong, Kimberly; Skinner, Sally; Kumar, M. Suresh; Wanke, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is a strong predictor of poor outcomes in people living with HIV (PLHIV). Drug users are at increased risk of malnutrition regardless of whether or not they are infected with HIV. Little data exists on the nutritional status of drug users (with or without HIV infection) in India. Methods We describe and compare the nutrition and metabolic status of 107 HIV-positive and 193 HIV-negative male clients of a community-based drop-in center for injection drug users in Chennai, India. Measures of nutrition and metabolic status include body composition, dietary intake, food insecurity, and serum lipid levels. Results We found poor overall nutritional status in both the HIV-positive and HIV-negative clients, with HIV-positive men faring worse on some parameters. Both groups had extremely low percent body fat, but levels in HIV-positive participants were significantly lower (6.5% vs. 7.9%, p=.01). HIV-positive men also had significantly lower total caloric and fat intakes compared to HIV-negative men. A considerable proportion (70%) of both HIV-positive and HIV-negative drug users were food insecure. HDL cholesterol levels were significantly lower and below normal range in the HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative men. Conclusions The high levels of food insecurity and poor nutritional status in this population, regardless of HIV status, indicates critical need for intervention. Improving nutritional status in those who are infected with HIV prior to initiation of antiretroviral treatment may help patients to reap the full benefits of therapy. PMID:21420798

  12. 49 CFR 655.61 - Action when an employee has a verified positive drug test result or has a confirmed alcohol test...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Action when an employee has a verified positive... DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Consequences § 655.61 Action when an employee has a verified positive.../third party administrator (C/TPA) that a covered employee has a verified positive drug test result,...

  13. [Two news drugs (ivacaftor & bedaquiline), one biomarker (florbetapir) and a re-positioned drug (propranolol) on the market].

    PubMed

    Monneret, C

    2014-07-01

    Among the new molecular entities approved by the EMEA and the FDA in 2012, four have caught our attention for their significant contribution to the health of patient. First of all, among the notable 2012 approvals, is ivacaftor or Kalydeco®. This is the first treatment that targets one of the gene defects that is underlying cause of cystic fibrosis. This is also an example of the promise of personalized medicine. The benefits with bedaquiline or Sirturo® are its ability to likely provide clinically relevant activity as part of multi-drug regimens against tuberculosis (TB) based on clinical data in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) patients, who were defined as being at least resistant against the two major tuberculostatic medicines (isaoniazide and rifampicine). On December 2012 and then, on December 2013, the FDA and European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended granting a conditional marketing authorization for Sirturo® (bedaquiline), respectively, for use as part of a combination therapy for pulmonary multidrug resistant tuberculosis in adult patients when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be composed for reasons of resistance or tolerability. Amyvid®, which is a solution for injection that contains the active substance florbetapir (18F), is a radiopharmaceutical that emits low amounts of radiation and works by targeting and attaching to β-amyloid plaques in the brain. This enables doctors to know whether or not significant amount of plaques are present in order to know if the patient is unlikely or not, to have Alzheimer's disease. Finally, the last topics addresses the propranolol, which is a beta-blocker, used alone or together with other medicines to treat high blood pressure. Propranolol is gaining a new lease of life for treating infantile hemangioma. PMID:24997884

  14. [Two news drugs (ivacaftor & bedaquiline), one biomarker (florbetapir) and a re-positioned drug (propranolol) on the market].

    PubMed

    Monneret, C

    2014-07-01

    Among the new molecular entities approved by the EMEA and the FDA in 2012, four have caught our attention for their significant contribution to the health of patient. First of all, among the notable 2012 approvals, is ivacaftor or Kalydeco®. This is the first treatment that targets one of the gene defects that is underlying cause of cystic fibrosis. This is also an example of the promise of personalized medicine. The benefits with bedaquiline or Sirturo® are its ability to likely provide clinically relevant activity as part of multi-drug regimens against tuberculosis (TB) based on clinical data in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) patients, who were defined as being at least resistant against the two major tuberculostatic medicines (isaoniazide and rifampicine). On December 2012 and then, on December 2013, the FDA and European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended granting a conditional marketing authorization for Sirturo® (bedaquiline), respectively, for use as part of a combination therapy for pulmonary multidrug resistant tuberculosis in adult patients when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be composed for reasons of resistance or tolerability. Amyvid®, which is a solution for injection that contains the active substance florbetapir (18F), is a radiopharmaceutical that emits low amounts of radiation and works by targeting and attaching to β-amyloid plaques in the brain. This enables doctors to know whether or not significant amount of plaques are present in order to know if the patient is unlikely or not, to have Alzheimer's disease. Finally, the last topics addresses the propranolol, which is a beta-blocker, used alone or together with other medicines to treat high blood pressure. Propranolol is gaining a new lease of life for treating infantile hemangioma.

  15. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  16. Position Statement: Drug Holiday in Osteoporosis Treatment with Bisphosphonates in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun; Gong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Si Young; Shin, Jung-Ho; Cho, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have been widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis with robust data from many placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction over 3 to 5 years of treatment. Although bisphosphonates are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about the adverse effects related to its long-term use, including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures. Because bisphosphonates are incorporated into the skeleton and continue to exert an anti-resorptive effect for a period of time after the discontinuation of drugs, the concept of a "drug holiday" has emerged, whereby the risk of adverse effects might be decreased while the patient still benefits from anti-fracture efficacy. As randomized clinical trial evidence is not yet available on who may qualify for a drug holiday, there is considerable controversy regarding the selection of candidates for the drug holiday and monitoring during a drug holiday, both of which should be based on individual assessments of risk and benefit. This statement will provide suggestions for clinicians in South Korea on the identification of possible candidates and monitoring during a bisphosphonate drug holiday. PMID:26713307

  17. Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome in HIV-Positive Drug Users in Miami.

    PubMed

    Baum, Marianna K; Rafie, Carlin; Lai, Shenghan; Xue, Lihua; Sales, Sabrina; Page, J Bryan; Berkman, Ronald; Karas, Linden; Campa, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    The frequency of coronary heart disease (CHD) is increasing among HIV seropositive persons. This phenomenon may be related to HIV disease itself, the use of antiretroviral medications and increased length of survival, or the synergism of these factors. In this study we have calculated the 10-year CHD risk estimate and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a cohort of 118 HIV seropositive chronic drug users, including those who are on HAART with or without protease inhibitors (PI). The results showed that the 10-year coronary heart disease risk among the HIV seropositive drug users was 4.8 ± 5.7, which is within the range of results published for other HIV infected cohorts. The 10-year CHD risk was significantly higher in men (5.9±6.1, p<0.001) than in women (1.7±2.4), due to their gender and the pre-menopausal mean age of the women (39.4±7.3 years of age), despite a significantly higher rate of abdominal obesity (54.8% in women vs. 8.1% in men, p<0.001) and lower HDL (61.3% in women vs. 40% in men, p=0.042). The rate of metabolic syndrome among our female HIV seropositive drug users was significantly higher (29% vs 10.3%, p=0.013) compared to men (10.3%). Participants with metabolic syndrome had a significantly higher 10-year CHD risk (27.8% vs. 10.2%, p=0.041) and higher mean BMI (28.6 ± 4.1 vs. 24.2±4, p<0.001) than those without the syndrome. The predominant proportion of the cohort had a high viral load, suggesting that their use of illicit drugs has an influence on either adherence or effectiveness of antiretroviral medication. Increased viral load was significantly associated with metabolic syndrome (OR=2.23, 95% CI:1.12, 4.47; p=0.023), high fasting glucose (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.55; p=0.042) and low HDL levels (OR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.98; p=0.046), after controlling for age gender, smoking, PI exposure, BMI and CD4. HAART with or without PI did not significantly impact the 10-year CHD risk estimate or metabolic syndrome in this cohort. The

  18. Introduction of chromosome segment carrying the seed storage protein genes from chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum showed positive effect on bread-making quality of common wheat.

    PubMed

    Ruiqi, Zhang; Mingyi, Zhang; Xiue, Wang; Peidu, Chen

    2014-03-01

    Development of wheat- D. villosum 1V#4 translocation lines; physically mapping the Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 loci; and assess the effects of the introduced Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 on wheat bread-making quality. Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci, located in the chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum, were proved to have positive effects on grain quality. However, there are very few reports about the transfer of the D. villosum-derived seed storage protein genes into wheat background by chromosome manipulation. In the present study, a total of six CS-1V#4 introgression lines with different alien-fragment sizes were developed through ionizing radiation of the mature female gametes of CS--D. villosum 1V#4 disomic addition line and confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), chromosome C-banding, twelve 1V#4-specific EST-STS markers and seed storage protein analysis enabled the cytological physical mapping of Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci to the region of FL 0.50-1.00 of 1V#4S of D. villosum. The Glu-V1 allele of D. villosum was Glu-V1a and its coded protein was V71 subunit. Quality analysis indicated that Glu-V1a together with Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci showed a positive effect on protein content, Zeleny sedimentation value and the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough. In addition, the positive effect could be maintained when specific Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci were transferred to the wheat genetic background as in the case of T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL, T1V#4S · 1BL and T1V#4S · 1DS translocation lines. These results showed that the chromosome segment carrying the Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci in 1V#4S of D. villosum had positive effect on bread-making quality, and the T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL and T1V#4S · 1BL translocation lines could be useful germplasms for bread wheat improvement. The developed 1V#4S-specific molecular markers could be used to rapidly identify and trace the alien chromatin of 1V#4S in wheat background.

  19. Introduction of chromosome segment carrying the seed storage protein genes from chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum showed positive effect on bread-making quality of common wheat.

    PubMed

    Ruiqi, Zhang; Mingyi, Zhang; Xiue, Wang; Peidu, Chen

    2014-03-01

    Development of wheat- D. villosum 1V#4 translocation lines; physically mapping the Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 loci; and assess the effects of the introduced Glu - V1 and Gli - V1 / Glu - V3 on wheat bread-making quality. Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci, located in the chromosome 1V of Dasypyrum villosum, were proved to have positive effects on grain quality. However, there are very few reports about the transfer of the D. villosum-derived seed storage protein genes into wheat background by chromosome manipulation. In the present study, a total of six CS-1V#4 introgression lines with different alien-fragment sizes were developed through ionizing radiation of the mature female gametes of CS--D. villosum 1V#4 disomic addition line and confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), chromosome C-banding, twelve 1V#4-specific EST-STS markers and seed storage protein analysis enabled the cytological physical mapping of Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci to the region of FL 0.50-1.00 of 1V#4S of D. villosum. The Glu-V1 allele of D. villosum was Glu-V1a and its coded protein was V71 subunit. Quality analysis indicated that Glu-V1a together with Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci showed a positive effect on protein content, Zeleny sedimentation value and the rheological characteristics of wheat flour dough. In addition, the positive effect could be maintained when specific Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci were transferred to the wheat genetic background as in the case of T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL, T1V#4S · 1BL and T1V#4S · 1DS translocation lines. These results showed that the chromosome segment carrying the Glu-V1 and Gli-V1/Glu-V3 loci in 1V#4S of D. villosum had positive effect on bread-making quality, and the T1V#4S-6BS · 6BL and T1V#4S · 1BL translocation lines could be useful germplasms for bread wheat improvement. The developed 1V#4S-specific molecular markers could be used to rapidly identify and trace the alien chromatin of 1V#4S in wheat background. PMID:24408374

  20. 18,000 displacement vectors and 44 positions surveys of RFID tracers show a normal diffusion of the bedload in a proglacial stream (Bossons glacier, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, Hervé; Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Buoncristiani, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Bedload transport is a stochastic process during which each particle hops for a random length then rests for a random duration. In recent years, this probabilistic approach was investigated by theoretical models, numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. These experiments are generally carried out on short time scales with sand, but underline the diffusive behaviour of the bedload. Conversely, marked pebbles in natural streams have mainly be used to infer about transport processes and transport time of the bedload. In this study, the stochastic characteristics of bedload transport are inferred from the radio-frequency identification (RFID) of pebbles. In particular, we provide insights for answering the following question : is the bedload transport sub-diffusive, normally diffusive or super-diffusive at the long time scale (i.e. global range)? Experiments designed to investigate the phenomenology of bedload transport have been carried out in the proglacial area of Bossons glacier. This 350 m long alluvial plain exhibits daily flood from the glacial system and is still redistributing material from catastrophic events pre-dating our investigations. From 2011 to 2014, the position of the ˜ 1000 RFID tracers have been measured by a mobile antenna and a differential GPS during 44 surveys providing ˜ 2500 tracer positions. Additionnaly, in 2014, 650 new tracers were seeded upstream from a static RFID antenna located at the outlet of the study area. For the 1 to 32 cm fraction surveyed, both mobile and static antenna results show no evidence for a significant export outside of the surveyed zone. Initial data have been maximized by using each possible campaign pairs leading to ˜700 campaign pairs and more than 18,000 displacement vectors. To our knowledge, this is one of the most extensive dataset of tracers positions measured in a natural stream using the RFID methodology. Using 152 campaigns pairs with at least 20 retrieved tracers,r standard probability

  1. Technology transfer through performance management: the effects of graphical feedback and positive reinforcement on drug treatment counselors' behavior.

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, M E; Kirby, K C; Morral, A R; Iguchi, M Y

    2001-07-01

    After drug treatment counselors at a community-based methadone treatment clinic were trained in implementing a contingency management (CM) intervention, baseline measures of performance revealed that, on average, counselors were meeting the performance criteria specified by the treatment protocol about 42% of the time. Counselors were exposed to graphical feedback and a drawing for cash prizes in an additive within-subjects design to assess the effectiveness of these interventions in improving protocol adherence. Counselor performance measures increased to 71% during the graphical feedback condition, and to 81% during the drawing. Each counselor's performance improved during the intervention conditions. Additional analyses suggested that counselors did not have skill deficits that hindered implementation. Rather, protocol implementation occurred more frequently when consequences were added, thereby increasing the overall proportion of criteria met. Generalizations, however, may be limited due to a small sample size and possible confounding of time and intervention effects. Nonetheless, present results show promise that feedback and positive reinforcement could be used to improve technology transfer of behavioral interventions into community clinic settings.

  2. [Cardiovascular safety of non-insulin anti-diabetic drugs. Scientific position statement of SEMERGEN].

    PubMed

    Prieto, M Á; Comas Samper, J M; Escobar Cervantes, C; Gasull Molinera, V

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. Although reducing plasma glucose levels to recommended targets decreases the risk of microvascular outcomes, the effects of anti-diabetic drugs on macrovascular complications and cardiovascular death are of concern. In fact, it has been suggested that some anti-diabetic agents could even be harmful for cardiovascular outcomes. In this context, several health care regulatory agencies have established the need for performing clinical trials specifically designed to assess the cardiovascular safety of anti-diabetic drugs. The results of 2 clinical trials have recently been published that provide important information on the cardiovascular safety of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. The aim of this document was to review the available evidence on the cardiovascular safety of non-insulin anti-diabetic drugs and provide practical recommendations on their use in this context.

  3. A cost-utility analysis of drug treatments in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only lamivudine has been included for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in the National List of Essential Drugs (NLED), a pharmaceutical reimbursement list in Thailand. There have also been no economic evaluation studies of CHB drug treatments conducted in Thailand yet. In order to fill this gap in policy research, the objective of this study was to compare the cost-utility of each drug therapy (Figure 1) with palliative care in patients with HBeAg-positive CHB. Methods A cost-utility analysis using an economic evaluation model was performed to compare each drug treatment for HBeAg-positive CHB patients. A Markov model was used to estimate the relevant costs and health outcomes during a lifetime horizon based on a societal perspective. Direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs, and indirect costs were included, and health outcomes were denoted in life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The results were presented as an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) in Thai baht (THB) per LY or QALY gained. One-way sensitivity and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were applied to investigate the effects of model parameter uncertainties. Results The ICER values of providing generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir when drug resistance occurred, generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir based on the road map guideline, and tenofovir monotherapy were -14,000 (USD -467), -8,000 (USD -267) , and -5,000 (USD -167) THB per QALY gained, respectively. However, when taking into account all parameter uncertainties in the model, providing generic lamivudine with the addition of tenofovir when drug resistance occurred (78% and 75%) and tenofovir monotherapy (18% and 24%) would yield higher probabilities of being cost-effective at the societal willingness to pay thresholds of 100,000 (USD 3,333) and 300,000 (USD 10,000) THB per QALY gained in Thailand, respectively. Conclusions Based on the policy recommendations from this

  4. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes.

    PubMed

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Aleo, Michael D; Strock, Christopher J; Stedman, Donald B; Wang, Huijun; Will, Yvonne

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify "toxic" and "non-toxic" drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition.

  5. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    SciTech Connect

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Aleo, Michael D.; Strock, Christopher J.; Stedman, Donald B.; Wang, Huijun; Will, Yvonne

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  6. Using Positive Youth Development Constructs to Design a Drug Education Curriculum for Junior Secondary Students in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Ching Man; Lau, Patrick S. Y.; Law, Ben M. F.; Poon, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the design of a new curriculum for positive youth development (P.A.T.H.S. II) in Hong Kong. The paper discusses the conceptual base for designing a drug-education curriculum for junior-secondary students using four positive youth development constructs—cognitive competence, emotional competence, beliefs in the future, and self-efficacy. The program design is premised on the belief that adolescents do have developmental assets; therefore, the curriculum is designed to develop their psychosocial competencies. The goal of the curriculum is to develop the selfhood of these youths and ultimately achieve the goal of successful adolescent development. PMID:22194667

  7. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  8. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  9. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  10. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., maintenance, or operation of nuclear reactors; or (v) Personnel directly engaged in production, use, storage... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... employee, who is allowed unescorted access to the control areas of the following DOE reactors:...

  11. Unprotected Sexual Behavior Among Heterosexual HIV-Positive Injection Drug Using Men: Associations by Partner Type and Partner Serostatus

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuko; Metsch, Lisa R.; Garfein, Richard; Tobin, Karin; Knight, Kelly; Latka, Mary H.

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have examined sexual risk behaviors of HIV-positive, heterosexual, injection drug using (IDU) men. We investigated such behaviors and associations with risk among sexually active, HIV-positive IDU men who reported only female sex partners in the 3 months prior to baseline interview. We examined associations separately for four non-exclusive groups of men by crossing partner type (main or casual) and partner serostatus (HIV-positive or HIV-negative/unknown). Of 732 male participants, 469 (64%) were sexually active with only female partners. Of these 469 men, 155 (33%) reported sex with HIV-positive main partners, 127 (27%) with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus main partners, 145 (31%) with HIV-positive casual partners, and 192 (41%) with HIV-negative/unknown serostatus casual partners. Significant multivariate associations for unprotected sex with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus main partners were less self-efficacy to use condoms, weaker partner norms supporting condoms, and more negative condom beliefs. Similar correlates were found for unprotected sex with HIV-positive main and casual partners. In addition, alcohol or drug use during sex was a significant correlate of unprotected sex with HIV-positive main partners, while depression was significant for HIV-positive casual partners. For unprotected sex with HIV-negative/unknown status casual partners, self-efficacy for condom use, sex trade, and education were significant multivariate correlates. A combination of broad and tailored intervention strategies based on the relationship pattern of men's lives may provide the most benefit for reducing unprotected sex with female partners. PMID:16736116

  12. Antimicrobial interactions (synergy) of teicoplanin with two broad-spectrum drugs (cefotaxime, ofloxacin) tested against gram-positive isolates from Germany and the United States.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N; Marshall, S A; Grimm, H

    1997-10-01

    Teicoplanin, a glycopeptide, has been widely used in some nations alone and in empiric therapy combinations to address infections caused by Gram-positive cocci. However, glycopeptide resistance and the increasing incidence of oxacillin-resistant staphylococci have compromised contemporary chemotherapy. In this study, teicoplanin was tested in combinations with ampicillin, cefotaxime with and without desacetylcefotaxime, and ofloxacin against 151 Gram-positive cocci to assess the potential for enhanced action. The strains included recent isolates from the United States and Germany having well-characterized resistance mechanisms (oxacillin-resistant staphylococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci), each tested by NCCLS methods, checkerboard synergy tests, and kill-curves. Teicoplanin alone was active (MIC90s, 0.25-2 micrograms/mL) against all species except vanA enterococci. Drug interactions of teicoplanin with beta-lactams revealed synergy and partial synergy versus oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (67-100%) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (70-100%), many at clinically achievable drug concentrations. However, confirming kill-curve experiments showed static action and no significant bactericidal effect. Combinations of ofloxacin with teicoplanin or cefotaxime plus desacetylcefotaxime showed a dominant additive and indifferent interaction. Teicoplanin continues to be a viable alternative to vancomycin, especially in combination therapy with selected broad-spectrum cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones. Many emerging pathogens that test resistant to individual drugs appear to be inhibited by tested combinations, extending their potential clinical utility.

  13. Italian association of clinical endocrinologists (AME) position statement: drug therapy of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Vescini, F; Attanasio, R; Balestrieri, A; Bandeira, F; Bonadonna, S; Camozzi, V; Cassibba, S; Cesareo, R; Chiodini, I; Francucci, C Maria; Gianotti, L; Grimaldi, F; Guglielmi, R; Madeo, B; Marcocci, C; Palermo, A; Scillitani, A; Vignali, E; Rochira, V; Zini, M

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of osteoporosis is aimed to prevent fragility fractures and to stabilize or increase bone mineral density. Several drugs with different efficacy and safety profiles are available. The long-term therapeutic strategy should be planned, and the initial treatment should be selected according to the individual site-specific fracture risk and the need to give the maximal protection when the fracture risk is highest (i.e. in the late life). The present consensus focused on the strategies for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis taking into consideration all the drugs available for this purpose. A short revision of the literature about treatment of secondary osteoporosis due both to androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and to aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer was also performed. Also premenopausal females and males with osteoporosis are frequently seen in endocrine settings. Finally particular attention was paid to the tailoring of treatment as well as to its duration. PMID:26969462

  14. HER2-positive advanced breast cancer: optimizing patient outcomes and opportunities for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Singh, J C; Jhaveri, K; Esteva, F J

    2014-01-01

    Effective targeting of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has changed the natural history of HER2 overexpressing (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer. The initial success of trastuzumab improving time to progression and survival rates led to the clinical development of pertuzumab, ado-trastuzumab emtansine and lapatinib. These biologic therapies represent significant additions to the breast medical oncology armamentarium. However, drug resistance ultimately develops and most tumours progress within 1 year. Ongoing studies are evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to overcome primary and secondary drug resistance in tumours, including inhibition of PI3K/TOR, HSP90, IGF-IR and angiogenesis. Mounting experimental data support the clinical testing of immune checkpoint modulators and vaccines. The central nervous system remains a sanctuary site for HER2+ breast cancer and further studies are needed for the prevention and treatment of brain metastases in this population. Despite efforts to identify predictors of preferential benefit from HER2-targeted therapies (e.g., truncated HER2, PTEN loss and SRC activation), HER2 protein overexpression and/or gene amplification remains the most important predictive factor of response to HER2-targeted therapies. In this article, we review the optimal sequence of HER2-targeted therapies and describe ongoing efforts to improve the outcome of HER2+ advanced breast cancer through rational drug development. PMID:25025958

  15. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D; Granados-Silvestre, Ma de Angeles; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M; Knowler, William C; Bortolini, M Cátira; Hayden, Michael R; Baier, Leslie J; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-07-15

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 x 10(-11)) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  16. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  17. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids.

    PubMed Central

    Kedda, M. A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M.

    1994-01-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid "ty-pos OCA" individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and "normal" chromosomes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8198130

  18. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  19. The Yeast Hrs1 Gene Is Involved in Positive and Negative Regulation of Transcription and Shows Genetic Characteristics Similar to Sin4 and Gal11

    PubMed Central

    Piruat, J. I.; Chavez, S.; Aguilera, A.

    1997-01-01

    We provide genetic evidence that HRS1/PGD1, a yeast gene previously identified as a suppressor of the hyper-recombination phenotype of hpr1, has positive and negative roles in transcriptional regulation. We have analyzed three differently regulated promoters, GAL1, PHO5 and HSP26, by β-galactosidase assays of lacZ-fused promoters and by Northern analysis of the endogenous genes. Transcription of these promoters was derepressed in hrs1δ mutants under conditions in which it is normally repressed in wild type. Under induced conditions it was either strongly reduced or significantly enhanced depending on the promoter system analyzed. Constitutive transcription was not affected, as determined in ADH1 and TEF2. In addition, Hrs1p was required for mating-factor expression, telomere-linked DNA silencing and DNA supercoiling of plasmids. Furthermore, hrs1δ suppressed Ty-insertion mutations and conferred a Gal(-) phenotype. Many of these phenotypes also result from mutations in GAL11, SIN4 or RGR1, which encode proteins of the RNA polII mediator. We also show that gal11δ and sin4δ partially suppress the hyper-rec phenotype of hpr1 mutants, although to a lesser extent than hrs1δ. Our results provide new evidence for the connection between hpr1δ-induced deletions and transcription. We discuss the possibility that Hrs1p might be a component of the RNA polII transcription machinery. PMID:9409823

  20. Genotype and growing environment interaction shows a positive correlation between substrates of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) biosynthesis and their accumulation in chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Gangola, Manu P; Khedikar, Yogendra P; Gaur, Pooran M; Båga, Monica; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2013-05-22

    To develop genetic improvement strategies to modulate raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) concentration in chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.) seeds, RFO and their precursor concentrations were analyzed in 171 chickpea genotypes from diverse geographical origins. The genotypes were grown in replicated trials over two years in the field (Patancheru, India) and in the greenhouse (Saskatoon, Canada). Analysis of variance revealed a significant impact of genotype, environment, and their interaction on RFO concentration in chickpea seeds. Total RFO concentration ranged from 1.58 to 5.31 mmol/100 g and from 2.11 to 5.83 mmol/100 g in desi and kabuli genotypes, respectively. Sucrose (0.60-3.59 g/100 g) and stachyose (0.18-2.38 g/100 g) were distinguished as the major soluble sugar and RFO, respectively. Correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between substrate and product concentration in RFO biosynthesis. In chickpea seeds, raffinose, stachyose, and verbascose showed a moderate broad sense heritability (0.25-0.56), suggesting the use of a multilocation trials based approach in chickpea seed quality improvement programs.

  1. Ethnic hair care products may increase false positives in hair drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, David A; Smith, Frederick P; Shepherd, Arica R

    2015-12-01

    The question of why different races appear more susceptible to hair contamination by external drugs remains controversial. This research studied susceptibility of head hair to external cocaine and methamphetamine when hair products have been applied. Three different chemical classes of ethnic hair products were applied to Caucasian, Asian, and African hair. Some products increased the methamphetamine and cocaine concentrations in all hair types. A unique finding of this research is that certain ethnic hair products can replace moisture as a diffusion medium, thereby increasing the susceptibility to contamination over 100-fold compared to petroleum-based products. PMID:26338354

  2. Ethnic hair care products may increase false positives in hair drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, David A; Smith, Frederick P; Shepherd, Arica R

    2015-12-01

    The question of why different races appear more susceptible to hair contamination by external drugs remains controversial. This research studied susceptibility of head hair to external cocaine and methamphetamine when hair products have been applied. Three different chemical classes of ethnic hair products were applied to Caucasian, Asian, and African hair. Some products increased the methamphetamine and cocaine concentrations in all hair types. A unique finding of this research is that certain ethnic hair products can replace moisture as a diffusion medium, thereby increasing the susceptibility to contamination over 100-fold compared to petroleum-based products.

  3. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis

  4. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  5. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kedda, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M. Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg )

    1994-06-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid [open quotes]ty-pos OCA[close quotes] individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and [open quotes]normal[close quotes] chromosomes. No haplotype showed statistically significant association with ty-pos OCA, and thus none could be used to predict the origins of the ty-pos OCA mutations. On the basis of the D15S12 results, there is evidence for multiple ty-pos OCA mutations in southern African negroids. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Possible role of more positive social behaviour in the clinical effect of antidepressant drugs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon N.; Moskowitz, Debbie S.; Rot, Marije aan het

    2014-01-01

    Increasing serotonin decreases quarrelsome behaviours and enhances agreeable behaviours in humans. Antidepressants, even those whose primary action is not on serotonin, seem to increase serotonin function. We suggest that antidepressants act in part by effects on social behaviour, which leads to a gradual improvement in mood. We review the evidence supporting the idea that anti-depressants may be moving behaviour from quarrelsome to agreeable. The more positive social responses of interaction partners would initiate a cycle of more positive social behaviour, and this iterative process would result in a clinically significant improvement in mood. PMID:24280182

  7. Modeling of release position and ventilation effects on olfactory aerosol drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Si, Xiuhua A; Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, Jongwon; Zhou, Yue; Zhong, Hualiang

    2013-03-01

    Direct nose-to-brain drug delivery has multiple advantages over conventional intravenous deliveries. However, demonstration of its clinical feasibility is still in adolescence due to the lack of devices that effectively deliver medications to olfactory epitheliums. The objective of this study is to numerically evaluate two olfactory delivery protocols in a MRI-based nasal airway model: (1) pointed drug release in the vestibule (i.e., vestibular intubation), and (2) deep intubation with mediation released close to the olfactory mucosa. Influences of breathing maneuvers on olfactory delivery were also studied. It was observed that the front vestibular release gave higher olfactory dosage than the posterior vestibular release, and deep intubations yielded better outcomes than vestibular intubations. Specifically, the optimal olfactory dosage was achieved with deep intubation during inhalation. Breath-holding or exhalation, which was initially considered advantageous, resulted in unfocused depositions throughout the nasal turbinate region. Results of this study have implications for developing new olfactory delivery devices and for optimizing delivery protocols specific to patients' ventilations.

  8. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection & risk factors for HCV positivity in injecting & non-injecting drug users attending a de-addiction centre in northern India

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Debasish; Sharma, Arun Kumar; Gupta, Sunil; Nebhinani, Naresh; Kumar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Injecting drug use is a major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India, but there may be other risk factors also. This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in injecting drug users (IDUs) vs. non-IDUs (NIDUs), and to study the risk estimates for HCV seropositivity in the total sample of substance users with regard to various demographic, clinical, behavioural and personality factors. Methods: The IDUs (n = 201) and NIDUs (n = 219) were assessed for demographic, clinical and behavioural information, and were rated on instruments for severity of dependence, risk behaviour and personality profiles. Anti-HCV antibody was tested by ELISA and confirmed by recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) test. Results: Almost one-third of the IDUs (64 of 201; 31.8%) were positive for anti-HCV antibody, as opposed to only seven (3.2%) of the NIDUs. The four risk factors strongly associated with HCV positivity in multivariate analysis were sharing syringe [Exp(B) 75.04; 95%CI 18.28-307.96; P<0.001], reuse of injection accessories (16.39; 3.51-76.92; P<0.001), blood transfusion (5.88; 1.63-21.23; P=0.007) and IDU status (3.60; 1.26-10.31; P=0.017). Other variables less strongly but significantly associated with HCV positivity were multiple sex partners, opioid dependence, risk behaviour scores, impulsivity, and lower age of onset of drug use. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed a high seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in IDUs. In the substance users, HCV positivity was significantly and independently associated with several clinical, behavioural, and personality risk factors. PMID:26458347

  9. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Hofmann, Tobias; Ahnis, Anne; Elbelt, Ulf; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI) and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI < 17.5 kg/m2) and overweight (obesity with BMI 30–40, 40–50 and >50 kg/m2, n = 14–15/group) and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 43). Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, n = 85), psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9–85 kg/m2, n = 74). No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p > 0.05). Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r = −0.30, p = 0.008), while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p > 0.05) in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point toward a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating. PMID:26089773

  10. Syndemic vulnerability, sexual and injection risk behaviors, and HIV continuum of care outcomes in HIV-positive injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuko; Purcell, David W.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Wilkinson, James D.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Knight, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Limited investigations have been conducted on syndemics and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Using baseline data from a multi-site, randomized controlled study of HIV-positive injection drug users (n=1052), we examined whether psychosocial factors co-occurred, and whether these factors were additively associated with behavioral and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Experiencing one type of psychosocial problem was significantly (p<0.05) associated with an increased odds of experiencing another type of problem. Persons with 3 or more psychosocial problems were significantly more likely to report sexual and injection risk behaviors and were less likely to be adherent to HIV medications. Persons with 4 or more problems were less likely to be virally suppressed. Reporting any problems was associated with not currently taking HIV medications. Our findings highlight the association of syndemics not only with risk behaviors, but also with outcomes related to the continuum of care for HIV-positive persons. PMID:25249392

  11. A preliminary study of spiritual self-schema (3-S(+)) therapy for reducing impulsivity in HIV-positive drug users.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Arthur; Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Beitel, Mark; Arnold, Ruth M; Fulwiler, Carl E; Avants, S Kelly

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, pretreatment correlations are presented among impulsivity, intoxicant use, HIV risk behavior, spirituality, and motivation in a sample of 38 HIV-positive drug users. Second, treatment outcomes are presented from a preliminary study of spiritual self-schema (3-S(+)) therapy - a manual-guided psychotherapy integrating cognitive and Buddhist psychologies - for increasing motivation for abstinence, HIV prevention, and medication adherence. Impulsivity was negatively correlated with spiritual practices and motivation for recovery, and was positively related to intoxicant use and HIV risk behavior. Relative to a standard care comparison condition, patients completing 3-S(+) therapy reported greater decreases in impulsivity and intoxicant use, and greater increases in spiritual practices and motivation for abstinence, HIV prevention, and medication adherence.

  12. Forfeiture of illegally acquired assets of drug traffickers: the position in India.

    PubMed

    Gujral, B B

    1983-01-01

    Trafficking in drugs and other related crimes generates huge illicit funds which are used to support other criminal activity, corruption, illicit arms trading, the smuggling of goods and currency, and other economic offences. The traditional enforcement techniques aimed only at carriers and confiscation of the seized contraband no longer provide a sufficient deterrent. The problem is international in scope and requires close cooperation of all the agencies concerned. In 1976, India enacted specific legislation providing for the forfeiture of the property and assets of smugglers, including traffickers and foreign-exchange manipulators. This legislation, known as the "Smugglers and Foreign-Exchange Manipulators (Forfeiture of Property) Act, 1976", enables the enforcement authorities to confiscate all property, both movable and immovable, illegally acquired or accumulated, or for which investment is made from unlawful earnings resulting from smuggling and foreign exchange racketeering. It covers all such property held, not only in the names of smugglers and traffickers themselves, but their relatives and associates as well. The Act provides for principles of natural justice to be followed for all forfeiture proceedings and for appeals to a high tribunal. The legislation has enabled forfeiture action in 2,297 cases, covering properties valued at $US 40 million, during the last six years.

  13. Positive and negative features of a computer assisted drug treatment program delivered by mentors to homeless drug users living in hostels.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Stevenson, Caral

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores positive and negative features of computer assisted therapy (CAT) delivered by mentors to homeless drug users (HDUs) living in hostels. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HDUs and 15 mentors (all hostel staff) at the beginning and end of a 12-week CAT program. Findings indicate that successful delivery of the CAT relates to: 'program features' (e.g. its accessibility, flexibility, user-friendly interface); 'delivery context' (e.g. privacy, having appropriate computing equipment), 'client characteristics' (HDUs being recovery-focused and committed to using the program), and 'mentor support' (clients having personalized attention from an encouraging and sympathetic other). It is concluded that CATs can be used with HDUs but are unlikely to replace addiction therapists. Rather, they are more likely to be effective when combined with a strong therapeutic relationship. Services using CATs with HDUs need to provide staff training, support, and time to maximize the potential benefits. PMID:25037480

  14. Positive and negative features of a computer assisted drug treatment program delivered by mentors to homeless drug users living in hostels.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Stevenson, Caral

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores positive and negative features of computer assisted therapy (CAT) delivered by mentors to homeless drug users (HDUs) living in hostels. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HDUs and 15 mentors (all hostel staff) at the beginning and end of a 12-week CAT program. Findings indicate that successful delivery of the CAT relates to: 'program features' (e.g. its accessibility, flexibility, user-friendly interface); 'delivery context' (e.g. privacy, having appropriate computing equipment), 'client characteristics' (HDUs being recovery-focused and committed to using the program), and 'mentor support' (clients having personalized attention from an encouraging and sympathetic other). It is concluded that CATs can be used with HDUs but are unlikely to replace addiction therapists. Rather, they are more likely to be effective when combined with a strong therapeutic relationship. Services using CATs with HDUs need to provide staff training, support, and time to maximize the potential benefits.

  15. The false-positive responses of analgesic drugs to the intradermal serotonin- and compound 48/80-induced scratches as an animal model of itch.

    PubMed

    Ilkaya, Fatih; Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Gunduz, Ozgur; Ide, Tayfun; Akar, Ahmet; Ulugol, Ahmet; Guzel, Hasan; Dogrul, Ahmet; Ucar, Durmus; Gunaydin, Caner

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal injection of pruritogens such as serotonin, histamine and compound 48/80 into the skin and then, the evaluation of the scratching behavior is the commonly used animal model to advance pruritic research and drug development. However, predictive validity of this model is poorly documented. There is a close interaction between itch and pain sensations with regard to mediation through an anatomically and functionally identical neuronal pathway. One approach is whether the existing animal model of itch differentiates itch or pain to show efficacy of clinically effective analgesic drugs as a back translation. In this study, we explored the effects of different group of analgesic drugs on serotonin and compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in Balb-C mice. Serotonin (25 μg) and compound 48/80 (100 μg) was injected intradermally in a volume of 50 μl into the rostral part of skin on the back of male mice and scratches were counted for a 30-min observation period. Morphine (1, 3, 10 mg/kg), tramadol (20, 40, 80 mg/kg), cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 (0.1, 0.3, 1 mg/kg), paracetamol (100, 200, 300 mg/kg) and diclofenac (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to pruritogen injection. The analgesic drugs dose dependently blocked serotonin and compound 48/80-induced straching behavior with exerting complete inhibition at certain doses. Our data suggests that intradermal pruritogen-induced scratching models may not discriminate pain and itch sensations and give false positive results when standard analgesic drugs are used. PMID:27685776

  16. Specificity dependence between serological tests for diagnosing bovine brucellosis in Brucella-free farms showing false positive serological reactions due to Yersinia enterocolitica O:9

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract When brucellosis false positive serological reactions happen in cattle, the serial use of pairs of specificity-correlated serological tests (rose bengal, complement fixation, competitive ELISA) results in specificities lower than expected. In this situation, highly specific tests, such as the indirect ELISA used alone, may be more adequate than serial testing. PMID:16454384

  17. High levels of autoantibodies against drug-metabolizing enzymes in SLA/LP-positive AIH-1 sera.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masakazu; Tanaka, Yuta; Kuno, Takuya; Matsufuji, Tamiko; Matsufuji, Senya; Murakami, Yasuko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH-1) is characterized by the detection of smooth muscle autoantibodies, antinuclear antibodies and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies, and AIH-2 is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against LKM, which contain drug-metabolizing enzymes. In this study, we measured the levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes in AIH-1 patients (ANA-positive). We exhaustively investigated the level of autoantibodies against major CYPs and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases of typical phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes, a transporter (MDR1), and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in 4 patients with AIH-1 and 6 controls, as a case report. Two (Patients 3 and 4) of the AIH patients exhibited high levels of autoantibodies, while two (Patients 1 and 2) of the patients and the controls did not. The levels of autoantibodies against CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, UGT1A6 and human liver microsomes in Patients 3 and 4 sera were over 2(3) times the levels in Patient 1, Patient 2 and the control sera. Meanwhile, the levels of autoantibodies against CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, UGT2B7, MDR1 and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase were 2-2(2) higher in Patients 3 and 4 than in the other subjects. We found that the pattern of elevation in the Patient 3 serum was not parallel with that in Patient 4. Thus, we found high levels of autoantibodies against drug-metabolizing enzymes in AIH-1 patients.

  18. Interaction Between Drugs and Biomedical Materials i: Binding Position of Bezafibrate to Human Serum Alubmin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masami; Minagawa, Keiji; Berber, Mohamed R.; Hafez, Inas H.; Mori, Takeshi

    The interaction between bezafibrate (BZF) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by equilibrium dialysis. Since the binding constant of BZF to HSA was independent of ionic strength and decreased with the addition of fatty acid, the interaction between BZF and HSA was considered to be due to hydrophobic mechanism. Chemical shifts in 1H-NMR spectra of BZF were independent of the concentration of BZF and addition of HSA. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of respective protons of BZF were independent of the concentration, but depended on the concentration of HSA added. The binding position of BZF to HSA was considered to involve the hydrophobic aromatic moiety of BZF from the ratio of spin-spin relaxation rates (1/T2) of BZF bound to HSA and free BZF.

  19. Unsaturated fatty acids show clear elicitation responses in a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase, and test positive in the direct peptide reactivity assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines (TG) adopted the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) as stand-alone skin sensitization test methods. However, unsaturated carbon-carbon double-bond and/or lipid acids afforded false-positive results more frequently in the LLNA compared to those in the GPMT and/or in human subjects. In the current study, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, fumaric, maleic, and succinic acid and squalene were tested in a modified LLNA with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE), and in a direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) to evaluate their skin-sensitizing potential. Oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic and maleic acid were positive in the LLNA:DAE, of which three, linoleic, linolenic, and maleic acid were positive in the DPRA. Furthermore, the results of the cross-sensitizing tests using four LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals were negative, indicating a chemical-specific elicitation response. In a previous report, the estimated concentration needed to produce a stimulation index of 3 (EC3) of linolenic acid, squalene, and maleic acid in the LLNA was < 10%. Therefore, these chemicals were classified as moderate skin sensitizers in the LLNA. However, the skin-sensitizing potential of all LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals was estimated as weak. These results suggested that oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, and maleic acid had skin-sensitizing potential, and that the LLNA overestimated the skin-sensitizing potential compared to that estimated by the LLNA:DAE.

  20. Unsaturated fatty acids show clear elicitation responses in a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase, and test positive in the direct peptide reactivity assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines (TG) adopted the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) as stand-alone skin sensitization test methods. However, unsaturated carbon-carbon double-bond and/or lipid acids afforded false-positive results more frequently in the LLNA compared to those in the GPMT and/or in human subjects. In the current study, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, fumaric, maleic, and succinic acid and squalene were tested in a modified LLNA with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE), and in a direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) to evaluate their skin-sensitizing potential. Oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic and maleic acid were positive in the LLNA:DAE, of which three, linoleic, linolenic, and maleic acid were positive in the DPRA. Furthermore, the results of the cross-sensitizing tests using four LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals were negative, indicating a chemical-specific elicitation response. In a previous report, the estimated concentration needed to produce a stimulation index of 3 (EC3) of linolenic acid, squalene, and maleic acid in the LLNA was < 10%. Therefore, these chemicals were classified as moderate skin sensitizers in the LLNA. However, the skin-sensitizing potential of all LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals was estimated as weak. These results suggested that oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, and maleic acid had skin-sensitizing potential, and that the LLNA overestimated the skin-sensitizing potential compared to that estimated by the LLNA:DAE. PMID:26558466

  1. Beliefs that Condoms Reduce Sexual Pleasure—Gender Differences in Correlates Among Heterosexual HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users (IDUs)

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, David W.; Latka, Mary H.; Metsch, Lisa R.; Gomez, Cynthia A.; Latkin, Carl A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies consistently find that negative condom beliefs or attitudes are significantly associated with less condom use in various populations, including HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs). As part of efforts to reduce sexual risk among HIV-positive IDUs, one of the goals of HIV interventions should be the promotion of positive condom beliefs. In this paper we sought to identify the correlates of negative condom beliefs and examined whether such correlates varied by gender, using a subsample (those with an opposite-sex main partner; n = 348) of baseline data collected as part of a randomized controlled study of HIV-positive IDUs. In multivariate analyses, we found more significant correlates for women than for men. With men, perception that their sex partner is not supportive of condom use (negative partner norm) was the only significant correlate (Beta = −0.30; p < 0.01; R2 = 0.18). Among women, negative partner norm (Beta = −0.18; p < 0.05); having less knowledge about HIV, STD, and hepatitis (Beta = −0.16; p < 0.05); lower self-efficacy for using a condom (Beta = −0.40; p < 0.01); and more episodes of partner violence (Beta = 0.15; p < 0.05) were significantly associated with negative condom beliefs (R2 = 0.36). These findings suggest important gender-specific factors to consider in interventions that seek to promote positive condom beliefs among HIV-positive IDUs. PMID:17447147

  2. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  3. Positive Control Mutations in the MyoD Basic Region Fail to Show Cooperative DNA Binding and Transcriptional Activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengal, Eyal; Flores, Osvaldo; Rangarajan, Pundi N.; Chen, Amy; Weintraub, Harold; Verma, Inder M.

    1994-06-01

    An in vitro transcription system from HeLa cells has been established in which MyoD and E47 proteins activate transcription both as homodimers and heterodimers. However, heterodimers activate transcription more efficiently than homodimers, and function synergistically from multiple binding sites. Positive control mutants in the basic region of MyoD that have previously been shown to be defective in initiating the myogenic program, can bind DNA but have lost their ability to function as transcriptional activators in vitro. Additionally, positive control mutants, unlike wild-type MyoD, fail to bind cooperatively to DNA. We propose that binding of MyoD complexes to high affinity MyoD binding sites induces conformational changes that facilitate cooperative binding to multiple sites and promote transcriptional activation.

  4. Study of antidepressant drugs in GPR39 (zinc receptor⁻/⁻) knockout mice, showing no effect of conventional antidepressants, but effectiveness of NMDA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Magdalena; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The monoamine-based antidepressants that are currently used generate many side effects, and more than 30% of depressed patients do not respond to this therapy. Glutamate-based antidepressants seem to play an important role in therapy for depression, but there is still an extensive search for safe drugs. An antagonist of the glutamatergic NMDA receptor - namely, zinc - plays a part in maintaining homeostasis between glutamate and GABA via the GPR39 receptor, which has been found to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. In this study we investigated the behavioral response resulting from chronic or acute treatment with monoamine-based antidepressants, such as imipramine, escitalopram or reboxetine, and from glutamate-based MK-801 or ketamine, as measured by the forced swim test (FST) in GPR39 knockout (GPR39 KO, -/-) mice versus wild-type (WT, +/+) controls. All the tested agents reduced the immobility time in the FST in the wild-type animals. However, only chronic or acute administration of MK-801 and ketamine (but not monoamine-based antidepressants) were active in the FST in GPR39 KO mice. Our results show for the first time that GPR39 is required for the antidepressant effect of monoamine-based antidepressants. PMID:25827929

  5. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. Where a covered employee...

  6. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. Where a covered employee...

  7. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. Where a covered employee...

  8. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-sensitive function, shall follow the procedures outlined in 49 CFR Part 40. ... test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. Where a covered employee...

  9. Long-term human primary hepatocyte cultures in a microfluidic liver biochip show maintenance of mRNA levels and higher drug metabolism compared with Petri cultures.

    PubMed

    Jellali, Rachid; Bricks, Thibault; Jacques, Sébastien; Fleury, Marie-José; Paullier, Patrick; Merlier, Franck; Leclerc, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Human primary hepatocytes were cultivated in a microfluidic bioreactor and in Petri dishes for 13 days. mRNA kinetics in biochips showed an increase in the levels of CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2D6, HNF4a, SULT1A1, UGT1A1 mRNA related genes when compared with post extraction levels. In addition, comparison with Petri dishes showed higher levels of CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2D6 related genes at the end of culture. Functional assays illustrated a higher urea and albumin production over the period of culture in biochips. Bioreactor drug metabolism (midazolam and phenacetin) was not superior to the Petri dish after 2 days of culture. The CYP3A4 midazolam metabolism was maintained in biochips after 13 days of culture, whereas it was almost undetectable in Petri dishes. This led to a 5000-fold higher value of the metabolic ratio in the biochips. CYP1A2 phenacetin metabolism was found to be higher in biochips after 5, 9 and 13 days of culture. Thus, a 100-fold higher metabolic ratio of APAP in biochips was measured after 13 days of perfusion. These results demonstrated functional primary human hepatocyte culture in the bioreactor in a long-term culture. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT UTILIZATION AMONG A COHORT OF HIV-POSITIVE INJECTING DRUG USERS IN A CANADIAN SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Fairbairn, Nadia; Milloy, M-J; Zhang, Ruth; Lai, Calvin; Grafstein, Eric; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU) are known to be at risk for multiple medical problems that may necessitate emergency department (ED) use, however, the relative contribution of HIV disease versus injection-related complications have not been well described. Objectives We examined factors associated with ED use among a prospective cohort of HIV-positive IDU in a Canadian setting. Methods We enrolled HIV-positive IDU into a community-recruited prospective cohort study. We modeled factors associated with the time to first ED visit using Cox regression to determine factors independently associated with ED use. In sub-analyses, we examined ED diagnoses and subsequent hospital admission rates. Results Between December 5, 2005, and April 30, 2008, 428 HIV-positive IDU were enrolled, among whom the cumulative incidence of ED use was 63.7% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 59.1% – 68.3%) at 12 months after enrollment. Factors independently associated with time to first ED visit included: unstable housing (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1–2.0) and reporting being unable to obtain needed health care services (HR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2–4.1), whereas CD4 count and viral load were non-significant. Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) accounted for the greatest proportion of ED visits (17%). Of the 2461 visits to the ED, 419 (17%) were admitted to hospital. Conclusions High rates of ED use were observed among HIV-positive IDU, a behavior that was predicted by unstable housing and limited access to primary care. Factors other than HIV infection appear to be driving ED use among this population in the post-HAART era. PMID:21719229

  11. False-positive tests for syphilis associated with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus infection among intravenous drug abusers. Valencian Study Group on HIV Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aguado, I; Bolumar, F; Moreno, R; Pardo, F J; Torres, N; Belda, J; Espacio, A

    1998-11-01

    The role of HIV, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus infections in the production of biological false-positive reactions for syphilis was evaluated in two large samples of intravenous drug abusers and homosexual men attending AIDS prevention centers in Spain. A significantly increased odds ratio (OR) for false-positive tests for syphilis [OR 2.23, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.76-2.83] was observed for HIV-seropositive intravenous drug abusers; biological false-positive reactions were also more frequent (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.30-2.31) among intravenous drug abusers who were hepatitis B virus seropositive but not among those who were hepatitis C virus seropositive (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.48-1.69). Among homosexuals, the association between HIV and biological false-positive reactions was restricted to subjects who were also intravenous drug abusers, indicating the crucial role of intravenous drug abuse. Only 20.5% of intravenous drug abusers with a previous biological false-positive reaction yielded a false-positive result in their subsequent visit.

  12. The administration of nasal drops in the "Kaiteki" position allows for delivery of the drug to the olfactory cleft: a pilot study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eri; Merkonidis, Christos; Cuevas, Mandy; Gudziol, Volker; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Systemic treatment with corticosteroids shows therapeutic effects, few patients benefit from intranasal topical drug application, probably due to limited access of the drug to the olfactory epithelium. The aim of the present study was to investigate how drops distribute within the nasal cavity when the "Kaiteki" position is performed. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated. Subjects were lying on the side with the head tilted and the chin turned upward. Blue liquid was used to visualize the intranasal distribution of the nasal drops. The investigation was carried out using photo documentation thorough nasal endoscopy; the intranasal distribution of the dye was judged by two independent observers in both a decongested state and a natural state where no decongestants had been used. With regard to the main criterion of this study, using the "Kaiteki" position, nasal drops reached the olfactory cleft in 96 % of the decongested cases and 75 % of the cases who had not been decongested. However, this difference was not statistically different. Because the "Kaiteki" maneuver is not too difficult to perform, it is more likely that topical steroids can be helpful in cases of olfactory loss. PMID:26141752

  13. The administration of nasal drops in the "Kaiteki" position allows for delivery of the drug to the olfactory cleft: a pilot study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eri; Merkonidis, Christos; Cuevas, Mandy; Gudziol, Volker; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Systemic treatment with corticosteroids shows therapeutic effects, few patients benefit from intranasal topical drug application, probably due to limited access of the drug to the olfactory epithelium. The aim of the present study was to investigate how drops distribute within the nasal cavity when the "Kaiteki" position is performed. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated. Subjects were lying on the side with the head tilted and the chin turned upward. Blue liquid was used to visualize the intranasal distribution of the nasal drops. The investigation was carried out using photo documentation thorough nasal endoscopy; the intranasal distribution of the dye was judged by two independent observers in both a decongested state and a natural state where no decongestants had been used. With regard to the main criterion of this study, using the "Kaiteki" position, nasal drops reached the olfactory cleft in 96 % of the decongested cases and 75 % of the cases who had not been decongested. However, this difference was not statistically different. Because the "Kaiteki" maneuver is not too difficult to perform, it is more likely that topical steroids can be helpful in cases of olfactory loss.

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Campagnari, Francine; de Almeida, Tailah Bernardo; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Tanuri, Amilcar; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs), and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs) containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001), while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009). Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies. PMID:27648838

  15. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Campagnari, Francine; de Almeida, Tailah Bernardo; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Tanuri, Amilcar; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs), and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs) containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001), while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009). Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies.

  16. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Campagnari, Francine; de Almeida, Tailah Bernardo; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Tanuri, Amilcar; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs), and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs) containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001), while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009). Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies. PMID:27648838

  17. Budget impact analysis of antiretroviral less drug regimen simplification in HIV-positive patients on the Italian National Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Restelli, Umberto; Andreoni, Massimo; Antinori, Andrea; Bonfanti, Marzia; Di Perri, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Lazzarin, Adriano; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Croce, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Background Deintensification and less drug regimen (LDR) antiretroviral therapy (ART) strategies have proved to be effective in terms of maintaining viral suppression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, increasing tolerability, and reducing toxicity of antiretroviral drugs administered to patients. However, the economic impact of these strategies have not been widely investigated. The aim of the study is to evaluate the economic impact that ART LDR could have on the Italian National Health Service (INHS) budget. Methods A budget impact model was structured to assess the potential savings for the INHS by the use of ART LDR for HIV-positive patients with a 3 year perspective. Data concerning ART cost, patient distribution within different ARTs, and probabilities for patients to change ART on a yearly basis were collected within four Italian infectious diseases departments, providing ART to 13.7% of the total number of patients receiving ART in Italy. Results The LDR investigated (protease inhibitor-based dual and monotherapies) led to savings for the hospitals involved when compared to the “do nothing” scenario on a 3 year basis, between 6.7% (23.11 million €) and 12.8% (44.32 million €) of the total ART expenditures. The mean yearly cost per patient is reduced from 9,875 € in the do nothing scenario to a range between 9,218 € and 8,615 €. The use of these strategies within the four departments involved would have led to a reduction of ART expenditures for the INHS of between 1.1% and 2.1% in 3 years. Conclusion ART LDR simplification would have a significant impact in the reduction of ART-related costs within the hospitals involved in the study. These strategies could therefore be addressed as a sustainable answer to the public financing reduction observed within the INHS in the last year, allowing therapies to be dispensed without affecting the quality of the services provided. PMID:25285019

  18. Trastuzumab emtansine in locally advanced or metastatic HER2 positive breast cancer; GENESIS-SEFH drug evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Miranda Romero, Patricia; Marín Gil, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Trastuzumab emtansina (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate directed against the HER2 for the treatment of HER2+ mestastatic breast cancer (MBC), who has previously received trastuzumab plus a taxane. According to the results of the EMILIA trial versus lapatinib plus capecitabine T-DM1 shows an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS). It has a favorable profile reducing the incidence of grade 3-4 adverse reactions such as hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea. On the contrary increases significantly severe thrombocytopenia; bleeding risk and liver function should also be monitored. With the current import price T-DM1 has a cost per QALY of over 120,000 €. The price of the drug for the Spanish NHS has not yet been established. Drug cost would be the key factor in the sensitivity analysis and a 50% reduction in the price of the drug would place it close to the threshold of cost-effectiveness usually considered in our midst. According to the budget impact model used, a maximum of 1,218 patients / year and the budgetary impact throughout the Spanish state would be at € 70,490,850. In the initial analysis no advantage was found for T-DM1 in those patients without visceral involvement. Although a subsequent re-analysis of the results of PFS in which the definition of visceral involvement was specified a significant benefit was shown in this subgroup. We believe that this approach introduces a high degree of uncertainty, which does not guarantee the benefit achieved for this subgroup of patients.

  19. Rapamycin and Chloroquine: The In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Autophagy-Modifying Drugs Show Promising Results in Valosin Containing Protein Multisystem Proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nalbandian, Angèle; Llewellyn, Katrina J.; Nguyen, Christopher; Yazdi, Puya G.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause hereditary Inclusion body myopathy (hIBM) associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), more recently termed multisystem proteinopathy (MSP). Affected individuals exhibit scapular winging and die from progressive muscle weakness, and cardiac and respiratory failure, typically in their 40s to 50s. Histologically, patients show the presence of rimmed vacuoles and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive large ubiquitinated inclusion bodies in the muscles. We have generated a VCPR155H/+ mouse model which recapitulates the disease phenotype and impaired autophagy typically observed in patients with VCP disease. Autophagy-modifying agents, such as rapamycin and chloroquine, at pharmacological doses have previously shown to alter the autophagic flux. Herein, we report results of administration of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, and chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor which reverses autophagy by accumulating in lysosomes, responsible for blocking autophagy in 20-month old VCPR155H/+ mice. Rapamycin-treated mice demonstrated significant improvement in muscle performance, quadriceps histological analysis, and rescue of ubiquitin, and TDP-43 pathology and defective autophagy as indicated by decreased protein expression levels of LC3-I/II, p62/SQSTM1, optineurin and inhibiting the mTORC1 substrates. Conversely, chloroquine-treated VCPR155H/+ mice revealed progressive muscle weakness, cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies and increased LC3-I/II, p62/SQSTM1, and optineurin expression levels. Our in vitro patient myoblasts studies treated with rapamycin demonstrated an overall improvement in the autophagy markers. Targeting the mTOR pathway ameliorates an increasing list of disorders, and these findings suggest that VCP disease and related neurodegenerative multisystem proteinopathies can

  20. Gene expression profile of Xenopus A6 cells cultured under random positioning machine shows downregulation of ion transporter genes and inhibition of dome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuzawa, Masayuki; Akiduki, Saori; Asashima, Makoto

    Random positioning machine (RPM) devices that generate a simulated microgravity environment of approximately 0 g prevent the formation of dome structures in Xenopus kidney-derived A6 cells. In the present study, the gene expression profile of A6 cells cultured under RPM was determined using the Xenopus 22K scale microarray, and those genes up- or downregulated twofold or more were investigated. We identified 29 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 4 genes) on day 5, 68 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 43 genes) on day 8, 111 genes (up, 69 genes; down, 42 genes) on day 10, and 283 genes (up, 153 genes; down, 130 genes) on day 15 of culture under RPM. These genes were classified according to categories described in the KOG database, such as "extracellular structure", "cytoskeleton", and "transcription". Almost all the genes involved in "inorganic ion transport and metabolism" were downregulated under RPM. Our study further investigated some of these including the epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) and Na +/K +-ATPase transporter genes. A specific inhibitor of Na +/K +-ATPases, ouabain, inhibited dome formation in the A6 cells, even under control culturing conditions of 1 g (the static condition). Together these data suggested that downregulation of sodium ion transporter gene expression plays a significant role in the RPM-dependent prevention of the dome formation in kidney epithelial cells.

  1. ADX71441, a novel, potent and selective positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, shows efficacy in rodent models of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Palea, S; Haddouk, H; Royer-Urios, I; Guilloteau, V; Lluel, P; Schneider, M; Saporito, M; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces urethral resistance and detrusor overactivity in patients with spasticity. However, baclofen's side effects limit its use for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Here, we tested a novel GABAB positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71441 in models of OAB in mice and guinea pigs. Experimental Approach Mice were left untreated or given (p.o.) vehicle (1= CMC), ADX71441 (1, 3, 10 mg kg−1) or oxybutynin (100 mg kg−1; Experiment 1) or vehicle (1= CMC), baclofen (1, 3, 6 mg kg−1) or oxybutynin (Experiment 2). Treated mice were then overhydrated with water, challenged with furosemide, before being placed into micturition chambers and monitored for urinary parameters. In anaesthetized guinea pigs, intravesical infusion of acetic acid was used to induce OAB and the effects of ADX71441 (1, 3 mg kg−1) or baclofen (1 mg kg−1), administered i.v., on cystometric parameters were monitored. Key Results In mice, 10 mg kg−1 ADX71441 increased urinary latencies, reduced the number of urinary events and the total and average urinary volumes. In guinea pigs, ADX71441 (1 and 3 mg kg−1) increased the intercontraction interval (ICI) and bladder capacity (BC), and reduced micturition frequency (MF) compared to vehicle. At 3 mg kg−1 ADX71441 completely inhibited the micturition reflex and induced overflow incontinence in five out of 10 animals. Baclofen slightly increased ICI and BC and reduced MF. Conclusion and Implications Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a GABAB PAM has potential as a novel approach for the treatment of OAB. PMID:24224799

  2. Tracking the extramedullary PML-RARα-positive cell reservoirs in a preclinical model: biomarker of long-term drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Katerina; Le Pogam, Carole; Chopin, Martine; Balitrand, Nicole; Reboul, Murielle; Cassinat, Bruno; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose Ann; Pla, Marika

    2013-02-01

    Using an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) preclinical model, we show that oncogene-specific PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction)-based assays allow to evaluate the efficacy of immunotherapy combining all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and a DNA-based vaccine targeting the promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML-RARα) oncogene. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis according to the peripheral blood PML-RARα normalized copy number (NCN) clearly shows that ATRA + DNA-treated mice with an NCN lower than 10 (43%) formed the group with a highly significant (p < 0.0001) survival advantage. Furthermore, a PCR assay was used to assess various tissues and organs for the presence of PML-RARα-positive cells in long-term survivors (n = 15). As expected, the majority of mice (n = 10) had no measurable tissue level of PML-RARα. However, five mice showed a weak positive signal in both the brain and spleen (n = 2), in the brain only (n = 2) and in the spleen only (n = 1). Thus tracking the oncogene-positive cells in long-term survivors reveals for the first time that extramedullary PML-RARα-positive cell reservoirs such as the brain may persist and be involved in relapses.

  3. High prevalence of alcohol use among hepatitis C virus antibody positive injection drug users in three US cities

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jennifer V.; Hagan, Holly; Latka, Mary H.; Garfein, Richard S.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Coady, Micaela H.; Thomas, David L.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2007-01-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) acquire the majority of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections and frequently use alcohol. Alcohol abuse accelerates liver disease among HCV-infected persons, can reduce the effectiveness of treatment for HCV infection and may be a contraindication for HCV treatment. HCV seropositive, HIV-negative IDUs aged 18–35 years in Baltimore, New York City and Seattle who were enrolled in a behavioral risk-reduction intervention trial underwent computerized self-interviews to assess baseline alcohol use and dependence and medical history. We measured problem alcohol use using the 10-item Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scale. Of 598 participants, 84% responded “false” to: “it is safe for a person with HCV to drink alcohol”. Problem drinking, defined as score ≥ 8 on AUDIT, was identified in 37%. Correlates of scoring ≥ 8 on AUDIT included homelessness, male gender, primarily injecting speedballs, having injected with used needles, prior alcohol treatment and depression. Although most HCV seropositive IDUs in our sample appear informed about their increased risk of liver disease from alcohol, two-fifths screened positive for problem alcohol use. These findings underscore the importance of referring HCV-positive persons to effective alcohol treatment programs to reduce future liver damage and improve eligibility for and effectiveness of treatment of HCV. PMID:16129567

  4. A selective positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 blocks a hallucinogenic drug model of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Benneyworth, Michael A; Xiang, Zixiu; Smith, Randy L; Garcia, Efrain E; Conn, P Jeffrey; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2007-08-01

    Recent clinical studies reveal that selective agonists of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have robust efficacy in treating positive and negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Group II mGlu receptor agonists also modulate the in vivo activity of psychotomimetic drugs and reduce the ability of psychotomimetic hallucinogens to increase glutamatergic transmission. Because increased excitation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in pathophysiology of schizophrenia, the ability of group II mGlu receptor agonists to reduce hallucinogenic drug action in this region is believed to be directly related to their antipsychotic efficacy. A novel class of ligands, termed positive allosteric modulators, has recently been identified, displaying exceptional mGlu2 receptor selectivity. These compounds do not activate mGlu2 receptors directly but potentiate the ability of glutamate and other agonists to activate this receptor. We now report that the mGlu2 receptor-selective positive allosteric modulator biphenyl-indanone A (BINA) modulates excitatory neurotransmission in the mPFC and attenuates the in vivo actions of the hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist (-)2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromoamphetamine [(-)DOB]. BINA attenuates serotonin-induced increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in the mPFC, mimicking the effect of the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV). In addition, BINA reduced (-)DOB-induced head twitch behavior and Fos expression in mPFC, effects reversed by pretreatment with the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropan-1-yl) -3 - (xanth-9-yl-)propionic acid (LY341495). These data confirm the relevance of excitatory signaling in the mPFC to the behavioral actions of hallucinogens and further support the targeting of mGlu2 receptors as a novel strategy for treating glutamatergic dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  5. Activity of the Novel Peptide Arminin against Multiresistant Human Pathogens Shows the Considerable Potential of Phylogenetically Ancient Organisms as Drug Sources▿

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, René; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Jungnickel, Stephanie; Hemmrich, Georg; Spudy, Björn; Podschun, Rainer; Bosch, Thomas C. G.

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria highlights the need for new antibacterial agents. Arminin 1a is a novel antimicrobial peptide discovered during investigations of the epithelial defense of the ancient metazoan Hydra. Following proteolytic processing, the 31-amino-acid-long positively charged C-terminal part of arminin 1a exhibits potent and broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, including multiresistant human pathogenic strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains (minimal bactericidal concentration, 0.4 μM to 0.8 μM). Ultrastructural observations indicate that bacteria are killed by disruption of the bacterial cell wall. Remarkably, the antibacterial activity of arminin 1a is not affected under the physiological salt conditions of human blood. In addition, arminin 1a is a selective antibacterial agent that does not affect human erythrocyte membranes. Arminin 1a shows no sequence homology to any known antimicrobial peptide. Because of its high level of activity against multiresistant bacterial strains pathogenic for humans, the peptide arminin 1a is a promising template for a new class of antibiotics. Our data suggest that ancient metazoan organisms such as Hydra hold promise for the detection of novel antimicrobial molecules and the treatment of infections caused by multiresistant bacteria. PMID:19770277

  6. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  7. On the positive and negative affective responses to cocaine and their relation to drug self-administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Aaron; Fomenko, Vira; Kaganovsky, Konstantin; Shelton, Kerisa; Wenzel, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Acute cocaine administration produces an initial rewarding state followed by a dysphoric/anxiogenic “crash”. Objective To determine whether individual differences in the relative value of cocaine’s positive and negative effects would account for variations in subsequent drug self-administration. Methods The dual actions of cocaine were assessed using a conditioned place test (where animals formed preferences for environments paired with the immediate rewarding effects of 1.0 mg/kg i.v. cocaine or aversions of environments associated with the anxiogenic effects present 15 min post-injection) and a runway test (where animals developed approach-avoidance “retreat” behaviors about entering a goal-box associated with cocaine delivery). Ranked scores from these two tests were then correlated with each other and with the escalation in the operant responding of the same subjects observed over 10 days of 1- or 6-h/day access to i.v. (0.4 mg/inj) cocaine self-administration. Results a) larger place preferences were associated with faster runway start latencies (rs=−0.64), but not with retreat frequency or run times; b) larger place aversions predicted slower runway start times (rs=0.62) and increased run times (rs=0.65) and retreats (rs=0.62); c) response escalation was observed in both the 1-h and 6-h self-administration groups and was associated with increased CPPs (rs=0.58) but not CPAs, as well as with faster run times (rs=−0.60). Conclusions Together, these data suggest that animals exhibiting a greater positive than negative response to acute (single daily injections of) cocaine are at the greatest risk for subsequent escalated cocaine self-administration, a presumed indicator of cocaine addiction. PMID:25662610

  8. Intraparenchymal drug delivery via positive-pressure infusion: experimental and modeling studies of poroelasticity in brain phantom gels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Jian; Broaddus, William C; Viswanathan, Raju R; Raghavan, Raghu; Gillies, George T

    2002-02-01

    We have used agarose gel to develop a robust model of the intraparenchymal brain tissues for the purpose of simulating positive-pressure infusion of therapeutic agents directly into the brain. In parallel with that effort, we have synthesized a mathematical description of the infusion process on the basis of a poroelastic theory for the swelling of the tissues under the influence of the infusate's penetration into the interstitial space. Infusion line pressure measurements and video microscopy determinations of infusate volume of distribution within the gel demonstrate a good match between theory and experiment over a wide range of flow rates (0.5-10.0 microliters/min) and have clinical relevance for the convection-enhanced delivery of drugs into the brain without hindrance by the blood-brain barrier. We have put the brain phantom gel and the infusion measurement system into routine use in determining performance characteristics of novel types of neurosurgical catheters. This approach simplifies the catheter design process and helps to avoid some of the costs of in vivo testing. It also will allow validation of the elementary aspects of treatment planning systems that predict infusion distribution volumes on the basis of theoretical descriptions such as those derived from the poroelastic model. PMID:12066887

  9. 49 CFR 655.46 - Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified positive drug test result and/or breath alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. 655.46... OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.46 Return to duty following refusal to submit to a test, verified...

  10. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive…

  11. Structures of substrate- and inhibitor-bound adenosine deaminase from a human malaria parasite show a dramatic conformational change and shed light on drug selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Deng, Wei; Krumm, Brian E.; Napuli, Alberto; Mueller, Natascha; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G. J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial adenosine deaminase accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5′-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax adenosine deaminase in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2′-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate-binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes. PMID:18602399

  12. Structures of Substrate-And Inhibitor-Bound Adenosine Deaminase From a Human Malaria Parasite Show a Dramatic Conformational Change And Shed Light on Drug Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Deng, W.; Krumm, B.E.; Napuli, A.; Mueller, N.; Voorhis, W.C.Van; Buckner, F.S.; Fan, E.; Lauricella, A.; DeTitta, G.; Luft, J.; Zucker, F.; Hol, W.G.J.; Verlinde, C.L.M.J.; Merritt, E.A.

    2009-05-20

    Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore, interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial ADA accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5{prime}-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax ADA in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2{prime}-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes.

  13. The Multi-Target Drug M30 Shows Pro-Cognitive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Luisa S; Allard, Simon; Do Carmo, Sonia; Weinreb, Orly; Danik, Marc; Hanzel, Cecilia E; Youdim, Moussa B; Cuello, A Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) offer partial symptomatic relief and do not modify disease progression. There is substantial evidence indicating a disease onset years before clinical diagnosis, at which point no effective therapy has been found. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a new multi-target drug, M30, at relatively early stages of the AD-like amyloid pathology in a robust rat transgenic model. McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rats develop the full AD-like amyloid pathology in a progressive fashion, and have a minimal genetic burden. McGill rats were given 5 mg/kg M30 or vehicle per os, every 2 days for 4 months, starting at a stage where the transgenic animals suffer detectable cognitive impairments. At the completion of the treatment, cognitive functions were assessed with Novel Object Location and Novel Object Recognition tests. The brains were then analyzed to assess amyloid-β (Aβ) burden and the levels of key inflammatory markers. Long-term treatment with M30 was associated with both the prevention and the reversal of transgene-related cognitive decline. The effects on cognition were accompanied by a shift of the Aβ-immunoreactive material toward an amyloid plaque aggregated molecular form, diminished molecular signs of CNS inflammation and a change in microglia morphology toward a surveying phenotype. This study is the first to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of M30 in a rat model of the AD amyloid pathology. It provides a rationale for further investigations with M30 and with potential multi-target approaches to delay, prevent or reverse the progression the AD pathology at early disease-stages. PMID:26401560

  14. Isolation and Structural Elucidation of Brevibacillin, an Antimicrobial Lipopeptide from Brevibacillus laterosporus That Combats Drug-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu; Yuan, Chunhua; Zhang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    A new environmental bacterial strain exhibited strong antimicrobial characteristics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Lactobacillus plantarum, and other Gram-positive bacteria. The producer strain, designated OSY-I1, was determined to be Brevibacillus laterosporus via morphological, biochemical, and genetic analyses. The antimicrobial agent was extracted from cells of OSY-I1 with isopropanol, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and structurally analyzed using mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The MS and NMR results, taken together, uncovered a linear lipopeptide consisting of 13 amino acids and an N-terminal C6 fatty acid (FA) chain, 2-hydroxy-3-methylpentanoic acid. The lipopeptide (FA-Dhb-Leu-Orn-Ile-Ile-Val-Lys-Val-Val-Lys-Tyr-Leu-valinol, where Dhb is α,β-didehydrobutyric acid and valinol is 2-amino-3-methyl-1-butanol) has a molecular mass of 1,583.0794 Da and contains three modified amino acid residues: α,β-didehydrobutyric acid, ornithine, and valinol. The compound, designated brevibacillin, was determined to be a member of a cationic lipopeptide antibiotic family. In addition to its potency against drug-resistant bacteria, brevibacillin also exhibited low MICs (1 to 8 μg/ml) against selected foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris. Purified brevibacillin showed no sign of degradation when it was held at 80°C for 60 min, and it retained at least 50% of its antimicrobial activity when it was held for 22 h under acidic or alkaline conditions. On the basis of these findings, brevibacillin is a potent antimicrobial lipopeptide which is potentially useful to combat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens and foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. PMID:26921428

  15. Isolation and Structural Elucidation of Brevibacillin, an Antimicrobial Lipopeptide from Brevibacillus laterosporus That Combats Drug-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Huang, En; Yuan, Chunhua; Zhang, Liwen; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2016-05-01

    A new environmental bacterial strain exhibited strong antimicrobial characteristics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Lactobacillus plantarum, and other Gram-positive bacteria. The producer strain, designated OSY-I1, was determined to be Brevibacillus laterosporusvia morphological, biochemical, and genetic analyses. The antimicrobial agent was extracted from cells of OSY-I1 with isopropanol, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and structurally analyzed using mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The MS and NMR results, taken together, uncovered a linear lipopeptide consisting of 13 amino acids and an N-terminal C6 fatty acid (FA) chain, 2-hydroxy-3-methylpentanoic acid. The lipopeptide (FA-Dhb-Leu-Orn-Ile-Ile-Val-Lys-Val-Val-Lys-Tyr-Leu-valinol, where Dhb is α,β-didehydrobutyric acid and valinol is 2-amino-3-methyl-1-butanol) has a molecular mass of 1,583.0794 Da and contains three modified amino acid residues: α,β-didehydrobutyric acid, ornithine, and valinol. The compound, designated brevibacillin, was determined to be a member of a cationic lipopeptide antibiotic family. In addition to its potency against drug-resistant bacteria, brevibacillin also exhibited low MICs (1 to 8 μg/ml) against selected foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, such as Listeria monocytogenes,Bacillus cereus, and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Purified brevibacillin showed no sign of degradation when it was held at 80 °C for 60 min, and it retained at least 50% of its antimicrobial activity when it was held for 22 h under acidic or alkaline conditions. On the basis of these findings, brevibacillin is a potent antimicrobial lipopeptide which is potentially useful to combat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens and foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. PMID:26921428

  16. Sexual violence from police and HIV risk behaviours among HIV-positive women who inject drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia – a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Cheng, Debbie M; Quinn, Emily K; Lunze, Fatima I; Liebschutz, Jane M; Bridden, Carly; Walley, Alexander Y; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Police violence against people who inject drugs (PWID) is common in Russia and associated with HIV risk behaviours. Sexual violence from police against women who use drugs has been reported anecdotally in Russia. This mixed-methods study aimed to evaluate sexual violence from police against women who inject drugs via quantitative assessment of its prevalence and HIV risk correlates, and through qualitative interviews with police, substance users and their providers in St. Petersburg, Russia. Methods Cross-sectional analyses with HIV-positive women who inject drugs (N=228) assessed the associations between sexual violence from police (i.e. having been forced to have sex with a police officer) and the following behaviours: current drug use, needle sharing and injection frequency using multiple regression models. We also conducted in-depth interviews with 23 key informants, including PWID, police, civil society organization workers, and other stakeholders, to explore qualitatively the phenomenon of sexual violence from police in Russia and strategies to address it. We analyzed qualitative data using content analysis. Results Approximately one in four women in our quantitative study (24.1%; 95% CI, 18.6%, 29.7%) reported sexual violence perpetrated by police. Affected women reported more transactional sex for drugs or money than those who were not; however, the majority of those reporting sexual violence from police were not involved in these forms of transactional sex. Sexual violence from police was not significantly associated with current drug use or needle sharing but with more frequent drug injections (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.04, 1.95). Qualitative data suggested that sexual violence and coercion by police appear to be entrenched as a norm and are perceived insurmountable because of the seemingly absolute power of police. They systematically add to the risk environment of women who use drugs in Russia. Conclusions Sexual violence

  17. Benzodiazepine whole blood concentrations in cases with positive oral fluid on-site screening test results using the DrugWipe(®) single for benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Blencowe, Tom; Vimpari, Kari; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2011-07-01

    Reliable on-site oral fluid screening devices are a useful and convenient means of policing traffic. In Finland, benzodiazepines represent a particular challenge to traffic safety. This study presents a retrospective examination of toxicological analysis results from whole blood in cases which gave a positive screening result for benzodiazepines in oral fluid using the DrugWipe Single device (Securetec). Use of oral fluid on-site screening tests and blood confirmation analyses reflects the real situation in many countries. The data were compiled from the databases of Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit at the National Institute for Health and Welfare. Confirmation analysis results in whole blood were obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data were from 224 real cases in which the Finnish police had conducted a DrugWipe Single benzodiazepines test on drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). The benzodiazepine concentrations encountered in positive oral fluid screening cases in this study indicate that the device is able to detect these substances even at relatively low levels. However, the DrugWipe device does not enable any distinction between therapeutic use and harmful use of benzodiazepines at higher doses.

  18. Psychological distress, drug use, sexual risks and medication adherence among young HIV-positive Black men who have sex with men: exposure to community violence matters.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Katherine; Voisin, Dexter R; Bouris, Alida; Schneider, John

    2016-07-01

    In the USA, Black males are disproportionately affected by community violence and HIV. The aim of this study was to assess whether exposures to community violence are related to psychological distress, drug use, sexual risk behaviors, and medication adherence among a sample of HIV-positive young Black men who had sex with men (YBMSM). Data are from 98 YBMSM ages 18-29 years recruited from Chicago who completed measures on demographics, exposures to community violence, psychological distress, drug use, condomless anal intercourse, and medication adherence. Rates of exposure to community violence were high and youth reported victimization and witnessing numerous types of violence in their lifetime. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, models indicate that YBMSM reporting higher levels of exposure to community violence had significantly higher rates of condomless anal intercourse in the previous 6 months (AOR: 5.33, 95%CI: 1.38-20.55). Additionally, exposure to community violence was positively associated with psychological distress, hard drug use, and use of marijuana as a sex drug. Adherence to HIV antiretroviral medication was negatively associated with community violence (AOR: 0.36, 95%CI: 0.13-0.97). Rates of exposure to community violence are especially high in urban communities. Overall findings suggest that treatment, intervention, and programmatic approaches that include initiatives to address exposure to community violence might correlate with better health-related outcomes for HIV-positive YBMSM.

  19. [Estimation of activity of pharmakopeal disinfectants and antiseptics against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolated from clinical specimens, drugs and environment].

    PubMed

    Grzybowska, Wanda; Młynarczyk, Grazyna; Młynarczyk, Andrzej; Bocian, Ewa; Luczak, Mirosław; Tyski, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The MIC of nine different disinfectants and antiseptics were determined for the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Strains originated from clinical specimens, drugs and environment. A sensitivity was determined against chlorhexidinum digluconate (Gram-negative: 0,625-80 mg/L, Gram-positive: 0,3-10 mg/L), benzalconium chloride (Gram-negative: 2,5-1280 mg/L, Gram-positive: 1,25-20 mg/L), salicilic acid (Gram-negative and Gram-positive: 400-1600 mg/L), benzoic acid (Gram-negative: 800-1600 mg/L, Gram-positive: 400-1 600 mg/L), boric acid (Gram-negative: 800-12 800 mg/L, Gram-positive: 1 600-6400 mg/L), chloramine B (Gram-negative: 1600-6400 mg/L, Gram-positive:800- 6400 mg/L), jodine (Gram-negative: 200-1600 mg/L, Gram-positive: 200-1600 mg/L), etacridine lactate (Gram-negative: 40 do > 20480 mg/L, Gram-positive: 40-1280 mg/L) and resorcine (Gram-negative: 1600-6400 mg/L, Gram-positive: 800-6400 mg/L). Diversified values of MIC for different strains were obtained, especially in the case of benzalconium chloride, etacridine lactate, chlorhexidinum digluconate, boric acid and iodine. Strains isolated from environment were usually more susceptible to examined compounds than clinical strains. The biggest diversification of sensitivity was observed among strains originated from drugs where besides sensitive appeared strains characterizing by very high MIC values of some substances, eg. boric acid.

  20. Acylation of SC4 dodecapeptide increases bactericidal potency against Gram-positive bacteria, including drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Nathan A; Haseman, Judith R; Tirrell, Matthew V; Mayo, Kevin H

    2004-01-01

    We have conjugated dodecyl and octadecyl fatty acids to the N-terminus of SC4, a potently bactericidal, helix-forming peptide 12-mer (KLFKRHLKWKII), and examined the bactericidal activities of the resultant SC4 'peptide-amphiphile' molecules. SC4 peptide-amphiphiles showed up to a 30-fold increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis), including S. aureus strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, but little or no increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Fatty acid conjugation improved endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by 3- to 6-fold. Although acylation somewhat increased lysis of human erythrocytes, it did not increase lysis of endothelial cells, and the haemolytic effects occurred at concentrations 10- to 100-fold higher than those required for bacterial cell lysis. For insight into the mechanism of action of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles, CD, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy studies were performed in micelle and liposome models of eukaryotic and bacterial cell membranes. CD indicated that SC4 peptide-amphiphiles had the strongest helical tendencies in liposomes mimicking bacterial membranes, and strong membrane integration of the SC4 peptide-amphiphiles was observed using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy under these conditions; results that correlated with the increased bactericidal activities of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles. NMR structural analysis in micelles demonstrated that the two-thirds of the peptide closest to the fatty acid tail exhibited a helical conformation, with the positively-charged side of the amphipathic helix interacting more with the model membrane surface. These results indicate that conjugation of a fatty acid chain to the SC4 peptide enhances membrane interactions, stabilizes helical structure in the membrane-bound state and increases bactericidal potency. PMID:14609430

  1. Patients treated for male pattern hair with finasteride show, after discontinuation of the drug, altered levels of neuroactive steroids in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Donatella; Abbiati, Federico; Giatti, Silvia; Romano, Simone; Fusco, Letizia; Cavaletti, Guido; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2015-02-01

    Observations performed in a subset of patients treated for male pattern hair loss indicate that persistent sexual side effects as well as anxious/depressive symptomatology have been reported even after discontinuation of finasteride treatment. Due to the capability of finasteride to block the metabolism of progesterone (PROG) and/or testosterone (T) we have evaluated, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, the levels of several neuroactive steroids in paired plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from post-finasteride patients and in healthy controls. At the examination, post-finasteride patients reported muscular stiffness, cramps, tremors and chronic fatigue in the absence of clinical evidence of any muscular disorder or strength reduction. Although severity of the anxious/depressive symptoms was quite variable in their frequency, overall all the subjects had a fairly complex and constant neuropsychiatric pattern. Assessment of neuroactive steroid levels in CSF showed a decrease of PROG and its metabolites, dihydroprogesterone (DHP) and tetrahydroprogesterone (THP), associated with an increase of its precursor pregnenolone (PREG). Altered levels were also observed for T and its metabolites. Thus, a significant decrease of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) associated with an increase of T as well as of 3α-diol was detected. Changes in neuroactive steroid levels also occurred in plasma. An increase of PREG, T, 3α-diol, 3β-diol and 17β-estradiol was associated with decreased levels of DHP and THP. The present observations show that altered levels of neuroactive steroids, associated with depression symptoms, are present in androgenic alopecia patients even after discontinuation of the finasteride treatment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Sex steroids and brain disorders'.

  2. The Effects of Opioid Substitution Treatment and Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on the Cause-Specific Risk of Mortality Among HIV-Positive People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Min, Jeong E.; Evans, Elizabeth; Li, Libo; Liu, Lei; Lima, Viviane D.; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prior studies indicated opioid substitution treatment (OST) reduces mortality risk and improves the odds of accessing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); however, the relative effects of these treatments for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive people who inject drugs (PWID) are unclear. We determine the independent and joint effects of OST and HAART on mortality, by cause, within a population of HIV-positive PWID initiating HAART. Methods. Using a linked population-level database for British Columbia, Canada, we used time-to-event analytic methods, including competing risks models, proportional hazards models with time-varying covariates, and marginal structural models, to identify the independent and joint effects of OST and HAART on all-cause as well as drug- and HIV-related mortality, controlling for covariates. Results. Among 1727 HIV-positive PWID, 493 (28.5%) died during a median 5.1 years (interquartile range, 2.1–9.1) of follow-up: 18.7% due to drug-related causes, 55.8% due to HIV-related causes, and 25.6% due to other causes. Standardized mortality ratios were 12.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8, 15.0) during OST and 30.0 (27.1, 33.1) during periods out of OST. Both OST (adjusted hazard, 0.34; 95% CI, .23, .49) and HAART (0.39 [0.31, 0.48]) decreased the hazard of all-cause mortality; however, individuals were at lowest risk of death when these medications were used jointly (0.16 [0.10, 0.26]). Both OST and HAART independently protected against HIV-related death, drug-related death and death due to other causes. Conclusions. While both OST and HAART are life-saving treatments, joint administration is urgently needed to protect against both drug- and HIV-related mortality. PMID:26113656

  3. Dual inhibition of AKT/FLT3-ITD by A674563 overcomes FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Yu, Kailin; Liu, Xiaochuan; Zou, Fengming; Zhao, Zheng; Wu, Jiaxin; Liu, Juan; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Li; Stone, Richard M.; Galinksy, Ilene A.; Griffin, James D.; Zhang, Shanchun; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most prevalent oncogenic mutations in AML. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors have shown impressive activity in clinical evaluation, however clinical responses are usually transient and clinical effects are rapidly lost due to drug resistance. One of the resistance mechanisms in the AML refractory patients involves FLT3-ligand induced reactivation of AKT and/or ERK signaling via FLT3 wt kinase. Via a screen of numerous AKT kinase inhibitors, we identified the well-established orally available AKT inhibitor, A674563, as a dual suppressor of AKT and FLT3-ITD. A674563 suppressed FLT3-ITD positive AML both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, compared to other FLT3 inhibitors, A674563 is able to overcome FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance through simultaneous inhibition of FLT3-ITD- and AKT-mediated signaling. Our findings suggest that A674563 might be a potential drug candidate for overcoming FLT3 ligand-mediated drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27074558

  4. Economic impact of delays in listing decisions by provincial drug plans after a positive Common Drug Review recommendation: the case of a smoking-cessation treatment.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Pierre Emmanuel; Mishagina, Natalia; Carter, Valérie; Raymond, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Although varenicline (Champix), a smoking-cessation treatment, was recommended for listing by the Common Drug Review (CDR) in 2007, only one CDR-participating drug insurance plan listed it in March 2011 (Saskatchewan). This study estimated the economic impact of delays in the public listing of varenicline in Canada. Using statistical data and peer-reviewed research, social costs and benefits of reimbursing varenicline were estimated. Flows of attempted and successful quitters were projected over a five-year period for three scenarios: immediate listing (2007), one- to four-year listing delays, and no reimbursement. Benefits of public reimbursement of varenicline would have been greatest in the first year ($271 million) and then decreased due to the erosion in smoking prevalence. The current three-year listing delay prevented a projected 17,729 current smokers from quitting, translating into a projected additional lifetime social burden of $700 million. The sizeable opportunity cost of delaying varenicline reimbursement implies broader economic issues for policy makers.

  5. Differences in T cell distribution and CCR5 expression in HIV-positive and HIV-exposed seronegative persons who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Kallas, Eveli; Huik, Kristi; Türk, Silver; Pauskar, Merit; Jõgeda, Ene-Ly; Šunina, Marina; Karki, Tõnis; Des Jarlais, Don; Uusküla, Anneli; Avi, Radko; Lutsar, Irja

    2016-06-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected despite repeated exposure to HIV. This protection against HIV has been partly associated with altered T cell subset distributions and CCR5 expression levels. However, the majority of studies have been conducted in sexually exposed subjects. We aimed to assess whether HIV infection and intravenous drug use were associated with differences in CCR5 expression, immune activation on the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and T cell distribution among Caucasian persons who inject drugs (PWIDs). Analyses of the data from 41 HIV-positive PWIDs, 47 HIV-exposed seronegative PWIDs (ESNs) and 47 age- and gender-matched HIV-negative non-drug users are presented. Of all of the study subjects, 111 (82 %) were male, and the median age was 29 years. T cell phenotyping was performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with multicolour flow cytometry using anti-CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RA, CD45RO, HLA-DR and CCR5 antibodies. The ESNs exhibited greater levels of immune activation and higher percentages of CD4+ CD45RA+RO+ and CD8+ CD45RA+RO+ cells compared to the controls but not the HIV-positive people. The CCR5 expression on the CD4+ T cell subsets in the ESNs was lower than that in the controls but similar to that the HIV positives. The percentages of CCR5+ T cells were similar in all study groups and in most of the studied cell populations. Intravenous drug use was similarly associated with differences in T cell subset distributions and CCR5 expression among both the HIV-positive and HIV-negative PWIDs compared with the controls.

  6. Targeting Hedgehog signaling pathway and autophagy overcomes drug resistance of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xian; Zhao, Hui; Li, Yubin; Fan, Jiajun; Sun, Yun; Wang, Shaofei; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Ping; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-01-01

    The frontline tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance is the major clinical challenge in the treatment of CML. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and autophagy are both related to tumorigenesis, cancer therapy, and drug resistance. This study was conducted to explore whether the Hh pathway could regulate autophagy in CML cells and whether simultaneously regulating the Hh pathway and autophagy could induce cell death of drug-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Our results indicated that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Hh pathway could markedly induce autophagy in BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Autophagic inhibitors or ATG5 and ATG7 silencing could significantly enhance CML cell death induced by Hh pathway suppression. Based on the above findings, our study demonstrated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could markedly reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells. Moreover, this combination had little cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, this combined strategy was related to PARP cleavage, CASP3 and CASP9 cleavage, and inhibition of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. In conclusion, this study indicated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could potently kill imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells, providing a novel concept that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy might be a potent new strategy to overcome CML drug resistance.

  7. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  8. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ute; Forster, Michael; Rinaldi, Anna; Risch, Thomas; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C; Moorman, Anthony V; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; Weid, Nicolas von der; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-09-01

    TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Using an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. We identified recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 in constellation with the fusion of TCF3 and HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin toward a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics but sensitivity to glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  9. Experimental Genital Herpes Drug Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... be presented Monday at an American Society for Microbiology meeting in Boston. Research presented at meetings is ... currently achievable," Fife said. SOURCE: American Society for Microbiology, news release, June 20, 2016 HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

  10. State of the art of drug treatment of schizophrenia and the future position of the novel/atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Möller, H J

    2000-10-01

    Neuroleptic medication is the most important part of the treatment regimen for schizophrenic patients. The efficacy of neuroleptics in the acute and long-term treatment of schizophrenia is very well proven and the effect size is comparatively high. After more than 40 years of clinical practice with the classical neuroleptics, several more or less generally accepted rules for the management of drug treatment in schizophrenia have been established. The paper aims to describe these standards, discussing, among other things, developments which have appeared in the last 10 to 20 years, e.g. the tendency to a lower daily dose during acute treatment and the tendency to alternative strategies during long-term treatment. The paper especially also takes into consideration the benefits of the novel/atypical antipsychotics as compared to the classical neuroleptics, which will change the current treatment standards under several aspects--a change which is already ongoing. The novel/atypical antipsychotics will be much better accepted by patients, thus leading to increased compliance, will be associated with a better quality of life and will possibly change the long-term outcome of schizophrenic patients in a very important manner. It should be considered that the so-called novel/atypical neuroleptics do not constitute a homogeneous group but are a group of individual drugs, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. As was the situation with the classical neuroleptics, the physician also has to choose the most adequate drug under consideration of the risk/benefit profile of each drug in relation to the disposition of the individual patient. PMID:12607217

  11. Expanding access to HIV testing and counseling and exploring vulnerabilities among spouses of HIV-positive men who inject drugs in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Salman; Majeed, Mohammad Faisal; Awaan, Ahmad Bakhsh; Mirza, Humayun; Sarfraz, Nasir; Veronese, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the utility of home and community-based HIV testing and counseling (HTC) to increase detection of undiagnosed HIV among female spouses and children of HIV-positive PWID in Punjab province, Pakistan. Design Between March 2014 and March 2015, home-based HTC was provided by a local NGO to spouses of HIV-positive PWID in Lahore, Faisalabad, and Sargodha. Convenience sampling was used to identify 2400 married, HIV-positive men who inject drugs and who were currently registered and receiving harm reduction services from the NGO ‘Roshan Rasta’ and seek consent to approach their wives. Method Trained outreach teams conducted HTC and administered a short sociodemographic and behavioral questionnaire to consenting spouses in their homes. HIV-exposed children were also tested with parental consent. Results of the 2400 married HIV positive male-injecting drug users, only 1959 spouses were approached and 1896 agreed to HTC (96.8%). HIV prevalence was 5.3% (n = 101) among spouses and they had very low level of HIV-related knowledge and protective behaviors Conclusion Home and community-based HTC was effective in identifying undiagnosed HIV among spouses of PWID, the majority of whom reported low rates of prior HIV testing and low HIV-related knowledge. Expansion of HIV prevention services and linkages to treatment and care including PMTCT are urgently needed for this group. PMID:26945140

  12. Clinical significance of smear positivity for acid-fast bacilli after ≥5 months of treatment in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyung Koo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Lee, Hyun; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) with acid-fast bacilli (AFB)-positive sputum smear at 5 months or later during treatment are considered to be cases of treatment failure according to World Health Organization guidelines. This study evaluated the proportion, clinical characteristics, and significance of positive sputum smears after ≥5 months of standard treatment in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary TB. This was a retrospective cohort study of 1611 patients with culture-confirmed drug-susceptible pulmonary TB who received standard anti-TB treatment from January 2009 to February 2014. Forty-one patients (2.5%) who were smear-positive after ≥5 months of treatment and 123 age- and sex-matched control patients were evaluated. Among the 41 smear-positive patients, culture of the sputum specimens yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in 1 patient (2.4%), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in 7 (17.1%), and no growth in the remaining 33 patients (80.5%). Treatment was successfully completed in 40 patients (97.6%) with prolongation of the continuation phase regimens without change to second-line anti-TB treatment. In patients with smear positivity after ≥5 months of treatment compared with controls, cavitation on chest radiographs (53.7% vs. 25.2%, P = 0.001), bilateral involvement (51.2% vs. 30.1%, P = 0.01) and combined pleural effusion (26.8% vs. 10.6%, P = 0.01) were found more frequently at the time of treatment initiation, and paradoxical response occurred more commonly (19.5% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.002) during treatment. Smear-positive sputum after ≥5 months of standard anti-TB treatment was mainly because of nonviable MTB bacilli or NTM in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary TB. AFB smear alone should not be used to assess treatment failure and careful examination of microbiologic status, including culture and drug susceptibility testing, is needed before making changes to retreatment regimens or empirical second

  13. Clinical significance of smear positivity for acid-fast bacilli after ≥5 months of treatment in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyung Koo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Lee, Hyun; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-08-01

    Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) with acid-fast bacilli (AFB)-positive sputum smear at 5 months or later during treatment are considered to be cases of treatment failure according to World Health Organization guidelines. This study evaluated the proportion, clinical characteristics, and significance of positive sputum smears after ≥5 months of standard treatment in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary TB.This was a retrospective cohort study of 1611 patients with culture-confirmed drug-susceptible pulmonary TB who received standard anti-TB treatment from January 2009 to February 2014. Forty-one patients (2.5%) who were smear-positive after ≥5 months of treatment and 123 age- and sex-matched control patients were evaluated.Among the 41 smear-positive patients, culture of the sputum specimens yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in 1 patient (2.4%), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in 7 (17.1%), and no growth in the remaining 33 patients (80.5%). Treatment was successfully completed in 40 patients (97.6%) with prolongation of the continuation phase regimens without change to second-line anti-TB treatment. In patients with smear positivity after ≥5 months of treatment compared with controls, cavitation on chest radiographs (53.7% vs. 25.2%, P = 0.001), bilateral involvement (51.2% vs. 30.1%, P = 0.01) and combined pleural effusion (26.8% vs. 10.6%, P = 0.01) were found more frequently at the time of treatment initiation, and paradoxical response occurred more commonly (19.5% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.002) during treatment.Smear-positive sputum after ≥5 months of standard anti-TB treatment was mainly because of nonviable MTB bacilli or NTM in patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary TB. AFB smear alone should not be used to assess treatment failure and careful examination of microbiologic status, including culture and drug susceptibility testing, is needed before making changes to retreatment regimens or empirical second-line anti

  14. Interactive “Video Doctor” Counseling Reduces Drug and Sexual Risk Behaviors among HIV-Positive Patients in Diverse Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Paul; Ciccarone, Daniel; Gansky, Stuart A.; Bangsberg, David R.; Clanon, Kathleen; McPhee, Stephen J.; Calderón, Sophia H.; Bogetz, Alyssa; Gerbert, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors. Methodology and Findings We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003–September 2006) at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults) completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476) were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a “Video Doctor” via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months) and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months). Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months) than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (−2.3 vs. −1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and −2.7 vs. −0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months). Conclusions The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual

  15. Antiepileptic carbamazepine drug treatment induces alteration of membrane in red blood cells: possible positive effects on metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Silvana; Misiti, Francesco; Russo, Annamaria; Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Bellocco, Ersilia; Barreca, Davide; Laganà, Giuseppina; Leuzzi, Ugo; Toscano, Giovanni; Giardina, Bruno; Galtieri, Antonio; Tellone, Ester

    2013-04-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an iminostilbene derivative commonly used for treatment of neuralgic pain and bipolar affective disorders. CBZ blood levels of treated patients are within the range of micromolar concentrations and therefore, significant interactions of this drug with erythrocytes are very likely. Moreover, the lipid domains of the cell membrane are believed to be one of the sites where iminostilbene derivatives exert their effects. The present study aimed to deeply characterize CBZ effects on erythrocytes, in order to identify extra and/or cytosolic cell targets. Our results indicate that erythrocyte morphological changes promoted by the drug, may be triggered by an alteration in band 3 functionality i.e. at the level of anionic flux. In addition, from a metabolic point of view this perturbation could be considered, at least in part, as a beneficial event because it could favour the CO2 elimination. Since lipid peroxidation, superoxide and free radical scavenging activities, caspase 3 activity and hemoglobin (Hb) functionality were not modified within the CBZ treated red blood cell (RBC), band 3 protein (B3) may well be a specific membrane target for CBZ and responsible for CBZ-induced toxic effects in erythrocytes. However some beneficial effects of this drug have been evidenced; among them an increased release of ATP and nitric oxide (NO) derived metabolites from erythrocytes to lumen, leading to an increased NO pool in the vasculature. In conclusion, these results indicate that CBZ, though considered responsible for toxic effects on erythrocytes, can also exhibit effects that at least in some conditions may be seen as beneficial.

  16. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anufrieva, N V; Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Bazhulina, N P; Manukhov, I V; Degtev, D I; Gnuchikh, E Yu; Rodionov, A N; Zavilgelsky, G B; Demidkina, T V

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 - dependent methionine γ-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patient's body. The enzyme catalyzes the γ- and β-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the γ- and β-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  17. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anufrieva, N. V.; Morozova, E. A.; Kulikova, V. V.; Bazhulina, N. P.; Manukhov, I. V.; Degtev, D. I.; Gnuchikh, E. Yu.; Rodionov, A. N.; Zavilgelsky, G. B.; Demidkina, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 – dependent methionine γ-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patient’s body. The enzyme catalyzes the γ- and β-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the γ- and β-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  18. Social-structural contexts of needle and syringe sharing behaviours of HIV-positive injecting drug users in Manipur, India: a mixed methods investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few investigations have assessed risk behaviours and social-structural contexts of risk among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Northeast India, where injecting drug use is the major route of HIV transmission. Investigations of risk environments are needed to inform development of effective risk reduction interventions. Methods This mixed methods study of HIV-positive IDUs in Manipur included a structured survey (n = 75), two focus groups (n = 17), seven in-depth interviews, and two key informant interviews. Results One-third of survey participants reported having shared a needle/syringe in the past 30 days; among these, all the men and about one-third of the women did so with persons of unknown HIV serostatus. A variety of social-structural contextual factors influenced individual risk behaviours: barriers to carrying sterile needles/syringes due to fear of harassment by police and "anti-drug" organizations; lack of sterile needles/syringes in drug dealers' locales; limited access to pharmacy-sold needles/syringes; inadequate coverage by needle and syringe programmes (NSPs); non-availability of sterile needles/syringes in prisons; and withdrawal symptoms superseding concern for health. Some HIV-positive IDUs who shared needles/syringes reported adopting risk reduction strategies: being the 'last receiver' of needles/syringes and not a 'giver;' sharing only with other IDUs they knew to be HIV-positive; and, when a 'giver,' asking other IDUs to wash used needles/syringes with bleach before using. Conclusions Effective HIV prevention and care programmes for IDUs in Northeast India may hinge on several enabling contexts: supportive government policy on harm reduction programmes, including in prisons; an end to harassment by the police, army, and anti-drug groups, with education of these entities regarding harm reduction, creation of partnerships with the public health sector, and accountability to government policies that protect IDUs' human rights; adequate

  19. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    PubMed

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA < 50 copies/ml. In unadjusted analyses, self-reported hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  20. Irinotecan Plus S-1 Followed by Hepatectomy for a Patient with Initially Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases, Who Showed Severe Drug Rash with Oxaliplatin Plus 5-FU and Leucovorin (FOLFOX)

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Imai, Katsunori; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    For unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), hepatic resection with or without chemotherapy is the only curative treatment that sufficiently achieves long-term survival. However, occasional severe allergic responses to anticancer drugs necessitate treatment discontinuation. A 45-year-old woman presented with metachronous unresectable colorectal liver metastases. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin plus 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) was initiated, but severe allergic dermatitis developed after the second cycle. Although she reported no prior history of adverse reactions to tegafur-uracil, a drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed an allergic response to 5-FU. We subsequently replaced with Irinotecan plus S-1 (IRIS) chemotherapy which was well tolerated and resulted in a partial response after 3 cycles. As a result, right trisectionectomy was successfully performed and no recurrence was detected in the following 3 years. A severe allergic reaction to intravenous 5-FU-containing drug regimens can be successfully alleviated by switching to S-1-containing regimens such as IRIS or S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX). PMID:25031875

  1. Trastuzumab-grafted PAMAM dendrimers for the selective delivery of anticancer drugs to HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulhari, Hitesh; Pooja, Deep; Shrivastava, Shweta; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Naidu, V. G. M.; Bansal, Vipul; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Adams, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer cases are human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive. This type of breast cancer is more aggressive and tends to reoccur more often than HER2-negative breast cancer. In this study, we synthesized trastuzumab (TZ)-grafted dendrimers to improve delivery of docetaxel (DTX) to HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Bioconjugation of TZ on the surface of dendrimers was performed using a heterocrosslinker, MAL-PEG-NHS. For imaging of cancer cells, dendrimers were also conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate. Comparative in vitro studies revealed that these targeted dendrimers were more selective, and had higher antiproliferation activity, towards HER2-positive MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cells than HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. When compared with unconjugated dendrimers, TZ-conjugated dendrimers also displayed higher cellular internalization and induction of apoptosis against MDA-MB-453 cells. Binding of TZ to the dendrimer surface could help site-specific delivery of DTX and reduce systemic toxicity resulting from its lack of specificity. In addition, in vivo studies revealed that the pharmacokinetic profile of DTX was significantly improved by the conjugated nanosystem. PMID:27052896

  2. Substituent position dictates the intercalative DNA-binding mode for anthracene-9,10-dione antitumor drugs.

    PubMed

    Tanious, F A; Jenkins, T C; Neidle, S; Wilson, W D

    1992-11-24

    Molecular modeling studies [Islam, S.A., Neidle, S., Gandecha, B.M., Partridge, M., Patterson, L.H., & Brown, J.R. (1985) J. Med. Chem. 28, 857-864] have suggested that anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) derivatives substituted at the 1,4 and 1,8 positions with-NH(CH2)2NH(CH2CH3)2+ side chains intercalate with DNA with both substituents in the same groove (classical intercalation) while a similarly substituted 1,5 derivative intercalates in a threading mode with one side chain in each groove. Modeling studies also suggested that anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) derivatives substituted at the 2,6 positions with -NHCO(CH2)R (where R is a cationic group) should bind to DNA by the threading mode, and several such derivatives have been synthesized [Agbandjie, M., Jenkins, T.C., McKenna, R., Reszka, A., & Neidle, S. (1992) J. Med. Chem. 35, 1418-1429]. We have conducted stopped-flow kinetics association and dissociation experiments on the interaction of these anthraquinones with calf thymus DNA and with DNA polymers with alternating AT and GC base pairs to experimentally determine the binding mode and how the threading mode affects intercalation rates relative to similarly substituted classical intercalators. The binding modes, determined by analysis of relative rates, energies of activation, and effects of salt concentration on association and dissociation rate constants, agree completely with the modes predicted by molecular modeling methods. Association and dissociation rate constants for the threading mode are approximately a factor of 10 lower than constants for the classical intercalation mode, and the two modes, thus, have similar binding constants. Variations in rate constants for changes in cationic substituents at the 2 and 6 positions of the anthraquinone ring were surprisingly small.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Hepatitis C virus seroconversion among HIV-positive men who have sex with men with no history of injection drug use: Results from a clinical HIV cohort

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Ann N; Gardner, Sandra L; Mazzulli, Tony; Manno, Michael; Raboud, Janet; Allen, Vanessa G; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Kaul, Rupert; McGee, Frank; Millson, Peggy; Remis, Robert S; Wobeser, Wendy; Cooper, Curtis; Rourke, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internationally, there is a growing recognition that hepatitis C virus (HCV) may be sexually transmitted among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). OBJECTIVE: To report the first Canadian estimate of HCV seroincidence in 2000 to 2010 and its risk factors among HIV-positive MSM with no known history of injection drug use. METHODS: Data from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study, an ongoing cohort of individuals in HIV care in Ontario, were analyzed. Data were obtained from medical charts, interviews and record linkage with the provincial public health laboratories. The analysis was restricted to 1534 MSM who did not report injection drug use and had undergone ≥2 HCV antibody tests, of which the first was negative (median 6.1 person-years [PY] of follow-up; sum 9987 PY). RESULTS: In 2000 to 2010, 51 HCV seroconversions were observed, an overall incidence of 5.1 per 1000 PY (95% CI 3.9 to 6.7). Annual incidence varied from 1.6 to 8.9 per 1000 PY, with no statistical evidence of a temporal trend. Risk for seroconversion was elevated among men who had ever had syphilis (adjusted HR 2.5 [95% CI 1.1 to 5.5) and men who had acute syphilis infection in the previous 18 months (adjusted HR 2.8 [95% CI 1.0 to 7.9]). Risk was lower for men who had initiated antiretroviral treatment (adjusted HR 0.49 [95% CI 0.25 to 0.95]). There were no statistically significant effects of age, ethnicity, region, CD4 cell count or HIV viral load. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that periodic HCV rescreening may be appropriate in Ontario among HIV-positive MSM. Future research should seek evidence whether syphilis is simply a marker for high-risk sexual behaviour or networks, or whether it potentiates sexual HCV transmission among individuals with HIV. PMID:25798149

  4. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID

  5. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  6. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Demetrio L.; Cabrera, Esperanza C.; Puzon, Juliana Janet M.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID

  7. Antiretroviral Drug-Related Liver Mortality Among HIV-Positive Persons in the Absence of Hepatitis B or C Virus Coinfection: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study

    PubMed Central

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Ryom, Lene; Worm, Signe W.; Smith, Colette; Phillips, Andrew; Reiss, Peter; Fontas, Eric; Petoumenos, Kathy; De Wit, Stéphane; Morlat, Philippe; Lundgren, Jens D.; Weber, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Background. Liver diseases are the leading causes of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive persons since the widespread use of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). Most of these deaths are due to hepatitis C (HCV) or B (HBV) virus coinfections. Little is known about other causes. Prolonged exposure to some antiretroviral drugs might increase hepatic mortality. Methods. All patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study without HCV or HBV coinfection were prospectively followed from date of entry until death or last follow-up. In patients with liver-related death, clinical charts were reviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results. We followed 22 910 participants without hepatitis virus coinfection for 114 478 person-years. There were 12 liver-related deaths (incidence, 0.10/1000 person-years); 7 due to severe alcohol use and 5 due to established ART-related toxicity. The rate of ART-related deaths in treatment-experienced persons was 0.04/1000 person-years (95% confidence interval, .01, .10). Conclusions. We found a low incidence of liver-related deaths in HIV-infected persons without HCV or HBV coinfection. Liver-related mortality because of ART-related toxicity was rare. PMID:23090925

  8. Individual and neighborhood predictors of mortality among HIV-positive Latinos with history of injection drug use, Florida, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Diana M.; Trepka, Mary Jo; Fennie, Kristopher P.; Prado, Guillermo; Madhivanan, Purnima; Dillon, Frank R.; Maddox, Lorene

    2015-01-01

    Background The objectives are to examine disparities in all-cause mortality risk among HIV-positive Latinos with injection drug use (IDU) history, and to identify individual- and neighborhood-level predictors. Methods Florida surveillance data for persons diagnosed with HIV 2000–2008 were merged with 2007–2011 administrative data from the American Community Survey. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using multi-level weighted Cox regression adjusting for individual and neighborhood (ZCTA-level) factors. Results Of 10,989 HIV-positive Latinos, 10.3% had IDU history. Latinos with IDU history were at increased mortality risk compared with Latinos without IDU history after controlling for individual and neighborhood factors (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43–1.80). Factors associated with mortality for those with IDU history included: being 40–59 (aHR 6.48, 95% CI 1.41–121.05) and ≥60 years (aHR 18.75, 95% CI 3.83–356.45) compared with 13–19 years of age; being diagnosed with AIDS within 3 months of HIV (aHR 2.31, 95% CI 1.87–2.86); residing in an area with ≥50% Latinos compared with <25% Latinos (aHR 1.56, 95% CI 1.19–2.04); and residing in a rural compared with an urban area at the time of diagnosis (aHR 1.73, 95% CI 1.06–2.70). Race and neighborhood poverty were not predictors among those with IDU, but were among those without. Conclusion HIV-positive Latinos with IDU history are at increased mortality risk and have unique contributing factors. Tertiary prevention strategies should target those who are older, diagnosed at later stages, and those who live in predominantly Latino and rural areas. PMID:26208792

  9. Role of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in the stimulus effects of hallucinogenic drugs. II: Reassessment of LSD false positives.

    PubMed

    Fiorella, D; Rabin, R A; Winter, J C

    1995-10-01

    In the context of animal studies of hallucinogens, an LSD-false positive is defined as a drug known to be devoid of hallucinogenic activity in humans but which nonetheless fully mimics LSD in animals. Quipazine, MK-212, lisuride, and yohimbine have all been reported to be LSD false positives. The present study was designed to determine whether these compounds also substitute for the stimulus effects of the more pharmacologically selective hallucinogen (-)DOM (0.56 mg/kg, 75-min pretreatment time). The LSD and (-)DOM stimuli fully generalized to quipazine (3.0 mg/kg) and lisuride (0.2 mg/kg), but only partially generalized to MK-212 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) and yohimbine (2-20 mg/kg). In combination tests, pirenpirone (0.08 mg/kg), a compound with both D2 and 5-HT2A affinity, blocked the substitution of quipazine and lisuride for the (-)DOM stimulus. Ketanserin (2.5 mg/kg), an antagonist with greater than 1 order of magnitude higher affinity for 5-HT2A receptors than either 5-HT2C or D2 receptors, also fully blocked the substitution of these compounds for the (-)DOM stimulus, while the selective D2 antagonist thiothixene (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) failed to block the substitution of lisuride for the (-)DOM stimulus. These results suggest that quipazine and lisuride substitute for the stimulus properties of the phenylalkglamine hallucinogen (-)DOM via agonist activity at 5-HT2A receptors. In addition, these results suggest that 5-HT2A agonist activity may be required, but is not in itself sufficient, for indolamine and phenylalkglamine compounds to elicit hallucinations in humans. Finally, it is concluded that MK-212 and yohimbine are neither LSD nor (-)DOM false positives.

  10. Differential Modulation of Thresholds for Intracranial Self-Stimulation by mGlu5 Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulators: Implications for Effects on Drug Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Cleva, Richard M.; Watterson, Lucas R.; Johnson, Meagan A.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptor alters various addiction related behaviors such as drug self-administration and the extinction and reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. However, the effects of pharmacological modulation of mGlu5 receptors on brain reward function have not been widely investigated. We examined the effects of acute administration of positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) on brain reward function by assessing thresholds for intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In addition, when acute effects were observed, we examined changes in ICSS thresholds following repeated administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bipolar electrodes into the medial forebrain bundle and trained to respond for ICSS, followed by assessment of effects of mGlu5 ligands on ICSS thresholds using a discrete trials current–intensity threshold determination procedure. Acute administration of the selective mGlu5 NAMs MTEP (0, 0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) and fenobam (0, 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased ICSS thresholds (∼70% at the highest dose tested), suggesting a deficit in brain reward function. Acute administration of the mGlu5 PAMs CDPPB (0, 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) or ADX47273 (0, 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) was without effect at any dose tested. When administered once daily for five consecutive days, the development of tolerance to the ability of threshold-elevating doses of MTEP and fenobam to increase ICSS thresholds was observed. We conclude that mGlu5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect brain reward function, and that tolerance to the ability of mGlu5 NAMs to reduce brain reward function develops with repeated administration. These brain reward deficits should be taken into consideration when interpreting acute effects of mGlu5 NAMs on drug self-administration, and repeated administration of these ligands may be an effective method to reduce these deficits. PMID

  11. Prevalence of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in HIV-1-Positive Treatment-Naive Pregnant Women in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo (Kento-Mwana Project).

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, Bianca; Saladini, Francesco; Sticchi, Laura; Mayinda Mboungou, Franc A; Barresi, Renata; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Calzi, Anna; Zazzi, Maurizio; Icardi, Giancarlo; Viscoli, Claudio; Bisio, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    The Kento-Mwana project was carried out in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo, to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. To determine the prevalence of different subtypes and transmitted drug resistance-associated mutations, 95 plasma samples were collected at baseline from HIV-1-positive naive pregnant women enrolled in the project during the years 2005-2008. Full protease and partial reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed and 68/95 (71.6%) samples were successfully sequenced. Major mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors were detected in 4/68 (5.9%), 3/68 (4.4%), and 2/68 (2.9%) samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 isolates showed a high prevalence of unique recombinant forms (24/68, 35%), followed by CRF45_cpx (7/68, 10.3%) and subsubtype A3 and subtype G (6/68 each, 8.8%). Although the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations appears to be currently limited, baseline HIV-1 genotyping is highly advisable in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy scale-up in resource-limited settings to optimize treatment and prevent perinatal transmission. PMID:25970260

  12. Prevalence of drug resistance and culture-positive rate among microorganisms isolated from patients with ocular infections over a 4-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Toshida, Hiroshi; Honda, Rio; Matsui, Asaki; Ohta, Toshihiko; Asada, Yousuke; Murakami, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the microbial isolates from patients with ocular infections and the trend in the emergence of levofloxacin-resistant strains over the past four years from 2006 to 2009 retrospectively. Patients and methods The subjects were 242 patients with ocular infections or traumas treated in our hospital including outpatients, inpatients, and emergency room patients. Most of them needed urgent care presenting with eye complaints, traumas, or decreased vision. Clinical samples were obtained from discharges, corneal, conjunctival tissues or vitreous fluid or aqueous humor, and cultured. Items for assessment included the patient’s age, the diagnosis, the prevalence of isolated bacteria, and the results of susceptibility tests for levofloxacin (LVFX) cefamezin (CEZ), gentamicin (GM) and vancomycin. This information was obtained from the patients’ medical records. Results There were 156 male patients and 86 female patients who were aged from 2 months old to 94 years old and mean age was 56.8 ± 24.2 years. Of the 242 patients, 78 (32.2%) had positive cultures. The culture-positive rate was significantly higher in male patients than female in total (P = 0.002) and in patients with corneal perforation (P = 0.005). Corneal perforation was the highest culture-positive rate (60.0%), followed by orbital cellulitis (56.5%), blepharitis (50.0%), dacryoadenitis (45.5%), conjunctivitis (38.2%), infectious corneal ulcer (28.5%) and endophthalmitis (24.7%). LVFX-resistant strains accounted for 40 out of a total of 122 strains (32.8%), and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was significantly higher in LVFX and GM compared with the other antibiotics. There were no vancomycin-resistant strains. Conclusion Attention should be paid to a possible future increase of strains with resistance to LVFX, as commonly prescribed ocular antibiotics bring emergence of resistant bacteria. Although no vancomycin-resistant strains were isolated this drug should be reserved as

  13. Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite endorsement by the Saskatchewan government to apply empirically-based approaches to youth drug prevention services in the province, programs are sometimes delivered prior to the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives. This paper shares the 'preptory’ outcomes of our team’s program evaluation of the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services’ Outreach Worker Service (OWS) in eight rural, community schools three years following its implementation. Before our independent evaluation team could assess whether expectations of the OWS were being met, we had to assist with establishing its overarching program goals and objectives and 'at-risk’ student population, alongside its alliance with an empirically-informed theoretical framework. Methods A mixed-methods approach was applied, beginning with in-depth focus groups with the OWS staff to identify the program’s goals and objectives and targeted student population. These were supplemented with OWS and school administrator interviews and focus groups with school staff. Alignment with a theoretical focus was determined though a review of the OWS’s work to date and explored in focus groups between our evaluation team and the OWS staff and validated with the school staff and OWS and school administration. Results With improved understanding of the OWS’s goals and objectives, our evaluation team and the OWS staff aligned the program with the Positive Youth Development theoretical evidence-base, emphasizing the program’s universality, systems focus, strength base, and promotion of assets. Together we also gained clarity about the OWS’s definition of and engagement with its 'at-risk’ student population. Conclusions It is important to draw on expert knowledge to develop youth drug prevention programming, but attention must also be paid to aligning professional health care services with a theoretically informed evidence-base for evaluation

  14. Calicheamicin-conjugated humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody (gemtuzumab zogamicin, CMA-676) shows cytocidal effect on CD33-positive leukemia cell lines, but is inactive on P-glycoprotein-expressing sublines.

    PubMed

    Naito, K; Takeshita, A; Shigeno, K; Nakamura, S; Fujisawa, S; Shinjo, K; Yoshida, H; Ohnishi, K; Mori, M; Terakawa, S; Ohno, R

    2000-08-01

    Calicheamicin-conjugated humanized anti-CD33 mouse monoclonal antibody, CMA-676, has recently been introduced to clinics as a promising drug to treat patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in relapse. However, the mechanism of action of CMA-676 has not been well elucidated. The cytotoxic effect of CMA-676 on HL60, NOMO-1, NB4, NKM-1, K562, Daudi, and the multidrug-resistant sublines, NOMO-1/ADR and NB4/MDR, was investigated by cell cycle distribution and morphology. These studies were done by a video-microscopic system, DNA fragmentation, dye exclusion and 3H-thymidine uptake after analysis of CD33, CD34, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated protein and lung-related protein on these cells. A dose-dependent, selective cytotoxic effect of CMA-676 was observed in cell lines that expressed CD33, and was dependent on the amount of CD33 and the proliferative speed of the cells. Sensitive cells were temporally arrested at the G2/M phase before undergoing morphological changes. CMA-676 is not effective on P-gp-expressing multidrug-resistant sublines compared with parental cell lines. MDR modifiers, MS209 and PSC833, restored the cytotoxic effect of CMA-676 in P-gp-expressing sublines. CMA-676 is a promising agent in the treatment of patients with AML that expresses CD33. The combined use of CMA-676 and MDR modifiers may increase the selective cytotoxic effect in multidrug-resistant AML. PMID:10942240

  15. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds.

  16. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds. PMID:26296082

  17. Hepatitis B Virus Sub-genotype A1 Infection Is Characterized by High Replication Levels and Rapid Emergence of Drug Resistance in HIV-Positive Adults Receiving First-line Antiretroviral Therapy in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Aoudjane, Samir; Chaponda, Mas; González del Castillo, Antonio Adrián; O'Connor, Jemma; Noguera, Marc; Beloukas, Apostolos; Hopkins, Mark; Khoo, Saye; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background. It has been proposed that hepatitis B virus (HBV) sub-genotype A1 infections have mild outcomes and a low risk of drug-resistance among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) receiving lamivudine-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) without tenofovir in Africa. Methods. The virologic expression of HBV sub-genotype A1 coinfection was studied over 12 months in HIV-positive adults starting stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine in Malawi, using Sanger, deep, clonal, and single full-genome sequencing for the sensitive characterization of HBV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Results. Among 1117 subjects, 133 (12%) tested HBsAg-positive. After starting ART, retention rates were 96/133 (72%) at 6 months and 54/133 (41%) at 12 months. Based upon the last available follow-up, 92/96 (96%) subjects achieved HIV-1 RNA <40 copies/mL, 48/96 (50%) showed HBV DNA <14 IU/mL, and 24/96 (25%) acquired HBV RAMs. At 6 months, M204I was detected in 8/46 (17%) and 16/17 (94%) subjects using Sanger and deep sequencing, respectively. At 12 months, all viremic patients had multiple resistance and compensatory mutations coexisting on the same HBV genomes. Comparing HBeA-positive (67/133, 50%) with HBeAg-negative subjects, 64/67 (96%) vs 35/66 (55%) showed baseline HBV DNA >2000 IU/mL (P = .0006), 39/47 (17%) vs 9/49 (82%) had persistent HBV DNA detection during follow-up (P < .0001), and 23/47 (49%) vs 2/49 (4%) acquired HBV RAMs (P < .0001). Baseline HBV DNA levels were median 8.1 vs 5.3 log10 IU/mL in subjects with vs those without treatment-emergent RAMs (P < .0001). Conclusions. HBV sub-genotype A1 infections showed a severe virologic expression in HIV-positive Malawians. The findings strengthen the urgency of interventions to improve ascertainment and management of chronic hepatitis B in the region. PMID:25100867

  18. Correlates of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-positive drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M R; Obeng-Aduasare, Y; Sheehan, H; Hong, S Y; Terrin, N; Duong, D V; Trung, N V; Wanke, C; Kinh, N V; Tang, A M

    2014-08-01

    The HIV epidemic in Vietnam is concentrated, with high prevalence estimates among injection drug users and commercial sex workers. Socio-demographics, substance use and clinical correlates of antiretroviral therapy non-adherence were studied in 100 HIV-1 infected drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months in Hanoi, Vietnam. All study participants were men with a mean age of 29.9 ± 4.9 years. The median duration on antiretroviral therapy was 16.2 ± 12.7 months; 83% reported 'very good' or 'perfect' adherence in the past 30 days on a subjective one-item Likert scale at time of study enrollment; 48% of participants reported drug use within the previous 6 months, with 22% reporting current drug use. Injection drug use with or without non-injection drug use in the past 6 months (95% C.I. 2.19, 1.30-3.69) and years on antiretroviral therapy (95% C.I. 1.43, 1.14-1.78) were correlated with suboptimal adherence. These findings support Vietnam's ongoing scale-up of harm reduction programmes for injection drug users and their integration with antiretroviral therapy delivery. Moreover, results highlight the need to identify and implement new ways to support high levels of antiretroviral therapy adherence as duration on antiretroviral therapy increases.

  19. Target-Independent Prediction of Drug Synergies Using Only Drug Lipophilicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of compounds have been instrumental in selecting lead compounds with increased drug-likeness. However, the relationship between physicochemical properties of constituent drugs and the tendency to exhibit drug interaction has not been systematically studied. We assembled physicochemical descriptors for a set of antifungal compounds (“drugs”) previously examined for interaction. Analyzing the relationship between molecular weight, lipophilicity, H-bond donor, and H-bond acceptor values for drugs and their propensity to show pairwise antifungal drug synergy, we found that combinations of two lipophilic drugs had a greater tendency to show drug synergy. We developed a more refined decision tree model that successfully predicted drug synergy in stringent cross-validation tests based on only lipophilicity of drugs. Our predictions achieved a precision of 63% and allowed successful prediction for 58% of synergistic drug pairs, suggesting that this phenomenon can extend our understanding for a substantial fraction of synergistic drug interactions. We also generated and analyzed a large-scale synergistic human toxicity network, in which we observed that combinations of lipophilic compounds show a tendency for increased toxicity. Thus, lipophilicity, a simple and easily determined molecular descriptor, is a powerful predictor of drug synergy. It is well established that lipophilic compounds (i) are promiscuous, having many targets in the cell, and (ii) often penetrate into the cell via the cellular membrane by passive diffusion. We discuss the positive relationship between drug lipophilicity and drug synergy in the context of potential drug synergy mechanisms. PMID:25026390

  20. Positive Proof.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoffrey

    1988-01-01

    Presents experiments which show that in electrostatics there are logical reasons for describing charged materials as positive or negative. Indicates that static and current electricity are not separate areas of physics. Diagrams of experiments and circuits are included. (RT)

  1. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  2. A Combined Analysis of 48 Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Risk Variants Shows No Discriminative Value to Predict Time to First Prescription of a Glucose Lowering Drug in Danish Patients with Screen Detected Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hornbak, Malene; Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Jensen, Majken Linnemann; Lau, Cathrine Juel; Witte, Daniel; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Andersson, Åsa; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the genetic influence of 48 type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants on disease progression measured as risk of early prescription redemption of glucose lowering drugs in screen-detected patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We studied type 2 diabetes progression in 1,480 patients with screen-detected type 2 diabetes from the ADDITION-Denmark study using information of redeemed prescriptions from the Register of Medicinal Products Statistics from 2001–2009 in Denmark. Patients were cluster randomized by general practitioners, who were randomized to treat type 2 diabetes according to either a conventional or a multifactorial intensive treatment algorithm. We investigated the genetic influence on diabetes progression by constructing a genetic risk score (GRS) of all 48 validated type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants, a GRS of 11 variants linked to β-cell function and a GRS of 3 variants linked to insulin sensitivity and assessed the association between number of risk alleles and time from diagnosis until first redeemed prescription of either any glucose lowering drug or an insulin drug. Results The GRS linked to insulin sensitivity only nominally increased the risk of an early prescription redemption with an insulin drug by 39% (HR [95% C.I.] = 1.39 [1.09–1.77], p = 0.009] in patients randomized to the intensive treatment group. Furthermore, the strongest univariate predictors of diabetes progression for the intensive treatment group (measured as time to first insulin) were younger age (HR [95% C.I.] = 0.96 [0.93–0.99]), increased BMI (1.05 [1.01–1.09]), increased HbA1c (1.50 [1.36–.66]), increased TG (1.24 [1.11–1.39]) and reduced fasting serum HDL (0.37 [0.17–0.80]) at baseline. Similar results were obtained for the conventional treatment group. Conclusion Higher levels of HbA1c, fasting circulating levels of triglyceride, lower HDL, larger BMI and younger age are significant determinants of early

  3. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  4. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A 10-DAY DRUG THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC GASTRODUODENAL PATHOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH CAGA-POSITIVE STRAINS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI].

    PubMed

    Dudnyk, V M; Rudenko, G M

    2015-01-01

    The results of triple Helicobacter-therapy (omeprazole, amoxicillin, nifuratel) in the treatment of chronic gastroduodenal pathology in children depending on the duration of it's use. The effectiveness of drug therapy was evaluated in terms of eradication of Helicobacter pylori and dynamics of pain, dyspeptic syndrome and astenovegetative syndrome.

  5. A systematic review of acute pancreatitis as an adverse event of type 2 diabetes drugs: from hard facts to a balanced position.

    PubMed

    Giorda, C B; Nada, E; Tartaglino, B; Marafetti, L; Gnavi, R

    2014-11-01

    The question whether antidiabetes drugs can cause acute pancreatitis dates back to the 1970s. Recently, old concerns have re-emerged following claims that use of incretins, a new class of drugs for type 2 diabetes, might increase the relative risk of acute pancreatitis up to 30-fold. Given that diabetes is per se a potent risk factor for acute pancreatitis and that drug-related acute pancreatitis is rare and difficult to diagnose, we searched the medical databases for information linking acute pancreatitis and type 2 diabetes drugs. Among the biguanides, both phenformin and metformin (the latter in patients with renal insufficiency) have been cited in case reports as a potential cause of acute pancreatitis. Sulphonylureas, as both entire class and single compound (glibenclamide), have also been found in cohort studies to increase its risk. No direct link was found between pancreatic damage and therapy with metaglinide, acarbose, pramlintide or SGLT-2 inhibitors. In animal models, thiazolinediones have demonstrated proprieties to attenuate pancreatic damage, opening perspectives for their use in treating acute pancreatitis in humans. Several case reports and the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacovigilance database indicate an association between acute pancreatitis and incretins, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists. To date, however, a clear-cut odds ratio for this association has been reported in only one of eight pharmacoepidemiological studies. Finally, none of the intervention trials investigating these compounds, including two large randomized controlled trials with cardiovascular endpoints, confirmed the purportedly increased risk of acute pancreatitis with incretin use.

  6. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  7. A Very Low Geno2pheno False Positive Rate Is Associated with Poor Viro-Immunological Response in Drug-Naïve Patients Starting a First-Line HAART

    PubMed Central

    Armenia, Daniele; Soulie, Cathia; Di Carlo, Domenico; Fabeni, Lavinia; Gori, Caterina; Forbici, Federica; Svicher, Valentina; Bertoli, Ada; Sarmati, Loredana; Giuliani, Massimo; Latini, Alessandra; Boumis, Evangelo; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Bellagamba, Rita; Andreoni, Massimo; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Calvez, Vincent; Antinori, Andrea; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Santoro, Maria Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously found that a very low geno2pheno false positive rate (FPR ≤2%) defines a viral population associated with low CD4 cell count and the highest amount of X4-quasispecies. In this study, we aimed at evaluating whether FPR ≤2% might impact on the viro-immunological response in HIV-1 infected patients starting a first-line HAART. Methods The analysis was performed on 305 HIV-1 B subtype infected drug-naïve patients who started their first-line HAART. Baseline FPR (%) values were stratified according to the following ranges: ≤2; 2–5; 5–10; 10–20; 20–60; >60. The impact of genotypically-inferred tropism on the time to achieve immunological reconstitution (a CD4 cell count gain from HAART initiation ≥150 cells/mm3) and on the time to achieve virological success (the first HIV-RNA measurement <50 copies/mL from HAART initiation) was evaluated by survival analyses. Results Overall, at therapy start, 27% of patients had FPR ≤10 (6%, FPR ≤2; 7%, FPR 2–5; 14%, FPR 5–10). By 12 months of therapy the rate of immunological reconstitution was overall 75.5%, and it was significantly lower for FPR ≤2 (54.1%) in comparison to other FPR ranks (78.8%, FPR 2–5; 77.5%, FPR 5–10; 71.7%, FPR 10–20; 81.8%, FPR 20–60; 75.1%, FPR >60; p = 0.008). The overall proportion of patients achieving virological success was 95.5% by 12 months of therapy. Multivariable Cox analyses showed that patients having pre-HAART FPR ≤2% had a significant lower relative adjusted hazard [95% C.I.] both to achieve immunological reconstitution (0.37 [0.20–0.71], p = 0.003) and to achieve virological success (0.50 [0.26–0.94], p = 0.031) than those with pre-HAART FPR >60%. Conclusions Beyond the genotypically-inferred tropism determination, FPR ≤2% predicts both a poor immunological reconstitution and a lower virological response in drug-naïve patients who started their first-line therapy. This parameter could be useful to identify patients

  8. Simultaneous determination of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization and its application in therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei; Wang, Tingting; Shi, Meiyun; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xiaojun; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2016-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma has been developed and validated. The method required only 10 μL of plasma. After simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile, the analytes and internal standard diphenhydramine were separated on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 2.7 μm) using acetonitrile/water as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The total run time was 6 min for each sample. The validation results of specificity, matrix effects, recovery, linearity, precision, and accuracy were satisfactory. The lower limit of quantification was 0.04 μg/mL for carbamazepine, 0.02 μg/mL for lamotrigine, 0.01 μg/mL for oxcarbazepine, 0.4 μg/mL for 10-hydroxycarbazepine, 0.1 μg/mL for carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, 0.15 μg/mL for levetiracetam, 0.06 μg/mL for phenytoin, 0.3 μg/mL for valproic acid, 0.03 μg/mL for topiramate, and 0.15 μg/mL for phenobarbital. The intraday precision and interday precision were less than 7.6%, with the accuracy ranging between -8.1 and 7.9%. The method was successfully applied to therapeutic drug monitoring of 1237 patients with epilepsy after administration of standard antiepileptic drugs. The method has been proved to meet the high-throughput requirements in therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:26711223

  9. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  10. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  11. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  12. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  13. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  14. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  15. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  16. The Art Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scolarici, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    This article describes what once was thought to be impossible--a formal art show extravaganza at an elementary school with 1,000 students, a Department of Defense Dependent School (DODDS) located overseas, on RAF Lakenheath, England. The dream of this this event involved the transformation of the school cafeteria into an elegant art show…

  17. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  18. Let the show begin

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-27

    Major changes should occur in the European polyolefins industry this year. BASF's (Ludwigshafen) polypropylene (PP) deal with ICI is expected to be followed by that of Hoechst (Frankfurt) and Petrofina (Brussels). The two are engaged in feasibility studies for a possible joint venture in PP and are expected to make a decision in the second quarter of this year. Shell and Himont are on track to complete their feasibility study in the first quarter for a polyolefins joint venture. And Huels and PCD are still in talks. But two new possible deals, a polyolefins merger between Nests (Helsinki) and Statoil (Stavanger) and an alliance in PP involving Appryl, the Elf Atochem (51%)/BP Chemicals (49%) joint venture, and Solvay have been denied. The Hoechst/Fina venture would initially encompass only the two companies European plants - Hoechst's 550,000-m.t./year and Fina's 180,000 m.t./year. In addition, Fina would either build or acquire another PP plant. In the second stage, the partners could bring in their overseas plants. Fina has plants in the US, and Hoechst has a combined 100,000 m.t./year in south Africa and Australia. Neste's board member Jukka Viinanen says the only talks between Nests and Statoil center on renegotiations of ethylene supply contract at Stenungsund, Sweden. Nests wants a more flexible deal on quantity and price. It needs 400,000 m.t./year of ethylene for its downstream plants. Viinanen adds that he is worried about the European petrochemical industry and producers need to do everything to improve margins through pricing policies and obtaining a balance between supply and demand. On the possibility of a future link with Statoil he comments, One can never say never. It would take time. We don't feel in a very vulnerable position right now.

  19. Complete republication: National Association of Medical Examiners position paper: Recommendations for the investigation, diagnosis, and certification of deaths related to opioid drugs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gregory G

    2014-03-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology and the National Association of Medical Examiners convened an expert panel to generate evidence-based recommendations for the practice of death investigation and autopsy, toxicological analysis, interpretation of toxicology findings, and death certification to improve the precision of death certificate data available for public health surveillance. The panel finds the following: 1. A complete autopsy is necessary for optimal interpretation of toxicology results, which must also be considered in the context of the circumstances surrounding death, medical history, and scene findings. 2. A complete scene investigation extends to reconciliation of prescription information and pill counts. 3. Blood, urine, and vitreous humor, when available, should be retained in all cases. Blood from the femoral vein is preferable to blood from other sites. 4. A toxicological panel should be comprehensive and include opioid and benzodiazepine analytes, as well as other potent depressant, stimulant, and anti-depressant medications. 5. Interpretation of postmortem opioid concentrations requires correlation with medical history, scene investigation, and autopsy findings. 6. If death is attributed to any drug or combination of drugs (whether as cause or contributing factor), the certifier should list all the responsible substances by generic name in the autopsy report and on the death certificate. 7. The best classification for manner of death in deaths due to the misuse or abuse of opioids without any apparent intent of self-harm is "accident." Reserve "undetermined" as the manner for the rare cases in which evidence exists to support more than one possible determination.

  20. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  1. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments.

  2. Obesity in show dogs.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a growing incidence. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, and decreases life span, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain breeds is often suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, we investigated 1379 dogs of 128 different breeds by determining their body condition score (BCS). Overall, 18.6% of the show dogs had a BCS >5, and 1.1% of the show dogs had a BCS>7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be correlated to the breed standards. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and judges in order to come to different interpretations of the standards to prevent overweight conditions from being the standard of beauty. PMID:22882163

  3. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  4. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  5. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  6. Workplace drug testing in Italy - critical considerations.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Morini, Luca; Pozzi, Fulvia; Collo, Giancarlo; Groppi, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Workplace drug testing (WDT) was established in Italy on 30 October 2007. Two tiers of survey are required: the first tier concerns drug testing on urine samples, the second involves both urine and hair analysis. Between July 2008 and December 2011, 10 598 workers' urine samples and 72 hair samples for opiates, cocaine, cannabinoids, amphetamines, methylenedioxyamphetamines, methadone, and buprenorphine were tested in our laboratory. Urine analyses were performed by immunological screening (EMIT); hair analysis and confirmation tests in urine were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Employees tested positive in urine for drugs of abuse numbered 2.8% in 2008, 2.03% in 2009, 1.62% in 2010, and 1.43% in 2011. As regards the second level of analysis, we observed that only one-third of the workers who had been tested positive for drugs of abuse were referred to an Addiction Treatment Unit in order to verify drug addiction. Our experience shows that, four years after approval of the law on WDT, the percentage of workers positive for drugs of abuse in urine has reduced in comparison to the first year. Moreover, our data show that most of the times employees who tested positive are tardily referred or not referred at all to a Public Addiction Treatment Unit to verify drug addiction. This makes us believe that the legal provisions are widely disregarded not paying the right tribute to the fact that Italy is one of few European countries with legislation on WDT.

  7. 5-(Bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA): showing a strategy of designing drug to block lung metastasis of tumors.

    PubMed

    Gan, Taiping; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Jianhui; Yang, Jian; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Early metastasis is still the most recalcitrant factor in the treatment of lung cancer patients. By analyzing the structures and comparing the docking scores of the known pharmacophores, the authors of this paper designed 5-(bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA) as a promising lead compound to develop metastasis inhibitors. In vitro 5, 10, and 20 µM of BHIMHA concentration dependently inhibited the migration and invasion of A549 cells. In vivo 0.4, 2.0, and 8.9 µmol/kg of BHIMHA dose dependently inhibited the metastasis of LLC (Lewis Lung Carcinoma) toward lung. In vivo, 2 µmol/kg of BHIMHA showed additional actions of slowing the growth of the primary tumor of C57BL/6 mice and S180 mice as well as inhibiting xylene-induced ear edema of the mice. Therefore, BHIMHA simultaneously blocked tumor metastasis toward lung, slowed the primary tumor growth, and limited the inflammation. These pharmacological actions were correlated with the inhibition of PKCα and NF-κB expression.

  8. 5-(Bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA): showing a strategy of designing drug to block lung metastasis of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Taiping; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Jianhui; Yang, Jian; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Early metastasis is still the most recalcitrant factor in the treatment of lung cancer patients. By analyzing the structures and comparing the docking scores of the known pharmacophores, the authors of this paper designed 5-(bis(3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)methyl)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (BHIMHA) as a promising lead compound to develop metastasis inhibitors. In vitro 5, 10, and 20 µM of BHIMHA concentration dependently inhibited the migration and invasion of A549 cells. In vivo 0.4, 2.0, and 8.9 µmol/kg of BHIMHA dose dependently inhibited the metastasis of LLC (Lewis Lung Carcinoma) toward lung. In vivo, 2 µmol/kg of BHIMHA showed additional actions of slowing the growth of the primary tumor of C57BL/6 mice and S180 mice as well as inhibiting xylene-induced ear edema of the mice. Therefore, BHIMHA simultaneously blocked tumor metastasis toward lung, slowed the primary tumor growth, and limited the inflammation. These pharmacological actions were correlated with the inhibition of PKCα and NF-κB expression. PMID:26937173

  9. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  10. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy.

  11. [Identification, during development, of a methodology targeted at determining the positioning of new drugs for therapeutic strategies: examples of rheumatoid arthritis and cardiac insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Le Jeunne, C; Plétan, Y; Boissel, J P

    2002-01-01

    The Marketing Authorization (MA) granted to a new molecular entity does not allow for proper anticipation of its future positioning within the therapeutic strategy. A specific methodology should be devised as early as during the pre-MA development phase that could result in an initial positioning that should be subjected to further reappraisal with regard to scientific advances, the arrival of new treatments and further developments with this molecule. A methodology is thus proposed, based on early optimisation of the development plan, the granting of subsequent MAs, and reappraisal of the positioning within the strategy, based on analysis of all available data. It should be possible to take into account the economic context, within an agreed system with pre-defined medico-economic criteria. This may in turn raise the issue of the role of the various parties involved in this assessment, as well as how to understand the respective opinions of stakeholders: authorities, sponsors, prescribers and patients, each of whom has a specific view of the definition of the strategic objective that should apply to the disease concerned.

  12. Fluency of pharmaceutical drug names predicts perceived hazardousness, assumed side effects and willingness to buy.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Simone; Siegrist, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The impact of pharmaceutical drug names on people's evaluations and behavioural intentions is still uncertain. According to the representativeness heuristic, evaluations should be more positive for complex drug names; in contrast, fluency theory suggests that evaluations should be more positive for simple drug names. Results of three experimental studies showed that complex drug names were perceived as more hazardous than simple drug names and negatively influenced willingness to buy. The results are of particular importance given the fact that there is a worldwide trend to make more drugs available for self-medication. PMID:23740259

  13. Treatment failure and drug resistance in HIV-positive patients on tenofovir-based first-line antiretroviral therapy in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Katherine; Diero, Lameck; DeLong, Allison; Balamane, Maya; Reitsma, Marissa; Kemboi, Emmanuel; Orido, Millicent; Emonyi, Wilfred; Coetzer, Mia; Hogan, Joseph; Kantor, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tenofovir-based first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended globally. To evaluate the impact of its incorporation into the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, we examined treatment failure and drug resistance among a cohort of patients on tenofovir-based first-line ART at the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, a large HIV treatment programme in western Kenya. Methods We determined viral load (VL), drug resistance and their correlates in patients on ≥six months of tenofovir-based first-line ART. Based on enrolled patients’ characteristics, we described these measures in those with (prior ART group) and without (tenofovir-only group) prior non-tenofovir-based first-line ART using Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests. Results Among 333 participants (55% female; median age 41 years; median CD4 336 cells/µL), detectable (>40 copies/mL) VL was found in 18%, and VL>1000 copies/mL (WHO threshold) in 10%. Virologic failure at both thresholds was significantly higher in 217 participants in the tenofovir-only group compared with 116 in the prior ART group using both cut-offs (24% vs. 7% with VL>40 copies/mL; 15% vs. 1% with VL>1000 copies/mL). Failure in the tenofovir-only group was associated with lower CD4 values and advanced WHO stage. In 35 available genotypes from 51 participants in the tenofovir-only group with VL>40 copies/mL (69% subtype A), any resistance was found in 89% and dual-class resistance in 83%. Tenofovir signature mutation K65R occurred in 71% (17/24) of the patients infected with subtype A. Patients with K65R had significantly lower CD4 values, higher WHO stage and more resistance mutations. Conclusions In this Kenyan cohort, tenofovir-based first-line ART resulted in good (90%) virologic suppression including high suppression (99%) after switch from non-tenofovir-based ART. Lower virologic suppression (85%) and high observed resistance levels (89%) in the tenofovir-only group impact future treatment

  14. Oxidative Stress Induced by Pt(IV) Pro-drugs Based on the Cisplatin Scaffold and Indole Carboxylic Acids in Axial Position

    PubMed Central

    Tolan, Dina; Gandin, Valentina; Morrison, Liam; El-Nahas, Ahmed; Marzano, Cristina; Montagner, Diego; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of Pt(IV) complexes as pro-drugs that are activated by intracellular reduction is a widely investigated approach to overcome the limitations of Pt(II) anticancer agents. A series of ten mono- and bis-carboxylated Pt(IV) complexes with axial indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) ligands were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, FT-IR, 1H and 195Pt NMR spectroscopy. Cellular uptake, DNA platination and cytotoxicity against a panel of human tumor cell lines were evaluated. All the complexes are able to overcome cisplatin-resistance and the most potent complex, cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(IPA)(OH)] was on average three times more active than cisplatin. Mechanistic studies revealed that the trend in cytotoxicity of the Pt(IV) complexes is primarily consistent with their ability to accumulate into cancer cells and to increase intracellular basal reactive oxygen species levels, which in turn results in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis induction. The role of the indole acid ligand as a redox modulator is discussed. PMID:27404565

  15. Oxidative Stress Induced by Pt(IV) Pro-drugs Based on the Cisplatin Scaffold and Indole Carboxylic Acids in Axial Position.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Dina; Gandin, Valentina; Morrison, Liam; El-Nahas, Ahmed; Marzano, Cristina; Montagner, Diego; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of Pt(IV) complexes as pro-drugs that are activated by intracellular reduction is a widely investigated approach to overcome the limitations of Pt(II) anticancer agents. A series of ten mono- and bis-carboxylated Pt(IV) complexes with axial indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) ligands were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, FT-IR, (1)H and (195)Pt NMR spectroscopy. Cellular uptake, DNA platination and cytotoxicity against a panel of human tumor cell lines were evaluated. All the complexes are able to overcome cisplatin-resistance and the most potent complex, cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(IPA)(OH)] was on average three times more active than cisplatin. Mechanistic studies revealed that the trend in cytotoxicity of the Pt(IV) complexes is primarily consistent with their ability to accumulate into cancer cells and to increase intracellular basal reactive oxygen species levels, which in turn results in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis induction. The role of the indole acid ligand as a redox modulator is discussed. PMID:27404565

  16. Oxidative Stress Induced by Pt(IV) Pro-drugs Based on the Cisplatin Scaffold and Indole Carboxylic Acids in Axial Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolan, Dina; Gandin, Valentina; Morrison, Liam; El-Nahas, Ahmed; Marzano, Cristina; Montagner, Diego; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The use of Pt(IV) complexes as pro-drugs that are activated by intracellular reduction is a widely investigated approach to overcome the limitations of Pt(II) anticancer agents. A series of ten mono- and bis-carboxylated Pt(IV) complexes with axial indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) ligands were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, FT-IR, 1H and 195Pt NMR spectroscopy. Cellular uptake, DNA platination and cytotoxicity against a panel of human tumor cell lines were evaluated. All the complexes are able to overcome cisplatin-resistance and the most potent complex, cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(IPA)(OH)] was on average three times more active than cisplatin. Mechanistic studies revealed that the trend in cytotoxicity of the Pt(IV) complexes is primarily consistent with their ability to accumulate into cancer cells and to increase intracellular basal reactive oxygen species levels, which in turn results in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis induction. The role of the indole acid ligand as a redox modulator is discussed.

  17. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children in Tripoli-Libya.

    PubMed

    Al-haddad, Omaima H; Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2014-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonized children are at an increased risk of developing infections than methicillin-sensitive S. aureus colonized children. Nasal specimens from inpatient children, mothers of inpatient children, healthcare workers, and outpatient children at Tripoli Children Hospital (TCH) were examined for MRSA by chromogenic MRSA ID medium. Susceptibility of MRSA isolates to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The nasal carriage rate of MRSA among inpatient children (8.3%, 24 of 289), their mothers (11%, 22 of 200), and healthcare workers (12.4%, 22 of 178) was significantly higher than among outpatient children (2.2%, 2 of 91) (P < 0.05, P < 0.02, and P < 0.006, respectively). Of the examined MRSA isolates (N = 35) 10 (28.6%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes by polymerase chain reaction. Multidrug resistance was found in 24.3% (17 of 70) of MRSA isolates. Nasal carriage of multidrug-resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive MRSA is not uncommon among inpatient children and their mothers in Tripoli.

  18. The latency rate of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) in positive and negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of intravenous drug users (IVDU).

    PubMed

    Jayavasu, C; Balachandra, K; Wongchuree, S; Kositanont, U; Warachit, P

    1997-03-01

    The seropositive and latency rates of HHV6 among IVDU with positive and negative HIV and control group were demonstrated. By immunofluorescent antibody test, no differences in the seropositive rates were found among these three groups. All groups had seropositive rate at the average 89% and GMT antibody 1:26. This meant that most of them had previous infection with HHV6. In addition, HHV6-DNA was determined and classified into subgroups: HHV6A and HHV6B, by polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence of HHV6-DNA indicated HHV6 latency in vivo. High latency rate of HHV6 was found in all three groups (the average 54%). Moreover, HHV6B (49%) had a higher frequency than HHV6A (5%); HHV6a was found only in IVDU with or without HIV infection. The result suggested that the HHV6 latency in IVDU with positive HIV may possibly transactivate HIV. The pathogenesis of HHV6 in AIDS patients should be further investigated. However, this research finding is useful for treatment, health care, prevention and control of AIDS in case of dual infections and latency of herpesvirus infection in AIDS.

  19. MSM and drug use: A latent class analysis of drug use and related sexual risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    McCarty-Caplan, David; Jantz, Ian; Swartz, James

    2014-07-01

    This study examined patterns of drug use among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) to identify sub-categories of men whose drug use and sexual behavior place them at especially high risk for HIV. A latent class analysis of a sample of MSM yielded a four-class model with two distinct high drug use sub-groups: one whose drug use concentrated on "sex-drugs" (SDU); and a distinct polydrug use class that showed higher probabilities of using all other drugs assessed. Comparative follow-up analyses indicated the SDU group was also more likely to engage in particular potentially high-risk sexual behaviors, be older, and to be HIV positive. Implications of distinguishing between patterns of drug use for HIV-risk prevention efforts with MSM are discussed.

  20. New Drug Shows Mixed Results Against Early Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sign Up See recent e-Newsletters Preserving Your Memory Magazine Get Your Copy Now Subscribe to our ... 3 Letter Resources Articles Brochure Download Preserving Your Memory Magazine e-Newsletter Resource Locator Videos Charity Navigator ...

  1. Positive maps, positive polynomials and entanglement witnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowronek, Łukasz; Życzkowski, Karol

    2009-08-01

    We link the study of positive quantum maps, block positive operators and entanglement witnesses with problems related to multivariate polynomials. For instance, we show how indecomposable block positive operators relate to biquadratic forms that are not sums of squares. Although the general problem of describing the set of positive maps remains open, in some particular cases we solve the corresponding polynomial inequalities and obtain explicit conditions for positivity.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators of Adherence to Antiretroviral Drug Therapy and Retention in Care among Adult HIV-Positive Patients: A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Bimirew, Mekides A.; Kassie, Desalew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country’s ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Results Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Conclusions Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes

  3. Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Jimmefors, Alexander; Archer, Trevor; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    Background. Illicit drug use influences people’s lives and elicits unwanted behaviour. Current research shows that there is an increase in young people’s drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use. Risk and protective factors relative to drug use were also a focus of interest. Method. High school pupils (n = 146) aged 17–21 years, responded to the Adolescent Health and Development Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Knowledge, and the Attitudes and Beliefs. Direct logistic, multiple regression analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the data. Results. Positive Attitudes towards drugs were predicted by risk factors (odds ratio = 37.31) and gender (odds ratio = .32). Risk factors (odds ratio = 46.89), positive attitudes towards drugs (odds ratio = 4.63), and impulsiveness (odds ratio = 1.11) predicted drug usage. Risk factors dimensions Family, Friends and Individual Characteristic were positively related to impulsiveness among drug users. Moreover, although boys reported using drugs to a greater extent, girls expressed more positive attitude towards drugs and even reported more impulsiveness than boys. Conclusion. This study reinforces the notion that research ought to focus on gender differences relative to pro-drug attitudes along with testing for differences in the predictors of girls’ and boys’ delinquency and impulsiveness. Positive attitudes towards drugs among adolescents seem to be part of a vicious circle including risk factors, such as friendly drug environments (e.g., friends who use drugs) and unsupportive family environments, individual characteristics, and impulsiveness. PMID:24949233

  4. Swedish high-school pupils' attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Fariba; Garcia, Danilo; Jimmefors, Alexander; Archer, Trevor; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    Background. Illicit drug use influences people's lives and elicits unwanted behaviour. Current research shows that there is an increase in young people's drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils' attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use. Risk and protective factors relative to drug use were also a focus of interest. Method. High school pupils (n = 146) aged 17-21 years, responded to the Adolescent Health and Development Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Knowledge, and the Attitudes and Beliefs. Direct logistic, multiple regression analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the data. Results. Positive Attitudes towards drugs were predicted by risk factors (odds ratio = 37.31) and gender (odds ratio = .32). Risk factors (odds ratio = 46.89), positive attitudes towards drugs (odds ratio = 4.63), and impulsiveness (odds ratio = 1.11) predicted drug usage. Risk factors dimensions Family, Friends and Individual Characteristic were positively related to impulsiveness among drug users. Moreover, although boys reported using drugs to a greater extent, girls expressed more positive attitude towards drugs and even reported more impulsiveness than boys. Conclusion. This study reinforces the notion that research ought to focus on gender differences relative to pro-drug attitudes along with testing for differences in the predictors of girls' and boys' delinquency and impulsiveness. Positive attitudes towards drugs among adolescents seem to be part of a vicious circle including risk factors, such as friendly drug environments (e.g., friends who use drugs) and unsupportive family environments, individual characteristics, and impulsiveness. PMID:24949233

  5. Understanding drug preferences, different perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Peter G M; Arnardottir, Arna H; Straus, Sabine M J; de Graeff, Pieter A; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Quik, Elise H; Krabbe, Paul F M; Denig, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Aims To compare the values regulators attach to different drug effects of oral antidiabetic drugs with those of doctors and patients. Methods We administered a ‘discrete choice’ survey to regulators, doctors and patients with type 2 diabetes in The Netherlands. Eighteen choice sets comparing two hypothetical oral antidiabetic drugs were constructed with varying drug effects on glycated haemoglobin, cardiovascular risk, bodyweight, duration of gastrointestinal complaints, frequency of hypoglycaemia and risk of bladder cancer. Responders were asked each time which drug they preferred. Results Fifty-two regulators, 175 doctors and 226 patients returned the survey. Multinomial conditional logit analyses showed that cardiovascular risk reduction was valued by regulators positively (odds ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.11–3.53), whereas drug choices were negatively affected by persistent gastrointestinal problems (odds ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.14–0.41) and cardiovascular risk increase (odds ratio 0.49, 95% confidence interval 0.27–0.87). Doctors and patients valued these effects in a similar manner to regulators. The values that doctors attached to large changes in glycated haemoglobin and that both doctors and patients attached to hypoglycaemia and weight gain also reached statistical significance. No group's drug choice was affected by a small absolute change in risk of bladder cancer when presented in the context of other drug effects. When comparing the groups, the value attached by regulators to less frequent hypoglycaemic episodes was significantly smaller than by patients (P = 0.044). Conclusions Regulators may value major benefits and risks of drugs for an individual diabetes patient mostly in the same way as doctors and patients, but differences may exist regarding the value of minor or short-term drug effects. PMID:25469876

  6. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  7. Rapid detection of Gram-negative bacteria and their drug resistance genes from positive blood cultures using an automated microarray assay.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunhee; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Yukyoung; Yu, Jin Kyung; Park, Kang Gyun; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay (CE-IVD version) for identification of Gram-negative (GN) bacteria and detection of resistance genes. A total of 163 GN organisms (72 characterized strains and 91 clinical isolates from 86 patients) were tested; among the clinical isolates, 86 (94.5%) isolates were included in the BC-GN panel. For identification, the agreement was 98.6% (146/148, 95% confidence interval [CI], 92.1-100) and 70% (7/10, 95% CI, 53.5-100) for monomicrobial and polymicrobial cultures, respectively. Of the 48 resistance genes harbored by 43 characterized strains, all were correctly detected. Of the 19 clinical isolates harboring resistance genes, 1 CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli isolated in polymicrobial culture was not detected. Overall, BC-GN assay provides acceptable accuracy for rapid identification of Gram-negative bacteria and detection of resistance genes, compared with routine laboratory methods despite that it has limitations in the number of genus/species and resistance gene included in the panel and it shows lower sensitivity in polymicrobial cultures.

  8. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  9. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  10. Drug Usage and Attitude Toward Drugs Among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Herbert J.; Keir, Richard G.

    1971-01-01

    Results of the data presented suggest that there is considerable experimentation among college students with illegal drugs, especially marijuana. Their attitudes toward other drugs still seems cautious. Marijuana, however, seems-to be accepted and generally positively evaluated. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of the NexScreen and DrugCheck Waive RT urine drug detection cups.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Nelson, Gordon J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2013-01-01

    Urine drug testing is an important tool that is commonly used to assess patient compliance with prescription regimens. Point-of-collection immunoassay devices allow for timely availability of laboratory test results to guide therapy during the same office visit. Two waived immunoassay-based urine drug screen cups were evaluated in this study. The NexScreen cup and the DrugCheck Waive RT cup claim to detect 10-12 drug classes of commonly used and/or abused drugs. This study included a sensitivity and precision challenge with 4-6 replicates at concentrations 0-150% of the manufacture's claimed cutoff, using drug-free urine spiked with purified reference standards. The stability of test results was evaluated by reading the results at intervals between five and 1,440 min. Specificity was evaluated by parallel comparison of pooled patients' specimens, representing 56 patients and 41 known drug compounds. When comparing results to validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results, false positives were observed in the NexScreen cups for benzodiazepine, methamphetamine, methadone, opiates and tricyclic antidepressant tests, but there were no false negatives. The DrugCheck Waive RT cups showed false negative results for barbiturates and opiates, but no false positives. Overall, the NexScreen cup demonstrated better sensitivity than claimed, whereas the sensitivity of the DrugCheck Waive RT cup did not meet claims.

  12. Design and Feasibility of a Randomized Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Distributive Injection Risk and Improve Health-Care Access Among hepatitisC virus Positive Injection Drug Users: The Study to Reduce Intravenous Exposures (STRIVE)

    PubMed Central

    Latka, Mary H.; Hagan, Holly; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Campbell, Jennifer V.; Coady, Micaela H.; Garfein, Richard S.; Thomas, David L.; Bonner, Sebastian; Thiel, Thelma; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hyperendemic among injection drug users (IDUs). However, few scientifically proven interventions to prevent secondary transmission of HCV from infected IDUs to others exist. This report describes the design, feasibility, and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the Study to Reduce Intravenous Exposure (STRIVE). STRIVE was a multisite, randomized-control trial to test a behavioral intervention developed to reduce distribution of used injection equipment (needles, cookers, cottons, and rinse water) and increase health-care utilization among antibody HCV (anti-HCV) positive IDUs. STRIVE enrolled anti-HCV positive IDU in Baltimore, New York City, and Seattle; participants completed behavioral assessments and venipuncture for HIV, HCV-RNA, and liver function tests (LFTs) and were randomized to attend either a six-session, small-group, peer-mentoring intervention workshop or a time-matched, attention-control condition. Follow-up visits were conducted at 3 and 6 months. At baseline, of the 630 HCV-positive IDUs enrolled (mean age of 26 years, 60% white, 76% male), 55% reported distributive needle sharing, whereas 74, 69, and 69% reported sharing cookers, cottons, and rinse water, respectively. Health-care access was low, with 41% reporting an emergency room as their main source of medical care. Among those enrolled, 66% (418/630) were randomized: 53% (222/418) and 47% (196/418) to the intervention and control conditions, respectively. Follow-up rates were 70 and 73% for the 3- and 6-month visits, respectively. As distributive sharing of used injection equipment was common while reports of receiving HCV care were low, these findings indicate an urgent need for HCV-related interventions with IDUs and demonstrate the acceptability and feasibility to do so. PMID:17200799

  13. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  14. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  15. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  16. Predicting the short-term risk of diabetes in HIV-positive patients: the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W; Fontas, Eric; Weber, Rainer; De Wit, Stephane; Bruyand, Mathias; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Monforte, Antonella D'Arminio; Friis-Møller, Nina; Lundgren, Jens D; Law, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) frequently experience metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, as well as lipodystrophy, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Rates of DM and other glucose-associated disorders among HIV-positive patients have been reported to range between 2 and 14%, and in an ageing HIV-positive population, the prevalence of DM is expected to continue to increase. This study aims to develop a model to predict the short-term (six-month) risk of DM in HIV-positive populations and to compare the existing models developed in the general population. Methods All patients recruited to the Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study with follow-up data, without prior DM, myocardial infarction or other CVD events and with a complete DM risk factor profile were included. Conventional risk factors identified in the general population as well as key HIV-related factors were assessed using Poisson-regression methods. Expected probabilities of DM events were also determined based on the Framingham Offspring Study DM equation. The D:A:D and Framingham equations were then assessed using an internal-external validation process; area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve and predicted DM events were determined. Results Of 33,308 patients, 16,632 (50%) patients were included, with 376 cases of new onset DM during 89,469 person-years (PY). Factors predictive of DM included higher glucose, body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride levels, and older age. Among HIV-related factors, recent CD4 counts of<200 cells/µL and lipodystrophy were predictive of new onset DM. The mean performance of the D:A:D and Framingham equations yielded AUROC of 0.894 (95% CI: 0.849, 0.940) and 0.877 (95% CI: 0.823, 0.932), respectively. The Framingham equation over-predicted DM events compared to D:A:D for lower glucose and lower

  17. Drug therapy smartens up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  18. Positional plagiocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Cranial asymmetry occurring as a result of forces that deform skull shape in the supine position is known as deformational plagiocephaly. The risk of plagiocephaly may be modified by positioning the baby on alternate days with the head to the right or the left side, and by increasing time spent in the prone position during awake periods. When deformational plagiocephaly is already present, physiotherapy (including positioning equivalent to the preventive positioning, and exercises as needed for torticollis and positional preference) has been shown to be superior to counselling about preventive positioning only. Helmet therapy (moulding therapy) to reduce skull asymmetry has some drawbacks: it is expensive, significantly inconvenient due to the long hours of use per day and associated with skin complications. There is evidence that helmet therapy may increase the initial rate of improvement of asymmetry, but there is no evidence that it improves the final outcome for patients with moderate or severe plagiocephaly. PMID:23024590

  19. The 3-metros study of drugs and crime in South Africa: findings and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Parry, Charles D; Plüddemann, Andreas; Louw, Antoinette; Leggett, Ted

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the drug-crime nexus by investigating the prevalence of recent drug use among persons arrested by the police. Data were gathered during August/September 2000 from 1050 adult arrestees in eight police stations in Cape Town, Durban, and Johannesburg (South Africa). Measures included urinalysis results for cannabis, methaqualone (Mandrax), opiates, cocaine, amphetamines, and benzodizepines, and a questionnaire designed to assess socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds of arrestees, history of prior arrests and imprisonment, current arrest information, profile of substance use, etc. Results of the study show high levels of drug use among arrestees, with 45% testing positive for at least one drug (mainly cannabis and Mandrax). A greater proportion of arrestees in Cape Town tested positive for drugs than in the other sites. Data were also analyzed in terms of gender, age, race, location (site and police station), and offense category. Persons arrested on charges of housebreaking or for drugs/alcohol offenses were particularly likely to test positive for drugs. Drug positive arrestees were more likely to have had a prior arrest. Among the conclusions of the study are that 1) strategies to reduce drug use and drug related crime must be area specific, 2) particular attention needs to focus on young offenders, 3) police need to be trained to recognize particular symptoms and to establish protocols on handling arrestees under the influence of drugs, and 4) diversion to treatment of drug using offenders deserves more consideration.

  20. The Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCrosta, Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The role of teachers in helping fight against drug abuse is discussed stressing the teacher's ability to see changes in the students and the potential for positive influence. A vital school role involves teaching life skills and wellness principles. Information on commonly abused drugs and their effects is presented. (SM)

  1. Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Upper Stringers, Typical Section Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Upper Stringers, Typical Section Showing End Framing, Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Lower Stringers, End Elevation - Covered Bridge, Spanning Contoocook River, Hopkinton, Merrimack County, NH

  2. Scaring Kids' Shows Off TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspberry, William

    1980-01-01

    Presents the view that activist groups whose attitude is that television advertising is bad for children are scaring off the advertisers and making it difficult for positive children's programs to obtain funding. (SS)

  3. Satellite positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.; Watkins, Michael M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in satellite positioning techniques and their applications are reviewed on the basis of the theoretical and practical work published by U.S. researchers in 1987-1990. Current techniques are classified into two main categories: satellite laser tracking and radio tracking. Particular attention is given to the Geoscience Laser Ranging System, the Lunar Laser Ranging concept; GPS ephemerides determination, fiducial networks, and reference frame; static GPS positioning; and kinematic GPS positioning.

  4. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  5. Positioning Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Nilay; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Conboy, Kieran

    Agile methods are increasingly adopted by European companies. Academics too are conducting numerous studies on different tenets of agile methods. Companies often feel proud in marketing themselves as ‘agile’. However, the true notion of ‘being agile’ seems to have been overlooked due to lack of positioning of oneself for agility. This raises a call for more research and interactions between academia and the industry. The proposed workshop refers to this call. It will be highly relevant to participants, interested in positioning their company’s agility from organizational, group or project perspectives. The positioning of agility will help companies to better align their agile practices with stakeholder values. Results of the workshop will be shared across participants and they will also have opportunity to continue their work on agile positioning in their companies. At broader level, the work done in this workshop will contribute towards developing Agile Positioning System.

  6. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  7. Drugs in oral fluid in randomly selected drivers.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Olaf H; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Chu, Mark; Swann, Philip; Boorman, Martin; Cairns, Ian

    2007-08-01

    There were 13,176 roadside drug tests performed in the first year of the random drug-testing program conducted in the state of Victoria. Drugs targeted in the testing were methamphetamines and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). On-site screening was conducted by the police using DrugWipe, while the driver was still in the vehicle and if positive, a second test on collected oral fluid, using the Rapiscan, was performed in a specially outfitted "drug bus" located adjacent to the testing area. Oral fluid on presumptive positive cases was sent to the laboratory for confirmation with limits of quantification of 5, 5, and 2 ng/mL for methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), and THC, respectively. Recovery experiments conducted in the laboratory showed quantitative recovery of analytes from the collector. When oral fluid could not be collected, blood was taken from the driver and sent to the laboratory for confirmation. These roadside tests gave 313 positive cases following GC-MS confirmation. These comprised 269, 118, and 87 cases positive to MA, MDMA, and THC, respectively. The median oral concentrations (undiluted) of MA, MDMA, and THC was 1136, 2724, and 81 ng/mL. The overall drug positive rate was 2.4% of the screened population. This rate was highest in drivers of cars (2.8%). The average age of drivers detected with a positive drug reading was 28 years. Large vehicle (trucks over 4.5 t) drivers were older; on average at 38 years. Females accounted for 19% of all positives, although none of the positive truck drivers were female. There was one false positive to cannabis when the results of both on-site devices were considered and four to methamphetamines.

  8. 8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically west side of arch and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  9. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  11. Show Them You Really Want the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Showing that one really "wants" the job entails more than just really wanting the job. An interview is part Broadway casting call, part intellectual dating game, part personality test, and part, well, job interview. When there are 300 applicants for a position, many of them will "fit" the required (and even the preferred) skills listed in the job…

  12. Positive Prevention: Successful Approaches To Preventing Youthful Drug and Alcohol Use [and] La Prevencion Positiva: Metodos que han tenido exito en la prevencion del uso de drogas y alcohol entre la juventud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    The United States has the highest rate of youthful drug abuse of any industrialized country in the world. There is a growing awareness that drug and alcohol use are closely connected to other problems such as teenage suicide, adolescent pregnancy, traffic fatalities, juvenile delinquency, poor school performance, runaways, and dropouts. Youthful…

  13. Relationships Between Illicit Drug Use and Body Mass Index Among Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Sarah R; Herrmann, Lynn K

    2016-02-01

    Prior research has established associations between body mass index (BMI) and use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. However, little research has been done investigating the relationship between other common illicit drugs and BMI trends. The present study investigated whether adolescents who reported using illicit drugs showed differences in BMI compared to peers who reported no drug use. There was a positive relationship between drug use and BMI as well as the number of drugs used and BMI. The results suggested that the positive relationship between the use of illicit drugs and BMI is largely due to smoking. Further research needs to ascertain whether smoking, illicit drug use, or both are among the first of many unhealthy behaviors that can subsequently lead to greater gains in BMI. Implications for health educators are discussed. PMID:25842387

  14. Overview of Selected Drug Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Edgar H.; And Others

    This document begins with a brief overview of findings from national surveys conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse which show increasing drug use throughout the 1970s and a decreasing trend in drug use during the 1980s. In spite of this decline, drug use in the U.S. is described as still constituting a major public health problem that…

  15. What Do Blood Tests Show?

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows the ranges for blood glucose levels after 8 to 12 hours of fasting (not eating). It shows the normal range and the abnormal ranges that are a sign of prediabetes or diabetes. Plasma Glucose Results (mg/dL)* Diagnosis 70 to 99 ...

  16. Position indicator

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  17. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  18. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  19. Legalization of drugs of abuse and the pediatrician.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H

    1991-10-01

    Growing numbers of individuals are proposing that drugs be legalized in the United States, with claims that federal, state, and local efforts to prohibit the use of illicit drugs are irrational and unenforceable. "Drug reform" advocates include persons of all political persuasions. Ironically, the call for drug reform comes at a time when trends in drug abuse, as reflected in national and state surveys, show a promising decline. It also is contradictory to at least one recent public opinion poll, in which respondents opposed the legalization of marijuana by a five-to-one margin. While their position is by no means unanimous, proponents of drug reform generally base their arguments on several key premises, such as elimination of or reductions in drug trafficking, enforcement, and interdiction expenditures; increased tax revenues from the legal sale of drugs; and reductions in health-care expenses associated with drug treatment. Reform advocates further claim that legalization would not be followed by an increase in drug use. The validity of each of these arguments is highly questionable. Legalization is a simplistic, short-sighted solution to a complex issue with public health, economic, criminal justice, and societal ramifications. Legalization would, moreover, abrogate the position taken in 1961 by the United States and 114 other nations in ratifying the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. The impact of drug reform merits an unbiased study by an independent agency. Until that time, pediatricians should inform themselves of the arguments for and against drug reform and be prepared to educate patients and their families about the issue.

  20. The metaphorical nature of drugs and drug taking.

    PubMed

    Montagne, M

    1988-01-01

    An inquiry into the role metaphor plays in personal and societal conceptions of drugs and drug taking reveals that drug metaphors and symbols are quite pervasive in individual thinking, social discourse, and the cultural media. They appear to influence beliefs and attitudes regarding drugs, the nature and meaning of drug experiences, and the reasons behind drug-taking behaviors. Some drug metaphors are common to different cultures and historical periods, while others are specific and exclusive to particular individuals and groups or drug-taking situations. These metaphors can carry positive as well as negative connotations. Further study is needed to delineate the metaphorical structuring of our thinking about drugs, and the process whereby these metaphors are generated and spread throughout society.

  1. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5680 Pediatric position holder. (a) Identification. A pediatric position holder is a...

  5. Drug Discovery against Psoriasis: Identification of a New Potent FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) Inhibitor, 1-(4-((1H-Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-3-fluorophenyl)-3-(5-(tert-butyl)isoxazol-3-yl)urea, That Showed Potent Activity in a Psoriatic Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Bo; Ma, Shuang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Ji, Sen; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Guo; Wang, Li-Jiao; Zhong, Jie-Min; Xiong, Yu; Wang, Jiang-Hong; Huang, Shen-Zhen; Li, Lin-Li; Xiang, Rong; Niu, Dawen; Chen, Ying-Chun; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2016-09-22

    Psoriasis is a chronic T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) has been considered as a potential molecular target for the treatment of psoriasis. In this investigation, structural optimization was performed on a lead compound, 1-(4-(1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-yloxy)phenyl)-3-(4-chloro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)urea (1), which showed a moderate inhibitory activity againt FLT3. A series of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized, and structure-activity relationship analysis led to the discovery of a number of potent FLT3 inhibitors. One of the most active compounds, 1-(4-(1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-yloxy)-3-fluorophenyl)-3-(5-tert-butylisoxazol-3-yl)urea (18b), was then chosen for in-depth antipsoriasis studies because this compound displayed the highest potency in a preliminary antipsoriasis test. Compound 18b exhibited significant antipsoriatic effects in the K14-VEGF transgenic mouse model of psoriasis, and no recurrence was found 15 days later after the last administration. Detailed mechanisms of action of compound 18b were also investigated. Collectively, compound 18b could be a potential drug candidate for psoriasis treatment.

  6. Gender Differences in Psychopathy Links to Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Nicole; Murphy, Brett; Verona, Edelyn

    2015-01-01

    While the relationship between psychopathic personality traits and substance use has received some attention (Hart & Hare, 1989; Smith & Newman, 1990), gender differences have not been thoroughly assessed. The current study examined whether gender modified the relationship between two criminally-relevant constructs, a) psychopathy and its factors and b) drug use. A sample of 318 participants with criminal histories and recent substance use was assessed for psychopathy using the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version and for illicit drug use using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. As expected, the impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy were positively related to a number of drug use characteristics (symptoms, age of drug initiation, extent of drug experimentation), whereas the interpersonal-affective traits (Factor 1) showed a negative relationship with drug abuse symptoms and a positive relationship with age of first use. In terms of gender differences, analyses revealed that women showed a stronger association between Factor 1 traits and later age of initiation compared to men, and that Factor 2, and antisocial facet in particular, were more strongly related to drug abuse in women than men. These findings suggest that psychopathic traits serve as both protective (Factor 1) and risk (Factor 2) correlates of illicit drug use, and in women, Factor 1 may be especially protective in terms of initiation. These conclusions add to the growing literature on potential routes to substance use and incarceration in women. PMID:26571339

  7. 21 CFR 1314.150 - Order To show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Order To show cause. 1314.150 Section 1314.150... CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Order to Show Cause § 1314.150 Order To show cause. (a) If, upon information gathered by... upon the regulated seller or distributor an order to show cause why the regulated seller or...

  8. 21 CFR 1314.150 - Order To show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Order To show cause. 1314.150 Section 1314.150... CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Order to Show Cause § 1314.150 Order To show cause. (a) If, upon information gathered by... upon the regulated seller or distributor an order to show cause why the regulated seller or...

  9. 21 CFR 1314.150 - Order To show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Order To show cause. 1314.150 Section 1314.150... CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Order to Show Cause § 1314.150 Order To show cause. (a) If, upon information gathered by... upon the regulated seller or distributor an order to show cause why the regulated seller or...

  10. 21 CFR 1314.150 - Order To show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Order To show cause. 1314.150 Section 1314.150... CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Order to Show Cause § 1314.150 Order To show cause. (a) If, upon information gathered by... upon the regulated seller or distributor an order to show cause why the regulated seller or...

  11. 21 CFR 1314.150 - Order To show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Order To show cause. 1314.150 Section 1314.150... CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Order to Show Cause § 1314.150 Order To show cause. (a) If, upon information gathered by... upon the regulated seller or distributor an order to show cause why the regulated seller or...

  12. Positive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Martin E P; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C

    2006-11-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported them to be "life-changing." Delivered on the Web, positive psychology exercises relieved depressive symptoms for at least 6 months compared with placebo interventions, the effects of which lasted less than a week. In severe depression, the effects of these Web exercises were particularly striking. This address reports two preliminary studies: In the first, PPT delivered to groups significantly decreased levels of mild-to-moderate depression through 1-year follow-up. In the second, PPT delivered to individuals produced higher remission rates than did treatment as usual and treatment as usual plus medication among outpatients with major depressive disorder. Together, these studies suggest that treatments for depression may usefully be supplemented by exercises that explicitly increase positive emotion, engagement, and meaning. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115810

  13. Positively Adolescent!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Believes that music teachers should reassess their views toward adolescent behavior in the music classroom by learning to see their behavior in a positive light. Describes teaching strategies that build on four adolescent behaviors: (1) desire for peer acceptance; (2) abundant energy; (3) love of fun; and (4) limited time-managing skills. (CMK)

  14. Satellite Movie Shows Erika Dissipate

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 27 to 29 shows Tropical Storm Erika move through the Eastern Caribbean Sea and dissipate near eastern Cuba. ...

  15. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  16. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  17. Why do we take drugs? From the drug-reinforcement theory to a novel concept of drug instrumentalization.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    The drug-reinforcement theory explains why humans get engaged in drug taking behavior. This theory posits that drugs of abuse serve as biological rewards by activating the reinforcement system. Although from a psychological and neurobiological perspective this theory is extremely helpful, it does not tell us about the drug-taking motives and motivation of an individual. The definition of drug instrumentalization goals will improve our understanding of individual drug-taking profiles. PMID:22074976

  18. Why do we take drugs? From the drug-reinforcement theory to a novel concept of drug instrumentalization.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    The drug-reinforcement theory explains why humans get engaged in drug taking behavior. This theory posits that drugs of abuse serve as biological rewards by activating the reinforcement system. Although from a psychological and neurobiological perspective this theory is extremely helpful, it does not tell us about the drug-taking motives and motivation of an individual. The definition of drug instrumentalization goals will improve our understanding of individual drug-taking profiles.

  19. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  20. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  1. Arches showing UV flaring activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The UVSP data obtained in the previous maximum activity cycle show the frequent appearance of flaring events in the UV. In many cases these flaring events are characterized by at least two footpoints which show compact impulsive non-simultaneous brightenings and a fainter but clearly observed arch developes between the footpoints. These arches and footpoints are observed in line corresponding to different temperatures, as Lyman alpha, N V, and C IV, and when observed above the limb display large Doppler shifts at some stages. The size of the arches can be larger than 20 arcsec.

  2. Position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A radiant energy angle sensor is provided wherein the sensitive portion thereof comprises a pair of linear array detectors with each detector mounted normal to the other to provide X and Y channels and a pair of slits spaced from the pair of linear arrays with each of the slits positioned normal to its associated linear array. There is also provided electrical circuit means connected to the pair of linear array detectors and to separate X and Y axes outputs.

  3. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  4. Pembrolizumab Shows Promise for NSCLC.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Data from the KEYNOTE-001 trial show that pembrolizumab improves clinical outcomes for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and is well tolerated. PD-L1 expression in at least 50% of tumor cells correlated with improved efficacy.

  5. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  6. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is…

  7. Drug deposition in coronary arteries with overlapping drug-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Edelman, Elazer R; Olgac, Ufuk; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-09-28

    Drug-eluting stents are accepted as mainstream endovascular therapy, yet concerns for their safety may be under-appreciated. While failure from restenosis has dropped to below 5%, the risk of stent thrombosis and associated mortality remain relatively high. Further optimization of drug release is required to minimize thrombosis risk while maintaining therapeutic dose. The complex three-dimensional geometry of deployed stents together with the combination of diffusive and advective drug transport render an intuitive understanding of the situation exceedingly difficult. In situations such as this, computational modeling has proven essential, helping define the limits of efficacy, determine the mode and mechanism of drug release, and identify alternatives to avoid toxicity. A particularly challenging conformation is encountered in coronary arteries with overlapping stents. To study hemodynamics and drug deposition in such vessels we combined high-resolution, multi-scale ex vivo computed tomography with a flow and mass transfer computational model. This approach ensures high geometric fidelity and precise, simultaneous calculation of blood flow velocity, shear stress and drug distribution. Our calculations show that drug uptake by the arterial tissue is dependent both on the patterns of flow disruption near the wall, as well as on the relative positioning of drug-eluting struts. Overlapping stent struts lead to localized peaks of drug concentration that may increase the risk of thrombosis. Such peaks could be avoided by anisotropic stent structure or asymmetric drug release designed to yield homogeneous drug distribution along the coronary artery and, at the least, suggest that these issues need to remain in the forefront of consideration in clinical practice. PMID:27432751

  8. Drug deposition in coronary arteries with overlapping drug-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Edelman, Elazer R; Olgac, Ufuk; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-09-28

    Drug-eluting stents are accepted as mainstream endovascular therapy, yet concerns for their safety may be under-appreciated. While failure from restenosis has dropped to below 5%, the risk of stent thrombosis and associated mortality remain relatively high. Further optimization of drug release is required to minimize thrombosis risk while maintaining therapeutic dose. The complex three-dimensional geometry of deployed stents together with the combination of diffusive and advective drug transport render an intuitive understanding of the situation exceedingly difficult. In situations such as this, computational modeling has proven essential, helping define the limits of efficacy, determine the mode and mechanism of drug release, and identify alternatives to avoid toxicity. A particularly challenging conformation is encountered in coronary arteries with overlapping stents. To study hemodynamics and drug deposition in such vessels we combined high-resolution, multi-scale ex vivo computed tomography with a flow and mass transfer computational model. This approach ensures high geometric fidelity and precise, simultaneous calculation of blood flow velocity, shear stress and drug distribution. Our calculations show that drug uptake by the arterial tissue is dependent both on the patterns of flow disruption near the wall, as well as on the relative positioning of drug-eluting struts. Overlapping stent struts lead to localized peaks of drug concentration that may increase the risk of thrombosis. Such peaks could be avoided by anisotropic stent structure or asymmetric drug release designed to yield homogeneous drug distribution along the coronary artery and, at the least, suggest that these issues need to remain in the forefront of consideration in clinical practice.

  9. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; Fanelli, M; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; Serra, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell lines. Results: Human osteosarcoma cell lines proved to be highly sensitive to both drugs. A decreased drug sensitivity was observed in doxorubicin-resistant cell lines, most probably related to ABCB1/MDR1 overexpression. Both drugs variably induced hyperploidy and apoptosis in the majority of cell lines. VX-680 also reduced in vitro cell motility and soft-agar cloning efficiency. Drug association experiments showed that VX-680 positively interacts with all conventional drugs used in osteosarcoma chemotherapy, overcoming the cross-resistance observed in the single-drug treatments. Conclusion: Aurora kinase-A and -B represent new candidate therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. In vitro analysis of the Aurora kinases inhibitors VX-680 and ZM447439 indicated in VX-680 a new promising drug of potential clinical usefulness in association with conventional osteosarcoma chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24129234

  10. Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The upper left image in this display is from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing the 'Magic Carpet' region near the rover at Gusev Crater, Mars, on Sol 7, the seventh martian day of its journey (Jan. 10, 2004). The lower image, also from the panoramic camera, is a monochrome (single filter) image of a rock in the 'Magic Carpet' area. Note that colored portions of the rock correlate with extracted spectra shown in the plot to the side. Four different types of materials are shown: the rock itself, the soil in front of the rock, some brighter soil on top of the rock, and some dust that has collected in small recesses on the rock face ('spots'). Each color on the spectra matches a line on the graph, showing how the panoramic camera's different colored filters are used to broadly assess the varying mineral compositions of martian rocks and soils.

  11. Drug and Alcohol Involvement in Four Types of Fatal Crashes*

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Eduardo; Voas, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of drunk and drugged driving to the occurrence of fatal crashes associated with speeding, failure to obey/yield, inattention, and seat belt nonuse. Method: We examined data for fatally injured drivers involved in single-vehicle crashes killed in states in which more than 79% of the drivers were tested for drugs other than alcohol and had a known result. Results: About 25% of the drivers tested positive for drugs, a figure almost double that estimated by the 2007 National Roadside Survey. Cannabinoids and stimulants each contributed to about 23% of the drug-positive results (6% among all fatally injured single-vehicle drivers). Stimulants more than cannabinoids were found to be associated with the four types of crashes under study. Some drugs showed a protective effect over the four crash types under study. Significant interactions between drugs and alcohol were observed. Stimulants contributed to the different types of fatal crashes irrespective of the levels of alcohol consumed by the drivers. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence of a link between drug consumption and fatal crashes. It also opens the door to some interesting and sometimes unexpected questions regarding the way drugs contribute to crashes, which we found varies depending on the type of crash considered, the class of drug, and the presence of alcohol. Research is also needed on drugs that could have a protective effect on the occurrence of fatal crashes. These findings could be highly relevant to the design of drug-related traffic laws and programs targeted at curbing drugged driving. PMID:21683038

  12. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, M.A.; Alter, P.

    1983-07-07

    An apparatus is provided for precisely adjusting the position of an article relative to a beam emerging from a neutron source disposed in a housing. The apparatus includes a support pivotably mounted on a movable base plate and freely suspended therefrom. The support is gravity biased toward the housing and carries an article holder movable in a first direction longitudinally of the axis of said beam and normally urged into engagement against said housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the suspended holder in two mutually perpendicular directions, respectively, normal to the axis of the beam.

  13. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  14. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  15. POSITIONING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wall, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.

    1959-09-15

    A positioner is described for a vertical reactor-control rod. The positioner comprises four grooved friction rotatable members that engage the control rod on all sides and shift it longitudinally. The four friction members are drivingly interconnected for conjoint rotation and comprise two pairs of coaxial members. The members of each pair are urged toward one another by hydraulic or pneumatic pressure and thus grip the control rod so as to hold it in any position or adjust it. Release of the by-draulic or pneumatic pressure permits springs between the friction members of each pair to force them apart, whereby the control rod moves quickly by gravity into the reactor.

  16. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  17. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  18. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  19. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  20. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  1. 21 CFR 1309.46 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1309.46 Section 1309.46 Food... Or Suspension of Registration § 1309.46 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the... upon the applicant an order to show cause why the application for registration should not be denied....

  2. 21 CFR 1309.46 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1309.46 Section 1309.46 Food... Or Suspension of Registration § 1309.46 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the... upon the applicant an order to show cause why the application for registration should not be denied....

  3. 21 CFR 1309.46 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1309.46 Section 1309.46 Food... Or Suspension of Registration § 1309.46 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the... upon the applicant an order to show cause why the application for registration should not be denied....

  4. 21 CFR 1301.37 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1301.37 Section 1301.37 Food... Suspension of Registration § 1301.37 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the application for... Administrator shall serve upon the applicant an order to show cause why the registration should not be...

  5. 21 CFR 1309.46 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1309.46 Section 1309.46 Food... Or Suspension of Registration § 1309.46 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the... upon the applicant an order to show cause why the application for registration should not be denied....

  6. 21 CFR 1301.37 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1301.37 Section 1301.37 Food... Suspension of Registration § 1301.37 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the application for... Administrator shall serve upon the applicant an order to show cause why the registration should not be...

  7. 21 CFR 1301.37 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1301.37 Section 1301.37 Food... Suspension of Registration § 1301.37 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the application for... Administrator shall serve upon the applicant an order to show cause why the registration should not be...

  8. 21 CFR 1301.37 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1301.37 Section 1301.37 Food... Suspension of Registration § 1301.37 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the application for... Administrator shall serve upon the applicant an order to show cause why the registration should not be...

  9. 21 CFR 1301.37 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1301.37 Section 1301.37 Food... Suspension of Registration § 1301.37 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the application for... Administrator shall serve upon the applicant an order to show cause why the registration should not be...

  10. 21 CFR 1309.46 - Order to show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Order to show cause. 1309.46 Section 1309.46 Food... Or Suspension of Registration § 1309.46 Order to show cause. (a) If, upon examination of the... upon the applicant an order to show cause why the application for registration should not be denied....

  11. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  12. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  13. Position statement on cannabis.

    PubMed

    Stein For The Executive Committee Of The Central Drug Authority, Dan Joseph

    2016-05-16

    There is an ongoing national debate around cannabis policy. This brief position statement by the Executive Committee of the Central Drug Authorityoutlines some of the factors that have contributed to this debate, delineates reduction strategies, summarises the harms and benefits ofmarijuana, and provides recommendations. These recommendations emphasise an integrated and evidence-based approach, the need forresources to implement harm reduction strategies against continued and chronic use of alcohol and cannabis, and the potential value of afocus on decriminalisation rather than the legalisation of cannabis.

  14. Drug abuse and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, C G; Asch, R H

    1987-09-01

    It is clear that a number of CNS agents, including drugs of abuse, can inhibit reproductive function. Figure 1 shows the chemical diversity of some of the drug groups that affect reproductive hormones. Their structural dissimilarity to the steroid hormones is also readily apparent in the figure. These chemically diverse drugs share an important pharmacologic property: they are highly potent neuroactive drugs, and they can disrupt hypothalamic-pituitary function. Although it is frequently difficult to distinguish between direct drug actions on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and subsequent effects on gonadal hormones and sex accessory gland function, the distinction is an important one. Most neuroactive drugs produce only transient effects on the central nervous pathways necessary for normal gonadotropin secretion. The disruptive effects of these drugs are likely to be transient and completely reversible, and tolerance to the inhibitory drug effects may occur even with continued drug use. Under these circumstances, normal adults may experience only subtle changes in sexual function. However, individuals with compromised reproductive function may exhibit major problems. It is also likely that adolescents may be at substantial risk for reproductive damage from these neuroactive drugs since the endocrine events associated with puberty are dependent on the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  15. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  16. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  17. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A B; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-04-21

    Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance.

  18. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance. PMID:27105118

  19. Perceived positions determine crowding.

    PubMed

    Maus, Gerrit W; Fischer, Jason; Whitney, David

    2011-01-01

    Crowding is a fundamental bottleneck in object recognition. In crowding, an object in the periphery becomes unrecognizable when surrounded by clutter or distractor objects. Crowding depends on the positions of target and distractors, both their eccentricity and their relative spacing. In all previous studies, position has been expressed in terms of retinal position. However, in a number of situations retinal and perceived positions can be dissociated. Does retinal or perceived position determine the magnitude of crowding? Here observers performed an orientation judgment on a target Gabor patch surrounded by distractors that drifted toward or away from the target, causing an illusory motion-induced position shift. Distractors in identical physical positions led to worse performance when they drifted towards the target (appearing closer) versus away from the target (appearing further). This difference in crowding corresponded to the difference in perceived positions. Further, the perceptual mislocalization was necessary for the change in crowding, and both the mislocalization and crowding scaled with drift speed. The results show that crowding occurs after perceived positions have been assigned by the visual system. Crowding does not operate in a purely retinal coordinate system; perceived positions need to be taken into account.

  20. New AIDS estimates show demographic changes.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the HIV epidemic's rate of increase has slowed to about three percent per year, with the incidence of AIDS cases estimated to have decreased in the West. The latest epidemic figures, reported through 1994 in the CDC's HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, puts the total of reported AIDS cases in the United States at 441,528. The implementation of the new AIDS definition in 1993 has distorted surveillance trends--six out of ten AIDS cases are now reported using the new CD4 criterion instead of the pre-1993 case definitions. An unpublished analysis of the epidemic shows a shift toward fewer gay men, more injection drug users, and more women becoming infected. However, the CDC contends that more heterosexuals are being infected and more racial and ethnic minorities are being infected. PMID:11362433

  1. Pea Plants Show Risk Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dener, Efrat; Kacelnik, Alex; Shemesh, Hagai

    2016-07-11

    Sensitivity to variability in resources has been documented in humans, primates, birds, and social insects, but the fit between empirical results and the predictions of risk sensitivity theory (RST), which aims to explain this sensitivity in adaptive terms, is weak [1]. RST predicts that agents should switch between risk proneness and risk aversion depending on state and circumstances, especially according to the richness of the least variable option [2]. Unrealistic assumptions about agents' information processing mechanisms and poor knowledge of the extent to which variability imposes specific selection in nature are strong candidates to explain the gap between theory and data. RST's rationale also applies to plants, where it has not hitherto been tested. Given the differences between animals' and plants' information processing mechanisms, such tests should help unravel the conflicts between theory and data. Measuring root growth allocation by split-root pea plants, we show that they favor variability when mean nutrient levels are low and the opposite when they are high, supporting the most widespread RST prediction. However, the combination of non-linear effects of nitrogen availability at local and systemic levels may explain some of these effects as a consequence of mechanisms not necessarily evolved to cope with variance [3, 4]. This resembles animal examples in which properties of perception and learning cause risk sensitivity even though they are not risk adaptations [5]. PMID:27374342

  2. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  3. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  4. Homelessness and drug misuse in developing countries: A mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunu, C. P.

    2014-06-01

    Homelessness and drug-misuse are known to exist like siamese twins. We present a model to capture the dynamics in the growth in the number of homeless (street kids and street adults) and drug misusers. The reproduction numbers of the model are determined and analyzed. Results from this study suggests that adult peer pressure plays a more significant role in the growth of drug-misuse and the number of street kids. This result suggests that in resource constrained settings intervention strategies should be tailor made to target adults whose behaviour influence others to misuse drugs and abuse children. Furthermore, numerical simulations show that homelessness and drug-misuse positively enhances, the growth of each other. Thus, to effectively control these two social problems require strategies targeting both of them.

  5. Who Tests which Athletes for What Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Sarah L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews trends in sports organizations' drug testing policies and procedures for its members, including which drugs are tested, who gets tested within the organizations, when tests are conducted, and penalties for those who test positive. (CB)

  6. Predicting the Onset of Sexual and Drug Risk Behaviors in HIV-Negative Youths with HIV-Positive Mothers: The Role of Contextual, Self-Regulation, and Social-Interaction Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Dolezal, Curtis; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Ouzama; Warne, Patricia; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV-negative, inner-city adolescents with HIV-infected parents are considered to be at high risk for acquiring HIV themselves. Using a modified theory of health behavior, this study examined the effects of maternal HIV infection and psychosocial variables on the onset of sexual and drug risk behavior in 144 HIV-negative adolescents with and…

  7. Drug-Path: a database for drug-induced pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Some databases for drug-associated pathways have been built and are publicly available. However, the pathways curated in most of these databases are drug-action or drug-metabolism pathways. In recent years, high-throughput technologies such as microarray and RNA-sequencing have produced lots of drug-induced gene expression profiles. Interestingly, drug-induced gene expression profile frequently show distinct patterns, indicating that drugs normally induce the activation or repression of distinct pathways. Therefore, these pathways contribute to study the mechanisms of drugs and drug-repurposing. Here, we present Drug-Path, a database of drug-induced pathways, which was generated by KEGG pathway enrichment analysis for drug-induced upregulated genes and downregulated genes based on drug-induced gene expression datasets in Connectivity Map. Drug-Path provides user-friendly interfaces to retrieve, visualize and download the drug-induced pathway data in the database. In addition, the genes deregulated by a given drug are highlighted in the pathways. All data were organized using SQLite. The web site was implemented using Django, a Python web framework. Finally, we believe that this database will be useful for related researches.

  8. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  9. Pseudoephedrine may cause "pigmenting" fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Esen; Elinç-Aslan, Meryem Sevinç

    2011-05-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive drug eruption characterized by recurrent well-defined lesions in the same location each time the responsible drug is taken. Two different clinical forms have been described: the common classic pigmenting form and the rare nonpigmenting form. Nonpigmenting FDE is mainly characterized by symmetrical large erythematous plaques and the dermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Pseudoephedrine is known as the major inducer of nonpigmenting FDE. Pigmenting FDE from pseudoephedrine has not been reported previously. Here, the first case of pseudoephedrine-induced pigmenting FDE is reported, showing the characteristic features of classic pigmenting FDE such as asymmetry, normal-sized lesions, and the epidermodermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Moreover, a positive occlusive patch-test reaction to pseudoephedrine could be demonstrated on postlesional FDE skin for the first time.

  10. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  11. Glioma-associated endothelial cells show evidence of replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Christiana; Virrey, Jenilyn; Kardosh, Adel; Jabbour, Mark N; Qazi-Abdullah, Lubna; Pen, Ligaya; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Schönthal, Axel H; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M

    2007-04-01

    The innately programmed process of replicative senescence has been studied extensively with respect to cancer, but primarily from the perspective of tumor cells overcoming this stringent innate barrier and acquiring the capacity for unlimited proliferation. In this study, we focus on the potential role of replicative senescence affecting the non-transformed endothelial cells of the blood vessels within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the well-documented aberrant structural and functional features of blood vessels within solid tumors, we hypothesized that tumor-derived factors may lead to premature replicative senescence in tumor-associated brain endothelial cells (TuBEC). We show here that glioma tissue, but not normal brain tissue, contains cells that express the signature of replicative senescence, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal), on CD31-positive endothelial cells. Primary cultures of human TuBEC stain for SA-beta-gal and exhibit characteristics of replicative senescence, including increased levels of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27, increased resistance to cytotoxic drugs, increased growth factor production, and inability to proliferate. These data provide the first demonstration that tumor-derived brain endothelial cells may have reached an end-stage of differentiation known as replicative senescence and underscore the need for anti-angiogenic therapies to target this unique tumor-associated endothelial cell population.

  12. Glioma-associated endothelial cells show evidence of replicative senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Charalambous, Christiana; Virrey, Jenilyn; Kardosh, Adel; Jabbour, Mark N.; Qazi-Abdullah, Lubna; Pen, Ligaya; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Schoenthal, Axel H.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M. . E-mail: hofman@usc.edu

    2007-04-01

    The innately programmed process of replicative senescence has been studied extensively with respect to cancer, but primarily from the perspective of tumor cells overcoming this stringent innate barrier and acquiring the capacity for unlimited proliferation. In this study, we focus on the potential role of replicative senescence affecting the non-transformed endothelial cells of the blood vessels within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the well-documented aberrant structural and functional features of blood vessels within solid tumors, we hypothesized that tumor-derived factors may lead to premature replicative senescence in tumor-associated brain endothelial cells (TuBEC). We show here that glioma tissue, but not normal brain tissue, contains cells that express the signature of replicative senescence, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), on CD31-positive endothelial cells. Primary cultures of human TuBEC stain for SA-{beta}-gal and exhibit characteristics of replicative senescence, including increased levels of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27, increased resistance to cytotoxic drugs, increased growth factor production, and inability to proliferate. These data provide the first demonstration that tumor-derived brain endothelial cells may have reached an end-stage of differentiation known as replicative senescence and underscore the need for anti-angiogenic therapies to target this unique tumor-associated endothelial cell population.

  13. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug’s mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  14. Marijuana and Children. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endsley, Patricia; Embrey, Mary Louise

    2014-01-01

    Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) promote wellness and disease prevention to improve health outcomes for our nation's children. It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the marijuana plant remain under the United States Drug Enforcement Agency's (DEA) Schedule I…

  15. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... beam of light is intended to be used during radiologic procedures to ensure proper positioning of...

  16. Catanionic mixtures involving a drug: a rather general concept that can be utilized for prolonged drug release from gels.

    PubMed

    Bramer, Tobias; Dew, Noel; Edsman, Katarina

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study at what extent mixtures of drug substances and oppositely charged surfactants form catanionic aggregates and to apply these as a means of obtaining prolonged drug release from a gel. The properties of traditional catanionic mixtures are relatively well known, but only recently we found that not only traditional surfactants form these mixtures, but also structurally more complex surface active drug compounds. In this study, several different compositions of catanionic mixtures were studied visually, by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and rheologically using a Bohlin VOR Rheometer. Some of the catanionic vesicle and micelle phases were incorporated in and released from gels using the USP paddle method. The drug compounds investigated were lidocaine, ibuprofen, naproxen, alprenolol, propranolol, and orphenadrine. Of the six drug molecules used in this study, five, both positively and negatively charged, were capable of forming catanionic vesicles and/or micelles with oppositely charged surfactants. The drug release studies show that catanionic drug surfactant mixtures are beneficial for obtaining prolonged release from gels, as the drug release using catanionic vesicles and micelles was prolonged between 10 and 100 times compared to the release of pure drug substance from the gel.

  17. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  18. Performance-enhancing drug use.

    PubMed

    Green, Gary A

    2009-09-01

    According to Gary Green, MD, everyone who deals with athletes is a "stakeholder" in the issue of performance-enhancing drugs and can influence athletes in a positive or negative role. In this issue of ORTHOPEDICS, Dr Green shares his thoughts on testing, prevention, and education of performance-enhancing drug use.

  19. Trematode hemoglobins show exceptionally high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Kiger, L; Rashid, A K; Griffon, N; Haque, M; Moens, L; Gibson, Q H; Poyart, C; Marden, M C

    1998-08-01

    Ligand binding studies were made with hemoglobin (Hb) isolated from trematode species Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gc), Paramphistomum epiclitum (Pe), Explanatum explanatum (Ee), parasitic worms of water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, and Isoparorchis hypselobagri (Ih) parasitic in the catfish Wallago attu. The kinetics of oxygen and carbon monoxide binding show very fast association rates. Whereas oxygen can be displaced on a millisecond time scale from human Hb at 25 degrees C, the dissociation of oxygen from trematode Hb may require a few seconds to over 20 s (for Hb Pe). Carbon monoxide dissociation is faster, however, than for other monomeric hemoglobins or myoglobins. Trematode hemoglobins also show a reduced rate of autoxidation; the oxy form is not readily oxidized by potassium ferricyanide, indicating that only the deoxy form reacts rapidly with this oxidizing agent. Unlike most vertebrate Hbs, the trematodes have a tyrosine residue at position E7 instead of the usual distal histidine. As for Hb Ascaris, which also displays a high oxygen affinity, the trematodes have a tyrosine in position B10; two H-bonds to the oxygen molecule are thought to be responsible for the very high oxygen affinity. The trematode hemoglobins display a combination of high association rates and very low dissociation rates, resulting in some of the highest oxygen affinities ever observed.

  20. Pattern of primary tuberculosis drug resistance and associated treatment outcomes in Transnistria, Moldova.

    PubMed

    Dolgusev, O; Obevzenco, N; Padalco, O; Pankrushev, S; Ramsay, A; Van den Bergh, R; Manzi, M; Denisiuk, O; Zachariah, R

    2014-10-21

    This cohort study assessed drug susceptibility testing (DST) patterns and associated treatment outcomes from Transnistria, Moldova, from 2009 to 2012. Of 1089 newly registered tuberculosis (TB) patients with available DST results, 556 (51%) had some form of drug resistance, while 369 (34%) had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). There were four cases of extensively drug-resistant TB. MDR-TB patients had poor treatment success (45%); human immunodeficiency virus positivity and a history of incarceration were associated with an unfavourable treatment outcome. This first study from Trans-nistria shows a high level of drug-resistant TB, which constitutes a major public health problem requiring urgent attention.

  1. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units: Chapter D.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    In other regions of the basin, group and formation boundaries are more difficult to identify over extensive areas. One example is the placement of the contact between the New River Formation and the overlying Kanawha Formation—a boundary that is not easily defined beyond the area where these units were first defined in West Virginia. At the type section of the Kanawha Formation, the base of the Lower Douglas coal zone (fig. 1) defines the contact between the Kanawha Formation and the underlying New River Formation (Rice and others, 1994b). However, subsequent mapping has demonstrated that the Lower Douglas coal zone is regionally discontinuous and in many parts of West Virginia is absent (Blake and others, 2002). Where absent, the Nuttall Sandstone Member of the underlying New River Formation sometimes occurs in the stratigraphic position of the Lower Douglas coal zone. Yet, even the Nuttall Sandstone Member has been found to be regionally discontinuous and of varying thickness throughout its extent, features that hinder its u

  2. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  3. Efficacy of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Dixon, G T; Johnson, E S

    1976-03-01

    The magnitude of the fall in blood-pressure in response to an antihypertensive drug depends on the level of the pretreatment pressure, and there is a direct relationship between the two in that the higher the pretreatment pressure the greater the fall in pressure in response to treatment. This simple relationship is inherent in the practical situation of titrating the diastolic blood-pressures of a group of hypertensive patients to a predetermined level. It is assumed that notionally the dose of an antihypertensive drug can be increased in all patients until the diastolic pressure is reduced to the predetermined level. When the fall in diastolic pressure (deltaD.P.) is plotted against pretreatment diastolic pressure (P.T.D.P.), the points for all patients lie on a straight line of slope unity and negative deltaD.P.-intercept numerically equal to the predetermined diastolic-pressure level. This straight-line relationship is termed the predetermined ideal response line. Analysis of data from clinical trials shows that, despite the variability inherent in the practical situation, the data appear to conform to this straight-line relationship. The method of assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive agents is essentially a comparison of each experimental point with the theoretical predetermined response line. In its simplest form the method consists in constructing a scatter diagram of deltaD.P. against P.T.D.P. for all patients. Patients can then be classified as responders or non-responders according to their position on the diagram relative to the predetermined response line. This method of assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive agents has several advantages, the most important of which is that it provides a simple method for displaying all the relevant information in a readily comparable form.

  4. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  5. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  6. Sex, drugs and moral goals: reproductive strategies and views about recreational drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kurzban, Robert; Dukes, Amber; Weeden, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Humans, unlike most other species, show intense interest in the activities of conspecifics, even when the activities in question pose no obvious fitness threat or opportunity. Here, we investigate one content domain in which people show substantial interest, the use of drugs for non-medical purposes. Drawing from two subject populations—one undergraduate and one Internet-based—we look at the relationships among (i) abstract political commitments; (ii) attitudes about sexuality; and (iii) views surrounding recreational drugs. Whereas some theories suggest that drug views are best understood as the result of abstract political ideology, we suggest that these views can be better understood in the context of reproductive strategy. We show that, as predicted by a strategic construal, drug attitudes are best predicted by sexual items rather than abstract political commitments and, further, that the relationship between factors such as political ideology and drugs, while positive, are reduced to zero or nearly zero when items assessing sexuality are controlled for. We conclude that considering morality from the standpoint of strategic interests is a potentially useful way to understand why humans care about third party behaviour. PMID:20554547

  7. Interoception and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stewart, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The role of interoception and its neural basis with relevance to drug addiction is reviewed. Interoception consists of the receiving, processing, and integrating body-relevant signals with external stimuli to affect ongoing motivated behavior. The insular cortex is the central nervous system hub to process and integrate these signals. Interoception is an important component of several addiction relevant constructs including arousal, attention, stress, reward, and conditioning. Imaging studies with drug-addicted individuals show that the insular cortex is hypo-active during cognitive control processes but hyperactive during cue reactivity and drug-specific, reward-related processes. It is proposed that interoception contributes to drug addiction by incorporating an “embodied” experience of drug uses together with the individual’s predicted versus actual internal state to modulate approach or avoidance behavior, i.e. whether to take or not to take drugs. This opens the possibility of two types of interventions. First, one may be able to modulate the embodied experience by enhancing insula reactivity where necessary, e.g. when engaging in drug seeking behavior, or attenuating insula when exposed to drug-relevant cues. Second, one may be able to reduce the urge to act by increasing the frontal control network, i.e. inhibiting the urge to use by employing cognitive training. PMID:23855999

  8. Newer antithrombotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Bindra, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolic disorders are one of the disorders for which we are still on the look out for a safe and efficient drug. Despite the widespread use of antithrombotic drugs for the prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thrombosis, thromboembolic diseases continue to be a major cause of death and disability worldwide. This shows our inefficiency in searching efficacious and safe antithrombotic drugs. We have reached the basic mechanism of thrombus formation and by interrupting various steps of this mechanism, we can prevent as well as treat thromboembolic disorders. In continuation of Aspirin, now, we are using Clopidogrel, Ticlopidine and GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors (Abciximab, Tirofiban and Eptifibatide). Warfarin is an old antithrombotic drug which is still being used; but due to various side effects and drug interactions, we are bound to use newer drugs. Newer antiplatelet drugs include Prasugrel, Ticagrelor and Cangrelor, whereas newer thrombin inhibitors are Ximelgatran and Dabigatran. Apixaban is also a newer entry in this category as factor Xa inhibitor. Idrabiotaparinux is an indirect inhibitor of Xa as it accelerates the activity of antithrombin. Moreover, researches and trials for better and safe drugs are ongoing. PMID:21572750

  9. Evaluation of efflux pump gene expression among drug susceptible and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kardan Yamchi, Jalil; Haeili, Mehri; Gizaw Feyisa, Seifu; Kazemian, Hossein; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Zahednamazi, Fatemeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Absence of mutations within the genes encoding drug targets in some phenotypically drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggests possible involvement of alternative mechanisms such as over-expression of efflux pumps. We investigated the expression level of Rv1410c, Rv2459, Rv1218c and Rv1273c efflux pumps gene by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in 31 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Susceptibility to first-line drugs was performed using the proportion method. Twenty one isolates were characterized with drug resistance (DR), and among them 12 showed a significantly elevated level of expression (>4 fold) for at least one of the studied genes encoding for efflux pumps. Point mutations in the katG (codons 315 or 335) and rpoB (codons 456 and 441) genes were found in 42.85% and 66.6% of drug resistant isolates, respectively. Only one isolate showed mutation at position -15 of the inhA promoter region. Among the 7 isolates (33.33%) which had no mutation in the studied regions of drug target genes, 5 isolates showed over-expression for efflux pumps. Our results demonstrated that over-expression of efflux pumps can contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  10. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  11. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  12. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse.

  13. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  14. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with

  15. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    release property to achieve increased therapeutic efficacy and reduced side effects. Nanoparticles and nanoliposomes are emerging areas of nanotechnologies that have already begun to make an impact over new modalities for cancer chemotherapy, diagnosis as well as gene delivery. Presently it is possible to reduce the particle size in such a way that the particles can be easily injected or inhaled and many types of human cells are capable to internalize them. A number of fabrications such as PEGylation, specific antibody conjugation, aptamer ligation, specific ligand binding etc. on the nanosize delivery devices makes them in the streamline of research to particularly target the diseased cells thus avoiding the healthy one. Potential of nanosize carriers to cross the blood brain barrier encourages us to build up a new strategy for delivery of therapeutically active agents to the brain. Nanotechnology is showing an emerging effect in chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Nanosize vaccines are having greater effect in production of better immunity against pathogens through direct administration of medication to the specialized dendritic cells in the immune systems. Lots of hopes and speculations are reigning around the scientists with nanosize drug delivery systems that may revolutionize the drug delivery with the better understanding of drug action mechanism and identification of biomarker associated with specific diseases. Nanosize drug delivery systems are emerging with the promising strategies for efficient targeted drug delivery. The proper designing of these systems can make them capable for being independent in the normal tissue environments and selective at the diseased pharmacological site. Nanomaterials as formulations are already in the market or in clinical trials. Investigation on nanostructural drug delivery is a highly growing field today as an extensive amount of research is on with an expectation to open up new avenues to

  16. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  17. The drug-of-choice phenomenon psychological differences among drug users who preferred different drugs.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, L E; Berry, J W; Morrison, A; Brown, S

    1995-04-01

    The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Sensation Seeking Scale, and the Brief Symptom Inventory were administered to 125 recovering drug users with three or more months abstinent from drugs. Subjects were divided according to drug preference: opiates, stimulants, marijuana, alcohol, and a polydrug preference. Opiate users were significantly higher in Susceptibility to Boredom. Alcohol misusers compared to a combined stimulant, opiate, and polydrug group were significantly lower in Extroversion and Susceptibility to Boredom. Subjects raised in drug/alcohol-using families scored significantly higher on Neuroticism and on the Positive Symptom Total of the BSI, and had a higher rate of suicidality. PMID:7601576

  18. IPI-145 shows promise in CLL patients.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Results from a phase I study of Infinity Pharmaceuticals' IPI-145, which inhibits both δ and γ isoforms of phosphoinositide3-kinase, suggest the drug is safe and effective in patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24501284

  19. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  20. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  1. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products. PMID:23992034

  2. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  3. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  4. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  5. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  6. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  7. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  8. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, E, Adam, Molly, Hug Beans, and Love Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known ...

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1971 STREETSCAPE SHOWING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, August, 1971 STREETSCAPE SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATIONS OF LOVE AND BILGER TIN SHOP (FAR LEFT), SACHS BROTHERS STORE, NEUBER'S JEWELRY STORE, KAHLER'S DRUG STORE, BEEKMAN BANK, UNITED STATES HOTEL. - Neuber's Jewelry Store, 130 West California Street, Jacksonville, Jackson County, OR

  10. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  11. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles. PMID:26455677

  12. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles.

  13. Ibuprofen-induced aseptic meningoencephalitis confirmed by drug challenge.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ancillo, A; Gil-Adrados, A C; Jurado-Palomo, J

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a diagnostic challenge. The major causative agents are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (particularly ibuprofen), antibiotics, intravenous immunoglobulin, and OKT3 monoclonal antibodies. DIAM is more frequently observed in patients with autoimmune diseases. A 36-year-old woman was attended in our department 3 months after being diagnosed with aseptic meningoencephalitis. She had had 2 episodes in 9 months. Neurological symptoms were associated with ibuprofen. A challenge with acetylsalicylic acid was negative, whereas a drug challenge with ibuprofen was positive. Thirty minutes after ingesting 50 mg of ibuprofen, she experienced general malaise and progressively developed chills, fever (39.5 degrees C), headache, and nuchal rigidity. Lumbar puncture showed normal glucose and high protein levels. Neutrophilic pleocytosis was observed at the first admission; lymphocytosis was predominant in the second and third episodes. DIAM is a rare and severe hypersensitivity reaction. Drug challenge enabled us to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21995183

  14. Can biochemistry drive drug discovery beyond simple potency measurements?

    PubMed

    Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Among the fields of expertise required to develop drugs successfully, biochemistry holds a key position in drug discovery at the interface between chemistry, structural biology and cell biology. However, taking the example of protein kinases, it appears that biochemical assays are mostly used in the pharmaceutical industry to measure compound potency and/or selectivity. This limited use of biochemistry is surprising, given that detailed biochemical analyses are commonly used in academia to unravel molecular recognition processes. In this article, I show that biochemistry can provide invaluable information on the dynamics and energetics of compound-target interactions that cannot be obtained on the basis of potency measurements and structural data. Therefore, an extensive use of biochemistry in drug discovery could facilitate the identification and/or development of new drugs.

  15. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  16. Correlation between Drug Market Withdrawals and Socioeconomic, Health, and Welfare Indicators Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kye Hwa; Kim, Grace Juyun; Kim, Ju Han

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between the number of withdrawn/restricted drugs and socioeconomic, health, and welfare indicators were investigated in a comprehensive review of drug regulation information in the United Nations (UN) countries. A total of of 362 drugs were withdrawn and 248 were restricted during 1950-2010, corresponding to rates of 12.02 ± 13.07 and 5.77 ± 8.69 (mean ± SD), respectively, among 94 UN countries. A socioeconomic, health, and welfare analysis was performed for 33 OECD countries for which data were available regarding withdrawn/restricted drugs. The gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, GDP per hour worked, health expenditure per GDP, and elderly population rate were positively correlated with the numbers of withdrawn and restricted drugs (P < 0.05), while the out-of-pocket health expenditure payment rate was negatively correlated. The number of restricted drugs was also correlated with the rate of drug-related deaths (P < 0.05). The World Bank data cross-validated the findings of 33 OECD countries. The lists of withdrawn/restricted drugs showed markedly poor international agreement between them (Fleiss's kappa = -0.114). Twenty-seven drugs that had been withdrawn internationally by manufacturers are still available in some countries. The wide variation in the numbers of drug withdrawals and restrictions among countries indicates the need to improve drug surveillance systems and regulatory communication networks.

  17. Correlation between Drug Market Withdrawals and Socioeconomic, Health, and Welfare Indicators Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kye Hwa; Kim, Grace Juyun

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the number of withdrawn/restricted drugs and socioeconomic, health, and welfare indicators were investigated in a comprehensive review of drug regulation information in the United Nations (UN) countries. A total of of 362 drugs were withdrawn and 248 were restricted during 1950-2010, corresponding to rates of 12.02±13.07 and 5.77±8.69 (mean±SD), respectively, among 94 UN countries. A socioeconomic, health, and welfare analysis was performed for 33 OECD countries for which data were available regarding withdrawn/restricted drugs. The gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, GDP per hour worked, health expenditure per GDP, and elderly population rate were positively correlated with the numbers of withdrawn and restricted drugs (P<0.05), while the out-of-pocket health expenditure payment rate was negatively correlated. The number of restricted drugs was also correlated with the rate of drug-related deaths (P<0.05). The World Bank data cross-validated the findings of 33 OECD countries. The lists of withdrawn/restricted drugs showed markedly poor international agreement between them (Fleiss's kappa=-0.114). Twenty-seven drugs that had been withdrawn internationally by manufacturers are still available in some countries. The wide variation in the numbers of drug withdrawals and restrictions among countries indicates the need to improve drug surveillance systems and regulatory communication networks. PMID:26538999

  18. Drug misuse.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  19. Systems pharmacology augments drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, T; Nasir, M; Keiser, M J; Vilar, S; Hripcsak, G; Tatonetti, N P

    2015-02-01

    Small molecule drugs are the foundation of modern medical practice, yet their use is limited by the onset of unexpected and severe adverse events (AEs). Regulatory agencies rely on postmarketing surveillance to monitor safety once drugs are approved for clinical use. Despite advances in pharmacovigilance methods that address issues of confounding bias, clinical data of AEs are inherently noisy. Systems pharmacology-the integration of systems biology and chemical genomics-can illuminate drug mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that these data can improve drug safety surveillance by highlighting drugs with a mechanistic connection to the target phenotype (enriching true positives) and filtering those that do not (depleting false positives). We present an algorithm, the modular assembly of drug safety subnetworks (MADSS), to combine systems pharmacology and pharmacovigilance data and significantly improve drug safety monitoring for four clinically relevant adverse drug reactions.

  20. Systems pharmacology augments drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, T; Nasir, M; Keiser, M J; Vilar, S; Hripcsak, G; Tatonetti, N P

    2015-02-01

    Small molecule drugs are the foundation of modern medical practice, yet their use is limited by the onset of unexpected and severe adverse events (AEs). Regulatory agencies rely on postmarketing surveillance to monitor safety once drugs are approved for clinical use. Despite advances in pharmacovigilance methods that address issues of confounding bias, clinical data of AEs are inherently noisy. Systems pharmacology-the integration of systems biology and chemical genomics-can illuminate drug mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that these data can improve drug safety surveillance by highlighting drugs with a mechanistic connection to the target phenotype (enriching true positives) and filtering those that do not (depleting false positives). We present an algorithm, the modular assembly of drug safety subnetworks (MADSS), to combine systems pharmacology and pharmacovigilance data and significantly improve drug safety monitoring for four clinically relevant adverse drug reactions. PMID:25670520

  1. Teens and Prescription Drugs: An Analysis of Recent Trends on the Emerging Drug Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report synthesizes a number of national studies that show the intentional abuse of prescription drugs to get high is a growing concern, particularly among teens. The analysis shows that teens are turning away from street drugs and using prescription drugs to get high. New users of prescription drugs have caught up with new users of marijuana.…

  2. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  3. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  4. [Benefit assessment of drugs].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Thomas; Vervölgyi, V; Wieseler, B

    2015-03-01

    In Germany, new drugs are subject to a benefit assessment at the time of their market access. This "early benefit assessment" is the method primarily used for the benefit assessment of pharmaceuticals in Germany. While for the authorization of a drug a positive risk-benefit ratio is sufficient, early benefit assessment examines whether the new drug has an added benefit compared with other therapies, and thus differs significantly from authorization. For the evaluation, the manufacturer is required to submit a dossier, which must contain all the relevant studies. Early benefit assessment is very transparent in international comparisons, because all the relevant data and the evaluation report will be published. The assessment is carried out with regard to the evidence-based standard of care (the "appropriate comparator"). If the new drug is found to have an additional benefit, the extent of this added benefit is assessed. In addition, groups of patients should be identified with the particular extent of the added benefit. Therefore, subgroup analyses have to be carried out frequently. Often, for new drugs, only registration studies are available. General requirements for such studies (e.g., placebo comparison, endpoints) and decisions regarding the approval process (e.g., dosage regimens) can affect the level of confidence of these studies in the benefit assessment. Joint scientific advice by regulatory authorities and HTA (health technology assessment) agencies are provided to solve this problem. However, this is not possible without additional expense for the pharmaceutical companies. PMID:25566842

  5. 1979-80 Financial Statistics for Current Cost of Education... Showing San Joaquin Delta College Position...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRicco, Lawrence A.

    The costs of education per unit of Average Daily Attendance (ADA) are detailed in this two-part report for 70 California community college districts for the academic year 1979-80. Both Part I, which presents data excluding non-resident ADA, and Part II, which presents figures including non-resident ADA, begin with tables which rank order the…

  6. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  7. 8. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING NORTH SHORE AND OPERATOR'S HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING NORTH SHORE AND OPERATOR'S HOUSE WITH BRIDGE IN OPEN POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Mystic River Bridge, Spanning Mystic River between Groton & Stonington, Groton, New London County, CT

  8. 37. HANGAR FROM RAILROAD DECK TELESCOPED IN COLUMN & SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. HANGAR FROM RAILROAD DECK TELESCOPED IN COLUMN & SHOWING PIN WHICH TRANSFERS LOAD FROM RAILROAD DECK TO TRUSS WHEN IN DOWN POSITION - Armour, Swift, Burlington Bridge, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO

  9. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  10. Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  11. [Ureter drugs].

    PubMed

    Raynal, G; Bellan, J; Saint, F; Tillou, X; Petit, J

    2008-03-01

    Many improvements have been made recently in the field of the ureteral smooth muscle pharmacology. After a brief summary on physiological basis, we review what is known about effects on ureter of different drugs class. In a second part, we review clinical applications for renal colic analgesia, calculi expulsive medical therapy, ESWL adjuvant treatment and preoperative treatment before retrograde access. There are now sufficient data on NSAID and alpha-blockers. beta-agonists, especially for beta3 selective ones, and topical drugs before retrograde access are interesting and should be further evaluated.

  12. Detection and prevalence of drug use in arrested drivers using the Dräger Drug Test 5000 and Affiniton DrugWipe oral fluid drug screening devices.

    PubMed

    Logan, Barry K; Mohr, Amanda L A; Talpins, Stephen K

    2014-09-01

    The use of oral fluid (OF) drug testing devices offers the ability to rapidly obtain a drug screening result at the time of a traffic stop. We describe an evaluation of two such devices, the Dräger Drug Test 5000 and the Affiniton DrugWipe, to detect drug use in a cohort of drivers arrested from an investigation of drug impaired driving (n = 92). Overall, 41% of these drivers were ultimately confirmed positive by mass spectrometry for the presence of one or more drugs. The most frequently detected drugs were cannabinoids (30%), benzodiazepines (11%) and cocaine (10%). Thirty-nine percent of drivers with blood alcohol concentrations >0.08 g/100 mL were found to be drug positive. Field test results obtained from OF samples were compared with collected OF and urine samples subsequently analyzed in the laboratory by gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Dräger Drug Test 5000 (DDT5000) and DrugWipe returned overall sensitivities of 51 and 53%, and positive predictive values of 93 and 63%, respectively. The most notable difference in performance was the DDT5000's better sensitivity in detecting marijuana use. Both devices failed to detect benzodiazepine use. Oral fluid proved to be a more effective confirmatory specimen, with more drugs being confirmed in OF than urine. PMID:24894458

  13. Temperature Data Shows Warming in 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    TThe figure above depicts how much air temperatures near the Earth's surface changed relative to the global mean temperature from 1951 to 1980. NASA researchers used maps of urban areas derived from city lights data to account for the 'heat island' effect of cities. The red and orange colors show that temperatures are warmer in most regions of the world when compared to the 1951 to 1980 'normal' temperatures. Warming around the world has been widespread, but it is not present everywhere. The largest warming is in Northern Canada, Alaska and Siberia, as indicated by the deeper red colors. The lower 48 United States have become warmer recently, but only enough to make the temperatures comparable to what they were in the 1930s. The scale on the bottom of these temperature anomaly images represent degrees in Celsius. The negative numbers represent cooling and the positive numbers depict warming. Overall, the air temperature near the Earth's surface has warmed by 1oF (0.6oC) globally, on average, over the last century. For more information and additional images, read Satellites Shed Light on a Warmer World. Image courtesy Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS).

  14. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  15. Assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia in listing and ranking of drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Božana S.; Ilić, Maja S.

    2013-01-01

    Inconsistent information about drug-drug interactions can cause variations in prescribing, and possibly increase the incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess whether there is an inconsistency in drug-drug interaction listing and ranking in three authoritative, freely accessible online drug information sources: The British National Formulary; The Compendium about Drugs Licensed for Use in the United Kingdom (the Electronic Medicines Compendium) and the Compendium about Drugs Licensed for Use in the United States (the DailyMed). Information on drug-drug interactions for thirty drugs which have a high or medium potential for interactions have been selected for analysis. In total, 1971 drug-drug interactions were listed in all three drug information sources, of these 992 were ranked as the interactions with the potential of clinical significance. Comparative analysis identified that 63.98% of interactions were listed in only one drug information source, and 66.63% of interactions were ranked in only one drug information source. Only 15.12% listed and 11.19% ranked interactions were identified in all three information sources. Intraclass correlation coefficient indicated a weak correlation among the three drug information sources in listing (0.366), as well as in ranking drug interactions (0.467). This study showed inconsistency of information on drug-drug interaction for the selected drugs in three authoritative, freely accessible online drug information sources. The application of a uniform methodology in assessment of information, and then the presentation of information in a standardized format is required to prevent and adequately manage drug-drug interactions. PMID:24289762

  16. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... patient and to monitor alignment of the radiation beam with the patient's anatomy. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... patient and to monitor alignment of the radiation beam with the patient's anatomy. (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... patient and to monitor alignment of the radiation beam with the patient's anatomy. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... patient and to monitor alignment of the radiation beam with the patient's anatomy. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  1. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  3. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  4. 21 CFR 890.3110 - Electric positioning chair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric positioning chair. 890.3110 Section 890.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3110...

  5. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  6. Show Horse Welfare: Horse Show Competitors' Understanding, Awareness, and Perceptions of Equine Welfare.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Melissa A; Hiney, Kristina; Richardson, Jennifer C; Waite, Karen; Borron, Abigail; Brady, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of stock-type horse show competitors' understanding of welfare and level of concern for stock-type show horses' welfare. Data were collected through an online questionnaire that included questions relating to (a) interest and general understanding of horse welfare, (b) welfare concerns of the horse show industry and specifically the stock-type horse show industry, (c) decision-making influences, and (d) level of empathic characteristics. The majority of respondents indicated they agree or strongly agree that physical metrics should be a factor when assessing horse welfare, while fewer agreed that behavioral and mental metrics should be a factor. Respondent empathy levels were moderate to high and were positively correlated with the belief that mental and behavioral metrics should be a factor in assessing horse welfare. Respondents indicated the inhumane practices that most often occur at stock-type shows include excessive jerking on reins, excessive spurring, and induced excessive unnatural movement. Additionally, respondents indicated association rules, hired trainers, and hired riding instructors are the most influential regarding the decisions they make related to their horses' care and treatment.

  7. [Resorption of drugs through the vaginal wall].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Guenzet, J; Pradal, G

    1983-01-01

    Drug absorption during vaginal administration. A method is described (systems approach to vaginal delivery of drugs and development of in situ vaginal drug absorption procedure) and is able to show vaginal absorption of drugs. Some drugs are rapidly and largely absorbed through vaginal epithelium: Metronidazole (Flagyl), Prostaglandins, Estrogens, Polyvidone-iodine (Betadine), Chloroquinadol (Gynotherax), d-Methadone, Hexachlorophene (Phisohex et Ultralan), Insulin and Triclosan. Other drugs are poorly absorbed: Amphotericin B (Fungizone, Amphocycline), Econazole (Pevaryl) and Trimethoprim. At least, some drugs are not absorbed: Nystatine (Mycostatine) and Furazolidone (Tricofuron).

  8. Intradermal Tests for Diagnosis of Drug Allergy are not Affected by a Topical Anesthetic Patch.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Ferreira, Ana; Cernadas, Josefina R

    2014-09-01

    The use of topical anesthesia to perform intradermal tests (IDTs) for drug allergy diagnosis was never investigated. We aimed to determine the effects of a topical anesthetic patch containing prilocaine-lidocaine on wheal size of IDT with drugs. Patients who had positive IDT as part of their investigation process of suspected drug hypersensitivity were selected. IDT were performed according to guidelines. Anesthetic patch (AP) was placed and the same prior positive IDT, as well as positive histamine skin prick test (SPT) and negative (saline IDT) controls, were performed in the anesthetized area. Patients with negative IDT were also included to check for false positives with AP. Increase in wheals after 20 minutes both with and without AP was recorded and compared. 45 IDT were performed (36 patients), of which 37 have been previously positive (14 antibiotics, 10 general anesthetics, 6 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 3 iodinated contrasts, 3 anti-Hi-histamines and 1 ranitidine). Mean histamine SPT size without the AP was 4.7 mm [95%CI (4.4-5.1]), and 4.6 mm [95%CI(4.2-5.0)] with anesthesia. Mean wheal increase in IDT for drugs without the anesthesia was 4.5 mm [95%CI(3.3-5.7)] and with anesthesia was 4.3 mm [95%CI(2.8-5.8)]. No statistical significant differences were observed between skin tests with or without AP for histamine SPT (P=0.089), IDT with saline (P=0.750), and IDT with drugs (P=0.995). None of the patients with negative IDT showed positivity with the AP, or vice-versa. The use of an AP containing prilocaine-lidocaine does not interfere with IDT to diagnose drug allergy, and no false positive tests were found. PMID:25229004

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents.

  10. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents. PMID:11564050

  11. [Drug resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from sputum in Chad].

    PubMed

    Abdelhadi, O; Ndokaïn, J; Ali, M Moussa; Friocourt, V; Mortier, E; Heym, B

    2012-02-01

    Culture and resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are not regularly performed in Chad. Sputa were obtained from three different categories of hospitals (district, regional and national) in Chad. All examined sputa were smear-positive and were investigated by culture and drug resistance testing for first-line antituberculosis drugs. From 232 sputa positive for acid-fast bacilli, 135 isolates of M. tuberculosis from different patients (46 women, 89 men, mean age 34 years) were analyzed. All the patients except one corresponded to new cases of tuberculosis. In total, 27 out of 135 isolates (20%) were resistant to at least one major antituberculosis drug. Resistance to isoniazid was the most frequent resistance observed, with 18 isolates (13%) presenting at least this resistance. Three isolates (2.2%) were resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin (multidrug resistance MDR) including one isolate being concomitantly resistant to streptomycin and ethambutol. The resistance rate differed in relation to the category of the hospital; the most important resistance rate was observed in regional hospitals (33%), while it was 16% and 14% in the national and district hospitals, respectively. HIV serology was performed in 81 patients, among whom 20 (25%) were positive. This is the first study that shows that drug resistance of M. tuberculosis is present in Chad. Besides single drug-resistant isolates, multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis could also be identified. This result highlights the urgency of initiating actions to detect drug resistance and limit the spread of drug-resistant strains.

  12. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Current research findings and treatment issues related to a number of drugs are briefly outlined. Topics include T-20, a reformulation of ddI, PMPA, chicoric acid, Omniferon (alpha leukoferon), and Mepron. Also discussed is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor called calanolide A, which is synthesized from a tree native to Malaysian rain forests. An update is provided on Panretin, a gel which is used to treat KS lesions. Contact information is provided.

  13. 28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED POSITION WITH THE EXTREME UPPER PORTION OF THE BASCULE RACK GEAR SHOWING IN THE LOWER RIGHT PORTION OF THE PHOTOGRAPH - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed. PMID:8867206

  15. Prevalence of psychotropic drug use in military police units.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sérgio Henrique Nascente; Yonamine, Maurício; Ramos, Andrea Luciana Martins; Oliveira, Fernando Gomes Ferreira; Rodrigues, Caroline Rego; da Cunha, Luiz Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to verify the prevalence of psychoactive drug use (amphetamines, methamphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opioids and benzodiazepines) among military police officers in the state of Goiás. Data were obtained from urine samples voluntarily provided by the officers participating in the study, who were informed of the study methods and signed a free and informed consent form. The samples were subject to screening analysis by immunochromatography (Multi-DrugOneStep Test®), with positive tests confirmed by gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and data analyzed by descriptive statistics. The results indicated the presence of the following drugs: amphetamines (0.33%), cannabinoids (0.67%) and benzodiazepines (1.34%); 97.66% showed negative results. The positive cases were distributed as follows: benzodiazepines (57.1%); cannabinoids (28.6%) and amphetamines (14.3%). In conclusion, the detection of psychoactive substances in voluntary sampling of military police officers indicates the need to implement drug testing among active military officers and preventive public policies aimed at eliminating the abusive consumption of psychotropic drugs.

  16. [Self-concept and drug use in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María C; García, Fernando; Gracia, Enrique; Lila, Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between a multidimensional measure of self-concept, the Self-concept Form-5 Questionnaire (AF5), and drug use among adolescents. From the responses of 632 participants (47.5% females) aged 12 to 17 years (M = 14.88 years, SD = 1.71 years), results showed negative relationships between family, academic and physical self-concept, and drug use. Although a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use was found, this significant relationship disappeared once the age and sex of adolescents was controlled statistically. Moreover, the study includes other adjustment indicators in adolescence (psychological adjustment, personal competence, antisocial behavior and parenting). Results support the idea of self-concept as an important correlate of psychological well-being and a basic theoretical construct for explaining adjusted and adaptive behaviors in adolescence. Likewise, our results underline the need for statistical control of the effect of a third variable (sex), which could explain some contradictory results reported in the literature (a positive relationship between social self-concept and drug use), so as to avoid reaching conclusions based on spurious relationships. self-concept, multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, adolescence, psychosocial adjustment, drug use.

  17. Positive reinforcement in clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, L M

    1992-01-01

    Contrary to the idea that nursing students are intrinsically motivated, findings in research studies show that students repeatedly report the significance of positive feedback to them. Delivery of positive reinforcement by clinical instructors can be developed so that the reinforcement is more meaningful to students and more effective in promoting or maintaining desired student behaviors.

  18. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  19. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G. Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-06-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.

  20. Drug models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Stone, James M

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831