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Sample records for drug targeting

  1. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  2. Other targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rodón, Jordi; Karachaliou, Niki; Sánchez, Jesús; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Riso, Aldo; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy drugs are developed against specific molecular alterations on cancer cells. Because they are “targeted” to the tumor, these therapies are more effective and better tolerated than conventional therapies such as chemotherapy. In the last decade, great advances have been made in understanding of melanoma biology and identification of molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of cells. The identification of oncogenic mutated kinases involved in this process provides an opportunity for development of new target therapies. The dependence of melanoma on BRAF-mutant kinase has provided an opportunity for development of mutation-specific inhibitors with high activity and excellent tolerance that are now being used in clinical practice. This marked a new era in the treatment of metastatic melanoma and much research is now ongoing to identify other “druggable” kinases and transduction signaling networking. It is expected that in the near future the spectrum of target drugs for melanoma treatment will increase. Herein, we review the most relevant potential novel drugs for melanoma treatment based on preclinical data and the results of early clinical trials. PMID:26605312

  3. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery. PMID:19663765

  4. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery.

  5. Heart-targeted nanoscale drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meifang; Li, Minghui; Wang, Guangtian; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Daming; Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Qun

    2014-09-01

    The efficacious delivery of drugs to the heart is an important treatment strategy for various heart diseases. Nanocarriers have shown increasing promise in targeted drug delivery systems. The success of nanocarriers for delivering drugs to therapeutic sites in the heart mainly depends on specific target sites, appropriate drug delivery carriers and effective targeting ligands. Successful targeted drug delivery suggests the specific deposition of a drug in the heart with minimal effects on other organs after administration. This review discusses the pathological manifestations, pathogenesis, therapeutic limitations and new therapeutic advances in various heart diseases. In particular, we summarize the recent advances in heart-targeted nanoscale drug delivery systems, including dendrimers, liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates, microparticles, nanostents, nanoparticles, micelles and microbubbles. Current clinical trials, the commercial market and future perspective are further discussed in the conclusions.

  6. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  7. Target deconvolution strategies in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Terstappen, Georg C; Schlüpen, Christina; Raggiaschi, Roberto; Gaviraghi, Giovanni

    2007-11-01

    Recognition of some of the limitations of target-based drug discovery has recently led to the renaissance of a more holistic approach in which complex biological systems are investigated for phenotypic changes upon exposure to small molecules. The subsequent identification of the molecular targets that underlie an observed phenotypic response--termed target deconvolution--is an important aspect of current drug discovery, as knowledge of the molecular targets will greatly aid drug development. Here, the broad panel of experimental strategies that can be applied to target deconvolution is critically reviewed.

  8. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  9. Targeted Nanodelivery of Drugs and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret A.; Gran, Martin L.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials for targeted delivery are uniquely capable of localizing delivery of therapeutics and diagnostics to diseased tissues. The ability to achieve high, local concentrations of drugs or image contrast agents at a target site provides the opportunity for improved system performance and patient outcomes along with reduced systemic dosing. In this review, the design of targeted nanodelivery systems is discussed with an emphasis on in vivo performance, the physicochemical properties that affect localization at the target site, and the incorporation of therapeutic drugs into these systems. PMID:20543895

  10. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery. PMID:27713328

  11. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  12. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  13. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load. PMID:26415215

  14. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  15. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  16. Epilepsy: new drug targets and neurostimulation.

    PubMed

    Asconapé, Jorge J

    2013-08-01

    Despite advances in the medical and surgical therapy for epilepsy, about 30% of patients do not achieve full seizure control. In the past 5 years new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for clinical use. Some of these drugs have unique, novel mechanisms of action. Overall efficacy of these agents, however, seems similar to other antiepileptic drugs. Vagus nerve stimulation is a well-established palliative therapy for medically resistant epilepsy. Neurostimulation, with newer devices and targets becoming available, is a rapidly expanding field in epileptology. Considerable development and research are still necessary before these newer techniques become the standard of care for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:23896505

  17. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  18. Open Challenges in Magnetic Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandip; Nacev, Aleksander; Muro, Silvia; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2014-01-01

    The principle of magnetic drug targeting, wherein therapy is attached to magnetically responsive carriers and magnetic fields are used to direct that therapy to disease locations, has been around for nearly two decades. Yet our ability to safely and effectively direct therapy to where it needs to go, for instance to deep tissue targets, remains limited. To date, magnetic targeting methods have not yet passed regulatory approval or reached clinical use. Below we outline key challenges to magnetic targeting, which include designing and selecting magnetic carriers for specific clinical indications, safely and effectively reaching targets behind tissue and anatomical barriers, real-time carrier imaging, and magnet design and control for deep and precise targeting. Addressing these challenges will require interactions across disciplines. Nanofabricators and chemists should work with biologists, mathematicians and engineers to better understand how carriers move through live tissues and how to optimize carrier and magnet designs to better direct therapy to disease targets. Clinicians should be involved early on and throughout the whole process to ensure the methods that are being developed meet a compelling clinical need and will be practical in a clinical setting. Our hope is that highlighting these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept to a clinically-available treatment that can put therapy where it needs to go in human patients. PMID:25377422

  19. Chemical signatures and new drug targets for gametocytocidal drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Magle, Crystal T.; Huang, Wenwei; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Williamson, Kim C.; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Control of parasite transmission is critical for the eradication of malaria. However, most antimalarial drugs are not active against P. falciparum gametocytes, responsible for the spread of malaria. Consequently, patients can remain infectious for weeks after the clearance of asexual parasites and clinical symptoms. Here we report the identification of 27 potent gametocytocidal compounds (IC50 < 1 μM) from screening 5,215 known drugs and compounds. All these compounds were active against three strains of gametocytes with different drug sensitivities and geographical origins, 3D7, HB3 and Dd2. Cheminformatic analysis revealed chemical signatures for P. falciparum sexual and asexual stages indicative of druggability and suggesting potential targets. Torin 2, a top lead compound (IC50 = 8 nM against gametocytes in vitro), completely blocked oocyst formation in a mouse model of transmission. These results provide critical new leads and potential targets to expand the repertoire of malaria transmission-blocking reagents.

  20. "Target-Site" Drug Metabolism and Transport.

    PubMed

    Foti, Robert S; Tyndale, Rachel F; Garcia, Kristine L P; Sweet, Douglas H; Nagar, Swati; Sharan, Satish; Rock, Dan A

    2015-08-01

    The recent symposium on "Target-Site" Drug Metabolism and Transport that was sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the 2014 Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego is summarized in this report. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter activity at the site of therapeutic action can affect the efficacy, safety, and metabolic properties of a given drug, with potential outcomes including altered dosing regimens, stricter exclusion criteria, or even the failure of a new chemical entity in clinical trials. Drug metabolism within the brain, for example, can contribute to metabolic activation of therapeutic drugs such as codeine as well as the elimination of potential neurotoxins in the brain. Similarly, the activity of oxidative and conjugative drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung can have an effect on the efficacy of compounds such as resveratrol. In addition to metabolism, the active transport of compounds into or away from the site of action can also influence the outcome of a given therapeutic regimen or disease progression. For example, organic anion transporter 3 is involved in the initiation of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and may have a role in how uremic toxins enter pancreatic β-cells and ultimately contribute to the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes. Finally, it is likely that a combination of target-specific metabolism and cellular internalization may have a significant role in determining the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates, a finding which has resulted in the development of a host of new analytical methods that are now used for characterizing the metabolism and disposition of antibody-drug conjugates. Taken together, the research summarized herein can provide for an increased understanding of potential barriers to drug efficacy and allow for a more rational approach for developing safe and effective therapeutics.

  1. Drug target identification and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Jin Kim, Yeoun; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Moore, Paul A; Ruben, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    The emerging technologies in proteomic analysis provide great opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic drug targets for unmet medical needs through delivering of key information on protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. This review presents a summary of current quantitative proteomic concepts and mass spectrometric technologies, which enable the acceleration of target discovery. Examples of the strategies and current technologies in the target identification/validation process are provided to illustrate the successful application of proteomics in target identification, in particular for monoclonal antibody therapies. Current bottlenecks and future directions of proteomic studies for target and biomarker identification are also discussed to better facilitate the application of this technology.

  2. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan Trang Nguyen, Ngoc; Thi Le, Ly

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people.

  3. Magnetizable implants for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Zachary Graham

    The capability to deliver high effective dosages to specific sites in the human body has become the holy grail of drug delivery research. Drugs with proven effectiveness under in vitro investigation often reach a major roadblock under in vivo testing due to a lack of an effective delivery strategy. In addition, many clinical scenarios require delivery of agents that are therapeutic at the desired delivery point, but otherwise systemically toxic. This project proposes a method for targeted drug delivery by applying high magnetic field gradients within the body to an injected superparamagnetic colloidal fluid carrying a drug, with the aid of modest uniform magnetic field. The design involves patterning of endovascular implants, such as coronary stents, with soft magnetic coatings capable of applying high local magnetic field gradients within the body. Examination of the feasibility of the design has been focused around the treatment of coronary restenosis following angioplasty. Drug-eluting stents, which have debuted in hospitals over the past two years, have thus far reduced restenosis rates to below 10%. Our local drug delivery system is a viable alternative or enhancement to drug-eluting stents, offering increased clinician control of dose size, the ability to treat a site repeatedly, and a wide array of applications for treatment of other pathologies. The theoretical models, parallel plate and pipe flow analysis, and cell culture models presented give insight into the use of micron and sub-micron scale magnetic particles for site-specific delivery of pharmaceuticals and magnetically labeled cells.

  4. Putative Drugs and Targets for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Carlos A.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder (BPD) is generally unsatisfactory for a large number of patients. Even with adequate modern bipolar pharmacological therapies, many afflicted individuals continue to have persistent mood episode relapses, residual symptoms, functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Creating novel therapeutics for BPD is urgently needed. Promising drug targets and compounds for BPD worthy of further study involve the following systems: purinergic, dynorphin opioid neuropeptide, cholinergic (muscarinic and nicotinic), melatonin and serotonin (5-HT2C receptor), glutamatergic, hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis have all been implicated. Intracellular pathways and targets worthy of further study include glycogen synthase kinase-3 protein, protein kinase C, arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:18704977

  5. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration.

  6. HDL drug carriers for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Suo, Rong; Xiong, Sheng-Lin; Zhang, Qing-Hai; Yi, Guang-Hui

    2013-01-16

    Plasma concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are strongly and inversely associated with cardiovascular risk. HDL is not a simple lipid transporter, but possesses multiple anti-atherosclerosis activities because it contains special proteins, signaling lipid, and microRNAs. Natural or recombinant HDLs have emerged as potential carriers for delivering a drug to a specified target. However, HDL function also depends on enzymes that alter its structure and composition, as well as cellular receptors and membrane micro-domains that facilitate interactions with the microenvironment. In this review, four mechanisms predicted to enhance functions or targeted therapy of HDL in vivo are discussed. The first involves caveolae-mediated recruitment of HDL signal to bind their receptors. The second involves scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) mediating anchoring and fluidity for signal-lipid of HDL. The third involves lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) concentrating the signaling lipid at the surface of the HDL particle. The fourth involves microRNAs (miRNAs) being delivered in the blood to special targets by HDL. Exploitation of these four mechanisms will promote HDL to carry targeted drugs and increase HDL's clinical value. PMID:23063777

  7. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  8. Antiobesity pharmacotherapy: new drugs and emerging targets.

    PubMed

    Kim, G W; Lin, J E; Blomain, E S; Waldman, S A

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing pandemic, and related health and economic costs are staggering. Pharmacotherapy, partnered with lifestyle modifications, forms the core of current strategies to reduce the burden of this disease and its sequelae. However, therapies targeting weight loss have a significant history of safety risks, including cardiovascular and psychiatric events. Here, evolving strategies for developing antiobesity therapies, including targets, mechanisms, and developmental status, are highlighted. Progress in this field is underscored by Belviq (lorcaserin) and Qsymia (phentermine/topiramate), the first agents in more than 10 years to achieve regulatory approval for chronic weight management in obese patients. On the horizon, novel insights into metabolism and energy homeostasis reveal guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) signaling circuits as emerging targets for antiobesity pharmacotherapy. These innovations in molecular discovery may elegantly align with practical off-the-shelf approaches, leveraging existing approved drugs that modulate cGMP levels for the management of obesity. PMID:24105257

  9. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes.

  10. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  11. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  12. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  13. New drugs and treatment targets in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the next years. Biologics are costly, require injections, and some patients experience tacaphylaxis, thus, the development of orally available, small-molecule inhibitors is desirable. Among small-molecules under investigation are A3 adenosine receptor agonists, Janus kinase inhibitors, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming years. We need to be aware of the limitations of drug safety data when selecting new novel treatments. Monitoring and clinical registries are still important tools.

  14. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  15. Therapeutic approaches to drug targets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamkhande, Prasad G.; Chandak, Prakash G.; Dhawale, Shashikant C.; Barde, Sonal R.; Tidke, Priti S.; Sakhare, Ram S.

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetes are responsible for major social and health burden as millions of people are dying every year. Out of which, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of deaths worldwide. The lipid abnormality is one of the major modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. Both genetic and environmental components are associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Immune and inflammatory mediators have a complex role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Understanding of all these processes will help to invent a range of new biomarkers and novel treatment modalities targeting various cellular events in acute and chronic inflammation that are accountable for atherosclerosis. Several biochemical pathways, receptors and enzymes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis that would be possible targets for improving strategies for disease diagnosis and management. Earlier anti-inflammatory or lipid-lowering treatments could be useful for alleviating morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, novel drug targets like endoglin receptor, PPARα, squalene synthase, thyroid hormone analogues, scavenger receptor and thyroid hormone analogues are more powerful to control the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the review briefly focuses on different novel targets that act at the starting stage of the plaque form to the thrombus formation in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25061401

  16. Multi-target drugs: the trend of drug research and development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target-target and drug-drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the network visualization and the market trends. We discussed the possible reasons and proposed the rational strategies for drug research and development in the future.

  17. Intermittent claudication: new targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Brass, Eric P

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is the result of extensive atherosclerosis in the arterial supply to the lower extremities. PAD is associated with increased systemic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as substantial disability due to walking impairment. Claudication is the classic symptom of leg pain with walking that is relieved by rest, but patients with PAD without typical claudication also have a walking limitation. Treatment of the patient with PAD is directed towards reducing cardiovascular risk and improving exercise capacity. The pathophysiology of the physical impairment is complex as changes in the muscle distal to the arterial stenoses contribute to the limitations. Current treatment options to improve exercise performance have limitations emphasizing the need for new pharmacotherapies for this highly prevalent condition. The multifactorial contributors to the exercise impairment in PAD suggest potential targets for novel drug therapies. Advances in understanding angiogenesis make pharmacologic revascularization possible. However, ensuring that new blood vessels develop in a distribution relevant to the clinical impairment remains a challenge. Skeletal muscle metabolism and its regulation are altered in patients with PAD and strategies to improve the efficient oxidation of fuel substrates may improve muscle function. PAD is associated with increased oxidative stress which may result in injury to the muscle microvasculature and myocyte. Minimizing this oxidative stress by enhancing cellular defense mechanisms, administration of anti-inflammatory agents or by providing antioxidants, could prevent oxidative injury. Given the central role of atherosclerosis in the flow limitation, therapies to induce regression of atherosclerotic lesions could result in improved blood flow and oxygen delivery. Drugs targeting the distribution of blood flow in the microcirculatory environment of the muscle have the potential to better match oxygen delivery with

  18. The hydrogenosome as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are spherical or slightly elongated organelles found in non-mitochondrial organisms. In Trichomonas hydrogenosomes measure between 200 to 500 nm, but under drug treatment they can reach 2 microm. Like mitochondria hydrogenosomes: (1) are surrounded by two closely apposed membranes and present a granular matrix: (2) divide in three different ways: segmentation, partition and the heart form; (3) they may divide at any phase of the cell cycle; (4) produce ATP; (5) participate in the metabolism of pyruvate formed during glycolysis; (6) are the site of molecular hydrogen formation; (7) present a relationship with the endoplasmic reticulum; (8) incorporate calcium; (9) import proteins post-translationally; (10) present cardiolipin. However, there are differences, such as: (1) absence of genetic material, at least in trichomonas; (2) lack a respiratory chain and cytochromes; (3) absence of the F(0)-F(1) ATPase; (4) absence of the tricarboxylic acid cycle; (5) lack of oxidative phosphorylation; (6) presence of peripheral vesicles. Hydrogenosomes are considered an excellent drug target since their metabolic pathway is distinct from those found in mitochondria and thus medicines directed to these organelles will probably not affect the host-cell. The main drug used against trichomonads is metronidazole, although other drugs such as beta-Lapachone, colchicine, Taxol, nocodazole, griseofulvin, cytochalasins, hydroxyurea, among others, have been used in trichomonad studies, showing: (1) flagella internalization forming pseudocyst; (2) dysfunctional hydrogenosomes; (3) hydrogenosomes with abnormal sizes and shapes and with an electron dense deposit called nucleoid; (4) intense autophagy in which hydrogenosomes are removed and further digested in lysosomes. PMID:18473836

  19. Opposing effects of target overexpression reveal drug mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Adam C.; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of a drug's molecular target often increases drug resistance, offering a pathway for adaptive evolution and a tool for target identification. It is unclear though why this phenomenon applies to some drugs but not others. Here we gradually overexpressed antibiotic targets in Escherichia coli and found that drug resistance can increase, remain unchanged, decrease, or even change non-monotonically. Even a single target can produce opposing responses to its different inhibitors. We explain these contradicting effects with quantitative models of enzyme inhibition that account for fitness costs and the biochemical activity or inactivity of drug-enzyme complexes. Thus, target overexpression confers resistance or sensitivity as a predictable property of drug mechanism, explaining its variable presence in nature as a resistance mechanism. Though overexpression screens may fail at identifying unknown targets, overexpressing known or putative targets provides a systematic approach to distinguish between simple inhibition and complex mechanisms of drug action. PMID:24980690

  20. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  1. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  2. Structural and energetic analyses of SNPs in drug targets and implications for drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui-Yong; Ji, Feng-Qin; Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2013-12-23

    Mutations in drug targets can alter the therapeutic effects of drugs. Therefore, evaluating the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on drug-target binding is of significant interest. This study focuses on the analysis of the structural and energy properties of SNPs in successful drug targets by using the data derived from HapMap and the Therapeutic Target Database. The results show the following: (i) Drug targets undergo strong purifying selection, and the majority (92.4%) of the SNPs are located far from the drug-binding sites (>12 Å). (ii) For SNPs near the drug-binding pocket (≤12 Å), nearly half of the drugs are weakly affected by the SNPs, and only a few drugs are significantly affected by the target mutations. These results have direct implications for population-based drug therapy and for chemical treatment of genetic diseases as well.

  3. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes

    PubMed Central

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A.; Irwin, John J.; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to “de-orphanize” drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration—approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  4. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes.

    PubMed

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A; Irwin, John J; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L; Shoichet, Brian K

    2012-07-10

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to "de-orphanize" drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  5. Network analysis of FDA approved drugs and their targets.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi; Jenkins, Sherry L; Goldfarb, Joseph; Iyengar, Ravi

    2007-04-01

    The global relationship between drugs that are approved for therapeutic use and the human genome is not known. We employed graph-theory methods to analyze the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and their known molecular targets. We used the FDA Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations 26(th) Edition Electronic Orange Book (EOB) to identify all FDA approved drugs and their active ingredients. We then connected the list of active ingredients extracted from the EOB to those known human protein targets included in the DrugBank database and constructed a bipartite network. We computed network statistics and conducted Gene Ontology analysis on the drug targets and drug categories. We find that drug to drug-target relationship in the bipartite network is scale-free. Several classes of proteins in the human genome appear to be better targets for drugs since they appear to be selectively enriched as drug targets for the currently FDA approved drugs. These initial observations allow for development of an integrated research methodology to identify general principles of the drug discovery process. PMID:17516560

  6. Is hippocampal atrophy a future drug target?

    PubMed

    Dhikav, Vikas; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    atrophy would be clinically useful in affecting disease, viz slowing its progression, reducing morbidity, complications or positively affecting the outcome of one or more of its clinically important aspects. If the answer to this is yes, we would have to know at what stage of the disease we use the drugs, dose, duration, follow-up and efficacy. The use of these drugs in the above mentioned conditions can not only test the potential of atrophy as a future drug target, but could also help in learning more about the hippocampus in both health and diseases.

  7. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  8. Antiobesity therapy: emerging drugs and targets.

    PubMed

    Das, Saibal Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ranjan

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and its associated morbidities and mortalities are the effects of imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. The healthcare burden for the treatment of obesity is significantly high, due to increased risk of secondary chronic diseases such as hypertension and associated co-morbidities such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Lack of physical activity, high fat diets and sedentary life styles are major factors contributing to obesity. However, genetic predisposition and ethnicity are increasingly found to cause obesity. Till date, approved therapeutics have addressed excess energy intake by acting on central neural circuits that regulate feeding or on peripheral mechanisms to reduce nutrient absorption from the gut. These approaches have met with moderate success; and recently with safety concerns, leaving an unmet medical need for effective and safe pharmacotherapy for obesity thereby posing a significant challenge to pharmaceutical industry. Potential antiobesity drugs, which are being investigated by different companies, can be classified in 4 broad categories: 1) Agents that primarily decrease appetite through central action; 2) Agents that primarily increase metabolic rate or affect metabolism through peripheral action; 3) Agents that act on gastrointestinal tract; and 4) Agents that not only affect obesity but also overall Metabolic Syndrome. The current review will deal mainly with different molecules, which are under development for the above-mentioned targets and also their potential benefits and disadvantages.

  9. Cryptic prophages as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial chromosomes may contain up to 20% phage DNA that encodes diverse proteins ranging from those for photosynthesis to those for autoimmunity; hence, phages contribute greatly to the metabolic potential of pathogens. Active prophages carrying genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance can be excised from the host chromosome to form active phages and are transmissible among different bacterial hosts upon SOS responses. Cryptic prophages are artifacts of mutagenesis in which lysogenic phage are captured in the bacterial chromosome: they may excise but they do not form active phage particles or lyse their captors. Hence, cryptic prophages are relatively permanent reservoirs of genes, many of which benefit pathogens, in ways we are just beginning to discern. Here we explore the role of active prophage- and cryptic prophage-derived proteins in terms of (i) virulence, (ii) antibiotic resistance, and (iii) antibiotic tolerance; antibiotic tolerance occurs as a result of the non-heritable phenotype of dormancy which is a result of activation of toxins of toxin/antitoxin loci that are frequently encoded in cryptic prophages. Therefore, cryptic prophages are promising targets for drug development. PMID:27449596

  10. Drug Targets from Genetics: Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Karin M.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical issues in Parkinson disease (PD) research is the identity of the specific toxic, pathogenic moiety. In PD, mutations in alpha-synuclein (αsyn) or multiplication of the SNCA gene encoding αsyn, result in a phenotype of cellular inclusions, cell death, and brain dysfunction. While the historical point of view has been that the macroscopic aggregates containing αsyn are the toxic species, in the last several years evidence has emerged that suggests instead that smaller soluble species - likely oligomers containing misfolded αsyn - are actually the toxic moiety and that the fibrillar inclusions may even be a cellular detoxification pathway and less harmful. If soluble misfolded species of αsyn are the toxic moieties, then cellular mechanisms that degrade misfolded αsyn would be neuroprotective and a rational target for drug development. In this review we will discuss the fundamental mechanisms underlying αsyn toxicity including oligomer formation, oxidative stress, and degradation pathways and consider rational therapeutic strategies that may have the potential to prevent or halt αsyn induced pathogenesis in PD. PMID:21838671

  11. Cryptic prophages as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial chromosomes may contain up to 20% phage DNA that encodes diverse proteins ranging from those for photosynthesis to those for autoimmunity; hence, phages contribute greatly to the metabolic potential of pathogens. Active prophages carrying genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance can be excised from the host chromosome to form active phages and are transmissible among different bacterial hosts upon SOS responses. Cryptic prophages are artifacts of mutagenesis in which lysogenic phage are captured in the bacterial chromosome: they may excise but they do not form active phage particles or lyse their captors. Hence, cryptic prophages are relatively permanent reservoirs of genes, many of which benefit pathogens, in ways we are just beginning to discern. Here we explore the role of active prophage- and cryptic prophage-derived proteins in terms of (i) virulence, (ii) antibiotic resistance, and (iii) antibiotic tolerance; antibiotic tolerance occurs as a result of the non-heritable phenotype of dormancy which is a result of activation of toxins of toxin/antitoxin loci that are frequently encoded in cryptic prophages. Therefore, cryptic prophages are promising targets for drug development.

  12. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sadhukhan, Gobinda Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug resistance. PMID

  13. Predictive in silico off-target profiling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Friedemann; Matter, Hans; Hessler, Gerhard; Czich, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Drug action can be rationalized as interaction of a molecule with proteins in a regulatory network of targets from a specific biological system. Both drug and side effects are often governed by interaction of the drug molecule with many, often unrelated, targets. Accordingly, arrays of protein-ligand interaction data from numerous in vitro profiling assays today provide growing evidence of polypharmacological drug interactions, even for marketed drugs. In vitro off-target profiling has therefore become an important tool in early drug discovery to learn about potential off-target liabilities, which are sometimes beneficial, but more often safety relevant. The rapidly developing field of in silico profiling approaches is complementing in vitro profiling. These approaches capitalize from large amounts of biochemical data from multiple sources to be exploited for optimizing undesirable side effects in pharmaceutical research. Therefore, current in silico profiling models are nowadays perceived as valuable tools in drug discovery, and promise a platform to support optimally informed decisions.

  14. Assessing drug target association using semantic linked data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ding, Ying; Wild, David J

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of public data in chemistry and biology provides new opportunities for large-scale data mining for drug discovery. Systematic integration of these heterogeneous sets and provision of algorithms to data mine the integrated sets would permit investigation of complex mechanisms of action of drugs. In this work we integrated and annotated data from public datasets relating to drugs, chemical compounds, protein targets, diseases, side effects and pathways, building a semantic linked network consisting of over 290,000 nodes and 720,000 edges. We developed a statistical model to assess the association of drug target pairs based on their relation with other linked objects. Validation experiments demonstrate the model can correctly identify known direct drug target pairs with high precision. Indirect drug target pairs (for example drugs which change gene expression level) are also identified but not as strongly as direct pairs. We further calculated the association scores for 157 drugs from 10 disease areas against 1683 human targets, and measured their similarity using a [Formula: see text] score matrix. The similarity network indicates that drugs from the same disease area tend to cluster together in ways that are not captured by structural similarity, with several potential new drug pairings being identified. This work thus provides a novel, validated alternative to existing drug target prediction algorithms. The web service is freely available at: http://chem2bio2rdf.org/slap.

  15. A weighted and integrated drug-target interactome: drug repurposing for schizophrenia as a use case

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational pharmacology can uniquely address some issues in the process of drug development by providing a macroscopic view and a deeper understanding of drug action. Specifically, network-assisted approach is promising for the inference of drug repurposing. However, the drug-target associations coming from different sources and various assays have much noise, leading to an inflation of the inference errors. To reduce the inference errors, it is necessary and critical to create a comprehensive and weighted data set of drug-target associations. Results In this study, we created a weighted and integrated drug-target interactome (WinDTome) to provide a comprehensive resource of drug-target associations for computational pharmacology. We first collected drug-target interactions from six commonly used drug-target centered data sources including DrugBank, KEGG, TTD, MATADOR, PDSP Ki Database, and BindingDB. Then, we employed the record linkage method to normalize drugs and targets to the unique identifiers by utilizing the public data sources including PubChem, Entrez Gene, and UniProt. To assess the reliability of the drug-target associations, we assigned two scores (Score_S and Score_R) to each drug-target association based on their data sources and publication references. Consequently, the WinDTome contains 546,196 drug-target associations among 303,018 compounds and 4,113 genes. To assess the application of the WinDTome, we designed a network-based approach for drug repurposing using mental disorder schizophrenia (SCZ) as a case. Starting from 41 known SCZ drugs and their targets, we inferred a total of 264 potential SCZ drugs through the associations of drug-target with Score_S higher than two in WinDTome and human protein-protein interactions. Among the 264 SCZ-related drugs, 39 drugs have been investigated in clinical trials for SCZ treatment and 74 drugs for the treatment of other mental disorders, respectively. Compared with the results using other

  16. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Sun, Wei; Salas, Antonio; Antia, Avan; Carvajal, Cindy; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhaojin; Zhou, Ming; Tawa, Gregory J.; Dehdashti, Jean; Zheng, Wei; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS) screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development. PMID:27486194

  17. Emerging high-throughput drug target validation technologies.

    PubMed

    Ilag, Leodevico L; Ng, Jocelyn H; Beste, Gerald; Henning, Stefan W

    2002-09-15

    Identifying the right target for drug development is a critical bottleneck in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. The genomics revolution has shifted the problem from a scarcity of targets to a surplus of putative drug targets. As the validity of a target cannot be simply inferred from correlative data, the key is confirmation of the causative role of a gene product in a particular disease. It should therefore be recognized that an effective therapeutic strategy requires an appropriate target validation technology to verify the right target.

  18. Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oommen P; Liu, Jianping; Sundaram, Karthi; Hilborn, Jöns; Oommen, Oommen P

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan derived nanoparticles are a promising delivery system owing to their unique tumour targeting ability. Exploiting fluorescein for inducing amphiphilicity in these biopolymers provides inherent imaging and drug stabilization capabilities by π-π stacking interactions with aromatic antineoplastic agents. This offers a versatile and highly customizable nanocarrier with narrow size distribution and high drug loading efficiency (80%) with sustained drug release. PMID:27431007

  19. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  20. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  1. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  2. Network-based characterization of drug-regulated genes, drug targets, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Max; Fortney, Kristen; Jurisica, Igor

    2012-08-01

    Proteins do not exert their effects in isolation of one another, but interact together in complex networks. In recent years, sophisticated methods have been developed to leverage protein-protein interaction (PPI) network structure to improve several stages of the drug discovery process. Network-based methods have been applied to predict drug targets, drug side effects, and new therapeutic indications. In this paper we have two aims. First, we review the past contributions of network approaches and methods to drug discovery, and discuss their limitations and possible future directions. Second, we show how past work can be generalized to gain a more complete understanding of how drugs perturb networks. Previous network-based characterizations of drug effects focused on the small number of known drug targets, i.e., direct binding partners of drugs. However, drugs affect many more genes than their targets - they can profoundly affect the cell's transcriptome. For the first time, we use networks to characterize genes that are differentially regulated by drugs. We found that drug-regulated genes differed from drug targets in terms of functional annotations, cellular localizations, and topological properties. Drug targets mainly included receptors on the plasma membrane, down-regulated genes were largely in the nucleus and were enriched for DNA binding, and genes lacking drug relationships were enriched in the extracellular region. Network topology analysis indicated several significant graph properties, including high degree and betweenness for the drug targets and drug-regulated genes, though possibly due to network biases. Topological analysis also showed that proteins of down-regulated genes appear to be frequently involved in complexes. Analyzing network distances between regulated genes, we found that genes regulated by structurally similar drugs were significantly closer than genes regulated by dissimilar drugs. Finally, network centrality of a drug

  3. SuperTarget and Matador: resources for exploring drug-target relationships

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Stefan; Kuhn, Michael; Dunkel, Mathias; Campillos, Monica; Senger, Christian; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Ahmed, Jessica; Urdiales, Eduardo Garcia; Gewiess, Andreas; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Schneider, Reinhard; Skoblo, Roman; Russell, Robert B.; Bourne, Philip E.; Bork, Peer; Preissner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The molecular basis of drug action is often not well understood. This is partly because the very abundant and diverse information generated in the past decades on drugs is hidden in millions of medical articles or textbooks. Therefore, we developed a one-stop data warehouse, SuperTarget that integrates drug-related information about medical indication areas, adverse drug effects, drug metabolization, pathways and Gene Ontology terms of the target proteins. An easy-to-use query interface enables the user to pose complex queries, for example to find drugs that target a certain pathway, interacting drugs that are metabolized by the same cytochrome P450 or drugs that target the same protein but are metabolized by different enzymes. Furthermore, we provide tools for 2D drug screening and sequence comparison of the targets. The database contains more than 2500 target proteins, which are annotated with about 7300 relations to 1500 drugs; the vast majority of entries have pointers to the respective literature source. A subset of these drugs has been annotated with additional binding information and indirect interactions and is available as a separate resource called Matador. SuperTarget and Matador are available at http://insilico.charite.de/supertarget and http://matador.embl.de PMID:17942422

  4. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juríková, A.; Csach, K.; Koneracká, M.; Závišová, V.; Múčková, M.; Tomašovičová, N.; Lancz, G.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Miškuf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  5. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  6. Cholecystokinin as a target for neuropsychiatric drugs.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    1998-08-01

    Cholecystokinin (CKK) has gained in importance in research for several reasons. Recent evidence suggests that CCK is implicated in the regulation of anxiety. Animal studies support human findings that CCK induces anxiety-like behaviors through CCK(B) receptors. Presently available CCK antagonists do not seem to be potent anxiolytic and antipanic drugs. Animal and human studies have also been conducted on the role of CCK in schizophrenia. The obvious neuroanatomical association between dopamine and CCK continues to stimulate research directed towards the development of new antipsychotic drugs. In spite of considerable effort made in this area, it is rather doubtful that CCK agonists or antagonists can be potent antipsychotic drugs. Of particular relevance are findings implicating CCK in anxiogenic processes associated with drug dependence and withdrawal. The most important avenue for CCK seems to be addictive disorders. Considering the therapeutic potential of these compounds, further developments in this field can be anticipated.

  7. Female Athletes: Targets for Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1986-01-01

    Increased participation in sports and greater pressures to win have made female athletes very vulnerable to drug abuse. How the physiology and socialization of females contributes to this problem is discussed. (Author/MT)

  8. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  9. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  10. Prioritizing Genomic Drug Targets in Pathogens: Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samiul; Daugelat, Sabine; Rao, P. S. Srinivasa; Schreiber, Mark

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a software program that weights and integrates specific properties on the genes in a pathogen so that they may be ranked as drug targets. We applied this software to produce three prioritized drug target lists for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, a disease for which a new drug is desperately needed. Each list is based on an individual criterion. The first list prioritizes metabolic drug targets by the uniqueness of their roles in the M. tuberculosis metabolome (“metabolic chokepoints”) and their similarity to known “druggable” protein classes (i.e., classes whose activity has previously been shown to be modulated by binding a small molecule). The second list prioritizes targets that would specifically impair M. tuberculosis, by weighting heavily those that are closely conserved within the Actinobacteria class but lack close homology to the host and gut flora. M. tuberculosis can survive asymptomatically in its host for many years by adapting to a dormant state referred to as “persistence.” The final list aims to prioritize potential targets involved in maintaining persistence in M. tuberculosis. The rankings of current, candidate, and proposed drug targets are highlighted with respect to these lists. Some features were found to be more accurate than others in prioritizing studied targets. It can also be shown that targets can be prioritized by using evolutionary programming to optimize the weights of each desired property. We demonstrate this approach in prioritizing persistence targets. PMID:16789813

  11. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  12. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  13. In vivo drug target discovery: identifying the best targets from the genome.

    PubMed

    Walke, D W; Han, C; Shaw, J; Wann, E; Zambrowicz, B; Sands, A

    2001-12-01

    A vast number of genes of unknown function threaten to clog drug discovery pipelines. To develop therapeutic products from novel genomic targets, it will be necessary to correlate biology with gene sequence information. Industrialized mouse reverse genetics is being used to determine gene function in the context of mammalian physiology and to identify the best targets for drug development.

  14. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile

    2016-07-01

    Due to the ability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB), and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed. PMID:27471668

  15. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; Fanelli, M; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; Serra, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell lines. Results: Human osteosarcoma cell lines proved to be highly sensitive to both drugs. A decreased drug sensitivity was observed in doxorubicin-resistant cell lines, most probably related to ABCB1/MDR1 overexpression. Both drugs variably induced hyperploidy and apoptosis in the majority of cell lines. VX-680 also reduced in vitro cell motility and soft-agar cloning efficiency. Drug association experiments showed that VX-680 positively interacts with all conventional drugs used in osteosarcoma chemotherapy, overcoming the cross-resistance observed in the single-drug treatments. Conclusion: Aurora kinase-A and -B represent new candidate therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. In vitro analysis of the Aurora kinases inhibitors VX-680 and ZM447439 indicated in VX-680 a new promising drug of potential clinical usefulness in association with conventional osteosarcoma chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24129234

  16. Leveraging Big Data to Transform Target Selection and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  17. Leveraging big data to transform target selection and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  18. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Muqing; Duval, Kayla; Guo, Xing; Chen, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this article, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (passive targeting, active targeting and physical targeting), compare methods of action, advantages, limitations, and the current stage of research. For the most commonly used nanoparticle carriers, fabrication methods are also reviewed. This is followed by a review of computational simulations and models on nanoparticle-based drug delivery. PMID:27398083

  19. Application of chemical biology in target identification and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Xiao, Ting; Lei, Saifei; Zhou, Fulai; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Drug discovery and development is vital to the well-being of mankind and sustainability of the pharmaceutical industry. Using chemical biology approaches to discover drug leads has become a widely accepted path partially because of the completion of the Human Genome Project. Chemical biology mainly solves biological problems through searching previously unknown targets for pharmacologically active small molecules or finding ligands for well-defined drug targets. It is a powerful tool to study how these small molecules interact with their respective targets, as well as their roles in signal transduction, molecular recognition and cell functions. There have been an increasing number of new therapeutic targets being identified and subsequently validated as a result of advances in functional genomics, which in turn led to the discovery of numerous active small molecules via a variety of high-throughput screening initiatives. In this review, we highlight some applications of chemical biology in the context of drug discovery.

  20. Mitochondrial drug targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in neurodegenerative diseases. Given the fact that mitochondria participate in diverse cellular processes, including energetics, metabolism, and death, the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuronal cells are inevitable. In fact, new strategies targeting mitochondrial dysfunction are emerging as potential alternatives to current treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on mitochondrial proteins that are directly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We also examine recently identified small molecule modulators of these mitochondrial targets and assess their potential in research and therapeutic applications.

  1. A Tutorial on Target-Mediated Drug Disposition (TMDD) Models

    PubMed Central

    Dua, P; Hawkins, E; van der Graaf, PH

    2015-01-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) is the phenomenon in which a drug binds with high affinity to its pharmacological target site (such as a receptor) to such an extent that this affects its pharmacokinetic characteristics.1 The aim of this Tutorial is to provide an introductory guide to the mathematical aspects of TMDD models for pharmaceutical researchers. Examples of Berkeley Madonna2 code for some models discussed in this Tutorial are provided in the Supplementary Materials. PMID:26225261

  2. Large-scale Direct Targeting for Drug Repositioning and Discovery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunli; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Wu, Ziyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Fu, Yingxue; Ru, Jinlong; Ali Shar, Piar; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    A system-level identification of drug-target direct interactions is vital to drug repositioning and discovery. However, the biological means on a large scale remains challenging and expensive even nowadays. The available computational models mainly focus on predicting indirect interactions or direct interactions on a small scale. To address these problems, in this work, a novel algorithm termed weighted ensemble similarity (WES) has been developed to identify drug direct targets based on a large-scale of 98,327 drug-target relationships. WES includes: (1) identifying the key ligand structural features that are highly-related to the pharmacological properties in a framework of ensemble; (2) determining a drug's affiliation of a target by evaluation of the overall similarity (ensemble) rather than a single ligand judgment; and (3) integrating the standardized ensemble similarities (Z score) by Bayesian network and multi-variate kernel approach to make predictions. All these lead WES to predict drug direct targets with external and experimental test accuracies of 70% and 71%, respectively. This shows that the WES method provides a potential in silico model for drug repositioning and discovery.

  3. NIH tools facilitate matching cancer drugs with gene targets

    Cancer.gov

    A new study details how a suite of web-based tools provides the research community with greatly improved capacity to compare data derived from large collections of genomic information against thousands of drugs. By comparing drugs and genetic targets, re

  4. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on ocular targets.

    PubMed

    Honda, Miki; Asai, Tomohiro; Oku, Naoto; Araki, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Minoru; Ebihara, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Poor drug delivery to lesions in patients' eyes is a major obstacle to the treatment of ocular diseases. The accessibility of these areas to drugs is highly restricted by the presence of barriers, including the corneal barrier, aqueous barrier, and the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers. In particular, the posterior segment is difficult to reach for drugs because of its structural peculiarities. This review discusses various barriers to drug delivery and provides comprehensive information for designing nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases. Nanoparticles can be designed to improve penetration, controlled release, and drug targeting. As highlighted in this review, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs in ocular diseases has been reported to be enhanced by the use of nanoparticles such as liposomes, micro/nanospheres, microemulsions, and dendrimers. Our recent data show that intravitreal injection of targeted liposomes encapsulating an angiogenesis inhibitor caused significantly greater suppression of choroidal neovascularization than did the injection of free drug. Recent progress in ocular drug delivery systems research has provided new insights into drug development, and the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery is thus a promising approach for advanced therapy of ocular diseases. PMID:23439842

  5. Drug target identification in intracellular and extracellular protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand for novel anti-parasitic drugs due to resistance formation to well-established chemotherapeutically important compounds has increased the demands for a better understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of existing drugs and of drugs in development. While different approaches have been developed to identify the targets and thus mode of action of anti-parasitic compounds, it has become clear that many drugs act not only on one, but possibly several parasite molecules or even pathways. Ideally, these targets are not present in any cells of the host. In the case of apicomplexan parasites, the unique apicoplast, provides a suitable target for compounds binding to DNA or ribosomal RNA of prokaryotic origin. In the case of intracellular pathogens, a given drug might not only affect the pathogen by directly acting on parasite-associated targets, but also indirectly, by altering the host cell physiology. This in turn could affect the parasite development and lead to parasite death. In this review, we provide an overview of strategies for target identification, and present examples of selected drug targets, ranging from proteins to nucleic acids to intermediary metabolism.

  6. Aiming drug discovery at lysophosphatidic acid targets

    PubMed Central

    Tigyi, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, 1-radyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphate) is the prototype member of a family of lipid mediators and second messengers. LPA and its naturally occurring analogues interact with G protein-coupled receptors on the cell surface and a nuclear hormone receptor within the cell. In addition, there are several enzymes that utilize LPA as a substrate or generate it as a product and are under its regulatory control. LPA is present in biological fluids, and attempts have been made to link changes in its concentration and molecular composition to specific disease conditions. Through their many targets, members of the LPA family regulate cell survival, apoptosis, motility, shape, differentiation, gene transcription, malignant transformation and more. The present review depicts arbitrary aspects of the physiological and pathophysiological actions of LPA and attempts to link them with select targets. Many of us are now convinced that therapies targeting LPA biosynthesis and signalling are feasible for the treatment of devastating human diseases such as cancer, fibrosis and degenerative conditions. However, successful targeting of the pathways associated with this pleiotropic lipid will depend on the future development of as yet undeveloped pharmacons. PMID:20735414

  7. Dendrimeric micelles for controlled drug release and targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Ashootosh V.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights the developments in dendrimer-based micelles for drug delivery. Dendrimers, the perfectly branched monodisperse macromolecules, have certain structural advantages that make them attractive candidates as drug carriers for controlled release or targeted delivery. As polymeric micelle-based approaches precede the work in dendrimers, these are also discussed briefly. The review concludes with a perspective on possible applications of biaryl-based dendrimeric micelles that exhibit environment-dependent conformations, in drug delivery. PMID:16053329

  8. Discovery of Anthelmintic Drug Targets and Drugs Using Chokepoints in Nematode Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christina M.; Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Powell, Kerrie; Schedl, Tim; Pearce, Edward J.; Abubucker, Sahar; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic roundworm infections plague more than 2 billion people (1/3 of humanity) and cause drastic losses in crops and livestock. New anthelmintic drugs are urgently needed as new drug resistance and environmental concerns arise. A “chokepoint reaction” is defined as a reaction that either consumes a unique substrate or produces a unique product. A chokepoint analysis provides a systematic method of identifying novel potential drug targets. Chokepoint enzymes were identified in the genomes of 10 nematode species, and the intersection and union of all chokepoint enzymes were found. By studying and experimentally testing available compounds known to target proteins orthologous to nematode chokepoint proteins in public databases, this study uncovers features of chokepoints that make them successful drug targets. Chemogenomic screening was performed on drug-like compounds from public drug databases to find existing compounds that target homologs of nematode chokepoints. The compounds were prioritized based on chemical properties frequently found in successful drugs and were experimentally tested using Caenorhabditis elegans. Several drugs that are already known anthelmintic drugs and novel candidate targets were identified. Seven of the compounds were tested in Caenorhabditis elegans and three yielded a detrimental phenotype. One of these three drug-like compounds, Perhexiline, also yielded a deleterious effect in Haemonchus contortus and Onchocerca lienalis, two nematodes with divergent forms of parasitism. Perhexiline, known to affect the fatty acid oxidation pathway in mammals, caused a reduction in oxygen consumption rates in C. elegans and genome-wide gene expression profiles provided an additional confirmation of its mode of action. Computational modeling of Perhexiline and its target provided structural insights regarding its binding mode and specificity. Our lists of prioritized drug targets and drug-like compounds have potential to expedite the discovery

  9. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Forte, Trudy M.; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  10. Targeting autophagic pathways for cancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku; Yang, Jin-Ming; Cheng, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process, has drawn an increasing amount of attention in recent years for its role in a variety of human diseases, such as cancer. Notably, autophagy plays an important role in regulating several survival and death signaling pathways that determine cell fate in cancer. To date, substantial evidence has demonstrated that some key autophagic mediators, such as autophagy-related genes (ATGs), PI3K, mTOR, p53, and Beclin-1, may play crucial roles in modulating autophagic activity in cancer initiation and progression. Because autophagy-modulating agents such as rapamycin and chloroquine have already been used clinically to treat cancer, it is conceivable that targeting autophagic pathways may provide a new opportunity for discovery and development of more novel cancer therapeutics. With a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing autophagy, we will have a better opportunity to facilitate the exploitation of autophagy as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer. This review discusses the current status of targeting autophagic pathways as a potential cancer therapy. PMID:22835386

  11. Respiratory ATP synthesis: the new generation of mycobacterial drug targets?

    PubMed

    Bald, Dirk; Koul, Anil

    2010-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, poses a global health challenge due to the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Recently, bacterial energy metabolism has come into focus as a promising new target pathway for the development of antimycobacterial drugs. This review summarizes our current knowledge on mycobacterial respiratory energy conversion, in particular, during the physiologically dormant state that is associated with latent or persistent tuberculosis infections. Targeting components of respiratory ATP production, such as type-2 NADH dehydrogenase or ATP synthase, is illustrated as an emerging strategy in the development of novel drugs.

  12. Micromixer Based Preparation of Functionalized Liposomes and Targeting Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqian; Wang, Weizhi; Han, Qiuju; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Yunhong; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-14

    We present here a specific targeting nanocarrier system by functionalization of liposomes with one new type of breast cancer targeting peptide (H6, YLFFVFER) by a micromixer with high efficiency. Antitumor drugs could be successfully delivered into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer cells with high efficiency in both in vivo and ex vivo models. PMID:27096054

  13. Large-scale Direct Targeting for Drug Repositioning and Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunli; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Wu, Ziyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Fu, Yingxue; Ru, Jinlong; Ali Shar, Piar; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    A system-level identification of drug-target direct interactions is vital to drug repositioning and discovery. However, the biological means on a large scale remains challenging and expensive even nowadays. The available computational models mainly focus on predicting indirect interactions or direct interactions on a small scale. To address these problems, in this work, a novel algorithm termed weighted ensemble similarity (WES) has been developed to identify drug direct targets based on a large-scale of 98,327 drug-target relationships. WES includes: (1) identifying the key ligand structural features that are highly-related to the pharmacological properties in a framework of ensemble; (2) determining a drug’s affiliation of a target by evaluation of the overall similarity (ensemble) rather than a single ligand judgment; and (3) integrating the standardized ensemble similarities (Z score) by Bayesian network and multi-variate kernel approach to make predictions. All these lead WES to predict drug direct targets with external and experimental test accuracies of 70% and 71%, respectively. This shows that the WES method provides a potential in silico model for drug repositioning and discovery. PMID:26155766

  14. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    PubMed

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754.

  15. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    PubMed

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. PMID:27121701

  16. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  17. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  18. Biodegradable Particulate Carrier Formulation and Tuning for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles have the potential to reform the drug development landscape by improving drug solubility, changing undesirable pharmacokinetics, realizing the benefits of new molecules arising from genomic and proteomic research, and increasing drug localization in target organs and tissues; i.e., drug targeting. This review provides an overview of the in vivo fate of biodegradable particulate carriers following administration via several routes, as well as how the patient's health state, disease pathophysiology and particle physicochemical properties affect such fates. It also discusses some of the widely used biodegradable polymers, their in vivo biochemical degradation, methods of nanoparticle formulation from such polymers and finally, how such methods could be tailored to achieve targeted delivery to specified tissues both passively and actively.

  19. INFERENCE OF PERSONALIZED DRUG TARGETS VIA NETWORK PROPAGATION.

    PubMed

    Shnaps, Ortal; Perry, Eyal; Silverbush, Dana; Sharan, Roded

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational strategy to simulate drug treatment in a personalized setting. The method is based on integrating patient mutation and differential expression data with a protein-protein interaction network. We test the impact of in-silico deletions of different proteins on the flow of information in the network and use the results to infer potential drug targets. We apply our method to AML data from TCGA and validate the predicted drug targets using known targets. To benchmark our patient-specific approach, we compare the personalized setting predictions to those of the conventional setting. Our predicted drug targets are highly enriched with known targets from DrugBank and COSMIC (p < 10(-5) outperforming the non-personalized predictions. Finally, we focus on the largest AML patient subgroup (~30%) which is characterized by an FLT3 mutation, and utilize our prediction score to rank patient sensitivity to inhibition of each predicted target, reproducing previous findings of in-vitro experiments.

  20. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  1. Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Targeted Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xianbo; Ali, Zeeshan; Li, Song; He, Nongyue

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are a special kind of nanomaterials and widely used in biomedical technology applications. Currently they are popularly customized for disease detection and treatment, particularly as drug carriers in drug targeted delivery systems, as a therapeutic in hyperthermia (treating tumors with heat), and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to their biocompatibility and superparamagnetic properties, MNPs as next generation drug carriers have great attraction. Although the potential benefits of MNPs are considerable, any potential toxicity associated with these MNPs should be identified distinctly. The drug loading capability and the biomedical properties of MNPs generated by different surface coatings are the most sensitive parameters in toxicity. A lot of organic and inorganic materials are utilized as coating materials for surface functionalization and reducing toxicity of MNPs. pH or temperature sensitivity materials are widely used to manage drug loading and targeted release. In addition, MNPs can be controlled and directed to the desired pathological region by using external magnetic files (EMF). The realization of targeted drug delivery has decreased the dosage and improved the efficiency of drugs, which results in reduced side effects to normal tissues. This review discussed the possible organ toxicities of MNPs and their current advances as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:26328305

  2. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoop, M; Mushtaq, F; Hurter, C; Chen, X-Z; Nelson, B J; Pané, S

    2016-07-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. PMID:27297037

  3. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  4. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps. PMID:27463566

  5. Membrane lipidomics for the discovery of new antiparasitic drug targets.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Eric; Riou, Mickaël; Kerboeuf, Dominique; Beugnet, Frédéric; Chaminade, Pierre; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2011-11-01

    Advances in lipid separation methods and mass spectrometry technologies allow the fine characterization of the lipidome of parasites, ranging from unicellular protists to worms, which cause threatening infections in vertebrates, including humans. Specific lipid structures or lipid metabolic pathways can inspire the development of novel antiparasitic drugs. Changes in the lipid balance in membranes of parasites can also provide clues on the dynamics of drugs and some mechanisms of drug resistance. This review highlights recent trends in parasite lipidomics, combined with functional analyses, for the discovery of novel targets and the development of novel drugs.

  6. HMGB1 as biomarker and drug target.

    PubMed

    Venereau, Emilie; De Leo, Federica; Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Careccia, Giorgia; Musco, Giovanna; Bianchi, Marco E

    2016-09-01

    High Mobility Group Box 1 protein was discovered as a nuclear protein, but it has a "second life" outside the cell where it acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern. HMGB1 is passively released or actively secreted in a number of diseases, including trauma, chronic inflammatory disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer. Extracellular HMGB1 triggers and sustains the inflammatory response by inducing cytokine release and by recruiting leucocytes. These characteristics make extracellular HMGB1 a key molecular target in multiple diseases. A number of strategies have been used to prevent HMGB1 release or to inhibit its activities. Current pharmacological strategies include antibodies, peptides, decoy receptors and small molecules. Noteworthy, salicylic acid, a metabolite of aspirin, has been recently found to inhibit HMGB1. HMGB1 undergoes extensive post-translational modifications, in particular acetylation and oxidation, which modulate its functions. Notably, high levels of serum HMGB1, in particular of the hyper-acetylated and disulfide isoforms, are sensitive disease biomarkers and are associated with different disease stages. In the future, the development of isoform-specific HMGB1 inhibitors may potentiate and fine-tune the pharmacological control of inflammation. We review here the current therapeutic strategies targeting HMGB1, in particular the emerging and relatively unexplored small molecules-based approach. PMID:27378565

  7. Drug elucidation: invertebrate genetics sheds new light on the molecular targets of CNS drugs

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Donard S.; Aamodt, Eric; Cohen, Bruce; Buttner, Edgar A.

    2014-01-01

    Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents, and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts. PMID:25120487

  8. Drug elucidation: invertebrate genetics sheds new light on the molecular targets of CNS drugs.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Donard S; Aamodt, Eric; Cohen, Bruce; Buttner, Edgar A

    2014-01-01

    Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents, and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts. PMID:25120487

  9. Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of molecularly targeted drugs in cancer for target pathway evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mashima, Tetsuo; Ushijima, Masaru; Matsuura, Masaaki; Tsukahara, Satomi; Kunimasa, Kazuhiro; Furuno, Aki; Saito, Sakae; Kitamura, Masami; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Dan, Shingo; Yamori, Takao; Tomida, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a rational and promising strategy for the treatment of advanced cancer. For the development of clinical agents targeting oncogenic signaling pathways, it is important to define the specificity of compounds to the target molecular pathway. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis is an unbiased approach to evaluate the compound mode of action, but it is still unknown whether the analysis could be widely applicable to classify molecularly targeted anticancer agents. We comprehensively obtained and analyzed 129 transcriptomic datasets of cancer cells treated with 83 anticancer drugs or related agents, covering most clinically used, molecularly targeted drugs alongside promising inhibitors of molecular cancer targets. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that compounds targeting similar target molecules or pathways were clustered together. These results confirmed that the gene signatures of these drugs reflected their modes of action. Of note, inhibitors of oncogenic kinase pathways formed a large unique cluster, showing that these agents affect a shared molecular pathway distinct from classical antitumor agents and other classes of agents. The gene signature analysis further classified kinome-targeting agents depending on their target signaling pathways, and we identified target pathway-selective signature gene sets. The gene expression analysis was also valuable in uncovering unexpected target pathways of some anticancer agents. These results indicate that comprehensive transcriptomic analysis with our database (http://scads.jfcr.or.jp/db/cs/) is a powerful strategy to validate and re-evaluate the target pathways of anticancer compounds. PMID:25911996

  10. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future.

  11. Targeting anti-HIV drugs to the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kavitha S; Ghorpade, Anuja; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral drugs over the past couple of decades has been commendable due to the identification of several new targets within the overall Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) replication cycle. However, complete control over HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is yet to be achieved. This is because the current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. This occurs because most anti-HIV drugs do not accumulate in certain cellular and anatomical reservoirs including the Central Nervous System (CNS). Insufficient delivery of anti-HIV drugs to the CNS is attributed to their low permeability across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Hence, low and sustained viral replication within the CNS continues even during prolonged antiretroviral drug therapy. Therefore, developing novel approaches that are targeted at enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required. In this review, we discussed the potential of nanocarriers and the role of cell-penetrating peptides in enhancing drug delivery to the CNS. Such drug delivery approaches could also lead to higher drug delivery to other cellular and anatomical reservoirs where the virus harbor than with conventional treatment, thus providing an effective therapy to eliminate the virus completely from the body. PMID:19566446

  12. Matrix metalloproteinases: drug targets for myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Li, Yaojun; Chilton, Robert J.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid advances in the treatment of acute MI have significantly improved short-term outcomes in patient, due in large part to successes in preventing myocardial cell death and limiting infarct area during the time of ischemia and subsequent reperfusion. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) play key roles in post-MI cardiac remodeling and in the development of adverse outcomes. This review highlights the importance of MMPs in the injury and remodeling response of the left ventricle and also discusses their potential as therapeutic targets Additional pre-clinical and clinical research is needed to further investigate and understand the cardioprotective effects of MMPs inhibitors. PMID:23316962

  13. Aquaporins: important but elusive drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Anderson, Marc O.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2014-01-01

    The aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small, integral membrane proteins that facilitate water transport across the plasma membranes of cells in response to osmotic gradients. Data from knockout mice support the involvement of AQPs in epithelial fluid secretion, cell migration, brain oedema and adipocyte metabolism, which suggests that modulation of AQP function or expression could have therapeutic potential in oedema, cancer, obesity, brain injury, glaucoma and several other conditions. Moreover, loss-of-function mutations in human AQPs cause congenital cataracts (AQP0) and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (AQP2), and autoantibodies against AQP4 cause the autoimmune demyelinating disease neuromyelitis optica. Although some potential AQP modulators have been identified, challenges associated with the development of better modulators include the druggability of the target and the suitability of the assay methods used to identify modulators. PMID:24625825

  14. Emerging targeted drug therapies in skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Yap, Patrick; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2016-10-01

    Quantum advances have occurred in the field of human genetics in the six decades since Watson and Crick expressed their "wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid." These culminated with the human genome project, which has opened up myriad possibilities, including that of individualized genetic medicine, the ability to deliver medical advice, management, and therapy tailored to an individual's genetic blueprint. Advances in genetic diagnostic capabilities have been rapid, to the point where the genome can be sequenced for several thousand dollars. Crucially, it has facilitated the identification of targets for "precision" treatments to combat genetic diseases at their source. This manuscript will review the innovative, pathogenesis-based therapies that are revolutionizing management of skeletal dysplasias, giving patients and families new options and outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27155200

  15. A functional variomics tool for discovering drug resistance genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Chen, Kaifu; Zhang, Jianhuai; Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Hui; Cui, Dandan; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Yong; Shi, Xiaomin; Li, Wei; Liu, Dan; Chen, Rui; Sucgang, Richard S.; Pan, Xuewen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive discovery of genetic mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of in vivo drug targets represent significant challenges. Here we present a functional variomics technology in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This tool analyzes numerous genetic variants and effectively tackles both problems simultaneously. Using this tool, we discovered almost all genes that, due to mutations or modest overexpression, confer resistance to rapamycin, cycloheximide, and amphotericin B. Most significant among the resistance genes were drug targets, including multiple targets of a given drug. With amphotericin B, we discovered the highly conserved membrane protein Pmp3 as a potent resistance factor and a possible novel target. Widespread application of this tool should allow rapid identification of conserved resistance mechanisms and targets of many more compounds. New genes and alleles that confer resistance to other stresses can also be discovered. Similar tools in other systems such as human cell lines will also be useful. PMID:23416056

  16. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  17. The Targeted-liposome Delivery System of Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-dang; Yi, Xiu-lin; Jiang, Li-xin; Li, Ya-zhuo; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Rong-da; Dai, Li-peng; Li, Wei; Ci, Xiao-yan; Si, Duan-yun; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-01-01

    The liposome delivery system has been intensively explored as novel drug delivery system (DDS) for antitumor drugs, due to its safety, selective cytotoxicity, long circulation and slow elimination in blood, which is favorable for cancer therapy. The liposome-based chemotherapeutics are used to treat a variety of cancers to enhance the therapeutic index of antitumor drugs. Here, the author reviewed the important targets for cancer therapy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of liposomal drugs in vivo, as well as the application of the targeting liposomal system in cancer therapy. Considering further application for clinical use, the great challenges of the liposome-based delivery system were also proposed as follows: 1) prepare stealth liposome with steric stabilization and further enhance the therapeutic effects and safety; 2) explore more safe clinical targets and complementary or different types of targeting liposome; 3) thirdly, more investment is needed on the research of pharmacokinetics of the elements such as the ligands (antibody), PEG and lipids of liposome delivery system as well as safety evaluation. Considering the complex process of the liposomal encapsulation drugs in vivo, the author inferred that there are maybe different forms of the encapsulation drug to be internalized by the tumor tissues at the same time and space, although there are little reports on it. PMID:26652257

  18. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  19. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on neurological targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases represent a medical, social, and economic problem of paramount importance in developed countries. Although their etiology is generally known, developing therapeutic interventions for the central nervous system is challenging due to the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier. Thus, the fight against neurological diseases usually struggles “at the gates” of the brain. Flooding the bloodstream with drugs, where only a minor fraction reaches its target therapeutic site, is an inefficient, expensive, and dangerous procedure, because of the risk of side effects at nontargeted sites. Currently, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled development of a generation of multifunctional molecular platforms that are capable of transporting drugs across the blood–brain barrier, targeting specific cell types or functional states within the brain, releasing drugs in a controlled manner, and enabling visualization of processes in vivo using conventional imaging systems. The marriage between drug delivery and molecular imaging disciplines has resulted in a relatively new discipline, known as theranostics, which represents the basis of the concept of personalized medicine. In this study, we review the concepts of the blood–brain barrier and the strategies used to traverse/bypass it, the role of nanotechnology in theranostics, the wide range of nanoparticles (with emphasis on liposomes) that can be used as stealth drug carriers, imaging probes and targeting devices for the treatment of neurological diseases, and the targets and targeting strategies envisaged in the treatment of different types of brain pathology. PMID:23486739

  20. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on neurological targets.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases represent a medical, social, and economic problem of paramount importance in developed countries. Although their etiology is generally known, developing therapeutic interventions for the central nervous system is challenging due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the fight against neurological diseases usually struggles "at the gates" of the brain. Flooding the bloodstream with drugs, where only a minor fraction reaches its target therapeutic site, is an inefficient, expensive, and dangerous procedure, because of the risk of side effects at nontargeted sites. Currently, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled development of a generation of multifunctional molecular platforms that are capable of transporting drugs across the blood-brain barrier, targeting specific cell types or functional states within the brain, releasing drugs in a controlled manner, and enabling visualization of processes in vivo using conventional imaging systems. The marriage between drug delivery and molecular imaging disciplines has resulted in a relatively new discipline, known as theranostics, which represents the basis of the concept of personalized medicine. In this study, we review the concepts of the blood-brain barrier and the strategies used to traverse/bypass it, the role of nanotechnology in theranostics, the wide range of nanoparticles (with emphasis on liposomes) that can be used as stealth drug carriers, imaging probes and targeting devices for the treatment of neurological diseases, and the targets and targeting strategies envisaged in the treatment of different types of brain pathology.

  1. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  2. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  3. New targets and targeted drugs for the treatment of cancer: an outlook to pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Rossig, Claudia; Juergens, Heribert; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2011-10-01

    Novel drugs and treatment modalities are urgently needed to further improve survival of children with cancer. In medical oncology, an increased understanding of the molecular basis of cancer is driving the development of new drugs that target relevant signaling pathways in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment. Small-molecule modulators of signal transduction and monoclonal antibodies against various cellular targets have been approved in adult cancers in recent years. These drugs are now starting to be considered for the use in children. Despite the biological differences between adult and pediatric cancers, common cellular pathways have emerged from experimental research. Thus, insights into clinical experience with molecular targeted drugs in adults may help to accelerate progress in pediatric oncology. Here, the authors review molecules and pathways for which drugs are approved for adult cancer treatment and provide links to existing and potential applications in pediatric oncology.

  4. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  5. Target-Independent Prediction of Drug Synergies Using Only Drug Lipophilicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of compounds have been instrumental in selecting lead compounds with increased drug-likeness. However, the relationship between physicochemical properties of constituent drugs and the tendency to exhibit drug interaction has not been systematically studied. We assembled physicochemical descriptors for a set of antifungal compounds (“drugs”) previously examined for interaction. Analyzing the relationship between molecular weight, lipophilicity, H-bond donor, and H-bond acceptor values for drugs and their propensity to show pairwise antifungal drug synergy, we found that combinations of two lipophilic drugs had a greater tendency to show drug synergy. We developed a more refined decision tree model that successfully predicted drug synergy in stringent cross-validation tests based on only lipophilicity of drugs. Our predictions achieved a precision of 63% and allowed successful prediction for 58% of synergistic drug pairs, suggesting that this phenomenon can extend our understanding for a substantial fraction of synergistic drug interactions. We also generated and analyzed a large-scale synergistic human toxicity network, in which we observed that combinations of lipophilic compounds show a tendency for increased toxicity. Thus, lipophilicity, a simple and easily determined molecular descriptor, is a powerful predictor of drug synergy. It is well established that lipophilic compounds (i) are promiscuous, having many targets in the cell, and (ii) often penetrate into the cell via the cellular membrane by passive diffusion. We discuss the positive relationship between drug lipophilicity and drug synergy in the context of potential drug synergy mechanisms. PMID:25026390

  6. Drug leads for interactive protein targets with unknown structure.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Scott, L Ridgway

    2016-04-01

    The disruption of protein-protein interfaces (PPIs) remains a challenge in drug discovery. The problem becomes daunting when the structure of the target protein is unknown and is even further complicated when the interface is susceptible to disruptive phosphorylation. Based solely on protein sequence and information about phosphorylation-susceptible sites within the PPI, a new technology has been developed to identify drug leads to inhibit protein associations. Here we reveal this technology and contrast it with current structure-based technologies for the generation of drug leads. The novel technology is illustrated by a patented invention to treat heart failure. The success of this technology shows that it is possible to generate drug leads in the absence of target structure. PMID:26484433

  7. Pim-1 kinase as cancer drug target: An update

    PubMed Central

    TURSYNBAY, YERNAR; ZHANG, JINFU; LI, ZHI; TOKAY, TURSONJAN; ZHUMADILOV, ZHAXYBAY; WU, DENGLONG; XIE, YINGQIU

    2016-01-01

    Proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus-1 (Pim-1) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates multiple cellular functions such as cell cycle, cell survival, drug resistance. Aberrant elevation of Pim-1 kinase is associated with numerous types of cancer. Two distinct isoforms of Pim-1 (Pim-1S and Pim-1L) show distinct cellular functions. Pim-1S predominately localizes to the nucleus and Pim-1L localizes to plasma membrane for drug resistance. Recent studies show that mitochondrial Pim-1 maintains mitochondrial integrity. Pim-1 is emerging as a cancer drug target, particularly in prostate cancer. Recently the potent new functions of Pim-1 in immunotherapy, senescence bypass, metastasis and epigenetic dynamics have been found. The aim of the present updated review is to provide brief information regarding networks of Pim-1 kinase and focus on its recent advances as a novel drug target. PMID:26893828

  8. Ion channels and drug transporters as targets for anthelmintics

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Infections with parasitic helminths such as schistosomes and soil-transmitted nematodes are hugely prevalent and responsible for a major portion of the global health and economic burdens associated with neglected tropical diseases. In addition, many of these parasites infect livestock and plants used in agriculture, resulting in further impoverishment. Treatment and control of these pathogens rely on anthelmintic drugs, which are few in number, and against which drug resistance can develop rapidly. The neuromuscular system of the parasite, and in particular, the ion channels and associated receptors underlying excitation and signaling, have proven to be outstanding targets for anthelmintics. This review will survey the different ion channels found in helminths, focusing on their unique characteristics and pharmacological sensitivities. It will also briefly review the literature on helminth multidrug efflux that may modulate parasite susceptibility to anthelmintics and may prove useful targets for new or repurposed agents that can enhance parasite drug susceptibility and perhaps overcome drug resistance. PMID:25554739

  9. Critical parameters in targeted drug development: the pharmacological audit trail.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai; Workman, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The Pharmacological Audit Trail (PhAT) comprises a set of critical questions that need to be asked during discovery and development of an anticancer drug. Key aspects include: (1) defining a patient population; (2) establishing pharmacokinetic characteristics; (3) providing evidence of target engagement, pathway modulation, and biological effect with proof of concept pharmacodynamic biomarkers; (4) determining intermediate biomarkers of response; (5) assessing tumor response; and (6) determining how to overcome resistance by combination or sequential therapy and new target/drug discovery. The questions asked in the PhAT should be viewed as a continuum and not used in isolation. Different drug development programmes derive different types of benefit from these questions. The PhAT is critical in making go-no-go decisions in the development of currently studied drugs and will continue to be relevant to discovery and development of future generations of anticancer agents.

  10. Critical parameters in targeted drug development: the pharmacological audit trail.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai; Workman, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The Pharmacological Audit Trail (PhAT) comprises a set of critical questions that need to be asked during discovery and development of an anticancer drug. Key aspects include: (1) defining a patient population; (2) establishing pharmacokinetic characteristics; (3) providing evidence of target engagement, pathway modulation, and biological effect with proof of concept pharmacodynamic biomarkers; (4) determining intermediate biomarkers of response; (5) assessing tumor response; and (6) determining how to overcome resistance by combination or sequential therapy and new target/drug discovery. The questions asked in the PhAT should be viewed as a continuum and not used in isolation. Different drug development programmes derive different types of benefit from these questions. The PhAT is critical in making go-no-go decisions in the development of currently studied drugs and will continue to be relevant to discovery and development of future generations of anticancer agents. PMID:27663475

  11. The role of acoustofluidics in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nilanjana; Zhang, Xunli; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of acoustic systems in clinical and therapeutic applications, acoustically driven microbubbles have gained a prominent role as powerful tools to carry, transfer, direct, and target drug molecules in cells, tissues, and tumors in the expanding fields of targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. The aim of the present study is to establish a biocompatible acoustic microfluidic system and to demonstrate the generation of an acoustic field and its effects on microbubbles and biological cells in the microfluidic system. The acoustic field creates non-linear oscillations of the microbubble-clusters, which results in generation of shear stress on cells in such microsystems. This effectively helps in delivering extracellular probes in living cells by sonoporation. The sonoporation is investigated under the combined effects of acoustic stress and hydrodynamic stress during targeted drug and gene delivery. PMID:26339329

  12. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  13. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  14. Nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery in brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Dinda, Subas C; Pattnaik, Gurudutta

    2013-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) found to act as rate limiting factor in drug delivery to brain in combating the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Such limiting physiological factors include the reticuloendothelial system and protein opsonization, which present across BBB, play major role in reducing the passage of drug. Several approaches employed to improve the drug delivery across the BBB. Nanoparticles (NP) are the solid colloidal particle ranges from 1 to 1000 nm in size utilized as career for drug delivery. At present NPs are found to play a significant advantage over the other methods of available drug delivery systems to deliver the drug across the BBB. Nanoparticles may be because of its size and functionalization characteristics able to penetrate and facilitate the drug delivery through the barrier. There are number of mechanisms and strategies found to be involved in this process, which are based on the type of nanomaterials used and its combination with therapeutic agents, such materials include liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and non-viral vectors of nano-sizes for CNS gene therapy, etc. Nanotechnology is expected to reduce the need for invasive procedures for delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Some devices such as implanted catheters and reservoirs however will still be needed to overcome the problems in effective drug delivery to the CNS. Nanomaterials are found to improve the safety and efficacy level of drug delivery devices in brain targeting. Nanoegineered devices are found to be delivering the drugs at cellular levels through nono-fluidic channels. Different drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nonogels and nonobiocapsules have been used to improve the bioavailability of the drug in the brain, but microchips and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate careers are found to be more effective therapeutically in treating brain tumor. The physiological approaches also utilized to improve the transcytosis capacity

  15. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

  16. Identifying problematic drugs based on the characteristics of their targets

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Shoemaker, Jason E.; Matsuoka, Yukiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Identifying promising compounds during the early stages of drug development is a major challenge for both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. The difficulties are even more pronounced when we consider multi-target pharmacology, where the compounds often target more than one protein, or multiple compounds are used together. Here, we address this problem by using machine learning and network analysis to process sequence and interaction data from human proteins to identify promising compounds. We used this strategy to identify properties that make certain proteins more likely to cause harmful effects when targeted; such proteins usually have domains commonly found throughout the human proteome. Additionally, since currently marketed drugs hit multiple targets simultaneously, we combined the information from individual proteins to devise a score that quantifies the likelihood of a compound being harmful to humans. This approach enabled us to distinguish between approved and problematic drugs with an accuracy of 60–70%. Moreover, our approach can be applied as soon as candidate drugs are available, as demonstrated with predictions for more than 5000 experimental drugs. These resources are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/psin/. PMID:26388775

  17. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  18. [Molecular targeted drugs for soft tissue sarcoma and neuroendocrine tumor].

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke

    2015-08-01

    Both the soft tissue sarcomas and the neuroendocrine tumors are rare diseases. Therefore the recruiting of these patients was more difficult than other cancer species, and the development of the new therapy for these diseases did not readily advance. However, the identification of driver molecules for each sub-type enabled us to the development of the molecular targeted drugs. As for the GIST, several TKIs are used, but in late years it is found that susceptibility of TKIs varies according to difference in second mutation. In this chapter, the molecular target drug for the soft tissue sarcoma and the neuroendocrine tumor is reviewed. PMID:26281696

  19. Lipid A as a Drug Target and Therapeutic Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this review, lipid A, from its discovery to recent findings, is presented as a drug target and therapeutic molecule. First, the biosynthetic pathway for lipid A, the Raetz pathway, serves as a good drug target for antibiotic development. Several assay methods used to screen for inhibitors of lipid A synthesis will be presented, and some of the promising lead compounds will be described. Second, utilization of lipid A biosynthetic pathways by various bacterial species can generate modified lipid A molecules with therapeutic value. PMID:26535075

  20. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  1. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions and Drug Repositioning via Network-Based Inference

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Lu, Weiqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Zhou, Weixing; Huang, Jin; Tang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Drug-target interaction (DTI) is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI), target-based similarity inference (TBSI) and network-based inference (NBI). Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning. PMID:22589709

  2. [Development of drug delivery systems for targeting to macrophages].

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio

    2007-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) using liposomes as drug carriers for targeting to macrophages have been developed for the treatment of diseases that macrophages are related to their progress. Initially, DDS for the treatment of atherosclerosis are described. The influence of particle size on the drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions that macrophages are richly present and antiatherosclerotic effects following intravenous administration of liposomes containing dexamethasone (DXM-liposomes) was investigated in atherogenic mice. Both the drug delivery efficacy of DXM-liposomes (particle size, 200 nm) to atherosclerotic lesions and their antiatherosclerotic effects were greater than those of 70 and 500 nm. These results indicate that there is an optimal particle size for drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions. DDS for the treatment of respiratory infections are then described. The influence of particle size and surface mannosylation on the drug delivery to alveolar macrophages (AMs) and antibacterial effects following pulmonary administration of liposomes containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX-liposomes) was investigated in rats. The drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposomes to AMs was particle size-dependent over the range 100-1000 nm and then became constant at over 1000 nm. These results indicate that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Both the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes (particle size, 1000 nm) to AMs and their antibacterial effects were significantly greater than those of unmodified CPFX-liposomes. These results indicate that the surface mannosylation is useful method for drug delivery to AMs. This review provides useful information to help in the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations aimed at drug targeting to macrophages.

  3. Increasing the Structural Coverage of Tuberculosis Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; Fox, David; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Staker, Bart L.; Gardberg, Anna S.; Choi, Ryan; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Myers, Janette; Barrett, Lynn K.; Zhang, Yang; Ferrell, Micah; Mundt, Elizabeth; Thompkins, Katie; Tran, Ngoc; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Abramov, Ariel; Sekar, Aarthi; Serbzhinskiy, Dmitri; Lorimer, Don; Buchko, Garry W.; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. Of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structures would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases. PMID:25613812

  4. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; Fox, David; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Staker, Bart L.; Gardberg, Anna S.; Choi, Ryan; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Myers, Janette; Barrett, Lynn K.; Zhang, Yang; Ferrell, Micah; Mundt, Elizabeth; Thompkins, Katie; Tran, Ngoc; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Abramov, Ariel; Sekar, Aarthi; Serbzhinskiy, Dmitri; Lorimer, Don; Buchko, Garry W.; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2014-12-19

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. We found that of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structures would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases.

  5. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets

    DOE PAGES

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; et al

    2014-12-19

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. We found that of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structuresmore » would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases.« less

  6. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  7. SuperPred: update on drug classification and target prediction.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Janette; Gohlke, Bjoern-Oliver; Erehman, Jevgeni; Banerjee, Priyanka; Rong, Wen Wei; Goede, Andrean; Dunkel, Mathias; Preissner, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The SuperPred web server connects chemical similarity of drug-like compounds with molecular targets and the therapeutic approach based on the similar property principle. Since the first release of this server, the number of known compound-target interactions has increased from 7000 to 665,000, which allows not only a better prediction quality but also the estimation of a confidence. Apart from the addition of quantitative binding data and the statistical consideration of the similarity distribution in all drug classes, new approaches were implemented to improve the target prediction. The 3D similarity as well as the occurrence of fragments and the concordance of physico-chemical properties is also taken into account. In addition, the effect of different fingerprints on the prediction was examined. The retrospective prediction of a drug class (ATC code of the WHO) allows the evaluation of methods and descriptors for a well-characterized set of approved drugs. The prediction is improved by 7.5% to a total accuracy of 75.1%. For query compounds with sufficient structural similarity, the web server allows prognoses about the medical indication area of novel compounds and to find new leads for known targets. SuperPred is publicly available without registration at: http://prediction.charite.de.

  8. Spherons as a drug target in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Averback, P

    1998-10-01

    Spherons are unique brain entities that are causally linked to the amyloid plaques (SPs [senile plaques]) of Alzheimer's disease (AD). SPs are the quantitatively major tissue abnormality of AD. Spherons increase in size (but not in number) gradually throughout life until they reach a size range where they burst and form SPs. Drugs targeted at attenuating the process of spheron transformation into SPs are a logical approach to AD therapy. There are 20 criteria of validity for an SP causal entity that are satisfied by spherons-and no more than a few of these 20 criteria are satisfied by any other known hypothesis. These criteria of validity are reviewed, in addition to common difficulties in understanding spheron theory and a number of common-sense considerations in AD therapeutic research. Spheron-based drug therapy in AD potentially can retard the process of spheron bursting and subsequent plaque formation by: 1) blocking the formation of SPs; 2) reducing the size of SPs; 3) delaying spheron breakdown; and 4) retarding spheron growth. Isolated spherons from human brain are intact human drug targets and can be used as human in vitro or in vivo screening targets. The paramount importance of spherons as a target for drug therapy in AD is emphasized by considering that regardless of any other type of real or potential therapy, there still already exists in every middle-aged adult a full population of spherons in the brain, filled with more than enough amyloid to bring about full-blown AD.

  9. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  10. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  11. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.

  12. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. PMID:26974603

  13. Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarriers as promising targeted drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiya; Xu, Yurui; Asghar, Sajid; Chen, Minglei; Zou, Lang; Eltayeb, Sulieman; Huo, Meirong; Ping, Qineng; Xiao, Yanyu

    2015-01-01

    Among the materials for preparing the polymeric nanocarriers, poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA), a polymer with medium length alkyl side chain, is of lower toxicity and proper degradation time. Therefore, PBCA has recently been regarded as a kind of widely used, biocompatible, biodegradable, low-toxic drug carrier. This review highlights the use of PBCA-based nanocarriers (PBCA-NCs) as targeting drug delivery systems and presents the methods of preparation, the surface modification and the advantages and limitations of PBCA-NCs. The drugs loaded in PBCA-NCs are summarized according to the treatment of diseases, and the different therapeutic applications and the most recent developments of PBCA-NCs are also discussed, which provides useful guidance on the targeting research of PBCA-NCs.

  14. Functional and mechanistic analysis of telomerase: An antitumor drug target.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinnan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    The current research on anticancer drugs focuses on exploiting particular traits or hallmarks unique to cancer cells. Telomerase, a special reverse transcriptase, has been recognized as a common factor in most tumor cells, and in turn a distinctive characteristic with respect to non-malignant cells. This feature has made telomerase a preferred target for anticancer drug development and cancer therapy. This review aims to analyze the pharmacological function and mechanism and role of telomerase in oncogenesis; to provide fundamental knowledge for research on the structure, function, and working mechanism of telomerase; to expound the role that telomerase plays in the initiation and development of tumor and its relationship with tumor cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and related pathway molecules; and to display potential targets of antitumor drug for inhibiting the expression, reconstitution, and trafficking of the enzyme. We therefore summarize recent advances in potential telomerase inhibitors for antitumor including natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides and proteins, which indicate that optimizing the delivery method and drug combination could be of help in a combinatorial drug treatment for tumor. More extensive understanding of the structure, biogenesis, and mechanism of telomerase will provide invaluable information for increasing the efficiency of rational antitumor drug design. PMID:27118336

  15. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal. PMID:25635061

  16. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A.; Robinet, Eric; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    ``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental procedures, additional SEM and TEM images of particles, complete UV-Vis and PL-monitored characterization of the breakdown of

  17. Intestinal targeting of drugs: rational design approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F; Ambler, Catherine M; Ruggeri, Roger B; Goosen, Theunis C; Cameron, Kimberly O

    2013-01-01

    Targeting drugs to the gastrointestinal tract has been and continues to be an active area of research. Gut-targeting is an effective means of increasing the local concentration of active substance at the desired site of action while minimizing concentrations elsewhere in the body that could lead to unwanted side-effects. Several approaches to intestinal targeting exist. Physicochemical property manipulation can drive molecules to large, polar, low absorption space or alternatively to lipophilic, high clearance space in order to minimize systemic exposure. Design of compounds that are substrates for transporters within the gastrointestinal tract, either uptake or efflux, or at the hepato-biliary interface, may help to increase intestinal concentration. Prodrug strategies have been shown to be effective particularly for colon targeting, and several different technology formulation approaches are currently being researched. This review provides examples of various approaches to intestinal targeting, and discusses challenges and areas in need of future scientific advances.

  18. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  19. Reductionism and complexity in nanoparticle-vectored drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Florence, Alexander T

    2012-07-20

    This paper briefly discusses reductionism as a process for dissecting the complexities of drug targeting mediated by nanoparticulate carriers. While reductionism has been said to have been a drawback to enhanced appreciation and understanding of complex biological systems, it is concluded here that the dissection of the individual stages of the procession from injection to final destination in specific targets in a living complex organism is essential. It should allow a decrease in the empiricism from laudable and inventive efforts to achieve high levels of drug delivery to specific diseased targets such as tumours. At the stage of development of the field there have perhaps been fewer than desirable detailed experimental or theoretical investigations of these individual stages. However, there are frequently analogies in the literature from which to draw at least tentative conclusions about the physics, physical chemistry and biology which underpin the processes involved.

  20. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  1. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  2. Carbon Nanotubes: An Emerging Drug Carrier for Targeting Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  3. Multiple Targets for Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is rapidly gaining the interest of researchers and practitioners as a prominent liability in drug discovery and development, accounting for a growing proportion of preclinical drug attrition and post-market withdrawals or black box warnings by the U.S. FDA. To date, the focus of registries of drugs that elicit mitochondrial toxicity has been largely restricted to those that either inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) or uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less appreciated are the toxicities that are secondary to the drug affecting either the molecular regulation, assembly or incorporation of the ETC into the inner mitochondrial membrane or those that limit substrate availability. The current article describes the complexities of molecular events and biochemical pathways required to sustain mitochondrial fidelity and substrate homeostasis with examples of drugs that interfere which the various pathways. The principal objective of this review is to shed light on the broader scope of drug-induced mitochondrial toxicities and how these secondary targets may account for a large portion of drug failures.

  4. Multiple Targets for Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is rapidly gaining the interest of researchers and practitioners as a prominent liability in drug discovery and development, accounting for a growing proportion of preclinical drug attrition and post-market withdrawals or black box warnings by the U.S. FDA. To date, the focus of registries of drugs that elicit mitochondrial toxicity has been largely restricted to those that either inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) or uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less appreciated are the toxicities that are secondary to the drug affecting either the molecular regulation, assembly or incorporation of the ETC into the inner mitochondrial membrane or those that limit substrate availability. The current article describes the complexities of molecular events and biochemical pathways required to sustain mitochondrial fidelity and substrate homeostasis with examples of drugs that interfere which the various pathways. The principal objective of this review is to shed light on the broader scope of drug-induced mitochondrial toxicities and how these secondary targets may account for a large portion of drug failures. PMID:25973981

  5. Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Robin; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Varani, Gabriele; Buchko, Garry W.; Stewart, Lance J.; Myler, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a consortium of researchers at Seattle BioMed, Emerald BioStructures, the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that was established to apply structural genomics approaches to drug targets from infectious disease organisms. The SSGCID is currently funded over a five-year period by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to determine the three-dimensional structures of 400 proteins from a variety of Category A, B and C pathogens. Target selection engages the infectious disease research and drug-therapy communities to identify drug targets, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates of biomedical relevance to combat infectious diseases. The protein-expression systems, purified proteins, ligand screens and three-dimensional structures produced by SSGCID con­stitute a valuable resource for drug-discovery research, all of which is made freely available to the greater scientific community. This issue of Acta Crystallographica Section F, entirely devoted to the work of the SSGCID, covers the details of the high-throughput pipeline and presents a series of structures from a broad array of pathogenic organisms. Here, a background is provided on the structural genomics of infectious disease, the essential components of the SSGCID pipeline are discussed and a survey of progress to date is presented. PMID:21904037

  6. Cancer Metabolism: New Validated Targets for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer metabolism directly implicate catabolic fibroblasts as a new rich source of i) energy and ii) biomass, for the growth and survival of anabolic cancer cells. Conversely, anabolic cancer cells upregulate oxidative mitochondrial metabolism, to take advantage of the abundant fibroblast fuel supply. This simple model of “metabolic-symbiosis” has now been independently validated in several different types of human cancers, including breast, ovarian, and prostate tumors. Biomarkers of metabolic-symbiosis are excellent predictors of tumor recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance, as well as poor patient survival. New pre-clinical models of metabolic-symbiosis have been generated and they genetically validate that catabolic fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis. Over 30 different stable lines of catabolic fibroblasts and >10 different lines of anabolic cancer cells have been created and are well-characterized. For example, catabolic fibroblasts harboring ATG16L1 increase tumor cell metastasis by >11.5-fold, despite the fact that genetically identical cancer cells were used. Taken together, these studies provide >40 novel validated targets, for new drug discovery and anti-cancer therapy. Since anabolic cancer cells amplify their capacity for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism, we should consider therapeutically targeting mitochondrial biogenesis and OXPHOS in epithelial cancer cells. As metabolic-symbiosis promotes drug-resistance and may represent the escape mechanism during anti-angiogenic therapy, new drugs targeting metabolic-symbiosis may also be effective in cancer patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic disease. PMID:23896568

  7. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Rickman, David; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mutations in transcription factors (TFs) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a Computational drug-Repositioning Approach For Targeting Transcription factor activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions and a global drug-protein network analysis further supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently over-expressed oncogenic TF predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Indeed, dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of Electronic Medical Record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy to identify drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  8. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  9. Combinatorial approaches for the identification of brain drug delivery targets.

    PubMed

    Stutz, Charles C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB.

  10. Drugs that target pathogen public goods are robust against evolved drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John W

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen drug resistance is a central problem in medicine and public health. It arises through somatic evolution, by mutation and selection among pathogen cells within a host. Here, we examine the hypothesis that evolution of drug resistance could be reduced by developing drugs that target the secreted metabolites produced by pathogen cells instead of directly targeting the cells themselves. Using an agent-based computational model of an evolving population of pathogen cells, we test this hypothesis and find support for it. We also use our model to explain this effect within the framework of standard evolutionary theory. We find that in our model, the drugs most robust against evolved drug resistance are those that target the most widely shared external products, or 'public goods', of pathogen cells. We also show that these drugs exert a weak selective pressure for resistance because they create only a weak correlation between drug resistance and cell fitness. The same principles apply to design of vaccines that are robust against vaccine escape. Because our theoretical results have crucial practical implications, they should be tested by empirical experiments.

  11. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ηm, which increase to 60–80 ηm upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ηm) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression

  12. From target identification to drug screening assays for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zuccato, Chiara; Tartari, Marzia; Goffredo, Donato; Cattaneo, Elena; Rigamonti, Dorotea

    2005-09-01

    Treatment of neurodegenerative diseases represents a major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry. Key to developing novel and efficacious therapeutics is the discovery of new druggable targets. Toward this aim, the current drug discovery process is strongly relying on the improved understanding of disease mechanisms and on a synergistic approach with chemistry, molecular biology and robotics. In this scenario, we present the case of a newly discovered molecular mechanism that may be of interest for drug discovery programmes in Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:15916902

  13. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  14. Ion Channels as Drug Targets in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waszkielewicz, A.M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na+ channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 – for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca2+ channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Cav1.1-Cav3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs. PMID:23409712

  15. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  16. A review on proniosomal drug delivery system for targeted drug action

    PubMed Central

    Radha, G. V.; Rani, T. Sudha; Sarvani, B.

    2013-01-01

    Proniosomes are dry formulation of water soluble carrier particles that are coated with surfactant. They are rehydrated to form niosomal dispersion immediately before use on agitation in hot aqueous media within minutes. Proniosomes are physically stable during the storage and transport. Drug encapsulated in the vesicular structure of proniosomes prolong the existence of drug in the systematic circulation and enhances the penetration into target tissue and reduce toxicity. From a technical point of view, niosomes are promising drug carriers as they possess greater chemical stability and lack of many disadvantages associated with liposomes, such as high- cost and variable purity problems of phospholipids. The present review emphasizes on overall methods of preparation characterization and applicability of proniosomes in targeted drug action. PMID:24808669

  17. Cell-Specific Aptamer-Mediated Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are in vitro-selected small, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can specifically recognize their target on the basis of their unique 3-dimensional structures. Recent advances in the development of escort aptamers to deliver and enhance the efficacy of other therapeutic agents have drawn enthusiasm in exploiting cell-type-specific aptamers as drug delivery vehicles. This review mainly focuses on the recent developments of aptamer-mediated targeted delivery systems. We also place particular emphasis on aptamers evolved against cell membrane receptors and possibilities for translation to clinical applications. PMID:21182455

  18. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  19. Drugs for 'protein clouds': targeting intrinsically disordered transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2010-12-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are very attractive but difficult drug targets. The difficulties come from several directions including the binding promiscuity of TFs and the intrinsically disordered nature of their binding sites, which often resemble 'protein clouds'. For a long time the targeting of proteins without defined structures was considered infeasible. Data have now emerged showing that selective blocking of specific interactions of intrinsically disordered TFs with their protein binding partners is possible. Initial hits have been optimized to increase their specificity and affinity. Several strategies have been elaborated for elucidating the mechanisms of blocking of intrinsic disorder-based protein-protein interactions. However, challenges remain in the field of drug development for 'protein clouds'; such development is still in its earliest stage.

  20. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  1. The opioid receptors as targets for drug abuse medication

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Florence; Lenoir, Magalie; Marie, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system is largely expressed in the brain, and both endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are present in areas associated with reward and motivation. It is well known that this endogenous system plays a key role in many aspects of addictive behaviours. The present review summarizes the modifications of the opioid system induced by chronic treatment with drugs of abuse reported in preclinical and clinical studies, as well as the action of opioid antagonists and agonists on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, with therapeutic perspectives. We have focused on the effects of chronic psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine exposure. Taken together, the changes in both opioid peptides and opioid receptors in different brain structures following acute or chronic exposure to these drugs of abuse clearly identify the opioid system as a potential target for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:25988826

  2. The opioid receptors as targets for drug abuse medication.

    PubMed

    Noble, Florence; Lenoir, Magalie; Marie, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous opioid system is largely expressed in the brain, and both endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are present in areas associated with reward and motivation. It is well known that this endogenous system plays a key role in many aspects of addictive behaviours. The present review summarizes the modifications of the opioid system induced by chronic treatment with drugs of abuse reported in preclinical and clinical studies, as well as the action of opioid antagonists and agonists on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, with therapeutic perspectives. We have focused on the effects of chronic psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine exposure. Taken together, the changes in both opioid peptides and opioid receptors in different brain structures following acute or chronic exposure to these drugs of abuse clearly identify the opioid system as a potential target for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addiction and the prevention of relapse.

  3. Membrane-targeting liquid crystal nanoparticles (LCNPs) for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    In addition to maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, the plasma membrane regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis and trafficking, apoptotic pathways and drug transport. The modulation or tracking of such cellular processes by means of controlled delivery of drugs or imaging agents via nanoscale delivery systems is very attractive. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery systems that mediate long-term residence (e.g., days) and controlled release of the cargoes in the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology would be ideal for this purpose. Our laboratory has developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs which can be slowly released from the particle over time. Here we highlight the utility of these nanopreparations for membrane delivery and imaging.

  4. The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) for efficient target analysis and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Liang, Chunguang; Nilla, Santosh; Cecil, Alexander; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) has been designed to provide fast, tailored information on drugs and their protein networks including indications, protein targets and side-targets. Starting queries include compound, target and protein interactions and organism-specific protein families. Furthermore, drug name, chemical structures and their SMILES notation, affected proteins (potential drug targets), organisms as well as diseases can be queried including various combinations and refinement of searches. Drugs and protein interactions are analyzed in detail with reference to protein structures and catalytic domains, related compound structures as well as potential targets in other organisms. DrumPID considers drug functionality, compound similarity, target structure, interactome analysis and organismic range for a compound, useful for drug development, predicting drug side-effects and structure–activity relationships. Database URL: http://drumpid.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de PMID:27055828

  5. Computer-Aided Drug Discovery and Design Targeting Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiansen; Gao, Zhaobing; Yang, Huaiyu

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are widely expressed in living cells and play critical roles in various cellular biological functions. Dysfunctional ion channels can cause a variety of diseases, making ion channels attractive targets for drug discovery. Computational approaches, such as molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations, provide economic and efficient tools for finding modulators of ion channels and for elucidating the action mechanisms of small molecules. In this review, we focus primarily on four types of ion channels (voltage-gated, ligand-gated, acid-sensing, and virus matrix 2 ion channels). The current advancements in computer-aided drug discovery and design targeting ion channels are summarized. First, ligand-based studies for drug design are briefly outlined. Then, we focus on the structurebased studies targeting pore domains, endogenous binding sites and allosteric sites of ion channels. Moreover, we also review the contribution of computational methods to the field of ligand binding and unbinding pathways of ion channels. Finally, we propose future developments for the field. PMID:26975507

  6. Reprofiled drug targets ancient protozoans: drug discovery for parasitic diarrheal diseases.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Anjan; Ndao, Momar; Reed, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel automated, high throughput screening (HTS) methodology for the anaerobic intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We validated this HTS platform by screening a chemical library containing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and bioactive compounds. We identified an FDA-approved drug, auranofin, as most active against E. histolytica both in vitro and in vivo. Our cell culture and animal studies indicated that thioredoxin reductase, an enzyme involved in reactive oxygen species detoxification, was the target for auranofin in E. histolytica. Here, we discuss the rationale for drug development for three parasites which are major causes of diarrhea worldwide, E. histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum and extend our current finding of antiparasitic activity of auranofin to Entamoeba cysts, G. lamblia and C. parvum. These studies support the use of HTS assays and reprofiling FDA-approved drugs for new therapy for neglected tropical diseases.

  7. Dual responsive PNIPAM-chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Ramasamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal; Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation.

  8. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  9. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  10. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed. PMID:15980096

  11. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells with Antipsychological Drug Thioridazine

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Haiying; Huang, Dongning; Qin, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Hua, Li; Wang, Guodong; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells critical for lung cancer progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Thioridazine, a classical neurological drug, has been reported with anticancer ability. However, whether thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells has never been studied. In our current work, we used different dosage of thioridazine to test its effect on lung cancer stem cells sphere formation. The response of lung cancer stem cells to chemotherapy drug with thioridazine treatment was measured. The cell cycle distribution of lung cancer stem cells after thioridazine treatment was detected. The in vivo inhibitory effect of thioridazine was also measured. We found that thioridazine could dramatically inhibit sphere formation of lung cancer stem cells. It sensitized the LCSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs 5-FU and cisplatin. Thioridazine altered the cell cycle distribution of LCSCs and decreased the proportion of G0 phase cells in lung cancer stem cells. Thioridazine inhibited lung cancer stem cells initiated tumors growth in vivo. This study showed that thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. It provides a potential drug for lung cancer therapy through targeting lung cancer stem cells. PMID:27556038

  12. Companion diagnostics for targeted cancer drugs - clinical and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Dana; Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US Food and Drug Administration has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity, they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world. PMID:24904822

  13. Acylation in trypanosomatids: an essential process and potential drug target

    PubMed Central

    Goldston, Amanda M.; Sharma, Aabha I.; Paul, Kimberly S.; Engman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acylation—the addition of fatty acid moieties such as myristate and palmitate to proteins—is essential for the survival, growth, and infectivity of the trypanosomatids: Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania. Myristoylation and palmitoylation are critical for parasite growth, targeting and localization, and the intrinsic function of some proteins. The trypanosomatids possess a single N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) and multiple palmitoyl acyltransferases, and these enzymes and their cellular targets are only now being characterized. Global inhibition of either process leads to cell death in trypanosomatids, and genetic ablation of NMT compromises virulence. Moreover, NMT inhibitors effectively cure T. brucei infection in rodents. Thus, protein acylation represents an attractive target for the development of trypanocidal drugs. PMID:24954795

  14. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed.

  15. Non-Spherical Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinrong; Clay, Nicholas; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microparticles loaded with various bioimaging contrast agents or therapeutic molecules have been increasingly used for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tissue defects. These particles, often a filled or hollow sphere, can extend the lifetime of encapsulated biomedical modalities in circulation and in target tissue. However, there is a great need to improve the drug loading and targeting efficiency of these particles. Recently, several simulation and in vitro experimental studies reported that particle shape plays a pivotal role in the targeted delivery of molecules. To better understand these findings and subsequently expedite the use of particles in biomedical applications, this review paper summarizes the methods to prepare non-spherical nano- and micro-scaled particles. In addition, this review covers studies reporting the effects of particle shape on the loading, delivery and release of encapsulated bioactive cargos. Finally, it discusses future directions to further improve the properties of non-spherical particles. PMID:25838583

  16. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  17. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  18. Cardiac calmodulin kinase: a potential target for drug design.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Szentandrássy, N; Tóth, A; Nánási, P P; Magyar, J; Chen-Izu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as ßblockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  19. Application of RNAi to Genomic Drug Target Validation in Schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Alessandra; Mansour, Nuha R.; Paveley, Ross A.; Carruthers, Ian M.; Besnard, Jérémy; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Bickle, Quentin D.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the possibility of resistance developing to praziquantel (PZQ), has stimulated efforts to develop new drugs for schistosomiasis. In addition to the development of improved whole organism screens, the success of RNA interference (RNAi) in schistosomes offers great promise for the identification of potential drug targets to initiate drug discovery. In this study we set out to contribute to RNAi based validation of putative drug targets. Initially a list of 24 target candidates was compiled based on the identification of putative essential genes in schistosomes orthologous of C. elegans essential genes. Knockdown of Calmodulin (Smp_026560.2) (Sm-Calm), that topped this list, produced a phenotype characterised by waves of contraction in adult worms but no phenotype in schistosomula. Knockdown of the atypical Protein Kinase C (Smp_096310) (Sm-aPKC) resulted in loss of viability in both schistosomula and adults and led us to focus our attention on other kinase genes that were identified in the above list and through whole organism screening of known kinase inhibitor sets followed by chemogenomic evaluation. RNAi knockdown of these kinase genes failed to affect adult worm viability but, like Sm-aPKC, knockdown of Polo-like kinase 1, Sm-PLK1 (Smp_009600) and p38-MAPK, Sm-MAPK p38 (Smp_133020) resulted in an increased mortality of schistosomula after 2-3 weeks, an effect more marked in the presence of human red blood cells (hRBC). For Sm-PLK-1 the same effects were seen with the specific inhibitor, BI2536, which also affected viable egg production in adult worms. For Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-aPKC the in vitro effects were reflected in lower recoveries in vivo. We conclude that the use of RNAi combined with culture with hRBC is a reliable method for evaluating genes important for larval development. However, in view of the slow manifestation of the effects of Sm-aPKC knockdown in adults and the lack of effects of Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-MAPK p38 on adult viability, these

  20. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  1. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  2. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  3. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  4. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  5. Cyanobacterial Cyclopeptides as Lead Compounds to Novel Targeted Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sainis, Ioannis; Fokas, Demosthenes; Vareli, Katerina; Tzakos, Andreas G.; Kounnis, Valentinos; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacterial cyclopeptides, including microcystins and nodularins, are considered a health hazard to humans due to the possible toxic effects of high consumption. From a pharmacological standpoint, microcystins are stable hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptides with a potential to cause cellular damage following uptake via organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP). Their intracellular biological effects involve inhibition of catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and PP2, glutathione depletion and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, certain OATPs are prominently expressed in cancers as compared to normal tissues, qualifying MC as potential candidates for cancer drug development. In the era of targeted cancer therapy, cyanotoxins comprise a rich source of natural cytotoxic compounds with a potential to target cancers expressing specific uptake transporters. Moreover, their structure offers opportunities for combinatorial engineering to enhance the therapeutic index and resolve organ-specific toxicity issues. In this article, we revisit cyanobacterial cyclopeptides as potential novel targets for anticancer drugs by summarizing existing biomedical evidence, presenting structure-activity data and discussing developmental perspectives. PMID:20411119

  6. Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles As an Alternative Platform for Targeted Drug-Delivery of Water Insoluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciane França; Bouchmella, Karim; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Bettini, Jefferson; Kobarg, Jörg; Cardoso, Mateus Borba

    2016-04-01

    The selective action of drugs in tumor cells is a major problem in cancer therapy. Most chemotherapy drugs act nonspecifically and damage both cancer and healthy cells causing various side effects. In this study, the preparation of a selective drug delivery system, which is able to act as a carrier for hydrophobic and anticancer drugs is reported. Amino-functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with curcumin were successfully synthesized via sol-gel approach and duly characterized. Thereafter, the targeting ligand, folate, was covalently attached to amino groups of nanoparticle surface through amide bond formation. The cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles on prostate cancer cells line was evaluated and compared to normal cells line (prostate epithelial cell). Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that folate-functionalized nanoparticles were significantly cytotoxic to tumor cells, whereas normal cells were much less affected by the presence of these structures.

  7. Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles As an Alternative Platform for Targeted Drug-Delivery of Water Insoluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciane França; Bouchmella, Karim; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Bettini, Jefferson; Kobarg, Jörg; Cardoso, Mateus Borba

    2016-04-01

    The selective action of drugs in tumor cells is a major problem in cancer therapy. Most chemotherapy drugs act nonspecifically and damage both cancer and healthy cells causing various side effects. In this study, the preparation of a selective drug delivery system, which is able to act as a carrier for hydrophobic and anticancer drugs is reported. Amino-functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with curcumin were successfully synthesized via sol-gel approach and duly characterized. Thereafter, the targeting ligand, folate, was covalently attached to amino groups of nanoparticle surface through amide bond formation. The cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles on prostate cancer cells line was evaluated and compared to normal cells line (prostate epithelial cell). Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that folate-functionalized nanoparticles were significantly cytotoxic to tumor cells, whereas normal cells were much less affected by the presence of these structures. PMID:26930039

  8. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are drug-delivery systems composed of both solid and liquid lipids as a core matrix. It was shown that NLCs reveal some advantages for drug therapy over conventional carriers, including increased solubility, the ability to enhance storage stability, improved permeability and bioavailability, reduced adverse effect, prolonged half-life, and tissue-targeted delivery. NLCs have attracted increasing attention in recent years. This review describes recent developments in drug delivery using NLCs strategies. The structures, preparation techniques, and physicochemical characterization of NLCs are systematically elucidated in this review. The potential of NLCs to be used for different administration routes is highlighted. Special attention is paid to parenteral injection and topical delivery since these are the most common routes for investigating NLCs. Relevant issues for the introduction of NLCs to market, including pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications, are discussed. The related patents of NLCs for drug delivery are also reviewed. Finally, the future development and current obstacles needing to be resolved are elucidated. PMID:22946628

  9. Novel bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, William C; Metcalf, Chester A; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Keenan, Terence; Weigele, Manfred; Bohacek, Regine S; Dalgarno, David C; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2003-09-01

    Bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase (STK) inhibitors have recently been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer-related bone diseases. The concept of bone targeting derives from bisphosphonates, and from the evolution of such molecules in terms of therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bone disorders. Interestingly, some of the earliest bisphosphonates were recognized for their ability to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation (scaling) by virtue of their affinity to chelate calcium. This chelating property was subsequently exploited in the development of bisphosphonate analogs as inhibitors of the bone-resorbing cells known as osteoclasts, giving rise to breakthrough medicines, such as Fosamax (for the treatment of osteoporosis) and Zometa (for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastases). Relative to these milestone achievements, there is a tremendous opportunity to explore beyond the limited chemical space (functional group diversity) of such bisphosphonates to design novel bone-targeting moieties, which may be used to develop other classes of promising small-molecule drugs affecting different biological pathways. Here, we review studies focused on bone-targeted inhibitors of STK, a key enzyme in osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Two strategies are described relative to bone-targeted STK inhibitor drug discovery: (i) the development of novel Src homology (SH)-2 inhibitors incorporating non-hydrolyzable phosphotyrosine mimics and exhibiting molecular recognition and bone-targeting properties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-22408; and (ii) the development of novel ATP-based Src kinase inhibitors incorporating bone-targeting moieties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-23236. In summary, AP-22408 and AP-23236, which differ mechanistically by virtue of blocking Src-dependent non-catalytic or catalytic activities in osteoclasts, exemplify ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' structure-based design of novel bone-targeted

  10. Drug target prediction using adverse event report systems: a pharmacogenomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Takarabe, Masataka; Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Unexpected drug activities derived from off-targets are usually undesired and harmful; however, they can occasionally be beneficial for different therapeutic indications. There are many uncharacterized drugs whose target proteins (including the primary target and off-targets) remain unknown. The identification of all potential drug targets has become an important issue in drug repositioning to reuse known drugs for new therapeutic indications. Results: We defined pharmacological similarity for all possible drugs using the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse event reporting system (AERS) and developed a new method to predict unknown drug–target interactions on a large scale from the integration of pharmacological similarity of drugs and genomic sequence similarity of target proteins in the framework of a pharmacogenomic approach. The proposed method was applicable to a large number of drugs and it was useful especially for predicting unknown drug–target interactions that could not be expected from drug chemical structures. We made a comprehensive prediction for potential off-targets of 1874 drugs with known targets and potential target profiles of 2519 drugs without known targets, which suggests many potential drug–target interactions that were not predicted by previous chemogenomic or pharmacogenomic approaches. Availability: Softwares are available upon request. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp Supplementary Information: Datasets and all results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/aers/. PMID:22962489

  11. Candidate Drug Targets for Prevention or Modification of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Varvel, Nicholas H.; Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent neurological disorder afflicting nearly 50 million people worldwide. The disorder is characterized clinically by recurrent spontaneous seizures attributed to abnormal synchrony of brain neurons. Despite advances in the treatment of epilepsy, nearly one-third of patients are resistant to current therapies, and the underlying mechanisms whereby a healthy brain becomes epileptic remain unresolved. Therefore, researchers have a major impetus to identify and exploit new drug targets. Here we distinguish between epileptic effectors, or proteins that set the seizure threshold, and epileptogenic mediators, which control the expression or functional state of the effector proteins. Under this framework, we then discuss attempts to regulate the mediators to control epilepsy. Further insights into the complex processes that render the brain susceptible to seizures and the identification of novel mediators of these processes will lead the way to the development of drugs to modify disease outcome and, potentially, to prevent epileptogenesis. PMID:25196047

  12. [Bacterial type II topoisomerases as targets for antibacterial drugs].

    PubMed

    Pietrusiński, Michał; Staczek, Paweł

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial type II DNA topoisomerases are essential enzymes for correct genome functioning and cell growth. Gyrase is responsible for maintaining negative supercoiling of bacterial chromosome, whereas topoisomerase IV acts in disentangling daughter chromosomes following replication. Type II DNA topoisomerases possess an ATP binding site, which can be treated as a target for antibacterial drugs. Resolving crystal structures of protein fragments consisting of an ATP binding site complexed with ADPNP/antibiotics have proven to be valuable for the understanding of the mode of action of existing antibacterial agents and presented new possibilities for novel drug design. Coumarins, quinolones and cyclothialidines are diverse group of antibiotics that interfere with type II DNA topoisomerases, however their mode of action is different. Recently a new class of antibiotics, simociclinones, was characterized. Their mechanism of action towards gyrase is entirely distinct from already known modes of action, therefore demonstrating the potential for development of novel anti-bacterial agents.

  13. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-02-16

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 {micro}m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 {micro}m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial

  14. Drug targets of migraine and neuropathy: treatment of hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Vécsei, László; Majláth, Zsófia; Balog, Anna; Tajti, János

    2015-01-01

    Migraine and neuropathic pain are common causes of chronic pain. The exact pathomechanism has not been fully clarified for either disorder, but their pathophysiological backgrounds involve several similar mechanisms. Peripheral sensitization occurs in the neuronal elements of the dorsal root ganglion or the trigeminal ganglion, while central sensitization appears in the second-order neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord or the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Central neuronal hyperexcitability has been implicated in both disorders, and the emerging evidence suggests alterations in the glutamatergic neurotransmission and N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor activation. Migraine and neuropathic pain additionally share certain clinical features, such as enhanced sensitivity to sensory stimuli and cutaneous allodynia. The pharmacotherapy of both diseases is often challenging, but several antiepileptic drugs that target hyperexcitability are beneficial for both migraine and neuropathic pain. Kynurenine pathway metabolites are capable of influencing the glutamate receptors, and might therefore be novel candidates for future drug development.

  15. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca2+ permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  16. Mining nematode genome data for novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeremy M; Zhang, Yinhua; Kumar, Sanjay; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2005-03-01

    Expressed sequence tag projects have currently produced over 400 000 partial gene sequences from more than 30 nematode species and the full genomic sequences of selected nematodes are being determined. In addition, functional analyses in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have addressed the role of almost all genes predicted by the genome sequence. This recent explosion in the amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data, provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify pre-validated drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. This article describes the various information sources available and strategies that can expedite this process.

  17. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca(2+) permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  18. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  19. Mammalian plasma membrane proteins as potential biomarkers and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2011-06-01

    Defining the plasma membrane proteome is crucial to understand the role of plasma membrane in fundamental biological processes. Change in membrane proteins is one of the first events that take place under pathological conditions, making plasma membrane proteins a likely source of potential disease biomarkers with prognostic or diagnostic potential. Membrane proteins are also potential targets for monoclonal antibodies and other drugs that block receptors or inhibit enzymes essential to the disease progress. Despite several advanced methods recently developed for the analysis of hydrophobic proteins and proteins with posttranslational modifications, integral membrane proteins are still under-represented in plasma membrane proteome. Recent advances in proteomic investigation of plasma membrane proteins, defining their roles as diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers and as target molecules in disease treatment, are presented.

  20. Mycobacterial shikimate pathway enzymes as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Ducati, R G; Basso, L A; Santos, D S

    2007-03-01

    The aetiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is responsible for millions of deaths annually. The increasing prevalence of the disease, the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, and the devastating effect of human immunodeficiency virus co-infection have led to an urgent need for the development of new and more efficient antimycobacterial drugs. Since the shikimate pathway is present and essential in algae, higher plants, bacteria, and fungi, but absent from mammals, the gene products of the common pathway might represent attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents. In this review we describe studies on shikimate pathway enzymes, including enzyme kinetics and structural data. We have focused on mycobacterial shikimate pathway enzymes as potential targets for the development of new anti-TB agents.

  1. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakkarapani, Prabu; Subbiah, Latha; Palanisamy, Selvamani; Bibiana, Arputha; Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer

    2015-04-01

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO3-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO3-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 μm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  2. RGD based peptide amphiphiles as drug carriers for cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, Poonam S.

    Specific interactions of ligands with receptors is one of the approaches for active targeting of anticancer drugs to cancer cells. Over expression of integrin receptors is a physiological manifestation in several cancers and is associated with cancer progression and metastasis, which makes it an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. The peptide sequence for this integrin recognition is the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). Self-assembly offers a unique way of presenting ligands to target receptors for recognition and binding. This study focuses on development of integrin specific peptide amphiphile self-assemblies as carriers for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to αvbeta 3 integrin overexpressing cancers. Amphiphiles composed of conjugates of different analogs of RGD (linear, cyclic or glycosylated) and aliphatic fatty acid with or without 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid (ADA) as linker were synthesized and characterized. The amphiphiles exhibited Critical Micellar Concentration in the range of 7-30 μM. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed the formation of spherical micelles in the size range of 10-40 nm. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer studies revealed entrapment of hydrophobic dyes within a tight micellar core and provided information regarding the cargo exchange within micelles. The RGD micelles exhibited competitive binding with 55% displacement of a bound fluorescent probe by the cyclic RGD micelles. The internalization of fluorescein isothiocynate (FITC) loaded RGD micelles was significantly higher in A2058 melanoma cells compared to free FITC within 20 minutes of incubation at 37°C. The same micelles showed significantly lower internalization at 4°C and on pretreatment with 0.45M sucrose confirming endocytotic uptake of the RGD micellar carriers. The IC50 of paclitaxel in A2058 melanoma cells was lower when treated within RGD micelles as compared to treatment of free drug. On the other hand, IC50 values increased by 2 to 9 fold for micellar treatment

  3. Targeting drug-metabolizing enzymes for effective chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Hollie I; Njar, Vincent C O; Yu, Zhen; Castro, David J; Gonzalez, Frank J; Williams, David E; Huang, Ying; Kong, Ah-Ng T; Doloff, Joshua C; Ma, Jie; Waxman, David J; Scott, Emily E

    2010-04-01

    The primary focus of chemoprevention research is the prevention of cancer using pharmacological, biological, and nutritional interventions. Chemotherapeutic approaches that have been used successfully for both the prevention and treatment of a number of human malignancies have arisen from the identification of specific agents and appropriate molecular targets. Although drug-metabolizing enzymes have historically been targeted in attempts to block the initial, genotoxic events associated with the carcinogenic process, emerging evidence supports the idea that manipulating drug-metabolizing enzymes may also be an effective strategy to be used for treating tumor progression, invasion, and, perhaps, metastasis. This report summarizes a symposium that presents some recent progress in this area. One area of emphasis is the development of a CYP17 inhibitor for treatment of prostate cancer that may also have androgen-independent anticancer activity at higher concentrations. A second focus is the use of a mouse model to investigate the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Cyp1b1 status and chemopreventative agents on transplacental cancer. A third area of focus is the phytochemical manipulation of not only cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes but also phase II inflammatory and antioxidant enzymes via the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway to block tumor progression. A final highlight is the use of prodrugs activated by P450 enzymes to halt tumor growth and considerations of dosing schedule and targeted delivery of the P450 transgene to tumor tissue. In addition to highlighting recent successes in these areas, limitations and areas that should be targeted for further investigation are discussed. PMID:20233842

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Functionalized Nanocarriers in Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Bradley, Ryan; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using functionalized nanocarriers (NCs) is a strategy in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this paper we review the recent development of models at multiple length and time scales and their applications to targeting of antibody functionalized nanocarriers to antigens (receptors) on the endothelial cell (EC) surface. Our mesoscale (100 nm-1 μm) model is based on phenomenological interaction potentials for receptor-ligand interactions, receptor-flexure and resistance offered by glycocalyx. All free parameters are either directly determined from independent biophysical and cell biology experiments or estimated using molecular dynamics simulations. We employ a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) strategy in conjunction with the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) to compute the free energy landscape (potential of mean force or PMF) associated with the multivalent antigen-antibody interactions mediating the NC binding to EC. The binding affinities (association constants) are then derived from the PMF by computing absolute binding free energy of binding of NC to EC, taking into account the relevant translational and rotational entropy losses of NC and the receptors. We validate our model predictions by comparing the computed binding affinities and PMF to a wide range of experimental measurements, including in vitro cell culture, in vivo endothelial targeting, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and flow chamber experiments. The model predictions agree closely and quantitatively with all types experimental measurements. On this basis, we conclude that our computational protocol represents a quantitative and predictive approach for model driven design and optimization of functionalized NCs in targeted vascular drug delivery. PMID:22116782

  5. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches.

  6. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:26958493

  7. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  8. Epigenetic drugs that do not target enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Dafydd R; Trzupek, John D

    2014-06-01

    While the installation and removal of epigenetic post-translational modifications or ‘marks’ on both DNA and histone proteins are the tangible outcome of enzymatically catalyzed processes, the role of the epigenetic reader proteins looks, at first, less obvious. As they do not catalyze a chemical transformation or process as such, their role is not enzymatic. However, this does not preclude them from being potential targets for drug discovery as their function is clearly correlated to transcriptional activity and as a class of proteins, they appear to have binding sites of sufficient definition and size to be inhibited by small molecules. This suggests that this third class of epigenetic proteins that are involved in the interpretation of post-translational marks (as opposed to the creation or deletion of marks) may represent attractive targets for drug discovery efforts. This review mainly summarizes selected publications, patent literature and company disclosures on these non-enzymatic epigenetic reader proteins from 2009 to the present.

  9. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  10. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  11. Glycosomal targets for anti-trypanosomatid drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Barros-Alvarez, X; Gualdrón-López, M; Acosta, H; Cáceres, A J; Graminha, M A S; Michels, P A M; Concepción, J L; Quiñones, W

    2014-01-01

    Glycosomes are peroxisome-related organelles found in all kinetoplastid protists, including the human pathogenic species of the family Trypanosomatidae: Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. Glycosomes are unique in containing the majority of the glycolytic/gluconeogenic enzymes, but they also possess enzymes of several other important catabolic and anabolic pathways. The different metabolic processes are connected by shared cofactors and some metabolic intermediates, and their relative importance differs between the parasites or their distinct lifecycle stages, dependent on the environmental conditions encountered. By genetic or chemical means, a variety of glycosomal enzymes participating in different processes have been validated as drug targets. For several of these enzymes, as well as others that are likely crucial for proliferation, viability or virulence of the parasites, inhibitors have been obtained by different approaches such as compound libraries screening or design and synthesis. The efficacy and selectivity of some initially obtained inhibitors of parasite enzymes were further optimized by structure-activity relationship analysis, using available protein crystal structures. Several of the inhibitors cause growth inhibition of the clinically relevant stages of one or more parasitic trypanosomatid species and in some cases exert therapeutic effects in infected animals. The integrity of glycosomes and proper compartmentalization of at least several matrix enzymes is also crucial for the viability of the parasites. Therefore, proteins involved in the assembly of the organelles and transmembrane passage of substrates and products of glycosomal metabolism offer also promise as drug targets. Natural products with trypanocidal activity by affecting glycosomal integrity have been reported.

  12. Autophagy in parasitic protists: unique features and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Brennand, Ana; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Coppens, Isabelle; Rigden, Daniel J; Ginger, Michael L; Michels, Paul A M

    2011-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells can degrade their own components, cytosolic proteins and organelles, using dedicated hydrolases contained within the acidic interior of their lysosomes. This degradative process, called autophagy, is used under starvation conditions to recycle redundant or less important macromolecules, facilitates metabolic re-modeling in response to environmental cues, and is also often important during cell differentiation. In this review, we discuss the role played by autophagy during the life cycles of the major parasitic protists. To provide context, we also provide an overview of the different forms of autophagy and the successive steps in the autophagic processes, including the proteins involved, as revealed in recent decades by studies using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, methylotrophic yeasts and mammalian cells. We describe for trypanosomatid parasites how autophagy plays a role in the differentiation from one life cycle stage to the next one and, in the case of the intracellular parasites, for virulence. For malarial parasites, although only a limited repertoire of canonical autophagy-related proteins can be detected, autophagy seems to play a role in the removal of redundant organelles important for cell invasion, when sporozoites develop into intracellular trophozoites inside the hepatocytes. The complete absence of a canonical autophagy pathway from the microaerophile Giardia lamblia is also discussed. Finally, the essential role of autophagy for differentiation and pathogenicity of some pathogenic protists suggests that the proteins involved in this process may represent new targets for drug development. Opportunities and strategies for drug design targeting autophagy proteins are discussed.

  13. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  14. Drug-target interaction prediction by random walk on the heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Ming-Xi; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Predicting potential drug-target interactions from heterogeneous biological data is critical not only for better understanding of the various interactions and biological processes, but also for the development of novel drugs and the improvement of human medicines. In this paper, the method of Network-based Random Walk with Restart on the Heterogeneous network (NRWRH) is developed to predict potential drug-target interactions on a large scale under the hypothesis that similar drugs often target similar target proteins and the framework of Random Walk. Compared with traditional supervised or semi-supervised methods, NRWRH makes full use of the tool of the network for data integration to predict drug-target associations. It integrates three different networks (protein-protein similarity network, drug-drug similarity network, and known drug-target interaction networks) into a heterogeneous network by known drug-target interactions and implements the random walk on this heterogeneous network. When applied to four classes of important drug-target interactions including enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, NRWRH significantly improves previous methods in terms of cross-validation and potential drug-target interaction prediction. Excellent performance enables us to suggest a number of new potential drug-target interactions for drug development.

  15. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  16. New drugs targeting Th2 lymphocytes in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Groneberg, David; Ito, Kazuhiro; Casolari, Paolo; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto

    2008-02-27

    Asthma represents a profound worldwide public health problem. The most effective anti-asthmatic drugs currently available include inhaled beta2-agonists and glucocorticoids and control asthma in about 90-95% of patients. The current asthma therapies are not cures and symptoms return soon after treatment is stopped even after long term therapy. Although glucocorticoids are highly effective in controlling the inflammatory process in asthma, they appear to have little effect on the lower airway remodelling processes that appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma at currently prescribed doses. The development of novel drugs may allow resolution of these changes. In addition, severe glucocorticoid-dependent and resistant asthma presents a great clinical burden and reducing the side-effects of glucocorticoids using novel steroid-sparing agents is needed. Furthermore, the mechanisms involved in the persistence of inflammation are poorly understood and the reasons why some patients have severe life threatening asthma and others have very mild disease are still unknown. Drug development for asthma has been directed at improving currently available drugs and findings new compounds that usually target the Th2-driven airway inflammatory response. Considering the apparently central role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of asthma, drugs targeting disease-inducing Th2 cells are promising therapeutic strategies. However, although animal models of asthma suggest that this is feasible, the translation of these types of studies for the treatment of human asthma remains poor due to the limitations of the models currently used. The myriad of new compounds that are in development directed to modulate Th2 cells recruitment and/or activation will clarify in the near future the relative importance of these cells and their mediators in the complex interactions with the other pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cells and mediators responsible of the different asthmatic

  17. New drugs targeting Th2 lymphocytes in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Caramori, Gaetano; Groneberg, David; Ito, Kazuhiro; Casolari, Paolo; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Asthma represents a profound worldwide public health problem. The most effective anti-asthmatic drugs currently available include inhaled β2-agonists and glucocorticoids and control asthma in about 90-95% of patients. The current asthma therapies are not cures and symptoms return soon after treatment is stopped even after long term therapy. Although glucocorticoids are highly effective in controlling the inflammatory process in asthma, they appear to have little effect on the lower airway remodelling processes that appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma at currently prescribed doses. The development of novel drugs may allow resolution of these changes. In addition, severe glucocorticoid-dependent and resistant asthma presents a great clinical burden and reducing the side-effects of glucocorticoids using novel steroid-sparing agents is needed. Furthermore, the mechanisms involved in the persistence of inflammation are poorly understood and the reasons why some patients have severe life threatening asthma and others have very mild disease are still unknown. Drug development for asthma has been directed at improving currently available drugs and findings new compounds that usually target the Th2-driven airway inflammatory response. Considering the apparently central role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of asthma, drugs targeting disease-inducing Th2 cells are promising therapeutic strategies. However, although animal models of asthma suggest that this is feasible, the translation of these types of studies for the treatment of human asthma remains poor due to the limitations of the models currently used. The myriad of new compounds that are in development directed to modulate Th2 cells recruitment and/or activation will clarify in the near future the relative importance of these cells and their mediators in the complex interactions with the other pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cells and mediators responsible of the different asthmatic

  18. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:16912073

  19. Carbon nanotube lipid drug approach for targeted delivery of a chemotherapy drug in a human breast cancer xenograft animal model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Paul, Arghya; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Crystal; Rodes, Laetitia; Prakash, Satya

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) possesses excellent properties as a drug carrier. To overcome the challenge of drug functionalization with CNT, we have developed a lipid-drug approach for efficient drug loading onto CNT, in which a long chain lipid molecule is conjugated to the drug molecule so that the lipid-drug can be loaded directly onto CNT through binding of the lipid 'tail' in the drug molecule to CNT surfaces via hydrophobic interactions. In a proof-of-concept study, drug paclitaxel (PTX) was conjugated with a non-toxic lipid molecule docosanol for functionalization with CNT. Folic acid was also conjugated to CNT for targeted drug delivery. High level of drug loading onto SWNT could be achieved by lipid-drug approach. Conjugation of FA to SWNT-lipid-PTX led to an increase in cell penetration capacity, and the targeted SWNT-lipid-PTX showed much improved drug efficacy in vitro in comparison to free drug Taxol and non-targeted SWNT-lipid-PTX at 48 h (78.5% vs. 31.6% and 59.1% in cytotoxicity respectively, p < 0.01). In vivo analysis using a human breast cancer xenograft mice model also confirmed the improved drug efficacy. The targeted SWNT-lipid-PTX was found non-toxic as evaluated by biochemical analysis using blood samples, and by histological analysis of major organs.

  20. Blood-brain barrier drug targeting: the future of brain drug development.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2003-03-01

    As human longevity increases, the likelihood of the onset of diseases of the brain (and other organs) also increases. Clinical therapeutics offer useful long-term treatments, if not cures, if drugs can be delivered appropriately and effectively. Unfortunately, research in drug transport to the brain has not advanced very far. Through better characterization of the transport systems utilized within the blood-brain barrier, a greater understanding of how to exploit these systems will lead to effective treatments for brain disorders. Pardridge reviews the functions of the various known transport systems in the brain and discusses how the development of BBB drug-targeting programs in pharmaceutical and academic settings may lead to more efficacious treatments.

  1. New approaches for the identification of drug targets in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Antiparasitic chemotherapy is an important issue for drug development. Traditionally, novel compounds with antiprotozoan activities have been identified by screening of compound libraries in high-throughput systems. More recently developed approaches employ target-based drug design supported by genomics and proteomics of protozoan parasites. In this chapter, the drug targets in protozoan parasites are reviewed. The gene-expression machinery has been among the first targets for antiparasitic drugs and is still under investigation as a target for novel compounds. Other targets include cytoskeletal proteins, proteins involved in intracellular signaling, membranes, and enzymes participating in intermediary metabolism. In apicomplexan parasites, the apicoplast is a suitable target for established and novel drugs. Some drugs act on multiple subcellular targets. Drugs with nitro groups generate free radicals under anaerobic growth conditions, and drugs with peroxide groups generate radicals under aerobic growth conditions, both affecting multiple cellular pathways. Mefloquine and thiazolides are presented as examples for antiprotozoan compounds with multiple (side) effects. The classic approach of drug discovery employing high-throughput physiological screenings followed by identification of drug targets has yielded the mainstream of current antiprotozoal drugs. Target-based drug design supported by genomics and proteomics of protozoan parasites has not produced any antiparasitic drug so far. The reason for this is discussed and a synthesis of both methods is proposed.

  2. Polymeric protective agents for nanoparticles in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Bejenaru, Cornelia; Bejenaru, Ludovic Everard

    2016-08-30

    Surface modification/functionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric protective agents is an issue of great importance and actuality for drug delivery and targeting. Improving the blood circulation half-life of surface-protected nanocarriers is closely related to the elimination of main biological barriers and limiting factors (protein absorption and opsonization), due to the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system. For passive or active targeted delivery, in biomedical area, surface-functionalized NPs with tissue-recognition ligands were designed and optimized as a result of modern research techniques. Also, multi-functionalized nanostructures are characterized by enhanced bioavailability, efficacy, targeted localization, active cellular uptake, and low side effects. Surface-protected NPs are obtained from biocompatible, biodegradable and less toxic natural polymers (dextran, β-cyclodextrin, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, gelatin) or synthetic polymers, such as poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(alkyl cyanoacrylates). PEGylation is one of the most important functionalization methods providing steric stabilization, long circulating and 'stealth' properties for both polymeric and inorganic-based nanosystems. In addition, for their antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor effects, cutting-edge researches in the field of pharmaceutical nanobiotechnology highlighted the importance of noble metal (platinum, gold, silver) NPs decorated with biopolymers. PMID:26972379

  3. New insight into p-glycoprotein as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Breier, Albert; Gibalova, Lenka; Seres, Mario; Barancik, Miroslav; Sulova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    changes in cell sensitivity to substances that are not P-gp substrates or modulators. We recently reported that P-gppositive L1210 cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to cisplatin, concanavalin A, thapsigargin and tunicamycin. Thus, P-gp-mediated MDR represents a more complex process than was expected, and the unintended effects of P-gp overexpression should be considered when describing this phenotype. The present review aims to provide the most current informations about P-gp-mediated MDR while paying particular attention to the possible dual function of this protein as a drug efflux pump and a regulatory protein that influences diverse cell processes. From a clinical standpoint, overexpression of P-gp in cancer cells represents a real obstacle to effective chemotherapy for malignant diseases. Therefore, this protein should be considered as a viable target for pharmaceutical design. PMID:22931413

  4. New insight into p-glycoprotein as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Breier, Albert; Gibalova, Lenka; Seres, Mario; Barancik, Miroslav; Sulova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    changes in cell sensitivity to substances that are not P-gp substrates or modulators. We recently reported that P-gppositive L1210 cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to cisplatin, concanavalin A, thapsigargin and tunicamycin. Thus, P-gp-mediated MDR represents a more complex process than was expected, and the unintended effects of P-gp overexpression should be considered when describing this phenotype. The present review aims to provide the most current informations about P-gp-mediated MDR while paying particular attention to the possible dual function of this protein as a drug efflux pump and a regulatory protein that influences diverse cell processes. From a clinical standpoint, overexpression of P-gp in cancer cells represents a real obstacle to effective chemotherapy for malignant diseases. Therefore, this protein should be considered as a viable target for pharmaceutical design.

  5. Candidiasis drug discovery and development: new approaches targeting virulence for discovering and identifying new drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Targeting pathogenetic mechanisms rather than essential processes represents a very attractive alternative for the development of new antibiotics. This may be particularly important in the case of antimycotics, due to the urgent need for novel antifungal drugs and the paucity of selective fungal targets. The opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the main etiological agent of candidiasis, the most common human fungal infection. These infections carry unacceptably high mortality rates, a clear reflection of the many shortcomings of current antifungal therapy, including the limited armamentarium of antifungal agents, their toxicity, and the emergence of resistance. Moreover the antifungal pipeline is mostly dry. Areas covered This review covers some of the most recent progress towards understanding C. albicans pathogenetic processes and how to harness this information for the development of anti-virulence agents. The two principal areas covered are filamentation and biofilm formation, as C. albicans pathogenicity is intimately linked to its ability to undergo morphogenetic conversions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and to its ability to form biofilms. Expert opinion We argue that filamentation and biofilm formation represent high value targets, yet clinically unexploited, for the development of novel anti-virulence approaches against candidiasis. Although this has proved a difficult task despite increasing understanding at the molecular level of C. albicans virulence, we highlight new opportunities and prospects for antifungal drug development targeting these two important biological processes. PMID:23738751

  6. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its

  7. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I–III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I–II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009–2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004–2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I–III trials of investigational drugs (2009–2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics

  8. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its

  9. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  10. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery.

  11. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

  12. [Preparation and lymphatic targeting research of targeting antitumor drug: pectin-adriamycin conjugates].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming; Xie, Ping; Tang, Xiaohai; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Yongmei; Zheng, Kaibo; He, Jun

    2009-06-01

    Pectin, a polysaccharide extracted from the cell wall of plants, was used as the drug carrier to synthesize the pectin-adriamycin conjugates (P(A)n). The structure of the conjugates was confirmed by UV and IR. The degree of esterification (DE) of the pectin was assessed, and it was found that DE significantly influenced the carboxy group contents, inherent viscosity and galacturonic acid contents of the pectin. The results of drug release test in vitro showed that the conjugate was stable in normal saline, but was gradually enzymolyzed to release the adriamycin in blood plasma and in lymph nodes. The results of lymphatic targeting study of P(A), demonstrated that the modification of DE or drug coupling capacity of pectin significantly influenced the lymphatic targeting characteristics of P (A)n. The adriamycin concentration of lymph nodes was 208 times higher than that of plasma after local injection of the P(A)n, of which the adriamycin content was 27.9% and the pectin was deesterificated 120 minutes by the use of hypothermy alkaline deesterification method.

  13. In Vitro Drug Sensitivity Tests to Predict Molecular Target Drug Responses in Surgically Resected Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ryohei; Anayama, Takashi; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Okada, Hironobu; Kume, Motohiko; Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors have dramatically changed the strategy of medical treatment of lung cancer. Patients should be screened for the presence of the EGFR mutation or echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion gene prior to chemotherapy to predict their clinical response. The succinate dehydrogenase inhibition (SDI) test and collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) are established in vitro drug sensitivity tests, which may predict the sensitivity of patients to cytotoxic anticancer drugs. We applied in vitro drug sensitivity tests for cyclopedic prediction of clinical responses to different molecular targeting drugs. Methods The growth inhibitory effects of erlotinib and crizotinib were confirmed for lung cancer cell lines using SDI and CD-DST. The sensitivity of 35 cases of surgically resected lung cancer to erlotinib was examined using SDI or CD-DST, and compared with EGFR mutation status. Results HCC827 (Exon19: E746-A750 del) and H3122 (EML4-ALK) cells were inhibited by lower concentrations of erlotinib and crizotinib, respectively than A549, H460, and H1975 (L858R+T790M) cells were. The viability of the surgically resected lung cancer was 60.0 ± 9.8 and 86.8 ± 13.9% in EGFR-mutants vs. wild types in the SDI (p = 0.0003). The cell viability was 33.5 ± 21.2 and 79.0 ± 18.6% in EGFR mutants vs. wild-type cases (p = 0.026) in CD-DST. Conclusions In vitro drug sensitivity evaluated by either SDI or CD-DST correlated with EGFR gene status. Therefore, SDI and CD-DST may be useful predictors of potential clinical responses to the molecular anticancer drugs, cyclopedically. PMID:27070423

  14. Recognizing drug targets using evolutionary information: implications for repurposing FDA-approved drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Drug repurposing to explore target space has been gaining pace over the past decade with the upsurge in the use of systematic approaches for computational drug discovery. Such a cost and time-saving approach gains immense importance for pathogens of special interest, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. We report a comprehensive approach to repurpose drugs, based on the exploration of evolutionary relationships inferred from the comparative sequence and structural analyses between targets of FDA-approved drugs and the proteins of M. tuberculosis. This approach has facilitated the identification of several polypharmacological drugs that could potentially target unexploited M. tuberculosis proteins. A total of 130 FDA-approved drugs, originally intended against other diseases, could be repurposed against 78 potential targets in M. tuberculosis. Additionally, we have also made an attempt to augment the chemical space by recognizing compounds structurally similar to FDA-approved drugs. For three of the attractive cases we have investigated the probable binding modes of the drugs in their corresponding M. tuberculosis targets by means of structural modelling. Such prospective targets and small molecules could be prioritized for experimental endeavours, and could significantly influence drug-discovery and drug-development programmes for tuberculosis. PMID:26429199

  15. Recognizing drug targets using evolutionary information: implications for repurposing FDA-approved drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Drug repurposing to explore target space has been gaining pace over the past decade with the upsurge in the use of systematic approaches for computational drug discovery. Such a cost and time-saving approach gains immense importance for pathogens of special interest, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. We report a comprehensive approach to repurpose drugs, based on the exploration of evolutionary relationships inferred from the comparative sequence and structural analyses between targets of FDA-approved drugs and the proteins of M. tuberculosis. This approach has facilitated the identification of several polypharmacological drugs that could potentially target unexploited M. tuberculosis proteins. A total of 130 FDA-approved drugs, originally intended against other diseases, could be repurposed against 78 potential targets in M. tuberculosis. Additionally, we have also made an attempt to augment the chemical space by recognizing compounds structurally similar to FDA-approved drugs. For three of the attractive cases we have investigated the probable binding modes of the drugs in their corresponding M. tuberculosis targets by means of structural modelling. Such prospective targets and small molecules could be prioritized for experimental endeavours, and could significantly influence drug-discovery and drug-development programmes for tuberculosis.

  16. Quantitative analysis on the characteristics of targets with FDA approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Li, Peng; Zhong, Zhaowei; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulated knowledge of genomic information, systems biology, and disease mechanisms provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of diseases, and to discover new and novel therapeutic targets from the wealth of genomic data. With hundreds to a few thousand potential targets available in the human genome alone, target selection and validation has become a critical component of drug discovery process. The explorations on quantitative characteristics of the currently explored targets (those without any marketed drug) and successful targets (targeted by at least one marketed drug) could help discern simple rules for selecting a putative successful target. Here we use integrative in silico (computational) approaches to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of 133 targets with FDA approved drugs and 3120 human disease genes (therapeutic targets) not targeted by FDA approved drugs. This is the first attempt to comparatively analyze targets with FDA approved drugs and targets with no FDA approved drug or no drugs available for them. Our results show that proteins with 5 or fewer number of homologs outside their own family, proteins with single-exon gene architecture and proteins interacting with more than 3 partners are more likely to be targetable. These quantitative characteristics could serve as criteria to search for promising targetable disease genes. PMID:18167532

  17. Preparation of bovine serum albumin nanospheres as drug targeting carriers.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Y; Takayama, K; Ueda, H; Machida, Y; Nagai, T

    1987-12-01

    Bovine serum albumin nanospheres (BSA-NS) of mean diameter about 170 nm were prepared by means of the tanning method with glutaraldehyde, and their efficacy as drug targeting carriers was evaluated. To gain insight of biodegradability, BSA microspheres (BSA-MS) were first administered to rats and their distributions in the lungs and liver were observed by a scanning electron microscope. A large amount of BSA-MS was found in the lungs and their surface was slightly degraded at 1 week after the administration. For investigating biocompatibility, the weight increase of the spleen and liver was measured after the administration of the BSA-NS to mice. The spleen weight of the group receiving BSA-NS was equivalent to that of the control group, though the liver weight was significantly increased. It was observed that conjugates of BSA-NS with antibody selectively concentrated on the surface of Sepharose beads which were coated with antigen.

  18. Single-cell transcriptomics for drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Spaethling, Jennifer M; Eberwine, James H

    2013-10-01

    Single cell sequencing is currently in its relative infancy although an unprecedented amount of information is already being generated. These techniques are providing new insight into intercellular variability as well as identification of previously unrecognized drug targets. As more groups are gaining an interest in this fruitful technique, new sample preparation techniques, sequencing platforms, and bioinformatics tools are being developed which only improve the quantity and quality of data generated in these studies. Great advancements in harvest (in vivo pipette), sample preparation, and sequencing (Illumina HiSeq 2500/MiSeq, Ion Torrent PGM, Pacific Biosciences RS) are allowing for previously untestable questions to be answered and for expanded accessibility of these technologies.

  19. Targeting RSV with Vaccines and Small Molecule Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Heather M.; Ray, William C.; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Peeples, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most significant cause of pediatric respiratory infections. Palivizumab (Synagis®), a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully for a number of years to prevent severe RSV disease in at-risk infants. However, despite intense efforts, there is no approved vaccine or small molecule drug for RSV. As an enveloped virus, RSV must fuse its envelope with the host cell membrane, which is accomplished through the actions of the fusion (F) glycoprotein, with attachment help from the G glycoprotein. Because of their integral role in initiation of infection and their accessibility outside the lipid bilayer, these proteins have been popular targets in the discovery and development of antiviral compounds and vaccines against RSV. This review examines advances in the development of antiviral compounds and vaccine candidates. PMID:22335496

  20. Immunomicelles: Targeted pharmaceutical carriers for poorly soluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Lukyanov, Anatoly N.; Gao, Zhonggao; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    To prepare immunomicelles, new targeted carriers for poorly soluble pharmaceuticals, a procedure has been developed to chemically attach mAbs to reactive groups incorporated into the corona of polymeric micelles made of polyethylene glycol–phosphatidylethanolamine conjugates. Micelle-attached antibodies retained their ability to specifically interact with their antigens. Immunomicelles with attached antitumor mAb 2C5 effectively recognized and bound various cancer cells in vitro and showed an increased accumulation in experimental tumors in mice when compared with nontargeted micelles. Intravenous administration of tumor-specific 2C5 immunomicelles loaded with a sparingly soluble anticancer agent, taxol, into experimental mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma resulted in an increased accumulation of taxol in the tumor compared with free taxol or taxol in nontargeted micelles and in enhanced tumor growth inhibition. This family of pharmaceutical carriers can be used for the solubilization and enhanced delivery of poorly soluble drugs to various pathological sites in the body. PMID:12716967

  1. Activity based chemical proteomics: profiling proteases as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Heal, William Percy; Wickramasinghe, Sasala Roshinie; Tate, Edward William

    2008-09-01

    The pivotal role of proteases in many diseases has generated considerable interest in their basic biology, and in the potential to target them for chemotherapy. Although fundamental to the initiation and progression of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis and malaria, in many cases their precise role remains unknown. Activity-based chemical proteomics-an emerging field involving a combination of organic synthesis, biochemistry, cell biology, biophysics and bioinformatics-allows the detection, visualisation and activity quantification of whole families or selected sub-sets of proteases based upon their substrate specificity. This approach can be applied for drug target/lead identification and validation, the fundamentals of drug discovery. The activity-based probes discussed in this review contain three key features; a 'warhead' (binds irreversibly but selectively to the active site), a 'tag' (allowing enzyme 'handling', with a combination of fluorescent, affinity and/or radio labels), and a linker region between warhead and tag. From the design and synthesis of the linker arise some of the latest developments discussed here; not only can the physical properties (e.g., solubility, localisation) of the probe be tuned, but the inclusion of a cleavable moiety allows selective removal of tagged enzyme from affinity beads etc. The design and synthesis of recently reported probes is discussed, including modular assembly of highly versatile probes via solid phase synthesis. Recent applications of activity-based protein profiling to specific proteases (serine, threonine, cysteine and metalloproteases) are reviewed as are demonstrations of their use in the study of disease function in cancer and malaria.

  2. Tyrosine aminotransferase from Leishmania infantum: A new drug target candidate.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Miguel Angel; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro Jose; Abramov, Ariel; de Lacoba, Mario García; Abendroth, Jan; Zhang, Sunny; Edwards, Thomas; Lorimer, Don; Myler, Peter John; Larraga, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin. The disease is fatal without treatment, which has been based on antimonial pentavalents for more than 60 years. Due to resistances, relapses and toxicity to current treatment, the development of new drugs is required. The structure of the L. infantum tyrosine aminotransferase (LiTAT) has been recently solved showing important differences with the mammalian orthologue. The characterization of LiTAT is reported herein. This enzyme is cytoplasmic and is over-expressed in the more infective stages and nitric oxide resistant parasites. Unlike the mammalian TAT, LiTAT is able to use ketomethiobutyrate as co-substrate. The pharmacophore model of LiTAT with this specific co-substrate is described herein. This may allow the identification of new inhibitors present in the databases. All the data obtained support that LiTAT is a good target candidate for the development of new anti-leishmanial drugs. PMID:25516846

  3. Adipokines as drug targets in diabetes and underlying disturbances.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Câmara, Niels O S; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are worldwide health problems. White fat dynamically participates in hormonal and inflammatory regulation. White adipose tissue is recognized as a multifactorial organ that secretes several adipose-derived factors that have been collectively termed "adipokines." Adipokines are pleiotropic molecules that gather factors such as leptin, adiponectin, visfatin, apelin, vaspin, hepcidin, RBP4, and inflammatory cytokines, including TNF and IL-1β, among others. Multiple roles in metabolic and inflammatory responses have been assigned to these molecules. Several adipokines contribute to the self-styled "low-grade inflammatory state" of obese and insulin-resistant subjects, inducing the accumulation of metabolic anomalies within these individuals, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Thus, adipokines are an interesting drug target to treat autoimmune diseases, obesity, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue inflammation. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the roles of adipokines in different immune and nonimmune cells, which will contribute to diabetes as well as to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance development. We describe how adipokines regulate inflammation in these diseases and their therapeutic implications. We also survey current attempts to exploit adipokines for clinical applications, which hold potential as novel approaches to drug development in several immune-mediated diseases.

  4. Discovery of the target for immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs).

    PubMed

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Half a century ago, the sedative thalidomide caused a serious drug disaster because of its teratogenicity and was withdrawn from the market. However, thalidomide, which has returned to the market, is now used for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma (MM) under strict control. The mechanism of thalidomide action had been a long-standing question. We developed a new affinity bead technology and identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. We found that CRBN functions as a substrate receptor of an E3 cullin-Ring ligase complex 4 (CRL4) and is a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Recently, new thalidomide derivatives, called immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), have been developed by Celgene. Among them, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) were shown to exert strong therapeutic effects against MM. It was found that Len and Pom both bind CRBN-CRL4 and recruit neomorphic substrates (Ikaros and Aiolos). More recently it was reported that casein kinase 1a (Ck1a) was identified as a substrate for CRBN-CRL4 in the presence of Len, but not Pom. Ck1a breakdown explains why Len is specifically effective for myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. It is now proposed that binding of IMiDs to CRBN appears to alter the substrate specificity of CRBN-CRL4. In this review, we introduce recent findings on IMiDs.

  5. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  6. Tyrosine aminotransferase from Leishmania infantum: A new drug target candidate

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Miguel Angel; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro Jose; Abramov, Ariel; de Lacoba, Mario García; Abendroth, Jan; Zhang, Sunny; Edwards, Thomas; Lorimer, Don; Myler, Peter John; Larraga, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin. The disease is fatal without treatment, which has been based on antimonial pentavalents for more than 60 years. Due to resistances, relapses and toxicity to current treatment, the development of new drugs is required. The structure of the L. infantum tyrosine aminotransferase (LiTAT) has been recently solved showing important differences with the mammalian orthologue. The characterization of LiTAT is reported herein. This enzyme is cytoplasmic and is over-expressed in the more infective stages and nitric oxide resistant parasites. Unlike the mammalian TAT, LiTAT is able to use ketomethiobutyrate as co-substrate. The pharmacophore model of LiTAT with this specific co-substrate is described herein. This may allow the identification of new inhibitors present in the databases. All the data obtained support that LiTAT is a good target candidate for the development of new anti-leishmanial drugs. PMID:25516846

  7. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s-1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  8. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s‑1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  9. Current drugs and drug targets in non-small cell lung cancer: limitations and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Daga, Aditi; Ansari, Afzal; Patel, Shanaya; Mirza, Sheefa; Rawal, Rakesh; Umrania, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a serious health problem and leading cause of death worldwide due to its high incidence and mortality. More than 80% of lung cancers feature a non-small cell histology. Over few decades, systemic chemotherapy and surgery are the only treatment options in this type of tumor but due to their limited efficacy and overall poor survival of patients, there is an urge to develop newer therapeutic strategies which circumvent the problems. Enhanced knowledge of translational science and molecular biology have revealed that lung tumors carry diverse driver gene mutations and adopt different intracellular pathways leading to carcinogenesis. Hence, the development of targeted agents against molecular subgroups harboring critical mutations is an attractive approach for therapeutic treatment. Targeted therapies are clearly more preferred nowadays over systemic therapies because they target tumor specific molecules resulting with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity to normal tissues. Thus, this review encompasses comprehensive updates on targeted therapies for the driver mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the potential challenges of acquired drug resistance faced in the field of targeted therapy along with the imminent newer treatment modalities against lung cancer.

  10. Neighborhood Regularized Logistic Matrix Factorization for Drug-Target Interaction Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Wu, Min; Miao, Chunyan; Zhao, Peilin; Li, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    In pharmaceutical sciences, a crucial step of the drug discovery process is the identification of drug-target interactions. However, only a small portion of the drug-target interactions have been experimentally validated, as the experimental validation is laborious and costly. To improve the drug discovery efficiency, there is a great need for the development of accurate computational approaches that can predict potential drug-target interactions to direct the experimental verification. In this paper, we propose a novel drug-target interaction prediction algorithm, namely neighborhood regularized logistic matrix factorization (NRLMF). Specifically, the proposed NRLMF method focuses on modeling the probability that a drug would interact with a target by logistic matrix factorization, where the properties of drugs and targets are represented by drug-specific and target-specific latent vectors, respectively. Moreover, NRLMF assigns higher importance levels to positive observations (i.e., the observed interacting drug-target pairs) than negative observations (i.e., the unknown pairs). Because the positive observations are already experimentally verified, they are usually more trustworthy. Furthermore, the local structure of the drug-target interaction data has also been exploited via neighborhood regularization to achieve better prediction accuracy. We conducted extensive experiments over four benchmark datasets, and NRLMF demonstrated its effectiveness compared with five state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:26872142

  11. Nucleoside transporter proteins as biomarkers of drug responsiveness and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Pérez-Torras, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoside and nucleobase analogs are currently used in the treatment of solid tumors, lymphoproliferative diseases, viral infections such as hepatitis and AIDS, and some inflammatory diseases such as Crohn. Two gene families are implicated in the uptake of nucleosides and nucleoside analogs into cells, SCL28 and SLC29. The former encodes hCNT1, hCNT2, and hCNT3 proteins. They translocate nucleosides in a Na+ coupled manner with high affinity and some substrate selectivity, being hCNT1 and hCNT2 pyrimidine- and purine-preferring, respectively, and hCNT3 a broad selectivity transporter. SLC29 genes encode four members, being hENT1 and hENT2 the only two which are unequivocally implicated in the translocation of nucleosides and nucleobases (the latter mostly via hENT2) at the cell plasma membrane. Some nucleoside-derived drugs can also interact with and be translocated by members of the SLC22 gene family, particularly hOCT and hOAT proteins. Inter-individual differences in transporter function and perhaps, more importantly, altered expression associated with the disease itself might modulate the transporter profile of target cells, thereby determining drug bioavailability and action. Drug transporter pharmacology has been periodically reviewed. Thus, with this contribution we aim at providing a state-of-the-art overview of the clinical evidence generated so far supporting the concept that these membrane proteins can indeed be biomarkers suitable for diagnosis and/or prognosis. Last but not least, some of these transporter proteins can also be envisaged as drug targets, as long as they can show “transceptor” functions, in some cases related to their role as modulators of extracellular adenosine levels, thereby providing a functional link between P1 receptors and transporters. PMID:25713533

  12. Halogen bond: its role beyond drug-target binding affinity for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Lu, Yunxiang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-27

    Halogen bond has attracted a great deal of attention in the past years for hit-to-lead-to-candidate optimization aiming at improving drug-target binding affinity. In general, heavy organohalogens (i.e., organochlorines, organobromines, and organoiodines) are capable of forming halogen bonds while organofluorines are not. In order to explore the possible roles that halogen bonds could play beyond improving binding affinity, we performed a detailed database survey and quantum chemistry calculation with close attention paid to (1) the change of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines along the drug discovery and development process and (2) the halogen bonds between organohalogens and nonbiopolymers or nontarget biopolymers. Our database survey revealed that (1) an obviously increasing trend of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines was observed along the drug discovery and development process, illustrating that more organofluorines are worn and eliminated than heavy organohalogens during the process, suggesting that heavy halogens with the capability of forming halogen bonds should have priority for lead optimization; and (2) more than 16% of the halogen bonds in PDB are formed between organohalogens and water, and nearly 20% of the halogen bonds are formed with the proteins that are involved in the ADME/T process. Our QM/MM calculations validated the contribution of the halogen bond to the binding between organohalogens and plasma transport proteins. Thus, halogen bonds could play roles not only in improving drug-target binding affinity but also in tuning ADME/T property. Therefore, we suggest that albeit halogenation is a valuable approach for improving ligand bioactivity, more attention should be paid in the future to the application of the halogen bond for ligand ADME/T property optimization.

  13. DrugE-Rank: improving drug–target interaction prediction of new candidate drugs or targets by ensemble learning to rank

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qingjun; Gao, Junning; Wu, Dongliang; Zhang, Shihua; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying drug–target interactions is an important task in drug discovery. To reduce heavy time and financial cost in experimental way, many computational approaches have been proposed. Although these approaches have used many different principles, their performance is far from satisfactory, especially in predicting drug–target interactions of new candidate drugs or targets. Methods: Approaches based on machine learning for this problem can be divided into two types: feature-based and similarity-based methods. Learning to rank is the most powerful technique in the feature-based methods. Similarity-based methods are well accepted, due to their idea of connecting the chemical and genomic spaces, represented by drug and target similarities, respectively. We propose a new method, DrugE-Rank, to improve the prediction performance by nicely combining the advantages of the two different types of methods. That is, DrugE-Rank uses LTR, for which multiple well-known similarity-based methods can be used as components of ensemble learning. Results: The performance of DrugE-Rank is thoroughly examined by three main experiments using data from DrugBank: (i) cross-validation on FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) approved drugs before March 2014; (ii) independent test on FDA approved drugs after March 2014; and (iii) independent test on FDA experimental drugs. Experimental results show that DrugE-Rank outperforms competing methods significantly, especially achieving more than 30% improvement in Area under Prediction Recall curve for FDA approved new drugs and FDA experimental drugs. Availability: http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/DrugE-Rank Contact: zhusf@fudan.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307615

  14. In vivo imaging of specific drug target binding at subcellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dubach, J.M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L.A.; Weissleder, R.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to measure binding of small molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labeled drug and enables high resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumor in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity. PMID:24867710

  15. Drug Target Prediction and Repositioning Using an Integrated Network-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Emig, Dorothea; Ivliev, Alexander; Pustovalova, Olga; Lancashire, Lee; Bureeva, Svetlana; Nikolsky, Yuri; Bessarabova, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of novel drug targets is a significant challenge in drug development. Although the human genome comprises approximately 30,000 genes, proteins encoded by fewer than 400 are used as drug targets in the treatment of diseases. Therefore, novel drug targets are extremely valuable as the source for first in class drugs. On the other hand, many of the currently known drug targets are functionally pleiotropic and involved in multiple pathologies. Several of them are exploited for treating multiple diseases, which highlights the need for methods to reliably reposition drug targets to new indications. Network-based methods have been successfully applied to prioritize novel disease-associated genes. In recent years, several such algorithms have been developed, some focusing on local network properties only, and others taking the complete network topology into account. Common to all approaches is the understanding that novel disease-associated candidates are in close overall proximity to known disease genes. However, the relevance of these methods to the prediction of novel drug targets has not yet been assessed. Here, we present a network-based approach for the prediction of drug targets for a given disease. The method allows both repositioning drug targets known for other diseases to the given disease and the prediction of unexploited drug targets which are not used for treatment of any disease. Our approach takes as input a disease gene expression signature and a high-quality interaction network and outputs a prioritized list of drug targets. We demonstrate the high performance of our method and highlight the usefulness of the predictions in three case studies. We present novel drug targets for scleroderma and different types of cancer with their underlying biological processes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of our method to identify non-suspected repositioning candidates using diabetes type 1 as an example. PMID:23593264

  16. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO₂ hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4-8.3) × 10⁵ s(-1) and kcat/KM values of (4.7-8.5) × 10⁷ M(-1)·s(-1). In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3-90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2-88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  17. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3) × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5) × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  18. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  19. tcTKB: an integrated cardiovascular toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-01-01

    Targeted cancer drugs are often associated with unexpectedly high cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Systematic approaches to studying CV events associated with targeted anticancer drugs have high potential for elucidating the complex pathways underlying targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we built tcTKB, a comprehensive CV toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs, by extracting drug-CV pairs from five large-scale and complementary data sources. The data sources include FDA drug labels (44,979 labels), the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) (4,285,097 records), the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database (CVAROD) (1,107,752 records), published biomedical literature (21,354,075 records), and published full-text articles from the Journal of Oncology (JCO) (13,855 articles). tcTKB contains 14,351 drug-CV pairs for 45 targeted anticancer drugs and 1,842 CV events. We demonstrate that CV events positively correlate with drug target genes and drug metabolism genes, demonstrating that tcTKB in combination with other data resources, could facilitate our understanding of targeted anticancer drugs and their associated CV toxicities. PMID:26958275

  20. Drug-target interaction prediction: databases, web servers and computational models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Feng; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Yongdong

    2016-07-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions is an important process in drug discovery. Although high-throughput screening and other biological assays are becoming available, experimental methods for drug-target interaction identification remain to be extremely costly, time-consuming and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, various computational models have been developed to predict potential drug-target associations on a large scale. In this review, databases and web servers involved in drug-target identification and drug discovery are summarized. In addition, we mainly introduced some state-of-the-art computational models for drug-target interactions prediction, including network-based method, machine learning-based method and so on. Specially, for the machine learning-based method, much attention was paid to supervised and semi-supervised models, which have essential difference in the adoption of negative samples. Although significant improvements for drug-target interaction prediction have been obtained by many effective computational models, both network-based and machine learning-based methods have their disadvantages, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of the network-based drug discovery and network approach for personalized drug discovery based on personalized medicine, genome sequencing, tumor clone-based network and cancer hallmark-based network. Finally, we discussed the new evaluation validation framework and the formulation of drug-target interactions prediction problem by more realistic regression formulation based on quantitative bioactivity data.

  1. Target-mediated drug disposition model and its approximations for antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2014-02-01

    Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a complex structure composed of an antibody linked to several molecules of a biologically active cytotoxic drug. The number of ADC compounds in clinical development now exceeds 30, with two of them already on the market. However, there is no rigorous mechanistic model that describes pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of these compounds. PK modeling of ADCs is even more complicated than that of other biologics as the model should describe distribution, binding, and elimination of antibodies with different toxin load, and also the deconjugation process and PK of the released toxin. This work extends the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model to describe ADCs, derives the rapid binding (quasi-equilibrium), quasi-steady-state, and Michaelis-Menten approximations of the TMDD model as applied to ADCs, derives the TMDD model and its approximations for ADCs with load-independent properties, and discusses further simplifications of the system under various assumptions. The developed models are shown to describe data simulated from the available clinical population PK models of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), one of the two currently approved ADCs. Identifiability of model parameters is also discussed and illustrated on the simulated T-DM1 examples.

  2. Targeted lipid based drug conjugates: a novel strategy for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Kwatra, Deep; Earla, Ravinder; Samanta, Swapan K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    A majority of studies involving prodrugs are directed to overcome low bioavailability of the parent drug. The aim of this study is to increase the bioavailability of acyclovir (ACV) by designing a novel prodrug delivery system which is more lipophilic, and at the same time site specific. In this study, a lipid raft has been conjugated to the parent drug molecule to impart lipophilicity. Simultaneously a targeting moiety that can be recognized by a specific transporter/receptor in the cell membrane has also been tethered to the other terminal of lipid raft. Targeted lipid prodrugs i.e., biotin-ricinoleicacid-acyclovir (B-R-ACV) and biotin-12hydroxystearicacid-acyclovir (B-12HS-ACV) were synthesized with ricinoleicacid and 12hydroxystearicacid as the lipophilic rafts and biotin as the targeting moiety. Biotin-ACV (B-ACV), ricinoleicacid-ACV (R-ACV) and 12hydroxystearicacid-ACV (12HS-ACV) were also synthesized to delineate the individual effects of the targeting and the lipid moieties. Cellular accumulation studies were performed in confluent MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. The targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV exhibited much higher cellular accumulation than B-ACV, R-ACV and 12HS-ACV in both cell lines. This result indicates that both the targeting and the lipid moiety act synergistically toward cellular uptake. The biotin conjugated prodrugs caused a decrease in the uptake of [(3)H] biotin suggesting the role of sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in uptake. The affinity of these targeted lipid prodrugs toward SMVT was studied in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Both the targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV (20.25 ± 1.74 μM) and B-12HS-ACV (23.99 ± 3.20 μM) demonstrated higher affinity towards SMVT than B-ACV (30.90 ± 4.19 μM). Further, dose dependent studies revealed a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on [(3)H] biotin uptake in the presence of biotinylated prodrugs. Transepithelial transport studies showed lowering of [(3)H] biotin permeability in

  3. The drug-target residence time model: a 10-year retrospective.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    The drug-target residence time model was first introduced in 2006 and has been broadly adopted across the chemical biology, biotechnology and pharmaceutical communities. While traditional in vitro methods view drug-target interactions exclusively in terms of equilibrium affinity, the residence time model takes into account the conformational dynamics of target macromolecules that affect drug binding and dissociation. The key tenet of this model is that the lifetime (or residence time) of the binary drug-target complex, and not the binding affinity per se, dictates much of the in vivo pharmacological activity. Here, this model is revisited and key applications of it over the past 10 years are highlighted.

  4. Neurodegeneration in Diabetic Retina and Its Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes causing vision loss and blindness worldwide. DR is widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease as evidenced from early changes at cellular and molecular levels in the neuronal component of the diabetic retina, which is further supported by various retinal functional tests indicating functional deficits in the retina soon after diabetes progression. Diabetes alters the level of a number of neurodegenerative metabolites, which increases influx through several metabolic pathways which in turn induce an increase in oxidative stress and a decrease in neurotrophic factors, thereby damage retinal neurons. Loss of neurons may implicate in vascular pathology, a clinical signs of DR observed at later stages of the disease. Here, we discuss diabetes-induced potential metabolites known to be detrimental to neuronal damage and their mechanism of action. In addition, we highlight important neurotrophic factors, whose level have been found to be dysregulated in diabetic retina and may damage neurons. Furthermore, we discuss potential drugs and strategies based on targeting diabetes-induced metabolites, metabolic pathways, oxidative stress, and neurotrophins to protect retinal neurons, which may ameliorate vision loss and vascular damage in DR. PMID:25342945

  5. Drug Targeting of α-Synuclein Oligomerization in Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Kazantsev, Aleksey

    2008-01-01

    The heterogeneity of symptoms and disease progression observed in synucleinopathies, of which Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most common representative, poses large problems for the discovery of novel therapeutics. The molecular basis for pathology is currently unclear, both in familial and in sporadic cases. While the therapeutic effects of L-DOPA and dopamine receptor agonists constitute good options for symptomatic treatment in PD, the development of neuroprotective and/or neurorestorative treatments for PD and other synucleinopathies faces significant challenges due to the poor knowledge of the putative targets. Recent experimental evidence strongly suggests a central role for neurotoxic α-synuclein oligomeric species in neurodegeneration. The events leading to protein oligomerization, as well as the oligomeric species themselves, are likely amenable to modulation by small molecules, which are beginning to emerge in high throughput compound screens in a variety of model organisms. The therapeutic potential of small molecule modulators of oligomer formation demands further exploration and validation in cellular and animal disease models in order to accelerate human drug development. PMID:19787096

  6. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    PubMed

    Page, Antony P; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D; Pertab, David

    2014-08-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  7. Neuropeptides as targets for the development of anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Clynen, Elke; Swijsen, Ann; Raijmakers, Marjolein; Hoogland, Govert; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. These seizures are due to abnormal excessive and synchronous neuronal activity in the brain caused by a disruption of the delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Neuropeptides can contribute to such misbalance by modulating the effect of classical excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. In this review, we discuss 21 different neuropeptides that have been linked to seizure disorders. These neuropeptides show an aberrant expression and/or release in animal seizure models and/or epilepsy patients. Many of these endogenous peptides, like adrenocorticotropic hormone, angiotensin, cholecystokinin, cortistatin, dynorphin, galanin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, somatostatin, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, are able to suppress seizures in the brain. Other neuropeptides, such as arginine-vasopressine peptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone, enkephalin, β-endorphin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and tachykinins have proconvulsive properties. For oxytocin and melanin-concentrating hormone both pro- and anticonvulsive effects have been reported, and this seems to be dose or time dependent. All these neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs. Other neuropeptides such as nesfatin-1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide have been less studied in this field; however, as nesfatin-1 levels change over the course of epilepsy, this can be considered as an interesting marker to diagnose patients who have suffered a recent epileptic seizure.

  8. Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Dunker, A. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs) are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies. PMID:22666276

  9. A Computational Drug-Target Network for Yuanhu Zhitong Prescription

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peng; Zhang, Fangbo; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Songsong

    2013-01-01

    Yuanhu Zhitong prescription (YZP) is a typical and relatively simple traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), widely used in the clinical treatment of headache, gastralgia, and dysmenorrhea. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of action of YZP is not clear. In this study, based on the previous chemical and metabolite analysis, a complex approach including the prediction of the structure of metabolite, high-throughput in silico screening, and network reconstruction and analysis was developed to obtain a computational drug-target network for YZP. This was followed by a functional and pathway analysis by ClueGO to determine some of the pharmacologic activities. Further, two new pharmacologic actions, antidepressant and antianxiety, of YZP were validated by animal experiments using zebrafish and mice models. The forced swimming test and the tail suspension test demonstrated that YZP at the doses of 4 mg/kg and 8 mg/kg had better antidepressive activity when compared with the control group. The anxiolytic activity experiment showed that YZP at the doses of 100 mg/L, 150 mg/L, and 200 mg/L had significant decrease in diving compared to controls. These results not only shed light on the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of YZP for curing diseases, but also provide some evidence for exploring the classic TCM formulas for new clinical application. PMID:23762151

  10. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    PubMed Central

    Page, Antony P.; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D.; Pertab, David

    2014-01-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  11. A small molecule nanodrug consisting of amphiphilic targeting ligand-chemotherapy drug conjugate for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-05-28

    Targeted drug delivery is a broadly applicable approach for cancer therapy. However, the nanocarrier-based targeted delivery system suffers from batch-to-batch variation, quality concerns and carrier-related toxicity issues. Thus, to develop a carrier-free targeted delivery system with nanoscale characteristics is very attractive. Here, a novel targeting small molecule nanodrug self-delivery system consisting of targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug was constructed, which combined the advantages of small molecules and nano-assemblies together and showed excellent targeting ability and long blood circulation time with well-defined structure, high drug loading ratio and on-demand drug release behavior. As a proof-of-concept, lactose (Lac) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as the targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug, respectively. Lac and DOX were conjugated through a pH-responsive hydrazone group. For its intrinsic amphiphilic property, Lac-DOX conjugate could self-assemble into nanoparticles in water. Both in vitro and in vivo assays indicated that Lac-DOX nanoparticles exhibited enhanced anticancer activity and weak side effects. This novel active targeting nanodrug delivery system shows great potential in cancer therapy.

  12. iDrug-Target: predicting the interactions between drug compounds and target proteins in cellular networking via benchmark dataset optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Liu, Zi; Cheng, Xiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Information about the interactions of drug compounds with proteins in cellular networking is very important for drug development. Unfortunately, all the existing predictors for identifying drug-protein interactions were trained by a skewed benchmark data-set where the number of non-interactive drug-protein pairs is overwhelmingly larger than that of the interactive ones. Using this kind of highly unbalanced benchmark data-set to train predictors would lead to the outcome that many interactive drug-protein pairs might be mispredicted as non-interactive. Since the minority interactive pairs often contain the most important information for drug design, it is necessary to minimize this kind of misprediction. In this study, we adopted the neighborhood cleaning rule and synthetic minority over-sampling technique to treat the skewed benchmark datasets and balance the positive and negative subsets. The new benchmark datasets thus obtained are called the optimized benchmark datasets, based on which a new predictor called iDrug-Target was developed that contains four sub-predictors: iDrug-GPCR, iDrug-Chl, iDrug-Ezy, and iDrug-NR, specialized for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), ion channels, enzymes, and NR (nuclear receptors), respectively. Rigorous cross-validations on a set of experiment-confirmed datasets have indicated that these new predictors remarkably outperformed the existing ones for the same purpose. To maximize users' convenience, a public accessible Web server for iDrug-Target has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDrug-Target/ , by which users can easily get their desired results. It has not escaped our notice that the aforementioned strategy can be widely used in many other areas as well.

  13. Thiamin (Vitamin B1) Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qinglin; Wang, Honghai; Xie, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics. PMID:21234302

  14. Thiamin (vitamin B1) biosynthesis and regulation: a rich source of antimicrobial drug targets?

    PubMed

    Du, Qinglin; Wang, Honghai; Xie, Jianping

    2011-01-09

    Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics.

  15. Predicting unintended effects of drugs based on off-target tissue effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Docyong; Lee, Jaehyun; Lee, Sunjae; Park, Junseok; Lee, Doheon

    2016-01-15

    Unintended effects of drugs can be caused by various mechanisms. Conventional analysis of unintended effects has focused on the target proteins of drugs. However, an interaction with off-target tissues of a drug might be one of the unintended effect-related mechanisms. We propose two processes to predict a drug's unintended effects by off-target tissue effects: 1) identification of a drug's off-target tissue and; 2) tissue protein - symptom relation identification (tissue protein - symptom matrix). Using this method, we predicted that 1,177 (10.7%) side-effects were related to off-target tissue effects in 11,041 known side-effects. Off-target tissues and unintended effects of successful repositioning drugs were also predicted. The effectiveness of relations of the proposed tissue protein - symptom matrix were evaluated by using the literature mining method. We predicted unintended effects of drugs as well as those effect-related off-target tissues. By using our prediction, we are able to reduce drug side-effects on off-target tissues and provide a chance to identify new indications of drugs of interest.

  16. Drug-target residence time--a case for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Hillger, Julia M; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-07-01

    A vast number of marketed drugs act on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the most successful category of drug targets to date. These drugs usually possess high target affinity and selectivity, and such combined features have been the driving force in the early phases of drug discovery. However, attrition has also been high. Many investigational new drugs eventually fail in clinical trials due to a demonstrated lack of efficacy. A retrospective assessment of successfully launched drugs revealed that their beneficial effects in patients may be attributed to their long drug-target residence times (RTs). Likewise, for some other GPCR drugs short RT could be beneficial to reduce the potential for on-target side effects. Hence, the compounds' kinetics behavior might in fact be the guiding principle to obtain a desired and durable effect in vivo. We therefore propose that drug-target RT should be taken into account as an additional parameter in the lead selection and optimization process. This should ultimately lead to an increased number of candidate drugs moving to the preclinical development phase and on to the market. This review contains examples of the kinetics behavior of GPCR ligands with improved in vivo efficacy and summarizes methods for assessing drug-target RT.

  17. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB) that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a) statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b) bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c) zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS), which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d) allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e) azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f) azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase (SMT). Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures), and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy) and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take place in

  18. Challenges in design and characterization of ligand-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of therapeutic agents to molecular markers expressed on the surface of cells requiring clinical intervention holds promise to improve specificity of delivery, enhancing therapeutic effects while decreasing potential damage to healthy tissues. Drug targeting to cellular receptors involved in endocytic transport facilitates intracellular delivery, a requirement for a number of therapeutic goals. However, after several decades of experimental design, there is still considerable controversy on the practical outcome of drug targeting strategies. The plethora of factors contributing to the relative efficacy of targeting makes the success of these approaches hardly predictable. Lack of fully specific targets, along with selection of targets with spatial and temporal expression well aligned to interventional requirements, pose difficulties to this process. Selection of adequate sub-molecular target epitopes determines accessibility for anchoring of drug conjugates and bulkier drug carriers, as well as proper signaling for uptake within the cell. Targeting design must adapt to physiological variables of blood flow, disease status, and tissue architecture by accommodating physicochemical parameters such as carrier composition, functionalization, geometry, and avidity. In many cases, opposite features need to meet a balance, e.g., sustained circulation versus efficient targeting, penetration through tissues versus uptake within cells, internalization within endocytic compartment to avoid efflux pumps versus accessibility to molecular targets within the cytosol, etc. Detailed characterization of these complex physiological factors and design parameters, along with a deep understanding of the mechanisms governing the interaction of targeted drugs and carriers with the biological environment, are necessary steps toward achieving efficient drug targeting systems. PMID:22709588

  19. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. Disease-modifying drugs. Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers, are very productive. The review "Drugs interacting with Targets other than Receptors or Enzymes. Disease-modifying Drugs" was accepted in October 2012. In the last 20 months, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. Enormous progress was realized in the pharmacological characterization of natural products with cognitive enhancing properties. This review covers the evolution of research in this field through May 2014.

  20. System-level multi-target drug discovery from natural products with applications to cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunli; Wang, Jinan; Liu, Jianling; Pei, Mengjie; Huang, Chao; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-08-01

    The term systems pharmacology describes a field of study that uses computational and experimental approaches to broaden the view of drug actions rooted in molecular interactions and advance the process of drug discovery. The aim of this work is to stick out the role that the systems pharmacology plays across the multi-target drug discovery from natural products for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Firstly, based on network pharmacology methods, we reconstructed the drug-target and target-target networks to determine the putative protein target set of multi-target drugs for CVDs treatment. Secondly, we reintegrated a compound dataset of natural products and then obtained a multi-target compounds subset by virtual-screening process. Thirdly, a drug-likeness evaluation was applied to find the ADME-favorable compounds in this subset. Finally, we conducted in vitro experiments to evaluate the reliability of the selected chemicals and targets. We found that four of the five randomly selected natural molecules can effectively act on the target set for CVDs, indicating the reasonability of our systems-based method. This strategy may serve as a new model for multi-target drug discovery of complex diseases.

  1. Are pharmaceuticals with evolutionary conserved molecular drug targets more potent to cause toxic effects in non-target organisms?

    PubMed

    Furuhagen, Sara; Fuchs, Anne; Lundström Belleza, Elin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine) and without (levonorgestrel) identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development), biochemical (RNA and DNA content) and molecular (gene expression) levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L-1, respectively) followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L-1, respectively). At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L-1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

  2. Special Review: Caught in the Crosshairs: Targeted Drugs and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Bibiana I; Hill, Richard; Link, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    All drugs have molecular targets; however, this does not mean that they are targeted therapeutics. Only by the interaction with a disease-specific molecule can the drug be classified as a targeted therapeutic. This is often not clearly defined and might refer to several different therapeutic modalities such as genomically targeted therapy, immune checkpoint therapy, or pharmacokinetic targeting. To develop a precise concept of targeted therapy, it is crucial to understand how drugs were discovered and how our rapidly expanding knowledge concerning disease mechanism is driving a fundamental conceptual change in modern drug discovery and development. In combination with the increasingly detailed analysis of disease at an individual patient level, we believe that it is very timely to consider the past and current approaches involved in the development of new medicines and to discuss the paradigm shift in and basic concepts associated with targeted therapies and personalized medicine. PMID:26588674

  3. Adenylating Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylation or adenylate-forming enzymes (AEs) are widely found in nature and are responsible for the activation of carboxylic acids to intermediate acyladenylates, which are mixed anhydrides of AMP. In a second reaction, AEs catalyze the transfer of the acyl group of the acyladenylate onto a nucleophilic amino, alcohol, or thiol group of an acceptor molecule leading to amide, ester, and thioester products, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes for more than 60 adenylating enzymes, many of which represent potential drug targets due to their confirmed essentiality or requirement for virulence. Several strategies have been used to develop potent and selective AE inhibitors including high-throughput screening, fragment-based screening, and the rationale design of bisubstrate inhibitors that mimic the acyladenylate. In this review, a comprehensive analysis of the mycobacterial adenylating enzymes will be presented with a focus on the identification of small molecule inhibitors. Specifically, this review will cover the aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (aaRSs), MenE required for menaquinone synthesis, the FadD family of enzymes including the fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAAL) and the fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs) involved in lipid metabolism, and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation enzyme MbtA that is necessary for mycobactin synthesis. Additionally, the enzymes NadE, GuaA, PanC, and MshC involved in the respective synthesis of NAD, guanine, pantothenate, and mycothiol will be discussed as well as BirA that is responsible for biotinylation of the acyl CoA-carboxylases. PMID:22283817

  4. Plasmodium dipeptidyl aminopeptidases as malaria transmission-blocking drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Deu, Edgar; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Ashburne, Michael J; Ali, Omar; Suri, Amreena; Kortagere, Sandhya; Bogyo, Matthew; Williamson, Kim C

    2013-10-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum and P. berghei genomes each contain three dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (dpap) homologs. dpap1 and -3 are critical for asexual growth, but the role of dpap2, the gametocyte-specific homolog, has not been tested. If DPAPs are essential for transmission as well as asexual growth, then a DPAP inhibitor could be used for treatment and to block transmission. To directly analyze the role of DPAP2, a dpap2-minus P. berghei (Pbdpap2Δ) line was generated. The Pbdpap2Δ parasites grew normally, differentiated into gametocytes, and generated sporozoites that were infectious to mice when fed to a mosquito. However, Pbdpap1 transcription was >2-fold upregulated in the Pbdpap2Δ clonal lines, possibly compensating for the loss of Pbdpap2. The role of DPAP1 and -3 in the dpap2Δ parasites was then evaluated using a DPAP inhibitor, ML4118S. When ML4118S was added to the Pbdpap2Δ parasites just before a mosquito membrane feed, mosquito infectivity was not affected. To assess longer exposures to ML4118S and further evaluate the role of DPAPs during gametocyte development in a parasite that causes human malaria, the dpap2 deletion was repeated in P. falciparum. Viable P. falciparum dpap2 (Pfdpap2)-minus parasites were obtained that produced morphologically normal gametocytes. Both wild-type and Pfdpap2-negative parasites were sensitive to ML4118S, indicating that, unlike many antimalarials, ML4118S has activity against parasites at both the asexual and sexual stages and that DPAP1 and -3 may be targets for a dual-stage drug that can treat patients and block malaria transmission.

  5. Tribbles pseudokinases: novel targets for chemical biology and drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Daniel M; Byrne, Dominic P; Bailey, Fiona P; Eyers, Patrick A

    2015-10-01

    Tribbles (TRIB) proteins are pseudokinase mediators of eukaryotic signalling that have evolved important roles in lipoprotein metabolism, immune function and cellular differentiation and proliferation. In addition, an evolutionary-conserved modulation of PI3K/AKT signalling pathways highlights them as novel and rather unusual pharmaceutical targets. The three human TRIB family members are uniquely defined by an acidic pseudokinase domain containing a 'broken' α C-helix and a MEK (MAPK/ERK)-binding site at the end of the putative C-lobe and a distinct C-terminal peptide motif that interacts directly with a small subset of cellular E3 ubiquitin ligases. This latter interaction drives proteasomal-dependent degradation of networks of transcription factors, whose rate of turnover determines the biological attributes of individual TRIB family members. Defining the function of individual Tribs has been made possible through evaluation of individual TRIB knockout mice, siRNA/overexpression approaches and genetic screening in flies, where the single TRIB gene was originally described 15 years ago. The rapidly maturing TRIB field is primed to exploit chemical biology approaches to evaluate endogenous TRIB signalling events in intact cells. This will help define how TRIB-driven protein-protein interactions and the atypical TRIB ATP-binding site, fit into cellular signalling modules in experimental scenarios where TRIB-signalling complexes remain unperturbed. In this mini-review, we discuss how small molecules can reveal rate-limiting signalling outputs and functions of Tribs in cells and intact organisms, perhaps serving as guides for the development of new drugs. We predict that appropriate small molecule TRIB ligands will further accelerate the transition of TRIB pseudokinase analysis into the mainstream of cell signalling. PMID:26517930

  6. Phenolic thio- and selenosemicarbazones as multi-target drugs.

    PubMed

    Calcatierra, Verónica; López, Óscar; Fernández-Bolaños, José G; Plata, Gabriela B; Padrón, José M

    2015-04-13

    A series of isosteric phenolic thio- and selenosemicarbazones have been obtained by condensation of naturally-occurring phenolic aldehydes and thio(seleno)semicarbazides. Title compounds were designed as potential multi-target drugs, and a series of structure-activity relationships could be established upon their in vitro assays: antioxidant activity, α-glucosidase inhibition and antiproliferative activity against six human tumor cell lines: A549 (non-small cell lung), HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast) and WiDr (colon). For the antiradical activity, selenium atom and 2 or 3 phenolic hydroxyl groups proved to be essential motifs; remarkably, the compound with the most potent activity, with a trihydroxyphenyl scaffold (EC50 = 4.87 ± 1.57 μM) was found to be stronger than natural hydroxytyrosol, a potent antioxidant present in olive oil (EC50 = 13.80 ± 1.41 μM). Furthermore, one of the thiosemicarbazones was found to be a strong non-competitive inhibitor of α-glucosidase (Ki = 9.6 ± 1.6 μM), with an 8-fold increase in activity compared to acarbose (Ki = 77.9 ± 11.4 μM), marketed for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Most of the synthesized compounds also exhibited relevant antiproliferative activities; in particular, seleno derivatives showed GI50 values lower than 6.0 μM for all the tested cell lines; N-naphthyl mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives behaved as more potent antiproliferative agents than 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin. PMID:25752525

  7. In silico identification of candidate drug and vaccine targets from various pathways in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Barh, Debmalya; Kumar, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for causing gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases prevailing globally. Although extensive researches are in progress in order to control the transmission of the disease and to develop drug(s) against the pathogen, till date no effective vaccine or specific drug could be developed and only antibiotic treatment is in use. Perhaps, due to excess use of antibiotics, several resistant strains have been found. In the present study, metabolic pathways-related candidate drug and vaccine targets have been identified in N. gonorrhoeae virulent strain FA 1090 using an in silico subtractive genomics approach. 106 putative drug targets out of 537 essential genes have been predicted. 67 cytoplasmic and 9 membrane enzymes, along with 10 membrane transporters are found to be the potential drug targets from the host-pathogen common metabolic pathways. Among these targets, competence lipoproteins (NGO0277) and cysW have been identified as candidate vaccine targets. 20 drug targets have been identified from pathogen specific unique metabolic pathways. Out of these, 6 enzymes are involved in dual metabolic pathways and 2 are expressed in cell wall and fimbrium. These gonococci-specific proteins are expected to be better possible drug targets. Screening of the functional inhibitors against these novel targets may result in discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be effective against antibiotic resistant strains. PMID:20109152

  8. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis as an off-target of sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hirohito; Pedersen, Miriam Grønlund; Gorska, Katarzyna Irena; Pojer, Florence; Johnsson, Kai

    2013-05-24

    The introduction of sulfa drugs for the chemotherapy of bacterial infections in 1935 revolutionized medicine. Although their mechanism of action is understood, the molecular bases for most of their side effects remain obscure. Here, we report that sulfamethoxazole and other sulfa drugs interfere with tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis through inhibition of sepiapterin reductase. Crystal structures of sepiapterin reductase with bound sulfa drugs reveal how structurally diverse sulfa drugs achieve specific inhibition of the enzyme. The effect of sulfa drugs on tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent neurotransmitter biosynthesis in cell-based assays provides a rationale for some of their central nervous system-related side effects, particularly in high-dose sulfamethoxazole therapy of Pneumocystis pneumonia. Our findings reveal an unexpected aspect of the pharmacology of sulfa drugs and might translate into their improved medical use.

  9. Protein targets for structure-based anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaoxue

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which belongs to the genus Mycobacterium, is the pathogenic agent for most tuberculosis (TB). As TB remains one of the most rampant infectious diseases, causing morbidity and death with emergence of multi-drug-resistant and extensively-drug-resistant forms, it is urgent to identify new drugs with novel targets to ensure future therapeutic success. In this regards, the structural genomics of M. tuberculosis provides important information to identify potential targets, perform biochemical assays, determine crystal structures in complex with potential inhibitor(s), reveal the key sites/residues for biological activity, and thus validate drug targets and discover novel drugs. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress on novel targets for structure-based anti-M. tuberculosis drug discovery.

  10. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-02-08

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs.

  11. Advancing cancer drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Cameron, David A

    2012-01-01

    Current drug-discovery strategies are typically 'target-centric' and are based upon high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries against nominated targets and a selection of lead compounds with optimized 'on-target' potency and selectivity profiles. However, high attrition of targeted agents in clinical development suggest that combinations of targeted agents will be most effective in treating solid tumors if the biological networks that permit cancer cells to subvert monotherapies are identified and retargeted. Conventional drug-discovery and development strategies are suboptimal for the rational design and development of novel drug combinations. In this article, we highlight a series of emerging technologies supporting a less reductionist, more agile, drug-discovery and development approach for the rational design, validation, prioritization and clinical development of novel drug combinations.

  12. A review of recent patents on the ASICs as a key drug target.

    PubMed

    Santos, Priscila L; Guimarães, Adriana G; Barreto, Rosana S S; Serafini, Mairim R; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2015-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are scattered various cells of human body. Drugs like amiloride has demonstrated nonspecific antagonism ASICs. Toxins, such as Psalmotoxin-1, have been used in animal models. There are no drugs available in the market whose action mechanism acts through these channels. We revised all patents relating to pharmaceutical formulations of applicability in ASICs. Drugs acting as antagonist in ASIC1 or ASIC3 channels seem to be the most promising targets. Patent data have suggested a variety of approaches for selective ASICs drugs, such as neuroprotective and analgesic. Studies analysis suggested that ASICs are promising targets for new drugs.

  13. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, T.; Johnson, R.; Krebs, L.; Khoshakhlagh, P.; Langguth, P.; Hellmann, N.; Goerigk, G.; Boesecke, P.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Szekely, N.; Schweins, R.

    2016-09-01

    T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation.

  14. Dextran-gated, multifunctional mesoporous nanoparticle for glucose-responsive and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arjyabaran; Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2014-12-24

    Design of drug delivery nanocarrier having targeted recognition followed by bioresponsive controlled release, especially via glucose-responsive release, is a challenging issue. Here, we report magnetic mesoporous silica (MMS)-based drug delivery nanocarrier that can target specific cell and release drug via glucose-responsive gate. The design involves synthesis of MMS functionalized with phenylboronic acid and folate. After drug loading inside the pores of MMS, outside of the pores are closed by dextran via binding with phenylboronic acid. Dextran-gated pores are opened for drug release in the presence of glucose that competes binding with phenylboronic acid. We found that tolbutamide and camptothecin loaded MMS can target beta cells and cancer cells, respectively, release drugs depending on bulk glucose concentration and offers glucose concentration dependent cytotoxicity. Developed functional MMS can be used for advanced drug delivery applications for diabetes and cancers with more efficient therapy. PMID:25458145

  15. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg; Yang, Jeremy J.; Taboureau, Olivier; Mathias, Stephen L.; Kouskoumvekaki, lrene; Sklar, Larry A.; Bologa, Cristian G.

    2012-01-01

    Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply bio- and cheminformatics tools using the DRUGS database, containing 3,837 unique small molecules annotated on 1,750 proteins. These are likely to serve as drug targets and antitargets (i.e., associated with side effects, SE). The academic community, the pharmaceutical sector and clinicians alike could benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based on 7,684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the “adverse reactions” section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5x5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE-D-T-CO. This type of data can be used to streamline drug repurposing and may result in novel insights that can lead to the identification of novel drug actions. PMID:22287994

  16. A survey of yeast genomic assays for drug and target discovery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew M.; Ammar, Ron; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the development and application of chemical genomic assays using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided powerful methods to identify the mechanism of action of known drugs and novel small molecules in vivo. These assays identify drug target candidates, genes involved in buffering drug target pathways and also help to define the general cellular response to small molecules. In this review, we examine current yeast chemical genomic assays and summarize the potential applications of each approach. PMID:20546776

  17. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A.; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A.; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance

  18. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor

  19. On the possibility of the unification of drug targeting systems. Studies with liposome transport to the mixtures of target antigens.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Berdichevsky, V R; Efremov, E E; Torchilin, V P

    1987-03-15

    In order to make the drug targeting system more effective, simple and technological, we suggest creation of drug-bearing conjugates capable of simultaneous binding with different antigenic components of the target via specific antibodies. It is supposed that the targeted therapy should include sequential administration of the mixture of modified antibodies (or other specific vectors) against different components of affected tissue and, upon antibody accumulation in the desired region, administration of modified drugs or drug carrying systems which can recognize and bind with the target via accumulated antibodies due to the interaction between vector modifier and carrier modifier. Using as a model system monolayers consisting of the mixture of extracellular antigens and appropriated antibodies, it was shown that the treatment of the target with the mixture of biotinylated antibodies against all target components and subsequent binding with the target of biotinylated liposomes via avidin permits high liposome accumulation on the monolayer. The binding achieved is always higher than in the case of the utilization of single antibody-bearing liposomes. Besides, the system suggested is very simple and its components can be easily obtained on technological scale in standardized conditions.

  20. Tubulin Beta3 Serves as a Target of HDAC3 and Mediates Resistance to Microtubule-Targeting Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Kim, Hyuna; Jeoung, Dooil

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the role of HDAC3 in anti-cancer drug-resistance. The expression of HDAC3 was decreased in cancer cell lines resistant to anti-cancer drugs such as celastrol and taxol. HDAC3 conferred sensitivity to these anti-cancer drugs. HDAC3 activity was necessary for conferring sensitivity to these anti-cancer drugs. The down-regulation of HDAC3 increased the expression of MDR1 and conferred resistance to anti-cancer drugs. The expression of tubulin β3 was increased in drug-resistant cancer cell lines. ChIP assays showed the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences of tubulin β3 and HDAC6. HDAC6 showed an interaction with tubulin β3. HDAC3 had a negative regulatory role in the expression of tubulin β3 and HDAC6. The down-regulation of HDAC6 decreased the expression of MDR1 and tubulin β3, but did not affect HDAC3 expression. The down-regulation of HDAC6 conferred sensitivity to taxol. The down-regulation of tubulin β3 did not affect the expression of HDAC6 or MDR1. The down-regulation of tubulin β3 conferred sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs. Our results showed that tubulin β3 serves as a downstream target of HDAC3 and mediates resistance to microtubule-targeting drugs. Thus, the HDAC3-HDAC6-Tubulin β axis can be employed for the development of anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Target network differences between western drugs and Chinese herbal ingredients in treating cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Western drugs have achieved great successes in CVDs treatment. However, they may lead to some side effects and drug resistance. On the other hand, more and more studies found that Traditional Chinese herbs have efficient therapeutic effects for CVDs, while their therapeutic mechanism is still not very clear. It may be a good view towards molecules, targets and network to decipher whether difference exists between anti-CVD western drugs and Chinese herbal ingredients. Results Anti-CVD western drugs and Chinese herbal ingredients, as well as their targets were thoroughly collected in this work. The similarities and the differences between the herbal ingredients and the western drugs were deeply explored based on three target-based perspectives including biochemical property, regulated pathway and disease network. The biological function of herbal ingredients' targets is more complex than that of the western drugs' targets. The signal transduction and immune system associated signaling pathways, apoptosis associated pathways may be the most important pathway for herbal ingredients, however the western drugs incline to regulate vascular smooth muscle contraction associated pathways. Chinese herbal ingredients prefer to regulate the downstream proteins of apoptosis associated pathway; while the western drugs incline to regulate the upstream proteins of VECC (Vascular Epidermal Cells Contraction) related pathways. Conclusion In summary, the characteristics identified in this study would be valuable for designing new network-based multi-target CVD drugs or vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25104437

  2. Methodological aspects of current problems in target-based anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takeharu; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Yukito; Oda, Shinya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2006-06-01

    Differently from the conventional antineoplastic agents, target-based drugs are designed a priori, based on our knowledge of various physiological molecules that has been obtained by the development of molecular biology. This "Copernican revolution" in drug development may imply a paradigm shift in this field. However, contrary to the initial expectations, many drugs developed by this approach are now faced with difficulties, mainly because of the fundamental and theoretical limits of this approach. All of the physiological functions are not always known in all target molecules. In low-molecular-weight drugs, i.e., "inhibitors," targets disperse, due to the structural similarities in physiological molecules. This double-faced "out-of-focusing" causes many problems in various steps of drug development, drug design, clinical trials, and administration to patients. Many drugs are now being abandoned because of unexpectedly lower response rates or unforeseeable adverse effects, and the variety of the drugs exhibits a kaleidoscopic appearance. The double-faced "out-of-focusing" derives from the methodological limits in molecular biology, i.e., elementalism, and limits in our techniques for drug development. To overcome these currently inevitable limits, it appears essential to elucidate the specific changes in target molecules that chiefly promote tumor growth and, consequently, strongly predict response to the administered drugs. Precise and efficient detection of responder populations is the key to the development and establishment of target-based anticancer therapies. PMID:16850122

  3. A Modular Probe Strategy for Drug Localization, Target Identification and Target Occupancy Measurement on Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Anna; Thomson, Douglas W; Vappiani, Johanna; Werner, Thilo; Mueller, Katrin M; Dittus, Lars; Krause, Jana; Muelbaier, Marcel; Bergamini, Giovanna; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2016-09-16

    Late stage failures of candidate drug molecules are frequently caused by off-target effects or inefficient target engagement in vivo. In order to address these fundamental challenges in drug discovery, we developed a modular probe strategy based on bioorthogonal chemistry that enables the attachment of multiple reporters to the same probe in cell extracts and live cells. In a systematic evaluation, we identified the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between trans-cyclooctene labeled probe molecules and tetrazine-tagged reporters to be the most efficient bioorthogonal reaction for this strategy. Bioorthogonal biotinylation of the probe allows the identification of drug targets in a chemoproteomics competition binding assay using quantitative mass spectrometry. Attachment of a fluorescent reporter enables monitoring of spatial localization of probes as well as drug-target colocalization studies. Finally, direct target occupancy of unlabeled drugs can be determined at single cell resolution by competitive binding with fluorescently labeled probe molecules. The feasibility of the modular probe strategy is demonstrated with noncovalent PARP inhibitors.

  4. A Modular Probe Strategy for Drug Localization, Target Identification and Target Occupancy Measurement on Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Anna; Thomson, Douglas W; Vappiani, Johanna; Werner, Thilo; Mueller, Katrin M; Dittus, Lars; Krause, Jana; Muelbaier, Marcel; Bergamini, Giovanna; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2016-09-16

    Late stage failures of candidate drug molecules are frequently caused by off-target effects or inefficient target engagement in vivo. In order to address these fundamental challenges in drug discovery, we developed a modular probe strategy based on bioorthogonal chemistry that enables the attachment of multiple reporters to the same probe in cell extracts and live cells. In a systematic evaluation, we identified the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between trans-cyclooctene labeled probe molecules and tetrazine-tagged reporters to be the most efficient bioorthogonal reaction for this strategy. Bioorthogonal biotinylation of the probe allows the identification of drug targets in a chemoproteomics competition binding assay using quantitative mass spectrometry. Attachment of a fluorescent reporter enables monitoring of spatial localization of probes as well as drug-target colocalization studies. Finally, direct target occupancy of unlabeled drugs can be determined at single cell resolution by competitive binding with fluorescently labeled probe molecules. The feasibility of the modular probe strategy is demonstrated with noncovalent PARP inhibitors. PMID:27384741

  5. Strategies and Advancement in Antibody-Drug Conjugate Optimization for Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee G.; Kim, Kristine M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates utilize the antibody as a delivery vehicle for highly potent cytotoxic molecules with specificity for tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Critical parameters that govern successful antibody-drug conjugate development for clinical use include the selection of the tumor target antigen, the antibody against the target, the cytotoxic molecule, the linker bridging the cytotoxic molecule and the antibody, and the conjugation chemistry used for the attachment of the cytotoxic molecule to the antibody. Advancements in these core antibody-drug conjugate technology are reflected by recent approval of Adectris® (anti-CD30-drug conjugate) and Kadcyla® (anti-HER2 drug conjugate). The potential approval of an anti-CD22 conjugate and promising new clinical data for anti-CD19 and anti-CD33 conjugates are additional advancements. Enrichment of antibody-drug conjugates with newly developed potent cytotoxic molecules and linkers are also in the pipeline for various tumor targets. However, the complexity of antibody-drug conjugate components, conjugation methods, and off-target toxicities still pose challenges for the strategic design of antibody-drug conjugates to achieve their fullest therapeutic potential. This review will discuss the emergence of clinical antibody-drug conjugates, current trends in optimization strategies, and recent study results for antibody-drug conjugates that have incorporated the latest optimization strategies. Future challenges and perspectives toward making antibody-drug conjugates more amendable for broader disease indications are also discussed. PMID:26535074

  6. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  7. Nanostructured lipid carriers and their current application in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Piyush; Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, various drug-delivery technologies have emerged and a fascinating part of this has been the development of nanoscale drug delivery devices. Nanoparticles (NPs) and other colloidal drug-delivery systems modify the kinetics, drug distribution in the body and release profile of an associated drug. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have been reported to be an alternative system to emulsions, liposomes, microparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and their polymeric counterparts due to their numerous advantages. This paper basically reviews the types of NLCs, mechanism of skin penetration, stability related issues along with their production techniques, characterisation and applications towards targeted drug delivery.

  8. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies reported June 7, 2012, in NEJM indicate that the drug vismodegib can elicit responses in people with advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma and help shrink or prevent tumors in those with basal cell nevus syndrome.

  9. Nanoparticles laden in situ gelling system for ocular drug targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Divya; Jain, Nidhi; Gulati, Neha; Nagaich, Upendra

    2013-01-01

    Designing an ophthalmic drug delivery system is one of the most difficult challenges for the researchers. The anatomy and physiology of eye create barriers like blinking which leads to the poor retention time and penetration of drug moiety. Some conventional ocular drug delivery systems show shortcomings such as enhanced pre-corneal elimination, high variability in efficiency, and blurred vision. To overcome these problems, several novel drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanoparticles, hydrogels, and in situ gels have been developed. In situ-forming hydrogels are liquid upon instillation and undergo phase transition in the ocular cul-de-sac to form viscoelastic gel and this provides a response to environmental changes. In the past few years, an impressive number of novel temperature, pH, and ion-induced in situ-forming systems have been reported for sustain ophthalmic drug delivery. Each system has its own advantages and drawbacks. Thus, a combination of two drug delivery systems, i.e., nanoparticles and in situ gel, has been developed which is known as nanoparticle laden in situ gel. This review describes every aspects of this novel formulation, which present the readers an exhaustive detail and might contribute to research and development. PMID:23662277

  10. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success.

  11. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine TN; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a ‘magic bullet’ to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a ‘Grail Quest’ by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made ‘made the turn’ toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  12. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  13. Application of traditional Chinese medicine preparation in targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xing, Feng J; Dong, Kai; You, Cuiyu; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Guilan; Chen, Youliang; Wang, Ke

    2015-05-01

    Targeting drug system (TDS) or targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) is a new kind of drug delivery system which could make drug to be directly concentrated on the target site with high curative effects and low side-effects. As the quintessence of Chinese culture, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a large advantage in many disease clinical treatments, especially in cancer, hypertension and many other intractable diseases owing to their low toxicity and side-effects relative to western medicine. This article reviews literatures on development of TCM-targeted preparations which were published in the past 10 years. TDS including active-targeting, passive-targeting and physical-chemical-targeting preparations were introduced through domestic and overseas literatures to reveal the unique advantages of TCM-targeting preparations in drug delivery system. In this article, we have reviewed some kinds of TCM-targeting preparations and indicated that great attention should be paid to the research on the TCM-targeting preparations.

  14. A new approach for prediction of tumor sensitivity to targeted drugs based on functional data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The success of targeted anti-cancer drugs are frequently hindered by the lack of knowledge of the individual pathway of the patient and the extreme data requirements on the estimation of the personalized genetic network of the patient’s tumor. The prediction of tumor sensitivity to targeted drugs remains a major challenge in the design of optimal therapeutic strategies. The current sensitivity prediction approaches are primarily based on genetic characterizations of the tumor sample. We propose a novel sensitivity prediction approach based on functional perturbation data that incorporates the drug protein interaction information and sensitivities to a training set of drugs with known targets. Results We illustrate the high prediction accuracy of our framework on synthetic data generated from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and an experimental dataset of four canine osteosarcoma tumor cultures following application of 60 targeted small-molecule drugs. We achieve a low leave one out cross validation error of <10% for the canine osteosarcoma tumor cultures using a drug screen consisting of 60 targeted drugs. Conclusions The proposed framework provides a unique input-output based methodology to model a cancer pathway and predict the effectiveness of targeted anti-cancer drugs. This framework can be developed as a viable approach for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:23890326

  15. Systems biology-embedded target validation: improving efficacy in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Drieke; Minke, Benedikt A; Fitzmaurice, William; Kholodenko, Boris N; Kolch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is faced with a range of challenges with the ever-escalating costs of drug development and a drying out of drug pipelines. By harnessing advances in -omics technologies and moving away from the standard, reductionist model of drug discovery, there is significant potential to reduce costs and improve efficacy. Embedding systems biology approaches in drug discovery, which seek to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of potential drug targets in a network context, will reduce attrition rates by earlier target validation and the introduction of novel targets into the currently stagnant market. Systems biology approaches also have the potential to assist in the design of multidrug treatments and repositioning of existing drugs, while stratifying patients to give a greater personalization of medical treatment.

  16. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics. PMID:23633219

  17. Delivery of drugs to intracellular organelles using drug delivery systems: Analysis of research trends and targeting efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2015-12-30

    Targeting of drug delivery systems (DDSs) to specific intracellular organelles (i.e., subcellular targeting) has been investigated in numerous publications, but targeting efficiency of these systems is seldom reported. We searched scientific publications in the subcellular DDS targeting field and analyzed targeting efficiency and major formulation parameters that affect it. We identified 77 scientific publications that matched the search criteria. In the majority of these studies nanoparticle-based DDSs were applied, while liposomes, quantum dots and conjugates were used less frequently. The nucleus was the most common intracellular target, followed by mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In 65% of the publications, DDSs surface was decorated with specific targeting residues, but the efficiency of this surface decoration was not analyzed in predominant majority of the studies. Moreover, only 23% of the analyzed publications contained quantitative data on DDSs subcellular targeting efficiency, while the majority of publications reported qualitative results only. From the analysis of publications in the subcellular targeting field, it appears that insufficient efforts are devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters and of the DDSs' intracellular fate. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for future studies in the field of organelle-specific drug delivery and targeting.

  18. Influence networks based on coexpression improve drug target discovery for the development of novel cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for novel molecularly targeted drugs will continue to rise as we move forward toward the goal of personalizing cancer treatment to the molecular signature of individual tumors. However, the identification of targets and combinations of targets that can be safely and effectively modulated is one of the greatest challenges facing the drug discovery process. A promising approach is to use biological networks to prioritize targets based on their relative positions to one another, a property that affects their ability to maintain network integrity and propagate information-flow. Here, we introduce influence networks and demonstrate how they can be used to generate influence scores as a network-based metric to rank genes as potential drug targets. Results We use this approach to prioritize genes as drug target candidates in a set of ER + breast tumor samples collected during the course of neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. We show that influential genes, those with high influence scores, tend to be essential and include a higher proportion of essential genes than those prioritized based on their position (i.e. hubs or bottlenecks) within the same network. Additionally, we show that influential genes represent novel biologically relevant drug targets for the treatment of ER + breast cancers. Moreover, we demonstrate that gene influence differs between untreated tumors and residual tumors that have adapted to drug treatment. In this way, influence scores capture the context-dependent functions of genes and present the opportunity to design combination treatment strategies that take advantage of the tumor adaptation process. Conclusions Influence networks efficiently find essential genes as promising drug targets and combinations of targets to inform the development of molecularly targeted drugs and their use. PMID:24495353

  19. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  20. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  1. The relationship between target-class and the physicochemical properties of antibacterial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mugumbate, Grace; Overington, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of novel mechanism of action (MOA) antibacterials has been associated with the concept that antibacterial drugs occupy a differentiated region of physicochemical space compared to human-targeted drugs. With, in broad terms, antibacterials having higher molecular weight, lower log P and higher polar surface area (PSA). By analysing the physicochemical properties of about 1700 approved drugs listed in the ChEMBL database, we show, that antibacterials for whose targets are riboproteins (i.e., composed of a complex of RNA and protein) fall outside the conventional human ‘drug-like’ chemical space; whereas antibacterials that modulate bacterial protein targets, generally comply with the ‘rule-of-five’ guidelines for classical oral human drugs. Our analysis suggests a strong target-class association for antibacterials—either protein-targeted or riboprotein-targeted. There is much discussion in the literature on the failure of screening approaches to deliver novel antibacterial lead series, and linkage of this poor success rate for antibacterials with the chemical space properties of screening collections. Our analysis suggests that consideration of target-class may be an underappreciated factor in antibacterial lead discovery, and that in fact bacterial protein-targets may well have similar binding site characteristics to human protein targets, and questions the assumption that larger, more polar compounds are a key part of successful future antibacterial discovery. PMID:25975639

  2. Advances in Bone-targeted Drug Delivery Systems for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Long-Bang; Shi, Xin; Wu, Su-Jia; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Targeted therapy for osteosarcoma includes organ, cell and molecular biological targeting; of these, organ targeting is the most mature. Bone-targeted drug delivery systems are used to concentrate chemotherapeutic drugs in bone tissues, thus potentially resolving the problem of reaching the desired foci and minimizing the toxicity and adverse effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Some progress has been made in bone-targeted drug delivery systems for treatment of osteosarcoma; however, most are still at an experimental stage and there is a long transitional period to clinical application. Therefore, determining how to combine new, polymolecular and multi-pathway targets is an important research aspect of designing new bone-targeted drug delivery systems in future studies. The purpose of this article was to review the status of research on targeted therapy for osteosarcoma and to summarize the progress made thus far in developing bone-targeted drug delivery systems for neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma with the aim of providing new ideas for highly effective therapeutic protocols with low toxicity for patients with osteosarcoma.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  4. Charge-reversal nanoparticles: novel targeted drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinli; Liu, Lisha; Jiang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Spurred by significant progress in materials chemistry and drug delivery, charge-reversal nanocarriers are being developed to deliver anticancer formulations in spatial-, temporal- and dosage-controlled approaches. Charge-reversal nanoparticles can release their drug payload in response to specific stimuli that alter the charge on their surface. They can elude clearance from the circulation and be activated by protonation, enzymatic cleavage, or a molecular conformational change. In this review, we discuss the physiological basis for, and recent advances in the design of charge-reversal nanoparticles that are able to control drug biodistribution in response to specific stimuli, endogenous factors (changes in pH, redox gradients, or enzyme concentration) or exogenous factors (light or thermos-stimulation). PMID:27471667

  5. Systematic Identification of Anti-Fungal Drug Targets by a Metabolic Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaltdorf, Martin; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K.; Liang, Chunguang; Binder, Jasmin; Dietl, Anna-Maria; Meir, Zohar; Haas, Hubertus; Osherov, Nir; Krappmann, Sven; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    New antimycotic drugs are challenging to find, as potential target proteins may have close human orthologs. We here focus on identifying metabolic targets that are critical for fungal growth and have minimal similarity to targets among human proteins. We compare and combine here: (I) direct metabolic network modeling using elementary mode analysis and flux estimates approximations using expression data, (II) targeting metabolic genes by transcriptome analysis of condition-specific highly expressed enzymes, and (III) analysis of enzyme structure, enzyme interconnectedness (“hubs”), and identification of pathogen-specific enzymes using orthology relations. We have identified 64 targets including metabolic enzymes involved in vitamin synthesis, lipid, and amino acid biosynthesis including 18 targets validated from the literature, two validated and five currently examined in own genetic experiments, and 38 further promising novel target proteins which are non-orthologous to human proteins, involved in metabolism and are highly ranked drug targets from these pipelines. PMID:27379244

  6. TCGA Bladder Cancer Study Reveals Potential Drug Targets - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with the TCGA Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease.

  7. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  8. One for All? Hitting Multiple Alzheimer's Disease Targets with One Drug

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Rebecca E.; Nikolic, Katarina; Ramsay, Rona R.

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Many AD target combinations are being explored for multi-target drug design.New databases and models increase the potential of computational drug designLiraglutide and other antidiabetics are strong candidates for repurposing to AD.Donecopride a dual 5-HT/AChE inhibitor shows promise in pre-clinical studies Alzheimer's Disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs (MTDs). Intended as an introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key MTD design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch, and the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer's Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic. PMID:27199640

  9. One for All? Hitting Multiple Alzheimer's Disease Targets with One Drug.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Rebecca E; Nikolic, Katarina; Ramsay, Rona R

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Many AD target combinations are being explored for multi-target drug design.New databases and models increase the potential of computational drug designLiraglutide and other antidiabetics are strong candidates for repurposing to AD.Donecopride a dual 5-HT/AChE inhibitor shows promise in pre-clinical studies Alzheimer's Disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs (MTDs). Intended as an introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key MTD design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch, and the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer's Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic.

  10. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  11. One for All? Hitting Multiple Alzheimer's Disease Targets with One Drug.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Rebecca E; Nikolic, Katarina; Ramsay, Rona R

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Many AD target combinations are being explored for multi-target drug design.New databases and models increase the potential of computational drug designLiraglutide and other antidiabetics are strong candidates for repurposing to AD.Donecopride a dual 5-HT/AChE inhibitor shows promise in pre-clinical studies Alzheimer's Disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs (MTDs). Intended as an introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key MTD design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch, and the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer's Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic. PMID:27199640

  12. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  13. In vivo characteristics of targeted drug-carrying filamentous bacteriophage nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines are a new class of nanomedicines that combines biological and chemical components into a modular nanometric drug delivery system. The core of the system is a filamentous phage particle that is produced in the bacterial host Escherichia coli. Target specificity is provided by a targeting moiety, usually an antibody that is displayed on the tip of the phage particle. A large drug payload is chemically conjugated to the protein coat of the phage via a chemically or genetically engineered linker that provides for controlled release of the drug after the particle homed to the target cell. Recently we have shown that targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines can be used to eradicate pathogenic bacteria and cultured tumor cells with great potentiation over the activity of the free untargeted drug. We have also shown that poorly water soluble drugs can be efficiently conjugated to the phage coat by applying hydrophilic aminoglycosides as branched solubility-enhancing linkers. Results With an intention to move to animal experimentation of efficacy, we tested anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines for toxicity and immunogenicity and blood pharmacokinetics upon injection into mice. Here we show that anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines that carry the antibiotic chloramphenicol conjugated via an aminoglycoside linker are non-toxic to mice and are greatly reduced in immunogenicity in comparison to native phage particles or particles to which the drug is conjugated directly and are cleared from the blood more slowly in comparison to native phage particles. Conclusion Our results suggest that aminoglycosides may serve as branched solubility enhancing linkers for drug conjugation that also provide for a better safety profile of the targeted nanomedicine. PMID:22185583

  14. Polymeric micelles with stimuli-triggering systems for advanced cancer drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masamichi; Akimoto, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1990s, nanoscale drug carriers have played a pivotal role in cancer chemotherapy, acting through passive drug delivery mechanisms and subsequent pharmaceutical action at tumor tissues with reduction of adverse effects. Polymeric micelles, as supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic polymers, have been considerably developed as promising drug carrier candidates, and a number of clinical studies of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric micelle carriers for cancer chemotherapy applications are now in progress. However, these systems still face several issues; at present, the simultaneous control of target-selective delivery and release of incorporated drugs remains difficult. To resolve these points, the introduction of stimuli-responsive mechanisms to drug carrier systems is believed to be a promising approach to provide better solutions for future tumor drug targeting strategies. As possible trigger signals, biological acidic pH, light, heating/cooling and ultrasound actively play significant roles in signal-triggering drug release and carrier interaction with target cells. This review article summarizes several molecular designs for stimuli-responsive polymeric micelles in response to variation of pH, light and temperature and discusses their potentials as next-generation tumor drug targeting systems.

  15. Tumor vascular targeting with tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corti, Angelo; Ponzoni, Mirco

    2004-12-01

    The poor selectivity of chemotherapeutic drugs for neoplastic cells may lead to dose-limiting side effects that compromise clinical outcomes. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, and increased interstitial pressure, could represent critical barriers that limit the penetration of drugs into neoplastic cells distant from tumor vessels and, consequently, the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have recently developed two strategies for increasing the local concentration of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumors and their therapeutic index, based on tumor vascular targeting. First, we have found that vascular targeting with minute amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammatory cytokine able to increase vascular permeability, alters tumor barriers and increases the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in subcutaneous tumors in mouse models. Targeted delivery of TNF-alpha to tumor vessels was achieved by coupling this cytokine with cyclic CNGRC peptide, an aminopeptidase N (CD13) ligand that targets the tumor neovasculature. Second, we have observed that encapsulation of doxorubicin into liposomes able to home to tumor vessels markedly improves drug uptake by neuroblastoma tumors, in an orthotopic xenograft model, and its therapeutic index. Targeted delivery of liposomes was achieved by coupling linear GNGRG peptide to the surface of liposomal doxorubicin. Vascular targeting, either indirectly with NGR-TNF-alpha or directly with NGR-targeted liposomes, could be a novel strategy for increasing the therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  16. The Role of Target Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2015-11-01

    Traditionally structure-activity/affinity relationships (SAR) have dominated research in medicinal chemistry. However, structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) can be very informative too. In this viewpoint we explore the molecular determinants of binding kinetics and discuss challenges for future binding kinetics studies. A scheme for future kinetics-directed drug design and discovery is also proposed.

  17. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets. PMID:24799897

  18. Molecular Communication Model for Targeted Drug Delivery in Multiple Disease Sites With Diversely Expressed Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A K; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B T Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery (TDD) for disease therapy using liposomes as nanocarriers has received extensive attention in the literature. The liposome's ability to incorporate capabilities such as long circulation, stimuli responsiveness, and targeting characteristics, makes it a versatile nanocarrier. Timely drug release at the targeted site requires that trigger stimuli such as pH, light, and enzymes be uniquely overexpressed at the targeted site. However, in some cases, the targeted sites may not express trigger stimuli significantly, hence, achieving effective TDD at those sites is challenging. In this paper, we present a molecular communication-based TDD model for the delivery of therapeutic drugs to multiple sites that may or may not express trigger stimuli. The nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver models for the molecular communication system are presented. Here, the nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver are injected into the targeted body system's blood network. The compartmental pharmacokinetics model is employed to model the transportation of these therapeutic nanocarriers to the targeted sites where they are meant to anchor before the delivery process commences. We also provide analytical expressions for the delivered drug concentration. The effectiveness of the proposed model is investigated for drug delivery on tissue surfaces. Results show that the effectiveness of the proposed molecular communication-based TDD depends on parameters such as the total transmitter volume capacity, the receiver radius, the diffusion characteristic of the microenvironment of the targeted sites, and the concentration of the enzymes associated with the nanotransmitter and the nanoreceiver designs.

  19. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  20. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  1. Recent advances in endocrine metabolic immune disorders drug targeting: an editorial overview.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    This editorial overview is aimed at reviewing all the work published by the Journal Endocrine Metabolic Immune Disorders-Drug Targets over the period 2012-2014. The main body of publications has been divided either into a section based on special issues and meeting proceedings or various specific sections according to different types of pathologies related to the field of endocrine metabolic immune disorder-drug targeting.

  2. Size matters: gold nanoparticles in targeted cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dreaden, Erik C; Austin, Lauren A; Mackey, Megan A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the current leading cause of death worldwide, responsible for approximately one quarter of all deaths in the USA and UK. Nanotechnologies provide tremendous opportunities for multimodal, site-specific drug delivery to these disease sites and Au nanoparticles further offer a particularly unique set of physical, chemical and photonic properties with which to do so. This review will highlight some recent advances, by our laboratory and others, in the use of Au nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery to these malignancies and will also provide insights into their rational design, synthesis, physiological properties and clinical/preclinical applications, as well as strategies and challenges toward the clinical implementation of these constructs moving forward. PMID:22834077

  3. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter.

  4. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter. PMID:26646477

  5. Phenotypic drug profiling in droplet microfluidics for better targeting of drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S.; Cohen, N.; Sabhachandani, P.; Konry, T.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a key factor in the failure of chemotherapy. Due to intratumoral heterogeneity, cancer cells depict variations in intracellular drug uptake and efflux at the single cell level, which may not be detectable in bulk assays. In this study we present a droplet microfluidics-based approach to assess the dynamics of drug uptake, efflux and cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. An integrated droplet generation and docking microarray was utilized to encapsulate single cells as well as homotypic cell aggregates. Drug-sensitive cells showed greater death in the presence or absence of Doxorubicin (Dox) compared to the drug-resistant cells. We observed heterogeneous Dox uptake in individual drug-sensitive cells while the drug-resistant cells showed uniformly low uptake and retention. Dox-resistant cells were classified into distinct subsets based on their efflux properties. Cells that showed longer retention of extracellular reagents also demonstrated maximal death. We further observed homotypic fusion of both cell types in droplets, which resulted in increased cell survival in the presence of high doses of Dox. Our results establish the applicability of this microfluidic platform for quantitative drug screening in single cells and multicellular interactions. PMID:26456240

  6. Approaches to target identification and validation for tuberculosis drug discovery: a UCT perspective.

    PubMed

    Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) disproportionately affects a few high-burden countries including South Africa. In these regions, basic TB research is rare, endemic countries being valued primarily as sites for drug trials and clinical studies. Our basic mycobacterial research focuses on current approaches to drug target identification and validation within the context of international trends in TB drug discovery. Increased funding for TB drug development globally prompted a significant shift in the composition of drug discovery consortia, with academic laboratories assuming a major role in collaboration with industrial partners. This hybrid model holds promise for the expansion of local programmes, especially where actively supported by government. However, the application of industry-standard business practices to research projects involving biology and chemistry expertise demands a greater appreciation of the differences between a chemically, versus biologically, validated drug target, and of the factors informing these differences. PMID:22668936

  7. New development and application of ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction in gene therapy and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Qiu, Ri-Xiang; Jiang, Lan; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Yu, Jiang-Xiu

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound is a common used technique for clinical imaging. In recent years, with the advances in preparation technology of microbubbles and the innovations in ultrasound imaging, ultrasound is no longer confined to detection of tissue perfusion, but extends to specific ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy gradually. With the development of research, ultrasound molecular imaging and target therapy have made great progresses. Targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging are achieved by binding target molecules, specific antibody or ligand to the surface of microbubbles to obtain specific imaging by attaching to target tissues. Meanwhile, it can also achieve targeting gene therapy or drug delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) mediating genes or drugs to specific target sites. UTMD has a number of advantages, such as target-specific, highly effective, non-invasivity, relatively low-cost and no radiation, and has broad application prospects, which is regarded as one hot spot in medical studies. We reviewed the new development and application of UTMD in gene therapy and drug delivery in this paper. With further development of technology and research, the gene or drug delivery system and related methods will be widely used in application and researches.

  8. Grants4Targets - an innovative approach to translate ideas from basic research into novel drugs.

    PubMed

    Lessl, Monika; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sommer, Anette; Schneider, Martin; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-04-01

    Collaborations between industry and academia are steadily gaining importance. To combine expertises Bayer Healthcare has set up a novel open innovation approach called Grants4Targets. Ideas on novel drug targets can easily be submitted to http://www.grants4targets.com. After a review process, grants are provided to perform focused experiments to further validate the proposed targets. In addition to financial support specific know-how on target validation and drug discovery is provided. Experienced scientists are nominated as project partners and, depending on the project, tools or specific models are provided. Around 280 applications have been received and 41 projects granted. According to our experience, this type of bridging fund combined with joint efforts provides a valuable tool to foster drug discovery collaborations.

  9. A new look at drugs targeting malignant melanoma--an application for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Yutaka; Végvári, Akos; Welinder, Charlotte; Jönsson, Göran; Ingvar, Christian; Lundgren, Lotta; Olsson, Håkan; Breslin, Thomas; Wieslander, Elisabet; Laurell, Thomas; Rezeli, Melinda; Jansson, Bo; Nishimura, Toshihide; Fehniger, Thomas E; Baldetorp, Bo; Marko-Varga, György

    2014-09-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) patients are being treated with an increasing number of personalized medicine (PM) drugs, several of which are small molecule drugs developed to treat patients with specific disease genotypes and phenotypes. In particular, the clinical application of protein kinase inhibitors has been highly effective for certain subsets of MM patients. Vemurafenib, a protein kinase inhibitor targeting BRAF-mutated protein, has shown significant efficacy in slowing disease progression. In this paper, we provide an overview of this new generation of targeted drugs, and demonstrate the first data on localization of PM drugs within tumor compartments. In this study, we have introduced MALDI-MS imaging to provide new information on one of the drugs currently used in the PM treatment of MM, vemurafenib. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, MALDI-MS imaging was used to identify vemurafenib applied to metastatic lymph nodes tumors of subjects attending the regional hospital network of Southern Sweden. The paper provides evidence of BRAF overexpression in tumors isolated from MM patients and localization of the specific drug targeting BRAF, vemurafenib, using MS fragment ion signatures. Our ability to determine drug uptake at the target sites of directed therapy provides important opportunity for increasing our understanding about the mode of action of drug activity within the disease environment. PMID:25044963

  10. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  11. Nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of saquinavir mesylate for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Hitendra S; Mahajan, Milind S; Nerkar, Pankaj P; Agrawal, Anshuman

    2014-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunological privileged sanctuary site-providing reservoir for HIV-1 virus. Current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. The low permeability of anti-HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) leads to insufficient delivery. Therefore, developing a novel approaches enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required for the treatment of neuro-AIDS. The aim of this study was to develop intranasal nanoemulsion (NE) for enhanced bioavailability and CNS targeting of saquinavir mesylate (SQVM). SQVM is a protease inhibitor which is a poorly soluble drug widely used as antiretroviral drug, with oral bioavailability is about 4%. The spontaneous emulsification method was used to prepare drug-loaded o/w nanoemulsion, which was characterized by droplet size, zeta potential, pH, drug content. Moreover, ex-vivo permeation studies were performed using sheep nasal mucosa. The optimized NE showed a significant increase in drug permeation rate compared to the plain drug suspension (PDS). Cilia toxicity study on sheep nasal mucosa showed no significant adverse effect of SQVM-loaded NE. Results of in vivo biodistribution studies show higher drug concentration in brain after intranasal administration of NE than intravenous delivered PDS. The higher percentage of drug targeting efficiency (% DTE) and nose-to-brain drug direct transport percentage (% DTP) for optimized NE indicated effective CNS targeting of SQVM via intranasal route. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated transport of drug in the CNS at larger extent after intranasal administration as NE.

  12. Mining predicted essential genes of Brugia malayi for nematode drug targets.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Chaudhary, Kshitiz; Foster, Jeremy M; Novelli, Jacopo F; Zhang, Yinhua; Wang, Shiliang; Spiro, David; Ghedin, Elodie; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2007-01-01

    We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression.

  13. A Critical Review of Pro-Cognitive Drug Targets in Psychosis: Convergence on Myelination and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kroken, Rune A.; Løberg, Else-Marie; Drønen, Tore; Grüner, Renate; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Kompus, Kristiina; Skrede, Silje; Johnsen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have thus far focused on dopaminergic antagonism at the D2 receptors, as counteracting the hyperdopaminergia in nigrostriatal and mesolimbic projections has been considered mandatory for the antipsychotic action of the drugs. Current drugs effectively target the positive symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions in the majority of patients, whereas effect sizes are smaller for negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions. With the understanding that neurocognitive dysfunction associated with schizophrenia have a greater impact on functional outcome than the positive symptoms, the focus in pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia has shifted to the potential effect of future drugs on cognitive enhancement. A major obstacle is, however, that the biological underpinnings of cognitive dysfunction remain largely unknown. With the availability of increasingly sophisticated techniques in molecular biology and brain imaging, this situation is about to change with major advances being made in identifying the neuronal substrates underlying schizophrenia, and putative pro-cognitive drug targets may be revealed. In relation to cognitive effects, this review focuses on evidence from basic neuroscience and clinical studies, taking two separate perspectives. One perspective is the identification of previously under-recognized treatment targets for existing antipsychotic drugs, including myelination and mediators of inflammation. A second perspective is the development of new drugs or novel treatment targets for well-known drugs, which act on recently discovered treatment targets for cognitive enhancement, and which may complement the existing drugs. This might pave the way for personalized treatment regimens for patients with schizophrenia aimed at improved functional outcome. The review also aims at identifying major current constraints for pro-cognitive drug development for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:24550848

  14. [New targets and new drugs in thoracic oncology].

    PubMed

    Rouviere, D; Bousquet, E; Pons, E; Milia, J-D; Guibert, N; Mazieres, J

    2015-10-01

    A number of mechanisms that drive oncogenesis have been deciphered over the last 20 years. The main oncogenic factors in the field of thoracic oncology are mutations of EGFR, KRAS, and EML4-ALK translocation, which are most often reported in adenocarcinomas. However, new molecular targets have been highlighted recently including BRAF mutations, HER2 or PI3K, new translocations such as ROS1 or KIF5B-RET. Molecular abnormalities have also been identified in tumors other than adenocarcinoma (squamous and small cell carcinoma). Therapeutic strategies have been designed to inhibit these signaling pathways including monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Some of these molecules are now approved as therapies, others are currently undergoing testing in clinical trials. We here present a review of novel targeted agents for lung cancer.

  15. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  16. Investigational cancer drugs targeting cell metabolism in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Sborov, Douglas W; Haverkos, Bradley M; Harris, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant cell transformation and tumor progression are associated with alterations in glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis, amino acid delivery and production of reactive oxygen species. With increased understanding of the role of metabolism in tumors, there has been interest in developing agents that target tumor specific metabolic pathways. Numerous promising agents targeting altered metabolic pathways are currently in Phase I – III clinical trials. Areas covered This paper reviews the early phase clinical trial development of these agents and provides perspective on the future direction of this emerging field. Specifically, the authors describe novel and repurposed therapies, focusing on the effects of each agent on tumor metabolism and results from relevant Phase I and II clinical trials. Expert opinion Metabolism modulating agents, alone and in combinations with other classes of agents, have shown efficacy in the treatment of neoplasm, which, the authors believe, will bear positive results in future studies. Because of the significant crosstalk between metabolic pathways and oncogenic signaling pathways, the authors also believe that combining metabolic modifiers with targeted agents will be an important strategy. An increased understanding of cancer metabolism, in addition to the continued study of metabolic modulators, should lead to further advances in this nascent therapeutic field in the future. PMID:25224845

  17. Investigating drug-target association and dissociation mechanisms using metadynamics-based algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Spitaleri, Andrea; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account highlights recent advances and discusses major challenges in the field of drug-target recognition, binding, and unbinding studied using metadynamics-based approaches, with particular emphasis on their role in structure-based design. Computational chemistry has significantly contributed to drug design and optimization in an extremely broad range of areas, including prediction of target druggability and drug likeness, de novo design, fragment screening, ligand docking, estimation of binding affinity, and modulation of ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties. Computationally driven drug discovery must continuously adapt to keep pace with the evolving knowledge of the factors that modulate the pharmacological action of drugs. There is thus an urgent need for novel computational approaches that integrate the vast amount of complex information currently available for small (bio)organic compounds, biologically relevant targets and their complexes, while also accounting accurately for the thermodynamics and kinetics of drug-target association, the intrinsic dynamical behavior of biomolecular systems, and the complexity of protein-protein networks. Understanding the mechanism of drug binding to and unbinding from biological targets is fundamental for optimizing lead compounds and designing novel biologically active ones. One major challenge is the accurate description of the conformational complexity prior to and upon formation of drug-target complexes. Recently, enhanced sampling methods, including metadynamics and related approaches, have been successfully applied to investigate complex mechanisms of drugs binding to flexible targets. Metadynamics is a family of enhanced sampling techniques aimed at enhancing the rare events and reconstructing the underlying free energy landscape as a function of a set of order parameters, usually referred to as collective variables. Studies of drug binding mechanisms have

  18. Neoadjuvant Window Studies of Metformin and Biomarker Development for Drugs Targeting Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lord, Simon R; Patel, Neel; Liu, Dan; Fenwick, John; Gleeson, Fergus; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential of the altered metabolic state typical of cancer cells as a drug target. The antidiabetes drug, metformin, is now under intense investigation as a safe method to modify cancer metabolism. Several studies have used window of opportunity in breast cancer patients before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to correlate gene expression analysis, metabolomics, immunohistochemical markers, and metabolic serum markers with those likely to benefit. We review the role metabolite measurement, functional imaging and gene sequencing analysis play in elucidating the effects of metabolically targeted drugs in cancer treatment and determining patient selection. PMID:26063894

  19. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

    2011-07-01

    We describe a label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) method to assess the pharmacology of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor. This method combines dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays using an array of probe molecule-hijacked cells with similarity analysis. The whole cell DMR assays track cell system-based, ligand-directed, and kinetics-dependent biased activities of the drugs, and translates their on-target pharmacology into numerical descriptors which are subject to similarity analysis. We demonstrate that the approach establishes an effective link between the label-free pharmacology and in vivo therapeutic indications of drugs.

  20. Transcription factors as targets for DNA-interacting drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2003-06-01

    Gene expression, both tissue specific or inducible, is controlled at the level of transcription by various transcription factors interacting with specific sequences of DNA. Anticancer drugs and other potential therapeutic agents alter interactions of regulatory proteins with DNA by a variety of different mechanisms. The main ones, considered in the review, are: i) competition for the transcription factor DNA binding sequences by drugs that interact non-covalently with DNA (e.g. anthracyclines, acridines, actinomycin D, pyrrole antibiotics and their polyamide derivatives); ii) covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents (e.g. nitrogen mustards, cisplatin) that prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences, or that result in multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which hijack the transcription factors, thus decreasing their availability in the nucleus; iii) competition with binding sites on the transcription factors by synthetic oligonucleotides or peptide nucleic acids in an antigene strategy. The latter compounds may also compete for binding sites on regulatory proteins, acting as decoys to lower their active concentration in the cell. In this review, we have summarized recent advances which have been made towards understanding the above mechanisms by which small molecules interfere with the function of transcription factors. PMID:12678680

  1. The role of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wanyi; Mahato, Rubi; Cheng, Kun

    2010-01-01

    HER2 is highly expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and gastric cancer. Since the discovery of its role in tumorigenesis, HER2 has received great attention in cancer research during the past two decades. Successful development of the humanized monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (Trastuzumab) for the treatment of breast cancer further spurred scientists to develop various HER2 specific antibodies, dimerization inhibitors and kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. On the other hand, the high expression of HER2 and the accessibility of its extracellular domain make HER2 an ideal target for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor drugs as well as imaging agents. Although there is no natural ligand for HER2, various artificial ligands targeting HER2 have been developed and applied in various targeted drug delivery systems. The emphasis of this review is to elucidate the roles of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery. The structure and signal pathway of HER2 will be briefly described. The role of HER2 in tumorigenesis and its relationship with other tumor markers will be discussed. For the HER2 targeted cancer therapy, numerous strategies including the blockage of receptor dimerization, inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity, and interruption of the downstream signal pathway will be summarized. For the targeted drug delivery to HER2 positive tumor cells, various targeting ligands and their delivery systems will be described in details. PMID:20385184

  2. Sulfa drugs as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase: new targets for the old drugs.

    PubMed

    al-Rashida, Mariya; Hussain, Sajad; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Altaf, Aisha; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    Sulfa drugs are well-known antibacterial agents containing N-substituted sulfonamide group on para position of aniline ring (NH2RSO2NHR'). In this study 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine derivatives of sulfa drugs, sulfamerazine (1b), sulfaquinoxaline (2b), sulfadiazine (3b), sulfadimidine (4b), and sulfachloropyrazine (5b) (1a-5a) were synthesized and characterized. Their carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity was evaluated against bovine cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (bCA II). For the sake of comparison the CA inhibition activity of the parent sulfa drugs (1b-5b) was also evaluated. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity of sulfa drugs was observed upon substitution with 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine moiety. Molecular docking studies were carried out to highlight binding site interactions. ADME properties were calculated to evaluate drug likeness of the compounds.

  3. Sulfa Drugs as Inhibitors of Carbonic Anhydrase: New Targets for the Old Drugs

    PubMed Central

    al-Rashida, Mariya; Hussain, Sajad; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Altaf, Aisha

    2014-01-01

    Sulfa drugs are well-known antibacterial agents containing N-substituted sulfonamide group on para position of aniline ring (NH2RSO2NHR′). In this study 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine derivatives of sulfa drugs, sulfamerazine (1b), sulfaquinoxaline (2b), sulfadiazine (3b), sulfadimidine (4b), and sulfachloropyrazine (5b) (1a–5a) were synthesized and characterized. Their carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity was evaluated against bovine cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (bCA II). For the sake of comparison the CA inhibition activity of the parent sulfa drugs (1b–5b) was also evaluated. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity of sulfa drugs was observed upon substitution with 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine moiety. Molecular docking studies were carried out to highlight binding site interactions. ADME properties were calculated to evaluate drug likeness of the compounds. PMID:25538942

  4. Sulfa drugs as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase: new targets for the old drugs.

    PubMed

    al-Rashida, Mariya; Hussain, Sajad; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Altaf, Aisha; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    Sulfa drugs are well-known antibacterial agents containing N-substituted sulfonamide group on para position of aniline ring (NH2RSO2NHR'). In this study 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine derivatives of sulfa drugs, sulfamerazine (1b), sulfaquinoxaline (2b), sulfadiazine (3b), sulfadimidine (4b), and sulfachloropyrazine (5b) (1a-5a) were synthesized and characterized. Their carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity was evaluated against bovine cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (bCA II). For the sake of comparison the CA inhibition activity of the parent sulfa drugs (1b-5b) was also evaluated. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity of sulfa drugs was observed upon substitution with 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine moiety. Molecular docking studies were carried out to highlight binding site interactions. ADME properties were calculated to evaluate drug likeness of the compounds. PMID:25538942

  5. Reverse Chemical Genetics: Comprehensive Fitness Profiling Reveals the Spectrum of Drug Target Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunita; Bergeron, Julien R.; Mellor, Joseph C.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and prevalence of drug resistance demands streamlined strategies to identify drug resistant variants in a fast, systematic and cost-effective way. Methods commonly used to understand and predict drug resistance rely on limited clinical studies from patients who are refractory to drugs or on laborious evolution experiments with poor coverage of the gene variants. Here, we report an integrative functional variomics methodology combining deep sequencing and a Bayesian statistical model to provide a comprehensive list of drug resistance alleles from complex variant populations. Dihydrofolate reductase, the target of methotrexate chemotherapy drug, was used as a model to identify functional mutant alleles correlated with methotrexate resistance. This systematic approach identified previously reported resistance mutations, as well as novel point mutations that were validated in vivo. Use of this systematic strategy as a routine diagnostics tool widens the scope of successful drug research and development. PMID:27588687

  6. Reverse Chemical Genetics: Comprehensive Fitness Profiling Reveals the Spectrum of Drug Target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai H; Sinha, Sunita; Bergeron, Julien R; Mellor, Joseph C; Giaever, Guri; Flaherty, Patrick; Nislow, Corey

    2016-09-01

    The emergence and prevalence of drug resistance demands streamlined strategies to identify drug resistant variants in a fast, systematic and cost-effective way. Methods commonly used to understand and predict drug resistance rely on limited clinical studies from patients who are refractory to drugs or on laborious evolution experiments with poor coverage of the gene variants. Here, we report an integrative functional variomics methodology combining deep sequencing and a Bayesian statistical model to provide a comprehensive list of drug resistance alleles from complex variant populations. Dihydrofolate reductase, the target of methotrexate chemotherapy drug, was used as a model to identify functional mutant alleles correlated with methotrexate resistance. This systematic approach identified previously reported resistance mutations, as well as novel point mutations that were validated in vivo. Use of this systematic strategy as a routine diagnostics tool widens the scope of successful drug research and development. PMID:27588687

  7. From laptop to benchtop to bedside: Structure-based Drug Design on Protein Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Morrow, John K.; Tran, Hoang T.; Phatak, Sharangdhar S.; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhang, Shuxing

    2013-01-01

    As an important aspect of computer-aided drug design, structure-based drug design brought a new horizon to pharmaceutical development. This in silico method permeates all aspects of drug discovery today, including lead identification, lead optimization, ADMET prediction and drug repurposing. Structure-based drug design has resulted in fruitful successes drug discovery targeting protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Meanwhile, challenges, noted by low accuracy and combinatoric issues, may also cause failures. In this review, state-of-the-art techniques for protein modeling (e.g. structure prediction, modeling protein flexibility, etc.), hit identification/optimization (e.g. molecular docking, focused library design, fragment-based design, molecular dynamic, etc.), and polypharmacology design will be discussed. We will explore how structure-based techniques can facilitate the drug discovery process and interplay with other experimental approaches. PMID:22316152

  8. Phenotypic side effects prediction by optimizing correlation with chemical and target profiles of drugs.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Rakesh; Sharma, Abhinav; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-11-01

    Despite technological progresses and improved understanding of biological systems, discovery of novel drugs is an inefficient, arduous and expensive process. Research and development cost of drugs is unreasonably high, largely attributed to the high attrition rate of candidate drugs due to adverse drug reactions. Computational methods for accurate prediction of drug side effects, rooted in empirical data of drugs, have the potential to enhance the efficacy of the drug discovery process. Identification of features critical for specifying side effects would facilitate efficient computational procedures for their prediction. We devised a generalized ordinary canonical correlation model for prediction of drug side effects based on their chemical properties as well as their target profiles. While the former is based on 2D and 3D chemical features, the latter enumerates a systems-level property of drugs. We find that the model incorporating chemical features outperforms that incorporating target profiles. Furthermore we identified the 2D and 3D chemical properties that yield best results, thereby implying their relevance in specifying adverse drug reactions. PMID:26252576

  9. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  10. New strategies and paradigm for drug target discovery: a special focus on infectious diseases tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Srimath-Tirumala-Peddinti, Ravi C P K; Nammi, Deepthi; Pasupuleti, Amita C M

    2013-10-01

    The discovery and exploitation of new drug targets is a key focus for both the pharmaceutical industry and academic research. To provide an insight into trends in the exploitation of new drug targets, we have analysed different methods during the past six decades and advances made in drug target discovery. A special focus remains on different methods used for drug target discovery on infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Gastritis, Malaria, Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis. We herewith provide a paradigm that is can be used for drug target discovery in the near future.

  11. UDP-galactopyranose mutase, a potential drug target against human pathogenic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sweta; Valicherla, Guru R; Mohd Shahab; Gupta, Jyoti; Gayen, Jiaur R; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a vector-borne neglected tropical disease affects millions of population in tropical and subtropical countries. Vaccine unavailability and emerging drug resistance against standard antifilarial drugs necessitate search of novel drug targets for developing alternate drugs. Recently, UDP-galactopyranose mutases (UGM) have emerged as a promising drug target playing an important role in parasite virulence and survival. This study deals with the cloning and characterization of Brugia malayi UGM and further exploring its antifilarial drug target potential. The recombinant protein was actively involved in conversion of UDP-galactopyranose (substrate) to UDP-galactofuranose (product) revealing Km and Vmax to be ∼51.15 μM and ∼1.27 μM/min, respectively. The purified protein appeared to be decameric in native state and its 3D homology modeling using Aspergillus fumigatus UGM enzyme as template revealed conservation of active site residues. Two specific prokaryotic inhibitors (compounds A and B) of the enzyme inhibited B. malayi UGM enzymatic activity competitively depicting Ki values ∼22.68 and ∼23.0 μM, respectively. These compounds were also active in vitro and in vivo against B. malayi The findings suggest that B. malayi UGM could be a potential antifilarial therapeutic drug target. PMID:27465638

  12. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  13. Pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the improved solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Puneet; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-03-18

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been devastating with nearly 7400 new infections every day. Although, the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made a tremendous contribution in reducing the morbidity and mortality in developed countries, the situation in developing countries is still grim with millions of people being infected by this disease. The new advancements in the field of nanotechnology based drug delivery systems hold promise to improve the situation. These nanoscale systems have been successfully employed in other diseases such as cancer, and therefore, we now have a better understanding of the practicalities and technicalities associated with their clinical development. Nanotechnology based approaches offer some unique opportunities specifically for the improvement of water solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of antiretroviral drugs. This review presents discussion on the contribution of pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the delivery anti-HIV drugs.

  14. Representation of target-bound drugs by computed conformers: implications for conformational libraries

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Stefan; Senger, Christian; Michalsky, Elke; Goede, Andrean; Preissner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background The increasing number of known protein structures provides valuable information about pharmaceutical targets. Drug binding sites are identifiable and suitable lead compounds can be proposed. The flexibility of ligands is a critical point for the selection of potential drugs. Since computed 3D structures of millions of compounds are available, the knowledge of their binding conformations would be a great benefit for the development of efficient screening methods. Results Integration of two public databases allowed superposition of conformers for 193 approved drugs with 5507 crystallised target-bound counterparts. The generation of 9600 drug conformers using an atomic force field was carried out to obtain an optimal coverage of the conformational space. Bioactive conformations are best described by a conformational ensemble: half of all drugs exhibit multiple active states, distributed over the entire range of the reachable energy and conformational space. A number of up to 100 conformers per drug enabled us to reproduce the bound states within a similarity threshold of 1.0 Å in 70% of all cases. This fraction rises to about 90% for smaller or average sized drugs. Conclusion Single drugs adopt multiple bioactive conformations if they interact with different target proteins. Due to the structural diversity of binding sites they adopt conformations that are distributed over a broad conformational space and wide energy range. Since the majority of drugs is well represented by a predefined low number of conformers (up to 100) this procedure is a valuable method to compare compounds by three-dimensional features or for fast similarity searches starting with pharmacophores. The underlying 9600 generated drug conformers are downloadable from the Super Drug Web site [1]. All superpositions are visualised at the same source. Additional conformers (110,000) of 2400 classified WHO-drugs are also available. PMID:16764718

  15. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

    2016-02-01

    The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions. PMID

  16. PLP-dependent enzymes as potential drug targets for protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Barbara; Tews, Ivo; Binter, Alexandra; Macheroux, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The chemical properties of the B(6) vitamers are uniquely suited for wide use as cofactors in essential reactions, such as decarboxylations and transaminations. This review addresses current efforts to explore vitamin B(6) dependent enzymatic reactions as drug targets. Several current targets are described that are found amongst these enzymes. The focus is set on diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Comparison across a range of these organisms allows insight into the distribution of potential targets, many of which may be of interest in the development of broad range anti-protozoan drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  17. Alginate-peptide amphiphile core-shell microparticles as a targeted drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoven, Job; Zha, R. Helen; Tantakitti, Faifan; Zhuang, Ellen; Zandi, Roya; Newcomb, Christina J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe in this work the synthesis of microparticles with a doxorubicin drug conjugated alginate core and a shell of peptide amphiphile nanofibres functionalized for targeting the folate receptor. The spherical geometry of the particle core allows high drug loading per surface area, whereas the nanoscale fibrous shell formed by self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles offers a high surface to volume ratio that is ideal for targeting. The synthesised microparticles have a 60-fold higher cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared to non-targeting particles. PMID:25642326

  18. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  19. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: Antiepileptogenesis targets

    PubMed Central

    Kobow, Katja; Auvin, Stéphane; Jensen, Frances; Löscher, Wolfgang; Mody, Istvan; Potschka, Heidrun; Prince, David; Sierra, Alejandra; Simonato, Michele; Pitkänen, Asla; Nehlig, Astrid; Rho, Jong M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary For several decades, both in vitro and in vivo models of seizures and epilepsy have been employed to unravel the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS)—the defining hallmark of the epileptic brain. However, despite great advances in our understanding of seizure genesis, investigators have yet to develop reliable biomarkers and surrogate markers of the epileptogenic process. Sadly, the pathogenic mechanisms that produce the epileptic condition, especially after precipitating events such as head trauma, inflammation, or prolonged febrile convulsions, are poorly understood. A major challenge has been the inherent complexity and heterogeneity of known epileptic syndromes and the differential genetic susceptibilities exhibited by patients at risk. Therefore, it is unlikely that there is only one fundamental pathophysiologic mechanism shared by all the epilepsies. Identification of antiepileptogenesis targets has been an overarching goal over the last decade, as current anticonvulsant medications appear to influence only the acute process of ictogenesis. Clearly, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic interventions that are disease modifying—therapies that either completely or partially prevent the emergence of SRS. An important secondary goal is to develop new treatments that can also lessen the burden of epilepsy comorbidities (e.g., cognitive impairment, mood disorders) by preventing or reducing the deleterious changes during the epileptogenic process. This review summarizes novel antiepileptogenesis targets that were critically discussed at the XIth Workshop on the Neurobiology of Epilepsy (WONOEP XI) meeting in Grottaferrata, Italy. Further, emerging neurometabolic links among several target mechanisms and highlights of the panel discussion are presented. PMID:23061663

  20. Exploring the Trypanosoma brucei Hsp83 Potential as a Target for Structure Guided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Hills, Tanya; Senisterra, Guillermo; Wernimont, Amy K.; Mackenzie, Claire; Norcross, Neil R.; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Wyatt, Paul G.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Hui, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is a neglected parasitic disease that is fatal if untreated. The current drugs available to eliminate the causative agent Trypanosoma brucei have multiple liabilities, including toxicity, increasing problems due to treatment failure and limited efficacy. There are two approaches to discover novel antimicrobial drugs - whole-cell screening and target-based discovery. In the latter case, there is a need to identify and validate novel drug targets in Trypanosoma parasites. The heat shock proteins (Hsp), while best known as cancer targets with a number of drug candidates in clinical development, are a family of emerging targets for infectious diseases. In this paper, we report the exploration of T. brucei Hsp83 – a homolog of human Hsp90 – as a drug target using multiple biophysical and biochemical techniques. Our approach included the characterization of the chemical sensitivity of the parasitic chaperone against a library of known Hsp90 inhibitors by means of differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). Several compounds identified by this screening procedure were further studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography, as well as tested in parasite growth inhibitions assays. These experiments led us to the identification of a benzamide derivative compound capable of interacting with TbHsp83 more strongly than with its human homologs and structural rationalization of this selectivity. The results highlight the opportunities created by subtle structural differences to develop new series of compounds to selectively target the Trypanosoma brucei chaperone and effectively kill the sleeping sickness parasite. PMID:24147171

  1. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    PubMed Central

    Accardo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morelli, Giancarlo; Tesauro, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs); and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles) loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors. PMID:24741304

  2. Sirtuins: Novel targets for metabolic disease in drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Weijian

    2008-08-29

    Calorie restriction extends lifespan and produces a metabolic profile desirable for treating diseases such as type 2 diabetes. SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, is a principal modulator of pathways downstream of calorie restriction that produces beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Activation of SIRT1 leads to enhanced activity of multiple proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and FOXO which helps to mediate some of the in vitro and in vivo effects of sirtuins. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic SIRT1 activator, mimics the effects of calorie restriction in lower organisms and in mice fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in unveiling the molecular mechanisms that underpin sirtuin as therapeutic candidates and discuss the possibility of using resveratrol as potential drug for treatment of diabetes.

  3. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  4. Drug Discovery Targeting Cell Division Proteins, Microtubules and FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kunal; Awasthi, Divya; Vineberg, Jacob G.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division or cytokinesis has been a major target for anticancer drug discovery. After the huge success of paclitaxel and docetaxel, microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) appear to have gained a premier status in the discovery of next-generation anticancer agents. However, the drug resistance caused by MDR, point mutations, and overexpression of tubulin subtypes, etc., is a serious issue associated with these agents. Accordingly, the discovery and development of new-generation MSAs that can obviate various drug resistances has a significant meaning. In sharp contrast, prokaryotic cell division has been largely unexploited for the discovery and development of antibacterial drugs. However, recent studies on the mechanism of bacterial cytokinesis revealed that the most abundant and highly conserved cell division protein, FtsZ, would be an excellent new target for the drug discovery of next-generation antibacterial agents that can circumvent drug-resistances to the commonly used drugs for tuberculosis, MRSA and other infections. This review describes an account of our research on these two fronts in drug discovery, targeting eukaryotic as well as prokaryotic cell division. PMID:24680057

  5. Delivering therapy to target: improving the odds for successful drug development.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin L; Sampson, John H

    2016-07-01

    The direct delivery of drugs and other agents into tissue (in contrast to systemic administration) has been used in clinical trials for brain cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral tumors. However, continuing evidence suggests that clinical efficacy depends on adequate delivery to a target. Inadequate delivery may have doomed otherwise effective drugs, through failure to distinguish drug inefficacy from poor distribution at the target. Conventional pretreatment clinical images of the patient fail to reveal the complexity and diversity of drug transport pathways in tissue. We discuss the richness of these pathways and argue that development and patient treatment can be sped up and improved by: using quantitative as well as 'real-time' imaging; customized simulations using data from that imaging; and device designs that optimize the drug-device combination. PMID:27403630

  6. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  7. Target engagement and drug residence time can be observed in living cells with BRET.

    PubMed

    Robers, Matthew B; Dart, Melanie L; Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Zimprich, Chad A; Kirkland, Thomas A; Machleidt, Thomas; Kupcho, Kevin R; Levin, Sergiy; Hartnett, James R; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Niles, Andrew L; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Daniels, Danette L; Slater, Michael; Wood, Monika G; Cong, Mei; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Wood, Keith V

    2015-12-03

    The therapeutic action of drugs is predicated on their physical engagement with cellular targets. Here we describe a broadly applicable method using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to reveal the binding characteristics of a drug with selected targets within intact cells. Cell-permeable fluorescent tracers are used in a competitive binding format to quantify drug engagement with the target proteins fused to Nanoluc luciferase. The approach enabled us to profile isozyme-specific engagement and binding kinetics for a panel of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Our analysis was directed particularly to the clinically approved prodrug FK228 (Istodax/Romidepsin) because of its unique and largely unexplained mechanism of sustained intracellular action. Analysis of the binding kinetics by BRET revealed remarkably long intracellular residence times for FK228 at HDAC1, explaining the protracted intracellular behaviour of this prodrug. Our results demonstrate a novel application of BRET for assessing target engagement within the complex milieu of the intracellular environment.

  8. A review of recent patents on the protozoan parasite HSP90 as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Angel, Sergio O; Matrajt, Mariana; Echeverria, Pablo C

    2013-04-01

    Diseases caused by protozoan parasites are still an important health problem. These parasites can cause a wide spectrum of diseases, some of which are severe and have high morbidity or mortality if untreated. Since they are still uncontrolled, it is important to find novel drug targets and develop new therapies to decrease their remarkable social and economic impact on human societies. In the past years, human HSP90 has become an interesting drug target that has led to a large number of investigations both at state organizations and pharmaceutical companies, followed by clinical trials. The finding that HSP90 has important biological roles in some protozoan parasites like Plasmodium spp, Toxoplasma gondii and trypanosomatids has allowed the expansion of the results obtained in human cancer to these infections. This review summarizes the latest important findings showing protozoan HSP90 as a drug target and presents three patents targeting T. gondii, P. falciparum and trypanosomatids HSP90.

  9. Functionalized Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Tumor Vasculature Targeting and PET Image-Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Hong, Hao; Chen, Feng; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Aim Development of multifunctional and well-dispersed hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) for tumor vasculature targeted drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Materials and Methods Amine functionalized HMSNs (150–250 nm) were conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator, NOTA, PEGylated and loaded with anti-angiogenesis drug, Sunitinib. Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys) (cRGDyK) peptide was attached to the nanoconjugate and radiolabeled with 64Cu for PET imaging. Results 64Cu-NOTA-HMSN-PEG-cRGDyK exhibited integrin specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo. PET results indicated ~ 8 %ID/g uptake of targeted nanoconjugates in U87MG tumors, which correlated well with ex vivo and histological analyses. Enhanced tumor targeted delivery of sunitinib was also observed. Conclusions We successfully developed tumor vasculature targeted HMSNs for PET imaging and image guided drug delivery. PMID:25955122

  10. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed.

  11. Discovery of novel drug targets and their functions using phenotypic screening of natural products.

    PubMed

    Chang, Junghwa; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2016-03-01

    Natural products are valuable resources that provide a variety of bioactive compounds and natural pharmacophores in modern drug discovery. Discovery of biologically active natural products and unraveling their target proteins to understand their mode of action have always been critical hurdles for their development into clinical drugs. For effective discovery and development of bioactive natural products into novel therapeutic drugs, comprehensive screening and identification of target proteins are indispensable. In this review, a systematic approach to understanding the mode of action of natural products isolated using phenotypic screening involving chemical proteomics-based target identification is introduced. This review highlights three natural products recently discovered via phenotypic screening, namely glucopiericidin A, ecumicin, and terpestacin, as representative case studies to revisit the pivotal role of natural products as powerful tools in discovering the novel functions and druggability of targets in biological systems and pathological diseases of interest.

  12. Recent discoveries of influenza A drug target sites to combat virus replication.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Sequence variations in the binding sites of influenza A proteins are known to limit the effectiveness of current antiviral drugs. Clinically, this leads to increased rates of virus transmission and pathogenicity. Potential influenza A inhibitors are continually being discovered as a result of high-throughput cell based screening studies, whereas the application of computational tools to aid drug discovery has further increased the number of predicted inhibitors reported. This review brings together the aspects that relate to the identification of influenza A drug target sites and the findings from recent antiviral drug discovery strategies. PMID:27284062

  13. Protein interaction network analysis--approach for potential drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Shakya, Madhvi

    2010-01-21

    In host-parasite diseases like tuberculosis, non-homologous proteins (enzymes) as drug target are first preference. Most potent drug target can be identified among large number of non-homologous protein through protein interaction network analysis. In this study, the entire promising dimension has been explored for identification of potential drug target. A comparative metabolic pathway analysis of the host Homo sapiens and the pathogen M. tuberculosis H37Rv has been performed with three level of analysis. In first level, the unique metabolic pathways of M. tuberculosis have been identified through its comparative study with H. sapiens and identification of non-homologous proteins has been done through BLAST similarity search. In second level, choke-point analysis has been performed with identified non-homologous proteins of metabolic pathways. In third level, two type of analysis have been performed through protein interaction network. First analysis has been done to find out the most potential metabolic functional associations among all identified choke point proteins whereas second analysis has been performed to find out the functional association of high metabolic interacting proteins to pathogenesis causing proteins. Most interactive metabolic proteins which have highest number of functional association with pathogenesis causing proteins have been considered as potential drug target. A list of 18 potential drug targets has been proposed which are various stages of progress at the TBSGC and proposed drug targets are also studied for other pathogenic strains. As a case study, we have built a homology model of identified drug targets histidinol-phosphate aminotransferase (HisC1) using MODELLER software and various information have been generated through molecular dynamics which will be useful in wetlab structure determination. The generated model could be further explored for insilico docking studies with suitable inhibitors.

  14. (Pro)renin receptor as a new drug target.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Basma A M; Seda, Ondrej; Lavoie, Julie L

    2011-11-01

    Over the last few years, the implication of the (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] in the pathogenesis of end-organ damage has been shown through many different studies. The (P)RR plays a dual role when stimulated by renin or prorenin as it enhances both cell surface production of angiotensin and stimulates angiotensin-independent intracellular signaling cascades. Since Ichihara's group demonstrated activation of prorenin when it was bound to antibodies targeted against a specific region in the renin prosegment, they designed a complementary decapeptide to this region called the handle region to use as a potential (P)RR blocker (PRRB). The effects of systemic administration of the PRRB on the development and progression of different renal, cardiac and ocular pathologies have been observed and have thus proposed the blocker as a potential new treatment for these afflictions. Conversely, the specificity of the PRRB has been questioned as conflicting results have been reported in the literature. A recent study has described a new high affinity binding site for renin and prorenin to the (P)RR called the hinge region. Hence, although there is great promise in the (P)RR potential as a therapeutic target, still much research is required to better identify adequate blockers.

  15. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  16. From in silico target prediction to multi-target drug design: current databases, methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Koutsoukas, Alexios; Simms, Benjamin; Kirchmair, Johannes; Bond, Peter J; Whitmore, Alan V; Zimmer, Steven; Young, Malcolm P; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Glick, Meir; Glen, Robert C; Bender, Andreas

    2011-11-18

    Given the tremendous growth of bioactivity databases, the use of computational tools to predict protein targets of small molecules has been gaining importance in recent years. Applications span a wide range, from the 'designed polypharmacology' of compounds to mode-of-action analysis. In this review, we firstly survey databases that can be used for ligand-based target prediction and which have grown tremendously in size in the past. We furthermore outline methods for target prediction that exist, both based on the knowledge of bioactivities from the ligand side and methods that can be applied in situations when a protein structure is known. Applications of successful in silico target identification attempts are discussed in detail, which were based partly or in whole on computational target predictions in the first instance. This includes the authors' own experience using target prediction tools, in this case considering phenotypic antibacterial screens and the analysis of high-throughput screening data. Finally, we will conclude with the prospective application of databases to not only predict, retrospectively, the protein targets of a small molecule, but also how to design ligands with desired polypharmacology in a prospective manner.

  17. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  18. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  19. Targeting tumor metastases: drug delivery mechanisms and technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Vidya; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Roth, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary sites of tumor are the focal triggers of cancers, yet it is the subsequent metastasis events that cause the majority of the morbidity and mortality. Metastatic tumor cells exhibit a phenotype that differs from that of the parent cells, as they represent a resistant, invasive subpopulation of the original tumor, may have acquired additional genetic or epigenetic alterations under exposure to prior chemotherapeutic or radiotherapeutic treatments, and reside in a microenvironment differing from that of its origin. This combination of resistant phenotype and distal location make tracking and treating metastases particularly challenging. In this review, we highlight some of the unique biological traits of metastasis, which in turn, inspire emerging strategies for targeted imaging of metastasized tumors and metastasis-directed delivery of therapeutics. PMID:26409123

  20. Mitochondrial fission - a drug target for cytoprotection or cytodestruction?

    PubMed

    Rosdah, Ayeshah A; K Holien, Jessica; Delbridge, Lea M D; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are morphologically dynamic organelles constantly undergoing processes of fission and fusion that maintain integrity and bioenergetics of the organelle: these processes are vital for cell survival. Disruption in the balance of mitochondrial fusion and fission is thought to play a role in several pathological conditions including ischemic heart disease. Proteins involved in regulating the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission are therefore potential targets for pharmacological therapies. Mdivi-1 is a small molecule inhibitor of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Inhibiting mitochondrial fission with Mdivi-1 has proven cytoprotective benefits in several cell types involved in a wide array of cardiovascular injury models. On the other hand, Mdivi-1 can also exert antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects, particularly in hyperproliferative cells. In this review, we discuss these divergent effects of Mdivi-1 on cell survival, as well as the potential and limitations of Mdivi-1 as a therapeutic agent. PMID:27433345

  1. Antibacterial Drug Leads: DNA and Enzyme Multi-Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yang; Li, Kai; Gao, Jian; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Chi; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Zhang, Yonghui; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of the activity of a series of amidine and bisamidine compounds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds bound to an AT-rich DNA dodecamer (CGCGAATTCGCG)2, and using DSC were found to increase the melting transition by up to 24 °C. Several compounds also inhibited undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) with IC50 values of 100–500 nM and we found good correlations (R2 = 0.89, S. aureus; R2 = 0.79, E. coli)) between experimental and predicted cell growth inhibition by using DNA ΔTm and UPPS IC50 experimental results together with 1 computed descriptor. We also solved the structures of three bisamidines binding to DNA as well as three UPPS structures. Overall, the results are of general interest in the context of the development of resistance-resistant antibiotics that involve multi-targeting. PMID:25574764

  2. Signaling through Rho GTPase pathway as viable drug target.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qun; Longo, Frank M; Zhou, Huchen; Massa, Stephen M; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Signaling through the Rho family of small GTPases has been increasingly investigated for their involvement in a wide variety of diseases such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neurological disorders as well as cancer. Rho GTPases are a subfamily of the Ras superfamily proteins which play essential roles in a number of biological processes, especially in the regulation of cell shape change, cytokinesis, cell adhesion, and cell migration. Many of these processes demonstrate a common theme: the rapid and dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton of which Rho signaling has now emerged as a major switch control. The involvement of dynamic changes of Rho GTPases in disease states underscores the need to produce effective inhibitors for their therapeutic applications. Fasudil and Y-27632, with many newer additions, are two classes of widely used chemical compounds that inhibit Rho kinase (ROCK), an important downstream effector of RhoA subfamily GTPases. These inhibitors have been successful in many preclinical studies, indicating the potential benefit of clinical Rho pathway inhibition. On the other hand, except for Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766, there are few effective inhibitors directly targeting Rho GTPases, likely due to the lack of optimal structural information on individual Rho-RhoGEF, Rho-RhoGAP, or Rho-RhoGDI interaction to achieve specificity. Recently, LM11A-31 and other derivatives of peptide mimetic ligands for p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) show promising effects upstream of Rho GTPase signaling in neuronal regeneration. CCG-1423, a chemical compound showing profiles of inhibiting downstream of RhoA, is a further attempt for the development of novel pharmacological tools to disrupt Rho signaling pathway in cancer. Because of a rapidly growing number of studies deciphering the role of the Rho proteins in many diseases, specific and potent pharmaceutical modulators of various steps of Rho GTPase signaling pathway are critically needed to target for

  3. Signaling pathways relevant to cognition-enhancing drug targets.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Gaudreau, Pierrette; Quirion, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    Aging is generally associated with a certain cognitive decline. However, individual differences exist. While age-related memory deficits can be observed in humans and rodents in the absence of pathological conditions, some individuals maintain intact cognitive functions up to an advanced age. The mechanisms underlying learning and memory processes involve the recruitment of multiple signaling pathways and gene expression, leading to adaptative neuronal plasticity and long-lasting changes in brain circuitry. This chapter summarizes the current understanding of how these signaling cascades could be modulated by cognition-enhancing agents favoring memory formation and successful aging. It focuses on data obtained in rodents, particularly in the rat as it is the most common animal model studied in this field. First, we will discuss the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and its receptors, downstream signaling effectors [e.g., calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)], associated immediate early gene (e.g., Homer 1a, Arc and Zif268), and growth factors [insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)] in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Second, the impact of the cholinergic system and related modulators on memory will be briefly reviewed. Finally, since dynorphin neuropeptides have recently been associated with memory impairments in aging, it is proposed as an attractive target to develop novel cognition-enhancing agents. PMID:25977080

  4. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns. PMID:23295481

  5. Imaging of a targeted PDT drug with fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffoletto, Dan; Gupta, Anurag; Xu, Zhiqiang; Mahrer, Chris; Bauer, Gretchen; Galas, Scott; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Sunar, Ulas

    2009-02-01

    We constructed a whole-body fluorescence tomography instrument to monitor novel bifunctional phototherapeutic drugs (e.g., HPPH-Cyanine dye conjugate) in small animals. The instrument allows dense source and detector sampling with a fast galvo scanner and a CCD detector for improved resolution and sensitivity (Patwardhan et al., 2005). Here we report tissue phantom measurements to evaluate the imaging performance with a newly constructed tomography instrument. Phantom measurements showed that strong fluorescence generated by HPPH-Cyanine dye (HPPH-CD), having high fluorescence quantum yield and long wavelength fluorescence emission, allowed deep tissue imaging. We also report in vivo fluorescence measurements of the conjugate in Nude mice bearing A549 human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors at 24 hr post injection to evaluate tumor detection ability of the conjugate. Our results indicate that the HPPH-CD shows preferential uptake in tumors compared to surrounding normal tissue at 24 hr post injection. This study demonstrates a potential use of HPPH-CD in detection (fluorescence imaging) and treatment (PDT) of deeply seated tumors.

  6. Epigenetic Modifications, Alcoholic Brain and Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jangra, Ashok; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Pandey, Suryanarayan; Choubey, Priyansha; Rajput, Prabha; Saroha, Babita; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic alcohol exposure evidently influences epigenetic changes, both transiently and permanently, and these changes in turn influence a variety of cells and organ systems throughout the body. Many of the alcohol-induced epigenetic modifications can contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. The persistence of behavioral changes demonstrates that long-lasting changes in gene expression, within particular regions of the brain, may contribute importantly to the addiction phenotype. The research activities over the past years have demonstrated a crucial role of epigenetic mechanisms in causing long lasting and transient changes in the expression of several genes in diverse tissues, including brain. This has stimulated recent research work that is aimed at characterizing the influence of epigenetic regulatory events in mediating the long lasting and transient effects of alcohol abuse on the brain in humans and animal models of alcohol addiction. In this study, we update our current understanding of the impact of alcohol exposure on epigenetic mechanisms in the brain and refurbish the knowledge of epigenetics in the direction of new drugs development. PMID:27780992

  7. Drug-loaded nanocarriers: passive targeting and crossing of biological barriers.

    PubMed

    Rabanel, J M; Aoun, V; Elkin, I; Mokhtar, M; Hildgen, P

    2012-01-01

    Poor bioavailability and poor pharmacokinetic characteristics are some of the leading causes of drug development failure. Therefore, poorly-soluble drugs, fragile proteins or nucleic acid products may benefit from their encapsulation in nanosized vehicles, providing enhanced solubilization, protection against degradation, and increased access to pathological compartments. A key element for the success of drug-loaded nanocarriers is their ability to either cross biological barriers themselves, or allow loaded drugs to traverse them to achieve optimal pharmacological action at pathological sites. Depending on the mode of administration, nanocarriers may have to cross different physiological barriers in their journey towards their target. In this review, the crossing of biological barriers by passive targeting strategies will be presented for intravenous delivery (vascular endothelial lining, particularly for tumor vasculature and blood brain barrier targeting), oral administration (gastrointestinal lining), and upper airway administration (pulmonary epithelium). For each specific barrier, background information will be provided on the structure and biology of the tissues involved as well as available pathways for nano-objects or loaded drugs (diffusion and convection through fenestration, transcytosis, tight junction crossing, etc.). The determinants of passive targeting - size, shape, surface chemistry, surface patterning of nanovectors - will be discussed in light of current results. Perspectives on each mode of administration will be presented. The focus will be on polymeric nanoparticles and dendrimers, although advances in liposome technology will be also reported as they represent the largest body in the drug delivery literature.

  8. Antibody fragment-conjugated polymeric micelles incorporating platinum drugs for targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jooyeon; Miura, Yutaka; Yamada, Naoki; Chida, Tsukasa; Liu, Xueying; Kim, Ahram; Sato, Ryuta; Tsumura, Ryo; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated therapies including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have shown much potential in cancer treatment by tumor-targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, there is a limitation of payloads that can be delivered by ADCs. Integration of antibodies to drug-loaded nanocarriers broadens the applicability of antibodies to a wide range of therapeutics. Herein, we developed antibody fragment-installed polymeric micelles via maleimide-thiol conjugation for selectively delivering platinum drugs to pancreatic tumors. By tailoring the surface density of maleimide on the micelles, one tissue factor (TF)-targeting Fab' was conjugated to each carrier. Fab'-installed platinum-loaded micelles exhibited more than 15-fold increased cellular binding within 1 h and rapid cellular internalization compared to non-targeted micelles, leading to superior in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo, Fab'-installed micelles significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts for more than 40 days, outperforming non-targeted micelles and free drugs. These results indicate the potential of Fab'-installed polymeric micelles for efficient drug delivery to solid tumors.

  9. Antibody fragment-conjugated polymeric micelles incorporating platinum drugs for targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jooyeon; Miura, Yutaka; Yamada, Naoki; Chida, Tsukasa; Liu, Xueying; Kim, Ahram; Sato, Ryuta; Tsumura, Ryo; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated therapies including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have shown much potential in cancer treatment by tumor-targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, there is a limitation of payloads that can be delivered by ADCs. Integration of antibodies to drug-loaded nanocarriers broadens the applicability of antibodies to a wide range of therapeutics. Herein, we developed antibody fragment-installed polymeric micelles via maleimide-thiol conjugation for selectively delivering platinum drugs to pancreatic tumors. By tailoring the surface density of maleimide on the micelles, one tissue factor (TF)-targeting Fab' was conjugated to each carrier. Fab'-installed platinum-loaded micelles exhibited more than 15-fold increased cellular binding within 1 h and rapid cellular internalization compared to non-targeted micelles, leading to superior in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo, Fab'-installed micelles significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts for more than 40 days, outperforming non-targeted micelles and free drugs. These results indicate the potential of Fab'-installed polymeric micelles for efficient drug delivery to solid tumors. PMID:25477168

  10. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA.

  11. Identification and characterization of potential drug targets by subtractive genome analyses of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Reaz; Saeed, Kiran

    2014-02-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes serious infections in humans and becomes resistant to a number of antibiotics. Due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains, there is an essential need to develop novel drug targets to address the challenge of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In current study, the idea was to utilize the available genome or proteome in a subtractive genome analyses protocol to identify drug targets within two of the MRSA types, i.e., MRSA ST398 and MRSA 252. Recently, the use of subtractive genomic approaches helped in the identification and characterization of novel drug targets of a number of pathogens. Our protocol involved a similarity search between pathogen and host, essentiality study using the database of essential genes, metabolic functional association study using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database (KEGG), cellular membrane localization analysis and Drug Bank database. Functional family characterizations of the identified non homologous hypothetical essential proteins were done by SVMProt server. Druggability potential of each of the identified drug targets was also evaluated by Drug Bank database. Moreover, metabolic pathway analysis of the identified druggable essential proteins with KEGG revealed that the identified proteins are participating in unique and essential metabolic pathways amongst MRSA strains. In short, the complete proteome analyses by the use of advanced computational tools, databases and servers resulted in identification and characterization of few nonhomologous/hypothetical and essential proteins which are not homologous to the host genome. Therefore, these non-homologous essential targets ensure the survival of the pathogen and hence can be targeted for drug discovery.

  12. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P.; Wang, Zhihua; Kinney, Justin B.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-induced mutations to the 5’ exons of candidate genes1–5, but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher proportion of null mutations and substantially increases the potency of negative selection. We show that the magnitude of negative selection reports the functional importance of individual protein domains of interest. A screen of 192 chromatin regulatory domains in murine acute myeloid leukemia cells identifies six known drug targets and 19 additional dependencies. A broader application of this approach may allow comprehensive identification of protein domains that sustain cancer cells and are suitable for drug targeting. PMID:25961408

  13. Extracellularly activated nanocarriers: A new paradigm of tumor targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Yeo, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine is to develop a nanocarrier that can selectively deliver anti-cancer drugs to the targeted tumors. Extensive efforts have resulted in several tumor-targeted nanocarriers, some of which are approved for clinical use. Most nanocarriers achieve tumor-selective accumulation through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Targeting molecules such as antibodies, peptides, ligands, or nucleic acids attached to the nanocarriers further enhance their recognition and internalization by the target tissues. While both the stealth and targeting features are important for effective and selective drug delivery to the tumors, achieving both features simultaneously is often found to be difficult. Some of the recent targeting strategies have the potential to overcome this challenge. These strategies utilize the unique extracellular environment of tumors to change the long-circulating nanocarriers to release the drug or interact with cells in a tumor-specific manner. This review discusses the new targeting strategies with recent examples, which utilize the environmental stimuli to activate the nanocarriers. Traditional strategies for tumor-targeted nanocarriers are briefly discussed with an emphasis on their achievements and challenges. PMID:19366234

  14. Whole-genome sequencing targets drug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Punina, N V; Makridakis, N M; Remnev, M A; Topunov, A F

    2015-01-01

    During the past two decades, the technological progress of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) had changed the fields of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, and, currently, is changing the underlying principles, approaches, and fundamentals of Public Health, Epidemiology, Health Economics, and national productivity. Today's WGS technologies are able to compete with conventional techniques in cost, speed, accuracy, and resolution for day-to-day control of infectious diseases and outbreaks in clinical laboratories and in long-term epidemiological investigations. WGS gives rise to an exciting future direction for personalized Genomic Epidemiology. One of the most vital and growing public health problems is the emerging and re-emerging of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections in the communities and healthcare settings, reinforced by a decline in antimicrobial drug discovery. In recent years, retrospective analysis provided by WGS has had a great impact on the identification and tracking of MDR microorganisms in hospitals and communities. The obtained genomic data are also important for developing novel easy-to-use diagnostic assays for clinics, as well as for antibiotic and therapeutic development at both the personal and population levels. At present, this technology has been successfully applied as an addendum to the real-time diagnostic methods currently used in clinical laboratories. However, the significance of WGS for public health may increase if: (a) unified and user-friendly bioinformatics toolsets for easy data interpretation and management are established, and (b) standards for data validation and verification are developed. Herein, we review the current and future impact of this technology on diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and control of MDR infectious bacteria in clinics and on the global scale. PMID:26243131

  15. Drug Targets for Oxidative Podocyte Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes mellitus that affects as much as one-third of diabetic patients irrespective of the type of diabetes. Hyperglycemia is the key trigger for DN that initiates a number of microscopic and ultramicroscopic changes in kidney architecture. Microscopic changes include thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), tubular basement membrane (TBM), mesangial proliferation, arteriosclerosis, and glomerulotubular junction abnormalities (GTJA). Among the ultramicroscopic changes, effacement of podocytes and decrease in their density seem to be the centerpiece of DN pathogenesis. These changes in kidney architecture then produce functional deficits, such as microalbuminuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Among several mechanisms involved in inflicting damage to podocytes, injuries sustained by increased oxidative stress turns out to be the most important mechanism. Different variables that are included in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) include a hyperglycemia-induced reduction in glutathione (GSH), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation via hyperglycemia, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), protein kinase C (PKC), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Unfortunately, control of podocyte injury hasn’t received much attention as a treatment approach for DN. Therefore, this review article is mainly concerned with the exploration of various treatment options that might help in decreasing the podocyte injury, mainly by reducing the level of NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS. This article concludes with a view that certain NADPH oxidase inhibitors, RAAS inhibitors, statins, antidiabetic drugs, and antioxidant vitamins might be useful in decreasing podocyte injury and resultant structural and functional kidney impairments in DN. PMID:26798569

  16. A smart polymeric platform for multistage nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Li, Lian; Zhu, Xi; Guan, Shan; Yang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell nucleus-targeted delivery of antitumor agents is of great interest in cancer therapy, since the nucleus is one of the most frequent targets of drug action. Here we report a smart polymeric conjugate platform, which utilizes stimulus-responsive strategies to achieve multistage nuclear drug delivery upon systemic administration. The conjugates composed of a backbone based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer and detachable nucleus transport sub-units that sensitive to lysosomal enzyme. The sub-units possess a biforked structure with one end conjugated with the model drug, H1 peptide, and the other end conjugated with a novel pH-responsive targeting peptide (R8NLS) that combining the strength of cell penetrating peptide and nuclear localization sequence. The conjugates exhibited prolonged circulation time and excellent tumor homing ability. And the activation of R8NLS in acidic tumor microenvironment facilitated tissue penetration and cellular internalization. Once internalized into the cell, the sub-units were unleashed for nuclear transport through nuclear pore complex. The unique features resulted in 50-fold increase of nuclear drug accumulation relative to the original polymer-drug conjugates in vitro, and excellent in vivo nuclear drug delivery efficiency. Our report provides a strategy in systemic nuclear drug delivery by combining the microenvironment-responsive structure and detachable sub-units.

  17. ADAM8 as a drug target in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlomann, Uwe; Koller, Garrit; Conrad, Catharina; Ferdous, Taheera; Golfi, Panagiota; Garcia, Adolfo Molejon; Höfling, Sabrina; Parsons, Maddy; Costa, Patricia; Soper, Robin; Bossard, Maud; Hagemann, Thorsten; Roshani, Rozita; Sewald, Norbert; Ketchem, Randal R.; Moss, Marcia L.; Rasmussen, Fred H.; Miller, Miles A.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Tuveson, David A.; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a grim prognosis with less than 5% survivors after 5 years. High expression levels of ADAM8, a metalloprotease-disintegrin, are correlated with poor clinical outcome. We show that ADAM8 expression is associated with increased migration and invasiveness of PDAC cells caused by activation of ERK 1/2 and higher MMP activities. For biological function, ADAM8 requires multimerisation and associates with β1-integrin on the cell surface. A peptidomimetic ADAM8 inhibitor, BK-1361, designed by structural modelling of the disintegrin domain, prevents ADAM8 multimerisation. In PDAC cells, BK-1361 affects ADAM8 function leading to reduced invasiveness, and less ERK 1/2 and MMP activation. BK-1361 application in mice decreased tumour burden and metastasis of implanted pancreatic tumour cells and provides improved metrics of clinical symptoms and survival in a KrasG12D-driven mouse model of PDAC. Thus, our data integrate ADAM8 in pancreatic cancer signalling and validate ADAM8 as a target for PDAC therapy. PMID:25629724

  18. ADAM8 as a drug target in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlomann, Uwe; Koller, Garrit; Conrad, Catharina; Ferdous, Taheera; Golfi, Panagiota; Garcia, Adolfo Molejon; Höfling, Sabrina; Parsons, Maddy; Costa, Patricia; Soper, Robin; Bossard, Maud; Hagemann, Thorsten; Roshani, Rozita; Sewald, Norbert; Ketchem, Randal R; Moss, Marcia L; Rasmussen, Fred H; Miller, Miles A; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Tuveson, David A; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a grim prognosis with <5% survivors after 5 years. High expression levels of ADAM8, a metalloprotease disintegrin, are correlated with poor clinical outcome. We show that ADAM8 expression is associated with increased migration and invasiveness of PDAC cells caused by activation of ERK1/2 and higher MMP activities. For biological function, ADAM8 requires multimerization and associates with β1 integrin on the cell surface. A peptidomimetic ADAM8 inhibitor, BK-1361, designed by structural modelling of the disintegrin domain, prevents ADAM8 multimerization. In PDAC cells, BK-1361 affects ADAM8 function leading to reduced invasiveness, and less ERK1/2 and MMP activation. BK-1361 application in mice decreased tumour burden and metastasis of implanted pancreatic tumour cells and provides improved metrics of clinical symptoms and survival in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse model of PDAC. Thus, our data integrate ADAM8 in pancreatic cancer signalling and validate ADAM8 as a target for PDAC therapy.

  19. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  20. Norovirus: targets and tools in antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Neyts, Johan; Jochmans, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    The development of antiviral strategies to treat or prevent norovirus infections is a pressing matter. Noroviruses are the number 1 cause of acute gastroenteritis, of foodborne illness, of sporadic gastroenteritis in all age groups and of severe acute gastroenteritis in children less than 5 years old seeking medical assistance [USA/CDC]. In developing countries, noroviruses are linked to significant mortality (~200,000 children <5 years old). Noroviruses are a major culprit for the closure of hospital wards, and associated with increased hospitalization and mortality among the elderly. Transplant patients have significant risk of acquiring persistent norovirus gastroenteritis. Control and prevention strategies are limited to the use of disinfectants and hand sanitizers, whose efficacy is frequently insufficient. Hence, there is an ample need for antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of norovirus infections. The fact that only a handful of inhibitors of norovirus replication have been reported can largely be attributable to the hampering inability to cultivate human noroviruses in cell culture. The Norwalk replicon-bearing cells and the murine norovirus-infected cell lines are the available models to assess in vitro antiviral activity of compounds. Human noroviruses have been shown to replicate (to some extent) in mice, calves, gnotobiotic pigs, and chimpanzees. Infection of interferon-deficient mice with the murine norovirus results in virus-induced diarrhea. Here we review recent developments in understanding which norovirus proteins or host cell factors may serve as targets for inhibition of viral replication. Given the recent advances, significant progress in the search for antiviral strategies against norovirus infections is expected in the upcoming years. PMID:24893351

  1. Drug carrier interaction with blood: a critical aspect for high-efficient vascular-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Sobczynski, Daniel J; Fish, Margaret B; Fromen, Catherine A; Carasco-Teja, Mariana; Coleman, Rhima M; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2015-01-01

    Vascular wall endothelial cells control several physiological processes and are implicated in many diseases, making them an attractive candidate for drug targeting. Vascular-targeted drug carriers (VTCs) offer potential for reduced side effects and improved therapeutic efficacy, however, only limited therapeutic success has been achieved to date. This is perhaps due to complex interactions of VTCs with blood components, which dictate VTC transport and adhesion to endothelial cells. This review focuses on VTC interaction with blood as well as novel ‘bio-inspired’ designs to mimic and exploit features of blood in VTC development. Advanced approaches for enhancing VTCs are discussed along with applications in regenerative medicine, an area of massive potential growth and expansion of VTC utility in the near future. PMID:26272334

  2. Large-Scale Prediction of Drug Targets Based on Local and Global Consistency of Chemical-Chemical Networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guohua; Feng, Kaiyan; Li, Xiaomei; Peng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to identify the molecular targets of a compound during the course of the new drug discovery and drug development. Due to the complexity of biological systems, finding drug targets by biological experiments is very tedious and expensive. In the paper, we used chemicalchemical interactions in the STITCH database to construct a network of drug-drug association. Based on the network, a learning method keeping local and global consistency was presented to infer drug targets. We achieved an accuracy of 57.75% in the first order prediction using leave-one-out cross validation, which was higher than the accuracy of 53.77% achieved by the local neighbor model. We manually validated 27 absent drug targets in the crossvalidation using drug-target interactions from other databases. Applying the presented method to large-scale prediction of unknown targets, we manually confirmed 14 pairs of drug-target interactions among the newly predicted drug targets. These results suggested that the presented method was a promising tool for large-scale identification of drug targets.

  3. Sulfonylurea pharmacogenomics in Type 2 diabetes: the influence of drug target and diabetes risk polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Aquilante, Christina L

    2010-01-01

    The sulfonylureas stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β cells, and have been a cornerstone of Type 2 diabetes pharmacotherapy for over 50 years. Although sulfonylureas are effective antihyperglycemic agents, interindividual variability exists in drug response (i.e., pharmacodynamics), disposition (i.e., pharmacokinetics) and adverse effects. The field of pharmacogenomics has been applied to sulfonylurea clinical studies in order to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of this response variability. Historically, most studies have sought to determine the influence of polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzyme genes on sulfonylurea pharmacokinetics in humans. More recently, polymorphisms in sulfonylurea drug target genes and diabetes risk genes have been implicated as important determinants of sulfonylurea pharmacodynamics in patients with Type 2 diabetes. As such, the purpose of this review is to discuss sulfonylurea pharmacogenomics in the setting of Type 2 diabetes, specifically focusing on polymorphisms in drug target and diabetes risk genes, and their relationship with interindividual variability in sulfonylurea response and adverse effects. PMID:20222815

  4. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles. PMID:26222406

  5. Cryptococcal therapies and drug targets: the old, the new and the promising.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carolina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Half a century after the introduction of Amphotericin B the management of cryptococcosis remains unsatisfactory. The disease, caused primarily by the two fungal species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, remains responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality despite standard medical care. Current therapeutic options are limited to Amphotericin B, azoles and 5-flucytosine. However, this organism has numerous well-characterized virulence mechanisms that are amenable to pharmacological interference and are thus potential therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss existing approved antifungal drugs, resistance mechanisms to these drugs and non-standard antifungal drugs that have potential in treatment of cryptococcosis, including immunomodulatory strategies that synergize with antifungal drugs, such as cytokine administration or monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we summarize attempts to target well-described virulence factors of Cryptococcus, the capsule or fungal melanin. This review emphasizes the pressing need for new therapeutic alternatives for cryptococcosis. PMID:26990050

  6. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  7. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Chien

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  8. Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Core-Shell Nanogels for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag-nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA-crosslinked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers feasible for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution. PMID:21542633

  9. Near-infrared light-responsive core-shell nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-28

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA cross-linked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR-based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer-functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution.

  10. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles.

  11. Near-infrared light-responsive core-shell nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-28

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA cross-linked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR-based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer-functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution. PMID:21542633

  12. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  13. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) represents a paradigm for the wider cancer field. Despite the fact that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have established targeted molecular therapy in CML, patients often face the risk of developing drug resistance, caused by mutations and/or activation of alternative cellular pathways. To optimize drug development, one needs to systematically test all possible combinations of drug targets within the genetic network that regulates the disease. The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a user-friendly computational tool that allows us to do exactly that. We used BMA to build a CML network-model composed of 54 nodes linked by 104 interactions that encapsulates experimental data collected from 160 publications. While previous studies were limited by their focus on a single pathway or cellular process, our executable model allowed us to probe dynamic interactions between multiple pathways and cellular outcomes, suggest new combinatorial therapeutic targets, and highlight previously unexplored sensitivities to Interleukin-3.

  14. Bioresponsive hyaluronic acid-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Li, Zhenhua; Lin, Youhui; Yin, Meili; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, we present a facile strategy to synthesize hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSP) for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery, in which the anchored HA polysaccharides not only act as capping agents but also as targeting ligands without the need of additional modification. The nanoconjugates possess many attractive features including chemical simplicity, high colloidal stability, good biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and precise cargo release, making them promising agents for biomedical applications. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the nanoconjugates are shown to release cargoes from the interior pores of MSPs upon HA degradation in response to hyaluronidase-1 (Hyal-1). Moreover, after receptor-mediated endocytosis into cancer cells, the anchored HA was degraded into small fragments, facilitating the release of drugs to kill the cancer cells. Overall, we envision that this system might open the door to a new generation of carrier system for site-selective, controlled-release delivery of anticancer drugs.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma.

  16. G Protein-Coupled Receptors - Targets for Fragment-based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Alastair D G

    2015-01-01

    As the considerable technical challenges involved with generating crystal structures of G (guanine nucleotide- binding) protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are starting to be successfully addressed, opportunities to apply fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) to this class of target are becoming a reality. GPCRs represent a large and important family of drug targets with considerable clinical and commercial interest. While their general seven transmembrane helix bundle structures are amenable to therapeutic intervention with small molecules, to date successful drugs have primarily been discovered using traditional competitive or function-based screening. With advances in biophysical screening techniques such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Target-Immobilised NMR Screening (TINS), being matched to developments in molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening and stabilisation of biologically relevant conformations of GPCRs, structure-based approaches using fragment starting points are beginning to be applied to the discovery of new generations of small molecules.

  17. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

  18. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

  19. G Protein-Coupled Receptors - Targets for Fragment-based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Alastair D G

    2015-01-01

    As the considerable technical challenges involved with generating crystal structures of G (guanine nucleotide- binding) protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are starting to be successfully addressed, opportunities to apply fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) to this class of target are becoming a reality. GPCRs represent a large and important family of drug targets with considerable clinical and commercial interest. While their general seven transmembrane helix bundle structures are amenable to therapeutic intervention with small molecules, to date successful drugs have primarily been discovered using traditional competitive or function-based screening. With advances in biophysical screening techniques such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Target-Immobilised NMR Screening (TINS), being matched to developments in molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening and stabilisation of biologically relevant conformations of GPCRs, structure-based approaches using fragment starting points are beginning to be applied to the discovery of new generations of small molecules. PMID:26126904

  20. Drug Targets for Cardiovascular-Safe Anti-Inflammatory: In Silico Rational Drug Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Sajad; Sahrawat, Tammanna R.; Ray, Monalisa; Dash, Swagatika; Kar, Dattatreya; Singh, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in memory consolidation and synaptic activity, the most fundamental functions of the brain. It converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide H2. In contrast, if over-expressed, it causes inflammation in response to cytokine, pro-inflammatory molecule, and growth factor. Anti-inflammatory agents, by allosteric or competitive inhibition of COX-2, alleviate the symptoms of inflammation. Coxib family drugs, particularly celecoxib, are the most famous anti-inflammatory agents available in the market showing significant inhibitory effect on COX-2 activity. Due to high cardiovascular risk of this drug group, recent researches are focused on the investigation of new safer drugs for anti-inflammatory diseases. Natural compounds, particularly, phytochemicals are found to be good candidates for drug designing and discovery. In the present study, we performed in silico studies to quantitatively scrutinize the molecular interaction of curcumin and its structural analogs with COX-2, COX-1, FXa and integrin αIIbβIII to investigate their therapeutic potential as a cardiovascular-safe anti-inflammatory medicine (CVSAIM). The results of both ADMET and docking study indicated that out of all the 39 compounds studied, caffeic acid had remarkable interaction with proteins involved in inflammatory response. It was also found to inhibit the proteins that are involved in thrombosis, thereby, having the potential to be developed as therapeutic agent. PMID:27258084

  1. Drug Synergy Screen and Network Modeling in Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma Identifies CDK4 and IGF1R as Synergistic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Martin L.; Molinelli, Evan J.; Nair, Jayasree S.; Sheikh, Tahir; Samy, Rita; Jing, Xiaohong; He, Qin; Korkut, Anil; Crago, Aimee M.; Singer, Samuel; Schwartz, Gary K.; Sander, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDLS) is a rare but aggressive cancer with high recurrence and low response rates to targeted therapies. Increasing treatment efficacy may require combinations of targeted agents that counteract the effects of multiple abnormalities. To identify a possible multicomponent therapy, we performed a combinatorial drug screen in a DDLS-derived cell line and identified cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) as synergistic drug targets. We measured the phosphorylation of multiple proteins and cell viability in response to systematic drug combinations and derived computational models of the signaling network. These models predict that the observed synergy in reducing cell viability with CDK4 and IGF1R inhibitors depend on activity of the AKT pathway. Experiments confirmed that combined inhibition of CDK4 and IGF1R cooperatively suppresses the activation of proteins within the AKT pathway. Consistent with these findings, synergistic reductions in cell viability were also found when combining CDK4 inhibition with inhibition of either AKT or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), another receptor similar to IGF1R that activates AKT. Thus, network models derived from context-specific proteomic measurements of systematically perturbed cancer cells may reveal cancer-specific signaling mechanisms and aid in the design of effective combination therapies. PMID:24065146

  2. Identification of New Drug Targets and Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ioerger, Thomas R.; O’Malley, Theresa; Liao, Reiling; Guinn, Kristine M.; Hickey, Mark J.; Mohaideen, Nilofar; Murphy, Kenan C.; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric J.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Barry, Clifton E.; Sherman, David R.; Parish, Tanya; Sacchettini, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of new drug targets is vital for the advancement of drug discovery against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, especially given the increase of resistance worldwide to first- and second-line drugs. Because traditional target-based screening has largely proven unsuccessful for antibiotic discovery, we have developed a scalable platform for target identification in M. tuberculosis that is based on whole-cell screening, coupled with whole-genome sequencing of resistant mutants and recombineering to confirm. The method yields targets paired with whole-cell active compounds, which can serve as novel scaffolds for drug development, molecular tools for validation, and/or as ligands for co-crystallization. It may also reveal other information about mechanisms of action, such as activation or efflux. Using this method, we identified resistance-linked genes for eight compounds with anti-tubercular activity. Four of the genes have previously been shown to be essential: AspS, aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, Pks13, a polyketide synthase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, MmpL3, a membrane transporter, and EccB3, a component of the ESX-3 type VII secretion system. AspS and Pks13 represent novel targets in protein translation and cell-wall biosynthesis. Both MmpL3 and EccB3 are involved in membrane transport. Pks13, AspS, and EccB3 represent novel candidates not targeted by existing TB drugs, and the availability of whole-cell active inhibitors greatly increases their potential for drug discovery. PMID:24086479

  3. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  4. Glutamate metabotropic receptors as targets for drug therapy in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Moldrich, Randal X; Chapman, Astrid G; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Meldrum, Brian S

    2003-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have multiple actions on neuronal excitability through G-protein-linked modifications of enzymes and ion channels. They act presynaptically to modify glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic transmission and can contribute to long-term changes in synaptic function. The recent identification of subtype-selective agonists and antagonists has permitted evaluation of mGlu receptors as potential targets in the treatment of epilepsy. Agonists acting on group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5) are convulsant. Antagonists acting on mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptors are anticonvulsant against 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced seizures and in mouse models of generalized motor seizures and absence seizures. The competitive, phenylglycine mGlu1/5 receptor antagonists generally require intracerebroventricular administration for potent anticonvulsant efficacy but noncompetitive antagonists, e.g., (3aS,6aS)-6a-naphthalen-2-ylmethyl-5-methyliden-hexahydrocyclopenta[c]furan-1-on (BAY36-7620), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), and 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) block generalized seizures with systemic administration. Agonists acting on group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2, mGlu3) to reduce glutamate release are anticonvulsant, e.g., 2R,4R-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC], (+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY354740), and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylate (LY379268). The classical agonists acting on group III mGlu receptors such as L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, and L-serine-O-phosphate are acutely proconvulsant with some anticonvulsant activity. The more recently identified agonists (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine [(R,S)-PPG] and (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine [(S)-3,4-DCPG] and (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid [ACPT-1] are all anticonvulsant without proconvulsant effects. Studies in animal models of kindling

  5. Octreotide-Mediated Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery via a Cleavable Doxorubicin-Peptide Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Freidel, Christoph; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Stalla, Günter; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-12-01

    Although recent methods for targeted drug delivery have addressed many of the existing problems of cancer therapy associated with undesirable side effects, significant challenges remain that have to be met before they find significant clinical relevance. One such area is the delicate chemical bond that is applied to connect a cytotoxic drug with targeting moieties like antibodies or peptides. Here we describe a novel platform that can be utilized for the preparation of drug-carrier conjugates in a site-specific manner, which provides excellent versatility and enables triggered release inside cancer cells. Its key feature is a cleavable doxorubicin-octreotide bioconjugate that targets overexpressed somatostatin receptors on tumor cells, where the coupling between the two components was achieved through the first cleavable disulfide-intercalating linker. The tumor targeting ability and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in AtT-20 cells by both octreotide and the doxorubicin hybrid were determined via a specific radioimmunoassay. Both substances reduced the hormone secretion to a similar extent, which demonstrated that the tumor homing peptide is able to interact with the relevant cell surface receptors after the attachment of the drug. Effective drug release was quickly accomplished in the presence of the physiological reducing agent glutathione. We also demonstrate the relevance of this scaffold in biological context in cytotoxicity assays with pituitary, pancreatic, and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26524088

  6. Crowd Sourcing a New Paradigm for Interactome Driven Drug Target Identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rohira, Harsha; Bhat, Ashwini G.; Passi, Anurag; Mukherjee, Keya; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Kumar, Vikas; Arora, Anshula; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Subramanian, Ahalyaa; Venkatachalam, Aparna; S, Gayathri; Raj, Sweety; Chitra, Vijaya; Verma, Kaveri; Zaheer, Salman; J, Balaganesh; Gurusamy, Malarvizhi; Razeeth, Mohammed; Raja, Ilamathi; Thandapani, Madhumohan; Mevada, Vishal; Soni, Raviraj; Rana, Shruti; Ramanna, Girish Muthagadhalli; Raghavan, Swetha; Subramanya, Sunil N.; Kholia, Trupti; Patel, Rajesh; Bhavnani, Varsha; Chiranjeevi, Lakavath; Sengupta, Soumi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Atray, Naresh; Gandhi, Swati; Avasthi, Tiruvayipati Suma; Nisthar, Shefin; Anurag, Meenakshi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hasija, Yasha; Dash, Debasis; Sharma, Arun; Scaria, Vinod; Thomas, Zakir; Chandra, Nagasuma; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative ‘Connect to Decode’ (C2D) to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed ‘interactome pathway’ (IPW), encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach. PMID:22808064

  7. Non-Covalent Functionalization of Carbon Nanovectors with an Antibody Enables Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jacob M.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Mohamedali, Khalid A.; Marcano, Daniela C.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Current chemotherapeutics are characterized by efficient tumor cell-killing and severe side effects mostly derived from off target toxicity. Hence targeted delivery of these drugs to tumor cells is actively sought. We previously demonstrated that poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized carbon nanovectors are able to sequester paclitaxel, a widely used hydrophobic cancer drug, by simple physisorption and deliver the drug for killing of cancer cells. The cell-killing when these drug-loaded carbon nanoparticles were used was equivalent to when a commercial formulation of paclitaxel was used. Here we show that by further mixing the drug-loaded nanoparticles with Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), paclitaxel is preferentially targeted to EGFR+ tumor cells in vitro. This supports progressing to in vivo studies. Moreover, the construct is unusual in that all three components are assembled through non-covalent interactions. Such non-covalent assembly could enable high-throughput screening of drug/antibody combinations. PMID:21736358

  8. VEGF pathway targeting agents, vessel normalization and tumor drug uptake: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Arjaans, Marlous; Schröder, Carolina P.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Dafni, Urania; Kleibeuker, Josée E.; de Vries, Elisabeth G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway targeting agents have been combined with other anticancer drugs, leading to improved efficacy in carcinoma of the cervix, stomach, lung, colon and rectum, ovary, and breast. Vessel normalization induced by VEGF pathway targeting agents influences tumor drug uptake. Following bevacizumab treatment, preclinical and clinical studies have shown a decrease in tumor delivery of radiolabeled antibodies and two chemotherapeutic drugs. The decrease in vessel pore size during vessel normalization might explain the decrease in tumor drug uptake. Moreover, the addition of bevacizumab to cetuximab, or panitumumab in colorectal cancer patients or to trastuzumab in breast cancer patients, did not improve efficacy. However, combining bevacizumab with chemotherapy did increase efficacy in some cancer types. Novel biomarkers to select patients who may benefit from combination therapies, such as the effect of an angiogenesis inhibitor on tumor perfusion, requires innovative trial designs and large clinical trials. Small imaging studies with radiolabeled drugs could be used in the interphase to gain further insight into the interplay between VEGF targeted therapy, vessel normalization and tumor drug delivery. PMID:26789111

  9. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD.

  10. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  11. Use of Single-Chain Antibody Derivatives for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Khalili, Masoumeh; Jaliani, Hossein Zarei; Zarei, Vahid; Erfani-Moghadam, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Single-chain antibodies (scFvs), which contain only the variable domains of full-length antibodies, are relatively small molecules that can be used for selective drug delivery. In this review, we discuss how scFvs help improve the specificity and efficiency of drugs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery using scFv-drug fusion peptides, siRNA delivery using scFv-conjugated nanoparticles, targeted delivery using scFv-viral peptide-fusion proteins, use of scFv in fusion with cell-penetrating peptides for effective targeted drug delivery, scFv-mediated targeted delivery of inorganic nanoparticles, scFv-mediated increase of tumor killing activity of granulocytes, use of scFv for tumor imaging, site-directed conjugation of scFv molecules to drug carrier systems, use of scFv to relieve pain and use of scFv for increasing drug loading efficiency are among the topics that are discussed here. PMID:27249008

  12. Multifunctional Micellar Nanocarriers for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Hydrophobic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Zhu, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Poor water solubility, low tumor specificity, insufficient cell internalization, and drug resistance are typical among chemotherapy drugs. In this study, the multifunctional micellar nanocarriers containing the PEG2k-pp-PE, a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-labile self-assembling block copolymer, and the TAT-PEG1k-PE, a cell penetrating moiety, were developed for tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs. The functional polymers and their nanocarriers were characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, micelle formation capability, drug loading and release, cellular uptake, and anticancer activity. After the MMP2-mediated cleavage, the protective long chain PEG (PEG2k) was deshielded and the cell penetrating peptide (TAT) was exposed for the enhanced tumor targeting and cellular penetration. In the in vitro studies, the multifunctional nanocarriers showed the improved cellular uptake and anticancer activity in various cancer cells including both drug sensitive and resistant cells, compared to their nonsensitive counterparts and conventional polymeric micelles. Furthermore, the PEG2k-pp-PE and its containing micelles were found to possess the capability to reverse the P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance. Our results suggested that the multifunctional micellar nanocarriers would be a promising tumor-targeted drug delivery platform, applicable for the MMP2 up-regulated cancers. PMID:27319214

  13. Transporter-mediated tissue targeting of therapeutic molecules in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingye; Xu, Jianfeng; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Minmin

    2015-03-01

    Tissue concentrations of endogenous chemicals and nutrients are in large part regulated by membrane transporters through their substrate specificity and differential tissue distributions. These transporters also play a key role in the disposition of therapeutic agents thus affecting their efficacy and safety profile. A transporter-mediated tissue targeting strategy, where the structural features recognized by the transporters are incorporated into the therapeutic molecule, is emerging as an effective approach in drug discovery. In this digest, we review this phenomenon and highlight recent cases in the design of liver and kidney targeted drug molecules.

  14. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wever, Claudia M.; Farrington, Danielle; Dent, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target. PMID:26393923

  15. Bi-directionally selective bone targeting delivery for anabolic and antiresorptive drugs: a novel combined therapy for osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Zhang, Hualin; Dong, Yiwen; Jin, Yifan; Hu, Xiaohui; Cai, Kaiyong; Ma, Jianfeng; Wu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a progressive systemic skeletal disease, in which the equilibrium of bone resorption and bone formation is disturbed. The drugs for osteoporosis can be divided into two categories according to their predominant effects: antiresorptive drugs and anabolic drugs. Antiresorptive drugs are designed to inhibit bone resorption and anabolic drugs are aiming to stimulate bone formation. On the other hand, most antiresorptive drugs usually decrease anabolic activities and reduce bone formation, while anabolic drugs can unintendedly increase bone resorption. Furthermore, both types of drugs show no preferential distribution in bone and can locate generally in the areas of both bone formation and bone resorption. Consequently, the non-specific interaction of these drugs with non-targeting area and cells can lead to a compromised efficacy. Combined therapies of antiresorptive and anabolic drugs do not necessarily yield superiority when compared to monotherapy. Here, basing on the targeting cells of these two kinds of drugs and the spatial distribution of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, we propose a novel drug delivery system of bi-directionally selective targeting in order to facilitate the efficacy of antiresorptive and anabolic drugs in combined therapy. In the system, an antiresorptive drug will be linked with a peptide of the eight repeating sequences of aspartate--(Asp)8 that can preferentially guide the drugs to bone resorption zone; while an anabolic drug linked with a peptide of six repeats of the sequence aspartate, serine, serine--(Asp-Ser-Ser)6 that can favorably guide the drugs to bone formation zone. The novel delivery system will improve the specific interaction between the drugs and their targeting cells. Furthermore, the system will reduce the non-specific interaction of the anabolic and antiresorptive drugs with their respective non-targeting cells, which will maximally reduce their side-effects. Therefore, we postulate that the new bone targeting

  16. Surface Modified Multifunctional and Stimuli Responsive Nanoparticles for Drug Targeting: Current Status and Uses.

    PubMed

    Siafaka, Panoraia I; Üstündağ Okur, Neslihan; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers, due to their unique features, are of increased interest among