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Sample records for drug users treated

  1. [Integral healthcare model for treating problems caused by alcohol and other drugs: perceptions of users, their companions and practitioners].

    PubMed

    Moraes, Maristela

    2008-01-01

    Based on an integral healthcare model for the users of alcohol and other drugs, the expansion of Brazil's Psycho-Social Care Centers - Alcohol and Drugs (CAPS-AD) is guided by the acknowledgement of users as citizens rather than patients, aiming at social reinsertion through an intersectoral approach and damage control, as well as other principles designed to build up integral healthcare services that are fair and egalitarian. This paper examines alcohol and drug users, their companions and healthcare practitioners in terms of the existing healthcare model, through a study conducted at two Psycho-Social Care Centers - Alcohol and Drugs in Recife, Pernambuco State. Focus groups, participative observation and documentary surveys were used to analyze the daily work routines at these Centers, exploring player perceptions and therapeutic projects. The findings indicate that users are still perceived as being ill, with medicalization and other traces of care models not used since the Psychiatric Reform. Social reinsertion was perceived as the main obstacle in integral healthcare. Restructuring this practice seems necessary, in order to break away from a culture of prejudice, exclusion and illness, as well as control models based on hospital-centric psychiatry.

  2. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  3. The Exploitation of Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Shirley; Montagne, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drug users have been exploited in research studies and clinical practice. We explore ways in which exploitation has occurred and strategies to help patients, research subjects and communities to prevent or avoid exploitation.

  4. Patterns of drug use among a sample of drug users and injecting drug users attending a General Practice in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Day, Carolyn; Nassirimanesh, Bijan; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Dolan, Kate

    2006-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to examine drug use, drug treatment history and risk behaviour among a sample of Iranian drug users seeking treatment through a general practice clinic in Iran. Methods Review of medical records and an intake questionnaire at a large general practice in Marvdasht, Iran, with a special interest in drug dependence treatment. Records from a random sample of injecting drug users (IDU), non-injecting drug users (DU) and non-drug using patients were examined. Results 292 records were reviewed (34% IDU, 31% DU and 35% non-drug users). Eighty-three percent were males; all females were non-drug users. The mean age of the sample was 30 years. Of the IDU sample, 67% reported sharing a needle or syringe, 19% of these had done so in prison. Of those who had ever used drugs, being 'tired' of drug use was the most common reason for seeking help (34%). Mean age of first drug use was 20 years. The first drugs most commonly used were opium (72%), heroin (13%) and hashish/ other cannabinoids (13%). Three quarters reported having previously attempted to cease their drug use. IDU were more likely than DU to report having ever been imprisoned (41% vs 7%) and 41% to have used drugs in prison. Conclusion This study has shown that there is a need for general practice clinics in Iran to treat drug users including those who inject and that a substantial proportion of those who inject have shared needles and syringes, placing them at risk of BBVI such as HIV and hepatitis C. The expansion of services for drug users in Iran such as needle and syringe programs and pharmacotherapies are likely to be effective in reducing the harms associated with opium use and heroin injection. PMID:16433914

  5. Main mental disorders in crack-cocaine users treated at Psychosocial Care Centers for Alcohol and Drugs in the city of Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio Gomes de; Silva, Diego César Nunes da; Figueiroa, Magda da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Brazil's Northeast region has the highest crack-cocaine consumption in the country. Crack-cocaine has more intense effects than cocaine powder and can cause greater chemical dependence. Psychosocial Care Centers for Alcohol and Drugs (CAPSad) are public health services that provide treatment for drug dependence. It is common for drug users, and particularly crack-cocaine users, to develop mental disorders. Objective: To evaluate the most common mental disorders in crack-cocaine dependents in treatment at CAPSad in the city of Recife, Brazil. The research database "Between rocks and shots: user profiles, consumption strategies, and social impact of crack cocaine" (CEP/CCS/UFPE no. 206/11) was consulted to establish the areas of crack cocaine consumption in the city of Recife. There were 885 patients in treatment for crack-cocaine use, with a mean age of 29.8±9.4 years. The mean duration of drug use was 6.1±4.6 years. Most of the patients were males (80.3%), had left school at some point between the 1st and 9th grades (45.6%), were unemployed and/or seeking employment (52%) and used drugs daily (56.4%). Cocaine chemical dependence was more significant when correlated with use of crack-cocaine and other drugs such as medications and hallucinogens (p = 0.01). Data from this study showed strong associations between crack-cocaine uses and development of mental disorders, particularly when abuse of multiple substances occurs. Based on these data, there is a clear need for coordination of related public policies for support and social reintegration to provide these people with comprehensive care.

  6. Prevention and Treatment of Hepatitis C in Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Edlin, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Injection drug users constitute the largest group of persons infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States, and most new infections occur in drug users. Controlling hepatitis C in the U.S. population, therefore, will require developing, testing, and implementing effective prevention and treatment strategies for persons who inject drugs. Fortunately, a substantial body of research and clinical experience exists on the prevention and management of chronic viral diseases among injection drug users. The need to implement interventions to stop the spread of HCV among drug users is critical. The capacity of substance-use treatment programs need to be expanded to accommodate all who want and need treatment. Physicians and pharmacists should be educated in how to provide access to sterile syringes and to teach safe injection techniques, both of which are lifesaving interventions. The treatment of hepatitis C in drug users requires an interdisciplinary approach that brings together expertise in treating hepatitis and caring for drug users. Treatment decisions should be made individually by patients with their physicians, based on a balanced assessment of risks and benefits and the patient's personal values. Physicians should carefully assess, monitor, and support adherence and mental health in all patients, regardless of whether drug use is known or suspected. Research is needed to better understand how best to prevent and treat hepatitis C in substance users. In the meantime, substantial progress can be made if existing knowledge and resources are brought to bear. PMID:12407596

  7. Prevention and treatment of hepatitis C in injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Edlin, Brian R

    2002-11-01

    Injection drug users constitute the largest group of persons infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States, and most new infections occur in drug users. Controlling hepatitis C in the U.S. population, therefore, will require developing, testing, and implementing effective prevention and treatment strategies for persons who inject drugs. Fortunately, a substantial body of research and clinical experience exists on the prevention and management of chronic viral diseases among injection drug users. The need to implement interventions to stop the spread of HCV among drug users is critical. The capacity of substance-use treatment programs need to be expanded to accommodate all who want and need treatment. Physicians and pharmacists should be educated in how to provide access to sterile syringes and to teach safe injection techniques, both of which are lifesaving interventions. The treatment of hepatitis C in drug users requires an interdisciplinary approach that brings together expertise in treating hepatitis and caring for drug users. Treatment decisions should be made individually by patients with their physicians, based on a balanced assessment of risks and benefits and the patient's personal values. Physicians should carefully assess, monitor, and support adherence and mental health in all patients, regardless of whether drug use is known or suspected. Research is needed to better understand how best to prevent and treat hepatitis C in substance users. In the meantime, substantial progress can be made if existing knowledge and resources are brought to bear.

  8. Drugs for treating giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Zaat, J O; Mank, T h; Assendelft, W J

    2000-01-01

    There can be a high rate of recurrence of disease after initial drug treatment for giardiasis. These drugs also have a range of adverse effects. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of drug treatments for giardiasis. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline and Embase, Current Contents, reference lists of articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of drug therapy for giardiasis compared with placebo or another drug. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Thirty-four trials were included. Only one trial was without serious methodological flaws. Compared with placebo, drug treatment was associated with an improved cure rate (odds ratio 11.5, 95% confidence interval 2.3 to 58). Metronidazole treatment longer than three days had a better parasitological cure rate than other long treatment courses (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 4.4), but there was significant heterogeneity between the trials. Single dose therapy appeared equally effective as longer treatment courses (odds ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval 0.08 to 1.34). Within the single dose regimens, tinidazole had a comparable parasitological cure rate to other short therapies (odds ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 12), but had a higher clinical cure rate (odds ratio 5.3, 95% 2.7-10.7). A single dose of tinidazole appears to give the highest clinical cure rate for giardiasis with relatively few adverse effects.

  9. Proteus endocarditis in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rohan; Sekar, Baskar; Payne, Mark N

    2015-11-26

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening condition with adverse consequences and increased mortality, despite improvements in treatment options. Diagnosed patients usually require a prolonged course of antibiotics, with up to 40-50% requiring surgery during initial hospital admission. We report a case of a 42-year-old intravenous drug user who presented feeling generally unwell, with lethargy, rigours, confusion and a painful swollen right leg. He was subsequently diagnosed with Proteus mirabilis endocarditis (fulfilling modified Duke criteria for possible IE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). He was successfully treated with single antibiotic therapy without needing surgical intervention or requiring anticoagulation for his DVT. Proteus endocarditis is extremely uncommon, with a limited number of case reports available in the literature. This case illustrates how blood cultures are invaluable in the diagnosis of IE, especially that due to unusual microorganisms. Our case also highlights how single antibiotic therapy can be effective in treating Proteus endocarditis.

  10. Coping with Loneliness: Young Adult Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami; Orzeck, Tricia

    Since there appears to be a connection between substance use (and abuse) and loneliness it is of theoretical and clinical interest to explore the differences of coping with loneliness which drug users employ. The present study examined the manner in which MDMA (Ecstasy) users in comparison with non-MDMA (Non-Ecstasy) users and the general…

  11. Attitudes Toward Illegal Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaple, James

    As concern over illegal drugs and drug-related behavior is a relatively recent phenomenon, there are little data available on the correlates and/or determinants of drug-related attitude-behaviors. The research done generates confused and often conflicting results, largely due to failure to specify level of attitude-behavior measured. This project…

  12. Infective endocarditis in the injection drug user.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patricia D; Levine, Donald P

    2002-09-01

    Although infective endocarditis is certainly not the most common infection seen in injecting drug users, it is the infection that clinicians most commonly think of when they consider infectious complications of injected drug use. The microbiology of infective endocarditis in injection drug users has remained relatively stable over the last several decades. Tricuspid valve endocarditis has been associated most frequently with injection drug use, but recent reports have suggested that involvement of left-sided valves is seen more often now than in the past. The use of transesophageal echocardiography has greatly advanced the ability to diagnose infective endocarditis and the cardiac complications of valvular infection.

  13. Clostridium novyi infection: a fatal association with injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J M; Paul, J; Curtis, S; Patel, N K

    2001-03-01

    Injecting drug users frequently use accident and emergency (A&E) departments to access emergency care for local and systemic infections. Clostridium novyi type A is a bacterium that has recently been associated with a number of fatalities among drug injecting addicts. The clinical course is described of a patient who attended an A&E department with septicaemia who was found at postmortem examination to have been infected with Clostridium novyi type A. Doctors working in A&E departments should be aware of the existence of this infection and be vigilant when treating injecting drug users with localised infection.

  14. Resilient Children of Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilowsky, Daniel J.; Zybert, Patricia A.; Vlahov, David

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations between resilience in children of injection drug users and children's coping strategies, parenting stress, and children's social support. Method: Injection drug-using parents (n = 91) and their children aged 6 to 11 (n = 117) were recruited in Baltimore (1997-1999). Resilience was defined as scoring in the lowest…

  15. Marathon Group Therapy with Former Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Mannion, John

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the effects of marathon group therapy on attitudes of former drug users in a residential drug treatment center. Experimental group members responded higher on the group counseling evaluative subscale and lower on the guilt evaluative subscale than control members. (Author)

  16. Marathon Group Therapy with Former Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Mannion, John

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the effects of marathon group therapy on attitudes of former drug users in a residential drug treatment center. Experimental group members responded higher on the group counseling evaluative subscale and lower on the guilt evaluative subscale than control members. (Author)

  17. Resilient Children of Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilowsky, Daniel J.; Zybert, Patricia A.; Vlahov, David

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations between resilience in children of injection drug users and children's coping strategies, parenting stress, and children's social support. Method: Injection drug-using parents (n = 91) and their children aged 6 to 11 (n = 117) were recruited in Baltimore (1997-1999). Resilience was defined as scoring in the lowest…

  18. The Parents Of Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Phylis M.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Students' perceptions of their parents were explored as possible correlates of extensive drug usage. Father's coldness, but not mother's, was found related to usage. Perceived parental permissiveness was not found related, but alienation from parental values and life style was correlated with usage. Implications for counseling are suggested.…

  19. A survey of attitudes among drug user treatment providers toward the treatment of inhalant users.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Frederick; Jumper-Thurman, Pamela; Plested, Barbara; Helm, Heather

    2002-09-01

    This study assessed the attitudes of drug user treatment program directors towards the problem of inhalant "abuse." In 2000, surveys were mailed to directors asking about treatment success and prognosis for inhalant users, level of neurological damage incurred by users, availability of treatment resources, their program's policies toward admission of users, and staff training needs for inhalant use. Two open-ended questions queried their assessment of barriers to treatment and subjective feelings about the topic of inhalant use. Five hundred and fifty responses were received. Findings show that program directors perceive a great deal of neurological damage incurred through inhalant use and have a general pessimism about treatment effectiveness and recovery. The respondents also felt that there were insufficient resources for inhalant user treatment and that special staff training in the area was needed. The majority of the directors indicated that they have or would treat inhalant users. Implications for future research and policy change are discussed.

  20. Profiles of club drug users in treatment.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Spence, Richard T

    2005-01-01

    There is little in the literature about treatment of persons with problems with "club" or "party" drugs. This paper looks at the characteristics of individuals admitted to treatment for primary, secondary, or tertiary problems with club drugs such as ecstasy, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), ketamine, flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), methamphetamine, and hallucinogens (e.g., LSD) in programs funded by the Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse. Some 38,350 unduplicated records from 1988 through 2003 of persons admitted with problems with club drugs were compared against users of alcohol or other drugs. Club drug users were more impaired on five of six Addiction Severity Index (ASI) indices at admission and they were more likely to use multiple substances more often. They were more likely than users of alcohol or other drugs to complete treatment, but this varied by drug. At follow-up 90 days after discharge, club drug users continued to report more ASI problems. Profiles of these clients show that ecstasy use has spread beyond the club culture, as indicated by the changes in client demographics over time. GHB clients presented a mixed picture of severe problems at admission and good response to treatment. Hallucinogen clients were young and less likely to complete treatment, while Rohypnol users were on the Texas-Mexico border. The methamphetamine epidemic has resulted in increased admissions, and the proportion of "Ice" smokers has increased. However, methamphetamine clients were less likely to complete treatment and their higher level of problems at admission and follow-up are of concern. Of special note are the indications of co-occurring problems and the need for both mental health and substance dependence treatment for some clients.

  1. [Users sceptical about generic drugs: an anthropological approach].

    PubMed

    Sarradon-Eck, A; Blanc, M-A; Faure, M

    2007-06-01

    Since the enactment of the 2002 legislative measures favoring the prescription of generic drugs, various quantitative studies have shown that approval by prescribers and users has risen in France. Nevertheless, scepticism remains as well as distrust towards these drugs focusing on their effectiveness compared with brand-name drugs, on potential dangers, and on the interruption they cause in prescription and consumption habits. Using a comprehensive approach, this article analyzes the social and cultural logic behind the negative image of generic drugs. The materials issued from an ethnographic study on the prescription of drugs for high blood pressure. Sixty-eight interviews were undertaken between April 2002 and October 2004 with people (39 women and 29 men, between the age of 40 and 95, 52 over the age of 60) treated for over a year for high blood pressure in rural areas in the Southeast of France. Thirteen people provided unsolicited opinions about generic drugs. Analysis of the information collected shows that users have various representations of generic drugs, including the idea of counterfeited and foreign drugs. These representations interfere with the adjustment process and the development of consumer loyalty. They are part of a set of social representations about drugs which form and express the user's reality. In these representations, the drug is an ambivalent object, carrier of both biological effectiveness and toxicity; it is also the metonymical extension of the prescriber, bestowing upon the prescription a symbolic value. By placing the generic drug in its network of symbolic and social meaning, this study highlights the coherence of the scepticism towards generic drugs by consumers (and prescribers) with a system of common opinion in which drugs are everyday things, personalized and compatible with users, symbolic exchange carriers in the physician-patient relationship, and in which confidence in the drug is also that given to the health care

  2. 75 FR 12555 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... FDA to continue collecting user fees for the prescription drug program. The Federal Food, Drug, and...

  3. Patterns of prescription drug misuse among young injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Lankenau, Stephen E; Teti, Michelle; Silva, Karol; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Harocopos, Alex; Treese, Meghan

    2012-12-01

    Misuse of prescription drugs and injection drug use has increased among young adults in the USA. Despite these upward trends, few studies have examined prescription drug misuse among young injection drug users (IDUs). A qualitative study was undertaken to describe current patterns of prescription drug misuse among young IDUs. Young IDUs aged 16-25 years who had misused a prescription drug, e.g., opioids, tranquilizers, or stimulants, at least three times in the past 3 months were recruited in 2008 and 2009 in Los Angeles (n = 25) and New York (n = 25). Informed by an ethno-epidemiological approach, descriptive data from a semi-structured interview guide were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Most IDUs sampled were both homeless and transient. Heroin, prescription opioids, and prescription tranquilizers were frequently misused in the past 30 days. Qualitative results indicated that young IDUs used prescription opioids and tranquilizers: as substitutes for heroin when it was unavailable; to boost a heroin high; to self-medicate for health conditions, including untreated pain and heroin withdrawal; to curb heroin use; and to reduce risks associated with injecting heroin. Polydrug use involving heroin and prescription drugs resulted in an overdose in multiple cases. Findings point to contrasting availability of heroin in North American cities while indicating broad availability of prescription opioids among street-based drug users. The results highlight a variety of unmet service needs among this sample of young IDUs, such as overdose prevention, drug treatment programs, primary care clinics, and mental health services.

  4. Drugs for treating urinary schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christine V; Zhang, Fan; Sinclair, David; Olliaro, Piero L

    2014-01-01

    Background Urinary schistosomiasis is caused by an intravascular infection with parasitic Schistosoma haematobium worms. The adult worms typically migrate to the venous plexus of the human bladder and excrete eggs which the infected person passes in their urine. Chronic infection can cause substantial morbidity and long-term complications as the eggs become trapped in human tissues causing inflammation and fibrosis. We summarised evidence of drugs active against the infection. This is new edition of a review first published in 1997. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of drugs for treating urinary schistosomiasis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE and LILACS and reference lists of articles up to 23 May 2014. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antischistosomal drugs and drug combinations compared to placebo, no intervention, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two researchers independently screened the records, extracted the data and assessed risk of bias. The primary efficacy outcomes were parasitological failure (defined as the continued presence of S. haematobium eggs in the urine at time points greater than one month after treatment), and percent reduction of egg counts from baseline. We presented dichotomous data as risk ratios (RR), and continuous data as mean difference (MD), alongside their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate we combined trials in meta analyses or tables. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included 30 RCTs enrolling 8165 participants in this review. Twenty-four trials were conducted in children in sub-Saharan Africa, and 21 trials were over 20 years old. Many studies were assessed as being at unclear risk of bias due to inadequate descriptions of study methods. Praziquantel On average, a single 40 mg/kg dose of praziquantel reduced the proportion of people still

  5. AIDS education in drug user treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Passannante, M R; Wells, D V; Quinones, M A; Jackson, J F; Rotkiewicz, L G

    1991-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an AIDS educational intervention for intravenous drug users (IVDUs) who participated in the New Jersey State Department of Health's Coupon program. An examination of the data showed that those with high pre-intervention test scores were more likely to have been White and to have been in treatment since 1981. Furthermore, the 1-hour AIDS educational intervention produced significantly higher post-intervention test scores (overall and for 27 of the 31 individual test items). Finally, none of the demographic and drug history variables used in this analysis were found to contribute significantly to the effectiveness of the educational session.

  6. Medical and nonmedical users of prescription drugs among college students.

    PubMed

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G

    2011-01-01

    To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response rate of 94%. Nonmedical users obtained prescription drugs from friends and took them with friends. More nonmedical users than medical users took combinations of drugs. Nonmedical users did not show strong preferences for particular drugs. Nonmedical users compared to medical users who took only 1 drug were more likely to take stimulants and less likely to take opioids. The nonmedical use of prescription drugs by college students is a social activity that involves sharing drugs and taking combinations of drugs with friends. Discouraging nonmedical use must focus on the dangers of combining drugs, sharing drugs, and using social gatherings to consume drugs.

  7. 76 FR 79198 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... (76 FR 76738). The document announced a public meeting entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee.'' The...

  8. Resilient children of injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Pilowsky, Daniel J; Zybert, Patricia A; Vlahov, David

    2004-11-01

    To examine associations between resilience in children of injection drug users and children's coping strategies, parenting stress, and children's social support. Injection drug-using parents (n=91) and their children aged 6 to 11 (n=117) were recruited in Baltimore (1997-1999). Resilience was defined as scoring in the lowest quartile of the Child Behavior Checklist total psychopathology score. Coping strategies used by resilient and nonresilient children, the extent and types of social support that they received, and the level of parenting stress reported by their parents were compared and contrasted. Rates of depressive, anxiety, and disruptive behavior disorders were 15.4%, 22.2%, and 21.4%, respectively, for the entire sample. Compared with the nonresilient, resilient children were less likely to use two avoidance coping strategies (internalizing [p=.002] and externalizing [p=.017]). The level of actual support received by resilient and nonresilient children did not differ significantly (p=.202). Perceived support was greater among resilient children (as reported by their parents; p <.001), and their parents reported lower parenting stress (p=.042). A significant proportion of children of injection drug users are in need of clinical care. Interventions to help children of substance-abusing parents modify their coping style merit exploration.

  9. Patterns of lifetime drug use among intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Dinwiddie, S H; Reich, T; Cloninger, C R

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a clearer description of the natural history of intravenous drug use (IVDU), 92 intravenous drug users (IVDUs), not selected through treatment or contact with the legal system, were identified. Concerning lifetime use, central nervous system (CNS) stimulants were the most common class of drug to be injected (by 72.8% of IVDUs), followed by opiates (by 50.0% of IVDUs). Mean age of onset of IVDU in this sample was 18.5 years, following initiation of alcohol use by an average of 4.6 years and cannabis use by an average of 2.1 years. Any history of IVDU in this sample indicated substantial lifetime use of illicit drugs and early onset of psychoactive substance use.

  10. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    PubMed Central

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. Objectives To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Selection criteria Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43

  11. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera.

    PubMed

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-06-19

    Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43.51 to -30.03, 19 trials, 1013 participants, moderate quality evidence). Antimicrobial therapy also

  12. Addressing the clinical needs of problem drug user patients

    PubMed Central

    Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I.; Graves, Meredith C.; Atkins, David C.; Maynard, Charles; Bumgardner, Kristin; Donovan, Dennis; Ries, Richard; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Illicit drug use is a serious public health problem associated with significant co-occurring medical disorders, mental disorders, and social problems. Yet most individuals with drug use disorders have never been treated, though they often seek medical treatment in primary care. The purpose of the present study was to examine baseline characteristics of persons presenting in primary care across a range of problem drug use severity to identify their clinical needs. Methods We examined socio-demographic characteristics, medical and psychiatric comorbidities, drug use severity, social and legal problems, and service utilization for 868 patients with drug problems recruited from primary care clinics in a safety-net medical setting. Based on Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) results, individuals were categorized as having low, intermediate, or substantial/severe drug use severity. Results Patients with substantial/severe drug use severity had serious drug use (opiates, stimulants, sedatives, intravenous drug use), high levels of homelessness (50%), psychiatric comorbidity (69%), arrests for serious crimes (24%), and frequent use of expensive emergency department and inpatient hospitals. Patients with low drug use severity were primarily users of marijuana with little reported use of other drugs, less psychiatric co-morbidity, and more stable lifestyles. Patients with intermediate drug use severity fell in-between the substantial/severe and low drug use severity subgroups on most variables. Conclusions Patients with highest drug use severity are likely to require specialized psychiatric and substance abuse care in addition to ongoing medical care that is equipped to address the consequences of severe/substantial drug use including intravenous drug use. Because of their milder symptoms, patients with low drug use severity may benefit from a collaborative care model that integrates psychiatric and substance abuse care in the primary care setting. Patients

  13. Are users' most recent drug purchases representative?

    PubMed

    Bond, Brittany; Caulkins, Jonathan P; Scott, Nick; Kilmer, Beau; Dietze, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Various surveys now ask respondents to describe their most recent purchase of illicit drugs, as one mechanism through which market size can be estimated. This raises the question of whether issues surrounding the timing of survey administration might make a sample of most recent purchases differ from a random sample of all purchases. We investigate these issues through a series of questions which ask about the three most recent purchases, and about drug use. Data were drawn from 688 respondents in the Melbourne Injecting Drug User Cohort Study across the period 2008-2013 and 2782 respondents to the Washington Cannabis Consumption Study in 2013. Responses to questions about the most recent purchases were compared to larger subsets of all recent purchases. For heroin, methamphetamine and cannabis no differences were found between the amount spent by participants on their most recent purchase and the average amount spent on three or more recent purchases. There were also no differences concerning the locations and types of deals, and the duration between consecutive cannabis purchases was the same for first and second most recent, and second and third most recent. Asking about the most recent purchase appears to be an economical way to learn about purchases more generally, with little evidence of substantial variation between the most recent purchase and other recent purchases reported by participants. In spite of consistent findings across our two surveys, further replication of the work reported in this paper involving other populations of users is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. WITHDRAWN: Drugs for treating giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Zaat, J O M; Mank, T H G; Assendelft, W J J

    2007-07-18

    There can be a high rate of recurrence of disease after initial drug treatment for giardiasis. These drugs also have a range of adverse effects. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of drug treatments for giardiasis. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, and reference lists of articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of drug therapy for giardiasis compared with placebo or another drug. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Thirty-four trials were included. Only one trial was without serious methodological flaws. Compared with placebo, drug treatment was associated with an improved cure rate (odds ratio 11.51, 95% confidence interval 2.29 to 57.98). Metronidazole treatment longer than three days had a better parasitological cure rate than other long treatment courses (odds ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.31 to 4.44), but there was significant heterogeneity between the trials. Available evidence has not detected a difference in cure between single dose therapy and longer treatment courses (odds ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval 0.08 to 1.34). Within the single dose regimens, the available evidence did not demonstrate a difference in parasitological cure rate between tinidazole and other short therapies (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 12.04), but had a higher clinical cure rate (odds ratio 5.33, 95% 2.66 to 10.67). A single dose of tinidazole appears to give the highest clinical cure rate for giardiasis with relatively few adverse effects.

  15. An unusual infection in an injecting drug user.

    PubMed

    Gillis, K; Seenan, J P; Cahill, A; Tyers, A; Khanna, N; Edwards, G F S; Diggle, M A

    2011-02-01

    Injecting drug users are prone to atypical infections. We present a case of septic thrombophlebitis secondary to Fusobacterium gonidiaformans infection in a heroin user, which demonstrates the frequently unusual nature of pathogens and presentations in this group of patients.

  16. Rural drug users: factors associated with substance abuse treatment utilization.

    PubMed

    Oser, Carrie B; Leukefeld, Carl G; Tindall, Michele Staton; Garrity, Thomas F; Carlson, Robert G; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a modified version of Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to identify the correlates of the number of substance abuse treatment episodes received by rural drug users. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with 711 drug users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Descriptive analyses examine rural drug users' substance use histories and retrospective substance abuse treatment service utilization patterns. A negative binomial regression model indicated that selected predisposing, historical health, and enabling factors were significantly associated with the utilization of substance abuse treatment among rural drug users. Despite high levels of recent and lifetime self-reported substance use among these rural drug users, treatment services were underutilized. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the health care system and characteristics of the external environment associated with rural substance abuse treatment in order to increase utilization among drug users.

  17. Adverse effects of stimulant drugs in a community sample of drug users.

    PubMed

    Williamson, S; Gossop, M; Powis, B; Griffiths, P; Fountain, J; Strang, J

    1997-03-14

    A sample of drug users (n = 158) were contacted and interviewed in non-clinical community settings about their use of Ecstasy, cocaine powder, and amphetamines and the adverse effects of these drugs. Subjects reported a wide range of adverse effects including anxiety problems, depression, mood swings, feelings of paranoia, and panic attacks. Sleep and appetite disturbances were the most commonly reported problems. About half of all subjects reported depression and paranoid feelings associated with their stimulant use. Many of those reporting problems stated that these were mild. However, for all drugs, a substantial minority of users reported adverse effects which they rated as 'severe'. Between 30 and 55% of the sample reported having had at least one 'severe' adverse effect (30% cocaine, 35% Ecstasy and 55% amphetamine). There were clear differences between the different drugs in the likelihood and reported severity of adverse effects. Amphetamine use was associated with significantly more adverse effects and with more severe adverse effects than Ecstasy or cocaine. Cocaine powder was associated with the least severe adverse effects. A common pattern of drug use involved the use of depressant drugs such as opiates and benzodiazepines in addition to stimulants. The stimulant and depressant users were more likely than the stimulants-only users to use stimulants by injection and more likely to report adverse effects associated with stimulant use. The stimulant and depressant users were also more likely to have been treated for a drug problem. Approximately a quarter of the sample stated that they had stopped using stimulants up to the point of interview as a result of their bad experiences.

  18. How do drug users define their progress in harm reduction programs? Qualitative research to develop user-generated outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ruefli, Terry; Rogers, Susan J

    2004-01-01

    Background Harm reduction is a relatively new and controversial model for treating drug users, with little formal research on its operation and effectiveness. In order to advance the study of harm reduction programs and our understanding of how drug users define their progress, qualitative research was conducted to develop outcomes of harm reduction programming that are culturally relevant, incremental, (i.e., capable of measuring change), and hierarchical (i.e., capable of showing how clients improve over time). Methods The study used nominal group technique (NGT) to develop the outcomes (phase 1) and focus group interviews to help validate the findings (phase 2). Study participants were recruited from a large harm-reduction program in New York City and involved approximately 120 clients in 10 groups in phase 1 and 120 clients in 10 focus groups in phase 2. Results Outcomes of 10 life areas important to drug users were developed that included between 10 to 15 incremental measures per outcome. The outcomes included ways of 1) making money; 2) getting something good to eat; 3) being housed/homeless; 4) relating to families; 5) getting needed programs/benefits/services; 6) handling health problems; 7) handling negative emotions; 8) handling legal problems; 9) improving oneself; and 10) handling drug-use problems. Findings also provided insights into drug users' lives and values, as well as a window into understanding how this population envisions a better quality of life. Results challenged traditional ways of measuring drug users based solely on quantity used and frequency of use. They suggest that more appropriate measures are based on the extent to which drug users organize their lives around drug use and how much drug use is integrated into their lives and negatively impacts other aspects of their lives. Conclusions Harm reduction and other programs serving active drug users and other marginalized people should not rely on institutionalized, provider

  19. Substance use pathways to methamphetamine use among treated users.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Greenwell, Lisa; Anglin, M Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has focused on patterns of substance use initiation among adolescents and for users of selected drugs; however, few data are available for methamphetamine (MA) users. This study describes substance initiation patterns for 352 MA users and assesses predictors of age of MA initiation and its sequencing. Subjects were randomly selected from treatment admissions in a large California county and interviewed using an extensive natural history protocol. Average age of MA initiation was 19 years. Nearly all (95%) had used alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco (average initiation age 13); inhalants, hallucinogens, and crack were also commonly used earlier in the drug sequence than MA. Earlier age of MA initiation was related to race/ethnicity (being non-African-American), younger age of first use of any substance, more types of early criminal behavior, and initiating MA use for sensation-seeking reasons. Following initiation of alcohol, marijuana, and/or tobacco, 27% initiated MA before other illicit drugs, 18% initiated another illicit drug before MA, and 56% initiated two or more other illicit drugs before MA. Later MA order in the initiation sequence was related to ethnicity (being African-American) and initiating MA to substitute for another drug. Results may support targeted prevention efforts and development of more effective interventions.

  20. Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Active-Duty Service Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-04

    to capture missing populations, as has been done for heavy drug users in the past. However, like that of all epidemiological models of health ...Initiation rate of light drug use 0.36 0.10 1.61 Estimated (National Survey on Drug Use and Health ) π M Recovery rate of treated medical user 0.47...Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality , Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health : Summary of National Findings

  1. Ibogaine for treating drug dependence. What is a safe dose?

    PubMed

    Schep, L J; Slaughter, R J; Galea, S; Newcombe, D

    2016-09-01

    The indole alkaloid ibogaine, present in the root bark of the West African rain forest shrub Tabernanthe iboga, has been adopted in the West as a treatment for drug dependence. Treatment of patients requires large doses of the alkaloid to cause hallucinations, an alleged integral part of the patient's treatment regime. However, case reports and case series continue to describe evidences of ataxia, gastrointestinal distress, ventricular arrhythmias and sudden and unexplained deaths of patients undergoing treatment for drug dependence. High doses of ibogaine act on several classes of neurological receptors and transporters to achieve pharmacological responses associated with drug aversion; limited toxicology research suggests that intraperitoneal doses used to successfully treat rodents, for example, have also been shown to cause neuronal injury (purkinje cells) in the rat cerebellum. Limited research suggests lethality in rodents by the oral route can be achieved at approximately 263mg/kg body weight. To consider an appropriate and safe initial dose for humans, necessary safety factors need to be applied to the animal data; these would include factors such as intra- and inter-species variability and for susceptible people in a population (such as drug users). A calculated initial dose to treat patients could be approximated at 0.87mg/kg body weight, substantially lower than those presently being administered to treat drug users. Morbidities and mortalities will continue to occur unless practitioners reconsider doses being administered to their susceptible patients.

  2. 76 FR 56201 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting to discuss proposed...

  3. 76 FR 76738 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-31630] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0381] Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  4. Family Factors in the Lives of Drug Users and Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurich, Anthony; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reviewed literature which suggested nine family factors that influence children's drug use. Conducted one-on-one interviews with 48 students to compare family factors of drug users with those of drug abusers. Results showed drug abusers were from families that had a communication gap and either laissez faire or authoritarian discipline. (BH)

  5. An Approach for Casual Drug Users. Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Erwin S., Ed.

    This publication was written to respond to the fact that many drug treatment centers receive inappropriate referrals of casual or recreational marihuana users from the courts for "treatment" as an alternative to jail. A drug abuse task force recommended that agencies give priority to abusers of the high-risk categories and to compulsive users of…

  6. An Approach for Casual Drug Users. Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Erwin S., Ed.

    This publication was written to respond to the fact that many drug treatment centers receive inappropriate referrals of casual or recreational marihuana users from the courts for "treatment" as an alternative to jail. A drug abuse task force recommended that agencies give priority to abusers of the high-risk categories and to compulsive users of…

  7. Marathon Group Counseling with Illicit Drug Users: Analysis of Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Wills, Judy

    1983-01-01

    Summarized a 16-hour marathon group for illicit drug users (N=12) in residential treatment. Content analysis showed the group spent more time on interpersonal relationships and relatively little time on group process. Drug users were able to successfully participate in therapeutic group discussions involving self-investment. (JAC)

  8. Marathon Group Counseling with Illicit Drug Users: Analysis of Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Wills, Judy

    1983-01-01

    Summarized a 16-hour marathon group for illicit drug users (N=12) in residential treatment. Content analysis showed the group spent more time on interpersonal relationships and relatively little time on group process. Drug users were able to successfully participate in therapeutic group discussions involving self-investment. (JAC)

  9. Clostridium novyi causing necrotising fasciitis in an injecting drug user

    PubMed Central

    Noone, M; Tabaqchali, M; Spillane, J B

    2002-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis with pronounced local oedema is described in an injecting drug user. Clostridium novyi was an unexpected single pathogen isolated from infected tissue. The patient was among a cluster of cases, all injecting drug users, presenting with toxaemia and soft tissue infection. The causal role and pathogenicity of C novyi is discussed. PMID:11865011

  10. Clostridium novyi causing necrotising fasciitis in an injecting drug user.

    PubMed

    Noone, M; Tabaqchali, M; Spillane, J B

    2002-02-01

    Necrotising fasciitis with pronounced local oedema is described in an injecting drug user. Clostridium novyi was an unexpected single pathogen isolated from infected tissue. The patient was among a cluster of cases, all injecting drug users, presenting with toxaemia and soft tissue infection. The causal role and pathogenicity of C novyi is discussed.

  11. Do drug users in China who frequently receive detoxification treatment change their risky drug use practices and sexual behavior?

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjie; Grusky, Oscar; Zhu, Yibin; Li, Xiaojing

    2006-09-01

    Relapse rates among treated drug users in China are high. We examined the associations between frequency of drug detoxification treatment and HIV-related risky drug practices and sexual behavior. A cross-sectional study was conducted among drug users in two Anhui province detoxification centers in 2003. A total of 312 drug users were recruited. Seventy-seven percent of the subjects had ever received two or more detoxification treatments. The median number of detoxification treatments received was three, with an interquartile range of two to five treatments. More than 7 in 10 (72%) ever injected drugs; 19% shared needles and syringes in the past 30 days; 40% of drug users reported having both regular and commercial sex partners in the past year and 48% reported having only regular sex partners. Multiple Poisson regression analysis documented that the frequency of detoxification treatment was not associated with a decrease in drug practice (injection or sharing needles) and in unprotected sex. Drug users who frequently received detoxification treatment did not change their risky drug use practices and sexual behavior. Effective behavioral interventions and substitution maintenance treatment should become an integral part of detoxification programs in China.

  12. Perceptions of drug users regarding Hepatitis C screening and care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Illicit drug users have a high prevalence of HCV and represent the majority of newly infected persons in the U.S. Despite the availability of effective HCV treatment, few drug users have been evaluated or treated for HCV. Racial and ethnic minorities have a higher incidence and prevalence of HCV and higher HCV-related mortality. Factors contributing to poor engagement in care are incompletely understood. Methods Fourteen mixed-gender focus groups of either African American or Latino/a drug users (N = 95) discussed barriers to HCV testing and treatment. Themes were identified through content analysis of focus group discussions. Results Many drug users were tested for HCV in settings where they were receiving care. Outside of these settings, most were unaware of voluntary test sites. After testing HCV positive, drug users reported not receiving clear messages regarding the meaning of a positive HCV test, the impact of HCV infection, or appropriate next steps including HCV clinical evaluations. Many drug users perceived treatment as unimportant because they lacked symptoms, healthcare providers minimized the severity of the diagnosis, or providers did not recommend treatment. Mistrust of the motivations of healthcare providers was cited as a barrier to pursuing treatment. Social networks or social interactions were a source of HCV-related information and were influential in shaping drug users perceptions of treatment and its utility. Conclusion Drug users perceived a paucity of settings for self-initiated HCV testing and poor provider-patient communication at test sites and during medical encounters. Notably, drug users reported having an unclear understanding about the meaning of a positive HCV test, the health implications of HCV infection, the importance of clinical evaluations and monitoring, and of treatment options for HCV. Efforts to improve the delivery of clinical messages about HCV infection for drug users at test settings and clinical encounters

  13. Descending polyneuropathy in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Jean M; McMahon, Geraldine

    2005-10-01

    A 27-year-old male intravenous drug user presented to the Emergency Department of St James's Hospital with a 1-week history of progressive dysphasia, dysphagia and difficulty 'holding his head up' and 'keeping his eyes open'. He also complained of increasing weakness in his upper limbs, as a result of which he kept dropping things. He was on a methadone program but was using both intravenous heroin and cocaine at the time of presentation. Examination of his motor function revealed generalized hypotonia, hyporeflexia and reduced power in both upper limbs. No sensory loss was observed. Co-ordination was intact. The clinical picture of a proximal symmetrical descending weakness and an absence of sensory loss was suggestive of botulism. Clostridium botulinum is a spore-forming, obligate anaerobe. The three forms of human botulism are food-borne, wound and intestinal. A fourth man-made form is produced from aerosolized botulinum toxin and results in inhalational botulism. A little as 1 g of aerosolized botulinum toxin has the potential to kill 1.5 million people. Toxin is detected in serum or stool specimens in only approximately 46% of clinically diagnosed cases. Treatment involves supportive care and early passive immunization with equine antitoxin. Patients should be regularly assessed for loss of gag and cough reflex, control of oropharyngeal secretions, oxygen saturation, vital capacity and inspiratory force. When respiratory function begins to deteriorate, anticipatory intubation is indicated. Early symptom recognition and early treatment with antitoxin are essential in order to prevent mortality, and to prevent additional cases, it is important to ascertain the presence of similar symptoms in contacts of the patient and local public health officials must be notified as one case may herald an outbreak. Given the continued threat of bioterrorism, the Centre for Disease Control Surveillance System in the United States must also be notified of any cases of botulism.

  14. Drug users in Hanoi, Vietnam: factors associated with membership in community-based drug user groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A syndemic conjoins injection drug use, incarceration, and HIV in Vietnam, where there is a need for programs that empower people who use drugs to minimize the harms thereby produced. Here we present a post-hoc evaluation of the organizing efforts of the Centre for Supporting Community Development Initiatives (SCDI) with two community-based drug user groups (CBGs) in Hanoi. Methods Members (n = 188) of the CBGs were compared to non-member peers (n = 184) on demographic, psychosocial, behavioral and knowledge variables using a face-to-face structured interview that focused on issues of quality of life and harm reduction. Bivariate analyses were conducted, and variables significantly associated with membership at p < 0.10 were included in a multivariate model. Results Variables associated with membership in the CBGs in the multivariate model included increased self-efficacy to get drug-related health care (OR 1.59, 1.24-2.04), increased quality of life in the psychological (OR 2.04, 1.07-3.93) and environmental (OR 2.54, 1.31-4.93) domains, and greater history of interactions with police about drugs (OR 3.15, 1.79-5.52). There was little difference between members and non-members on injection-related harms except in the domain of knowledge about opioid overdose. Among the 114 current injectors (30.6% of the sample), low rates of unsafe injection practices were reported, and low statistical power limited the ability to conclusively assess association with membership. Conclusions Although the CBG members displayed higher levels of well-being and access to healthcare than non-members, further longitudinal study is required to determine if these are a result of membership. The CBGs should pay more attention towards meeting challenges in responding to specific health issues of those who continue to use drugs including HIV, hepatitis, and drug overdose. PMID:24268108

  15. Drug users in Hanoi, Vietnam: factors associated with membership in community-based drug user groups.

    PubMed

    Hayes-Larson, Eleanor; Grau, Lauretta E; Khoshnood, Kaveh; Barbour, Russell; Khuat, Oanh Thi Hai; Heimer, Robert

    2013-11-22

    A syndemic conjoins injection drug use, incarceration, and HIV in Vietnam, where there is a need for programs that empower people who use drugs to minimize the harms thereby produced. Here we present a post-hoc evaluation of the organizing efforts of the Centre for Supporting Community Development Initiatives (SCDI) with two community-based drug user groups (CBGs) in Hanoi. Members (n = 188) of the CBGs were compared to non-member peers (n = 184) on demographic, psychosocial, behavioral and knowledge variables using a face-to-face structured interview that focused on issues of quality of life and harm reduction. Bivariate analyses were conducted, and variables significantly associated with membership at p < 0.10 were included in a multivariate model. Variables associated with membership in the CBGs in the multivariate model included increased self-efficacy to get drug-related health care (OR 1.59, 1.24-2.04), increased quality of life in the psychological (OR 2.04, 1.07-3.93) and environmental (OR 2.54, 1.31-4.93) domains, and greater history of interactions with police about drugs (OR 3.15, 1.79-5.52). There was little difference between members and non-members on injection-related harms except in the domain of knowledge about opioid overdose. Among the 114 current injectors (30.6% of the sample), low rates of unsafe injection practices were reported, and low statistical power limited the ability to conclusively assess association with membership. Although the CBG members displayed higher levels of well-being and access to healthcare than non-members, further longitudinal study is required to determine if these are a result of membership. The CBGs should pay more attention towards meeting challenges in responding to specific health issues of those who continue to use drugs including HIV, hepatitis, and drug overdose.

  16. Drug-Related HIV Risk Behaviors and Cocaine Preference among Injection Drug Users in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longshore, Douglas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared drug-related risk behavior of drug users whose preferred injection drug was cocaine and users with preference for heroin or no preference between the two drugs (total n=422). Found cocaine preference unrelated to likelihood of needle sharing overall, needle sharing with strangers, needle sharing at shooting galleries, and failure to use…

  17. Drug-Related HIV Risk Behaviors and Cocaine Preference among Injection Drug Users in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longshore, Douglas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared drug-related risk behavior of drug users whose preferred injection drug was cocaine and users with preference for heroin or no preference between the two drugs (total n=422). Found cocaine preference unrelated to likelihood of needle sharing overall, needle sharing with strangers, needle sharing at shooting galleries, and failure to use…

  18. Cognitive impairments in poly-drug ketamine users.

    PubMed

    Liang, H J; Lau, C G; Tang, A; Chan, F; Ungvari, G S; Tang, W K

    2013-11-01

    Cognitive impairment has been found to be reversible in people with substance abuse, particularly those using ketamine. Ketamine users are often poly-substance users. This study compared the cognitive functions of current and former ketamine users who were also abusing other psychoactive substances with those of non-users of illicit drugs as controls. One hundred ketamine poly-drug users and 100 controls were recruited. Drug users were divided into current (n = 32) and ex-users (n = 64) according to the duration of abstinence from ketamine (>30 days). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADSA) and the Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) were used to evaluate depression and anxiety symptoms and the severity of drug use, respectively. The cognitive test battery comprised verbal memory (Wechsler Memory Scale III: Logic Memory and Word List), visual memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, ROCF), executive function (Stroop, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Modified Verbal Fluency Test), working memory (Digit Span Backward), and general intelligence (Information, Arithmetic and Digit-Symbol Coding) tests. Current users had higher BDI and HADSA scores than ex-users (p < 0.001 for BDI and p = 0.022 for HADSA) and controls (p < 0.001 for BDI and p = 0.002 for HADSA). Ex-users had higher BDI (p = 0.006) but equal HADSA scores (p = 1.000) compared to controls. Both current and ex-users had lower scores on Logical Memory delayed recall (p = 0.038 for current users and p = 0.032 for ex-users) and ROCF delayed recall (p = 0.033 for current users and p = 0.014 for ex-users) than controls. Current users also performed worse on ROCF recognition than controls (p = 0.002). No difference was found between the cognitive functions of current and ex-users. Ketamine poly-drug users displayed predominantly verbal and visual memory impairments, which persisted in ex-users. The interactive effect of ketamine and poly-drug use on memory needs further

  19. The Impact of Trauma on Drug Users' Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etherington, Kim

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses drug users' identity construction, and invites counsellors, psychotherapists, researchers and others who work with drug misusers to notice how cultural and societal discourses can shape drug misusers' stories, and the positions from which helpers listen and respond to them. By representing and analysing parts of two life…

  20. What America's Users Spend on Illegal Drugs. An Office of National Drug Control Policy Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    Two approaches were used to estimate the amount of illicit drugs consumed and available for consumption in the United States. Estimates of the number of drug users were multiplied by estimates of the average amount of drugs consumed. Then the supply of drugs available for consumption was examined by estimating the amount of drugs that enters the…

  1. International epidemiology of HIV and AIDS among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Choopanya, K; Vanichseni, S; Ward, T P

    1992-10-01

    HIV/AIDS and iv drug use (IVDU) are of significant multinational scope and growing. Supporting increased IVDU in many countries are countries' geographical proximity to illicit drug trafficking distribution routes, law enforcement efforts which increase the demand for more efficient drug distribution and consumption, and countries' infrastructural and social modernization. Given the failures of intensified law enforcement efforts to thwart the use and proliferation of illegal drugs, countries with substantial IVDU should look away from preventing use to preventing HIV transmission within drug user populations. With HIV seroprevalence rates rapidly reaching 40-50% in some developing country IVDU groups, a variety of prevention programs is warranted. Such programs should be supported and implemented while prevention remains feasible. This paper examines the variation in HIV seroprevalence among IVD users, rapid HIV spread among users, HIV among IVDUs in Bangkok, emerging issues in HIV transmission among IVDUs, non-AIDS manifestations of HIV infection among IVDUs, prevention programs and effectiveness, and harm reduction.

  2. Factors That Affect Adolescent Drug Users' Suicide Attempts.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Song, Hokwang

    2016-05-01

    Drug abuse has been widely linked to suicide risk. We examined the factors that affect adolescent drug users' suicide attempts in South Korea. This study analyzed the data of 311 adolescents who had used drugs such as inhalants, psychotropic drugs, and marijuana (195 males and 116 females). Among 311 subjects, 109 (35.0%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. After adjusting for other variables, depressive mood (OR=19.79) and poly-drug use (OR=2.79), and low/middle levels of academic achievement compared with a high level (OR=3.72 and 4.38) were independently associated with increased odds of a suicide attempt, while better perceived health (OR=0.32) was independently associated with reduced odds of a suicide attempt. For adolescent drug users, preventive work should be directed toward the active treatment of drug use, depression, and physical health and reinforcing proper coping strategies for academic and other stress.

  3. Factors That Affect Adolescent Drug Users' Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hokwang

    2016-01-01

    Drug abuse has been widely linked to suicide risk. We examined the factors that affect adolescent drug users' suicide attempts in South Korea. This study analyzed the data of 311 adolescents who had used drugs such as inhalants, psychotropic drugs, and marijuana (195 males and 116 females). Among 311 subjects, 109 (35.0%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. After adjusting for other variables, depressive mood (OR=19.79) and poly-drug use (OR=2.79), and low/middle levels of academic achievement compared with a high level (OR=3.72 and 4.38) were independently associated with increased odds of a suicide attempt, while better perceived health (OR=0.32) was independently associated with reduced odds of a suicide attempt. For adolescent drug users, preventive work should be directed toward the active treatment of drug use, depression, and physical health and reinforcing proper coping strategies for academic and other stress. PMID:27247604

  4. Drug user settings: a crack house typology.

    PubMed

    Geter, R S

    1994-06-01

    Both lay persons and members of the scientific community have come to view the inner-city crack house as a facility where drug dealers and crack addicts sell, buy, and use crack cocaine. It is suggested in this article that the term "crack house" be unbundled into four more meaningful terms based on the physical conditions of the house, its functionality, and the social relationships that it supports. Two typologies are proposed. The first separates drug houses into four general categories: (1) Crack House, (2) Cop House, (3) Drug House III, and (4) Drug House IV. The second typology categorizes the Crack House into four types: (A) the Party House, (B) the Hit House, (C) the Smoke House, and (D) the Bandominium. Each of these types is explored in detail.

  5. Current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention for drug users in China and provide scientific evidence for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in drug users. Literature and articles related to drug abuse in China, as well as the results of prevention efforts and successful cases regarding HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users, are reviewed. Lessons learned are drawn out for the future improvement of work and the sustainable development of treatment programs. The number of drug users in China is increasing. Even though the number of opioid-type drug users is growing more slowly than in the past, the number of amphetamine-type stimulant users has increased sharply. It has been proven that methadone maintenance treatment and syringe exchange programs gradually and successfully control HIV/AIDS transmission in drug users. However, it is necessary to enhance these prevention methods and expand their coverage. In addition, the strengthening of antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment for HIV-infected drug users is crucial for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The rapidly growing number of amphetamine-type stimulant users, along with their high-risk behavior, poses a hidden danger of greater HIV/AIDS transmission through sexual intercourse in the near future. PMID:25284965

  6. 77 FR 65198 - Generic Drug User Fee-Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, and Drug Master File Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rate for...

  7. Needle and Syringe Cleaning Practices among Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Harbke, Colin R.; Canty, John R.; Reynolds, Grace L.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates the effect of needle exchange on the bleach-mediated disinfection (BMD) practices of 176 needle and syringe sharing injection drug users (IDUs). Results reveal that IDUs who traded sex for money or drugs were less likely to practice BMD, and IDUs who reported a reduced number of sex partners were more likely to practice BMD. (Contains 36…

  8. Needle and Syringe Cleaning Practices among Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Harbke, Colin R.; Canty, John R.; Reynolds, Grace L.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates the effect of needle exchange on the bleach-mediated disinfection (BMD) practices of 176 needle and syringe sharing injection drug users (IDUs). Results reveal that IDUs who traded sex for money or drugs were less likely to practice BMD, and IDUs who reported a reduced number of sex partners were more likely to practice BMD. (Contains 36…

  9. The efficacy of interviewing young drug users through online chat.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Monica J

    2012-06-01

    Despite the fact that most young people who use 'party drugs' also use the Internet, accounts of drugs research involving qualitative interviewing using real-time instant messaging or online chat are yet to be published. This paper assesses the efficacy of conducting qualitative research interviews with young party drug users through instant messaging. In 2007-2008, 837 Australian residents who reported recent use of psychostimulants and/or hallucinogens and participated in online drug discussion completed a web survey and a subsample of 27 completed online interviews (median age 21, range 17-37, 59% male). Experienced drug users were more likely to volunteer to be interviewed than novices. The time and space flexibility provided by the online interviews was convenient; however, interviews were more prone to interruption. Establishing legitimacy, personal disclosure, appropriate linguistic style and humour facilitated the development of rapport and enabled the production of more detailed and in-depth data. These strategies were not successful in all cases and when unsuccessful, interviewees were more easily able to exit the interview by choosing not to respond. Young drug users already using the Internet to chat about drugs find online interviewing an acceptable and convenient way to contribute to research. With adequate preparation to develop technical and cultural competencies, online interviewing offers an effective way of engaging with young people that is worthy of consideration by researchers in the alcohol and other drug field. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Perinatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women Users of Illegal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tenilson Amaral; Bersusa, Ana Aparecida Sanches; Santos, Tatiana Fiorelli Dos; Aquino, Márcia Maria Auxiliadora de; Mariani Neto, Corintio

    2016-04-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perinatal outcomes in pregnant women who use illicit drugs. Methods A retrospective observational study of patients who, at the time of delivery, were sent to or who spontaneously sought a public maternity hospital in the eastern area of São Paulo city. We compared the perinatal outcomes of two distinct groups of pregnant women - illicit drugs users and non-users - that gave birth in the same period and analyzed the obstetric and neonatal variables. We used Student's t-test to calculate the averages among the groups, and the Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test to compare categorical data from each group. Results We analyzed 166 women (83 users and 83 non-users) in both groups with a mean of age of 26 years. Ninety-five percent of the drug users would use crack or pure cocaine alone or associated with other psychoactive substances during pregnancy. Approximately half of the users group made no prenatal visit, compared with 2.4% in the non-users group (p < 0.001). Low birth weight (2,620 g versus 3,333 g on average, p < 0.001) and maternal syphilis (15.7% versus 0%, p < 0.001) were associated with the use of these illicit drugs. Conclusions The use of illicit drugs, mainly crack cocaine, represents an important perinatal risk. Any medical intervention in this population should combine adherence to prenatal care with strategies for reducing maternal exposure to illicit drugs.

  11. Patterns of Drug Use in a Sample of 200 Young Drug Users in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCambridge, Jim; Strang, John

    2004-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a secondary prevention intervention study was conducted to describe patterns of drug use in a non-treatment sample of young drug users recruited in ten further-education colleges across inner London. Participants were 200 young people who were either weekly cannabis users and/or who had…

  12. Patterns of Drug Use in a Sample of 200 Young Drug Users in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCambridge, Jim; Strang, John

    2004-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a secondary prevention intervention study was conducted to describe patterns of drug use in a non-treatment sample of young drug users recruited in ten further-education colleges across inner London. Participants were 200 young people who were either weekly cannabis users and/or who had…

  13. Edinburgh drug users: are they injecting and sharing less?

    PubMed

    Peters, A D; Reid, M M; Griffin, S G

    1994-04-01

    To describe epidemiological trends in injecting and equipment sharing among a sample drawn from a drug-using population with a high rate of HIV infection. A structured interview was administered prior to treatment to cross-sectional samples of drug users over the period 1988-1991. Reports of injecting, sharing and HIV infection were compared annually. Lothian Health Board's Community Drug Problems Service is a secondary level service offering harm reduction and treatment of dependency. A total of 734 consecutively referred drug users resident in Edinburgh. Re-referrals in the same calendar year were excluded. History of injecting and sharing, recent injecting and sharing, HIV testing history, drugs used in previous month and substitute prescription status. Large reductions in the frequency of injecting were found over the 4 years even among those who were not receiving oral substitutes. More participants in latter years were receiving prescriptions combining opioids and benzodiazepines. Fewer of those interviewed latterly had ever shared injecting equipment. Among recent injectors just as many share equipment as previously. HIV prevalence did not vary significantly over the period. An HIV prevalence of 19% was reported among recent injectors. Edinburgh's drug users are engaging in far safer drug-taking behaviour than previously. Levels of HIV in this population suggest that the epidemic is being contained. A small number persist in high risk drug-related activities. Further investigation of the characteristics of these individuals and the need to develop novel methods of influencing their behaviour are recommended.

  14. 78 FR 46977 - Generic Drug User Fee-Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, Drug Master...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, Drug Master File, Final Dosage Form Facility, and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Facility Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  15. Pituitary microadenoma treated with antipsychotic drug aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Wix-Ramos, Richard J; Paez, Reinalis; Capote, Eduardo; Ezequiel, Uribe

    2011-01-01

    Male patient 24 years old with a pituitary microadenoma and mental and behavioural disorders due to multiple drug use and use of other psychoactive substances (cocaine, cannabis and alcohol) were treated with haloperidol (dopamine receptor blocker) 10 mg daily. In the last control, the patient presented mammary hypertrophy; laboratory testing and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, reporting the presence of a pituitary microadenoma syndrome with hormonal alteration (Prolactin levels 28.4 ng/ml). Haloperidol, carbamazepine and levomepromazine were then discontinued. He was started on aripiprazole 15 mg po daily for 4 days; the dosage was then increased to 30 mg po daily, with Valproic Acid 500 mg po tid. After 3 weeks on aripiprazole, the mammary hypertrophy that had increased in the patient had resolved. After 10 weeks follow up of prolactin revealed a normal level, at 4.33 ng/ml. Insomnia, aggressiveness, irritability, visual, tactile and auditory hallucinations remained absent after treatment with aripiprazole which is not a first line drug in multiple drug use patient with psychosis. We also consider the correlation of drug use in patient with psychosis, haloperidol treatment, pituitary microadenoma syndrome, hyperprolactinemia, and dopamine D2- receptor partial agonist aripiprazole treatment. This article also summarizes some relevant patents.

  16. 78 FR 46955 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... at http://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/UserFees/AnimalDrugUserFeeActADUFA/default.htm and, under Tools and... Drug User Cover Sheet, transmit it to FDA, and print a copy. After logging into your account with...

  17. Perceptions of parental bonding in freebase cocaine users versus non-illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Pettenon, Marcia; Kessler, Felix Henrique Paim; Guimarães, Luciano S P; Pedroso, Rosemeri Siqueira; Hauck, Simone; Pechansky, Flavio

    2014-06-01

    Evidence has suggested that parenting styles have peculiar characteristics in families with drug-related issues. This study was undertaken to investigate the perception of crack (smoke cocaine) users and non-users about parental bonding quality regarding care and control in Brazil. A total of 198 hospitalized crack users and 104 users of any non-illicit drug were assessed using the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that crack users were more likely (ORadj=9.68; 95% CI: 2.82, 33.20) to perceive neglectful mothers, as well as more likely (ORadj=4.71, 95% CI: 2.17, 10.22) to perceive controlling and affectionless fathers in comparison with non-illicit drug users who were more likely to perceive optimal parenting. Our findings indicate that the perception of neglectful mothers and affectionless controlling fathers may be associated with the tendency of the children to be less resilient when facing stressful events, leading them to a greater risk to use crack.

  18. Perceptions of parental bonding in freebase cocaine users versus non-illicit drug users

    PubMed Central

    Pettenon, Márcia; Kessler, Felix Henrique Paim; Guimarães, Luciano S. P.; Pedroso, Rosemeri Siqueira; Hauck, Simone; Pechansky, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Evidence has suggested that parenting styles have peculiar characteristics in families with drug-related issues. This study was undertaken to investigate the perception of crack (smoke cocaine) users and non-users about parental bonding quality regarding care and control in Brazil. Methods: A total of 198 hospitalized crack users and 104 users of any non-illicit drug were assessed using the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Results: Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that crack users were more likely (ORadj = 9.68; 95% CI: 2.82, 33.20) to perceive neglectful mothers, as well as more likely (ORadj = 4.71, 95% CI: 2.17, 10.22) to perceive controlling and affectionless fathers in comparison with non-illicit drug users who were more likely to perceive optimal parenting. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings indicate that the perception of neglectful mothers and affectionless controlling fathers may be associated with the tendency of the children to be less resilient when facing stressful events, leading them to a greater risk to use crack. PMID:25109717

  19. Mortality of registered drug users in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Mravcik, Viktor; Zabransky, Tomas; Talu, Ave; Jasaitis, Ernestas; Gafarova, Nuriya; Musabekova, Zhannat; Baymirova, Luiza; Makhsutov, Makhsut; Ganiev, Furkat

    2014-11-01

    Within the fifth phase of the Central Asia Drug Action Programme (CADAP) covering five post-Soviet Central Asian countries, an analysis of the mortality of drug users was performed. The results for Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are presented in detail in this paper since results from Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are not considered valid and Turkmenistan did not provide data at all. A system of registration of all users of illegal drugs known to the health and/or law enforcement authorities ("narcological registers") exists in Central Asian countries inherited from the system of Soviet "narcology". According to the legal norms, the death of a registered person should be recorded. We conducted indirect standardisation of crude mortality rates and computed the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) comparing observed number of deaths with expected number of deaths according to age and gender specific mortality rates in the general population of the same country. The results show excess mortality in registered drug users, particularly in registered females, in Uzbekistan (the latest available SMR for all those registered is 7.4; the SMR in females is 16.3) and Kazakhstan (4.0 and 12.9). The excess mortality is highest among young adults (18-34) in all the studies. Taking into account the limited quality and reliability of the data - first of all, the likely under-reporting of deaths in the narcological registers - the crude mortality rate among registered drug users is quite high when compared to EU countries. The SMR in total is comparably lower as a result of the high background mortality in the general population. This excess mortality is preventable and should be targeted by the national drug policies. Specifically, the programmes should target registered and unregistered female drug users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Do adolescent Ecstasy users have different attitudes towards drugs when compared to Marijuana users?

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Silvia S.; Storr, Carla L.; Alexandre, Pierre K.; Chilcoat, Howard D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Perceived risk and attitudes about the consequences of drug use, perceptions of others expectations and self-efficacy influence the intent to try drugs and continue drug use once use has started. We examine associations between adolescents’ attitudes and beliefs towards ecstasy use; because most ecstasy users have a history of marijuana use, we estimate the association for three groups of adolescents: non-marijuana/ecstasy users, marijuana users (used marijuana at least once but never used ecstasy) and ecstasy users (used ecstasy at least once). Methods Data from 5,049 adolescents aged 12–18 years old who had complete weighted data information in Round 2 of the Restricted Use Files (RUF) of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY). Data were analyzed using jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. Results Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy users were more likely to approve of marijuana and ecstasy use as compared to non-drug using youth. Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy users were more likely to have close friends who approved of ecstasy as compared to non-drug using youth. The magnitudes of these two associations were stronger for ecstasy use than for marijuana use in the final adjusted model. Our final adjusted model shows that approval of marijuana and ecstasy use was more strongly associated with marijuana and ecstasy use in adolescence than perceived risk in using both drugs. Conclusion Information about the risks and consequences of ecstasy use need to be presented to adolescents in order to attempt to reduce adolescents’ approval of ecstasy use as well as ecstasy experimentation. PMID:18068314

  1. Identifying heterogeneity among injection drug users: a cluster analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Souradet Y; Shah, Lena; Jolly, Ann M; Wylie, John L

    2008-08-01

    We used cluster analysis to subdivide a population of injection drug users and identify previously unknown behavioral heterogeneity within that population. We applied cluster analysis techniques to data collected in a cross-sectional survey of injection drug users in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The clustering variables we used were based on receptive syringe sharing, ethnicity, and types of drugs injected. Seven clusters were identified for both male and female injection drug users. Some relationships previously revealed in our study setting, such as the known relationship between Talwin (pentazocine) and Ritalin (methylphenidate) use, injection in hotels, and hepatitis C virus prevalence, were confirmed through our cluster analysis approach. Also, relationships between drug use and infection risk not previously observed in our study setting were identified, an example being a cluster of female crystal methamphetamine users who exhibited high-risk behaviors but an absence or low prevalence of blood-borne pathogens. Cluster analysis was useful in both confirming relationships previously identified and identifying new ones relevant to public health research and interventions.

  2. Cohesive subgroups and drug user networks in Dhaka City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Tarun Kanti; Gayen, Kaberi; Raeside, Robert; Elliott, Lawrie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore group drug taking behaviour in a slum area of Dhaka, Bangladesh. We set out to examine the relationships between those who met, at least weekly, to take illegal drugs together, and how these relationships might shape their drug behaviour. Sociometric and behavioural data were collected using questionnaires via semi-structured interviews. We found that the likelihood of injecting drugs and sharing needles increased with age, duration of group membership and length of drug use. Drug users were classified into two clusters: one was more cohesive and comprised longer-term users, who were more likely to inject drugs and had poorer physical and mental health. The other cluster comprised younger, better educated members who were more transient, less cohesive, less likely to inject drugs and had better health. Qualitative data suggested that members of the first cluster were less accepting of outsiders and confirmed more to group norms. We conclude that emotionally bonded cohesive subgroups acquire norms, which reinforce problematic drug-using behaviour. Thus, health initiatives need to consider group relationships and norms and those initiatives which work with networks may be more effective and more appropriate for low-income countries.

  3. Rate of methadone use among Aboriginal opioid injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S.; Li, Kathy; Barney, Lucy; Tyndall, Mark W.; Kerr, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown elevated rates of health-related harms among Aboriginal people who use injection drugs such as heroin. Methadone maintenance therapy is one of the most effective interventions to address the harms of heroin injection. We assessed the rate of methadone use in a cohort of opioid injection drug users in Vancouver and investigated whether methadone use was associated with Aboriginal ethnic background. Methods Using data collected as part of the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (May 1996–November 2005), we evaluated whether Aboriginal ethnic background was associated with methadone use using generalized estimating equations and Cox regression analysis. We compared methadone use among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal injection drug users at the time of enrolment and during the follow-up period, and we evaluated the time to first methadone use among people not using methadone at enrolment. Results During the study period, 1603 injection drug users (435 Aboriginal, 1168 non-Aboriginal) were recruited. At enrolment, 54 (12.4%) Aboriginal participants used methadone compared with 247 (21.2%) non-Aboriginal participants (odds ratio [OR] 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38–0.73, p < 0.001). Among the 1351 (84.3%) participants who used heroin, Aboriginal people were less likely to use methadone throughout the follow-up period (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.45–0.81, p < 0.001). Among people using heroin but who were not taking methadone at enrolment, Aboriginal ethnic background was associated with increased time to first methadone use (adjusted relative hazard 0.60, 95% CI 0.49–0.74, p < 0.001). Interpretation Methadone use was lower among Aboriginal than among non-Aboriginal injection drug users. Culturally appropriate interventions with full participation of the affected community are required to address this disparity. PMID:17606937

  4. Flashblood: Blood sharing among female injecting drug users in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Sheryl A.; Ross, Michael W.; Williams, Mark L.; Kilonzo, G.P.; Leshabari, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    Aims This study examined the association between the blood-sharing practice “flashblood” and demographic factors, HIV status, and variables associated with risky sex and drug behaviors among female injecting drug users. Flashblood is a syringe full of blood passed from someone who has just injected heroin to someone else who injects it in lieu of heroin. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Participants One hundred and sixty-nine female injecting drug users (IDUs) were recruited using purposive sampling for hard-to-reach populations. Measurements The association between flashblood use, demographic and personal characteristics and risky sex and drug use variables was analyzed by t-test and χ2 test. The association between flashblood use and residential neighborhood was mapped. Findings Flashblood users were more likely to: be married (p=.05), have lived in the current housing situation for a shorter time (p<.000), have been forced as a child to have sex by a family member(p=.007), inject heroin more in the last 30 days (p=.005), smoke marijuana at an earlier age (p=.04), use contaminated rinse-water (p<.03), pool money for drugs (p<.03), and share drugs (p=.00). Non-flashblood users were more likely to live with their parents (p=.003). Neighborhood flashblood use was highest near downtown and in the two next adjoining suburbs and lowest in the most distant suburbs. Conclusions These data indicate that more vulnerable women who are heavy users and living in shorter term housing are injecting flashblood. The practice of flashblood appears to be spreading from the inner city to the suburbs. PMID:20331567

  5. Identifying injection drug users at risk of nonfatal overdose.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Phillip O; Tracy, Melissa; Bucciarelli, Angela; Ompad, Danielle; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2007-07-01

    Drug overdose is the second leading cause of accidental deaths among U.S. adults aged 15-64 years. Emergency physicians have a unique opportunity to provide overdose prevention interventions, because habitual drug users are in frequent need of medical care. The authors evaluated associations between individual-level risk factors and experiencing an overdose in the past six months to determine which characteristics and behaviors may be most predictive of overdose. The authors used data from a sample of street-recruited habitual drug users who participated in face-to-face interviews about overdose from November 2001 to February 2004. This analysis was restricted to 772 respondents who had been injecting for at least one year and who had injected heroin within the past two months. A total of 16.6% of participants had overdosed in the past six months. Characteristics and behaviors that were independently associated with an increased risk of a recent overdose were having had a prior overdose (odds ratio [OR], 28.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.10 to 57.96), using cocaine/crack in the past six months (OR, 2.07; 95% CI = 1.25 to 3.45), using alcohol in the past six months (OR, 1.90; 95% CI = 1.01 to 3.57), experiencing serious withdrawal symptoms in the past two months (OR, 2.70; 95% CI = 1.58 to 4.61), and younger age. Drug users who have previously experienced a nonfatal overdose are at very high risk of experiencing future overdoses. Further longitudinal studies are needed to identify robust predictors of overdose risk over time in habitual drug users, but these data suggest that drug users who have overdosed warrant aggressive prevention efforts such as agonist maintenance treatment or provision of take-home naloxone.

  6. Treating Migraine Headaches Some Drugs Should Rarely be Used

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients’ Stories Providers’ Stories Treating Migraine Headaches Some drugs should rarely be used drugs. Here’s why: These drugs can make headaches worse. Using too much pain ...

  7. Injection Drug Users' Involvement In Drug Economy: Dynamics of Sociometric and Egocentric Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Latkin, Carl; Muth, Stephen Q; Rudolph, Abby

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the effect of social network cohesiveness on drug economy involvement, and to test whether this relationship is mediated by drug support network size in a sample of active injection drug users. Involvement in the drug economy was defined by self-report of participation in at least one of the following activities: selling drugs, holding drugs or money for drugs, providing street security for drug sellers, cutting/packaging/cooking drugs, selling or renting drug paraphernalia (e.g., pipes, tools, rigs), and injecting drugs in others' veins. The sample consists of 273 active injection drug users in Baltimore, Maryland who reported having injected drugs in the last 6 months and were recruited through either street outreach or by their network members. Egocentric drug support networks were assessed through a social network inventory at baseline. Sociometric networks were built upon the linkages by selected matching characteristics, and k-plex rank was used to characterize the level of cohesiveness of the individual to others in the social network. Although no direct effect was observed, structural equation modeling indicated k-plex rank was indirectly associated with drug economy involvement through drug support network size. These findings suggest the effects of large-scale sociometric networks on injectors' drug economy involvement may occur through their immediate egocentric networks. Future harm reduction programs for injection drug users (IDUs) should consider providing programs coupled with economic opportunities to those drug users within a cohesive network subgroup. Moreover, individuals with a high connectivity to others in their network may be optimal individuals to train for diffusing HIV prevention messages.

  8. [The buccal-dental health of drug addicts treated in the University hospital centre in Nice].

    PubMed

    Madinier, Isabelle; Harrosch, Joseph; Dugourd, Michel; Giraud-Morin, Chantal; Fosse, Thierry

    2003-06-07

    Drug-addicts often suffer from rapidly progressive extensive dental decay. The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of illicit drugs on buccal and dental health and the use of illicit drugs for toothache. Two groups of intravenous and non-intravenous drug-addicts were compared with two control groups of age matched non-addicted subjects. During a routine dental examination, medical and addictive history, periodontal and dental health and dental complaints were recorded. This study showed that intravenous heroin was responsible for rapidly progressive dental decay, even in four drug-addicts with satisfactory dental hygiene. Intravenous heroin users (14 women, 38 men, mean age 35) had a mean number of 10 missing and 10 decayed teeth, 6 of them to be extracted, and needed two dentures with 8 teeth each. Their masticatory function (45%) and smile did not permit normal alimentation or social life. Non-intravenous drug users (9 women, 29 men, mean age 26) had a mean number of one missing tooth and 4 decayed teeth to be treated. When compared to control groups, drug users of both categories exhibited more decayed teeth, reduced masticatory function and a lower periodontal health correlated with inadequate dental hygiene. Finally, 52% of heroin users and 21% of other illicit drug users admitted the use of illicit drugs as analgesics for toothache. The management of toothache should be proposed in the cessation protocols and dentures provided to intravenous drug-addicts, before any attempt at social reinsertion.

  9. Drug Trafficking Routes and Hepatitis B in Injection Drug Users, Manipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Banerjee, Arup; Chandra, Partha K.; Mahapatra, Pradip K.; Chakrabarti, Shekhar

    2006-01-01

    Prevalence of hepatitis B genotype C in injection drug users in the northeastern Indian state of Manipur, neighboring the "Golden Triangle," correlates well with overland drug-trafficking routes, the injection drug use epidemic, and the spread of HIV. Further spread to other regions of India through mobile populations is possible. PMID:17326951

  10. Drug trafficking routes and hepatitis B in injection drug users, Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Banerjee, Arup; Chandra, Partha K; Mahapatra, Pradip K; Chakrabarti, Shekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2006-12-01

    Prevalence of hepatitis B genotype C in injection drug users in the northeastern Indian state of Manipur, neighboring the "Golden Triangle," correlates well with overland drug-trafficking routes, the injection drug use epidemic, and the spread of HIV. Further spread to other regions of India through mobile populations is possible.

  11. Comorbidity and Risk Behaviors among Drug Users Not in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane; Wells, Rebecca S.; Theno, Shelley A.; Fisher, Dennis G.

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 700 drug users, 64% evidenced comorbidity (i.e., coexisting substance use and psychiatric disorders). Robust relationships between the presence of comorbidity and increased levels of risk behavior, such as needle sharing and trading sex for money, were revealed. (Contains 44 references and 2 tables.) (Author)

  12. Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

  13. Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

  14. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Löckenhoff, Corinna E; Crum, Rosa M; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Costa, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57) were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions. PMID:18405382

  15. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  16. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide.

  17. HIV post-exposure therapy for drug users in treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P G

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of drug treatment program providers concerning human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) post-exposure therapy (PET) for drug users enrolled in drug treatment. This was a cross-sectional evaluation of drug treatment program providers in four methadone maintenance programs (MMPs) in New Haven, Connecticut. Thirty-five MMP providers including: 29 MMP treatment staff (physicians, nurses, counselors) and 6 primary care provider staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) participated in the study. The providers were presented with four case vignettes of individuals exposed to HIV through a needle stick ("stick"): a phlebotomist with occupational exposure (Case A) and three drug users with nonoccupational exposure to HIV (Cases B, C, and D). Case B had the same estimated future risk as Case A (three sticks/4 years) and the other cases had increased risk: Case C (four to six sticks/year) and Case D (monthly "sticks"). For each vignette, providers were asked whether they would offer HIV PET ("yes" or "no"). In addition, focus groups were held within each group of providers who were asked: "What role should drug treatment programs play in the implementation of PET?" All MMP staff (29/29) and primary care providers (6/6) felt that the phlebotomist with occupational exposure should be offered PET. The percent of MMP and Primary care provider staff recommending PET for the other cases were: Case B (MMP staff: 86% [25/29], PCPs: 100% [6/6]), Case C (MMP staff: 69% [20/29], PCPs: 33% [2/6]), and Case D (MMP staff: 59% [17/29], PCPs: 17% [1/6]). The "common themes" that were identified in the focus groups included: concern that MMPs lack resources to provide PET, the ethics of withholding PET, the "limit" on the number of times PET should be offered, and the role of PET in the overall HIV prevention message. Both MMP staff and PCPs felt that MMPs should have an "indirect" role in providing HIV PET by providing education

  18. Acute Central Vision Loss in an IV Drug User.

    PubMed

    Bettendorf, Brittany A; Thomson, Mary; Reichstein, David; Thomas, Jaren

    2015-04-01

    This report describes the case of a 21-year-old heroin user who presented with a 6-day history of decreased vision in her right eye, preceded by 1 week of headache and tender scalp nodules, neck stiffness, and photophobia. A broad infectious workup for acute vision loss was completed, and she was ultimately presumed to have acquired toxoplasmic chorioretinitis (ocular toxoplasmosis). We review the initial workup for chorioretinitis, and the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. Intravenous drug users may be at increased risk of acquired ocular toxoplasmosis.

  19. HIV epidemic among drug users in China: 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Guo, Wei; Li, Dongmin; Ding, Zhengwei; McGoogan, Jennifer M; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zunyou; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To describe trends in the HIV epidemic among drug users (DUs) in China from 1995 to 2011. Data sets from China's national HIV/AIDS case reporting and sentinel surveillance systems as of December 2011 were used separately for descriptive analysis. Changes in the geographic distribution of the number of HIV cases and HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs were examined. We also analysed changes in HIV prevalence among the broader DU population, and drug use-related behaviours including types of drugs used, recent injecting and recent needle sharing in the context of the rapid scale-up of DU sentinel sites and national harm reduction programmes. The HIV epidemic among China's DUs is still highly concentrated in five provinces. Here, HIV prevalence peaked at 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI)=28.6, 32.1] among IDUs in 1999, and then gradually decreased to 10.9% (95% CI=10.6, 11.2) by 2011. We observed a rapid increase in the use of 'nightclub drugs' among DUs from 1.3% in 2004 to 24.4% in 2011. A decline in recent needle sharing among current IDU from 19.5% (95% CI=19.4, 19.6) in 2006 to 11.3% (95% CI=11.2, 11.4) in 2011 was found to be correlated with the rapid scale-up of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT; r(4)=-0.94, P=0.003) harm reduction efforts. While HIV prevalence and needle sharing among current injecting drug users in China have declined dramatically and are correlated with the scale-up of national harm reduction efforts, the recent, rapid increased use of 'nightclub drugs' presents a new challenge. © 2014 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Perceptions of genetic testing and genomic medicine among drug users.

    PubMed

    Perlman, David C; Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Friedman, Samuel R; Jordan, Ashly E; Hagan, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Genetic testing will soon enter care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and for addiction. There is a paucity of data on how to disseminate genetic testing into healthcare for marginalized populations. We explored drug users' perceptions of genetic testing. Six focus groups were conducted with 34 drug users recruited from syringe exchange programmes and an HIV clinic between May and June 2012. Individual interviews were conducted with participants reporting previous genetic testing. All participants expressed acceptance of genetic testing to improve care, but most had concerns regarding confidentiality and implications for law enforcement. Most expressed more comfort with genetic testing based on individual considerations rather than testing based on race/ethnicity. Participants expressed comfort with genetic testing in medical care rather than drug treatment settings and when specifically asked permission, with peer support, and given a clear rationale. Although participants understood the potential value of genetic testing, concerns regarding breaches in confidentiality and discrimination may reduce testing willingness. Safeguards against these risks, peer support, and testing in medical settings based on individual factors and with clear rationales provided may be critical in efforts to promote acceptance of genetic testing among drug users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The poor oral health status of former heroin users treated with methadone in a Chinese city

    PubMed Central

    Ma, He; Shi, Xin-chang; Hu, De-yu; Li, Xue

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background There have been few studies conducted on the oral health status of illegal drug users in China, affecting the development of preventive and therapeutic approaches. The aim of the present study was to investigate and analyze the oral health status of former heroin users treated with methadone in Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province in southwestern China. Material/Methods The presence of caries (decayed tooth and root), missing teeth, residual roots, dental prosthetic restoration and periodontal health were investigated in 445 former heroin users treated with methadone (317 males and 128 females). Their ages ranged from 20 to 59 years old. Results Among the study subjects, the prevalence of decayed/filled teeth was 64.72%, and the mean of decayed/filled teeth score was 2.92. The prevalence of decayed/filled roots was 21.80%, and the mean of decayed/filled roots score was 0.62. The prevalence of missing teeth was 31.46%, and the mean missing teeth score was 0.62. The prevalence of residual roots was 42.02%, with a mean score of 1.06. The rates of gingival bleeding, calculus, shallow pockets periodontal pocket, and deep periodontal pocket were 99.55%, 96.63%, 30.34%, and 2.70%, respectively. Conclusions The oral health status among the studied former heroin users in Chengdu was poorer than the general population. Better dental care for the former heroin users is needed to promote their oral health. PMID:22460103

  2. Hardcore drug users claim to be occasional users: drug use frequency underreporting.

    PubMed

    Morral, A R; McCaffrey, D; Iguchi, M Y

    2000-01-01

    Self-reports of drug use frequency are central to treatment outcome evaluations, estimates of the prevalence of heavy use, estimates of treatment need, and other questions with direct relevance to drug policies. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known about the validity of these self-reports. This study examines the accuracy of 701 frequency self-reports made by a sample of methadone maintenance clients. Self-report accuracy is evaluated by comparing rates of positive urinalyses found for each case with rates that would be expected had drug use occurred only as often as reported. Expected rates of positive urinalyses are derived from conservative Monte Carlo models of drug use for each case. This procedure reveals extensive heroin and cocaine use frequency underreporting. After adjusting for frequency underreporting, 51% of 279 cases reporting only occasional heroin use (1-10 days in the past 30), and 22% of the 157 cases reporting occasional cocaine use, are found to be using these drugs with frequencies corresponding to what the Office of National Drug Control Policy defines as 'hardcore use' (more than 10 days in the past 30). Drug use frequency underreporting appears substantial, and might constitute an important threat to the validity of some treatment outcome evaluations, needs assessments and other analyses that rely on drug use frequency self-reports.

  3. 76 FR 45831 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2012 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates for prescription drug user fees for fiscal year (FY) 2012. The Federal Food, Drug, and...

  4. 75 FR 46952 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates for prescription drug user fees for fiscal year (FY) 2011. The Federal Food, Drug, and...

  5. 78 FR 46980 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates for prescription drug user fees for ] fiscal year (FY) 2014. The Federal Food, Drug, and...

  6. 77 FR 65199 - Generic Drug User Fee-Backlog Fee Rate for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Backlog Fee Rate for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...) 2013. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Generic Drug User Fee...

  7. Cost comparison of drug-drug and drug-condition interactions in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy treated with pregabalin versus duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stephen S; Udall, Margarita; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Johnson, Barbara H; Shrady, George; Chu, Bong-Chul; Silverman, Stuart L

    2013-12-15

    The frequency and financial impact of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and drug-condition interactions (DCIs) in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) treated with either pregabalin or duloxetine were compared. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large U.S. administrative claims database. Patients selected for study inclusion had a diagnosis of DPN and were newly initiated on either pregabalin or duloxetine between July 1, 2008, and October 1, 2010. Data on potential DDIs and DCIs were collected. Health care costs were measured as the sum of gross covered payments for all medical and prescription claims incurred during the six months after the index date. The study sample comprised 2499 pregabalin users and 1354 duloxetine users. Among pregabalin users, 48 (1.8%) had at least one potential pregabalin DCI; none had potential pregabalin DDIs. Among duloxetine users, 966 (71%) had at least one potential duloxetine DDI or DCI. The frequencies of potential DDIs and DCIs differed significantly between pregabalin and duloxetine users (p < 0.001). Potential duloxetine DDIs and DCIs were associated with a significant increase in mean health care costs in duloxetine users (p = 0.002). Potential pregabalin DDIs and DCIs were not associated with additional health care costs in pregabalin users. Among patients with painful DPN treated with either pregabalin or duloxetine, the frequency of potential duloxetine DDIs and DCIs was substantially higher than that of pregabalin. Potential DDIs and DCIs were associated with significantly increased health care costs in duloxetine users.

  8. Harms and benefits associated with psychoactive drugs: findings of an international survey of active drug users

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia JA; Noronha, Louise A; Muetzelfeldt, Mark; Fielding, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    There have been several recent efforts in the UK and the Netherlands to describe the harms of psychoactive substances based on ratings of either experts or drug users. This study aimed to assess the perceived benefits as well as harms of widely used recreational drugs, both licit and illicit, in an international sample of drug users. The survey was hosted at https://www.internationaldrugsurvey.org/ and was available in three languages. Residents reported their experience of 15 commonly used drugs or drug classes; regular users then rated their harms and benefits. In all, 5791 individuals from over 40 countries completed the survey, although the majority were from English speaking countries. Rankings of drugs differed across 10 categories of perceived benefits. Skunk and herbal cannabis were ranked consistently beneficial, whilst alcohol and tobacco fell below many classified drugs. There was no correlation at all between users’ harm ranking of drugs and their classification in schedules of the USA or ABC system in the UK. Prescription analgesics, alcohol and tobacco were ranked within the top 10 most harmful drugs. These findings suggest that neither the UK nor US classification systems act to inform users of the harms of psychoactive substances. It is hoped the results might inform health professionals and educators of what are considered to be both the harms and benefits of psychoactive substances to young people. PMID:23438502

  9. 76 FR 45814 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... application fees and any other fees owed under the Animal Generic Drug User Fee program. II. Revenue Amount... application fees is $1,712,000 and each of the other two generic new animal drug user fee categories, annual...

  10. Enhancing HIV Vaccine Trial Consent Preparedness Among Street Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Celia B.

    2011-01-01

    This research used open-ended and true-false questions to assess the preparedness of 96 ethnically diverse, economically and socially marginalized adult street drug users to consent to participate in HIV vaccine trials (HVT). Specific areas of consent vulnerability included misconceptions about: (1) the recuperative value and risk of vaccines in general; (2) the presence of the HIV virus within the vaccine and the possibility of contracting or transmitting HIV as a consequence of participation; (3) inclusion criteria and experimental blinds; and (4) distrust in the medical and research establishments. A brief HVT lesson administered to 30 participants was effective in correcting specific HVT knowledge misperceptions and increasing certain, but not all areas of HVT trust. Assessment of post-lesson responses to ethics-relevant questions provides information on respondents' attitudes toward AIDS safe behavior, research risks and benefits, monetary compensation, and willingness to participate. Implications for enhancing informed consent for HVT involving active drug users are discussed. PMID:20569151

  11. Survey of abuses against injecting drug users in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sara LM; Triwahyuono, Agus; Alexander, Risa

    2009-01-01

    In Indonesia, an ongoing government "war on drugs" has resulted in numerous arrests and anecdotal reports of abuse in detention, but to date there has been little documentation or analysis of this issue. JANGKAR (also known in English as the Indonesian Harm Reduction Network), a nongovernmental organization (NGO) based in Jakarta, surveyed 1106 injecting drug users in 13 cities about their experiences of police abuse. Of those interviewed, 667 or 60% reported physical abuse by police. These findings indicate the importance of continuing efforts to promote police reform and harm reduction in Indonesia. PMID:19852845

  12. Affinity of Mucormycosis for Basal Ganglia in Intravenous Drug Users: Case Illustration and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Ali; Galgano, Michael; Fullmer, Joseph; Hall, Walter; Chin, Lawrence

    2017-02-01

    Central nervous system mucormycosis is an aggressive fungal infection often ending in fatality. The usual circumstance is an immunocompromised individual presenting with rapidly progressive rhinocerebral involvement. An extremely rare variant of central nervous system mucormycosis isolated to the basal ganglia in an immunocompetent intravenous drug user is detailed in this manuscript. The patient was aggressively treated with aspiration of the fungal abscess and long-term intravenous antifungal agents.

  13. Mental Health Status, Drug Treatment Use, and Needle Sharing among Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Lena M.; Amodeo, Maryann; Chassler, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among mental health symptoms, drug treatment use, and needle sharing in a sample of 507 injection drug users (IDUs). Mental health symptoms were measured through the ASI psychiatric scale. A logistic regression model identified that some of the ASI items were associated with needle sharing in an opposing…

  14. Buprenorphine substitution treatment in France: drug users' views of the doctor-user relationship

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Anne; Lert, France; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Richard, Lucie

    2007-01-01

    The French system for drug substitution, or maintenance treatment, established in 1996, differs from the often strict conditions attached to methadone clinics in other countries. Because of the predominant role of general practitioners and the flexible prescription rules for Subutex® in France, the relationship between the physician and the drug user becomes a central element in the treatment. This article deals with the expectations that these users have of the physician, and their perception of his or her attitude towards them. In order to identify possible reasons for the absence of treatment compliance and of Subutex® misuse, it focuses on the users’ assessment of the physician’s response to the problems they report. This study, based on a diversified sample of 28 persons in treatment, showed 4 patterns of relationships between physicians and users, which differed in their focus: a) dosage, b) compliance, c) the person and d) obtaining a prescription. In all four case types, users had difficulty reporting other drug use or intravenous Subutex® injection within this relationship in which the stigma attached to drug dependence seems to reappear. Moreover, the lack of clarity about the treatment objectives and time frame limits the users’ ability to integrate the treatment into their lives and to commit themselves to it. The heterogeneity and fragility of the users’ situations are elements related to dependence that, during contact with the physician, require regular assessment of the individual’s situation and of the treatment objectives. This constant reappraisal of the situation with the physician should help to optimize the treatment and avoid the hiatus that can generate or continue “misuse.” PMID:17442473

  15. HIV epidemic among drug users in China: 1995 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Guo, Wei; Li, Dongmin; Ding, Zhengwei; McGoogan, Jennifer M.; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zunyou; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe trends in the HIV epidemic among drug users (DUs) in China from 1995 to 2011. Design, setting and participants Datasets from China's national HIV/AIDS case reporting and sentinel surveillance systems as of December 2011 were used separately for descriptive analysis. Measures Changes in the geographic distribution of the number of HIV cases and HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs were examined. We also analyzed changes in HIV prevalence among the broader DU population, and drug use-related behaviors including types of drugs used, recent injecting, and recent needle sharing in the context of the rapid scale-up of DU sentinel sites and national harm reduction programs. Findings The HIV epidemic among China's DUs is still highly concentrated in five provinces. Here, HIV prevalence peaked at 30.3% (95% CI [28.6, 32.1]) among IDUs in 1999, and then gradually decreased to 10.9% (95% CI [10.6, 11.2]) by 2011. We observed a rapid increase in the use of “nightclub drugs” among DUs from 1.3% in 2004 to 24.4% in 2011. A decline in recent needle sharing among current IDU from 19.5% (95% CI [19.4, 19.6]) in 2006 to 11.3% (95% CI [11.2, 11.4]) in 2011 was found to be correlated with the rapid scale-up of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT; r(4) = - .94, p = 0.003) harm reduction efforts. Conclusions While needle sharing among current injecting drug users in China has declined dramatically and is correlated with the scale-up of national harm reduction efforts, the recent, rapid increased use of “nightclub drugs” presents a new challenge. PMID:25533861

  16. Border crossing to inject drugs in Mexico among injection drug users in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Tyson; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Garfein, Richard S; Patterson, Thomas L; Pollini, Robin A; Wagner, Karla D; Artamanova, Irina; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-04-01

    We examined correlates of ever injecting drugs in Mexico among residents of San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2010, injecting drug users (IDUs) in San Diego underwent an interviewer-administered survey. Logistic regression identified correlates of injection drug use in Mexico. Of 302 IDUs, 38% were Hispanic, 72% male and median age was 37; 27% ever injected in Mexico; 43% reported distributive syringe sharing there. Factors independently associated with ever injecting drugs in Mexico included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin, distributive syringe sharing at least half of the time, and transporting drugs over the last 6 months. One-quarter of IDUs reported ever injecting drugs in Mexico, among whom syringe sharing was common, suggesting possible mixing between IDUs in the Mexico-US border region. Prospective studies should monitor trends in cross-border drug use in light of recent Mexican drug policy reforms partially decriminalizing drug possession.

  17. Risk behaviours for HIV infection among injecting drug users attending a drug dependency clinic.

    PubMed

    Hart, G J; Sonnex, C; Petherick, A; Johnson, A M; Feinmann, C; Adler, M W

    1989-04-22

    To study a range of possible risk factors for HIV among injecting drug user patients attending a clinic in London were interviewed from November 1986 to November 1987. Serum samples were tested for viral markers. Of 116 patients, 101 had shared injecting equipment, 75 on the first occasion of injecting and 76 during the past year. Seventy said that sharing was because equipment was not available. In the past year 102 had been sexually active, a third having two to 20 partners; a quarter of the women had exchanged sexual intercourse for money. The four patients who were positive for antibody to HIV antigen had shared equipment or had intercourse with drug users from areas with a high prevalence of HIV. Eleven patients had injected drugs while in prison. Despite a low prevalence of HIV infection this infection remains a threat to drug users in London; strenuous efforts are still needed to prevent its further transmission.

  18. Testing a fall risk model for injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Goldberg, Allon

    2012-01-01

    Fall risk is a critical component of clinical assessment and has not been examined for persons who have injected illicit drugs and are aging. The aim of this study was to test and develop the Fall Risk Model for Injection Drug Users by examining the relationships among injection drug use, chronic venous insufficiency, lower extremity impairments (i.e., decreased ankle range of motion, reduced calf muscle endurance, and leg pain), age and other covariates, and the Tinetti balance and gait total score as a measure of fall risk. A cross-sectional comparative design was used with four crossed factors. Standardized instruments were used to assess the variables. Moderated multiple regression with linear and quadratic trends in age was used to examine the nature of the relationship between the Tinetti balance and gait total and age and the potential moderating role of injection drug use. A prespecified series of models was tested. Participants (n = 713) were men (46.9%) and women with a mean age of 46.26 years and primarily African American (61.7%) in methadone treatment centers. The fall risk of a 48-year-old leg injector was comparable with the fall risk of a 69-year-old who had not injected drugs. Variables were added to the model sequentially, resulting in some lost significance of some when they were explained by subsequent variables. Final significant variables in the model were employment status, number of comorbidities, ankle range of motion, leg pain, and calf muscle endurance. Fall risk was associated with route of drug use. Lower extremity impairments accounted for the effects of injection drug use and chronic venous insufficiency on risk for falls. Further understanding of fall risk in injection users is necessary as they age, attempt to work, and participate in activities.

  19. 76 FR 58277 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request... comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting on the Animal Generic Drug... on the Internet at...

  20. 75 FR 45632 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...Industry/UserFees/AnimalDrugUserFeeActADUFA/default.htm and, under Tools and Resources click ``The Animal..., transmit it to FDA, and print a copy. After logging into your account with your user name and...

  1. Perceptions of Genetic Testing and Genomic Medicine among Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, David C.; Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Friedman, Samuel R.; Jordan, Ashly E.; Hagan, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic testing will soon enter care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and for addiction. There is a paucity of data on how to disseminate genetic testing into healthcare for marginalized populations. We explored drug users’ perceptions of genetic testing. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 34 drug users recruited from syringe exchange programs and an HIV clinic between May and June 2012. Individual interviews were conducted with participants reporting previous genetic testing. Results All participants expressed acceptance of genetic testing to improve care, but most had concerns regarding confidentiality and implications for law enforcement. Most expressed more comfort with genetic testing based on individual considerations rather than testing based on race/ethnicity. Participants expressed comfort with genetic testing in medical care rather than drug treatment settings and when specifically asked permission, with peer support, and given a clear rationale. Conclusions Although participants understood the potential value of genetic testing, concerns regarding breaches in confidentiality and discrimination may reduce testing willingness. Safeguards against these risks, peer support, and testing in medical settings based on individual factors and with clear rationales provided may be critical in efforts to promote acceptance of genetic testing among drug users. PMID:25037119

  2. Are payers treating orphan drugs differently?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joshua P.; Felix, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Background Some orphan drugs can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars annually per patient. As a result, payer sensitivity to the cost of orphan drugs is rising, particularly in light of increased numbers of new launches in recent years. In this article, we examine payer coverage in the United States, England and Wales, and the Netherlands of outpatient orphan drugs approved between 1983 and 2012, as well as the 11 most expensive orphan drugs. Methods We collected data from drug regulatory agencies as well as payers and drug evaluation authorities. Results We found that orphan drugs have more coverage restrictions than non-orphan drugs in all three jurisdictions. From an economic perspective, the fact that a drug is an orphan product or has a high per-unit price per se should not imply a special kind of evaluation by payers, or necessarily the imposition of more coverage restrictions. Conclusion Payers should consider the same set of decision criteria that they do with respect to non-orphan drugs: disease severity, availability of treatment alternatives, level of unmet medical need, and cost-effectiveness, criteria that justifiably may be taken into account and traded off against one another in prescribing and reimbursement decisions for orphan drugs. PMID:27226840

  3. 75 FR 45636 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... applications for generic new animal drugs, manufacturing supplemental abbreviated applications for generic new... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the...

  4. An outbreak of hepatitis A amongst injecting drug users.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, D.; Cooke, R. P.; Joce, R.; Eastbury, A.; Waite, J.; Stene-Johansen, K.

    2001-01-01

    This descriptive study investigated an outbreak of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection among injecting drug users (IDUs) and their contacts. Twenty-seven cases of acute HAV infection were identified in a 5-month period. Connections with the local injecting drug using (IDU) population were established for 25 of the cases of whom 14 admitted to injecting drug use. HAV RNA genotyping revealed two HAV variants, closely related to variants found in Scandinavian IDUs and in South East Asia. The study demonstrates that once HAV enters the IDU population extensive outbreaks are possible. We recommend that all IDUs should be tested for HAV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and offered combined hepatitis A and B vaccines if non-immune. PMID:11811880

  5. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU) in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. Results These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0) and 66 (26.2%) were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8%) participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004) and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019). A majority (67.9%) reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%). Conclusions Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions. PMID:20465842

  6. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Milloy, M-J; Fairbairn, Nadia; Hayashi, Kanna; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2010-05-13

    Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU) in Bangkok, Thailand. Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0) and 66 (26.2%) were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8%) participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004) and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019). A majority (67.9%) reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%). Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions.

  7. "Why Has It Only become an Issue Now?": Young Drug Users' Perceptions of Drug Driving in Melbourne, Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laura Ann; Wilson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary research into drug-user perceptions of drug driving was undertaken with a sample group of drug users aged 18 to 24 from Melbourne, Victoria. Eleven males and nine females participated in semi-structured interviews and completed self-report surveys. Participants discussed their drug driving and their perceptions of the likelihood of…

  8. "Why Has It Only become an Issue Now?": Young Drug Users' Perceptions of Drug Driving in Melbourne, Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laura Ann; Wilson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary research into drug-user perceptions of drug driving was undertaken with a sample group of drug users aged 18 to 24 from Melbourne, Victoria. Eleven males and nine females participated in semi-structured interviews and completed self-report surveys. Participants discussed their drug driving and their perceptions of the likelihood of…

  9. Nanotechnology controlled drug delivery for treating bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Rapid developments at the intersection of nanotechnology and controlled drug delivery have triggered exceptional growth in treating various bone diseases. As a result, over the past decade, nanotechnology has contributed tremendously to controlling drug delivery for treating various bone diseases, and in many cases, has led to increased bone regeneration. In this review paper, the recent experimental progress towards using nanotechnology to treat bone-specific diseases is reviewed. Novel applications of different types of nanomaterials (from nanoparticles to 3D nanostructured scaffolds) for treating bone diseases are summarized. In addition, fundamental principles for utilizing nanomaterials to create better drug delivery systems, especially for treating bone diseases and regenerating bone, are emphasized.

  10. 77 FR 45624 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0806] Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year... Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates and payment procedures for fiscal year (FY) 2013 animal drug user... full payment of application fees and any other animal drug user fees owed. II. Revenue Amount for FY...

  11. Unemployment, drug use, and HIV risk among American Indian and Alaska Native drug users.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, G L; Fisher, D G; Estrada, A L; Trotter, R

    2000-01-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have had low employment in recent history. Drug users also have low employment due to cycles of drug use and relapse,and the impact of the type of drug abused on levels of functioning. Drug use is associated with increased HIV risk through injection drug use, frequency of injection, and needle sharing. Data from three sites of the NIDA Cooperative Agreement for Community Based-Outreach/Intervention Research were analyzed to determine the relationship among race/ethnicity, age, and level of educational attainment on employment and unemployment at intake interview and six-month follow-up. HIV risk for those employed and unemployed was then assessed. American Indian and Alaska Native drug users were younger, less educated, and less likely to have a paid job at both intake and follow-up than non-Native drug users. Those participants who were unemployed at baseline interview who were American Indian/Alaska Native were less likely to transition to employment at six-month follow-up than other race/ethnicity groups in the cohort. However, all participants showed low levels of employment at follow-up. Individuals who were employed at baseline and those who transitioned to employment had lower levels of injection drug use and needle sharing than those who were unemployed at both baseline and follow-up. American Indian and Alaska Native drug users may be at risk for acquisition of HIV due to drug risk behaviors that appear to be associated with unemployment.

  12. Initiation into Prescription Opioid Misuse among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Teti, Michelle; Silva, Karol; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Harocopos, Alex; Treese, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    Background Prescription opioids are the most frequently misused class of prescription drugs among young adults. Initiation into prescription opioid misuse is an important public health concern since opioids are increasingly associated with drug dependence and fatal overdose. Descriptive data about initiation into prescription opioid misuse among young injection drug users (IDUs) are scarce. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken to describe patterns of initiation into prescription opioid misuse among IDUs aged 16 to 25 years. Those young IDUs who had misused a prescription drug at least three times in the past three months were recruited during 2008 and 2009 in Los Angeles (n=25) and New York (n=25). Informed by an ethno-epidemiological approach, descriptive data from a semi-structured interview guide were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Initiation into prescription opioid misuse was facilitated by easy access to opioids via participant’s own prescription, family, or friends, and occurred earlier than misuse of other illicit drugs, such as heroin. Nearly all transitioned into sniffing opioids, most injected opioids, and many initiated injection drug use with an opioid. Motives for transitions to sniffing and injecting opioids included obtaining a more potent high and/or substituting for heroin; access to multiple sources of opioids was common among those who progressed to sniffing and injecting opioids. Conclusion Prescription opioid misuse was a key feature of trajectories into injection drug use and/or heroin use among this sample of young IDUs. A new pattern of drug use may be emerging whereby IDUs initiate prescription opioid misuse before using heroin. PMID:21689917

  13. Initiation into prescription opioid misuse amongst young injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Lankenau, Stephen E; Teti, Michelle; Silva, Karol; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Harocopos, Alex; Treese, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    Prescription opioids are the most frequently misused class of prescription drugs amongst young adults. Initiation into prescription opioid misuse is an important public health concern since opioids are increasingly associated with drug dependence and fatal overdose. Descriptive data about initiation into prescription opioid misuse amongst young injection drug users (IDUs) are scarce. An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken to describe patterns of initiation into prescription opioid misuse amongst IDUs aged 16-25 years. Those young IDUs who had misused a prescription drug at least three times in the past three months were recruited during 2008 and 2009 in Los Angeles (n=25) and New York (n=25). Informed by an ethno-epidemiological approach, descriptive data from a semi-structured interview guide were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Initiation into prescription opioid misuse was facilitated by easy access to opioids via participant's own prescription, family, or friends, and occurred earlier than misuse of other illicit drugs, such as heroin. Nearly all transitioned into sniffing opioids, most injected opioids, and many initiated injection drug use with an opioid. Motives for transitions to sniffing and injecting opioids included obtaining a more potent high and/or substituting for heroin; access to multiple sources of opioids was common amongst those who progressed to sniffing and injecting opioids. Prescription opioid misuse was a key feature of trajectories into injection drug use and/or heroin use amongst this sample of young IDUs. A new pattern of drug use may be emerging whereby IDUs initiate prescription opioid misuse before using heroin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediabetes in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Manu, Peter; Correll, Christoph U; van Winkel, Ruud; Wampers, Martien; De Hert, Marc

    2012-04-01

    In 2010, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) proposed that individuals with fasting glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL (5.6-6.9 mmol/L) or glucose level of 140-199 mg/dL (7.8-11.0 mmol/L) 2 hours after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test or hemoglobin A(1c) 5.7%-6.4% be classified as prediabetic, indicating increased risk for the emergence of diabetes mellitus. At the same time, the ADA formulated guidelines for the use of metformin for the treatment of prediabetes. To determine the prevalence of prediabetes in a cohort of psychiatrically ill adults receiving antipsychotics and to compare the clinical and metabolic features of prediabetic patients with those of patients with normal glucose tolerance and those with diabetes mellitus. The 2010 ADA criteria were applied to a large, consecutive, single-site European cohort of 783 adult psychiatric inpatients (mean age: 37.6 years) without a history of diabetes who were receiving antipsychotics. All patients in this cross-sectional study underwent measurement of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, oral glucose tolerance test, and fasting insulin and lipids from November 2003 through July 2007. 413 patients (52.8%) had normal glucose tolerance, 290 (37.0%) had prediabetes, and 80 (10.2%) had diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose and/or hemoglobin A(1c) criteria were met by 89.7% of prediabetic patients. A statistically significant intergroup gradient from normal glucose tolerance to prediabetes and from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus was observed for waist circumference, triglycerides, fasting insulin levels, and frequency of metabolic syndrome (P = .02 to P < .0001). Only 19/290 prediabetic patients (6.6%) met the 2010 ADA criteria for treatment with metformin. Prediabetes is highly prevalent in adults treated with antipsychotic drugs and correlates with markers of increased intraabdominal adiposity, enhanced lipolysis, and insulin resistance. Criteria for using metformin to prevent the emergence of diabetes

  15. The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Users and Religion on Drug Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Joon; Johnson, Byron R.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research finds drug-using peers and religiosity to be key predictors of drug use among youth, but the effects of childhood exposure to drug users and religion on later drug use have been understudied. The authors hypothesize a child's exposure to parental drug use and religious upbringing have a causal influence on drug use in youth…

  16. The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Users and Religion on Drug Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Joon; Johnson, Byron R.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research finds drug-using peers and religiosity to be key predictors of drug use among youth, but the effects of childhood exposure to drug users and religion on later drug use have been understudied. The authors hypothesize a child's exposure to parental drug use and religious upbringing have a causal influence on drug use in youth…

  17. Syphilis in drug users in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Lara S; Newberry, Ashley; Hagan, Holly; Cleland, Charles M; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlman, David C

    2010-01-01

    Genital ulcer disease (GUD), including syphilis, is an important cause of morbidity in low and middle income (LMI) countries and syphilis transmission is associated with HIV transmission. We conducted a literature review to evaluate syphilis infection among drug users in LMI countries for the period 1995-2007. Countries were categorized using the World Bank Atlas method [The World Bank. (2007). Data and statistics: Country groups. Retrieved online October 18, 2007 at http://go.worldbank.org/D7SN0B8YU0] according to 2006 gross national income per capita. Thirty-two studies were included (N=13,848 subjects), mostly from Southeast Asia with some from Latin America, Eastern Europe, Central and East Asia, North Africa and the Middle East but none from regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa. The median prevalence of overall lifetime syphilis (N=32 studies) was 11.1% (interquartile range: 6.3-15.3%) and of HIV (N=31 studies) was 1.1% (interquartile range: 0.22-5.50%). There was a modest relation (r=0.27) between HIV and syphilis prevalence. Median syphilis prevalence by gender was 4.0% (interquartile range: 3.4-6.6%) among males (N=11 studies) and 19.9% (interquartile range: 11.4-36.0%) among females (N=6 studies). There was a strong relation (r=0.68) between syphilis prevalence and female gender that may be related to female sex work. Drug users in LMI countries have a high prevalence of syphilis but data are limited and, in some regions, entirely lacking. Further data are needed, including studies targeting the risks of women. Interventions to promote safer sex, testing, counselling and education, as well as health care worker awareness, should be integrated in harm reduction programs and health care settings to prevent new syphilis infections and reduce HIV transmission among drug users and their partners in LMI countries.

  18. Heroin overdose among young injection drug users in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Kristen C; Davidson, Peter J; Evans, Jennifer L; Hahn, Judith A; Page-Shafer, Kimberly; Moss, Andrew R

    2005-12-12

    We sought to identify prevalence and predictors of heroin-related overdose among young injection drug users (IDU). A total of 795 IDU under age of 30 years were interviewed in four neighbourhoods in San Francisco, California, USA. Participants were recruited as part of a broader study of HIV, hepatitis B and C among injecting drug users in San Francisco using street outreach and snowball techniques. Independent predictors of recent heroin overdose requiring intervention were determined using regression analysis. Of 795 injecting drug users under age of 30 years, 22% (174/795) of participants reported a heroin overdose in the last year. In stepwise multiple logistic regression, independent predictors of recent heroin overdose were lifetime incarceration exceeding 20 months (odds ratio (OR) = 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.52-5.88); heroin injection in the last 3 months (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 2.03-11.74); cocaine injection in the last 3 months (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.14-2.45); injection of heroin mixed with methamphetamine in the last 3 months (OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.15-2.65); ever tested for hepatitis B or C (OR = 1.66 per year, CI = 1.09-2.54) and ever having witnessed another person overdose (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.76-4.73). Individuals with high levels of incarceration are at great risk of overdose, and prison or jail should be considered a primary intervention site. Further research on the role of cocaine and amphetamine in heroin-related overdose is indicated.

  19. How do researchers categorize drugs, and how do drug users categorize them?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juliet P.; Antin, Tamar M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers drug classifications and terms widely used in US survey research, and compares these to classifications and terms used by drug users. We begin with a critical review of drug classification systems, including those oriented to public policy and health services as well as survey research. We then consider the results of a pile sort exercise we conducted with 76 respondents within a mixed method study of Southeast Asian American adolescent and young adult drug users in urban Northern California, USA. We included the pile sort to clarify how respondents handled specific terms which we understood to be related to Ecstasy and methamphetamines. Results of the pile sort were analyzed using graphic layout algorithms as well as content analysis of pile labels. Similar to the national surveys, our respondents consistently differentiated Ecstasy terms from methamphetamine terms. We found high agreement between some specific local terms (thizz, crystal) and popular drug terms, while other terms thought to be mainstream (crank, speed) were reported as unknown by many respondents. In labeling piles, respondents created taxonomies based on consumption method (in particular, pill) as well as the social contexts of use. We conclude by proposing that divergences between drug terms utilized in survey research and those used by drug users may reflect two opposing tendencies: the tendency of survey researchers to utilize standardized language that constructs persons and experiences as relatively homogeneous, varying only within measurable degrees, and the tendency of drug users to utilize specialized language (argot) that reflects their understandings of their experiences as hybrid and diverse. The findings problematize the validity of drug terms and categories used in survey research. PMID:24431475

  20. HIV, Hepatitis C, and Abstinence from Alcohol Among Injection and Non-injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer C.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Stohl, Malka; Des Jarlais, Don C.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals using illicit drugs are at risk for heavy drinking and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite medical consequences of drinking with HIV and/or HCV, whether drug users with these infections are less likely to drink is unclear. Using samples of drug users in treatment with lifetime injection use (n = 1309) and non-injection use (n = 1996) participating in a large, serial, cross-sectional study, we investigated the associations between HIV and HCV with abstinence from alcohol. About half of injection drug users (52.8 %) and 26.6 % of non-injection drug users abstained from alcohol. Among non-injection drug users, those with HIV were less likely to abstain [odds ratio (OR) 0.55; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.58] while those with HCV were more likely to abstain (OR 1.46; AOR 1.34). In contrast, among injection drug users, neither HIV nor HCV was associated with drinking. However, exploratory analyses suggested that younger injection drug users with HIV or HCV were more likely to drink, whereas older injection drug users with HIV or HCV were more likely to abstain. In summary, individuals using drugs, especially non-injection users and those with HIV, are likely to drink. Age may modify the risk of drinking among injection drug users with HIV and HCV, a finding requiring replication. Alcohol intervention for HIV and HCV infected drug users is needed to prevent further harm. PMID:26080690

  1. Prevalence of skin problems and leg ulceration in a sample of young injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    condition that is costly to treat and has long-term implications for drug users and services caring for current or former injectors long after illicit drug use has ceased. PMID:25119472

  2. How Can Prescription Drug Addiction Be Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... same brain targets as other opioids such as heroin, morphine, and opioid pain medications. It has been ...

  3. Best Drugs to Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... less than the risk from prednisone. There are differences in the biologic drugs in the risk of certain infections they pose. For example, a British study found the relative risk of tuberculosis was three to four times ...

  4. Drugs to Treat Nausea and Vomiting

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientific reviews conducted by the Oregon Health and Science University-based Drug Effectiveness Review Project. Grants from the Engelberg Foundation and the National Library of Medicine help fund Consumer Reports Best ...

  5. Candida lusitaniae arthritis in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Jeragh, A; Ahmad, S; Naseem, J; Khan, Z U

    2007-09-01

    A case of arthritis of the right knee caused by Candida lusitaniae in a 29-year-old intravenous drug abuser is described. The diagnosis was based on the isolation of C. lusitaniae from synovial fluid and was supported by the presence of C. lusitaniae-specific DNA and high levels of (1-3)-beta-d-glucan (122 pg ml-1) in the same specimen. While the isolate was susceptible to amphotericin B and fluconazole in vitro, treatment with amphotericin B was not very effective. The patient achieved complete cure with fluconazole therapy only after undergoing synovectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of arthritis caused by C. lusitaniae in an intravenous drug user.

  6. Oral health status of a group of illicit drug users in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, T; Shah, N; Mathur, V P; Dhawan, A

    2012-03-01

    To assess the oral health and related practices of a group of illicit drug users in Delhi, India; to compare with that of non-drug users; and to assess the impact of illicit drug use on oral health. Cross-sectional study. Comparison was made with non-drug users to investigate any differences in oral health between illicit drug users and general population. Illicit drug users attending a drug dependence treatment clinic in Delhi (n=126). Equal number of non-drug users attending other outpatient departments in the same setting. Oral health practices assessed using structured questionnaire; dental caries, periodontal status and oral mucosa assessed using World Health Organization 2004 criteria; oral hygiene assessed using OHI-S. Mean DMFT and OHI-S scores amongst the drug users were 3.48 and 3.80, respectively. Bleeding, shallow pockets and deep pockets were found as the highest CPI finding in 42%, 44% and 12% of drug users respectively. Premalignant states of leukoplakia and OSMF were diagnosed in 13% and 4% of drug users respectively. Significant differences were found between drug users and non-drug users with respect to oral hygiene practices; DMFT, OHI-S, CPI scores; and leukoplakia. In multivariate analysis, illicit drug use was significantly associated with CPI highest score (OR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.08-4.52). The illicit drug users had significantly poorer oral hygiene practices, oral hygiene and periodontal health; higher caries experience; and higher prevalence of leukoplakia as compared to non-drug users. The findings of the study suggest that illicit drug use is independently associated with poor periodontal health.

  7. Generalized bullous fixed drug eruption treated with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Neeta; Cyrus, Nika; Vandergriff, Travis; Mauskar, Melissa

    2017-02-15

    Fixed drug eruptions (FDE) comprise 10 percent of alladverse cutaneous drug reactions and generalizedbullous fixed drug eruptions (GBFDE) are a raresubset of FDEs. We present a patient with severeGBFDE caused by ibuprofen successfully treated withcyclosporine. Further work is needed to determine ifcyclosporine can be an effective therapy for GBFDE.

  8. Prevalence and correlates of jugular injections among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Zia; Kerr, Thomas; Li, Kathy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2008-07-01

    Jugular injection of drugs has been reported, although little is known about the prevalence of and risk factors associated with this behaviour. We evaluated factors associated with jugular injection among a cohort of injection drug users (IDU) in Vancouver, Canada. We used univariate statistics and logistic regression to examine factors associated with jugular injection among participants in the Vancouver Injecting Drug Users Study (VIDUS), a large prospective cohort study of IDU recruited through snowball sampling methods in Vancouver, Canada. Between December 2004 and November 2005, 780 IDU were followed up as part of VIDUS and 198 (25%) reported jugular injection in the previous 6 months. In multivariate analyses, factors associated independently with jugular injection included: being of the female gender [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.59; p = 0.010], daily heroin use (aOR = 2.89, 95% CI: 1.93-4.34; p < 0.001), daily cocaine use (aOR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.12-2.76; p = 0.014], requiring help injecting (aOR = 4.44, 95% CI: 2.64-7.46; p < 0.001), and involvement in the sex-trade (aOR = 2.71, 95% CI: 1.6-4.55; p < 0.001). Reporting a history of jugular injecting was alarmingly high in the cohort and was associated with several identifiable demographic and drug-using characteristics. Given previous reports demonstrating the risk of infection and vascular trauma due to this behaviour, these populations should be considered seriously as a target for safer injecting education.

  9. Permissive Attitude Towards Drug Use, Life Satisfaction, and Continuous Drug Use Among Psychoactive Drug Users in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N Wt; Cheung, Y W; Chen, X

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects of a permissive attitude towards regular and occasional drug use, life satisfaction, self-esteem, depression, and other psychosocial variables in the drug use of psychoactive drug users. Psychosocial factors that might affect a permissive attitude towards regular / occasional drug use and life satisfaction were further explored. We analysed data of a sample of psychoactive drug users from a longitudinal survey of psychoactive drug abusers in Hong Kong who were interviewed at 6 time points at 6-month intervals between January 2009 and December 2011. Data of the second to the sixth time points were stacked into an individual time point structure. Random-effects probit regression analysis was performed to estimate the relative contribution of the independent variables to the binary dependent variable of drug use in the last 30 days. A permissive attitude towards drug use, life satisfaction, and depression at the concurrent time point, and self-esteem at the previous time point had direct effects on drug use in the last 30 days. Interestingly, permissiveness to occasional drug use was a stronger predictor of drug use than permissiveness to regular drug use. These 2 permissive attitude variables were affected by the belief that doing extreme things shows the vitality of young people (at concurrent time point), life satisfaction (at concurrent time point), and self-esteem (at concurrent and previous time points). Life satisfaction was affected by sense of uncertainty about the future (at concurrent time point), self-esteem (at concurrent time point), depression (at both concurrent and previous time points), and being stricken by stressful events (at previous time point). A number of psychosocial factors could affect the continuation or discontinuation of drug use, as well as the permissive attitude towards regular and occasional drug use, and life satisfaction. Implications of the findings for prevention and intervention work targeted at

  10. 76 FR 45811 - Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... the letters AD, from the upper right-hand corner of your completed Animal Drug User Fee Cover Sheet... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal... Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates and payment procedures for fiscal year (FY) 2012 animal drug...

  11. Metformin: a potential drug to treat hyperpigmentation disorders.

    PubMed

    Belisle, Elisabeth S; Park, Hee-Young

    2014-10-01

    Hyperpigmentation disorders are generally difficult to treat because of the limited availability of effective therapeutics with minimal side effects. In this issue, Lehraiki et al. report that metformin, an antidiabetic drug, inhibited melanogenesis, in vitro and in vivo, and they suggest that metformin may be used to treat hyperpigmentation disorders. This commentary reviews the molecular mechanisms through which metformin inhibits melanogenesis and examines metformin as a potential drug to treat hyperpigmentation.

  12. A pilot study of loss aversion for drug and non-drug commodities in cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Justin C; Beckmann, Joshua S; Rush, Craig R; Stoops, William W

    2017-09-12

    Numerous studies in behavioral economics have demonstrated that individuals are more sensitive to the prospect of a loss than a gain (i.e., loss aversion). Although loss aversion has been well described in "healthy" populations, little research exists in individuals with substance use disorders. This gap is notable considering the prominent role that choice and decision-making play in drug use. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate loss aversion in active cocaine users. Current cocaine users (N=38; 42% female) participated in this within-subjects laboratory pilot study. Subjects completed a battery of tasks designed to assess loss aversion for drug and non-drug commodities under varying risk conditions. Standardized loss aversion coefficients (λ) were compared to theoretically and empirically relevant normative values (i.e., λ=2). Compared to normative loss aversion coefficient values, a precise and consistent decrease in loss aversion was observed in cocaine users (sample λ≈1). These values were observed across drug and non-drug commodities as well as under certain and risky conditions. These data represent the first systematic study of loss aversion in cocaine-using populations and provide evidence for equal sensitivity to losses and gains or loss equivalence. Futures studies should evaluate the specificity of these effects to a history of cocaine use as well as the impact of manipulations of loss aversion on drug use to determine how this phenomenon may contribute to intervention development efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SEX DIFFERENCES IN DRUG USE AMONG POLYSUBSTANCE USERS

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ben; Hoffman, Lauren A.; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2014-01-01

    Background Available evidence indicates women with substance use disorders may experience more rapid progression through usage milestones (telescoping). The few investigations of sex differences in treatment-seeking populations often focus on single substances and typically do not account for significant polysubstance abuse. The current study examined sex differences in a heterogeneous sample of treatment seeking polysubstance users. We examined patterns of drug use, age at drug use milestones (e.g., initial use, regular use), and progression rates between milestones. Nicotine and alcohol use were also evaluated. Methods Participants (N=543; 288 women) completed personal histories of substance use, including chronicity, frequency, and regularity, as well as inventories assessing affect, and intellectual ability. Results Rates of drug use and milestone ages varied by sex and specific drug. Analyses suggested pronounced telescoping effects for pain medication and marijuana, with women progressing more rapidly through usage milestones. Conclusions Our data were generally supportive of telescoping effects, although considerable variance in progression measures was noted. The contrast between the marked telescoping observed in pain medication use and the absence of telescoping in other opioids was of particular interest. The discrepancy in telescoping effects, despite shared pharmacologies, suggests the need for further work examining underlying psychosocial factors. These results highlight that the specific sample population, substance, and outcome measure should be carefully considered when interpreting sex differences in substance use. PMID:25454410

  14. [Harm reduction interventions in drug users: current situation and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Bosque-Prous, Marina; Brugal, María Teresa

    2016-11-01

    Harm reduction encompasses interventions, programmes and policies that seek to reduce the negative consequences of the consumption of both legal and illegal drugs on the individual and public health. Harm reduction looks to mitigate the harm suffered by drug users through drug use monitoring and prevention, and promotes initiatives that respect and protect the human rights of this population. The harm reduction policies that have proven effective and efficient are: opioid substitution maintenance therapy (methadone); needle and syringe exchange programmes; supervised drug consumption rooms; and overdose prevention through peer-based naloxone distribution. In order to be effective, these policies must have comprehensive coverage and be implemented in areas where the target population is prevalent. Resident-based opposition to the implementation of these policies is known as the NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) phenomenon, which is characterised by being against the implementation of new measures in a particular place, but does not question their usefulness. Given that any NIMBY phenomenon is a complex social, cultural and political phenomenon, it is important to conduct a thorough analysis of the situation prior to implementing any of these measures. Harm reduction policies must be extended to other substances such as alcohol and tobacco, as well as to other conditions beyond infectious/contagious diseases and overdose. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Sex differences in drug use among polysubstance users.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ben; Hoffman, Lauren A; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2014-12-01

    Available evidence indicates women with substance use disorders may experience more rapid progression through usage milestones (telescoping). The few investigations of sex differences in treatment-seeking populations often focus on single substances and typically do not account for significant polysubstance abuse. The current study examined sex differences in a heterogeneous sample of treatment seeking polysubstance users. We examined patterns of drug use, age at drug use milestones (e.g., initial use, regular use), and progression rates between milestones. Nicotine and alcohol use were also evaluated. Participants (n = 543; 288 women) completed personal histories of substance use, including chronicity, frequency, and regularity, as well as inventories assessing affect, and intellectual ability. Rates of drug use and milestone ages varied by sex and specific drug. Analyses suggested pronounced telescoping effects for pain medication and marijuana, with women progressing more rapidly through usage milestones. Our data were generally supportive of telescoping effects, although considerable variance in progression measures was noted. The contrast between the marked telescoping observed in pain medication use and the absence of telescoping in other opioids was of particular interest. The discrepancy in telescoping effects, despite shared pharmacologies, suggests the need for further work examining underlying psychosocial factors. These results highlight that the specific sample population, substance, and outcome measure should be carefully considered when interpreting sex differences in substance use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Barriers to Employment among Unemployed Drug Users: Age Predicts Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; Ring, Brandon M.; O’Reilly, Kristen; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug users in treatment or exiting treatment face many barriers to employment when entering the job market, such as low levels of education and technical skills, and low levels of interpersonal skills. As a result of these and other barriers, employment rates in these groups are generally low. Objective This article examines the existence and possible predictors of specific barriers to employment related to interpersonal and technical skills in a sample of participants enrolled in a therapeutic workplace intervention for substance abuse. Methods In Study I (N = 77), we characterized and examined predictors of participant scores on a staff-rated scale of interpersonal skills (Work Behavior Inventory). In Study II (N = 29), we examined whether participants had lower levels of computer knowledge than job seekers in the general population, and investigated possible predictors of computer knowledge in the sample. Results In general, participants in Study I displayed low levels of interpersonal skills, and participants in Study II scored lower on the computer knowledge test than job seekers in the general population. Older participants tended to have lower levels of interpersonal skills and lower levels of computer knowledge. Conclusions and Scientific Significance These results suggest that providers of workforce development services for drug users in treatment or exiting treatment should attend to these specific barriers to employment, which may also be more pronounced among older clients. PMID:22242680

  17. The landscape of services for drug users in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Chris; Kurniasih, Yacinta; Barton, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Drug use has increased rapidly in Indonesia since the late 1990s. The formal drug treatment sector has grown within the bounds of available government funding; however, there is also a substantial informal sector which provides a range of services for current and former users. While information regarding the former is available from the provincial and national governments, there are few sources that detail the latter. The aim of the current study, therefore, is to document the drug treatment services in one Indonesian city, Yogyakarta. This qualitative study utilised nine key informant interviews with drug treatment workers from nine government and non-government treatment services. Transcripts were analysed thematically. There exists a patchwork of enthusiastic yet under-resourced non-government services that complement the government rehabilitation and withdrawal programs in Yogyakarta. The focus of most such services is on abstinence (including several faith-based residential rehabilitation programs); however, some harm reduction programs have emerged in recent years. Under-utilisation is a feature of many non-government services, and all respondents acknowledged a significant gap in service coordination. Yogyakarta has a drug treatment sector in which most major treatment types are represented, and there appears to be potential for growth within many organisations. Nevertheless, the number and reach of the services are limited by a lack of resources and collaboration, and there are substantial cultural barriers to improving inter-organisational coordination. This study suggests that Yogyakarta and greater Indonesia may benefit from greater service coordination facilitated by local government. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  18. Factors related to Psychosocial Barriers to Drug Treatment among Chinese Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C; Liu, Tieqiao; Zhang, Guanbai; Hao, Wei; Wang, Jichuan

    2014-01-01

    Although substance abuse treatment has been considerably scaled up in China, impediments to accessing these services remain among drug users. The authors examine the primary psychosocial barriers to drug treatment in this population and evaluate factors associated with these barriers. Barriers to accessing drug treatment were measured using the Barriers to Treatment Inventory (BTI). A Structural Equation Model was used to examine whether the internal barriers were associated with treatment history and frequent methamphetamine use as well as how demographic characteristics influence such barriers. We found four primary factors of internal barriers to drug treatment – absence of problem, negative social support, fear of treatment, and privacy concerns – to fit well. Demographic factors, notably age and employment status, indirectly influence barriers to treatment via other factors. Frequency of methamphetamine use and drug treatment history are directly associated with the absence of problem and negative social support dimensions of the BTI, and it is through these pathways that demographic factors such as age and employment status shape barriers to treatment. The findings indicate that perceived absence of a problem and negative social support are the barriers most influenced by the personal domains of Chinese drug users’ lives. Efforts to engage drug users in China about drug treatment options may consider how these barriers are differentially perceived in order to effectively reach this population. PMID:24813554

  19. Drug user organizations in the Nordic countries--local, national, and international dimensions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Vibeke Asmussen; Anker, Jørgen; Tammi, Tuukka

    2012-04-01

    The article focuses on drug user organizations that represent and advocate for active "hard drug" users in the Nordic countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges that these organizations face in their search for legitimacy and political influence. The comparative perspective points at similarities and differences in national contexts that both support and challenges the existence of drug user organizations, including drug policy, social welfare policy, trends in drug use, and organizational conditions. The article also discusses the importance of international network and transnational organizations that support drug user organizations.

  20. Suicidal behaviours in male and female users of illicit drugs recruited in drug treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Arribas-Ibar, Elisabet; Suelves, Josep Maria; Sanchez-Niubò, Albert; Domingo-Salvany, Antònia; T Brugal, M

    We assessed prevalence of suicidal ideation and plans among illicit drug users and their association with contextual factors, by gender. Cross-sectional study. In a sample of 511 illicit drug users recruited during spring 2012 in drug treatment and prevention facilities in Catalonia (Spain), the prevalence of suicidal ideation/plans in the last 12 months was assessed. Poisson regression was used to examine associations between suicidal ideation/plans and various factors (socio-demographic, psychological, illegal drug market activities and marginal income generation activities, which included any reported sex work, stealing, peddling, begging or borrowing on credit from a dealer). The average age was 37.9 years (standard deviation: 8.62); 76.3% were men. Suicidal ideation/plans were reported by 30.8% of men and 38.8% of women, with no significant differences by age or gender. Recent aggression (male prevalence ratio [PR]=2.2; female PR=1.4), psychological treatment (male PR=1.2; female PR=1.3) and illegal/marginal income generation activities (male PR=1.5; female PR=1.1) were associated with suicidal ideation/plans. Men who trafficked were more likely to have suicidal ideation/plans (PR=1.3), while prison history was positive for women (PR=1.8) and negative for men (PR=0.7). Prevalence of suicidal ideation/plans was high among illicit drug users recruited from healthcare facilities. Besides psychological variables, participation in illegal market activities and crime ought to be considered in drug users' suicidal prevention. Suicide risk needs to be evaluated in drug treatment facilities and psychological status and context contemplated. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice, request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing...

  2. Does Harm Reduction Programming Make a Difference in the Lives of Highly Marginalized, At-Risk Drug Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Susan J.; Ruefli, Terry

    Harm reduction is a controversial model for treating drug users with little formal research on its operation and effectiveness. In order to advance the field, the authors conducted participatory research with 120 clients of harm reduction using nominal group technique to develop culturally relevant outcomes to measure progress. Second, the authors…

  3. Policing Drug Users in Russia: Risk, Fear, and Structural Violence

    PubMed Central

    Sarang, Anya; Rhodes, Tim; Sheon, Nicolas; Page, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    We undertook qualitative interviews with 209 injecting drug users (primarily heroin) in three Russian cities: Moscow, Barnaul, and Volgograd. We explored drug injectors’ accounts of HIV and health risk. Policing practices and how these violate health and self emerged as a primary theme. Findings show that policing practices violate health and rights directly, but also indirectly, through the reproduction of social suffering. Extrajudicial policing practices produce fear and terror in the day-to-day lives of drug injectors, and ranged from the mundane (arrest without legal justification; the planting of evidence to expedite arrest or detainment; the extortion of money or drugs for police gain) to the extreme (physical violence as a means of facilitating ‘confession’ and as an act of ‘moral’ punishment without legal cause or rationale; the use of methods of ‘torture’; and rape). We identify the concept of police bespredel – living with the sense that there are ‘no limits’ to police power – as key to perpetuating fear and terror, internalized stigma, and a sense of fatalist risk acceptance. ‘Police besprediel’ is analyzed as a form of structural violence, contributing to ‘oppression illness’. Yet we also identify cases of resistance to such oppression, characterised by strategies to preserve dignity and hope. We identify hope for change as a resource of risk reduction as well as escape, if only temporarily, from the pervasiveness of social suffering. Future drug policies, and the state responses they sponsor, should set out to promote public health while protecting human rights, hope and human dignity. PMID:20397872

  4. Barriers to condom use and needle cleaning among impoverished minority female injection drug users and partners of injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, A M; Lewis, C; Leake, B; Flaskerud, J; Bennett, C

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to describe sexual behaviors and drug use and other factors that inhibit condom use and needle cleaning among impoverished women who are injection drug users (IDUs) or sexual partners of IDUs. This study also investigated whether risky sexual behavior or barriers to risk reduction differ with ethnicity and level of acculturation. Survey instruments to assess drug and sexual activity were administered to 378 African American and Latina women recruited primarily from homeless shelters and drug recovery programs. The most commonly cited barriers to condom use were belief that partners did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), lack of knowledge about where to get and how to use condoms, and discomfort discussing condom use with partners. African American women were more likely to report having multiple partners and unprotected sex, and more likely to report barriers in using, discussing, and obtaining condoms. Latina women were more likely to report partners' dislike of condoms. African American and highly acculturated Latina women were more likely to be IDUs than less acculturated Latina women. The most pervasive barriers for needle cleaning were not having personal needles, being high and not interested in needle cleaning, and not having disinfectant available. In a multiple logistic regression analysis for engaging in unprotected sex and cleaning needles, not ethnic or acculturation differences were found after controlling for selected demographic characteristics and risk factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7630993

  5. Hepatitis C virus treatment as prevention among injecting drug users: who should we cure first?

    PubMed

    de Vos, Anneke S; Prins, Maria; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E E

    2015-06-01

    Treatment of injecting drug users (IDU) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may prevent onward transmission. Treating individuals who often share injecting equipment is most likely to prevent new infections. However, these high-risk IDU are also more likely to become re-infected than low-risk IDU. We investigated to which group treatment is best targeted. We modelled the expected benefits per treatment of one chronically HCV-infected IDU in a population of low- and high-risk IDU. The benefits of treating one low- or one high-risk IDU were compared. Benefits included the probability for the treated IDU to become and remain uninfected, as well as the expected number of prevented infections to others (i.e. we quantified the total expected decrease in chronic infections). We found a threshold in HCV-RNA prevalence above which treating low-risk IDU, and below which treating high-risk IDU, resulted in the greatest benefits. This threshold was at 50% of exchanged syringes being HCV contaminated. When 42% of IDU engaged in high-risk behaviour (borrowing and lending out syringes 7.3 times more frequently than low-risk IDU), the corresponding threshold of HCV-RNA prevalence among IDU was at 32%. Larger-risk heterogeneity led to a lower corresponding threshold among IDU. A combination of HCV treatment and 50% risk reduction was best directed at high-risk IDU for prevalence among syringes up to 59%. The threshold was marginally sensitive to changes in disease and treatment variables. When more than half of all exchanged syringes in a population of injecting drug users (IDU) are contaminated by hepatitis C virus, it is most efficient to treat low-risk IDU first. Below this threshold, it is most efficient to treat high-risk IDU first. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Characteristics of Cannabis-Only and Other Drug Users Who Visit the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Susan I.; McCabe, Cameron T.; Hohman, Melinda; Clapp, John D.; Shillington, Audrey M.; Eisenberg, Kimberly; Sise, C. Beth; Castillo, Edward M.; Chan, Theodore C.; Sise, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Emergency department (ED) settings have gained interest as venues for illegal drug misuse prevention and intervention, with researchers and practitioners attempting to capitalize on the intersection of need and opportunity within these settings. This study of 686 adult patients visiting two EDs for various reasons who admitted drug use compared daily cannabis-only users, nondaily cannabis-only users, and other drug users on sociodemographic and drug-related severity outcomes. The three drug use groups did not differ on most sociodemographic factors or medical problem severity scores. Forty-five percent of the sample was identified as having a drug use problem. ED patients who used drugs other than cannabis were at particular risk for high drug use severity indicators and concomitant problems such as psychiatric problems and alcohol use severity. However, 19–29% of cannabis-only users were identified as having problematic drug use. Furthermore, daily cannabis-only users fared less well than nondaily cannabis users with regard to drug use severity indicators and self-efficacy for avoiding drug use. Results may assist emergency medicine providers and medical social workers in matching patients to appropriate intervention. For example, users of drugs other than cannabis (and perhaps heavy, daily cannabis-only users) may need referral to specialty services for further assessment. Enhancement of motivation and self-efficacy beliefs could be an important target of prevention and treatment for cannabis-only users screened in the ED. PMID:27689138

  7. Cross-border drug injection relationships among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Pollini, Robin A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Vera, Alicia; Volkmann, Tyson A.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Background International borders are unique social and environmental contexts characterized by high levels of mobility. Among drug users, mobility increases risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in part through its effects on the social environment. However, the social dynamics of drug users living in border regions are understudied. Methods 1056 injection drug users (IDUs) residing in Tijuana, Mexico were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) from 2006 to 2007, and underwent surveys and testing for HIV, syphilis, and tuberculosis (TB). Using logistic regression on baseline data, we identified correlates of having ever injected drugs with someone from the US. Results Almost half (48%) reported ever injecting drugs with someone from the US. In RDS-adjusted logistic regression, factors independently associated with having ever injected with someone from the US included: having greater than middle school education (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.91; 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 1.52, 5.91), speaking English (AOR 3.24, 95% C.I. 1.96, 5.36), age (AOR 1.10 per year; 95% C.I. 1.07, 1.14), age at initiation of injection drug use (AOR 0.90 per year; 95% C.I. 0.86, 0.94), homelessness (AOR 2.61; 95% C.I. 1.27, 5.39), and having ever been incarcerated (AOR 11.82; 95% C.I., 5.22, 26.77). No associations with HIV, syphilis, TB, drug use, or injection risk behavior were detected. Conclusion Findings suggest that IDU networks in Mexico and the US may transcend international borders, with implications for cross-border transmission of infectious disease. Binational programs and policies need to consider the structure and geographic distribution of drug using networks. PMID:20889270

  8. HIV risk behavior among bisexual and heterosexual drug users.

    PubMed

    Logan, T K; Leukefeld, C

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the sexual and drug use behaviors for bisexual and heterosexual drug users (n=11,435 males and n=5,636 females) who participated in the NIDA AIDS Cooperative Agreement study. Results of the study suggest that, for males, bisexuality was highly associated with being homeless, having ever been paid for sex, having five or more sex partners in the month preceding the interview, having an IV drug-using sexual partner in the month preceding the interview, using crack, and sharing injection equipment in the month preceding the interview. For females, bisexuality was associated with ever having been arrested, past substance abuse treatment, ever having been paid for sex, ever having paid for sex, having five or more sexual partners in the month preceding the interview, ever using cocaine, and sharing injection equipment in the month preceding the interview. Overall, results from this study indicate that both male and female bisexuals, when compared to heterosexuals, were at higher risk for HIV and were more likely to be HIV positive. One implication of these results is that a universal prevention message may not be as effective as targeting prevention messages specifically for bisexual males and females.

  9. Psychiatric comorbidity in injecting drug users in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Shelly; Kamal, Rama; De Jong, Cor A

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in injecting drug users (IDUs) in the Western countries is high and is associated with lower quality of life and reduces the effectiveness of treatment programs. The aim of this study is to provide a review about psychiatric comorbidity in IDUs in Asia and Africa, where HIV prevalence is high and still increasing. Studies focusing on psychiatric comorbidity in Asia and Africa are scarce. The prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity is comparable with the prevalence in western countries. Psychiatric disorders can occur before or during drug abuse and are also associated with substance abuse and physical comorbidity and its treatments. Childhood trauma followed by post-traumatic disorders is a significant risk factor for substance abuse. Psychiatric co-occurring disorders influence the adherence to the physical and drug use treatment. Evidence-based treatment for psychiatric comorbidity in IDUs is still limited. A better understanding of the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in IDUs and its impact on the overall treatments is growing. However, more studies focusing on the treatment for psychiatric comorbidity in IDUs in Asia and Africa are needed.

  10. Mortality of intravenous drug users in Rome: a cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Perucci, C A; Davoli, M; Rapiti, E; Abeni, D D; Forastiere, F

    1991-01-01

    A historical cohort study was carried out in Rome to examine overall and cause-specific mortality among intravenous drug users (IVDUs). A total of 4200 IVDUs (3411 men and 789 women) enrolled in methadone treatment centers between 1980 and 1988 were studied. There were 239 deaths during the follow-up period. The overall SMR was 10.10 in the entire cohort (95% confidence interval, 8.86-11.47), 9.30 in males and 18.07 in females. A large excess of mortality in both sexes was found for infectious, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive diseases as well as for violence, overdose, AIDS, and unknown or ill-defined causes. Tumors and suicide were excessive only in males. Deaths due to drug overdose, violence or trauma, and cirrhosis accounted for 63.6%, AIDS for 7.1%, endocarditis and other bacterial infections for 7.1%, and neoplasms for 3.8% of total mortality. These findings document serious health consequences of drug abuse in Italy. PMID:1656799

  11. [Drugs used to treat nicotine addiction].

    PubMed

    Zieleń, Iwona; Sliwińska-Mossoń, Mariola; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking in Poland is fairly widespread on a large scale. Research suggests that the early twenty-first century, the percentage of female daily smokers aged 20 and above was 26%, and men the same age 43%. In addition, epidemiological studies have shown that smoking was the cause of approximately sixty-nine thousand deaths in Poland (including fifty-seven thousand men and twelve thousand women). It is common ground that cigarette smoking has a negative effect on our body. It represents one of the main and most commonly defined risk factors for many diseases that can be eliminated. Smoking often leads to addiction, and nicotine is an addictive drug. Nicotine addiction is characterized by symptoms such as: "hunger" smoking, difficulty in controlling behavior on smoking or the number of cigarettes smoked, nicotine withdrawal, the occurrence of tolerance, neglect of interests, as well as devoting more time on activities related to smoking, follow-up smoking despite knowledge of its dangers. The most commonly used in Poland, a questionnaire to identify nicotine dependence is a test Fagerstöma. Currently assigned some importance, "the doctor a conversation the patient" and motivating him to stop smoking and maintain abstinence as long as possible. But beyond the "conversation" is also used as an aid to medical treatment for the patient to stop smoking, especially to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. The first attempts of pharmacological help in the effort to weaning from smoking began in the thirties. Were conducted fairly successful, although uncontrolled trials with lobeline, an alkaloid of action similar to nicotine. In Poland, the drugs of first choice in the treatment of nicotine dependence are nicotine replacement therapies (nicotine gum and patches that contain nicotine) and bupropion SR. Quite a popular drugs to help in the fight against addiction are also cytisine and varenicline. The choice of the drug is usually the result of medical experience in the use

  12. Tuberculosis knowledge among New York City injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, H; Marmor, M; Maslansky, R; Nichols, S; Simberkoff, M; Des Jarlais, D; Moss, A

    1995-01-01

    Structured interviews measuring tuberculosis knowledge were administered to 494 New York City injection drug users, 31% of whom reported a history of having a reactive tuberculin skin test. Medical records review of a subsample confirmed the validity of self-reported data. Most respondents understood the mechanisms of tuberculosis transmission. Three fourths of the subjects did not fully understand the distinction between a reactive skin test and active tuberculosis, but those who reported a history of skin test reactivity were twice as likely to understand this distinction. Forty percent of subjects did not understand the importance of medication adherence. Misunderstandings, based on a recent lack of tuberculosis education, may contribute to the fear and confusion that interfere with efforts to control tuberculosis. PMID:7604926

  13. Pregnancy and Sexual Health Among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of prenatal care, and histories of sexual victimization are described. A total of 81 lifetime pregnancies and 26 children were reported. Infrequent and ineffective use of contraception was common. While pregnancy motivated some homeless youth to establish housing, miscarriages and terminations were more frequent among youth who reported being housed. Widespread access to prenatal and medical services was reported during pregnancy, but utilization varied. Many women continued to use substances throughout pregnancy. Several youth reported childhood sexual abuse and sexual victimization while homeless. Pregnancy presents a unique opportunity to encourage positive health behaviors in a high-risk population seldom seen in a clinical setting. PMID:18692891

  14. Policing drug users in Russia: risk, fear, and structural violence.

    PubMed

    Sarang, Anya; Rhodes, Tim; Sheon, Nicolas; Page, Kimberly

    2010-05-01

    We undertook qualitative interviews with 209 injecting drug users (IDUs) (primarily heroin) in three Russian cities: Moscow, Barnaul, and Volgograd. We explored IDU's accounts of HIV and health risk. Policing practices and how these violate health and self, emerged as a primary theme. Findings show that policing practices violate health and rights directly, but also indirectly, through the reproduction of social suffering. Extrajudicial policing practices produce fear and terror in the day-to-day lives of drug injectors, and ranged from the mundane (arrest without legal justification; the planting of evidence to expedite arrest or detainment; and the extortion of money or drugs for police gain) to the extreme (physical violence as a means of facilitating "confession" and as an act of "moral" punishment without legal cause or rationale; the use of methods of "torture"; and rape). We identify the concept of police bespredel-living with the sense that there are "no limits" to police power-as a key to perpetuating fear and terror, internalized stigma, and a sense of fatalist risk acceptance. Police besprediel is analyzed as a form of structural violence, contributing to "oppression illness." Yet, we also identify cases of resistance to such oppression, characterized by strategies to preserve dignity and hope. We identify hope for change as a resource of risk reduction as well as escape, if only temporarily, from the pervasiveness of social suffering. Future drug use(r)-related policies, and the state responses they sponsor, should set out to promote public health while protecting human rights, hope, and dignity.

  15. Natural history of HIV-1 infection and predictors of survival in a cohort of HIV-1 seropositive injecting drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L. S.; Siddiqui, N. S.; Chu, A. F.

    1996-01-01

    Injecting drug users represent a pivotal and increasing component of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) case reporting in the United States. This article describes the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in a New York City cohort of 328 HIV-infected injecting drug users. The study sample of nearly two-thirds men (predominately African Americans and Latino Americans) underwent follow-up from December 1988 through December 1993. Male injecting drug users reported a longer injecting drug use history and were more likely to share needles/works than female injecting drug users. Eighty-nine of 328 study subjects died during the 5 years of observation. Comparing African Americans and Latinos, race/ethnicity was not related to survival. Survival was related to baseline CD4 count and hemoglobin level. Zidovudine use and PCP prophylaxis did not predict survival. Because of the continuing and increasing impact of HIV disease on injecting drug users and communities of color, there remains an unquestionable need to develop effective prevention programs, to understand the natural history of HIV disease, and to develop appropriate therapeutic interventions to treat those with HIV disease. PMID:8583491

  16. Combining Drugs to Treat Ovarian Cancer - Annual Plan

    Cancer.gov

    Approximately 70 percent of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer will die from the disease. Read about the NCI-funded combination drug trial that has successfully treated Betsy Brauser's recurrent cancer.

  17. [Cost of drugs used to treat cardiovascular disease in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Bueno, Cristiane Schmalz; Moreira, Angélica Cristiane; Oliveira, Karla Renata de

    2012-01-01

    Diseases of the circulatory system are a principal cause of mortality in Brazil. Using as a basis drugs dispensed through Brazil's Popular Pharmacy Program (FPB, for its name in Portuguese), prices for drugs used to treat circulatory diseases were analyzed to identify the advantages of using generic drugs and the FPB. Drug prices were obtained using Brazil's Pharmacy Price Guide and FPB price tables. The costs of 15 drugs available through the FPB were compared with those of three generic pharmaceutical products, three similar products, and the reference drug. The generic drugs were lower in price for 10 of the drugs and for four of the similar products. The FPB drugs were of the lowest price. Generic and FPB drugs are easily accessed by the population and thus facilitate the continuity of pharmacotherapy when these drugs are not available through the Unified Health System and/or are not affordable through other means. Access to drugs should be taken into consideration at the time prescriptions are filled, especially as regards those used to treat chronic diseases.

  18. Injection drug users' perceptions of drug treatment services and attitudes toward substitution therapy: a qualitative study in three Russian cities.

    PubMed

    Bobrova, Natalia; Alcorn, Ron; Rhodes, Tim; Rughnikov, Iurii; Neifeld, Elena; Power, Robert

    2007-12-01

    This study explored injection drug users' (IDUs) perceptions of drug abuse treatment and treatment providers in three Russian cities as well as their attitudes toward opiate substitution therapy, which is currently not available in Russia. Data were collected from 121 qualitative interviews with IDUs conducted in 2003-2004. Negative perceptions of available treatments were related to poor treatment outcomes, judgmental service providers, lack of psychologic services, and short lengths of stay in treatment. Positive perceptions were associated with receiving psychosocial care and nonjudgmental attitudes from providers. Most participants had heard about opiate substitution therapy, and some had treated themselves using methadone from the black market. Although respondents had doubts that opiate substitution therapy could work effectively in Russia, most agreed that this type of treatment would help IDUs function better in the society.

  19. 77 FR 45629 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... payment of related application fees and any other fees owed under the Animal Generic Drug User Fee program... abbreviated application fees is $1,809,000 and each of the other two generic new animal drug user fee...] [FR Doc No: 2012-18710] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket...

  20. Methamphetamine Users in a Community-Based Drug Court: Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jennifer L.; Listwan, Shelley Johnson; Shaffer, Deborah Koetzle

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines men and women methamphetamine (meth) users who participated in a community-based drug court. The treatment of female drug users is a particularly salient issue because of the concerns with relapse and recidivism. For the current study, we studied the impact of the drug court by gender on a group of high-risk/high-need meth…

  1. Methamphetamine Users in a Community-Based Drug Court: Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jennifer L.; Listwan, Shelley Johnson; Shaffer, Deborah Koetzle

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines men and women methamphetamine (meth) users who participated in a community-based drug court. The treatment of female drug users is a particularly salient issue because of the concerns with relapse and recidivism. For the current study, we studied the impact of the drug court by gender on a group of high-risk/high-need meth…

  2. 76 FR 79195 - Animal Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period... September 20, 2011 (76 FR 58279). In that notice, FDA requested comments on the Animal Drug User Fee Act...

  3. 78 FR 53152 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014... Administration is correcting a notice entitled ``Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014'' that appeared in the Federal Register of August 2, 2013 (78 FR 46980). The document announced the Fiscal...

  4. New Drugs for Treating Dyslipidemia: Beyond Statins

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Statins have been shown to be very effective and safe in numerous randomized clinical trials, and became the implacable first-line treatment against atherogenic dyslipidemia. However, even with optimal statin treatment, 60% to 80% of residual cardiovascular risk still exists. The patients with familial hypercholesterolemia which results in extremely high level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level and the patients who are intolerant or unresponsive to statins are the other hurdles of statin treatment. Recently, new classes of lipid-lowering drugs have been developed and some of them are available for the clinical practice. The pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexintype 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor increases the expression of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in hepatocytes by enhancing LDL receptor recycling. The microsomal triglyceride transport protein (MTP) inhibitor and antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein B (ApoB) reduce the ApoB containing lipoprotein by blocking the hepatic very low density lipoprotein synthesis pathway. The apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) mimetics pursuing the beneficial effect of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and can reverse the course of atherosclerosis. ApoA1 mimetics had many controversial clinical data and need more validation in humans. The PCSK9 inhibitor recently showed promising results of significant LDL-C lowering in familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients from the long-term phase III trials. The MTP inhibitor and antisesnse oligonucleotide against ApoB were approved for the treatment of homozygous FH but still needs more consolidated evidences about hepatic safety such as hepatosteatosis. We would discuss the benefits and concerns of these new lipid-lowering drugs anticipating additional benefits beyond statin treatment. PMID:25922802

  5. Therapeutic effects of acetylspiramycin and garlicin on cryptosporidiosis among drug users

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Zhu; Li, Jin; Guan, Lan; Li, Deng-Qing; Nie, Xin-Min; Gui, Rong; Chen, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis affects humans of all ages, particularly malnourished children and those with compromised immune systems such as HIV/AIDS. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of acetylspiramycin and garlicin on Cryptosporidium infection in institutionalized male drug users receiving rehabilitative treatment. Examination of stool specimens from 903 drug users via modified acid-fast bacilli staining resulted in 172 positive cases. Among them 151 subjects consented to participate in a randomized trial of acetylspiramycin and garlicin in four groups: acetylspiramycin plus garlicin, acetylspiramycin only, garlicin only, and placebo control. The cryptosporidiosis rate was higher in younger subjects with longer drug use history than subjects who are older with shorter history of drug use. After two segments of treatments, 76.2% of the cases achieved negative test results, with the four groups achieving the rates of 92.1%, 76.7%, 72.2%, and 61.8%, respectively (χ2 = 9.517, P = 0.023). These results indicate clinical potential of garlicin in conjunction with acetylspiramycin in treating cryptosporidiosis. PMID:27120065

  6. Therapeutic effects of acetylspiramycin and garlicin on cryptosporidiosis among drug users.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zhu; Li, Jin; Guan, Lan; Li, Deng-Qing; Nie, Xin-Min; Gui, Rong; Chen, Xia

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidiosis affects humans of all ages, particularly malnourished children and those with compromised immune systems such as HIV/AIDS. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of acetylspiramycin and garlicin on Cryptosporidium infection in institutionalized male drug users receiving rehabilitative treatment. Examination of stool specimens from 903 drug users via modified acid-fast bacilli staining resulted in 172 positive cases. Among them 151 subjects consented to participate in a randomized trial of acetylspiramycin and garlicin in four groups: acetylspiramycin plus garlicin, acetylspiramycin only, garlicin only, and placebo control. The cryptosporidiosis rate was higher in younger subjects with longer drug use history than subjects who are older with shorter history of drug use. After two segments of treatments, 76.2% of the cases achieved negative test results, with the four groups achieving the rates of 92.1%, 76.7%, 72.2%, and 61.8%, respectively (χ(2) = 9.517, P = 0.023). These results indicate clinical potential of garlicin in conjunction with acetylspiramycin in treating cryptosporidiosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Do performance and image enhancing drug users in regional Queensland experience difficulty accessing health services?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Matthew; Henshaw, Richard; McKay, Fiona H

    2016-07-01

    To understand health service access and needs of people who use performance and image enhancing drugs (PIED) in regional Queensland. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 people (n = 19 men) who reported the use of a range of PIEDs, including anabolic-androgenic steroids, human chorionic gonadotropin, growth hormone, clenbuterol, tamoxifen, insulin and peptides. Participants reported accessing a range of services, including needle and syringe programs and pharmacies, for sterile injecting equipment. While PIEDs users attributed some stigma to needle and syringe programs, they were seen as an important service for injecting equipment. Participants reported receiving either positive care from health-care providers, such as general practitioners (GP), or having negative experiences due to the stigma attached with PIED use. Few participants reported disclosing their PIED use to their GP not only because of the concerns that their GP would no longer see them but also because they felt their GP was not knowledgeable about these substances. Participants in the study reported no difficulty in accessing health services based on living in a regional area, with their concern focused more upon how they were viewed and treated by service staff. [Dunn M, Henshaw R, Mckay F. H. Do performance and image enhancing drug users in regional Queensland experience difficulty accessing health services? Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:377-382]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  8. Treating Teens: A Guide to Adolescent Drug Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Strategies, Washington, DC.

    This guide looks at drug abuse in the context of adolescent development and provides a framework for understanding what has been learned about effective adolescent drug treatment over the last decade. The guide, which underscores the need to address developmental issues when treating adolescents, provides concrete ways to assess treatment…

  9. Nonstructured treatment interruptions among injection drug users in Baltimore, MD.

    PubMed

    Kavasery, Ravi; Galai, Noya; Astemborski, Jacquie; Lucas, Gregory M; Celentano, David D; Kirk, Gregory D; Mehta, Shruti H

    2009-04-01

    We characterized patterns of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use and predictors of nonstructured treatment interruptions (NTIs) among injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, MD. Three hundred thirty-five IDUs who initiated HAART from 1996 to 2006 were studied. NTIs were defined as any subsequent 6-month interval where HAART was not reported. Predictors of the first NTI and subsequent restart of HAART were examined using Cox regression. Two hundred sixty (78%) reported > or =1 NTI. Of 215 with > or =1 follow-up visit after the NTI, 44 (20%) never restarted HAART, 62 (29%) restarted and remained on HAART, and 109 (51%) reported multiple NTIs. NTIs were less likely among those who initiated HAART in later calendar years and had a recent outpatient visit and more likely among women, persons with detectable HIV RNA at the prior visit, and those who reported injecting daily. Among those with NTIs, interuptions occurred earlier in persons who were younger, who did not have a prior AIDS diagnosis, and who were actively injecting; NTIs lasted longer in persons who had higher HIV RNA levels, in persons who were incarcerated, and in persons drinking alcohol. A recent outpatient visit and not actively injecting were associated with restarting HAART. NTIs were common in this population and occurred most frequently in the setting of active drug use and disruption of health care. Effective linkages between primary care for HIV and substance abuse treatment may improve HAART outcomes in this population.

  10. Infective endocarditis in an HIV-infected intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Mėlinytė, Karolina; Savickaitė, Jurgita; Rekienė, Daiva Emilija; Naudžiūnas, Albinas; Burkauskienė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Laima

    2015-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common complication among injecting drug users. Disease risk among these patients is increased by the spread of HIV infection. In the following article, we discuss the exceptional clinical presentation of a 28-year-old patient who used intravenous drugs (heroin) for 10 years, had been infected with HIV for seven years and as a complication had developed Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis. The patient came to the hospital in serious condition, complaining of bodily pain, swelling of the legs and general weakness. During hospitalization, besides infective endocarditis, she was also diagnosed with anemia, toxic hepatitis, renal failure, ascites, sepsis, and pneumonia. A completely disrupted tricuspid valve, damaged aortic valve, and fibrosis of the mitral valve were detected. Echocardiographic and radiologic data showed that the patient's condition continued to deteriorate day by day, with significant progression of heart failure, ejection fraction decreasing from 45% to 10%, and development of myocarditis, hydrothorax and pericarditis. However, this progressive worsening of the patient's condition ceased when vancomycin was administered. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case described in the literature in which significant improvement was observed despite the patient's complex condition with associated complications.

  11. Sex and drugs: the correlations of injecting drug users' risk perception and behavioral patterns.

    PubMed

    Márványkövi, Ferenc; Melles, Katalin; Rácz, József

    2009-01-01

    A low-level blood-borne virus infection exists among Hungary's injecting drug users (IDUs). Assessing the relationship between risk perception and risk behaviors is necessary in order to predict future drug-injecting trends. During 1999 -and 2000, 197 IDUs were interviewed in Budapest using the Risk Assessment Questionnaire developed by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Certain IDUs perceived high risks but did not act accordingly. High-risk perception of sexual behavior correlates with high-risk perception of drug use, which should be taken into consideration when planning intervention strategies targeting IDUs. Additional research with a larger sample is needed to explain our results in more detail. The study's limitations have been noted.

  12. Values and beliefs of psychedelic drug users: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Michael; Lyvers, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and psilocybin are often claimed to be capable of inducing life-changing experiences described as mystical or transcendental, especially if high doses are taken. The present study examined possible enduring effects of such experiences by comparing users of psychedelic drugs (n = 88), users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, amphetamines) (n = 29) and non illicit drug-using social drinkers (n = 66) on questionnaire measures of values, beliefs and emotional empathy. Samples were obtained from Israel (n = 110) and Australia (n = 73) in a cross-cultural comparison to see if values associated with psychedelic drug use transcended culture of origin. Psychedelic users scored significantly higher on mystical beliefs (e.g., oneness with God and the universe) and life values of spirituality and concern for others than the other groups, and lower on the value of financial prosperity, irrespective of culture of origin. Users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs scored significantly lower on a measure of coping ability than both psychedelic users and non illicit drug users. Both groups of illegal drug users scored significantly higher on empathy than non illicit drug users. Results are discussed in the context of earlier findings from Pahnke (1966) and Doblin (1991) of the transformative effect of psychedelic experiences, although the possibility remains that present findings reflect predrug characteristics of those who chose to take psychedelic drugs rather than effects of the drugs themselves.

  13. Injecting drug users: a stigmatised and stigmatising population.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Lesley; Coomber, Ross

    2009-03-01

    This paper considers the way that social stigma impacts both on injecting drug user (IDU) populations and operates within them and the consequences this has for prevention and harm reduction amongst IDUs. The research from which this paper is drawn was a city case study, itself part of a larger national study to evaluate the efficacy of needle exchanges throughout England and Wales. Not initially part of the issues being explored, the interviews consistently pointed to concerns of stigma, and in this sense the theme was emergent from the qualitative process itself. The primary findings relating to this issue were: IDUs concern for being recognised or 'seen' as IDUs affected service uptake and/or their interaction with services; 'normal' IDUs moreover tended to stigmatise those IDUs they believed to be 'worse' than them--primarily the homeless--despite the fact that their own behaviour was often less than 'responsible' itself. In these ways 'stigma', whether being accepted or expressed by these different groups militated against the 'harm reductive' goals of Safer Injecting Services. It is concluded that much can be done to reduce stigma related to IDU and drug use in general and that this may result in improved service efficacy and a reduction in associated drug related harms. It is also concluded that many IDUs seek to enhance their own self-esteem and reinforce their own sense as 'responsible members of society' rather than the outsiders they often feel themselves to be by attributing stigmatised behaviours on other 'lesser' IDUs. This practice may also contribute to them militating against their own guilt regarding their own risky behaviours, however in so doing the goal of harm reduction may be further undermined.

  14. Mortality and HIV transmission among male Vietnamese injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Vu Minh; Le Minh, Nguyen; Ha, Tran Viet; Ngoc, Nguyen Phuong; Vu, Pham The; Celentano, David D.; Mo, Tran Thi; Go, Vivian F.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To estimate all-cause mortality rate and to assess predictors of all-cause mortality among injection drug users (IDUs) in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam between 2005 and 2007. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Community-dwelling IDUs were enrolled and followed at 3-month intervals for up to 2 years. Participants 894 male IDUs (median age of 32 years, 22.8% HIV-positive, all having injected opioid). Measurements Deaths were confirmed by family members and by reviewing government records. Marginal Cox proportional hazards models for clustered data were constructed to determine the independent predictors of all-cause mortality, using both fixed baseline measurements and time-dependent repeated measurements. Findings During 710.1 person-years of follow-up, 45 (5.0%) drug injectors died. The causes of deaths were aids-related death (14 cases, 31%), drug overdose (12, 27%), suicide (3, 7%), traffic accident (3, 7%), violence (2, 4%), pneumonia (2, 4%), non-traffic accident (1, 2%), and unknown causes (8, 18%). The all-cause mortality rate was 6.3% (95% CI = 4.6–8.5) per 100 person-years. The standardized mortality ratio was 13.4. The HIV incidence rate was 5.2 (95% CI = 3.5–7.6) per 100 person-years. In multifactorial analysis, hiv infection (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.9–6.3) and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis (HR = 10.0, 95% CI = 4.1–24.3) were significantly associated with increased hazard of death. Conclusions The all cause, age and sex standardized mortality among Vietnamese IDUs is 13-fold higher than the general population and substantially higher than IDUs studied in developed countries. Effective prevention and control of HIV infection and tuberculosis are urgently needed. PMID:21054619

  15. Mortality and HIV transmission among male Vietnamese injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Quan, Vu Minh; Minh, Nguyen Le; Ha, Tran Viet; Ngoc, Nguyen Phuong; Vu, Pham The; Celentano, David D; Mo, Tran Thi; Go, Vivian F

    2011-03-01

    To estimate all-cause mortality rate and to assess predictors of all-cause mortality among injection drug users (IDUs) in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam between 2005 and 2007. Prospective cohort study. Community-dwelling IDUs were enrolled and followed at 3-month intervals for up to 2 years. A total of 894 male IDUs (median age of 32 years, 22.8% HIV-positive, all having injected opioids). Deaths were confirmed by family members and by reviewing government records. Marginal Cox proportional hazards models for clustered data were constructed to determine the independent predictors of all-cause mortality, using both fixed baseline measurements and time-dependent repeated measurements. During 710.1 person-years of follow-up, 45 (5.0%) drug injectors died. The causes of deaths were AIDS-related (14 cases, 31%), drug overdose (12, 27%), suicide (three, 7%), traffic accident (three, 7%), violence (two, 4%), pneumonia (two, 4%), non-traffic accident (one, 2%) and unknown causes (eight, 18%). The all-cause mortality rate was 6.3% (95% CI = 4.6-8.5) per 100 person-years. The standardized mortality ratio was 13.4. The HIV incidence rate was 5.2 (95% CI = 3.5-7.6) per 100 person-years. In multi-factorial analysis, HIV infection [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.9-6.3] and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis (HR = 10.0, 95% CI = 4.1-24.3) were associated significantly with increased hazard of death. The all-cause, age- and sex-standardized mortality among Vietnamese IDUs is 13-fold higher than the general population and substantially higher than IDUs studied in developed countries. Effective prevention and control of HIV infection and tuberculosis are needed urgently. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Longitudinal Trajectories of Ketamine Use among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Shin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that became increasing popular in the club and rave scene in the 1980s and 1990s. Reports surfaced in the late 1990s indicating that ketamine was being injected in several U.S. cities by young injection drug users (IDUs). Since all studies on ketamine injection were cross-sectional, a longitudinal study was undertaken in 2005 to determine: characteristics of young IDUs who continue to inject ketamine; frequency of ketamine injection over an extended time period; risks associated with ongoing ketamine injection; and environmental factors that impact patterns of ketamine use. Methods Young IDUs aged 16 to 29 with a history of injecting ketamine (n=101) were recruited from public locations in Los Angeles and followed during a two-year longitudinal study. A semi-structured instrument captured quantitative and qualitative data on patterns of ketamine injection and other drug use. A statistical model sorted IDUs who completed three or more interviews (n=66) into three groups based upon patterns of ketamine injection at baseline and follow-up. Qualitative analysis focused on detailed case studies within each group. Results IDUs recruited at baseline were typically in their early 20s, male, heterosexual, white, and homeless. Longitudinal injection trajectories included: “Moderates,” who injected ketamine several times per year (n=5); “Occasionals,” who injected ketamine approximately once per year (n=21); and “Abstainers,” who did not inject any ketamine during follow-up (n=40). Findings suggest that ketamine is infrequently injected compared to other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Most IDUs who begin injecting ketamine will stop or curb use due to: negative or ambivalent experiences associated with ketamine; an inability to find the drug due to declining supply; or maturing out of injecting drugs more generally. Conclusion Reducing ketamine injection among young IDUs may best be accomplished

  17. The role of criminal justice system in treating drug abusers: the Chinese experience.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lening; Liu, Jianhong; Huang, Kaicheng

    2011-07-01

    This study explores the role of China's criminal justice system in treating drug abusers and provides a preliminary assessment of the mandatory treatment centers administered by police and reeducation-through-labor camps managed by correction agencies in China. The exploration and assessment are conducted using data collected from recent surveys of drug users in several mandatory treatment centers and a reeducation-through-labor camp in a large city of China in 2009. The data reveal that the treatment involvement levels of drug users in these mandatory treatment centers and reeducation-through-labor camps varied and their perceptions of the treatments they had received for their recovery seem fairly positive. The implication of these findings was discussed in the context of Chinese social and legal tradition.

  18. Resource use in treating alcohol- and drug-related diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Bramble, James D; Sakowski, Henry; Rich, Eugene C; Esterbrooks, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the variations in hospital resource use in the treatment of alcohol and drug diagnoses. Specifically, the study tested 2 hypotheses: 1). patients treated in teaching hospitals will have shorter lengths of stay and lower hospital charges than patients treated in nonteaching hospitals; and 2). patients treated in hospitals with more experience treating these conditions will have shorter lengths of stay and lower hospital charges. A retrospective cross-sectional study design used data from the 1996 Health Care Utilization Project to test the proposed hypotheses. The population for this study consisted of patients over 18 years old with an acute alcohol- or drug-related discharge diagnostic related group code. The variables of interest were teaching hospital status, as defined by the Council of Teaching Hospitals, and hospital experience, defined as the ratio of alcohol- and drug-related diagnoses to the hospital's total admissions. Measures of hospital resource use included the patient's length of stay and total hospital charges. Patients treated at hospitals with relatively more experience in treating alcohol- and drug-related diagnoses had 10.3% (US dollars 321) lower total charges (P =.017). Similar to research for high-volume surgical hospitals, these findings confirm that hospitals that have greater experience with complex medical conditions such as alcohol and drug intoxication and withdrawal may be more efficient. This important finding provides a rationale for further exploration of the key factors associated with higher quality and more efficient care for complex medical conditions.

  19. A qualitative exploration of prescription opioid injection among street-based drug users in Toronto: behaviours, preferences and drug availability

    PubMed Central

    Firestone, Michelle; Fischer, Benedikt

    2008-01-01

    Background There is evidence of a high prevalence of prescription opioid (PO) and crack use among street drug users in Toronto. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe drug use behaviours and preferences as well as the social and environmental context surrounding the use of these drugs among young and old street-based drug injection drug users (IDUs). Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 25 PO injectors. Topics covered included drug use history, types of drugs used, how drugs were purchased and transitions to PO use. Interviews were taped and transcribed. Content analysis was conducted to identify themes. Results Five prominent themes emerged from the interviews: 1) Combination of crack and prescription opioids, 2) First injection experience and transition to prescription opioids, 3) Drug preferences and availability, 4) Housing and income and 5) Obtaining drugs. There was consensus that OxyContin and crack were the most commonly available drugs on the streets of Toronto. Drug use preferences and behaviours were influenced by the availability of drugs, the desired effect, ease of administration and expectations around the purity of the drugs. Distinct experiences were observed among younger users as compared to older users. In particular, the initiation of injection drug use and experimentation with POs among younger users was influenced by their experiences on the street, their peers and general curiosity. Conclusion Given the current profile of street-based drug market in Toronto and the emergence of crack and POs as two predominant illicit drug groups, understanding drug use patterns and socio-economic factors among younger and older users in this population has important implications for preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:18928556

  20. Male injection drug users try new drugs following U.S. deportation to Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela M; Rangel, M Gudelia; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2012-01-01

    Among male injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, U.S. deportation is associated with HIV transmission. Changing drug use behaviors following deportation, including the use of new drugs, may increase HIV risk but are understudied. We identify correlates of trying new drugs following male IDUs' most recent U.S. deportation to Mexico. In 2010, we recruited 328 deported male IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico. Questionnaires collected retrospective data on drug use and other HIV risk behaviors throughout migratory events. Logistic regression identified correlates of trying new drugs/combinations following their most recent deportations. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Nearly one in six men (n=52, 16%) tried new drugs following their most recent deportation, including heroin (n=31), methamphetamine (n=5), and heroin/methamphetamine combined (n=17). Trying new drugs following deportation was independently associated with U.S. incarceration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=3.96; 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 1.78, 8.84), increasing numbers of U.S. deportations (AOR=1.11 per deportation; C.I. 1.03, 1.20), feeling sad following deportation (AOR 2.69; C.I. 1.41, 5.14), and perceiving that one's current lifestyle increases HIV/AIDS risk (AOR 3.91; C.I. 2.05, 7.44). Trying new drugs following U.S. deportation may be related to the unique contexts and stressors experienced by drug-abusing migrants as they attempt to reestablish their lives in Mexico. Findings imply an unmet need for health and social programs to alleviate pre- and post-deportation stressors faced by undocumented and return migrants in the U.S.-Mexico context. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Male injection drug users try new drugs following U.S. deportation to Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Angela M.; Rangel, M. Gudelia; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Among male injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, U.S. deportation is associated with HIV transmission. Changing drug use behaviors following deportation, including the use of new drugs, may increase HIV risk but are understudied. We identify correlates of trying new drugs following male IDUs’ most recent U.S. deportation to Mexico. Methods In 2010, we recruited 328 deported male IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico. Questionnaires collected retrospective data on drug use and other HIV risk behaviors throughout migratory events. Logistic regression identified correlates of trying new drugs/combinations following their most recent deportations. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Results Nearly one in six men (n=52, 16%) tried new drugs following their most recent deportation, including heroin (n=31), methamphetamine (n=5), and heroin/methamphetamine combined (n=17). Trying new drugs following deportation was independently associated with U.S. incarceration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]= 3.96; 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 1.78, 8.84), increasing numbers of U.S. deportations (AOR=1.11 per deportation; C.I. 1.03, 1.20), feeling sad following deportation (AOR 2.69; C.I. 1.41, 5.14), and perceiving that one’s current lifestyle increases HIV/AIDS risk (AOR 3.91; C.I. 2.05, 7.44). Conclusions Trying new drugs following U.S. deportation may be related to the unique contexts and stressors experienced by drug-abusing migrants as they attempt to reestablish their lives in Mexico. Findings imply an unmet need for health and social programs to alleviate pre-and post-deportation stressors faced by undocumented and return migrants in the U.S.-Mexico context. PMID:21835559

  2. Frequent food insecurity among injection drug users: correlates and concerns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Food insecurity and nutrition are two topics that are under-researched among injection drug users (IDUs). Our study examined the extent and correlates of food insecurity among a sample of IDUs and explored whether there is an association between food insecurity and injection-related HIV risk. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Data were collected at a needle exchange program in London, Ontario, Canada between September 2006 and January 2007. Participants included 144 English-speaking IDUs who had injected drugs in the past 30 days. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, HIV risk behaviours, food insecurity, and health/social service use. Results In the past 6 months, 54.5% of participants reported that on a daily/weekly basis they did not have enough to eat because of a lack of money, while 22.1% reported this type of food insecurity on a monthly basis. Moreover, 60.4% and 24.3% reported that they did not eat the quality or quantity of food they wanted on a daily/weekly or a monthly basis, respectively. Participants reported re-using someone else’s injection equipment: 21% re-used a needle, 19% re-used water, and 37.3% re-used a cooker. The odds of sharing injection equipment were increased for food insecure individuals. Conclusions Findings show that IDUs have frequent and variable experiences of food insecurity and these experiences are strongly correlated with sharing of injection-related equipment. Such behaviours may increase the likelihood of HIV and HCV transmission in this population. Addressing food-related needs among IDUs is urgently needed. PMID:23216869

  3. Predictors of accidental fatal drug overdose among a cohort of injection drug users.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, P T; McGough, J; Hagan, H; Thiede, H; Critchlow, C; Alexander, E R

    2001-06-01

    This study evaluated factors associated with accidental fatal drug overdose among a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs). In a prospective cohort study of 2849 IDUs in King County, Washington, deaths were identified by electronically merging subject identifiers with death certificate records. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of overdose mortality. Thirty-two overdoses were observed. Independent predictors of overdose mortality were bisexual sexual orientation (relative risk [RR] = 4.86; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.30, 13.2), homelessness (RR = 2.30; 95% CI = 1.06, 5.01), infrequent injection of speedballs (RR = 5.36; 95% CI = 1.58, 18.1), daily use of powdered cocaine (RR = 4.84; 95% CI = 1.13, 20.8), and daily use of poppers (RR = 22.0; 95% CI = 1.74, 278). Sexual orientation, homelessness, and drug use identify IDUs who may benefit from targeted interventions.

  4. Similarity and Difference in Drug Addiction Process Between Heroin- and Methamphetamine-Dependent Users.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyun; Li, Wei-Xiu; Zhi-Min, Liu

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to compare the drug addiction process between Chinese heroin- and methamphetamine (MA)-dependent users via a modified 4-stage addiction model (experimentation, occasional use, regular use, and compulsive use). A descriptive study was conducted among 683 eligible participants. In the statistical analysis, we selected 340 heroin- and 295 MA-dependent users without illicit drug use prior to onset of heroin or MA use. The addiction process of heroin-dependent users was shorter than that of MA-dependent users, with shorter transitions from the onset of drug-use to the first drug craving (19.5 vs. 50.0 days), regular use (30.0 vs. 60.0 days), and compulsive use (50.0 vs. 85.0 days). However, no significant differences in the addiction process were observed in frequency of drug administration, except that heroin users reported more administrations of the drug (20.0 vs. 15.0) before progressing to the stage of compulsive drug use. A larger proportion of regular heroin users progressed to use illicit drugs recklessly than did MA users. Most heroin and MA users reported psychological dependence as their primary motivation for compulsive drug use, but more heroin users selected uncomfortable symptoms upon ceasing drug use as further reason to continue. Our results suggest that typical heroin and MA users may experience a similar four-stage addiction process, but MA users might undergo a longer addiction process (in days). More research is necessary to further explore factors influencing the drug addiction process.

  5. Spirometry findings among drug users in the Indonesian National Narcotics and illicit drug Bureau Rehabilitation Center

    PubMed Central

    Samoedro, Erlang; Yunus, Faisal; Antariksa, Budhi; Nurwidya, Fariz

    2017-01-01

    Background: The increasing prevalence of drug user in Indonesia is affecting the health sectors. The lungs health were affected by the use of the illicit drug. However, lung function among drug users is still unclear. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study involves 144 drug users who met the inclusion criteria. Chest X-ray was performed to identify the subject with pulmonary tuberculosis to exclude from the study. Subjects were then undergone spirometry test and interviewed using questionnaires. Results: One hundred and forty-four subjects were included in this study. One hundred and twenty-one (84.03%) were male and 128 subjects showed normal lung function. Proportion of abnormal spirometry was 10.4% (n = 15). The restriction was found in ten subjects, and obstruction was found in four subjects. There was significant correlation between the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and age (P = 0.000; r = −0.454, moderate correlation), time of using cannabis (P = 0.01; r = −0.345, weak correlation), time of using methamphetamine inhalation (P = 0.004; r = −0.25, weak correlation), duration of using heroin injection (P = 0.025; r = −0.337, weak correlation), time of using cigarette (P = 0.000; r = −0.365, weak correlation), and the amount of cigarette consumption/day (P = 0.04; r = −0.238, weak correlation). Conclusion: This study found that there was a weak correlation between declined FEV1/FVC with a time of smoking, the amount of cigarette consume per day, time of cannabis inhalation, time of methamphetamine inhalation, and time of heroin injection. PMID:28250678

  6. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug-use and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR 0.49; 95%CI 0.25-0.97), had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR 1.90; 95%CI 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR 2.38; 95%CI 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in non-injecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs. PMID:22116012

  7. The trading of sex for drugs or money and HIV seropositivity among female intravenous drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Astemborski, J; Vlahov, D; Warren, D; Solomon, L; Nelson, K E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Data from 538 women in a cohort study recruited in 1988-1989 were analyzed to determined whether trading sex for drugs or money was independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence in a population of female intravenous drug users. METHODS. The women were grouped according to the number of partners with whom they reported trading sex for drugs or money during the previous 10 years: none, 1 through 49 (low), or 50 or more (high); the prevalence of HIV seropositivity in the three groups was 23.2%, 23.7%, and 47.6%, respectively. Logistic regression was used to compare the low- and high-trade groups separately with the group that reported no trading. RESULTS. Low trading was not associated with seroprevalent HIV infection. In a multivariate model, high trading (compared with no trading) was significantly associated with HIV seropositivity after adjustment for cocaine use, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and duration of intravenous drug use. CONCLUSIONS. These data indicate that, among intravenous drug-using women, high levels of trading sex for drugs or money were independently associated with HIV infection. This group needs to be targeted for further intensive intervention. PMID:8129052

  8. Seeing is believing, looks are deceiving: what does one see in images of drugs and drug use(rs)?

    PubMed

    Montagne, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Images of drugs and drug use(rs) convey meaning, feelings, and beliefs, and what is being seen is often believed. Images can also deceive in content, meaning, and belief. Drug use(r) researchers, who use images as data, must be cautious in interpreting what is being conveyed and why. As technological advances continue to shape the creation, modification, storage, and analysis of images, researchers must be ever more vigilant about what they are seeing and believing.

  9. Deep neck infections in cervical injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Sharon O; Marom, Tal; Len, Assaf; Gluck, Ofer; Goldfarb, Abraham; Roth, Yehudah

    2015-06-01

    To characterize deep neck infections (DNI) in adult intravenous drug users (IDUs) who injected illicit substances to their neck, in comparison to DNI in non-IDUs. Retrospective, cohort study. Data were retrieved from medical charts of adult DNI patients in a secondary hospital during 2000-2013. Clinical, radiologic, and microbial data were extracted and tabulated following categorization into 2 patient groups: IDUs and non-IDUs. Of the 136 patients identified with DNI, 20 (15%) were IDUs; of them 80% were males. IDUs were significantly younger than non-IDUs (mean age, 35 ± 10 vs. 44 ± 16 years, P = .01). All IDUs had multiple comorbidities. IDUs presented for medical examination and hospitalization later in the course of their disease, and the most common involved neck spaces were consistent with areas where cervical injections are commonly performed. Abscess formation was more common in IDUs than non-IDUs (16 [80%] vs. 79 [68%], respectively, P = .04). Despite later presentation of IDUs and their higher rate of comorbidities, laboratory data, microbiology cultures, and disease course were similar to non-IDUs. Although IDU and non-IDU differ in DNI presentation, both groups had good outcomes. DNI in IDUs frequently evolved into abscesses, and most were found in the anterior triangle deep to sternocleidomastoid (SCM), posterior triangle, and anterior triangle superficial to SCM, in concordance with the injection sites. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Drug-Drug Interactions and Diagnostics for Drug Users With HIV and HIV/HCV Coinfections: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Jag H; Talal, Andrew H; Morse, Gene

    2017-03-01

    Substance use and pharmacologic treatment of co-occurring infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are associated with many adverse consequences including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored a 2-day conference on DDIs at which clinicians/scientists from government, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry presented the most current research findings to formulate a comprehensive overview of DDIs. Specific topics discussed included drug metabolism; drug interactions between medications used in the treatment of HIV, HCV, and substance use disorders; intrahepatic concentrations and methods of assessment of drugs in liver disease of varying etiologies and degrees of impairment; and minimally invasive sampling techniques for the assessment of intrahepatic drug concentrations, viral replication, and changes in gene expression in response to treatment. Finally, the speakers identified research targets and priorities on DDIs. Areas of emphasis included development of diagnostic assays for drug concentration assessment in different organs, an enhanced understanding of factors responsible for alterations in drug metabolism and excretion, and establishment of clinical trials and work groups to study DDIs. Our long-term objective is to broaden investigation in the field of DDIs in substance users. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Drug and sexual HIV risk behaviours related to knowledge of HIV serostatus among injection drug users in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Noor, Syed W B; Ross, Michael W; Lai, Dejian; Risser, Jan M

    2014-02-01

    This study examines the association between drug and sexual HIV risk behaviours and knowledge of HIV serostatus among a sample of injection drug users, recruited into the 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance project. We calculated prevalence ratios and associated 95% confidence intervals of reporting a given risk behaviour comparing injection drug users unaware of their serostatus and HIV-negative to HIV-positive injection drug users. Of 523 participants, 21% were unaware of their HIV serostatus. The three groups were not different from each other in terms of drug-use behaviours; however, injection drug users unaware of their HIV serostatus were 33% more likely to report having more than three sexual partners in the past 12 months and 45% more likely to report having unprotected sex compared to HIV-positive injection drug users. We observed markedly higher prevalence of sexual risk behaviours among injection drug users unaware of their serostatus, but drug-use risk behaviours were similar across the groups.

  12. 76 FR 58020 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act IV Information Technology Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act IV Information Technology Plan AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of an updated information technology (IT) plan entitled...

  13. 77 FR 45639 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-18711] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0007] Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rates for...

  14. 76 FR 33307 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is extending the comment period for the notice of...

  15. Organization of Needs in Male and Female Drug and Alcohol Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huba, George J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The Personality Research Form (PRF) was administered to 1,095 college students. Students were divided into groups of nonusers of drugs and alcohol and users of a variety of drug combinations. Results suggest organization of motivational tendencies is the same for both sexes and for different types of substance users. (Author)

  16. [Comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients treated with disease modifying drugs].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Z A; Sizyakina, L P; Belovolova, R A; Megeryan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Because of intensive growth of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) during the last years, the comorbidity of MS and AID is not a rarity. In this literature review, the development of comorbid AID in patients with MS is considered to be the probable complication of disease modifying therapy with drugs of different groups. The authors present the own data on the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients with MS treated with disease modifying drugs.

  17. Non-adherence to telemedicine interventions for drug users: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Taís de Campos; Signor, Luciana; Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Fernandes, Simone; Bortolon, Cassandra Borges; Benchaya, Mariana Canellas; Ferigolo, Maristela; Barros, Helena MT

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate rates of non-adherence to telemedicine strategies aimed at treating drug addiction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted of randomized controlled trials investigating different telemedicine treatment methods for drug addiction. The following databases were consulted between May 18, 2012 and June 21, 2012: PubMed, PsycINFO, SciELO, Wiley (The Cochrane Library), Embase, Clinical trials and Google Scholar. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. The criteria evaluated were: appropriate sequence of data generation, allocation concealment, blinding, description of losses and exclusions and analysis by intention to treat. There were 274 studies selected, of which 20 were analyzed. RESULTS Non-adherence rates varied between 15.0% and 70.0%. The interventions evaluated were of at least three months duration and, although they all used telemedicine as support, treatment methods differed. Regarding the quality of the studies, the values also varied from very poor to high quality. High quality studies showed better adherence rates, as did those using more than one technique of intervention and a limited treatment time. Mono-user studies showed better adherence rates than poly-user studies. CONCLUSIONS Rates of non-adherence to treatment involving telemedicine on the part of users of psycho-active substances differed considerably, depending on the country, the intervention method, follow-up time and substances used. Using more than one technique of intervention, short duration of treatment and the type of substance used by patients appear to facilitate adherence. PMID:25119947

  18. High Prevalence of Hepatitis C virus Among Injection Drug Users in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nana; Ge, Qinjuan; Feng, Qingchuan; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Caihong; Xu, Yongkang; He, Guangli; Zhang, Chiyu

    2011-12-01

    The constant increase in the number of drug users and rapidly spread of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among drug users result in a serious public health problem in China. To investigate HCV prevalence among drug users in Zhenjiang city, Jiangsu, China, 207 drug users from Zhenjiang were enrolled in this study during 2009 and the prevalence of HCV, HIV and syphilis infection were detected. HCV prevalence among injection drug users (IDUs) was 81.6%, significantly higher than that (22.9%) among oral drug users (P < 0.001), suggesting a strong association of HCV infection with injection drug use (IDU). Most drug users were more than 25 years old (89.2%), single (60.5%, including single and divorced/widowed), and had a history of drug abuse over 6 years (92.9%). HCV prevalence among drug users with middle (72.6%) or high (83.8%) school diplomas was significantly higher than that among those with lower (46.9%) education level (P = 0.007). HCV prevalence among IDUs did not obviously change along with the increase in duration of drug use and in frequency of injection per day, suggesting less association of HCV infection with both variables. These results suggest that most Chinese addicts might start drug use after their middle/high school education. To reduce drug use and to prevent HIV and HCV transmission via IDU, large-scale drug prevention educations should be urgently conducted in all China's middle and high schools.

  19. Could Education Contribute to Reduce Prevalence of HIV among Injecting Drug Users? A Case Study of IDUs from the Rehabilitation Center for Drugs Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2008-01-01

    This study primarily focuses on Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) from the Narconon Nepal for drugs rehabilitation and prevention center. The study attempt to explore the changing behavior of IDUs from the education received from the rehabilitation center which contributes to reduce the prevalence of HIV among IDUs. The data were collected through semi…

  20. In-hospital and long-term mortality in infective endocarditis in injecting drug users compared to non-drug users: a retrospective study of 192 episodes.

    PubMed

    Thalme, Anders; Westling, Katarina; Julander, Inger

    2007-01-01

    In a retrospective study, in-hospital and long-term mortality for patients with infective endocarditis (IE) was analysed. The study was conducted at a department of infectious diseases in Stockholm, Sweden. Mortality was compared between injecting drug users (IDUs) and patients without drug abuse (non-IDUs). 192 episodes of IE from 1995 to 2000 were analysed, 60 in IDUs and 135 in non-IDUs, median follow-up 4.4 y. Episodes were classified using the Duke criteria: 145 definite and 47 possible. Of 53 definite episodes in IDUs, 55% were right-sided IE and 43% left-sided IE (including combined left- and right-sided). Surgical treatment was used in 34/145 definite episodes, all being left-sided IE. The in-hospital mortality was 14/145 (9.6%). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patient groups with left-sided IE. The IDU patients with left-sided IE had a higher long-term mortality with the increased mortality rate explained by late deaths in the surgically treated IDUs. Treatment results for IDUs with right-sided IE were good with no in-hospital mortality, no relapses and no increase in long-term mortality. This difference in prognosis between left-sided and right-sided IE in IDUs makes high quality echocardiography important to identify patients with left-sided IE and worse prognosis.

  1. Reliability of Drug Users' Self-Reported HIV Risk Behaviors and Validity of Self-Reported Recent Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Guyer, Seana; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reliability and validity of the Risk Behavior Assessment, a questionnaire evaluating drug use and sexual human immunovirus risk behavior through self-reports, were studied with 218 drug users who also provided urine samples. Overall, self-reports of drug use and sexual behavior were reliable. (SLD)

  2. A plan for estimating the number of "hardcore" drug users in the United States.

    PubMed

    Simeone, R S; Rhodes, W M; Hunt, D E

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a program of research that would allow the size, characteristics, and geographic distribution of the "hardcore" population of drug users in the United States to be monitored over time. The program is conceived as a complement to and extension of existing federal data collection initiatives. It involves the development of mathematical models of drug use careers, and the use of these models to estimate the size of the "hardcore" population of drug users within selected geographic areas. These local area estimates are then used in conjunction with more readily available information to estimate the size of the "hardcore" population of drug users in the country as a whole.

  3. Research fatigue among injecting drug users in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Karachi is the largest metropolis of Pakistan and its economic hub attracting domestic migrants for economic opportunities. It is also the epicenter of HIV epidemic in the country. Since 2004, one pilot study and four behavioral and biological surveillance rounds have been conducted in Karachi. In addition many student research projects have also focused on key risk groups including injection drug users (IDUs). As a result of this extra ordinary exposure of same kind of questions, IDUs know how to respond to high value questions related to sharing of needles or unsafe sexual practices. The purpose of the study was to explore the element of research fatigue among IDUs in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods The study was conducted on 32 spots in Karachi, selected on the basis of estimate of IDUs at each spot. A trained field worker (recovered IDU) visited each spot; observed sharing behavior of IDUs and asked questions related to practices in January 2009. Verbal consent was obtained from each respondent before asking questions. Results On average 14 IDUs were present at each spot and out of 32 selected spots, 81% were active while more than two groups were present at 69% spots. In each group three to four IDUs were present and everyone in the group was sharing. One dose of injecting narcotics was observed. Sharing of syringes, needles and distilled water was observed at 63% spots while professional injector/street doctor was present at 60% spots. Conclusion There is a need to check internal consistency in surveillance research. It is highly likely that IDUs and other risk groups know how to respond to key questions but their responses do not match with the practices. PMID:23758666

  4. Health services usage by Alaskan injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Grace L; Wells, Rebecca S; Fisher, Dennis G; Cagle, Henry H

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore health services usage among injection drug users in Anchorage, Alaska. 645 participants were recruited as part of a federally funded study of needle exchanges. They completed a health services usage questionnaire that elicited information on use of a health care provider (physician or nurse) and emergency room services. Chi-square and t-tests were used for the bivariate analyses, and multiple logistic regression was used to develop the final predictive models. The majority of respondents (n = 646) were male (77 percent). Race/ethnicity included 58 percent White, 22 percent Alaska Native, and 20 percent African American. The multivariate model predicting accessing a health care provider (HCP) included ever having had chlamydia (OR 2.7, CI 1.6, 4.5), current income from welfare or public assistance (OR 2.6, CI 1.7, 3.9), current income from disability (OR 5.0, CI 2.2, 11.4), current income from SSI (OR .30, CI .12, .77) and the number of days in the last 30 used opiates other than heroin (OR 1.04, CI 1.002, 1.078). The multivariate model predicting use of an emergency room (ER) was similar to that predicting use of an HCP, with the additional finding of a negative association between being African American and ER use. The role of public assistance benefits enabling access to health care for IDUs has policy implications. Large public programs, such as the Indian Health Service, paid for much of the health care received by the IDUs recruited as part of this study.

  5. Resource Use in Treating Alcohol- and Drug-related Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Bramble, James D; Sakowski, Henry; Rich, Eugene C; Esterbrooks, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined the variations in hospital resource use in the treatment of alcohol and drug diagnoses. Specifically, the study tested 2 hypotheses: 1) patients treated in teaching hospitals will have shorter lengths of stay and lower hospital charges than patients treated in nonteaching hospitals; and 2) patients treated in hospitals with more experience treating these conditions will have shorter lengths of stay and lower hospital charges. DESIGN A retrospective cross-sectional study design used data from the 1996 Health Care Utilization Project to test the proposed hypotheses. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS The population for this study consisted of patients over 18 years old with an acute alcohol- or drug-related discharge diagnostic related group code. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS The variables of interest were teaching hospital status, as defined by the Council of Teaching Hospitals, and hospital experience, defined as the ratio of alcohol- and drug-related diagnoses to the hospital's total admissions. Measures of hospital resource use included the patient's length of stay and total hospital charges. Patients treated at hospitals with relatively more experience in treating alcohol- and drug-related diagnoses had 10.3% ($321) lower total charges (P = .017). CONCLUSIONS Similar to research for high-volume surgical hospitals, these findings confirm that hospitals that have greater experience with complex medical conditions such as alcohol and drug intoxication and withdrawal may be more efficient. This important finding provides a rationale for further exploration of the key factors associated with higher quality and more efficient care for complex medical conditions. PMID:14748858

  6. Social adjustment of family members and significant others (FSOs) of drug users.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Clifton R; Kirby, Kimberly C; Firely, Monica L; Festinger, David S; Marlowe, Douglas B

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the social adjustment of female family members and significant others (FSOs) of illicit drug users in order to gain insight into the impact of drug use upon those close to the user. Using the Social Adjustment Scale-Self Report (SAS-SR), we examined the social adjustment self-ratings (overall and in seven specific role areas) of 41 female partners and 24 mothers of drug users. We compared these ratings to the ratings they reported for their drug-using partners or children, to each other, and to self-ratings drawn from community comparison samples. As expected, results showed that the female FSOs reported significantly better social adjustment than the drug users in most role areas. However, their social adjustment was compromised relative to the community samples. Partners of drug users reported poorer adjustment than parents of drug users overall and in the specific areas of marital and economic functioning. Further inquiry is needed to improve our understanding of the impact of drug use on the users' family members.

  7. Designer Drugs and the Impact on the Adolescent User.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    There are serious concerns regarding adolescent use of designer drugs. Designer drug usage is often undetected and can result in life-threatening physical and psychiatric reactions. This article explores the history of designer drugs, identifies some of the more recent designer drugs available, distinguishes the symptoms of designer drugs usage, and identifies reasons the designer drugs are popular with our young population. Lastly, this paper addresses what nurses can do to facilitate early and proper treatment to reduce serious physiological damage and death that can result from not detecting the use of designer drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treating drug dependence with the aid of ibogaine: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; de Castro Comis, Maria Angélica; Chaves, Bruno Rasmussen; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Ibogaine is an alkaloid purported to be an effective drug dependence treatment. However, its efficacy has been hard to evaluate, partly because it is illegal in some countries. In such places, treatments are conducted in underground settings where fatalities have occurred. In Brazil ibogaine is unregulated and a combined approach of psychotherapy and ibogaine is being practiced to treat addiction. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ibogaine, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from 75 previous alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and crack users (72% poly-drug users). We observed no serious adverse reactions or fatalities, and found 61% of participants abstinent. Participants treated with ibogaine only once reported abstinence for a median of 5.5 months and those treated multiple times for a median of 8.4 months. This increase was statistically significant (p < 0.001), and both single or multiple treatments led to longer abstinence periods than before the first ibogaine session (p < 0.001). These results suggest that the use of ibogaine supervised by a physician and accompanied by psychotherapy can facilitate prolonged periods of abstinence, without the occurrence of fatalities or complications. These results suggest that ibogaine can be a safe and effective treatment for dependence on stimulant and other non-opiate drugs.

  9. Patterns of drug abuse among drug users with regular and irregular attendance for treatment as detected by comprehensive UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Mira; Pelander, Anna; Simojoki, Kaarlo; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    The most severe consequences of drug abuse include infectious diseases, overdoses, and drug-related deaths. As the range of toxicologically relevant compounds is continually changing due to the emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS), laboratories are encountering analytical challenges. Current immunoassays are insufficient for determining the whole range of the drugs abused, and a broad-spectrum screening method is therefore needed. Here, the patterns of drug abuse in two groups of drug users were studied from urine samples using a comprehensive screening method based on high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The two groups comprised drug abusers undergoing opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) or drug withdrawal therapy and routinely visiting a rehabilitation clinic, and drug abusers with irregular attendance at a harm reduction unit (HRU) and suspected of potential NPS abuse. Polydrug abuse was observed in both groups, but was more pronounced among the HRU subjects with a mean number of concurrent drugs per sample of 3.9, whereas among the regularly treated subjects the corresponding number was 2.1. NPS and pregabalin were more frequent among HRU subjects, and their abuse was always related to drug co-use. The most common drug combination for an HRU subject included amphetamine, cannabis, buprenorphine, benzodiazepine, and alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone. A typical set of drugs for treated subjects was buprenorphine, benzodiazepine, and occasionally amphetamine. Abuse of several concurrent drugs poses a higher risk of drug intoxication and a threat of premature termination of OMT. Since the subjects attending treatment used fewer concurrent drugs, this treatment could be valuable in reducing polydrug abuse. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 5-Year trends in use of hallucinogens and other adjunct drugs among UK dance drug users.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Jim; Winstock, Adam; Hunt, Neil; Mitcheson, Luke

    2007-01-01

    To describe and assess trends in the use of hallucinogens and other adjunct drugs over a 5-year period. Repeated-measures cross-sectional survey. Annual magazine-based survey targeting people who use drugs in dance contexts. Lifetime use prevalence (ever used); age of first use; current use prevalence (any use within the last month), and extent of use within the last month (number of days used) for LSD, psilocybin, ketamine, GHB and nitrates. Prevalence increases for psilocybin, ketamine, GHB and nitrates use have been detected, with a sharp recent rise in current psilocybin use in 2002-2003 contrasting with more gradual and comprehensive evidence of increased ketamine use throughout the period 1999-2003. The declining prevalence of LSD use in general population surveys is replicated in this sentinel population study. The rise in prevalence of hallucinogen and other adjunct drugs identified among dance drug users may be mirrored by wider prevalence increases among young people with a consequent need to study these trends carefully and to develop effective interventions, where required.

  11. The relationship between drug use stigma and HIV injection risk behaviors among injection drug users in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl; Srikrishnan, Aylur K; Yang, Cui; Johnson, Sethulakshmi; Solomon, Sunil S; Kumar, Suresh; Celentano, David D; Solomon, Suniti

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived drug use stigma, acquiescence response bias, and HIV injection risk behaviors among current injection drug users in Chennai, India. Methods The sample consists of 851 males in Chennai, India who reported having injected drugs in the last month and were recruited through street outreach. Results Results indicate a strong and consistent positive association between drug use stigma and HIV injection drug use risk behaviors. This association held across the injection behaviors of frequency of sharing needles, cookers, cotton filters, rinse water, prefilled syringes and common drug solutions, even after controlling for acquiescence response bias, frequency of injection, and HIV/HCV serostatus. Conclusions These findings suggest that future HIV prevention and harm reduction programs for injection drug users and service providers should address drug use stigma. PMID:20462707

  12. Elderly users of fall-risk-increasing drug perceptions of fall risk and the relation to their drug use - a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bell, Hege Therese; Steinsbekk, Aslak; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how home-dwelling elderly who use fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) perceive their fall risk and how they relate this to their drug use. A qualitative study with 14 home-dwelling elderly FRID users between 65 and 97 years in Central Norway participating in semi-structured individual interviews. The data were analyzed thematically by using systematic text condensation. The main finding was that the informants did not necessarily perceive the use of FRIDs to be a prominent risk factor for falls. Some informants said they did not reflect upon drug use whatsoever and said they fully trusted their physician's choices. When either experiencing dizziness, fall episodes or by reading the patient information leaflet the informants said to either adjust their drug use or to contact their physician. Some felt rejected due to not getting their point across or their wish to alter the drug was not granted by the physician. Elderly FRID users did not necessarily relate their drug use to fall risk or struggled to present their perceived drug-related problems. Physicians need to regularly inform, monitor and assess the drug treatment when treating elderly with FRIDs.

  13. Category 3 and 4 Controlled Drugs Users' Perceptions of Participating in Drug-Abuse-Health Prevention Lectures in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fan-Ko; Long, Ann; Yu, Pei-Jane; Huang, Hui-Man; Chiang, Chun-Ying; Yao, YuChun

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to explore Category 3 and 4 controlled drug users' perceptions of participating in health-prevention lectures. A phenomenological approach was used. Twelve participants were interviewed after completing the lectures. Findings revealed five themes (1) mixed emotions; (2) self-development; (3) finding the lectures lacked practicality and relevance; (4) highlighting three stages for discontinuing drug-usage; and, (5) suggesting tips for the advancement of lectures. These findings could be used as a map to help health professionals understand drug users' perceptions of attending health prevention lectures and provide insight into how young people might stop using drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods for population size estimation of problem drug users using a single registration.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Peter G M; Cruts, Guus; Cruyff, Maarten

    2013-11-01

    The number of problem drug users is used as a key indicator to monitor the drug situation in the European Union. An alternative approach to estimate the number of problem drug users is given by 'the one-source capture-recapture analysis' that uses a single registration. Two variants of the one-source capture-recapture analysis were applied to a single registration: the truncated Poisson regression model (TPR) and the Zelterman regression model. These models were applied to data about clinical drug-related hospital admissions derived from the Dutch Hospital Registration (LMR). The TPR accounts for heterogeneity in capture probabilities by allowing for covariates and the Zelterman regression model relies on the problem drug users that were seen only once or twice in the hospital; the latter model is known to be robust against unobserved heterogeneity. The TPR model was found to have a bad fit due to unobserved heterogeneity. The Zelterman regression model estimated the population size at 10,415 problem drug users (95% CI is 8400-12,429). This figure is an estimate of the number of problem drug users who are at risk of a clinical hospital admission due to the medical consequences of their drug use. The model can also provide estimates of different subgroups of problematic drug users. The method presented here offers a promising alternative for estimating the number of problem drug users, including different subgroups of drug users. In addition, observed and unobserved heterogeneity can be accounted for in these estimates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Can we stop the hepatitis C virus transmission in drug users?].

    PubMed

    Lert, F

    2006-07-01

    Despite the effectiveness of drug treatment and harm reduction programmes aimed at reducing illegal drug use, especially heroin use, situations at risk of transmitting HCV infection are still very frequent. Among routes of drug administration, injection appears as the most dangerous mean regarding the spread of HCV infection among drug users. This practice frequently occurs within a context of a group sharing climate (equipment, substance, housing, etc.) and mutual support. Risk of unsafe behaviour is increased at the time of their first injection or during the first steps of their experience as newly injectors. Public health interventions should target a reduction in the number of injections by modifying the pharmacological format of sublingual buprenorphine, by defining the cessation of injection as one of the main objectives of drug users care programs, by designing and implementing interventions and iniatives that target recreational multiple drug users at risk of initiating drug injection.

  16. Quantitative Authorship Attribution of Users of Mexican Drug Dealing Related Online Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rico Sulayes, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    As the violence in the Mexican drug war escalates, a proliferation of social media sites about drug trafficking in Mexico was followed by the murder of some of their users, and the eventual disappearance of many of those sites. Despite these events, there still exist a number of drug-dealing related social media outlets in this country with a…

  17. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  18. Perspectives on Health among Adult Users of Illicit Stimulant Drugs in Rural Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Draus, Paul J.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although the nonmedical use of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine is increasingly common in many rural areas of the United States, little is known about the health beliefs of people who use these drugs. Purpose: This research describes illicit stimulant drug users' views on health and health-related concepts that may…

  19. Quantitative Authorship Attribution of Users of Mexican Drug Dealing Related Online Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rico Sulayes, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    As the violence in the Mexican drug war escalates, a proliferation of social media sites about drug trafficking in Mexico was followed by the murder of some of their users, and the eventual disappearance of many of those sites. Despite these events, there still exist a number of drug-dealing related social media outlets in this country with a…

  20. Drug choice, spatial distribution, HIV risk, and HIV prevalence among injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Gina Rae; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Shaboltas, Alla V; Toussova, Olga V; Hoffman, Irving F; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2009-07-31

    The HIV epidemic in Russia has been driven by the unsafe injection of drugs, predominantly heroin and the ephedrine derived psychostimulants. Understanding differences in HIV risk behaviors among injectors associated with different substances has important implications for prevention programs. We examined behaviors associated with HIV risk among 900 IDUs who inject heroin, psychostimulants, or multiple substances in 2002. Study participants completed screening questionnaires that provided data on sociodemographics, drug use, place of residence and injection- and sex-related HIV risk behaviors. HIV testing was performed and prevalence was modeled using general estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Individuals were clustered by neighborhood and disaggregated into three drug use categories: Heroin Only Users, Stimulant Only Users, and Mixed Drug Users. Among Heroin Only Users, younger age, front/backloading of syringes, sharing cotton and cookers were all significant predictors of HIV infection. In contrast, sharing needles and rinse water were significant among the Stimulant Only Users. The Mixed Drug Use group was similar to the Heroin Only Users with age, front/back loading, and sharing cotton significantly associated with HIV infection. These differences became apparent only when neighborhood of residence was included in models run using GEE. The type of drug injected was associated with distinct behavioral risks. Risks specific to Stimulant Only Users appeared related to direct syringe sharing. The risks specific to the other two groups are common to the process of sharing drugs in preparation to injecting. Across the board, IDUs could profit from prevention education that emphasizes both access to clean syringes and preparing and apportioning drug with these clean syringes. However, attention to neighborhood differences might improve the intervention impact for injectors who favor different drugs.

  1. USER S GUIDE FOR THE RANDOM DRUG SCREENING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    McNeany, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    The Random Drug Screening System (RDSS) is a desktop computing application designed to assign nongameable drug testing dates to each member in a population of employees, within a specific time line. The program includes reporting capabilities, test form generation, unique test ID number assignment, and the ability to flag high-risk employees for a higher frequency of drug testing than the general population.

  2. The Ocular Manifestations of Drugs Used to Treat Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heath, Gregory; Airody, Archana; Gale, Richard Peter

    2017-03-01

    Recent times have seen an increase in the number of options to treat multiple sclerosis. Ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis are well known to treating physicians; however, the medications used to treat multiple sclerosis can also have ocular side effects. This review article focuses on the ocular manifestations of corticosteroids and disease-modifying agents such as interferon, fingolomod, natalizumab, alemtuzumab and mitoxantron used to treat the disease. The ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis treatments can be varied depending on the drug used, and include retinopathy, chronic central serous chorioretinopathy, macular oedema, Graves' ophthalmopathy and cortical blindness. These effects may be specific to the drug or secondary to their immunosuppressive effect. The association of macular oedema with fingolomod is clear and merits ocular screening for toxicity. The immunosuppressive nature of the treatments makes patients prone to acquired infections. Hence, if a patient with multiple sclerosis presents with vision loss, infectious and drug-induced aetiology should be considered alongside relapses of multiple sclerosis itself as a cause.

  3. [Illicit drug use and the critical perspectives of drug users' relatives and acquaintances in Northern Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Loyola, Cristina Maria Douat; Brands, Bruna; Adlaf, Edward; Giesbrecht, Norman; Simich, Laura; Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the partial results of a multicenter, cross-temporal study, which was performed using multiple methods, and involved seven Latin-American countries and Canada. The results presented refer to the city center of Rio de Janeiro (n=108). The central question of the study was: 'How do illicit drug users' relatives and acquaintances describe protective and risk factors, prevention initiatives, treatment services, laws and policies regarding illicit drugs?' The quantitative data was collected using an instrument containing closed questions. In total, 108 young adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed, who stated being affected by the drug although they were not users. For 104 interviewees (96%), negligence is the family dynamics that causes the greatest exposure to drugs, and 106 (98%) consider that parent support is what offers the greatest protection. Policies, the police and the criminal system have neither reduced drug use nor do they protect users.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis C virus antiviral treatment for injection drug user populations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Natasha K; Vickerman, Peter; Miners, Alec; Foster, Graham R; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Goldberg, David J; Hickman, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Injecting drug use is the main risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission in most developed countries. HCV antiviral treatment (peginterferon-α + ribavirin) has been shown to be cost-effective for patients with no reinfection risk. We examined the cost-effectiveness of providing antiviral treatment for injecting drug users (IDUs) as compared with treating ex/non-IDUs or no treatment. A dynamic model of HCV transmission and disease progression was developed, incorporating: a fixed number of antiviral treatments allocated at the mild HCV stage over 10 years, no retreatment after treatment failure, potential reinfection, and three baseline IDU HCV chronic prevalence scenarios (20%, 40%, and 60%). We performed a probabilistic cost-utility analysis estimating long-term costs and outcomes measured in quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) comparing treating IDUs, ex/non-IDUs, or no treatment. Antiviral treatment for IDUs is the most cost-effective option in the 20% and 40% baseline chronic prevalence settings, with ICERs compared with no treatment of £ 521 and £ 2,539 per QALY saved, respectively. Treatment of ex/non-IDUs is dominated in these scenarios. At 60% baseline prevalence, treating ex/non-IDUs is slightly more likely to be the more cost-effective option (with an ICER compared with no treatment of £ 6,803), and treating IDUs dominated due to high reinfection. A sensitivity analysis indicates these rankings hold even when IDU sustained viral response rates as compared with ex/non-IDUs are halved. Despite the possibility of reinfection, the model suggests providing antiviral treatment to IDUs is the most cost-effective policy option in chronic prevalence scenarios less than 60%. Further research on how HCV treatment for injectors can be scaled up and its impact on prevalence is warranted. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Drug-Avoidance Self-Efficacy Among Exclusive Cannabis Users vs. Other Drug Users Visiting the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Clingan, Sarah E; Woodruff, Susan I

    2017-07-29

    Medical care in the emergency department (ED) is a growing and complex area of outpatient care, with about 256 visits made to EDs every minute in 2013. Studies report that, compared to people who do not use drugs, people who use illicit drugs are more likely to use the ED for their medical care. Self-efficacy has been shown to be a predictor of abstinence or reduced use among drug-using individuals. The current study describes drug avoidance self-efficacy among exclusive cannabis-using individuals and other drug-using individuals who use the ED for any reason. Participants were 693 adult patients visiting the trauma units and EDs of two large urban "safety net" hospitals (i.e., providing care to low-income, uninsured, and vulnerable population) in Southern California who reported using illicit drugs in the past 30 days. For people who use only cannabis, higher drug-avoidance self-efficacy was associated with older age, lower drug involvement scores, lower drug severity scores, and higher readiness to change use. For people who use other drugs, higher drug avoidance self-efficacy scores was associated with lower drug severity scores, lower psychiatric severity scores, higher medical severity scores, and higher readiness to change use. This study identified several factors (some common, some unique) related to higher drug-avoidance self-efficacy for both groups. Results may be important when designing intervention protocols for use in the ED.

  6. Family functioning and health issues associated with codependency in families of drug users.

    PubMed

    Bortolon, Cassandra Borges; Signor, Luciana; Moreira, Taís de Campos; Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Benchaya, Mariana Canellas; Machado, Cássio Andrade; Ferigolo, Maristela; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse affects both the user and the family system as a whole, yet substance abuse treatment is centered on the user, leaving the family in the background. To identify the symptoms of codependency and health issues in the codependent family members of drug users who called a toll-free telephone counseling service. In total, 505 family members participated in this cross-sectional study. Drug users' mothers and wives who had less than 8 years of education and those who were unemployed had a greater chance of high codependency. It was also determined that a high level of codependency imposed a significant burden on the physical and emotional well-being of those affected, resulting in poor health, reactivity, self-neglect and additional responsibilities. It was concluded that codependency has a negative impact on the family system and on the health of the family members of drug users.

  7. Frequent ED users: are most visits for mental health, alcohol, and drug-related complaints?

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan W; Nagurney, John T; Chang, Yuchiao; Parry, Blair A; Smulowitz, Peter; Atlas, Steven J

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether frequent emergency department (ED) users are more likely to make at least one and a majority of visits for mental health, alcohol, or drug-related complaints compared to non-frequent users. We performed a retrospective cohort study exploring frequent ED use and ED diagnosis at a single, academic hospital and included all ED patients between January 1 and December 31, 2010. We compared differences in ED visits with a primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision visit diagnosis of mental health, alcohol or drug-related diagnoses between non-frequent users (<4 visits during previous 12-months) and frequent (repeat [4-7 visits], highly frequent [8-18 visits] and super frequent [≥19 visits]) users in univariate and multivariable analyses. Frequent users (2496/65201 [3.8%] patients) were more likely to make at least one visit associated with mental health, alcohol, or drug-related diagnoses. The proportion of patients with a majority of visits related to any of the three diagnoses increased from 5.8% among non-frequent users (3616/62705) to 9.4% among repeat users (181/1926), 13.1% among highly frequent users (62/473), and 25.8% (25/97 patients) in super frequent users. An increasing proportion of visits with alcohol-related diagnoses was observed among repeat, highly frequent, and super frequent users but was not found for mental health or drug-related complaints. Frequent ED users were more likely to make a mental health, alcohol or drug-related visit, but a majority of visits were only noted for those with alcohol-related diagnoses. To address frequent ED use, interventions focusing on managing patients with frequent alcohol-related visits may be necessary. © 2013.

  8. The validity of behavioral data reported by injection drug users on a clinical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C S; McCusker, J; Stoddard, A M; Bigelow, C

    1995-05-01

    The validity of drug and sexual behavior data collected by drug user treatment staff using a short clinical risk assessment among 387 injection drug users is evaluated using in-depth, confidential interview process. Moderate to high agreement levels were found for most, but not all, variables. Participants consistently reported less risky behaviors on the clinical risk assessment than on the in-depth interview. More easily recalled information can be accurately gathered through a short clinical risk assessment. However, in-depth, confidential interviewing is important when gathering self-reports of the frequency of drug and sexual behaviors.

  9. Parenteral emulsions and liposomes to treat drug overdose.

    PubMed

    Damitz, Robert; Chauhan, Anuj

    2015-08-01

    Drug overdoses from both pharmaceutical and recreational drugs are a major public health concern. Although some overdoses may be treated with specific antidotes, the most common treatment involves providing supportive care to allow the body to metabolize and excrete the toxicant. In many cases, supportive care is limiting, ineffective, and expensive. There is a clear medical need to improve the effectiveness of detoxification, in particular by developing more specific therapies or antidotes for these overdoses. Intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs) have been investigated as a potential treatment for overdoses of local anesthetics and other hydrophobic drugs. While ILE therapy has been successful in several cases, its use beyond local anesthetic systemic toxicity is controversial and its mechanism of detoxification remains a subject of debate. ILEs were not originally developed to treat overdose, but clarifying the mechanisms of detoxification observed with ILE may allow us to design more effective future treatments. Liposomes are highly biocompatible and versatile formulations, thus it was a natural step to explore their use for drug overdose therapy as well. Several researchers have designed liposomes using a variety of approaches including surface charge, pH gradients, and inclusion of enzymes in the liposome core to optimize the formulations for detoxification of a specific drug or toxicant. The in vitro results for drug sequestration by liposomes are very promising and animal trials have in some cases shown comparable performance to ILE at reduced lipid dosing. This narrative review summarizes the current status and advances in the use of emulsions and liposomes for detoxification and also suggests several areas in which studies are needed for developing future therapies.

  10. An outbreak of infection with Bacillus anthracis in injecting drug users in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, C N; Stirling, A; Smith, J; Hawkins, G; Brooks, T; Hood, J; Penrice, G; Browning, L M; Ahmed, S

    2010-01-14

    An investigation is currently underway to explore and control an outbreak of Bacillus anthracis among drug users (mainly injecting) in Scotland. Contaminated heroin or a contaminated cutting agent mixed with the heroin is considered to be the most likely source and vehicle of infection. Heroin users have been advised of the risk. The risk to the general public is regarded as very low.

  11. Factors to Improve the Management of Hepatitis C in Drug Users: An Observational Study in an Addiction Centre

    PubMed Central

    Moussalli, Joseph; Delaquaize, Helene; Boubilley, Dominique; Lhomme, Jean Pierre; Merleau Ponty, Jules; Sabot, David; Kerever, Anne; Valleur, Marc; Poynard, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Barriers to management of HCV in injection drug users are related to patients, health providers, and facilities. In a primary care drug user's addiction centre we studied access to HCV standard of care before and after using an onsite total care concept provided by a multidisciplinary team and noninvasive liver fibrosis evaluation. A total of 586 patients were seen between 2002 and 2004. The majority, 417 patients, were HCV positive and of these patients 337 were tested positive for HCV RNA. In 2002, patients were sent to the hospital. with the Starting of 2003, patients were offered standard of care HCV management in the center by a team of general practitioners, a consultant hepatologist, psychiatrists, nurses, and a health counsellor. Liver fibrosis was assessed by a non invasive method. In 2002, 6 patients had liver fibrosis assessment at hospital facilities, 4 patients were assessed with liver biopsy and 2 patients with Fibrotest-Actitest. 2 patients were treated for HCV at hospital. In 2003 and 2004, 224 patients were assessed with Fibrotest-Actitest on site. Of these, 85 were treated for HCV. SVR was achieved in 43%. We conclude that the combination of an onsite multidisciplinary team with the use of a noninvasive assessment method led to improved management of HCV infection in drug users' primary care facility. PMID:20811482

  12. Factors to improve the management of hepatitis C in drug users: an observational study in an addiction centre.

    PubMed

    Moussalli, Joseph; Delaquaize, Helene; Boubilley, Dominique; Lhomme, Jean Pierre; Merleau Ponty, Jules; Sabot, David; Kerever, Anne; Valleur, Marc; Poynard, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Barriers to management of HCV in injection drug users are related to patients, health providers, and facilities. In a primary care drug user's addiction centre we studied access to HCV standard of care before and after using an onsite total care concept provided by a multidisciplinary team and noninvasive liver fibrosis evaluation. A total of 586 patients were seen between 2002 and 2004. The majority, 417 patients, were HCV positive and of these patients 337 were tested positive for HCV RNA. In 2002, patients were sent to the hospital. with the Starting of 2003, patients were offered standard of care HCV management in the center by a team of general practitioners, a consultant hepatologist, psychiatrists, nurses, and a health counsellor. Liver fibrosis was assessed by a non invasive method. In 2002, 6 patients had liver fibrosis assessment at hospital facilities, 4 patients were assessed with liver biopsy and 2 patients with Fibrotest-Actitest. 2 patients were treated for HCV at hospital. In 2003 and 2004, 224 patients were assessed with Fibrotest-Actitest on site. Of these, 85 were treated for HCV. SVR was achieved in 43%. We conclude that the combination of an onsite multidisciplinary team with the use of a noninvasive assessment method led to improved management of HCV infection in drug users' primary care facility.

  13. Addiction Research Ethics and the Belmont Principles: Do Drug Users Have a Different Moral Voice?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Celia B.

    2013-01-01

    This study used semi-structured interviews and content analysis to examine moral principles that street drug users apply to three hypothetical addiction research ethical dilemmas. Participants (n = 90) were ethnically diverse, economically disadvantaged drug users recruited in New York City in 2009. Participants applied a wide range of contextually sensitive moral precepts, including respect, beneficence, justice, relationality, professional obligations, rules, and pragmatic self-interest. Limitations and implications for future research and the responsible conduct of addiction research are discussed. PMID:21073412

  14. From Abstinence to Relapse: A Preliminary Qualitative Study of Drug Users in a Compulsory Drug Rehabilitation Center in Changsha, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Mamy, Jules; Gao, Pengcheng; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Relapse among abstinent drug users is normal. Several factors are related to relapse, but it remains unclear what individuals’ actual life circumstances are during periods of abstinence, and how these circumstances facilitate or prevent relapse. Objective To illuminate drug users’ experiences during abstinence periods and explore the real-life catalysts and inhibitors contributing to drug use relapse. Method Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 drug users recruited from a compulsory isolated drug rehabilitation center in Changsha. The interviews were guided by open-ended questions on individuals’ experiences in drug use initiation, getting addicted, treatment history, social environment, abstinence, and relapse. Participants were also encouraged to share their own stories. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. The data of 18 participants who reported abstinence experiences before admission were included in the analyses. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis with inductive hand coding to derive themes. Results Most drug users were able to successfully abstain from drugs. During abstinence, their lives were congested with challenges, such as adverse socioeconomic conditions, poor family/social support, interpersonal conflicts, and stigma and discrimination, all of which kept them excluded from mainstream society. Furthermore, the police’s system of ID card registration, which identifies individuals as drug users, worsened already grave situations. Relapse triggers reported by the participants focused mainly on negative feelings, interpersonal conflicts, and stressful events. Craving was experienced but not perceived as a relapse trigger by most participants. Conclusions This study of in-depth interview with drug users found evidence of situations and environments they live during abstinence appear rather disadvantaged, making it extremely difficult for them to remain abstinent. Comprehensive programs

  15. Reward-Related Decision-Making Deficits and Elevated Impulsivity Among MDMA and Other Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Karen L.; Luciana, Monica; Sullwold, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    Background The recreational drug, MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; ‘Ecstasy’), is a synthetic amphetamine derivative and a serotonin neurotoxin. MDMA use is associated with cognitive dysfunction and impulsivity, but since polydrug abuse is common among users it is difficult to attribute these problems specifically to MDMA. Moreover, few studies have examined reward-related cognitive processes. Our aim was to examine reward-related decision-making and impulsivity among MDMA users while controlling for polydrug use via appropriate comparison groups. Methods We examined decision-making (Iowa Gambling Task; IGT; Bechara et al., 1994), self-reported impulsivity (Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire – Brief Form [Constraint subscale]; Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale), and drug use among 22 abstinent MDMA users, 30 other drug users, and 29 healthy non-drug controls. Results MDMA and other drug users showed comparable patterns of decision-making and impulsivity. However, both drug groups demonstrated poorer IGT performance and elevated self-reported impulsivity relative to controls. Poorer decision-making was related to heavier drug use in the past year, heavier weekly alcohol use, and meeting lifetime substance use disorder (SUD) criteria for more drug classes. Elevated impulsivity was associated with heavier drug use, heavier weekly alcohol use, more lifetime SUDs, and higher self-reported depression levels. Conclusions These findings contradict the idea that MDMA is specifically associated with deficient decision-making. Drug users, in general, may be at risk for decision-making deficits and elevated impulsivity. Such behaviors may represent trait factors that lead to the initiation of drug and alcohol use, and/or they may represent behavior patterns that are exacerbated by extensive use. PMID:18384979

  16. Foreign body aspiration pneumonia in an intravenous drug user

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Balu; Andelkovic, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Heroin use is associated with several well described respiratory complications, including noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, aspiration pneumonitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome,pneumonia, lung abscess, septic pulmonary emboli, and atelectasis. We describe an interesting case of a young female patient, an intravenous heroin user who presented with progressive dyspnea, hypoxia, and left lung consolidation. PMID:22412782

  17. Medical and Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Participants: Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. Methods: A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response…

  18. Medical and Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Participants: Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. Methods: A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response…

  19. Systematic review of HIV and HCV infection among drug users in China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Y-P; Liu, Z-M

    2009-06-01

    To determine the HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) geographical distribution among drug users in China, a systematic literature review of 40 peer-reviewed publications (comprising 15,565 drug users) was conducted. Of the total drug users, 10,724 were found to be injection drug users (IDUs) and 4841 were non-injection drug users (non-IDUs). Various studies identified that among IDUs and non-IDUs, the overall HIV prevalence rates were 12.55% and 1.05%, and the HCV prevalence rates were 66.97% and 18.30%, respectively. The HIV prevalence rate ranged from 0% (Anhui and Inner Mongolia) to 52.51% (Yunnan) among IDUs, and from 0% to 19.80% among non-IDUs correspondingly. The HCV prevalence rate ranged from 11.43% (Shannxi) to 90.77% (Hubei) among IDUs, and from 0% (Anhui) to 40.00% (Fujian) among non-IDUs. Based on the high prevalence of HIV and HCV among drug users, scaling-up harm reduction was required from 'heroin trafficking areas' to other areas in China.

  20. High HCV seroprevalence and HIV drug use risk behaviors among injection drug users in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Irene; ul-Hasan, Salman; Galai, Noya; Thomas, David L; Zafar, Tariq; Ahmed, Mohammad A; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2006-01-01

    Introduction HIV and HCV risk behaviors among injection drug users (IDUs) in two urban areas in Pakistan were identified. Methods From May to June 2003, 351 IDUs recruited in harm-reduction drop-in centers operated by a national non-governmental organization in Lahore (Punjab province) and Quetta (Balochistan province) completed an interviewer-administered survey and were tested for HIV and HCV. Multivariable logistic regression identified correlates of seropositivity, stratifying by site. All study participants provided written, informed consent. Results All but two were male; median age was 35 and <50% had any formal education. None were HIV-positive; HCV seroprevalence was 88%. HIV awareness was relatively high, but HCV awareness was low (19%). Injection behaviors and percutaneous exposures such as drawing blood into a syringe while injecting ('jerking'), longer duration of injection, and receiving a street barber shave were significantly associated with HCV seropositivity. Discussion Despite no HIV cases, overall HCV prevalence was very high, signaling the potential for a future HIV epidemic among IDUs across Pakistan. Programs to increase needle exchange, drug treatment and HIV and HCV awareness should be implemented immediately. PMID:16914042

  1. Propensity to Work Among Chronically Unemployed Adult Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; DeFulio, Anthony; Long, Lauren; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Analyses were conducted to compare rates of employment before, during, and after employment at the therapeutic workplace, which is a novel employment-based treatment for drug misuse. Participants in two clinical trials attended the therapeutic workplace at higher rates than they worked before intake and six months after discharge. These data suggest that unemployed chronic drug misusers will attend work at higher rates at the therapeutic workplace than in the community when paid modest wages, and that the failure of chronic drug misusers to obtain employment in the community may not result from lack of interest in work. PMID:20964531

  2. Drug injecting and HIV risk among injecting drug users in Hai Phong, Vietnam: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Long, Thanh Nguyen; Huong, Phan Thi; Stewart, Donald Edwin

    2015-01-29

    Hai Phong, located in northern Vietnam, has become a high HIV prevalence province among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) since the infection shifted from the southern to the northern region of the country. Previous research indicates high levels of drug and sex related risk behaviour especially among younger IDUs. Our recent qualitative research provides a deeper understanding of HIV risk behaviour and highlights views and experiences of IDUs relating to drug injecting and sharing practices. Fifteen IDUs participated in semi-structured interviews conducted in September-October, 2012. Eligible participants were selected from those recruited in a larger scale behavioural research project and identified through screening questions. Interviews were conducted by two local interviewers in Vietnamese and were audiotaped. Ethical procedures, including informed consent and participants' understanding of their right to skip and withdraw, were applied. Transcripts were translated and double checked. The data were categorised and coded according to themes. Thematic analysis was conducted and a qualitative data analysis thematic framework was used. Qualitative analysis highlighted situational circumstances associated with HIV risks among IDUs in Hai Phong and revealed three primary themes: (i) places for injecting, (ii) injecting drugs in small groups, and (iii) sharing practices. Our results showed that shared use of jointly purchased drugs and group injecting were widespread among IDUs without adequate recognition of these as HIV risk behaviours. Frequent police raids generated a constant fear of arrest. As a consequence, the majority preferred either rail lines or isolated public places for injection, while some injected in their own or a friend's home. Price, a heroin crisis, and strong group norms encouraged collective preparation and group injecting. Risk practices were enhanced by a number of factors: the difficulty in getting new syringes, quick withdrawal management

  3. Psychoeducational Tutoring of Young Drug Users in a Therapeutic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patalano, Frank

    1978-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of establishing a warm student/teacher relationship when tutoring drug abusers. Describes a tutoring process teachers can use to gear remedial work toward the interest patterns of the students. (RL)

  4. Medication assisted treatment in the treatment of drug abuse and dependence in HIV/AIDS infected drug users.

    PubMed

    Kresina, Thomas F; Bruce, R Douglas; McCance-Katz, Elinore F

    2009-07-01

    Drug use and HIV/AIDS are global public health issues. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that up to 30% of HIV infections are related to drug use and associated behaviors. The intersection, of the twin epidemics of HIV and drug/alcohol use, results in difficult medical management issues for the health care providers and researchers who work in the expanding global HIV prevention and treatment fields. Access to care and treatment, medication adherence to multiple therapeutic regimens, and concomitant drug -drug interactions of prescribed treatments are difficult barriers for drug users to overcome without directed interventions. Injection drug users are frequently disenfranchised from medical care and suffer sigma and discrimination creating additional barriers to care and treatment for their drug abuse and dependence as well as HIV infection. In an increasing number of studies, medication assisted treatment of drug abuse and dependence has been shown to be an important HIV prevention intervention. Controlling the global transmission of HIV will require further investment in evidence-based interventions and programs to enhance access to care and treatment of individuals who abuse illicit drugs and alcohol. In this review, we present the cumulative evidence of the importance of medication assisted treatment in the prevention, care, and treatment of HIV infected individuals who also abuse drugs and alcohol.

  5. 76 FR 59705 - Guidance for Industry on User Fee Waivers, Reductions, and Refunds for Drug and Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Refunds for Drug and Biological Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... industry entitled ``User Fee Waivers, Reductions, and Refunds for Drug and Biological Products.'' This... a guidance for industry entitled ``User Fee Waivers, Reductions, and Refunds for Drug and Biological...

  6. 77 FR 51814 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... effective generic drugs to the public and reduce costs to industry. GDUFA enables FDA to assess user fees to... safe and effective generic drugs to the public and reduce costs to industry. GDUFA enables FDA to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User...

  7. [Analysis of utilization situation of harm reduction services among drug users and its impact factors].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-ying; Yu, Xiao-ming; Sun, Jiang-ping; Xue, Hui; Wang, Geng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Lu

    2013-06-18

    To study the utilization situation of harm reduction services among drug users and to analyze the reasons of the drug users' absence in the services as well as their evaluation of the services quality based on the gender perspective, and then to provide advice on the improvement of harm reduction services in the future. Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in four cities of Yunnan Province. The information was collected from the drug users in the drug rehabilitation centers and communities through outreach workers. The utilization of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and needle exchange service, the reason of the drug users' absence in the services and the evaluation towards the convenience, acceptability, as well as services quality were all surveyed. The valid samples were 579 with sex ratio 50.8% (male) and 49.2% (female). Most of the respondents (56.3%) had an educational level of junior high school and 44.0% were single. There were 61.8% (358/579) of respondents who used to utilize MMT service with female participation rate being 57.5%, which was lower than the male one (P<0.05). And there were 58.2% (223/383) of the respondents who used to exchange needles from the outreach workers or needle exchange points with female participation rate being 52.9%, which was lower than the male one (P<0.05). The leading cause of the drug users' absence in the services was their lack of understanding about the services. Among the people who used to utilize the services, the evaluations of women were better than those of men. Drug users have a low awareness of harm reduction services and female drug users are lack of the utilization towards services. More publicity and concern on harm reduction services in the future as well as exploration of the services which better fit the traits of women and privacy protection are suggested.

  8. Survey of doctors prescribing diamorphine (heroin) to opiate-dependent drug users in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Metrebian, Nicky; Carnwath, Tom; Stimson, Gerry V; Storz, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    To determine the scale and practice of diamorphine (heroin) prescribing for opiate dependence in the United Kingdom in 2000. Postal survey. England, Scotland and Wales. One hundred and eleven of the 164 doctors in the United Kingdom on the Home Office record as holding a licence to prescribe diamorphine (response rate 68%), and 59 of the 108 doctors in the United Kingdom eligible to hold a licence (working in drug clinics), but not doing so (response rate 54%). The characteristics of doctors (a) holding a licence and (b) currently prescribing; the number of opiate users receiving a prescription; current treatment delivery, clinical criteria for patient eligibility; and reasons for prescribing or not prescribing diamorphine. Seventy of the 111 doctors actually held a licence. While the majority were consultant psychiatrists, five were general practitioners. Forty-six were currently prescribing to 448 patients. The majority of prescribers reported that they had not initiated a prescription for diamorphine but had inherited patients already receiving such a prescription. Most of those who prescribed considered that in selected cases it could produce clinical and social improvement. There were great variations in clinical criteria for patient eligibility, prescribing practice, daily dose prescribed (range 5-1500 mg) and the daily dose-equivalent of 100 mg methadone (range 50-900 mg). Many respondents cited lack of appropriate resources as a reason for not prescribing to more patients. Reasons for non-prescribing varied from lack of resources to little evidence of its effectiveness. The prescribing of diamorphine to opiate dependent drug users remains rare in the United Kingdom. Not all eligible doctors seek a licence to prescribe, and not all those with licences actually prescribe it. There is no clear consensus on who should be treated with diamorphine and in what way.

  9. The Risk Avoidance Partnership: Training Active Drug Users as Peer Health Advocates

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Margaret R.; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Mosack, Katie E.; Convey, Mark; Martinez, Maria; Clair, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Efforts have expanded to create AIDS prevention programs for drug users that consider the social context and interpersonal relationships within which risky practices take place. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) project is designed to train active drug users as “Peer/Public Health Advocates” (PHAs) to bring a structured, peer-led intervention into the sites where they and their drug-using social networks use illicit drugs. The RAP Peer Health Advocacy training curriculum and peer-led intervention promote harm reduction among drug users and support drug-user organization to reduce infectious disease and other harm in the context of injection drug use, crack cocaine use, and sexual activity. Initial findings suggest that RAP PHAs perceive a significant positive role change in themselves while conducting health advocacy work, and willingly and successfully carry the peer-led intervention into locations of high-risk drug activity to deliver it to their peers even in the absence of project staff support. PMID:19337568

  10. Risk Behaviors and Perceptions of AIDS among Street Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Fen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Conducted 325 survey interviews and 22 guided in-depth interviews with injection drug users to document drug usage and injection patterns, sexual practices, perceived risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection, sources of health information, and knowledge and attitudes about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. (Author/ABL)

  11. 77 FR 43844 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ...) and final dosage form (FDF) facilities; fees for new ANDAs and prior approval supplements (PASs); and... Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA 3794 AGENCY: Food and Drug... response to the notice. This notice solicits comments concerning collection of information using Form...

  12. 75 FR 73103 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Animal Drug User...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... 76 Sheet) Total 76 \\1\\ There are no capital costs or operating and maintenance costs associated with... Collection; Comment Request; Animal Drug User Fee Cover Sheet, Form 3546 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...) Cover Sheet. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on the collection of information by...

  13. Risk Behaviors and Perceptions of AIDS among Street Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Fen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Conducted 325 survey interviews and 22 guided in-depth interviews with injection drug users to document drug usage and injection patterns, sexual practices, perceived risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection, sources of health information, and knowledge and attitudes about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. (Author/ABL)

  14. 'Silk Road', the virtual drug marketplace: a single case study of user experiences.

    PubMed

    Van Hout, Marie Claire; Bingham, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The online promotion of 'drug shopping' and user information networks is of increasing public health and law enforcement concern. An online drug marketplace called 'Silk Road' has been operating on the 'Deep Web' since February 2011 and was designed to revolutionise contemporary drug consumerism. A single case study approach explored a 'Silk Road' user's motives for online drug purchasing, experiences of accessing and using the website, drug information sourcing, decision making and purchasing, outcomes and settings for use, and perspectives around security. The participant was recruited following a lengthy relationship building phase on the 'Silk Road' chat forum. The male participant described his motives, experiences of purchasing processes and drugs used from 'Silk Road'. Consumer experiences on 'Silk Road' were described as 'euphoric' due to the wide choice of drugs available, relatively easy once navigating the Tor Browser (encryption software) and using 'Bitcoins' for transactions, and perceived as safer than negotiating illicit drug markets. Online researching of drug outcomes, particularly for new psychoactive substances was reported. Relationships between vendors and consumers were described as based on cyber levels of trust and professionalism, and supported by 'stealth modes', user feedback and resolution modes. The reality of his drug use was described as covert and solitary with psychonautic characteristics, which contrasted with his membership, participation and feelings of safety within the 'Silk Road' community. 'Silk Road' as online drug marketplace presents an interesting displacement away from 'traditional' online and street sources of drug supply. Member support and harm reduction ethos within this virtual community maximises consumer decision-making and positive drug experiences, and minimises potential harms and consumer perceived risks. Future research is necessary to explore experiences and backgrounds of other users. Copyright © 2013

  15. Social psychological determinants of the use of performance-enhancing drugs by gym users.

    PubMed

    Wiefferink, C H; Detmar, S B; Coumans, B; Vogels, T; Paulussen, T G W

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the social psychological determinants of the use of performance-enhancing drugs by gym users who practice bodybuilding, fitness, powerlifting or combat sports. In this questionnaire-based study, 144 respondents answered questions on their actual use and intention to use such drugs and also on their background characteristics and beliefs, such as their attitudes, social influences and self-efficacy. While all social psychological determinants correlated with intention to use these drugs, the most important predictors were personal norms, beliefs about performance outcomes and the perceived behavior of others. Non-users held more restrictive norms about using performance-enhancing drugs, were less optimistic about the performance-enhancing outcomes and believed that fewer significant others used performance-enhancing drugs than users and ex-users. The results of this study indicate that users attribute advantages to performance-enhancing drugs and are inclined to overlook the risks of using them. Preventive interventions should focus on influencing personal norms and social processes.

  16. High-Cost Users of Prescription Drugs: A Population-Based Analysis from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weymann, Deirdre; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J; Morgan, Steven G

    2017-04-01

    To examine variation in pharmaceutical spending and patient characteristics across prescription drug user groups. British Columbia's population-based linked administrative health and sociodemographic databases (N = 3,460,763). We classified individuals into empirically derived prescription drug user groups based on pharmaceutical spending patterns outside hospitals from 2007 to 2011. We examined variation in patient characteristics, mortality, and health services usage and applied hierarchical clustering to determine patterns of concurrent drug use identifying high-cost patients. Approximately 1 in 20 British Columbians had persistently high prescription costs for 5 consecutive years, accounting for 42 percent of 2011 province-wide pharmaceutical spending. Less than 1 percent of the population experienced discrete episodes of high prescription costs; an additional 2.8 percent transitioned to or from high-cost episodes of unknown duration. Persistent high-cost users were more likely to concurrently use multiple chronic medications; episodic and transitory users spent more on specialized medicines, including outpatient cancer drugs. Cluster analyses revealed heterogeneity in concurrent medicine use within high-cost groups. Whether low, moderate, or high, costs of prescription drugs for most individuals are persistent over time. Policies controlling high-cost use should focus on reducing polypharmacy and encouraging price competition in drug classes used by ordinary and high-cost users alike. © 2016 The Authors. Health Services Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Cotton Fever: A Condition Self-Diagnosed by IV Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Zerr, Ashley Michelle; Ku, Kimberly; Kara, Areeba

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of fever in an intravenous drug user prompts diagnostic testing targeted at identifying infectious etiologies. However, an alternate diagnosis exists in "cotton fever." While few reports describe this phenomenon in the peer-reviewed literature, the diagnosis is well recognized among the intravenous drug user community. Although its etiology is not well understood, cotton fever seems to be a self-limited, febrile response to the intravenous administration of a drug filtered through cotton. Educating clinicians regarding cotton fever may limit unnecessary hospital admissions and improve our ability to care for this population.

  18. Knowledge of AIDS and HIV transmission among drug users in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proper knowledge of HIV transmission is not enough for people to adopt protective behaviors, but deficits in this information may increase HIV/AIDS vulnerability. Objective To assess drug users' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and the possible association between knowledge and HIV testing. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted in 2006/7 with a convenience sample of 295 illicit drug users in Rio de Janeiro, assessing knowledge on AIDS/HIV transmission and its relationship with HIV testing. Information from 108 randomly selected drug users who received an educational intervention using cards illustrating situations potentially associated with HIV transmission were assessed using Multidimensional Scaling (MDS). Results Almost 40% of drug users reported having never used condoms and more than 60% reported not using condoms under the influence of substances. Most drug users (80.6%) correctly answered that condoms make sex safer, but incorrect beliefs are still common (e.g. nearly 44% believed HIV can be transmitted through saliva and 55% reported that HIV infection can be transmitted by sharing toothbrushes), with significant differences between drug users who had and who had not been tested for HIV. MDS showed queries on vaginal/anal sex and sharing syringes/needles were classified in the same set as effective modes of HIV transmission. The event that was further away from this core of properly perceived risks referred to blood donation, perceived as risky. Other items were found to be dispersed, suggesting inchoate beliefs on transmission modes. Conclusions Drug users have an increased HIV infection vulnerability compared to the general population, this specific population expressed relevant doubts about HIV transmission, as well as high levels of risky behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that possessing inaccurate HIV/AIDS knowledge may be a barrier to timely HIV testing. Interventions should be tailored to such specific characteristics. PMID:21324119

  19. Partner notification with HIV-infected drug users: results of formative research.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S J; Tross, S; Doino-Ingersol, J; Weisfuse, I

    1998-08-01

    The authors conducted formative research on the use of partner notification with HIV-infected drug users (i.e. those who use/abuse injectable drugs, crack or cocaine) in order to guide the development of an effective intervention for this population in New York City. Structured focus group and personal interviews were conducted with 25 in- and out-of-treatment drug users, 23 counsellors from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic and a methadone maintenance treatment programme (MMTP), and nine experts in the field of HIV partner notification and/or substance abuse prevention and treatment. Results revealed factors associated with HIV-positive disclosure, the strengths and barriers of existing partner notification programmes and issues that should be considered in designing an effective intervention with HIV-infected drug users. Further research and planning activities are recommended before piloting and evaluating such a programme.

  20. Adherence to treatment of depression in active injection drug users: the minerva study.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Herman, Debra S; Solomon, David A; Anthony, Jennifer L; Anderson, Bradley J; Ramsey, Susan E; Miller, Ivan W

    2004-03-01

    The impact of depression on drug users is extensive, serving as a trigger for high-risk injection practices and continued drug use. Yet the ability to retain active drug users in mental health treatment has never been tested clinically. We recruited injection drug users (IDU) for a randomized study of combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the treatment of depression. Among the 53 SCID-diagnosed depressed subjects assigned to the combined treatment group, 43.4% were "fully adherent" to treatment (75% or greater attendance at cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions or 75% or greater adherence to the pharmacotherapy regimen). The correlation of CBT attendance and pharmacotherapy use was high (r(s) =.74). Persons with double depression (major depression plus dysthymia) were most likely to be fully adherent (p =.01); frequency of heroin use was inversely associated with adherence. Developing public health treatment interventions to engage out-of-treatment, dually-diagnosed IDUs is possible.

  1. Performance-Enhancing Drugs in Sports: How Chemists Catch Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, T. C.; Hatton, Caroline K.

    2011-01-01

    The "cat-and-mouse game" between those who enable athletes to use performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) and those who try to detect such use provides a wealth of interesting examples for the undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry classroom. In this article, we focus on several commonly used PEDs, including amphetamine, anabolic steroids,…

  2. An Integrative Model for Drug Use Severity among Inhalant Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, George W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Tests with linear structural equations (LISREL) suggest that an integrative model best explains interrelationships among peer deviancy, psychological vulnerability, inhalant availability, family environment, acculturative and socioeconomic stress, and educational attainment, and their longitudinal effects on inhalant use and drug use severity…

  3. Treatment motivation in drug users: a theory-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Longshore, Douglas; Teruya, Cheryl

    2006-02-01

    Motivation for drug use treatment is widely regarded as crucial to a client's engagement in treatment and success in quitting drug use. Motivation is typically measured with items reflecting high treatment readiness (e.g., perceived need for treatment and commitment to participate) and low treatment resistance (e.g., skepticism regarding benefits of treatment). Building upon reactance theory and the psychotherapeutic construct of resistance, we conceptualized these two aspects of treatment motivation - readiness and resistance - as distinct constructs and examined their predictive power in a sample of 1295 drug-using offenders referred to treatment while on probation. The sample was 60.7% African Americans, 33.5% non-Hispanic Whites, and 21.2% women; their ages ranged from 16 to 63 years old. Interviews occurred at treatment entry and 6 months later. Readiness (but not resistance) predicted treatment retention during the 6-month period. Resistance (but not readiness) predicted drug use, especially among offenders for whom the treatment referral was coercive. These findings suggest that readiness and resistance should both be assessed among clients entering treatment, especially when the referral is coercive. Intake and counseling protocols should address readiness and resistance separately.

  4. Performance-Enhancing Drugs in Sports: How Chemists Catch Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, T. C.; Hatton, Caroline K.

    2011-01-01

    The "cat-and-mouse game" between those who enable athletes to use performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) and those who try to detect such use provides a wealth of interesting examples for the undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry classroom. In this article, we focus on several commonly used PEDs, including amphetamine, anabolic steroids,…

  5. Does harm reduction programming make a difference in the lives of highly marginalized, at-risk drug users?

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Susan J; Ruefli, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Harm reduction is a controversial model for treating drug users, with little formal research available on its operation and effectiveness. In order to advance the field, we first conducted participatory research of harm reduction with 120 clients using nominal-group technique to develop culturally relevant outcomes to measure progress. Second, we conducted focus group interviews with a different group of clients to help validate the outcomes. Third, we used the outcomes in an evaluation of the largest harm reduction program in New York City, which involved a representative sample of 261 and entailed baseline, post, and six follow-up assessments. The participatory research resulted in outcomes of 10 life areas important to drug users. Evaluation results showed that program participants made positive improvements across most outcomes, with the most substantial progress made in how clients dealt with drug-use problems. Along with their participation in the program, progress in some outcomes was also associated with clients' type of drug use (i.e., stable vs. chaotic), where more stable drug use was associated with better ways of making an income and types of housing. Surprisingly, progress was not associated with the kinds or numbers of services received or the length of time in the program. This was attributed to the service delivery model of harm reduction, in which clients are less inclined to associate their success with a single staff person or with a single service or intervention received than with the program as a whole. PMID:15171790

  6. Effective treatment of injecting drug users with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dore, Gregory J; Hellard, Margaret; Matthews, Gail V; Grebely, Jason; Haber, Paul S; Petoumenos, Kathy; Yeung, Barbara; Marks, Philippa; van Beek, Ingrid; McCaughan, Geoffrey; White, Peter; French, Rosemary; Rawlinson, William; Lloyd, Andrew R; Kaldor, John M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who receive treatment achieve high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), but few studies have examined outcomes among injecting drug users (IDUs). We evaluated the efficacy of treatment of recent HCV infection in IDUs with acute and early chronic HCV. We analyzed data from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C-a prospective study of the natural history and treatment outcomes of patients with recent HCV infection. Participants eligible for the study had their first anti-HCV antibody-positive test result within the past 6 months and either acute clinical HCV within the past 12 months or documented anti-HCV seroconversion within 24 months. Participants with HCV received pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (180 microg/wk, n = 74); those with HCV/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection received pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (180 microg/wk) with ribavirin (n = 35) for 24 weeks. From June 2004 to February 2008, 167 participants were enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C; 79% had injected drugs in the previous 6 months. Among 74 with only HCV, the SVRs were 55% and 72% by intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis, respectively. In multivariate analyses, baseline factors independently associated with lower SVR included decreased social functioning and current opiate pharmacotherapy. Adherent participants had higher SVR rates (63% vs 29%; P = .025). Of the 35 participants with HCV/HIV co-infection, the SVRs were 74% and 75% by intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis, respectively. Treatment of recent HCV infection among IDUs, including those with HIV co-infection, is effective. Strategies to engage socially marginalized individuals and increase adherence should improve treatment outcomes in this population. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Alcohol and Illegal Drug Use Behaviors and Prescription Opioids Use: How do Nonmedical and Medical Users Compare, and Does Motive to Use Really Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Ghandour, Lilian A.; El Sayed, Donna S.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The study compared illegal drug and alcohol use behaviors between medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids (PO) and nonmedical users with distinct motives to use. Method An ethically-approved cross-sectional study (2010) was conducted on a representative sample of private university students (n=570), using a self-filled anonymous questionnaire. Results About 25% reported using PO only medically and 15% nonmedically. The prevalence of alcohol and illegal drug use was consistently higher among nonmedical than medical PO users. Adjusting for age and gender, lifetime medical users of PO were more likely to use marijuana only (OR=1.8, 95%CI= 1.1, 2.8), while nonmedical users were at higher odds of using marijuana, ecstasy, cocaine/crack, and alcohol problematically. Compared to non-users, students who took PO nonmedically for non-therapeutic reasons were more likely to use various illegal drugs, but nonmedical users who took PO to relieve pain/help in sleep were only more likely to use marijuana (OR=2.5, 95%CI=1.1, 5.4) and alcohol (e.g., alcohol abuse, OR=3.8, 95%CI= 1.4, 10.1). Conclusion Youth who use PO nonmedically to self-treat have a different alcohol and illegal drug-using profile than those who take it for non-therapeutic reasons. PMID:23391856

  8. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ...; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information.'' This guidance document describes the user fees associated with 513(g) requests...

  9. Trends in reports of driving following illicit drug consumption among regular drug users in Australia, 2007-2013: Has random roadside drug testing had a deterrent effect?

    PubMed

    Horyniak, Danielle; Dietze, Paul; Lenton, Simon; Alati, Rosa; Bruno, Raimondo; Matthews, Allison; Breen, Courtney; Burns, Lucy

    2017-07-01

    Driving following illicit drug consumption ('drug-driving') is a potential road safety risk. Roadside drug testing (RDT) is conducted across Australia with the dual aims of prosecuting drivers with drugs in their system and deterring drug-driving. We examined trends over time in self-reported past six-month drug-driving among sentinel samples of regular drug users and assessed the impact of experiences of RDT on drug-driving among these participants. Data from 1913 people who inject drugs (PWID) and 3140 regular psychostimulant users (RPU) who were first-time participants in a series of repeat cross-sectional sentinel studies conducted in Australian capital cities from 2007 to 2013 and reported driving in the past six months were analysed. Trends over time were assessed using the χ(2) test for trend. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed the relationship between experiences of RDT and recent drug-driving, adjusting for survey year, jurisdiction of residence and socio-demographic and drug use characteristics. The percentage of participants reporting recent (past six months) drug-driving decreased significantly over time among both samples (PWID: 83% [2007] vs. 74% [2013], p<0.001; RPU: 72% vs. 56%, p<0.001), but drug-driving remained prevalent. Lifetime experience of RDT increased significantly over time (PWID: 6% [2007] vs. 32% [2013], p<0.001; RPU: 2% vs. 11%, p<0.001). There were no significant associations between experiencing RDT and drug-driving among either PWID or RPU. Although there is some evidence that drug-driving among key risk groups of regular drug users is declining in Australia, possibly reflecting a general deterrent effect of RDT, experiencing RDT appears to have no specific deterrent effect on drug-driving. Further intervention, with a particular focus on changing attitudes towards drug-driving, may be needed to further reduce this practice among these groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care.

  11. Treating adolescent drug abuse: a randomized trial comparing multidimensional family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Howard A; Dakof, Gayle A; Turner, Ralph M; Henderson, Craig E; Greenbaum, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of two adolescent drug abuse treatments: individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT). A 2 (treatment condition) x 4 (time) repeated-measures intent-to-treat randomized design. Data were gathered at baseline, termination, 6 and 12 months post-termination. Analyses used latent growth curve modeling. Community-based drug abuse clinic in the northeastern United States. A total of 224 youth, primarily male (81%), African American (72%), from low-income single-parent homes (58%) with an average age of 15 years were recruited into the study. All youth were drug users, with 75% meeting DSM-IV criteria for cannabis dependence and 13% meeting criteria for abuse. Five outcomes were measured: (i) substance use problem severity; (ii) 30-day frequency of cannabis use; (iii) 30-day frequency of alcohol use; (iv) 30-day frequency of other drug use; and (v) 30-day abstinence. Both treatments produced significant decreases in cannabis consumption and slightly significant reductions in alcohol use, but there were no treatment differences in reducing frequency of cannabis and alcohol use. Significant treatment effects were found favoring MDFT on substance use problem severity, other drug use and minimal use (zero or one occasion of use) of all substances, and these effects continued to 12 months following treatment termination. Both interventions are promising treatments. Consistent with previous controlled trials, MDFT is distinguished by the sustainability of treatment effects.

  12. [Drug information for patients (Package Leaflets), and user testing in EU].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Michiko; Doi, Hirohisa; Furukawa, Aya

    2015-01-01

    Patients and consumers have desired high quality drug information in their pharmacotherapy, and are entitled to receive it. It is desirable that the information should be aimed at shared decision-making between patients and healthcare professionals about medications. The quality of drug information available to patients should also be assured. With an aim to improve the quality of "Drug Guide for Patients", we investigated Patient Information Leaflets (PILs) which are approved by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the United Kingdom (UK) with regard to the criteria of development and user testing for assuring the quality of the PILs. In the European Union (EU), these are called Package Leaflets (PLs). PILs have been a legal requirement in the UK since 1999 for all medications. The user testing of PILs has been implemented as evidence since 2005 so that people can rely on the information provided in the leaflet. Execution of PILs which follow the guidance of the user testing, according to the guidance of this user testing, would reflect the views of patients. Here, we introduce the development process and implementation of user testing of PILs. In terms of readability, accessibility and understandability of drug information for patients, we need to discuss involving the public in decisions on how its quality should be assured and how it can be made easily be comprehensible for patients, in order to make effective use of "Drug Guide for Patients" in the future in Japan.

  13. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among injection drug users in Toronto

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, I D; Yuan, L; Millson, M E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injection drug users are at increased risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis (TB). The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection among injection drug users in Toronto, as indicated by a positive tuberculin skin test result. An additional objective was to identify predictors of a positive skin test result in this population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out involving self-selected injection drug users in the city of Toronto. A total of 171 participants were recruited through a downtown Toronto needle-exchange program from June 1 to Oct. 31, 1996. RESULTS: Of 167 subjects tested, 155 (92.8%) returned for interpretation of their skin test result within the designated timeframe (48 to 72 hours). Using a 5-mm cut-off, the prevalence rate of positive tuberculin skin test results was 31.0% (95% confidence interval 23.8% to 38.9%). Birth outside of Canada and increasing age were both predictive of a positive result. INTERPRETATION: There is a high burden of M. tuberculosis infection in this population of injection drug users. The compliance observed with returning for interpretation of skin test results indicates that successful TB screening is possible among injection drug users. PMID:10189423

  14. Voice of the psychonauts: coping, life purpose, and spirituality in psychedelic drug users.

    PubMed

    Móró, Levente; Simon, Katalin; Bárd, Imre; Rácz, József

    2011-01-01

    Psychoactive drug use shows great diversity, but due to a disproportionate focus on problematic drug use, predominant nonproblematic drug use remains an understudied phenomenon. Historic and anecdotal evidence shows that natural sources of "psychedelic" drugs (e.g., mescaline and psilocybin) have been used in religious and spiritual settings for centuries, as well as for psychological self-enhancement purposes. Our study assessed a total of 667 psychedelic drug users, other drug users, and drug nonusers by online questionnaires. Coping, life purpose, and spirituality were measured with the Psychological Immune Competence Inventory, the Purpose in Life test, and the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale, respectively. Results indicate that the use of psychedelic drugs with a purpose to enhance self-knowledge is less associated with problems, and correlates positively with coping and spirituality. Albeit the meaning of "spirituality" may be ambiguous, it seems that a spiritually-inclined attitude in drug use may act as a protective factor against drug-related problems. The autognostic use of psychedelic drugs may be thus hypothesized as a "training situation" that promotes self-enhancement by rehearsing personal coping strategies and by gaining self-knowledge. However, to assess the actual efficiency and the speculated long-term benefits of these deliberately provoked exceptional experiences, further qualitative investigations are needed.

  15. Cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine) in hair and urine of drug users.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Poet, T S; Pillai, R; Erickson, J; Estrada, A L; Watson, R R

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of drug detection, urinalysis and hair analysis, were compared with respect to the efficiency of identification of drug use in a population of men living on the Arizona-Mexico border. The standard curve of cannabinoids in urine was linear to 20 ng/mL. The GC/MS levels for all cannabinoids combined in urine were very similar to that obtained by radioimmunoassay (RIA), 91% concordance. Similar results were obtained from samples analyzed dually for the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE) after spiking. As determined by RIA of urine, 74% of the subjects were positive for cannabinoids. The majority were in the range of 100-1000 ng/mg creatinine. The pattern of excretion of THC metabolites with respect to the verbally reported time of first use was fairly normal, with the peak rate of elimination 13-24 hours following the last reported use. Washed hair samples were extracted by overnight acid hydrolysis. Urine samples and neutralized hair extracts were analyzed for cocaine and BE by RIA. Of the hair samples, 55% contained cocaine/BE, as compared with only 4.3% of the urine samples. Most hair samples contained cocaine/BE in the range of 25-100 ng/sample (100 mg hair). All hair samples testing negative for cocaine/BE by RIA also tested negative by GC/MS, and four samples containing the highest amounts of cocaine and BE by RIA were similarly found to contain the highest amounts by GC/MS. Hair analysis, therefore, gives a wider window of detection of drug use than does urinalysis and shows merit in the confirmation of cocaine use in small clinical research studies.

  16. The relationship between housing status and HIV risk among active drug users: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Hilario, Helena; Convey, Mark; Corbett, A Michelle; Weeks, Margaret; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between housing status and HIV risk using longitudinal, qualitative data collected in 2004-2005, from a purposeful sample of 65 active drug users in a variety of housed and homeless situations in Hartford, Connecticut. These data were supplemented with observations and in-depth interviews regarding drug use behavior collected in 2001-2005 to evaluate a peer-led HIV prevention intervention. Data reveal differences in social context within and among different housing statuses that affect HIV risk or protective behaviors including the ability to carry drug paraphernalia and HIV prevention materials, the amount of drugs in the immediate environment, access to subsidized and supportive housing, and relationships with those with whom drug users live. Policy implications of the findings, limitations to the data, and future research are discussed.

  17. The Relationship between Housing Status and HIV Risk among Active Drug Users: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Hilario, Helena; Convey, Mark; Corbett, A. Michelle; Weeks, Margaret; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between housing status and HIV risk using longitudinal, qualitative data collected in 2004-2005, from a purposeful sample of 65 active drug users in a variety of housed and homeless situations in Hartford, Connecticut. These data were supplemented with observations and in-depth interviews regarding drug use behavior collected in 2001-2005 to evaluate a peer-led HIV prevention intervention. Data reveal differences in social context within and among different housing statuses that affect HIV risky or protective behaviors including the ability to carry drug paraphernalia and HIV prevention materials, the amount of drugs in the immediate environment, access to subsidized and supportive housing, and relationships with others with whom drug users live. Policy implications of the findings, limitations to the data and future research are discussed. PMID:19142817

  18. Use of MDA (the "love drug") and methamphetamine in Toronto by unsuspecting users of ecstasy (MDMA).

    PubMed

    Kalasinsky, Kathryn S; Hugel, John; Kish, Stephen J

    2004-09-01

    It has recently been reported that purity of illicit tablets of ecstasy (MDMA) is now high. Our objective was to confirm whether hair of drug users, who request only ecstasy from their supplier, contains MDMA in the absence of other drugs. GC-MS analysis of scalp hair segments disclosed the presence of MDMA in 19 of 21 subjects and amphetamine/methamphetamine in eight subjects. Surprisingly, seven subjects had hair levels of the MDMA metabolite, MDA, equal to or greater than those of MDMA, suggesting use of MDA in addition to that of MDMA. These amphetamine derivatives might be included by clandestine laboratories to enhance effects of the drug cocktail or because of a perception that MDA synthesis might be simpler than that of MDMA. Drug users and investigators examining possible brain neurotoxic effects of MDMA need to consider that "ecstasy" tablets can contain MDA and methamphetamine despite no demand for the drugs.

  19. Wound botulism in drug users: a still underestimated diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodolico, C; Barca, E; Fenicia, L; Anniballi, F; Sinardi, A U; Girlanda, P

    2010-12-01

    Wound botulism is a rare infectious disease that is becoming a frequent complication of parental drug use. Diagnosis is often difficult and based on clinical suspicion. We report the first Italian case of wound botulism due to intramuscular heroin injection in a 48-year-old man with an acute onset of slurred speech and dysphagia. The most considerable finding of electrophysiological study was the reduction in amplitude of compound muscle action potential which should be considered a useful initial electrodiagnostic sign in the clinical context of botulism. Alerting clinicians to botulism is crucial for a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment and thus decreasing mortality and complications.

  20. Premature mortality in Scottish injecting drug users: a life-history approach.

    PubMed

    Copeland, L; Robertson, J; McKenzie, J; Kimber, J; Macleod, J; Hickman, M; de Angelis, D

    2012-02-01

    In Scotland, deaths in drug users are known to be higher than in the rest of the UK and most of Europe. Reducing drug-related deaths is currently a national priority for the Scottish Government.  This study aimed to present a description of the life histories of a group of injecting drug users who have recently died, with a view to highlighting areas for further research. The Edinburgh Addiction Cohort study recently carried out 432 follow-up interviews between the years 2005 and 2007. Thirty-three cases who completed this extensive interview detailing early life, education, employment, drug use, opiate substitution treatment, criminal history, mental health problems and overdose have subsequently died, leaving this source of rich information about their lives. The design of the interview used the life grid approach. Information was also compiled from full primary care records and General Register Office death certificates. Early life adversity was apparent for many cases, with a steady progression into early criminal behaviour and drug misuse. Poor adult life outcomes illustrated the lifelong damaging effects of drug injecting. Death occurred significantly earlier than in the general population or those living in deprived communities who did not use drugs. In conclusion, a clearer understanding of the life histories of problem drug users would be advantageous for health-care professionals and policy-makers. More qualitative research studies are needed to highlight areas which might require early intervention and also complement the existing secondary data studies.

  1. Drug therapy for treating post-dural puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Basurto Ona, Xavier; Osorio, Dimelza; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2015-07-15

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 8, 2011, on 'Drug therapy for treating post-dural puncture headache'.Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is the most common complication of lumbar puncture, an invasive procedure frequently performed in the emergency room. Numerous pharmaceutical drugs have been proposed to treat PDPH but there are still some uncertainties about their clinical effectiveness. To assess the effectiveness and safety of drugs for treating PDPH in adults and children. The searches included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE and MEDLINE in Process (from 1950 to 29 July 2014), EMBASE (from 1980 to 29 July 2014) and CINAHL (from 1982 to July 2014). There were no language restrictions. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of any pharmacological drug used for treating PDPH. Outcome measures considered for this review were: PDPH persistence of any severity at follow-up (primary outcome), daily activity limited by headache, conservative supplementary therapeutic option offered, epidural blood patch performed, change in pain severity scores, improvements in pain severity scores, number of days participants stay in hospital, any possible adverse events and missing data. Review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We estimated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes. We calculated a 95% confidence interval (CI) for each RR and MD. We did not undertake meta-analysis because the included studies assessed different sorts of drugs or different outcomes. We performed an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. We included 13 small RCTs (479 participants) in this review (at least 274 participants were women, with 118 parturients after a lumbar puncture for regional anaesthesia). In the original version of this Cochrane review, only seven small RCTs

  2. Analysis of extensively washed hair from cocaine users and drug chemists to establish new reporting criteria.

    PubMed

    Morris-Kukoski, Cynthia L; Montgomery, Madeline A; Hammer, Rena L

    2014-01-01

    Samples from a self-proclaimed cocaine (COC) user, from 19 drug users (postmortem) and from 27 drug chemists were extensively washed and analyzed for COC, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine (NC), cocaethylene (CE) and aryl hydroxycocaines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Published wash criteria and cutoffs were applied to the results. Additionally, the data were used to formulate new reporting criteria and interpretation guidelines for forensic casework. Applying the wash and reporting criteria, hair that was externally contaminated with COC was distinguished from hair collected from individuals known to have consumed COC. In addition, CE, NC and hydroxycocaine metabolites were only present in COC users' hair and not in drug chemists' hair. When properly applied, the use of an extended wash, along with the reporting criteria defined here, will exclude false-positive results from environmental contact with COC.

  3. Toxicological screening in heroin users: implications for management of drug misuse

    PubMed Central

    Skidmore, Carol A.; Robertson, J. Roy; Simpson, D.; Jarvie, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The toxicological screening of 200 urine samples from 55 known heroin users claiming to be abstinent revealed that in 18% of samples (24% of users tested) opiates were unexpectedly detected. Other substances, many of which were psychoactive drugs, were identified in 35% of samples. Cocaine was not detected in any samples. In addition, nicotine was found in 91% of users and caffeine in 44%. The data showed the presence of polydrug abuse in 29% of subjects and suggested there is an illegal supply of drugs originating from doctors' prescriptions. The requirement for more general use of toxicological screening and the implications of the results for management of drug takers in general practices are discussed. PMID:3450865

  4. Network structure and the risk for HIV transmission among rural drug users.

    PubMed

    Young, A M; Jonas, A B; Mullins, U L; Halgin, D S; Havens, J R

    2013-09-01

    Research suggests that structural properties of drug users' social networks can have substantial effects on HIV risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the structural properties of Appalachian drug users' risk networks could lend insight into the potential for HIV transmission in this population. Data from 503 drug users recruited through respondent-driven sampling were used to construct a sociometric risk network. Network ties represented relationships in which partners had engaged in unprotected sex and/or shared injection equipment. Compared to 1,000 randomly generated networks, the observed network was found to have a larger main component and exhibit more cohesiveness and centralization than would be expected at random. Thus, the risk network structure in this sample has many structural characteristics shown to be facilitative of HIV transmission. This underscores the importance of primary prevention in this population and prompts further investigation into the epidemiology of HIV in the region.

  5. A qualitative view of drug use behaviors of Mexican male injection drug users deported from the United States.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Victoria D; Robertson, Angela M; Hiller, Sarah P; Lozada, Remedios; Cornelius, Wayne; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2011-02-01

    Deportees are a hidden yet highly vulnerable and numerous population. Significantly, little data exists about the substance use and deportation experiences of Mexicans deported from the United States. This pilot qualitative study describes illicit drug use behaviors among 24 Mexico-born male injection drug users (IDUs), ≥ 18 years old, residing in Tijuana, Mexico who self-identified as deportees from the United States. In-person interviews were conducted in Tijuana, Mexico in 2008. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified major themes in participants' experiences. Few participants had personal or family exposures to illicit drugs prior to their first U.S. migration. Participants reported numerous deportations. Social (i.e., friends/family, post-migration stressors) and environmental factors (e.g., drug availability) were perceived to contribute to substance use initiation in the U.S. Drugs consumed in the United States included marijuana, heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and crack. More than half of men were IDUs prior to deportation. Addiction and justice system experiences reportedly contributed to deportation. After deportation, several men injected new drugs, primarily heroin or methamphetamine, or a combination of both drugs. Many men perceived an increase in their substance use after deportation and reported shame and loss of familial social and economic support. Early intervention is needed to stem illicit drug use in Mexican migrant youths. Binational cooperation around migrant health issues is warranted. Migrant-oriented programs may expand components that address mental health and drug use behaviors in an effort to reduce transmission of blood-borne infections. Special considerations are merited for substance users in correctional systems in the United States and Mexico, as well as substance users in United States immigration detention centers. The health status and health behaviors of deportees are likely to impact receiving Mexican

  6. Problem gambling and comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders among drug users recruited from drug treatment and community settings.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Williams, R M; Cottler, L B; Compton, W M; Spitznagel, E L; Ben-Abdallah, A

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about gambling rates of drug users recruited from drug treatment compared with those recruited from the community. We use the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) to provide lifetime prevalence estimates of problem gambling (i.e., at least one gambling problem) and DSM-III-R pathological gambling (i.e., at least four gambling problems) and describe the association between gambling and psychiatric disorders for drug users recruited from drug treatment settings (n = 512) and from the community (n = 478). We also report the relative risk of being a recreational and problem gambler in this sample. The sample was first interviewed in 1989-90 as a part of two NIDA-funded St. Louis-based studies. The prevalence of problem gambling in the overall sample was 22% and the prevalence of pathological gambling was 11%. There were no statistically significant differences in problem and pathological gambling rates for subjects recruited from drug treatment and those recruited from the community. The conditional prevalence rates, that is, the rate of problem and pathological gambling only among gamblers were 27% and 13.5%, respectively. Major findings indicate that problem gambling was associated with Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), even after controlling for recruitment source and socio-demographic characteristics. In fact, when examining the temporal order of these disorders, we found that pathological gambling was always secondary to ASPD, occurring on average 11.4 years after the onset of ASPD. Problem gamblers, compared with everyone else, were more likely to be male, African-American, recruited from drug treatment, have ASPD and be dependent on illicit drugs. Multinomial logistic regression analysis predicted the relative risk of being a recreational and problem gambler (compared with a nongambler) in this sample according to socio-demographics, ASPD, and dependence on illicit drugs. Results imply that screening for gambling problems will need to be

  7. Behavioral Risk Reduction in a Declining HIV Epidemic: Injection Drug Users in New York City, 1990-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlis, Theresa; Friedman, Samuel R.; Chapman, Timothy; Kwok, John; Rockwell, Russell; Paone, Denise; Milliken, Judith; Monterroso, Edgar

    2000-01-01

    Assessed trends in HIV risk behaviors among New York City injection drug users from 1990-97. Interviews at a drug detoxification program and a research storefront in a high drug-use area showed continuing risk reduction among users that indicated a declining phase in the large HIV epidemic in New York City. HIV prevention programs appeared to be…

  8. Estimating numbers of injecting drug users in metropolitan areas for structural analyses of community vulnerability and for assessing relative degrees of service provision for injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Samuel R; Tempalski, Barbara; Cooper, Hannah; Perlis, Theresa; Keem, Marie; Friedman, Risa; Flom, Peter L

    2004-09-01

    This article estimates the population prevalence of current injection drug users (IDUs) in 96 large US metropolitan areas to facilitate structural analyses of its predictors and sequelae and assesses the extent to which drug abuse treatment and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counseling and testing are made available to drug injectors in each metropolitan area. We estimated the total number of current IDUs in the United States and then allocated the large metropolitan area total among large metropolitan areas using four different multiplier methods. Mean values were used as best estimates, and their validity and limitations were assessed. Prevalence of drug injectors per 10,000 population varied from 19 to 173 (median 60; interquartile range 42-87). Proportions of drug injectors in treatment varied from 1.0% to 39.3% (median 8.6%); and the ratio of HIV counseling and testing events to the estimated number of IDUs varied from 0.013 to 0.285 (median 0.082). Despite limitations in the accuracy of these estimates, they can be used for structural analyses of the correlates and predictors of the population density of drug injectors in metropolitan areas and for assessing the extent of service delivery to drug injectors. Although service provision levels varied considerably, few if any metropolitan areas seemed to be providing adequate levels of services.

  9. Characterizing Drug Non-Users as Distinctive in Prevention Messages: Implications of Optimal Distinctiveness Theory

    PubMed Central

    Comello, Maria Leonora G.

    2011-01-01

    Optimal Distinctiveness Theory posits that highly valued groups are those that can simultaneously satisfy needs to belong and to be different. The success of drug-prevention messages with a social-identity theme should therefore depend on the extent to which the group is portrayed as capable of meeting these needs. Specifically, messages that portray non-users as a large and undifferentiated majority may not be as successful as messages that emphasize uniqueness of non-users. This prediction was examined using marijuana prevention messages that depicted non-users as a distinctive or a majority group. Distinctiveness characterization lowered behavioral willingness to use marijuana among non-users (Experiment 1) and served as a source of identity threat (contingent on gender) among users (Experiment 2). PMID:21409672

  10. The street/treatment barrier: treatment experiences of Puerto Rican injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Porter, J

    1999-12-01

    This study describes, through ethnographic interviews, the treatment experiences of Puerto Rican long-term heroin users who are at extremely high risk for HIV infection and the barriers they perceive to drug treatment. On the basis of this information we suggest policy recommendations for increasing drug treatment access for Puerto Rican long-term injectors of heroin. It is critical that Puerto Rican populations access drug treatment facilities given their risk factors for HIV infection and the high rate of poverty in Puerto Rican communities that exacerbates drug use.

  11. Recruiting and retaining mobile young injection drug users in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lankenau, Stephen E; Sanders, Bill; Hathazi, Dodi; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal studies that research homeless persons or transient drug users face particular challenges in retaining subjects. Between 2005 and 2006, 101 mobile young injection drug users were recruited in Los Angeles into a 2-year longitudinal study. Several features of ethnographic methodology, including fieldwork and qualitative interviews, and modifications to the original design, such as toll-free calls routed directly to ethnographer cell phones and wiring incentive payments, resulted in retention of 78% of subjects for the first follow-up interview. Longitudinal studies that are flexible and based upon qualitative methodologies are more likely to retain mobile subjects while also uncovering emergent research findings.

  12. Clostridium butyricum sepsis in an injection drug user with an indwelling central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Edward M; Kestler, Mary; Beieler, Alison; Belknap, Robert W

    2008-02-01

    Clostridium novyi has been associated with a large outbreak of severe infections in injection drug users. A case of bacteraemia with Clostridium butyricum in an injection drug user is reported. During treatment for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis, the patient used an indwelling central venous catheter to inject cocaine. He was admitted with C. butyricum sepsis that responded to broad spectrum antibiotics, including vancomycin. Local investigation for other cases was unrevealing; however, growth of an unusual pathogen in clinical specimens should be investigated as it may represent a sentinel event with public health implications.

  13. Factors affecting cognitive functioning in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Arthur; Avants, S Kelly; Warburton, Lara A; Hawkins, Keith A

    2002-06-01

    Injection drug users represent a major vector of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the nation's inner cities, and are an important population for harm reduction treatment interventions to target. However, there has been relatively little research examining the specific contribution of the multiple factors contributing to cognitive functioning among injection drug users that may affect engagement in, and response to, addiction and HIV-related interventions. The current study examined the independent contributions to neuropsychological (NP) test performance of premorbid educational attainment, medical and psychiatric history, long- and short-term drug use, assessed by laboratory, observation, and self-report measures, and HIV disease, assessed by plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load and CD4+ count, in a sample of 90 HIV-positive injection drug users dually addicted to heroin and cocaine. Fully 88% of the sample showed evidence of impairment (>1 standard deviation below the population mean) on an NP test battery selected to assess processes associated with successful engagement in the treatment of substance abuse and HIV, such as learning and memory of verbal information, capacity to solve new problems and deal with more than one stimulus at a time, visual-motor coordination, and visual tracking and cognitive flexibility. In addition to drug use, independent predictors of NP test performance were HIV viral load, educational attainment, and premorbid medical and psychiatric problems. Findings underscore the multiplicity of factors that contribute to cognitive impairment in HIV-positive drug-abusing individuals in addition to drug use. Clinical implications are discussed.

  14. The relationship between social network characteristics and exchanging sex for drugs or money among drug users in Baltimore, MD, USA.

    PubMed

    Latkin, C A; Hua, W; Forman, V L

    2003-11-01

    The current study examined social network and drug use factors associated with buying and selling sex among a sample of opiate and cocaine users in Baltimore, Maryland. A sample of 702 drug users who were sexually active were administered a social network and risk behaviour inventory. Compared to 25% of men, only 1.7% of women reported a history of giving money or drugs to get sex during the past 90 days. Conversely, more women (21.2%) than men (4.7%) sold sex for money or drugs. Those who sold sex were more likely to be low frequency crack smokers, were more likely to drink alcohol at least once a day, had a higher average number of crack-only smokers in their network, and had a smaller number of kin in their network. Men who exchanged money or drugs for sex tended to be low frequency crack smokers and reported having more crack-only smokers and injectors and fewer kin in their networks. The results suggest that network composition may be a risk factor for exchanging sex, particularly with respect to crack users, while kin may be a protective factor. These associations may be either a cause or consequence of exchanging sex.

  15. Diversion of prescribed drugs by drug users in treatment: analysis of the UK market and new data from London.

    PubMed

    Fountain, J; Strang, J; Gossop, M; Farrell, M; Griffiths, P

    2000-03-01

    To review the available knowledge about the diversion to the illicit market of drugs prescribed to drug users in treatment in the United Kingdom, and to identify aspects of the London market in more detail. An analysis of the literature and new data in terms of the extent and nature of the market, the practicalities of trade, motives for selling, reasons for demand and the influence of variations in prescribing practice on diversion. Prices of diverted prescription drugs and details of their availability in London are presented. The size of the market is substantial and appears to involve a large number of individuals, each diverting small amounts of their own prescribed drugs. Major motives for selling prescribed drugs are to raise funds to buy other, preferred, drugs and/or to pay for a private prescription. Buyers in treatment appear to be motivated by a desire to supplement their own prescriptions because they are dissatisfied with the particular drug prescribed, dosage and formulation. Drug users in treatment can exploit the variations in prescribing practice--such as how much 'take-home' medication they are allowed and whether tests are conducted to ascertain if they are using it themselves--and divert their prescribed drugs. Prices of prescription drugs on the illicit market can fluctuate on a daily basis according to supply and demand. The results suggest that, to be effective, diversion control must simultaneously involve deterrents from prescribers, drug treatment services, law enforcement agencies and dispensing pharmacists. Finally, some suggestions for further research on this under-studied issue are suggested.

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery for treating melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Vaibhav; Li, Wei; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer with limited treatment options. New targeted therapeutic options with the discovery of BRAF and MEK inhibitors have shown significant survival benefits. Despite the recent progress, development of chemoresistance and systemic toxicity remains a challenge for treating metastatic melanoma. While the response from the first line of treatment against melanoma using dacarbazine remains only 5–10%, the prolonged use of targeted therapy against mutated oncogene BRAF develops chemoresistance. In this review, we will discuss the nanoparticle-based strategies for encapsulation and conjugation of drugs to the polymer for maximizing their tumor distribution through enhanced permeability and retention effect. We will also highlight photodynamic therapy and design of melanoma-targeted nanoparticles. PMID:26244818

  17. User-centered design improves the usability of drug-drug interaction alerts: Experimental comparison of interfaces.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel R; Rizzato Lede, Daniel A; Otero, Carlos M; Risk, Marcelo R; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2017-02-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems can alert health professionals about drug interactions when they prescribe medications. The Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in Argentina developed an electronic health record with drug-drug interaction alerts, using traditional software engineering techniques and requirements. Despite enhancing the drug-drug interaction knowledge database, the alert override rate of this system was very high. We redesigned the alert system using user-centered design (UCD) and participatory design techniques to enhance the drug-drug interaction alert interface. This paper describes the methodology of our UCD. We used crossover method with realistic, clinical vignettes to compare usability of the standard and new software versions in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and user satisfaction. Our study showed that, compared to the traditional alert system, the UCD alert system was more efficient (alerts faster resolution), more effective (tasks completed with fewer errors), and more satisfying. These results indicate that UCD techniques that follow ISO 9241-210 can generate more usable alerts than traditional design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of a Primary Care based Brief Intervention Trial among Risky Drug Users on Health-related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Gelberg, Lillian; Leake, Barbara D.; Yacenda-Murphy, Julia; Vahidi, Mani; Andersen, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvement in quality of life (QOL) is a long term goal of drug treatment. Although some brief interventions have been found to reduce illicit drug use, no trial among adult risky (moderate non-dependent) drug users has tested effects on health-related quality of life. Methods A single-blind randomized controlled trial of patients enrolled from February 2011 to November 2012 was conducted in waiting rooms of five federally qualified health centers. 413 adult primary care patients were identified as risky drug users using the WHO-ASSIST and 334 (81% response; 171 intervention, 163 control) consented to participate in the trial. Three-month follow-ups were completed by 261 patients (78%). Intervention patients received the QUIT intervention of brief clinician advice and up to two drug-use health telephone sessions. The control group received usual care and information on cancer screening. Outcomes were three-month changes in the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental health component summary score (MCS) and physical health component summary score (PCS). Results The average treatment effect (ATE) was non-significant for MCS (0.2 points, p-value=0.87) and marginally significant for PCS (1.7 points, p-value=0.08). The average treatment effect on the treated (ATT) was 0.1 (p-value=0.93) for MCS and 1.9 (p-value=0.056) for PCS. The effect on PCS was stronger at higher (above median) baseline number of drug use days: ATE=2.7, p-value=0.04; ATT=3.21, p-value=0.02. Conclusions The trial found a marginally significant effect on improvement in PCS, and significant and stronger effect on the SF-12 physical component among patients with greater frequency of initial drug use. PMID:25042213

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Infection Among Drug Users: Identification of Hidden Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gwizdala, Robert A.; Miller, Maureen; Bhat, Meera; Vavagiakis, Peter; Henry, Christopher; Neaigus, Alan; Shi, Qiuhu

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We combined social-network analysis and molecular epidemiology to investigate Staphylococcus aureus among drug users. Methods. From 2003 through 2005, we recruited adult drug users in Brooklyn, New York. Of 501 individuals recruited, 485 participated. Participants were screened for HIV infection and S. aureus carriage, and they answered a questionnaire assessing risk factors for S. aureus. Participants were asked to nominate up to 10 members of their social networks, and they were invited to recruit nominees to participate. Results. We identified 89 sociocentric risk networks, 1 of which contained 327 (67%) members. One third of participants were either colonized (20%) or infected (19%) with S. aureus. Overall strain similarity was unusually high, suggesting spread within and across networks. In multivariate analysis, 7 health-related and drug-use variables remained independently associated with infection. Moreover, 27% of nominees were not drug users. Conclusions. We found a large, linked, hidden network among participants, with no discernible clustering of closely related strains. Our results suggest that once a pathogen is introduced into a sociocentric network of active drug users, an identifiable community S. aureus reservoir is likely created, with significant linkages to the general population. PMID:21653250

  20. Cutaneous myiasis due to Cochliomyia hominivorax in a drug user.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Luis; Oliva, Adriana; Galache, Viviana; Bava, Javier; Troncoso, Alcides

    2009-12-14

    Myiasis is the condition resulting from the invasion of tissues or organs of man or animals by dipterous larvae. The blowflies (Calliphoridae) of Argentina comprise several species that may cause myiasis by colonizing wounds or infected body orifices, and one specific parasite: Cochliomyia hominivorax. This species often causes traumatic myiasis in cattle, dogs and cats, and it is not rare in humans. The larvae consume living tissues, so they are dangerous unless speedily removed. Immediate operative exploration along with the removal of larvae and primary defect closure is recommended in every case. Here we report a case of myiasis in a scalp wound caused by blunt force trauma to the area, in a male patient with a case history of alcohol and drug abuse. Seventy-one living larvae were extracted from the wound and determined as C. hominivorax in the Forensic Entomology Laboratory. Given the aggressiveness of these larvae, specific and quick diagnosis as well as the application of appropriate treatment is crucial.

  1. Differences in illegal drug consumption between native and immigrants in a large sample of injected drug users in Catalonia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Saigí, Núria; Espelt, Albert; Folch, Cinta; Sarasa-Renedo, Ana; Castellano, Yolanda; Majó, Xavier; Meroño, Mercè; Brugal, M Teresa; Casabona, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe illegal drug abuse patterns in relation to the migration process and use of drug treatment centers among immigrant injected drug users (IDUs) involved in harm reduction programs, and to compare the characteristics of immigrant and native IDUs. Cross-sectional study of 748 IDUs aged ≥18 years attending harm reduction centers between 2008 and 2009. We explored differences in socio-economic status, illegal drug consumption, health status and use of treatment centers in native versus immigrant IDUs. We also described whether immigrant IDUs started using injected drugs before or after entering the host country. Immigrant IDUs tend to live alone more frequently, start injection at later ages, use heroin and inject it more frequently and use drug treatment centers less frequently than native IDUs. Seventy-six percent of immigrants began using illegal drugs before arriving at the host country. Those who started in other countries were residing in the host country for 5 years or less (63.9%). Overall, immigrant IDUs attended drug treatment centers (36.9%) less frequently than native IDUs (71.8%). In conclusion, migration could be a risk factor for illegal drug abuse initiation or increase in consumption, often with the adoption of local consumption patterns and aggravated due to a lower access to drug treatment centers.

  2. Abuse liability of buprenorphine-naloxone tablets in untreated IV drug users.

    PubMed

    Alho, Hannu; Sinclair, David; Vuori, Erkki; Holopainen, Antti

    2007-04-17

    Buprenorphine (Subutex) is widely abused in Finland. A combination of buprenorphine plus naloxone (Suboxone) has been available since late 2004, permitting a comparison of the abuse of the two products among untreated intravenous (IV) users. A survey was distributed to attendees at a Helsinki needle exchange program over 2-weeks in April, 2005, At least 30% were returned anonymously. Survey variables included: years of prior IV opioid abuse, years of buprenorphine abuse, frequency, dosage, route of administration and reasons for use, concomitant IV abuse of other substances and amount paid on the street for both buprenorphine and buprenorphine+naloxone. Buprenorphine was the most frequently used IV drug for 73% of the respondents. More than 75% said they used IV buprenorphine to self-treat addiction or withdrawal. Most (68%) had tried the buprenorphine+naloxone combination IV, but 80% said they had a "bad" experience. Its street price was less than half that of buprenorphine alone. The buprenorphine+naloxone combination appears to be a feasible tool, along with easier access to addiction treatment, for decreasing IV abuse of buprenorphine.

  3. Overcoming Drug Resistance and Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Semenas, Julius; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Boorjian, Stephen A; Mongan, Nigel P; Persson, Jenny Liao

    2012-01-01

    Most of the prostate cancers (PCa) in advanced stage will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Within CRPC group, 50-70% of the patients will develop bone metastasis in axial and other regions of the skeleton. Once PCa cells spread to the bone, currently, no treatment regimens are available to eradicate the metastasis, and cancer-related death becomes inevitable. In 2012, it is estimated that there will be 28,170 PCa deaths in the United States. Thus, PCa bone metastasis-associated clinical complications and treatment resistance pose major clinical challenges. In this review, we will present recent findings on the molecular and cellular pathways that are responsible for bone metastasis of PCa. We will address several novel mechanisms with a focus on the role of bone and bone marrow microenvironment in promoting PCa metastasis, and will further discuss why prostate cancer cells preferentially metastasize to the bone. Additionally, we will discuss novel roles of several key pathways, including angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling in bone marrow and stem cell niches with their relationship to PCa bone metastasis and poor treatment response. We will evaluate how various chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapies may allow aggressive PCa cells to gain advantageous mutations leading to increased survival and rendering the cancer cells to become resistant to treatment. The novel concept relating several key survival and invasion signaling pathways to stem cell niches and treatment resistance will be reviewed. Lastly, we will provide an update of several recently developed novel drug candidates that target metastatic cancer microenvironments or niches, and discuss the advantages and significance provided by such therapeutic approaches in pursuit of overcoming drug resistance and treating advanced PCa. PMID:22746994

  4. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Csete, Joanne; Kaplan, Karyn; Hayashi, Kanna; Fairbairn, Nadia; Suwannawong, Paisan; Zhang, Ruth; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2011-10-20

    Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions.

  5. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. Methods We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. Results In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. Conclusion These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions. PMID:22014093

  6. Risk of congenital anomalies in pregnant users of statin drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ofori, Benjamin; Rey, Evelyne; Bérard, Anick

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Cholesterol is known to be essential for fetal development. Statins, which inhibit cholesterol production, have therefore been considered as potential teratogens and are contraindicated in pregnancy. Data available thus far on the risks of congenital anomalies associated with statin therapy have come from non-analytic postmarketing surveillance studies. Given the increasing use of statins in women of childbearing age, there is a need for a population-based study on the risks of congenital anomalies associated with gestational statin use. What this study adds In this pharmacoepidemiological study, we determined the risk of congenital anomalies in women who filled prescriptions for statins during the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with women who had stopped statins before pregnancy or those who used fibrates during pregnancy. We found no evidence of an increased risk of fetal anomalies among first-trimester statin users, or any discernable pattern of congenital anomalies among live births. However, in the absence of outcome data on nonlive births, conclusions remain uncertain. Aims Evidence from animal studies suggests that statin medications should not be taken during pregnancy. Our aim was to examine the association between the use of statins in early pregnancy and the incidence of congenital anomalies. Methods A population-based pregnancy registry was built. Three study groups were assembled: women prescribed statins in the first trimester (group A), fibrate/nicotinic acid in the first trimester (group B) and statins between 1 year and 1 month before conception, but not during pregnancy (group C). Among live-born infants, we selected as cases infants with any congenital anomaly diagnosed in the first year of life. Controls were defined as infants with no congenital anomalies. The rate of congenital anomalies in the respective groups was calculated. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were

  7. Increased ventral striatal BOLD activity during non-drug reward anticipation in cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Liam; Hester, Robert; Garavan, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Despite an increased understanding of the pharmacology and long-term cognitive effects of cannabis in humans, there has been no research to date examining its chronic effects upon reward processing in the brain. Motivational theories regarding long-term drug use posit contrasting predictions with respect to how drug users are likely to process non-drug incentives. The reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) of addiction posits that there are deficits in dopamine (DA) motivational circuitry for non-drug rewards, such that only drugs of abuse are capable of normalizing DA in the ventral striatum (VS). Alternatively, the opponent process theory (OPT) holds that in individuals prone to drug use, there exists some form of mesolimbic hyperactivity, in which there is a bias towards reward-centred behaviour concomitant with impulsivity. The current study examined BOLD responses during reward and loss anticipation and their outcome deliveries in 14 chronic cannabis users and 14 drug-naive controls during a monetary incentive delay (MID) task. Despite no significant behavioural differences between the two groups, cannabis users had significantly more right VS BOLD activity during reward anticipation. Correlation analyses demonstrated that this right VS BOLD response was significantly correlated with life-time use and reported life-time cannabis joints consumed. No correlations between cannabis abstinence and BOLD responses were observed. We also observed a number of group differences following outcome deliveries, most notably hypoactivity in the left insula cortex in response to loss and loss avoidance outcome notifications in the cannabis group. These results may suggest hypersensitivity during instrumental response anticipation for non-drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to loss outcomes in chronic cannabis users; the implications of which are discussed with respect to the potentially sensitizing effects of cannabis for other rewards.

  8. Increased ventral striatal BOLD activity during non-drug reward anticipation in cannabis users

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Liam; Hester, Robert; Garavan, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increased understanding of the pharmacology and long-term cognitive effects of cannabis in humans, there has been no research to date examining its chronic effects upon reward processing in the brain. Motivational theories regarding long-term drug use posit contrasting predictions with respect to how drug users are likely to process non-drug incentives. The reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) of addiction posits that there are deficits in dopamine (DA) motivational circuitry for non-drug rewards, such that only drugs of abuse are capable of normalizing DA in the ventral striatum (VS). Alternatively, the opponent process theory (OPT) holds that in individuals prone to drug use, there exists some form of mesolimbic hyperactivity, in which there is a bias towards reward-centred behaviour concomitant with impulsivity. The current study examined BOLD responses during reward and loss anticipation and their outcome deliveries in 14 chronic cannabis users and 14 drug-naïve controls during a monetary incentive delay (MID) task. Despite no significant behavioural differences between the two groups, cannabis users had significantly more right VS BOLD activity during reward anticipation. Correlation analyses demonstrated that this right VS BOLD response was significantly correlated with life-time use and reported life-time cannabis joints consumed. No correlations between cannabis abstinence and BOLD responses were observed. We also observed a number of group differences following outcome deliveries, most notably hypoactivity in the left insula cortex in response to loss and loss avoidance outcome notifications in the cannabis group. These results may suggest hypersensitivity during instrumental response anticipation for non-drug rewards and a hyposensitivity to loss outcomes in chronic cannabis users; the implications of which are discussed with respect to the potentially sensitizing effects of cannabis for other rewards. PMID:19631753

  9. High-impact hepatitis C virus testing for injection drug users in an urban ED.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Erik S; Pfeil, Sarah K; Deering, Laura J; Todorovic, Tamara; Lippert, Suzanne; White, Douglas A E

    2016-06-01

    We implemented the "High-Impact Testing for Injection Drug Users", or the "HIT IDU" initiative, an emergency physician (EP)-based hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of this clinical protocol. This was a prospective observational pilot study. The HIT IDU initiative encouraged EPs to integrate targeted HCV testing into care, with an emphasis on screening all people who inject drugs (PWID). Physicians selected the primary indication for HCV testing from a drop-down menu integrated into the electronic ordering process. The primary outcome was the absolute number and overall proportion of EP-based HCV antibody positive tests, further stratified by the indication for testing. Over the 3-month study period, 14,253 unique patients were evaluated, and EPs tested 155 patients for HCV (1.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.9%-1.2%), of which 40 (26%, 95% CI, 19%-33%) were HCV antibody positive. The proportion of HCV antibody positivity by testing indication was as follows: PWID 47% (34/73; 95% CI, 35%-59%), patient requested test 10% (4/40; 95% CI, 3%-24%), confirm patient report 67% (2/3; 95% CI, 9%-99%), liver disease of uncertain etiology 0% (0/3; 95% CI, 0%-71%), and other 0% (0/36; 95% CI, 0%-10%). There were 22 patients chronically infected, 19 had a follow-up appointment arranged, 3 attended their follow-up appointment, and 1 patient was treated at 1 year of follow-up. Although the overall number of EP-based HCV tests performed was low, high rates of infection were identified, particularly among PWID. There were significant challenges with linkage to care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Garfein, R. S.; Lozada, R.; Liu, L.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Rodwell, T. C.; Deiss, R.; Alvelais, J.; Catanzaro, A.; Chiles, P. G.; Strathdee, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND We studied prevalence and correlates of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, where tuberculosis (TB) is endemic. METHODS IDUs aged ⩾18 years were recruited via respondent-driven sampling (RDS) and underwent standardized interviews, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing and LTBI screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube, a whole-blood interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). LTBI prevalence was estimated and correlates were identified using RDS-weighted logistic regression. RESULTS Of 1020 IDUs, 681 (67%) tested IGRA-positive and 44 (4%) tested HIV-positive. Mean age was 37 years, 88% were male and 98% were Mexican-born. IGRA positivity was associated with recruitment nearest the US border (aOR 1.64, 95%CI 1.09–2.48), increasing years of injection (aOR 1.20/5 years, 95%CI 1.07–1.34), and years lived in Tijuana (aOR 1.10/5 years, 95%CI 1.03–1.18). Speaking some English (aOR 0.38, 95%CI 0.25–0.57) and injecting most often at home in the past 6 months (aOR 0.68, 95%CI 0.45–0.99) were inversely associated with IGRA positivity. DISCUSSION Increased LTBI prevalence among IDUs in Tijuana appears to be associated with greater drug involvement. Given the high risk for HIV infection among Tijuana’s IDUs, interventions are urgently needed to prevent HIV infection and treat LTBI among IDUs before these epidemics collide. PMID:19383197

  11. High prevalence of abscesses and self-treatment among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Robin A.; Gallardo, Manuel; Hasan, Samreen; Minuto, Joshua; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Zúñiga, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Soft tissue infections are common among injection drug users (IDUs), but information on correlates and treatment in this highly marginalized population is lacking. Methods Six hundred twenty-three community-recruited IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico, completed a detailed interview on abscess history and treatment. Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to identify factors independently associated with having an abscess in the prior 6 months. Results Overall, 46% had ever had an abscess and 20% had had an abscess in the past 6 months. Only 12% had sought medical care for their most recent abscess; 60% treated the abscess themselves. The most common self-treatment method was to apply heated (24%) or unheated (23%) Aloe vera leaf. Other methods included draining the wound with a syringe (19%) or knife (11%). Factors independently associated with recent abscess were having income from sex work (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.08–10.00), smoking methamphetamine (aOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.05–2.62), seeking someone to help with injection (aOR 2.06, 95% CI 1.18–3.61), and reporting that police affected where they used drugs (aOR 2.14, 95% CI 1.15–3.96). Conclusions Abscesses are common among IDUs in this setting, but appropriate treatment is rare. Interventions to reduce barriers to medical care in this population are needed. Research on the effectiveness of Aloe vera application in this setting is also needed, as are interventions to provide IDU sex workers, methamphetamine smokers, and those who assist with injection with the information and equipment necessary to reduce abscess risk. PMID:20381396

  12. The Melding of Drug Markets in Houston After Katrina: Dealer and User Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kotarba, Joseph A.; Fackler, Jennifer; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dunlap, Eloise

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the majority of routine activities in New Orleans were disrupted, including the illegal drug market. The large-scale relocation of New Orleans evacuees (NOEs), including many illegal drug users and sellers, to host cities led to a need for new sources of illegal drugs. This need was quickly satisfied by two initially distinct drug markets (1) drug dealers from New Orleans who were themselves evacuees and (2) established drug dealers in the host cities. To be expected, the two markets did not operate indefinitely in parallel fashion. This paper describes the evolving, operational relationship between these two drug markets over time, with a focus on Houston. We analyze the reciprocal evolution of these two markets at two significant points in time: at the beginning of the relocation (2005) and two years later (2007). The overall trend is towards a melding of the two drug markets, as evidenced primarily by decreases in drug-related violence and the cross-fertilization of drug tastes. We describe the process by which the two drug markets are melded over time, in order to seek a better understanding of the social processes by which drug markets in general evolve. PMID:20509741

  13. The melding of drug markets in Houston after Katrina: dealer and user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kotarba, Joseph A; Fackler, Jennifer; Johnson, Bruce D; Dunlap, Eloise

    2010-07-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the majority of routine activities in New Orleans were disrupted, including the illegal drug market. The large-scale relocation of New Orleans evacuees (NOEs), including many illegal drug users and sellers, to host cities led to a need for new sources of illegal drugs. This need was quickly satisfied by two initially distinct drug markets (1) drug dealers from New Orleans who were themselves evacuees and (2) established drug dealers in the host cities. To be expected, the two markets did not operate indefinitely in parallel fashion. This paper describes the evolving, operational relationship between these two drug markets over time, with a focus on Houston. We analyze the reciprocal evolution of these two markets at two significant points in time: at the beginning of the relocation (2005) and two years later (2007). The overall trend is towards a melding of the two drug markets, as evidenced primarily by decreases in drug-related violence and the cross-fertilization of drug tastes. We describe the process by which the two drug markets are melded over time, in order to seek a better understanding of the social processes by which drug markets in general evolve.

  14. Fluoroquinolones for treating tuberculosis (presumed drug-sensitive).

    PubMed

    Ziganshina, Lilia E; Titarenko, Albina F; Davies, Geraint R

    2013-06-06

    first-line regimen. For relapse, we are uncertain if there is an effect (one trial, 170 participants, very low quality evidence). No trials reported on treatment failure. For death, sputum culture conversion at eight weeks, or serious adverse events we do not know if there was an effect (three trials, 723 participants, very low quality evidence for all three outcomes). Fluoroquinolones substituted for isoniazid in standard regimens A single trial (433 participants) substituted moxifloxacin for isoniazid. Treatment failure and relapse were not reported. For death, sputum culture conversion, or serious adverse events the substitution may have little or no difference (one trial, 433 participants, low quality evidence for all three outcomes). Fluoroquinolines in four month regimensSix trials are currently in progress testing shorter regimens with fluoroquinolones. Ofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin have been tested in RCTs of standard first-line regimens based on rifampicin and pyrazinamide for treating drug-sensitive TB. There is insufficient evidence to be clear whether addition or substitution of fluoroquinolones for ethambutol or isoniazid in the first-line regimen reduces death or relapse, or increases culture conversion at eight weeks. Much larger trials with fluoroquinolones in short course regimens of four months are currently in progress.

  15. Residual Neurocognitive Features of Long-Term Ecstasy Users With Minimal Exposure to Other Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, John H.; Sherwood, Andrea R.; Hudson, James I.; Gruber, Staci; Kozin, David; Pope, Harrison G.

    2010-01-01

    Aims In field studies assessing cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users, there are several frequent confounding factors that might plausibly bias the findings toward an overestimate of ecstasy-induced neurocognitive toxicity. We designed an investigation seeking to minimize these possible sources of bias. Design We compared illicit ecstasy users and non-users while 1) excluding individuals with significant lifetime exposure to other illicit drugs or alcohol; 2) requiring that all participants be members of the “rave” subculture; and 3) testing all participants with breath, urine, and hair samples at the time of evaluation to exclude possible surreptitious substance use. We compared groups with adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family-of-origin variables, and childhood history of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We provide significance levels without correction for multiple comparisons. Setting Field study. Participants Fifty-two illicit ecstasy users and 59 non-users, age 18-45. Measurements Battery of 15 neuropsychological tests tapping a range of cognitive functions. Findings We found little evidence of decreased cognitive performance in ecstasy users, save for poorer strategic-self-regulation, possibly reflecting increased impulsivity. However this finding might have reflected a premorbid attribute of ecstasy users, rather than a residual neurotoxic effect of the drug. Conclusions In a study designed to minimize limitations found in many prior investigations, we failed to demonstrate marked residual cognitive effects in ecstasy users. This finding contrasts with many previous findings—including our own—and emphasizes the need for continued caution in interpreting field studies of cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users. PMID:21205042

  16. Residual neurocognitive features of long-term ecstasy users with minimal exposure to other drugs.

    PubMed

    Halpern, John H; Sherwood, Andrea R; Hudson, James I; Gruber, Staci; Kozin, David; Pope, Harrison G

    2011-04-01

    In field studies assessing cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users, there are several frequent confounding factors that might plausibly bias the findings toward an overestimate of ecstasy-induced neurocognitive toxicity. We designed an investigation seeking to minimize these possible sources of bias. We compared illicit ecstasy users and non-users while (1) excluding individuals with significant life-time exposure to other illicit drugs or alcohol; (2) requiring that all participants be members of the 'rave' subculture; and (3) testing all participants with breath, urine and hair samples at the time of evaluation to exclude possible surreptitious substance use. We compared groups with adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family-of-origin variables and childhood history of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We provide significance levels without correction for multiple comparisons. Field study. Fifty-two illicit ecstasy users and 59 non-users, aged 18-45 years. Battery of 15 neuropsychological tests tapping a range of cognitive functions. We found little evidence of decreased cognitive performance in ecstasy users, save for poorer strategic self-regulation, possibly reflecting increased impulsivity. However, this finding might have reflected a pre-morbid attribute of ecstasy users, rather than a residual neurotoxic effect of the drug. In a study designed to minimize limitations found in many prior investigations, we failed to demonstrate marked residual cognitive effects in ecstasy users. This finding contrasts with many previous findings-including our own-and emphasizes the need for continued caution in interpreting field studies of cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. [Social network analysis and high risk behavior characteristics of recreational drug users: a qualitative study].

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Wang, Zhenhong; Jiang, Zhenxia; Fu, Xiaojing; Li, Hui; Zhang, Dapeng; Liu, Hui; Hu, Yifei

    2014-11-01

    To understand the characteristics of recreational drug users' behaviors and social network, as well as their potential impact to the transmission of sexual transmitted infections (STI). Qualitative interview was used to collect information on rough estimation of population size and behavior change before and after recreational drug use. A total of 120 participants were recruited by convenient sampling from April to October, 2013 in a community of Qingdao city. Blood specimens were taken for HIV/syphilis serological testing and social network analysis was performed to understand the characteristics of their behavior and social network. All participants used methamphetamine and 103 of them showed social connection. The prevalence of syphilis and HIV were 24.2% (29/120) and 2.5% (3/120) respectively. The estimated size of recreational drug users was big with a wide diversity of occupations and age range, and males were more frequent than females. Drug use may affect condom use and frequent drug users showed symptom of psychosis and neuro-toxicities. The size of social network was 2.45 ± 1.63 in the past 6 months, which indicated an increasing trend of the sexual partner number and risky behaviors. Recreational drug use could increase the size of social network among sex partners, the frequency of risky sexual behaviors and syphilis prevalence, which indicate a high risk of HIV/STI among this population as well as a huge burden of disease prevention and control in the future.

  18. Online drug user-led harm reduction in Hungary: a review of “Daath”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Harm reduction has been increasingly finding its way into public drug policies and healthcare practices worldwide, with successful intervention measures justifiably focussing on the highest-risk groups, such as injecting drug users. However, there are also other types of drug users in need for harm reduction, even though they pose less, low, or no public health risk. Occasionally, drug users may autonomously organise themselves into groups to provide advocacy, harm reduction, and peer-help services, sometimes online. The http://www.daath.hu website has been operated since 2001 by the “Hungarian Psychedelic Community”, an unorganised drug user group with a special interest in hallucinogenic and related substances. As of today, the website serves about 1200 visitors daily, and the online community comprises of more than 8000 registered members. The Daath community is driven by a strong commitment to the policy of harm reduction in the form of various peer-help activities that aim to expand harm reduction without promoting drug use. Our review comprehensively summarises Daath’s user-led harm reduction services and activities from the last ten years, firstly outlining the history and growth phases of Daath, along with its self-set guidelines and policies. Online services (such as a discussion board, and an Ecstasy pill database) and offline activities (such as Ecstasy pill field testing, and a documentary film about psychedelics) are described. In order to extend its harm reduction services and activities in the future, Daath has several social, commercial, and legislative challenges to face. Starting with a need to realign its focus, outlooks for the upcoming operation of Daath are pondered. Future trends in harm reduction, such as separating harm-decreasing from benefit-increasing, are also discussed. We aim to share these innovative harm reduction measures and good practices in order to be critically assessed, and – if found useful – adapted and applied

  19. Online drug user-led harm reduction in Hungary: a review of "Daath".

    PubMed

    Móró, Levente; Rácz, József

    2013-10-02

    Harm reduction has been increasingly finding its way into public drug policies and healthcare practices worldwide, with successful intervention measures justifiably focussing on the highest-risk groups, such as injecting drug users. However, there are also other types of drug users in need for harm reduction, even though they pose less, low, or no public health risk. Occasionally, drug users may autonomously organise themselves into groups to provide advocacy, harm reduction, and peer-help services, sometimes online. The http://www.daath.hu website has been operated since 2001 by the "Hungarian Psychedelic Community", an unorganised drug user group with a special interest in hallucinogenic and related substances. As of today, the website serves about 1200 visitors daily, and the online community comprises of more than 8000 registered members. The Daath community is driven by a strong commitment to the policy of harm reduction in the form of various peer-help activities that aim to expand harm reduction without promoting drug use. Our review comprehensively summarises Daath's user-led harm reduction services and activities from the last ten years, firstly outlining the history and growth phases of Daath, along with its self-set guidelines and policies. Online services (such as a discussion board, and an Ecstasy pill database) and offline activities (such as Ecstasy pill field testing, and a documentary film about psychedelics) are described. In order to extend its harm reduction services and activities in the future, Daath has several social, commercial, and legislative challenges to face. Starting with a need to realign its focus, outlooks for the upcoming operation of Daath are pondered. Future trends in harm reduction, such as separating harm-decreasing from benefit-increasing, are also discussed. We aim to share these innovative harm reduction measures and good practices in order to be critically assessed, and--if found useful--adapted and applied elsewhere.

  20. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA) involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101) and a major metropolitan area (n = 111) in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting) for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use. PMID:20950455

  1. Control over Drug Acquisition, Preparation, and Injection: Implications for HIV and HCV Risk among Young Female Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathazi, Susan Dodi; Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Young female injection drug users (IDUs) are at risk for HIV/HCV, and initiating the use of a new drug may confer additional and unexpected risks. While gender differences in the social context of injection drug use have been identified, it is unknown whether those differences persist during the initiation of a new drug. This mixed-methods study examined the accounts of 30 young female IDUs in Los Angeles, CA, USA from 2004 to 2006, who described the social context of initiating injection drug use and initiating ketamine injection. The analysis aimed to understand how the social context of young women's injection events contributes to HIV/HCV risk. Women's initiation into ketamine injection occurred approximately 2 years after their first injection of any drug. Over that time, women experienced changes in some aspects of the social context of drug injection, including the size and composition of the using group. A significant proportion of women described injection events characterized by a lack of control over the acquisition, preparation, and injection of drugs, as well as reliance on friends and sexual partners. Findings suggest that lack of control over drug acquisition, preparation, and injection may elevate women's risk; these phenomena should be considered as a behavioral risk factor when designing interventions. PMID:24364027

  2. HIV needle risk behaviors and drug use: a comparison of crack-smoking and nonsmoking injection drug users in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R G; Falck, R S; Wang, J; Siegal, H A; Rahman, A

    1999-01-01

    This study compares the drug use and needle risk behaviors among 733 crack-smoking injection drug users (IDUs) and 518 nonsmoking IDUs. Participants were recruited in Dayton and Columbus, Ohio, for the Cooperative Agreement for AIDS Community-Based Outreach/Intervention Research Program from 1992 to 1996. Crack-smoking IDUs were more likely to be male, African-American, and 30 to 40 years of age, but less likely to be married or living with a sex partner compared to nonsmokers. Daily crack users were less likely to be daily injectors but more likely to use alcohol daily when compared to non-crack users and less-than-daily crack smokers. IDUs who smoked crack less than daily were more likely to have injected with needles and syringes used by others. There is an urgent need for additional research on the relationship between drug injection and crack smoking as well as improved HIV risk-reduction interventions that include drug abuse treatment components focusing on issues surrounding crack-cocaine addiction.

  3. Influences of Cross-Border Mobility on Tuberculosis Diagnoses and Treatment Interruption Among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, Robert; Garfein, Richard S.; Lozada, Remedios; Burgos, Jose Luis; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Moser, Kathleen S.; Zuniga, Maria Luisa; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify correlates of reported lifetime diagnoses of TB among injection drug users in the border city of Tijuana, Mexico. Methods. Injection drug users in Tijuana were recruited into a prospective cohort study during 2006 and 2007. We used weighted multivariate logistic regression to identify correlates of TB diagnoses. Results. Of the 1056 participants, 103 (9.8%) reported a history of TB, among whom 93% received anti-TB medication and 80% were diagnosed in the United States. Treatment was prematurely halted among 8% of patients; deportation from the United States was the cause of half of these treatment interruptions. History of travel to (odds ratio [OR] = 6.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.53, 27.20) or deportation from (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.12) the United States and incarceration (OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.06, 4.58) were independently associated with a reported lifetime diagnosis of TB. Conclusions. Mobility and migration are important factors in identifying and treating TB patients diagnosed in the US–Mexico border region. Strengthening capacity on both sides of the border to identify, monitor, and treat TB is a priority. PMID:19542040

  4. Someone to Count On: Homeless, Male Drug Users and Their Friendship Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterk-Elifson, Claire; Elifson, Kirk W.

    1992-01-01

    A study exploring friendship relations of homeless, male drug users (aged between 21 and 50 years) through 27 in-depth interviews in Atlanta (Georgia) found that subjects were engaged in friendship networks that offered social support and that there was a relationship between friendships and patterns of crack cocaine use. (JB)

  5. Secondary Prevention Interventions for Young Drug Users: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Lawrence; Orr, Linda; Watson, Lynsey; Jackson, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the international scientific evidence on the effectiveness of secondary prevention interventions for young drug users. The review provides insight into the effectiveness of interventions that have been evaluated using moderately strong research designs. Most of the studies included are from the United States of America. Some…

  6. Commissioning Pharmacological Treatments for Drug Users: A Brief Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, Jenny; Oliver, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To provide a brief review of relevant existing evidence regarding pharmacological treatment for drug users, in order to enable commissioners and service providers to make informed decisions that are evidence based wherever possible. Methods: The review process involved an examination of key reference texts and literature derived from…

  7. Adaptation and Validation of the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a Sample of Male Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-21

    The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a sample of male drug users. A sample of 326 male drug users and 322 non-clinical males was selected by cluster sampling and convenience sampling, respectively. Results showed that the scale had good psychometric properties and adequate internal consistency reliability (Initiation = .66, Refusal = .74 and STD-P = .79). An evaluation of the invariance showed strong factor equivalence between both samples. A high and moderate effect of Differential Item Functioning was only found in items 1 and 14 (∆R 2 Nagelkerke = .076 and .037, respectively). We strongly recommend not using item 1 if the goal is to compare the scores of both groups, otherwise the comparison will be biased. Correlations obtained between the CSFQ-14 and the safe sex ratio and the SAS subscales were significant (CI = 95%) and indicated good concurrent validity. Scores of male drug users were similar to those of non-clinical males. Therefore, the adaptation of the SAS to drug users provides enough guarantees for reliable and valid use in both clinical practice and research, although care should be taken with item 1.

  8. Interpersonal Relationship Styles in Marathon Group Therapy: A Study with Illicit Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Bridges, Ned

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how illegal drug users (N=12) related to one another during a 16-hour unstructured group marathon. Interaction analysis supported the effectiveness of the marathon group. Members and facilitators were able to relate to each other by confronting significant behaviors and receiving feedback about ways to cope with personal problems. (JAC)

  9. AIDS knowledge and attitudes among injection drug users: the issue of reliability.

    PubMed

    Longshore, D; Hsieh, S C; Anglin, M D

    1992-01-01

    Among injection drug users (IDUs), AIDS-related knowledge and attitudes have not consistently predicted AIDS risk behavior. This may be due in part to the limited reliability of indexes used to measure drug users' AIDS knowledge and attitudes. In addition, the substantive interpretation of findings is confounded if index reliability is lower for particular demographic groups (e.g., ethnic populations and women). This report is based on 8 measures of AIDS-related knowledge and attitudes in a sample of 332 injection drug users in Los Angeles. The reliability of knowledge and attitude indexes for the overall sample is generally acceptable for the purpose of group comparison (average alpha = .60). But reliability is consistently lower for respondents who are Hispanic (average alpha = .49) and respondents with less formal education (alpha = .56). The reliability of 2 measures of sex-related attitudes is lower for female respondents. It is therefore important that the reliability of knowledge and attitude indexes be assessed not just for drug-user samples as a whole, but also within demographic groups of substantive interest.

  10. Polyvinylpyrrolidone induced artefactual prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin times in intravenous drug users with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, A H; Bjånes, T K; Jordal, S; Leh, S; Leh, F; Svarstad, E

    2016-05-01

    Essentials Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) were found in drug users with renal failure. An oral methadone solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) had been injected intravenously. Spiking normal plasma with increasing concentrations of PVP resulted in artifically prolonged APTT. APTT prolongation may indicate PVP deposits as underlying cause in patients with renal failure.

  11. Meth mouth severity in response to drug-use patterns and dental access in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronni E; Morisky, Donald E; Silverstein, Steven J

    2013-06-01

    Meth mouth is the rapid development of tooth decay in methamphetamine users. Our study questioned whether drug-use patterns and dental care access are risk factors affecting the severity of meth mouth. Participants received dental examinations, and the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) were counted and used to measure meth mouth severity.

  12. Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella oxytoca in an intravenous drug user with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Connor; Hatch, Michael; Ayan, Mohamed; Winn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by Klebsiella species is rare, with most isolates being K. pneumoniae. We report the case of a 24-year-old intravenous drug user with newly diagnosed seminoma who developed K. oxytoca endocarditis. In addition to having K. oxytoca isolated from blood culture, cultures of that species were obtained from a retroperitoneal metastasis found on original presentation. PMID:27034562

  13. Interpersonal Relationship Styles in Marathon Group Therapy: A Study with Illicit Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Bridges, Ned

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how illegal drug users (N=12) related to one another during a 16-hour unstructured group marathon. Interaction analysis supported the effectiveness of the marathon group. Members and facilitators were able to relate to each other by confronting significant behaviors and receiving feedback about ways to cope with personal problems. (JAC)

  14. Criminality among Female Drug Users Following an HIV Risk-Reduction Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theall, Katherine P.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.; Stewart, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    The main objectives of this article are to determine the prevalence of criminality among a sample of female African American drug users and to examine change in criminality over time, including the correlates associated with this change. Data were collected from 336 adult women who participated in an HIV risk-reduction intervention focused on the…

  15. A proposal for financing postmarketing drug safety studies by augmenting FDA user fees.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    I propose to raise funds for postapproval studies of long-term drug safety by augmenting the existing "user-fee" system. Fees would be raised by an amount deemed optimal for revenue collection, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would direct the incremental funds to a combination of randomized controlled trials, epidemiological studies, and postmarketing surveillance. User-fee augmentation is an achievable, incremental reform that would subsidize information that is now undersupplied in the U.S. health care system; spread the burden of funding postmarketing safety studies among pharmaceutical sponsors; and help restore public, scientific, and professional confidence in the FDA and its user-fee system.

  16. [Factors related to syphilis and other infections among female drug users in Shandong women's compulsory drug rehabilitation center in 2015].

    PubMed

    Li, R; Liao, M Z; Huang, P X; Yang, X G; Zhu, X Y; Su, S L; Lin, B; Han, L; Zhang, K; Kang, D M

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence of HIV, syphilis and related factors among female drug users in Shandong women's compulsory drug rehabilitation center(SWCDRC). Methods: During May 2015, we used a cluster sampling method for drug users in SWCDRC, with a questionnaire and serological testing. We included respondents who volunteered to take part in this study, had clear histories of drug abuse, and had no symptoms of psychosis or current drug use; 451 women participated. The questionnaire addressed socio-demographic information and the participants' health knowledge, including AIDS knowledge, behavioral information, drug use, and STD treatment. We also drew 5 ml blood from each subject for serological tests of HIV and syphilis. Chi-square test was used to compare syphilis antibody positive rate among drug users who had different characteristics. Multi-factor unconditioned logistic regression model was used to explore related factors about syphilis infection of women drug users. Results: Subjects' mean age was(27.25±7.06)years. Of the 451 women, 33.5%(151/451)tested positive for syphilis and 2.2%(10/451)for HIV. The rate of syphilis antibody(SAb)positive whether providing commercial server, providing: 47.2%(25/53); no providing: 31.6%(125/396); χ(2)=5.12, P=0.024. The SAb (+) rate from whether having temporary sexual behavior, having: 47.4%(91/192); no having: 23.6%(60/254); χ(2)=27.6, P<0.001. The SAb(+) rate of subjects who tested positive for herpes simplex virus-2(HSV-2)was 39.4%(128/325); for those who tested negative it was 18.3%(23/126); χ(2)=18.2, P<0.001. The SAb(+) rate by frequency of drug use was ≥3 times a week: 36.9%(106/287);<3 times per week: 27.3%(42/154); χ(2)=4.20, P=0.041. Compared with subjects who were unmarried, divorced, or widowed drug users, the OR(95% CI)for SAb(+) among subjects who cohabited with a partner was 2.19(1.36- 3.51). Compared with subjects who had not been having temporary sexual behavior, the OR(95%CI)for SAb

  17. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Drug User

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatziioannou, Achilleas; Doriforou, Ortansia; Skiadas, Vasilios Koutoulidis, Vasilios; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros

    2006-08-15

    A 26-year-old drug abuser who presented with sepsis was found to have a pseudoaneurysm in the left vertebral artery. This aneurysm was presumed to be post-traumatic, since the patient reported multiple attempts to inject drugs in the left jugular vein 15 days prior to admission. The pseudoaneurysm was treated effectively with stent-graft placement.

  18. Behavioral outcomes of AIDS educational interventions for drug users in short-term treatment.

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, J; Stoddard, A M; Zapka, J G; Lewis, B F

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the behavioral outcomes of informational vs enhanced small-group educational interventions for drug users among 407 subjects in a short-term drug treatment program. Logistic regression was used to analyze drug use and sexual behaviors at the final follow-up visit. Among lower risk subjects, the enhanced intervention was more effective in reducing injection practices that produced risks in terms of human immunodeficiency virus infection; among those at highest risk, the informational interventions were more effective. The enhanced intervention was more effective than the informational interventions in reducing cocaine use at follow-up. No differential intervention effect on sexual risk behaviors was found. PMID:8214241

  19. Antihypertensive drug prescribing and persistence among new elderly users: implications for persistence improvement interventions.

    PubMed

    Tu, Karen; Anderson, Laura N; Butt, Debra A; Quan, Hude; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Campbell, Norm R; McAlister, Finlay A

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine persistence rates and factors influencing persistence for new elderly users of antihypertensive drugs. We conducted a population-based cohort study in Ontario of adults aged 66 years or older to identify new users of antihypertensive medications between 1999 and 2010. Two-year therapy and class persistence were defined as persistence on any antihypertensive medication and persistence only on the same antihypertensive medication class, respectively. From 1999-2010, the prevalence of antihypertensive drug use increased from 47.8%-60.5% (P < 0.0001). Persistence was evaluated in 420,148 new users of antihypertensive drugs. After 2 years, therapy persistence was 58.9% and varied according to initial class prescribed, from 52.3% for diuretics to 64.1% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Class persistence ranged from 25.3% for diuretics to 35.8% for angiotensin II receptor blockers. Therapy persistence rates were greater in new users from more recent years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-1.27). Subgroups that demonstrated poorer persistence included patients older than 75 years (aOR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), those with lowest neighbourhood income quintile (aOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.80-0.83 compared with the highest quintile), those from urban vs rural areas (aOR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.81-0.84), and those who started on diuretics as initial monotherapy compared with all other drug classes. Although 2-year therapy and class persistence were low for new users of antihypertensive drugs, improvements have occurred over the past decade. Our data highlight subgroups to target for future persistence improvement interventions. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drug users' self-reports of behaviors and affective states under the influence of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, D H; Jaffe, J H; Synder, F R; Haertzen, C A; Hickey, J E

    1993-12-01

    This study tested a modified version of the Alcohol-Related Behavior Questionnaire (ARBQ) to investigate the influence of alcohol on negative mood states. The ARBQ asked subjects (substance users and those not misusing drugs or alcohol) to recall various moods and behaviors under three drug conditions: sober, drinking, and drunk. Tests of the ARBQ subscales provided support for its reliability and validity. Scale scores measuring negative affect increased as levels of recalled alcohol intake increased, suggesting that larger amounts of alcohol produced more negative and aggressive feelings. Alcohol-dependent subjects reported more anger and aggression with increasing levels of alcohol intake than nonproblem drinkers. These data further indicated that, among those with alcohol dependence, a history of childhood aggression is an important predictor of negative behaviors and feelings associated with alcohol intake. Among other groups of drug users, a diagnosis of antisocial personality was relatively more important.

  1. Association of higher-risk alcohol consumption with injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Shen, Jiucheng; Deng, Yuan; Liu, Xianling; Li, Jianhua; Wolff, Kim; Finch, Emily

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol use is common among injecting drug users. The coexistence of alcohol consumption and injecting risk behaviour has the potential to increase harms among intravenous drug users (IDUs). This study aimed to determine whether the level of alcohol use is a risk factor for injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours. A total of 637 treatment-seeking IDUs were assessed for injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours and drinking risk level as defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Multivariate analyses were performed to identify alcohol risk factors associated with injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours. After adjusting for the effects of ethnicity, employment and drug used, the odds ratio of higher risk drinking for injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours was 1.92 (95% CI 1.31-2.83). Higher-risk drinking in IDUs is associated with higher rates of injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours. It is important to take alcohol use into account when evaluating these patients for treatment and designing intervention strategies.

  2. Social support networks and primary care use by HIV-infected drug users.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Megha; Kelly, Patricia J; Li, Xuan; Berg, Karina M; Litwin, Alain H; Arnsten, Julia H

    2013-01-01

    HIV-infected current and former drug users utilize primary care and preventive health services at suboptimal rates, but little is known about how social support networks are associated with health services use. We investigated the relationship between social support networks and the use of specific types of health services by HIV-infected drug users receiving methadone maintenance. We found that persons with greater social support, in particular more social network members or more network members aware of their HIV status, were more likely to use primary care services. In contrast, social support networks were not related to emergency room or inpatient hospital use. Interventions that build social support might improve coordinated and continuous health services utilization by HIV-infected persons in outpatient drug treatment.

  3. MDMA, methamphetamine and their combination: possible lessons for party drug users from recent preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Kelly J; McGregor, Iain S; Hunt, Glenn E; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    The substituted amphetamines 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and methamphetamine (METH, 'ice', 'speed') are increasingly popular drugs amongst party-drug users. Studies with humans have investigated the acute and possible long-term adverse effects of these drugs, yet outcomes of such studies are often ambiguous due to a variety of confounding factors. Studies employing animal models have value in determining the acute and long-term effects of MDMA and METH on brain and behaviour. Self-administration studies show that intravenous METH is a particularly potent reinforcer in rats and other species. In contrast, MDMA appears to have powerful effects in enhancing social behaviour in laboratory animals. Brief exposure to MDMA or METH may produce long-term reductions in dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline in the brain and alterations in the density of various receptor and transporter proteins. However it is still unclear, particularly in the case of MDMA, whether this reflects a 'neurotoxic' effect of the drug. Lasting alterations in social behaviour, anxiety, depressive symptoms and memory have been demonstrated in laboratory rats given MDMA or METH and this matches long-term changes reported in some human studies. Recent laboratory studies suggest that MDMA/METH combinations may produce greater adverse neurochemical and behavioural effects than either drug alone. This is of some concern given recent evidence that party drug users may be frequently exposed to this combination of drugs.

  4. High risk behavior for HIV transmission among former injecting drug users: a survey from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Injecting drug use is an increasingly important cause of HIV transmission in most countries worldwide, especially in eastern Europe, South America, and east and southeast Asia. Among people actively injecting drugs, provision of clean needles and opioid substitution reduce HIV-transmission. However, former injecting drug users (fIDUs) are often overlooked as a high risk group for HIV transmission. We compared HIV risk behavior among current and former injecting drug users (IDUs) in Indonesia, which has a rapidly growing HIV-epidemic largely driven by injecting drug use. Methods Current and former IDUs were recruited by respondent driven sampling in an urban setting in Java, and interviewed regarding drug use and HIV risk behavior using the European Addiction Severity Index and the Blood Borne Virus Transmission Questionnaire. Drug use and HIV transmission risk behavior were compared between current IDUs and former IDUs, using the Mann-Whitney and Pearson Chi-square test. Results Ninety-two out of 210 participants (44%) were self reported former IDUs. Risk behavior related to sex, tattooing or piercing was common among current as well as former IDUs, 13% of former IDUs were still exposed to contaminated injecting equipment. HIV-infection was high among former (66%) and current (60%) IDUs. Conclusion Former IDUs may contribute significantly to the HIV-epidemic in Indonesia, and HIV-prevention should therefore also target this group, addressing sexual and other risk behavior. PMID:20698979

  5. Individual and social factors associated with participation in treatment programs for drug users.

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Latkin, Carl A

    2008-01-01

    Since only about one third of people who are dependent on drugs are in treatment, there is a need to promote both treatment entry and retention. Previous research has described the role of individual and social characteristics in drug user treatment participation, but little is known about the interaction of individual and social factors. Injecting and noninjecting drug users (2002-2004; N = 581) were recruited, as part of Self-Help in Eliminating Life-Threatening Diseases (SHIELD) study, in Baltimore, MD, and were administered a structured questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 43.6 years, out of which 41% were female, 50% had high school education, and 16% self-reported being HIV infected. Logistic regression analyses of interaction terms revealed that compared to those with no plans to stop and no friends encouraging them to enter treatment those who planned to cease drug use or whose friends encouraged treatment were more likely to attend a 12-step program. Furthermore, compared to those with no problems with drug use and no friends encouraging them to enter treatment those with greater perceived drug problem severity or with friends encouraging treatment were more likely to attend methadone maintenance, as were those who did not receive free drugs from others. The influence of friends may have a crucial modifying effect by getting into treatment less addicted individuals who have higher chances of successful recovery.

  6. Effect of medical, drug abuse, and mental health care on receipt of dental care by drug users.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Laine, Christine; Cohen, Abigail; Hauck, Walter W

    2002-10-01

    We examined the association of patterns of health care in 1996 with subsequent dental care in 1997 or 1998 for 47,260 drug users enrolled in New York State Medicaid. From Medicaid files, we identified psychiatric care, prescribed antidepressants, a regular source of medical care, regular drug treatment (6+ contiguous months), and clinical conditions. Of this cohort, 58% received dental care. The adjusted odds ratios (AOR) of dental care were increased for drug users receiving psychiatric care and antidepressants (1.66 [1.55, 1.77]), psychiatric care alone (1.48 [1.41, 1.56]), or only antidepressants (1.18 [1.10, 1.27]), vs. neither. AORs of dental care were also higher for those with a regular source of medical care alone (1.27 [1.23, 1.35]) or with regular drug treatment (1.33 [CI 1.25, 1.41]) vs. neither. Mental health care and, to a lesser extent, a regular source of medical care and regular drug treatment may promote dental care in this vulnerable population.

  7. Cross cultural adaptation of the Injection Drug User Quality Of Life Scale (IDUQOL) in Spanish drug dependent population, with or without injectable consumption: Drug User Quality of Life Scale-Spanish (DUQOL-Spanish).

    PubMed

    Morales-Manrique, C C; Valderrama-Zurián, J C; Castellano-Gómez, M; Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Palepu, A

    2007-09-01

    The Injection Drug User Quality of life Scale (IDUQOL) measures the unique and individual circumstances that determine the quality of life of injection drug users. This paper reports the psychometric properties of the Spanish version, for drug dependent persons with or without injectable consumption using a revised instrument: Drug user Quality of Life Scale-Spanish (DUQOL-Spanish). We studied 169 outpatients in 9 Spanish drug treatment centers. Factor analysis, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and criterion-related validity were assessed. The results show the essential unidimensionality of the scale, which supports the use of a total score. Both internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: 0.86), and test-retest reliability (r=0.79) of the total score were high. Criterion-related validity supports the interpretation of the DUQOL-Spanish total score as measuring a construct consistent with quality of life. This study suggests that the DUQOL-Spanish is a valid instrument to measure subjective quality of life in Spanish drug users, and allows the identification of life areas that are considered by the patient important to change in order to improve their quality of life.

  8. Prescription Opioid Use, Misuse, and Diversion among Street Drug Users in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Rees Davis, W.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The use of heroin, cocaine, and other drugs is well researched in New York City, but prescription opioids (POs) have been overlooked. This study documents patterns of PO use, misuse, and diversion among street drug users, and begins to indicate how drug culture practices interact with the legitimate therapeutic goals of PO prescriptions (e.g. pain management). Methods Staff completed interviews inquiring about the reasons for use of POs and illicit drugs with 586 street drug users. Ethnographers wrote extensive field notes about subjects’ complex patterns of PO use. Results Methadone was used (71.9%) and sold (64.7%) at a higher level than OxyContin, Vicodin, and Percocet, used by between 34% and 38% of the users and sold by between 28% and 41% of the sellers. Recent PO use is associated with the recency of using heroin and cocaine (p<.001). Half of the heroin/cocaine sellers sold POs, and one quarter of the PO sellers only sold POs. Subjects were classified into four groups by whether they diverted POs or used POs to relieve pain or withdrawal rather than for euphoria. This classification was associated with frequency of PO use, whether POs were obtained from doctors/pharmacies or from drug dealers and family members, and those mostly likely to use POs for pain and withdrawal. Conclusions POs are an important component of street drug users’ drug-taking regimes, especially those who are Physically III Chemical Abusers (PICA). Future research is needed to model PO use, misuse, and diversion among this population. PMID:17913395

  9. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  10. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    PubMed Central

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  11. Risk Factors for Proteinuria in HIV-infected and -uninfected Hispanic Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Martin S.; Schmid, Christopher H.; Stevens, Lesley A.; Forrester, Janet E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Proteinuria may be an early marker of chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with coexisting chronic hepatitis and/or drug use. Minorities are at greater risk of chronic kidney disease. Data are limited on the risk factors for proteinuria in Hispanic drug users with and without HIV infection. Study Design A cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants A community-recruited Hispanic cohort to study the role of drug use in HIV-associated malnutrition, comprised of four groups (106 HIV-infected drug users; 96 HIV-uninfected drug users; 38 HIV-infected non-drug users; 47 healthy controls). Patients on renal replacement therapy were excluded. Predictors HIV infection, chronic hepatitis, history of hypertension or diabetes, and intravenous drug use (never, prior, or current). Outcomes & Measurements The presence of proteinuria was defined as urine dipstick >= 1+. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for proteinuria. Results Of 287 patients with available data, 24 (8.4%) had proteinuria. In univariate analyses, those with HIV infection, prior, but not current, intravenous drug use, and a history of hypertension or diabetes were more likely to have proteinuria. In multivariate analyses significant risk factors for proteinuria (OR, 95% CI) were HIV (9.2, 1.9 – 45.8, P=0.007), prior, but not current, intravenous drug use (4.7, 1.4 – 15.3, P=0.01), and a history of hypertension or diabetes (8.2, 3.1 – 21.7, P<0.001). Limitations The cross-sectional study design makes it difficult to establish the temporal relationship. The number of outcomes in relation to the number of predictors is small. Conclusions HIV and prior intravenous drug use, but not chronic hepatitis or current intravenous drug use, were independently associated with proteinuria in this Hispanic population. Longitudinal studies to assess the development of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease in this high

  12. Fixed-dose combinations of drugs versus single-drug formulations for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Rigau Comas, David; Valderrama Rodríguez, Angélica; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Parker, Lucy Anne; Caylà, Joan; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are newly diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) typically receive a standard first-line treatment regimen that consists of two months of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol followed by four months of isoniazid and rifampicin. Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of these drugs are widely recommended. Objectives To compare the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of anti-tuberculosis regimens given as fixed-dose combinations compared to single-drug formulations for treating people with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 11 2015); MEDLINE (1966 to 20 November 2015); EMBASE (1980 to 20 November 2015); LILACS (1982 to 20 November 2015); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials; and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), without language restrictions, up to 20 November 2015. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared the use of FDCs with single-drug formulations in adults (aged 15 years or more) newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We attempted to assess the effect of treatment for time-to-event measures with hazard ratios and their 95% CIs. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool to determine the risk of bias in included trials. We used the fixed-effect model when there was little heterogeneity and the random-effects model with moderate heterogeneity. We used an I² statistic value of 75% or greater to denote significant heterogeneity, in which case we did not perform a

  13. GABAB receptors as drug targets to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Anders

    2009-06-01

    For many years, acid-suppressive therapy has been at the forefront of treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), yet despite the advent of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) some patients continue to experience persistent GERD symptoms. Therapeutic (non-surgical) options for such patients are currently limited. To tackle this clinical issue, research efforts have begun to focus on 'reflux inhibition' as a potential therapeutic target - i.e. inhibition of transient lower esophageal relaxations (TLESRs), the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Preclinical research has identified a number of drug targets through which TLESRs can be modulated, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B (GABA(B)) receptor has emerged as one of the most promising. Studies with baclofen, a well-known agonist of this receptor, have demonstrated that reflux inhibition is a valid concept in the clinical setting in that reducing the incidence of TLESRs improves GERD symptoms. But baclofen is associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) side effects, rendering it undesirable for use as a treatment for GERD. Further development work has yielded a number of novel GABA(B) receptor agonists with reduced CNS side effect profiles, and clinical trials are currently being performed with several agents. Compounds that target TLESRs may therefore present a new add-on treatment for patients with persistent GERD symptoms despite PPI therapy.

  14. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rate for the generic...

  15. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... the draft guidance entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information.'' This draft guidance describes the user fees associated with 513(g) requests for...

  16. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive…

  17. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive…

  18. The Feasibility of Interventions to Reduce HIV Risk and Drug Use among Heterosexual Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Karen F.; Lehman, Wayne E.; Min, Sung-Joon; Lance, Shannon P.; Speer, Nicole; Booth, Robert E.; Shoptaw, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a feasibility study that examined contingency management among out-of-treatment, heterosexual methamphetamine users and the reduction of drug use and HIV risk. Fifty-eight meth users were recruited through street outreach in Denver from November 2006 through March 2007. The low sample size reflects that this was a pilot study to see if CM is feasible in an out-of-treatment, street-recruited population of meth users. Secondary aims were to examine if reductions and drug use and risk behavior could be found. Subjects were randomly assigned to contingency management (CM) or CM plus strengths-based case management (CM/SBCM), with follow-up at 4 and 8 months. Participants were primarily White (90%), 52% male and averaged 38 years old. Eighty-three percent attended at least one CM session, with 29% attending at least fifteen. All participants reduced meth use significantly at follow-up. Those who attended more sessions submitted more stimulant-free urines than those who attended fewer sessions. Participants assigned to CM/SBCM attended more sessions and earned more vouchers than clients in CM. Similarly, participants reported reduced needle-sharing and sex risk. Findings demonstrate that CM and SBCM may help meth users reduce drug use and HIV risk. PMID:23493796

  19. Theories of addiction: methamphetamine users' explanations for continuing drug use and relapse.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard; Kalechstein, Ari D; Tziortzis, Desey; Jacobsen, Caitlin A

    2009-01-01

    A variety of preclinical models have been constructed to emphasize unique aspects of addiction-like behavior. These include Negative Reinforcement ("Pain Avoidance"), Positive Reinforcement ("Pleasure Seeking"), Incentive Salience ("Craving"), Stimulus Response Learning ("Habits"), and Inhibitory Control Dysfunction ("Impulsivity"). We used a survey to better understand why methamphetamine-dependent research volunteers (N = 73) continue to use methamphetamine, or relapse to methamphetamine use after a period of cessation of use. All participants met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine abuse or dependence, and did not meet criteria for other current Axis I psychiatric disorders or dependence on other drugs of abuse, other than nicotine. The questionnaire consisted of a series of face-valid questions regarding drug use, which in this case referred to methamphetamine use. Examples of questions include: "Do you use drugs mostly to make bad feelings like boredom, loneliness, or apathy go away?", "Do you use drugs mostly because you want to get high?", "Do you use drugs mostly because of cravings?", "Do you find yourself getting ready to take drugs without thinking about it?", and "Do you impulsively take drugs?". The scale was anchored at 1 (not at all) and 7 (very much). For each question, the numbers of participants rating each question negatively (1 or 2), neither negatively or affirmatively (3-5), and affirmatively (6 or 7) were tabulated. The greatest number of respondents (56%) affirmed that they used drugs due to "pleasure seeking." The next highest categories selected were "impulsivity" (27%) and "habits"(25%). Surprisingly, many participants reported that "pain avoidance" (30%) and "craving" (30%) were not important for their drug use. Results from this study support the contention that methamphetamine users (and probably other drug users as well) are more heterogeneous than is often appreciated, and imply that treatment development might be more successful if

  20. Risk factors of suicidal ideation and attempt in women with drug user spouses.

    PubMed

    Noori, Roya; Rafiey, Hassan; Azizabadi-Farahani, Mahdi; Khoddami-Vishteh, Hamid-Reza; Mirabi, Parvaneh; Farhadi, Mohammad-Hassan; Narenjiha, Hooman

    2013-11-01

    Despite ample evidence of the presence of mental and psychological disorders observed in the family members of drug users, few studies have attempted to focus on suicidal behavior in women whose spouses are drug users. This cross-sectional study focused on 131 women who had a drug user spouse. They had all been married for >2 years, with no mental or psychological disorders and no history of drug use prior to marriage. Drug use history after marriage, the extent and nature of physical and non-physical wife abuse, and any history of suicidal ideation and attempt in the past year were collected, in addition to data about anxiety and depression. Our study showed that women who identified with a history of suicidal ideation and attempt were younger, had a shorter marital duration, had a more extensive history of drug use, were more likely to be abused by their spouse, and had higher anxiety and depression scores than their counterparts. Suicidal ideation predictors included a personal history of drug use [odds ratio (OR) = 9.217, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.727-49.180, p = 0.009] and anxiety and depression (OR = 1.080, 95% CI = 1.022-1.141, p = 0.004), whereas suicidal attempt predictors included a personal history of drug use (OR = 7.236, 95% CI = 1.671-31.326, p = 0.010), exposure to physical abuse by spouse (OR = 4.005, 95% CI = 1.393-11.523, p = 0.008), and anxiety and depression (OR = 1.092, 95% CI = 1.015-1.175, p = 0.018). The findings of this study showed that a personal history of drug use, an elevated anxiety score, and depression and exposure to physical abuse by their spouse may act as predictors of suicidal ideation or attempt in women with a drug user spouse. These findings may serve to benefit and support healthcare systems, associated with ongoing efforts to develop preventive programs for suicidal behavior in this population. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Gender similarities and differences in antisocial behavioral syndromes among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K; Salomonsen-Sautel, Stacy; Sakai, Joseph T; Booth, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Studies report that more female substance users meet the adult antisocial behavioral (AASB) criteria of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) without having conduct disorder. We assessed gender and antisocial syndrome (ASPD vs. AASB) effects jointly on multiple outcomes in injection drug users. More males had ASPD (40%) and more females had AASB (67%). After adjusting for gender, the ASPD group was consistently more severe, indicating discriminative validity for the diagnosis. However, the AASB group reported substantial pathology, signifying AASB as an important sub-threshold antisocial syndrome. Antisocial behavior might be described as a distribution, with AASB and ASPD defined by increasingly extreme points.

  2. What happened to the HIV epidemic among non-injecting drug users in New York City?

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Campbell, Aimee N C; Tross, Susan; Cooper, Hannah L F; Hagan, Holly; Perlman, David C

    2017-02-01

    HIV has reached high prevalence in many non-injecting drug user (NIDU) populations. The aims of this study were to (1) examine the trend in HIV prevalence among non-injecting cocaine and heroin NIDUs in New York City, (2) identify factors potentially associated with the trend and (3) estimate HIV incidence among NIDUs. Serial-cross sectional surveys of people entering drug treatment programs. People were permitted to participate only once per year, but could participate in multiple years. Mount Sinai Beth Israel drug treatment programs in New York City, USA. We recruited 3298 non-injecting cocaine and heroin users from 2005 to 2014. Participants were 78.7% male, 6.1% white, 25.7% Hispanic and 65.8% African American. Smoking crack cocaine was the most common non-injecting drug practice. Trend tests were used to examine HIV prevalence, demographics, drug use, sexual behavior and use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) by calendar year; χ(2) and multivariable logistic regression were used to compare 2005-10 versus 2011-14. HIV prevalence declined approximately 1% per year (P < 0.001), with a decline from 16% in 2005-10 to 8% in 2011-14 (P < 0.001). The percentages of participants smoking crack and having multiple sexual partners declined and the percentage of HIV-positive people on ART increased. HIV incidence among repeat participants was 1.2 per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval = 0.03/1000-7/1000). HIV prevalence has declined and a high percentage of HIV-positive non-injecting drug users (NIDUs) are receiving antiretroviral treatment, suggesting an end to the HIV epidemic among NIDUs in New York City. These results can be considered a proof of concept that it is possible to control non-injecting drug use related sexual transmission HIV epidemics. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Hepatitis C seroprevalence amongst injecting drug users attending a methadone programme.

    PubMed

    Chetwynd, J; Brunton, C; Blank, M; Plumridge, E; Baldwin, D

    1995-09-08

    To study the seroprevalence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) amongst a population of injecting drug users and to examine the relationship between potential risk factors and HCV infection. A sample of 116 clients attending a methadone treatment clinic in Christchurch took part in this study. Blood samples were analysed to detect antibodies to HCV and to test for HCV RNA: Serum transaminases were also measured. In addition a short questionnaire about sexual behaviour and drug use practices was self completed by all participants in strictest confidence. Slightly more than half the sample were female (54.3%) and most were of European origin (90.6%). The average age was 31.56 years and the average length of time they had been injecting drugs was 9.54 years. HCV antibodies were detected in 84.2% of the sample and HCV RNA in 66.1% of the sample including 75.9% amongst those who were anti-HCV positive and 16.6% amongst those who were anti-HCV negative. AST and ALT levels were elevated amongst 16.8% and 46.2% of the sample respectively. The likelihood of being anti-HCV positive increased with years of drug use and with increased sharing of injecting equipment. No significant relationship between HCV status and sexual practices was evident. Data on the history of drug using practices indicated that sharing of injecting equipment had become less common over time and access to new equipment through reliable sources had become more common with time. HCV is widespread amongst this population of injecting drug users suggesting the possibility of a major clinical and social problem. Despite evidence of a reduction in the sharing of injecting equipment, HCV transmission is still occurring indicating the potential for other parenterally transmitted diseases, such as HIV, to become established amongst injecting drug users. Those at high risk of HCV should be discouraged from donating blood because of the possibility of HCV seronegative infectivity.

  4. Usefulness of multi-parameter opiate analysis in hair of drug users and victims of fatal poisonings.

    PubMed

    Kłys, Małgorzata; Rojek, Sebastian; Kulikowska, Joanna; Bozek, Edward; Scisłowski, Mariusz

    2005-01-01

    The results of a multi-parameter analysis of opiates in the hair of drug users and victims of fatal poisonings with these xenobiotics have been presented. The analysis was carried out with the use of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The article discusses the monitoring of the drug users' adherence to pharmacotherapy and the usefulness of hair analysis for medico-legal purposes. The authors evaluate the differences in the contents of particular opiates in the hair as related to the origin of a sample (untreated drug user, drug user in the course of treatment, victim of fatal poisoning). The report presents differences between the Polish and American profiles of abuse, providing confirmation that a great part of drug users undergoing methadone treatment do not abstain from opiates and/or amphetamine, the latter as a rule being very often taken with opiates.

  5. HIV Treatment for Alcohol and Non-Injection Drug Users in El Salvador

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Bodnar, Gloria; Petroll, Andy; Johnson, Kali; Glasman, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, many developing countries have introduced and expanded the availability of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to persons living with HIV (PLH). However, AIDS-related mortality continues to be high particularly among drug users. In this article, we present results from in-depth interviews with 13 HIV medical providers and 29 crack cocaine and alcohol using PLH in El Salvador. Providers endorsed negative attitudes toward substance using PLH and warned PLH that combining cART with drugs and alcohol would damage their livers and kidneys resulting in death. Upon diagnosis, PLH received little information about HIV treatment and many suffered depression and escalated their drug use. PLH reported suspending cART when they drank or used drugs because of providers’ warnings. Substance using PLH were given few strategies and resources to quit using drugs. Messages from medical providers discourage drug users from initiating or adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and may contribute to treatment abandonment. PMID:25595149

  6. HIV Treatment for Alcohol and Non-Injection Drug Users in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Bodnar, Gloria; Petroll, Andy; Johnson, Kali; Glasman, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Since the mid-1990 s, many developing countries have introduced and expanded the availability of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to persons living with HIV (PLH). However, AIDS-related mortality continues to be high particularly among drug users. In this article, we present results from in-depth interviews with 13 HIV medical providers and 29 crack cocaine and alcohol using PLH in El Salvador. Providers endorsed negative attitudes toward substance using PLH and warned PLH that combining cART with drugs and alcohol would damage their livers and kidneys resulting in death. Upon diagnosis, PLH received little information about HIV treatment and many suffered depression and escalated their drug use. PLH reported suspending cART when they drank or used drugs because of providers' warnings. Substance using PLH were given few strategies and resources to quit using drugs. Messages from medical providers discourage drug users from initiating or adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and may contribute to treatment abandonment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Herpes simplex virus 2 and syphilis among young drug users in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Plitt, S; Sherman, S; Strathdee, S; Taha, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the sex specific seroprevalence and correlates of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and syphilis among a cohort of young drug users. Methods: Drug users aged 15–30 years old who used heroin, cocaine, or crack were recruited between October 1999 and August 2002. Baseline interviews gathered information on sociodemographics, drug use and sexual behaviours. Serum was tested at baseline for HSV-2 and syphilis seroreactivity. For each sexually transmitted infection (STI), infected and non-infected participants were stratified by sex and compared using χ2, Mann-Whitney tests, and logistic regression. Results: Of the 543 participants recruited, 42.4% were female and 39.3% were African-American. The seroprevalence of STIs among females and males, respectively, were HSV-2: 58.7% and 22.0%; syphilis: 4.3% and 0.3%. In multivariate models, older age, African-American race, having over 30 lifetime sex partners, current HIV infection and previous incarceration were independently associated with HSV-2 infection among males. For females, older age, African-American race, sex trade, and daily heroin use were independently associated with HSV-2. For females, only a self reported previous syphilis diagnosis was associated with current syphilis seroreactivity in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Examination of this cohort revealed a particularly high seroprevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis, especially among female drug users. Few infected participants had been previously diagnosed with these infections. PMID:15923296

  8. Evaluation of a needle social marketing strategy to control HIV among injecting drug users in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zunyou; Luo, Wei; Sullivan, Sheena G; Rou, Keming; Lin, Peng; Liu, Wei; Ming, Zhongqiang

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a needle social marketing strategy to reduce needle sharing and hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV transmission among injecting drug users (IDU) in China. Two-armed, prospective, community-randomized prevention trial. Four counties/townships in Guangxi and Guangdong provinces; one randomized to intervention the other to control in each province. Injecting drug users: 823 (443 intervention, 382 control) at baseline and 852 (415 intervention, 407 control) at the second cross-sectional survey 12 months later. A needle social marketing programme, including promotion of safe injection norms and increased access to clean needles over a 12 month period. Cross sectional surveys at baseline and follow-up compared changes in drug using behaviours and HIV and HCV rates in the intervention and control communities. Needle sharing behaviours were similar in the two groups at baseline (68.4 vs. 67.8%), and dropped significantly to 35.3% in the intervention community and remained relatively stable in the control community (62.3%; P < 0.001). In a subset of cohort of new injectors, the incidence of HCV was significant lower in intervention than in control in both provinces (P < 0.001, P = 0.014) and overall (P < 0.001) but HIV was only significantly lower in intervention in Guangdong (P = 0.011). Needle social marketing can reduce risky injecting behaviour and HIV/HCV transmission among injecting drug users in China and should be expanded.

  9. Altered subjective reward valuation among drug-deprived heavy marijuana users: Aversion to uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Kathryn R.; Starr, Mark. J.; Curtin, John. J.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States and its use is rising. Nonetheless, scientific efforts to clarify the risk for addiction and other harm associated with marijuana use have been lacking. Maladaptive decision-making is a cardinal feature of addiction that is likely to emerge in heavy users. In particular, distorted subjective reward valuation related to homeostatic or allostatic processes has been implicated for many drugs of abuse. Selective changes in responses to uncertainty have been observed in response to intoxication and deprivation from various drugs of abuse. To assess for these potential neuroadaptive changes in reward valuation associated with marijuana deprivation, we examined the subjective value of uncertain and certain rewards among deprived and non-deprived heavy marijuana users in a behavioral economics decision-making task. Deprived users displayed reduced valuation of uncertain rewards, particularly when these rewards were more objectively valuable. This uncertainty aversion increased with increasing quantity of marijuana use. These results suggest comparable decision-making vulnerability from marijuana use as other drugs of abuse, and highlights targets for intervention. PMID:26595464

  10. Validity of injecting drug users' self report of hepatitis A, B, and C.

    PubMed

    Schlicting, Erin G; Johnson, Mark E; Brems, Christiane; Wells, Rebecca S; Fisher, Dennis G; Reynolds, Grace

    2003-01-01

    To test the validity of drug users self-reports of diseases associated with drug use, in this case hepatitis A, B, and C. Injecting drug users (n = 653) were recruited and asked whether they had been diagnosed previously with hepatitis A, B, and/or C. These self-report data were compared to total hepatitis A antibody, hepatitis B core antibody, and hepatitis C antibody seromarkers as a means of determining the validity of the self-reported information. Anchorage, Alaska. Criteria for inclusion included being at least 18-years old; testing positive on urinalysis for cocaine metabolites, amphetamine, or morphine; having visible signs of injection (track marks). Serological testing for hepatitis A, B, and C. Findings indicate high specificity, low sensitivity, and low kappa coefficients for all three self-report measures. Subgroup analyses revealed significant differences in sensitivity associated with previous substance abuse treatment experience for hepatitis B self-report and with gender for hepatitis C self-report. Given the low sensitivity, the validity of drug users, self-reported information on hepatitis should be considered with caution.

  11. Health care utilization among young adult injection drug users in Harlem, New York.

    PubMed

    Cronquist, A; Edwards, V; Galea, S; Latka, M; Vlahov, D

    2001-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the predictors for and patterns of health care utilization among young adult injection drug users (IDUs). The subjects were 206 IDUs, ages 18-29, who were street-recruited from Harlem, New York. Participants were interviewed about their drug use, health conditions, and use of services such as health care, needle exchange programs (NEPs), and drug treatment in the preceding 6 months. Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Health insurance was associated with use of health care both among NEP users [AOR (adjusted odds ratio) 10.66] and non-NEP users (AOR 2.45). Use of health care was independently associated with drug treatment (AOR 2.58), being gay/bisexual (AOR 3.86), and negatively associated with injecting cocaine (AOR 0.56). Half the participants (49%) had used health care in the previous 6 months; 48% were uninsured. Many participants who did not use health services reported a condition that would have warranted medical care. Health insurance was strongly associated with use of health care, particularly among those who attend NEPs. Young adult IDUs may benefit from increased efforts to help them arrange and maintain health insurance coverage, potentially at NEPs. NEPs may be connecting young IDUs with health insurance to medical care through referrals.

  12. Mediators of interpersonal violence and drug addiction severity among methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hobkirk, Andréa L.; Watt, Melissa H.; Green, Kimberly T.; Beckham, Jean C.; Skinner, Donald; Meade, Christina S.

    2014-01-01

    South Africa has high rates of interpersonal violence and a rapidly growing methamphetamine epidemic. Previous research has linked experiences of interpersonal violence to higher rates of substance use, and identified mental health constructs as potential mediators of this association. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal violence and addiction severity among active methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa, and to explore symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use coping as mediators of this relationship. A community sample of 360 methamphetamine users was recruited through respondent driven sampling and surveyed on their experiences of violence, mental health, coping, and drug use and severity. A series of one-way ANOVAs were conducted to examine the relationship of self-reported interpersonal violence with drug addiction severity, and multiple mediation analyses were used to determine if PTSD symptoms and substance use coping mediated this relationship. The majority (87%) of the sample reported experiencing at least one instance of interpersonal violence in their lifetime, and the number of violent experiences was associated with increased drug addiction severity. PTSD and substance use coping were significant mediators of this association. Only the indirect effect of substance use coping remained significant for the female sample when the mediation model was conducted separately for men and women. The findings point to the need for integrated treatments that address drug use and PTSD for methamphetamine users in South Africa and highlight the importance of coping interventions for women. PMID:25479528

  13. Mediators of interpersonal violence and drug addiction severity among methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hobkirk, Andréa L; Watt, Melissa H; Green, Kimberly T; Beckham, Jean C; Skinner, Donald; Meade, Christina S

    2015-03-01

    South Africa has high rates of interpersonal violence and a rapidly growing methamphetamine epidemic. Previous research has linked experiences of interpersonal violence to higher rates of substance use, and identified mental health constructs as potential mediators of this association. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal violence and addiction severity among active methamphetamine users in Cape Town, South Africa, and to explore symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use coping as mediators of this relationship. A community sample of 360 methamphetamine users was recruited through respondent driven sampling and surveyed on their experiences of violence, mental health, coping, and drug use and severity. A series of one-way ANOVAs were conducted to examine the relationship of self-reported interpersonal violence with drug addiction severity, and multiple mediation analyses were used to determine if PTSD symptoms and substance use coping mediated this relationship. The majority (87%) of the sample reported experiencing at least one instance of interpersonal violence in their lifetime, and the number of violent experiences was associated with increased drug addiction severity. PTSD and substance use coping were significant mediators of this association. Only the indirect effect of substance use coping remained significant for the female sample when the mediation model was conducted separately for men and women. The findings point to the need for integrated treatments that address drug use and PTSD for methamphetamine users in South Africa and highlight the importance of coping interventions for women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An examination of drug craving over time in abstinent methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Gantt P; Singleton, Edward G; Buscemi, Raymond; Baggott, Matthew J; Dickerhoof, René M; Mendelson, John E

    2010-01-01

    Craving for addictive drugs may predict relapse in abstinent addicts. To assess relationships between craving and use, we examined changes in craving for methamphetamine (MA) in a sample of 865 outpatients in a multisite 16-week MA-treatment study. Craving was assessed on a 0-100 scale, and MA use was assessed by self-report and confirmed by urinalysis. We hypothesized that the magnitude of craving would decline (decay) with increased time of abstinence, and that decay would be greater for more frequent MA users, and greater for intravenous (IV) users and smokers as compared to those who used MA intranasally. Craving declined significantly as the number of weeks of consecutive abstinence increased. Rate of decay was greater for IV users and smokers as compared to both intranasal users and oral users, but not for more frequent users of MA. Rate of decay was independent of age, gender, and race/ethnicity. The trajectory to 0 (no) craving was 1 week shorter for females than males because females had significantly lower pretreatment craving scores compared to males. This study confirms that the sooner MA-dependent people are able to quit using and the longer that they are able to stay abstinent, the more likely it is that their craving for MA will decrease over time. 

  15. New Drug Combo Shows Promise Curbing Tough-to-Treat Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162445.html New Drug Combo Shows Promise Curbing Tough-to-Treat Breast ... were more common in the group taking the new drug combo, however. Those women reported more fatigue, high ...

  16. A TYPOLOGY OF DRUG-RELATED OFFENDING AMONG YOUNG HOMELESS INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathaz, Dodi S.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates a link between drug use and offending, particularly amongst high-risk individuals, such as homeless youth. The extent to which such youth interpret their offending as being related to their drug use, though, is understudied. This manuscript investigates the interpretations of drug-related offenses offered by 151 primarily white, male, homeless IDUs aged 16–29 years. Youth were asked specific questions about their drug-related offenses during in-depth interviews as part of a larger study investigating health risks surrounding drug injection between 2004 and 2006. The first section of the manuscript outlines offenses youth revealed committing either in pursuit of or after using a variety of substances. The second part of the manuscript examines the overall context (motivation, environment), and provides a seven-tiered typology of drug-related offending based on youth's interpretations, linking certain drugs to specific offenses within particular contexts. From here, some theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21423855

  17. The oral health of heroin drug users: case study in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Injection drug use is a major public health problem. Oral health problems and the appearance of dental disease among injection drug users (IDUs) are caused by their lifestyle. The aim of the present study was to examine the relations between socioeconomic factors, drug use, and oral hygiene habits on the oral health of heroin drug users. Methods A cross-sectional survey on oral health was carried out as part of UNICEF’s research on the biological and behaviours survey among injection drug users in Sarajevo, Banja Luka and Zenica in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A sample of 519 IDUs participated in the survey. Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) was used to obtain the sample. The data were obtained through face–to–face interviews using a structured questionnaire related to socio-demographic characteristics, duration of drug injection, frequency of drug injection in the last month and oral health. Results Older participants (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.02 -1.10), part–time employment (OR = 3.57; 95% CI = 1.02 - 12.20) and unemployment (OR = 3.23; 95% CI = 1.23 - 8.33) in comparison to full-time employment as the referent category, and longer duration of drug injection (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.003 - 1.12) were predictors of bad oral health. A higher level of education (OR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.39 - 0.79), more frequent tooth brushing (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.49 - 0.71), and regular dental checkups (OR = 3.30; 95% CI = 1.42 - 7.67) were predictors of good oral health. Conclusions Socioeconomic characteristics of IDUs as well as their lifestyles may contribute to oral health problems. Heroin drug users have specific dental needs, and programmes to improve their oral health should be an integral part of strategies to prevent addictions including treatments and harm reduction programmes. PMID:24355082

  18. Mortality among heroin users and users of other internationally regulated drugs: A 27-year follow-up of users in the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program household samples

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Roth, Kimberly B.; Eaton, William W.; Wu, Li-Tzy; Cottler, Linda B.; Bruce, Martha; Anthony, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In contrast to research on more restricted samples of drug users, epidemiological studies open up a view of death rates and survivorship of those who have tried heroin a few times, with no acceleration toward sustained use patterns often seen in treatment and criminal justice samples. At their best, epidemiological estimates of heroin effects on risk of dying are not subject to serious selection biases faced with more restricted samples. Methods Data are from 7207 adult participants aged 18–48 years in United States Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program field surveys, launched in 1980–1984. US National Death Index (NDI) records through 2007 disclosed 723 deaths. NDI enabled estimation of heroin-associated risk of dying as well as survivorship. Results Estimated cumulative mortality for all 18–48 year old participants is 3.9 deaths per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval, CI = 3.7, 4.2), relative to 12.4 deaths per 1000 person-years for heroin users (95% CI = 8.7, 17.9). Heroin use, even when non-sustained, predicted a 3–4 fold excess of risk of dying prematurely. Post-estimation record review showed trauma and infections as top-ranked causes of these deaths. Conclusions Drawing strengths from epidemiological sampling, standardized baseline heroin history assessments, and very long-term NDI follow-up, this study of community-dwelling heroin users may help clinicians and public health officials who need facts about heroin when they seek to prevent and control heroin outbreaks. Heroin use, even when sporadic or non-sustained, is predictive of premature death in the US, with expected causes of death such as trauma and infections. PMID:26386826

  19. Mortality among heroin users and users of other internationally regulated drugs: A 27-year follow-up of users in the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program household samples.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Roth, Kimberly B; Eaton, William W; Wu, Li-Tzy; Cottler, Linda B; Bruce, Martha; Anthony, James C

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to research on more restricted samples of drug users, epidemiological studies open up a view of death rates and survivorship of those who have tried heroin a few times, with no acceleration toward sustained use patterns often seen in treatment and criminal justice samples. At their best, epidemiological estimates of heroin effects on risk of dying are not subject to serious selection biases faced with more restricted samples. Data are from 7207 adult participants aged 18-48 years in United States Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program field surveys, launched in 1980-1984. US National Death Index (NDI) records through 2007 disclosed 723 deaths. NDI enabled estimation of heroin-associated risk of dying as well as survivorship. Estimated cumulative mortality for all 18-48 year old participants is 3.9 deaths per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval, CI=3.7, 4.2), relative to 12.4 deaths per 1000 person-years for heroin users (95% CI=8.7, 17.9). Heroin use, even when non-sustained, predicted a 3-4 fold excess of risk of dying prematurely. Post-estimation record review showed trauma and infections as top-ranked causes of these deaths. Drawing strengths from epidemiological sampling, standardized baseline heroin history assessments, and very long-term NDI follow-up, this study of community-dwelling heroin users may help clinicians and public health officials who need facts about heroin when they seek to prevent and control heroin outbreaks. Heroin use, even when sporadic or non-sustained, is predictive of premature death in the US, with expected causes of death such as trauma and infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing la malilla: Exploring drug treatment experiences among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico, and their implications for drug law reform.

    PubMed

    Syvertsen, Jennifer; Pollini, Robin A; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-11-01

    In August 2009, Mexico reformed its drug laws and decriminalized small quantities of drugs for personal use; offenders caught three times will be mandated to enter drug treatment. However, little is known about the quality or effectiveness of drug treatment programs in Mexico. We examined injection drug users' (IDUs) experiences in drug treatment in Tijuana, Mexico, with the goal of informing program planning and policy. We examined qualitative and quantitative data from Proyecto El Cuete, a multi-phased research study on HIV risk among IDUs in Tijuana. Phase I consisted of 20 in-depth interviews and Phase II employed respondent-driven sampling to recruit 222 IDUs for a quantitative survey. We also reviewed national drug policy documents, surveillance data, and media reports to situate drug users' experiences within the broader sociopolitical context. Participants in the qualitative study were 50% male with a mean age of 32; most injected heroin (85.0%) and methamphetamine (60.0%). The quantitative sample was 91.4% male with a mean age of 35; 98.2% injected heroin and 83.7% injected heroin and methamphetamine together. The majority of participants reported receiving treatment: residential treatment was most common, followed by methadone; other types of services were infrequently reported. Participants' perceptions of program acceptability and effectiveness were mixed. Mistreatment emerged as a theme in the qualitative interviews and was reported by 21.6% of Phase II participants, primarily physical (72.0%) and verbal (52.0%) abuse. Our results point to the need for political, economic, and social investment in the drug treatment system before offenders are sentenced to treatment under the revised national drug law. Resources are needed to strengthen program quality and ensure accountability. The public health impact of the new legislation that attempts to bring drug treatment to the forefront of national drug policy should be systematically evaluated. Copyright

  1. Innocent parties or devious drug users: the views of primary healthcare practitioners with respect to those who misuse prescription drugs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many health professionals engage in providing health services for drug users; however, there is evidence of stigmatisation by some health professionals. Prescription drug misusers as a specific group, may also be subject to such judgment. This study aimed to understand issues for primary care health practitioners in relation to prescription drug misuse (PDM), by exploring the attitudes and experiences of healthcare professionals with respect to PDM. Methods Tape-recorded interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of general practitioners (17), community pharmacists (16) and 'key experts' (18) in New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis undertaken. Participants were offered vouchers to the value of NZ$30 for their participation. Results A major theme that was identified was that of two different types of patients involved in PDM, as described by participants - the 'abuser' and the 'overuser'. The 'abuser' was believed to acquire prescription medicines through deception for their own use or for selling on to the illicit market, to use the drugs recreationally, for a 'high' or to stave off withdrawal from illicit drugs. 'Overusers' were characterised as having become 'addicted' through inadvertent overuse and over prescribing, and were generally viewed more sympathetically by practitioners. It also emerged that practitioners' attitudes may have impacted on whether any harm reduction interventions might be offered. Furthermore, whilst practitioners might be more willing to offer help to the 'over-user', it seemed that there is a lack of appropriate services for this group, who may also lack a peer support network. Conclusions A binary view of PDM may not be helpful in understanding the issues surrounding PDM, nor in providing appropriate interventions. There is a need for further exploration of 'over users’ whose needs may not be being met by mainstream drug services, and issues of stigma in relation to

  2. Beyond income: Material resources among drug users in economically-disadvantaged New York City neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Ompad, Danielle C.; Nandi, Vijay; Cerdá, Magdalena; Crawford, Natalie; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about material resources among drug users beyond income. Income measures can be insensitive to variation among the poor, do not account for variation in cost-of-living, and are subject to non-response bias and underreporting. Further, most do not include illegal income sources that may be relevant to drug-using populations. Methods We explored the reliability and validity of an 18-item material resource scale and describe correlates of adequate resources among 1593 current, former and non-drug users recruited in New York City. Reliability was determined using coefficient α, ωh, and factor analysis. Criterion validity was explored by comparing item and mean scores by income and income source using ANOVA; content validity analyses compared scores by drug use. Multiple linear regression was used to describe correlates of adequate resources. Results The coefficient α and ωh for the overall scale were 0.91 and 0.68, respectively, suggesting reliability was at least adequate. Legal income >$5000 (vs. ≤ $5000) and formal (vs. informal) income sources were associated with more resources, supporting criterion validity. We observed decreasing resources with increasing drug use severity, supporting construct validity. Three factors were identified: basic needs, economic resources and services. Many did not have their basic needs met and few had adequate economic resources. Correlates of adequate material resources included race/ethnicity, income, income source, and homelessness. Conclusions The 18-item material resource scale demonstrated reliability and validity among drug users. These data provide a different view of poverty, one that details specific challenges faced by low-income communities. PMID:21835561

  3. Psychosocial considerations for the prevention of HIV infection in injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Albertín-Carbó, P; Domingo-Salvany, A; Hartnoll, R L

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a study that investigated the meaning that injecting drug users attribute to risk behaviors linked to HIV transmission, especially through the use of nonsterile syringes or the failure to use condoms. To do this, social discourses with respect to the prevention of HIV infection are evaluated. The discussion focuses on how these discourses affect the daily practices of heroin users, practices that in turn influence discourses. Ethnography was used to observe 78 heroin users and 35 people following a methadone treatment program. Observation was carried out in a central district of Barcelona, Spain, with a low socioeconomic level. The results are a useful starting point for generating strategies aimed at preventing HIV transmission among this population on personal, community, and sociostructural levels.

  4. "Injection first": a unique group of injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Morris, Meghan D; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Lozada, Remedios M; Gallardo, Manuel; Vera, Alicia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-01-01

    Using baseline data from a study of injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico (N = 1,052), we identified social and behavioral factors associated with injecting at the same age or earlier than other administration routes of illicit drug use (eg, "injection first") and examined whether this IDU subgroup had riskier drug using and sexual behaviors than other IDUs. Twelve-percent "injected first." Characteristics independently associated with a higher odds of "injection first" included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin as their first drug, being alone at the first injection episode, and having a sexual debut at the same age or earlier as when they initiated drug use; family members' illicit drug use was associated with lower odds of injecting first. When adjusting for age at first injection and number of years injecting, "injection first" IDUs had lower odds of ever overdosing, and ever trading sex. On the other hand, they were less likely to have ever been enrolled in drug treatment, and more commonly obtained their syringes from potentially unsafe sources. In conclusion, a sizable proportion of IDUs in Tijuana injected as their first drug using experience, although evidence that this was a riskier subgroup of IDUs was inconclusive. 

  5. Characteristics of male and female injecting drug users of the AjUDE-Brasil II Project.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida

    2006-04-01

    The object of this study is to compare female and male injection drug users (IDUs) in terms of sociodemographic profile and aspects of their initiation to the use of injection drugs. It was a cross-sectional and multicentric study realized in 2000-2001 in six Brazilian syringe-exchange programs. 146 women and 709 men were interviewed, with average ages of 29.5 and 28.3 years, respectively. Both began injection drug use at similar ages, 18.6 and 19.3, for women and men, respectively, although women report more frequently than men that they were initiated by a sexual partner to acquiring drugs and syringes, and to the act of injection. Compared to men, women report significantly more regular sexual partners (83% versus 72%); fewer casual partners (39% versus 58%), more use of injection drugs with their partners, as well as more "exchange" of sex for drugs. Among HIV-seropositive individuals, women show less education, had more chance of their sexual partners participating in their initiation to injection drugs, and report sexual partners that used injection drugs more frequently. Female IDUs exhibit aspects of behavior indicating greater vulnerability to HIV infection than do males.

  6. Microbiology and Initial Antibiotic Therapy for Injection Drug Users and Non-Injection Drug Users with Cutaneous Abscesses in the Era of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Timothy C.; Knepper, Bryan C.; Moore, S. Jason; Saveli, Carla C.; Pawlowski, Sean W.; Perlman, Daniel M.; McCollister, Bruce D.; Burman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cutaneous abscesses has increased markedly since the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Injection drug use is a risk factor for abscesses and may impact the microbiology and treatment of these infections. In a cohort of patients hospitalized with cutaneous abscesses in the era of CA-MRSA, our objectives were to: 1) compare the microbiology of abscesses between injection drug users and non-injection drug users, and 2) evaluate antibiotic therapy started in the emergency department in relation to microbiological findings and national guideline treatment recommendations. Methods This was a secondary analysis of two published retrospective cohorts of patients requiring hospitalization for an acute bacterial skin infection between January 1, 2007 and May 31, 2012 in 7 academic and community hospitals in Colorado. In the subgroup of patients with a cutaneous abscess, microbiological findings and the antibiotic regimen started in the emergency department were compared among injection drug users and non-injection drug users. Antibiotic regimens involving multiple agents, lack of activity against MRSA, or an agent with broad gram-negative activity were classified as discordant with Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guideline treatment recommendations. Results Of 323 patients with a cutaneous abscess, 104 (32%) occurred in injection drug users. Among the 235 cases where at least one microorganism was identified by culture, S. aureus was identified less commonly among injection drug users compared with non-injection drug users (55% vs 75%, p = .003), with similar patterns observed for both MRSA (33% vs. 47%, p = .054) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (17% vs. 26%, p = .11). In contrast to S. aureus, streptococcal species (53% vs 25%, p <.001) and anaerobic organisms (29% vs 10%, p < .001) were identified more commonly among injection drug users. Of 88 injection drug users and

  7. Outbreak of Clostridium histolyticum infections in injecting drug users in England and Scotland.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S; Gal, M; Hall, V; Morris, T E

    2004-09-01

    Clostridial infections in injecting drug users in the United Kingdom are a relatively new phenomenon that came to light in 2000 when cases of serious illness and deaths due to Clostridium novyi were recorded. In the period December 2003 to April 2004, the Anaerobe Reference Laboratory received twelve referrals of an extremely rare isolate, Clostridium histolyticum, from cases of infection in injecting drug users submitted from nine different hospitals in England and Scotland. Molecular typing of these isolates by two different methods of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and PCR ribotyping revealed they are all indistinguishable, indicating a common source of the infections, most probably a batch of heroin that was recently distributed across the UK.

  8. Long-term outcome of lung transplantation in previous intravenous drug users with talc lung granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Weinkauf, J G; Puttagunta, L; Nador, R; Jackson, K; LaBranche, K; Kapasi, A; Mullen, J; Modry, D L; Stewart, K C; Thakrar, M; Doucette, K; Lien, D C

    2013-01-01

    Talc lung granulomatosis results from the intravenous use of medication intended for oral use. Talc (magnesium silicate) acts as filler in some oral medications; when injected intravenously, it deposits in the lungs leading to airflow obstruction and impaired gas exchange. Allocation of donor lungs to previous intravenous drug users is controversial. After a careful selection process, 19 patients with talc lung granulomatosis have received lung allografts in our program. Long-term survival for these patients is excellent and our results suggest the previous use of intravenous drugs should not necessarily preclude lung transplantation.

  9. Behavioral risk factors and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among intravenous drug users in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Robles, R R; Colón, H M; Sahai, H; Matos, T D; Marrero, C A; Reyes, J C

    1992-03-01

    This study reports on four empirical models likely to contribute to understanding the behaviors linked with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among intravenous drug users. The sample comprises 1,637 intravenous drug users recruited between May 1989 and June 1990 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Adjusting for sociodemographics, four logistic regression models were constructed to assess the association of risk behaviors with HIV seropositivity. In model 1, the variables found to be significantly associated with HIV seropositivity were injecting four times a day, injection as the only route of consuming drugs, and years of injection. In model 2, the only risk behavior significantly associated with HIV seropositivity was injecting drugs in shooting galleries. In model 3, all sex risk variables failed to meet the adjusted level of significance. In model 4, pneumonia, hepatitis, and syphilis were significantly linked with HIV infection. In order to assess the individual effects of the significant variables in each one of the four models, a logistic regression analysis was performed simultaneously controlling for all of the variables. After adjustment for the Bonferroni correction, age group 25-34 years, injection as the only route of using drugs, number of years of injection, and syphilis were the only significant variables remaining.

  10. Drug use and risk behaviour among regular ecstasy users: Does sexuality make a difference?

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Louisa

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to compare homo/bisexual men and women with their heterosexual counterparts who were regular ecstasy users, to consider whether patterns of drug use or risk differed across these groups. Respondents (n = 852 ecstasy users) were recruited via advertisements in entertainment street press, gay and lesbian newspapers, music and clothing stores and at university campuses. Interviewer contacts and 'snowball' sampling were also utilized. In total, 23% of females in the sample self-identified as lesbian or bisexual and 13% of males interviewed self-identified as homo/bisexual. Rates of use of 'newer' drugs on the dance scene--crystal methamphetamine and ketamine--were higher among homo/bisexual men and women. Self-reported risk behaviours such as unprotected sex and needle sharing (among those who had injected drugs) did not differ according to sexuality. However, homo/bisexual men and women were significantly more likely than heterosexual men and women to report a greater number of sexual partners and higher rates of injecting drug use. These findings suggest that among a group of people who were selected because they were regularly involved in the party drug market, initiatives designed to reduce harms related to injecting and sex risk may be needed for a greater proportion of homo/bisexual males and females who are involved in the dance/nightclub scene.

  11. HIV incidence among injection drug users in Baltimore, Maryland (1988-2004).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shruti H; Galai, Noya; Astemborski, Jacquie; Celentano, David D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Vlahov, David; Nelson, Kenrad E

    2006-11-01

    We examined recent trends (1999-2004) in HIV incidence among a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs) followed since 1988 in Baltimore, Maryland. One thousand eighty-three HIV-seronegative individuals with a history of injection drug use were recruited between 1988 and 1998 and returned for >or=1 semiannual follow-up visit, where they underwent HIV antibody testing and interviews eliciting risk behaviors. Person-time methods were used to calculate HIV incidence rates per 100 person-years (PYs). Over 14,770 PYs, 304 individuals seroconverted to HIV (2.06 per 100 PYs). Annual incidence declined from 4.57 in 1988 to 0.53 per 100 PYs in 2004. Similarly, among individuals actively injecting drugs, incidence steadily declined from 5.43 in 1988 to 0 in 2004, with the exception of 2003, when an incidence of 2.59 per 100 PYs was observed. Reported sexual risk behaviors and drug injection declined from 1988 through 2004, but among those actively injecting, reported needle sharing declined from 1988 through 1998 and then increased from 30% in 1998 to nearly 40% in 2003 through 2004. Long-term declines in HIV incidence among IDUs are consistent with other reports; however, in 2003, we observed an unexpected increase in seroconversion that seems to be related to needle sharing. Although additional follow-up is needed to identify trends, these data indicate the need to reinforce HIV prevention efforts and to continue surveillance of drug users' behaviors.

  12. Physical health, illicit drug use, and demographic characteristics in rural stimulant users.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Thomas F; Leukefeld, Carl G; Carlson, Robert G; Falck, Russel S; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M

    2007-01-01

    There is growing concern about illicit rural stimulant use, especially regarding methamphetamine use and its health consequences. The present study describes associations between aspects of stimulant use and illness experience in rural areas, with additional focus on the role of demographic characteristics in these associations. The research participants were 710 stimulant drug users who were recruited from rural areas of Arkansas, Kentucky, and Ohio using Heckathorn's respondent-driven sampling method. Health was measured by self-reports of perceived health and extent of current, recent, and lifelong health problems. Drug use was measured with self-reports of type and frequency of use. Several associations were found between drug use and illness, controlling for demographics. Stimulant use pattern related significantly with the sum of health problems in the previous 6 months and the sum of lifetime illness diagnoses, after adjustment for demographic factors. Extent of illicit drug use in the past month and self-perceived drug and alcohol problems were associated with several measures of health. In this sample of stimulant users, methamphetamine use was associated with fewer recent medical problems than crack cocaine, combined crack and powder cocaine use, and use of all 3 of these stimulants. These results, across the 3 sites, suggest that prevalent assumptions about the methamphetamine "plague" and its negative health consequences must be viewed cautiously and examined with additional research.

  13. The filter of choice: filtration method preference among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injection drug use syringe filters (IDUSF) are designed to prevent several complications related to the injection of drugs. Due to their small pore size, their use can reduce the solution's insoluble particle content and thus diminish the prevalence of phlebitis, talcosis.... Their low drug retention discourages from filter reuse and sharing and can thus prevent viral and microbial infections. In France, drug users have access to sterile cotton filters for 15 years and to an IDUSF (the Sterifilt®) for 5 years. This study was set up to explore the factors influencing filter preference amongst injecting drug users. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered through 241 questionnaires and the participation of 23 people in focus groups. Results Factors found to significantly influence filter preference were duration and frequency of injecting drug use, the type of drugs injected and subculture. Furthermore, IDU's rationale for the preference of one type of filter over others was explored. It was found that filter preference depends on perceived health benefits (reduced harms, prevention of vein damage, protection of injection sites), drug retention (low retention: better high, protective mechanism against the reuse of filters; high retention: filter reuse as a protective mechanism against withdrawal), technical and practical issues (filter clogging, ease of use, time needed to prepare an injection) and believes (the conviction that a clear solution contains less active compound). Conclusion It was concluded that the factors influencing filter preference are in favour of change; a shift towards the use of more efficient filters can be made through increased availability, information and demonstrations. PMID:21859488

  14. Surviving in two worlds: social and structural violence of Thai female injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Haritavorn, Niphattra

    2014-01-01

    Thai females injecting drugs are ensnared in a web of problems arising from forms of prejudice that magnify their vulnerability. They are vulnerable, at risk, and exposed to a high degree of social suffering. This paper aims to elucidate how social production and structural violence combine to shape the lives of these women. Using a qualitative methodology, two focus groups with 5 key informants and in-depth interviews involving a total of 35 women injecting drugs were conducted in Bangkok. The findings reveal that the structural environment that directly impacts upon these women's lives becomes the reason for their suffering. The structural environment puts these women at risk of violence in numerous social settings in which these women engage as well as generating tension at a subjective level (i.e. the habitus) of these women. Thai female injecting drug users are trapped in a difficult tension between the demands for being Thai women seeking to exist in the masculine world of drug use but at the same time meeting Thai society's expectations of womanhood. Unequal gender relations are manifest in the everyday violence that women face in the drug community, culminating in the essential nature of women being questioned, undermined and threatened. Living in the drug community, women are subjected to violence and harassment, and gendered brutality by intimate partners. In conclusion, the social suffering that Thai female injecting drug users find themselves confronting is confined to dilemmas cause by tensions between drug use and the overriding gender habitus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Decline in hepatitis B infection observed after 11 years of regional vaccination among Danish drug users.

    PubMed

    Mössner, B K; Skamling, M; Jørgensen, T Riis; Georgsen, J; Pedersen, C; Christensen, P B

    2010-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the current prevalence of viral hepatitis and HIV among drug users, and to compare this prevalence with previous findings in the same geographical region. Cross-sectional surveys of drug users attending treatment centers on the island of Funen with approximately 500,000 inhabitants were administered in 1996 and 2007. The 2007 prevalence estimates were: anti-HBc 50.2%, HBsAg 0.9%, anti-HCV 66.8%, HCV-RNA 40%, and anti-HIV 1.1%. The corresponding 1996 prevalence values were: anti-HBc 70% (P < 0.0001), HBsAg 9.8% (P < 0.0001), anti-HCV 82.8% (P < 0.0001), HCV-RNA 56.3% (P = 0.002), and anti-HIV 1% (P = 1). The 2007 prevalence of viral hepatitis decreased due to the increasing proportion of non-injectors. Among injectors, the prevalence remained unchanged except for a significant decrease in HBsAg. The 2007 prevalence of ongoing HBV infection among infected (HBsAg/anti-HBc proportion) was the lowest that to our knowledge has been reported among drug-users. Vaccination coverage among susceptible persons tested in 2007 was 24%, compared to 0.7% in 1996. Therefore, despite an unchanged prevalence of anti-HBc among injecting drug users, a highly significant drop in HBsAg prevalence was seen during the last decade. This observation may be linked causally to an increase in hepatitis B vaccination of the susceptible population. Our findings suggest that even incomplete vaccination, without persistent protective anti-HBs levels, may induce an immune memory sufficient to prevent chronic infection upon transmission.

  16. [Survey of Hepatitis B infection and vaccination status among drug users in Xi'an].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Zu, Jian; Wei, Xiaoli; You, Lijuan; Kou, Lingling; Li, Hengxin; Zhuang, Guihua

    2014-10-01

    To explore seroepidemiological status and vaccine coverage of hepatitis B among drug users in Xi'an. 545 drug users in the Xi'an Compulsory Detoxification Center were asked to answer questionnaire and provide blood sample (3-5 ml) for test of HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HBs from March to June 2013. Totally, 545 subjects were surveyed and tested. All of them effectively completed the survey. The positive rates of HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HBs were 29.4% (160/545), 60.0% (327/545) and 56.1% (306/545), respectively. Eighty five subjects (15.6%) were negative for all of the three markers. The prevalence of HBsAg and anti-HBc among injection drug users were 40.0% (94/235) and 65.6% (154/235), which was significantly higher than non- injection drug users' (21.6% (52/241), 58.5% (141/241)) and mixed non-injection and injection drug users ((20.3% (14/69), 46.4% (32/69)) (χ(2) = 23.518 and 9.017, respectively, P < 0.05) . The HBsAg positive rate (30.6% (153/500)) of subjects with more than once per day of drug using within one year was significantly higher than those who used drugs for 2-3 times per week (15.6% (7/45)) (χ(2) = 4.51, P < 0.05). Only 11.7% (64/545) of drug users had a clear history of hepatitis B vaccination. The vaccination rate of subjects (3.5% (5/141)) with primary education or below was significantly lower than those with high school (16.3% (45/276)) (χ(2) = 26.61, P < 0.05). The vaccination rate of subjects (7.8% (12/153)) over 45 years old was significantly lower than that of subjects below 30 years old (15.9% (21/132)) and 30-44 years old (11.9% (31/260)) (χ(2) = 30.36, P < 0.05). The vaccinees had a significantly higher positive rate of anti-HBs (73.4% (47/64)) than those who without vaccination (53.8% (259/481)) (χ(2) = 8.81, P = 0.003), but the positive rates of HBsAg (16.7% (11/64)) were lower than those who without vaccination (31.0% (149/481)) (χ(2) = 23.52 and 9.02, respectively;P > 0.05). The HBV infection status among drug users in Xi

  17. Broadly Applicable Nanowafer Drug Delivery System for Treating Eye Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    the drug molecular transport into the cornea. Intravital laser confocal imaging of the live mouse cornea demonstrating the presence of drug in the...vivo drug release in the mouse cornea by laser confocal fluorescence imaging study revealed that the nanowafers upon instillation on mouse eye were...C) 500nm; (D) 1µm; (E) 1.5µm; and (F) 3µm A B C D E F microscopy (SEM) for the feature integrity and uniformity. The SEM images revealed the presence

  18. Investigational drugs in early development for treating dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Beesetti, Hemalatha; Khanna, Navin; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2016-09-01

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant arboviral disease of the current century. A drug for dengue is an urgent unmet need. As conventional drug discovery efforts have not produced any promising clinical candidates, there is a shift toward re-positioning pre-existing drugs for dengue to fast-track dengue drug development. This article provides an update on the current status of recently completed and ongoing dengue drug trials. All dengue drug trials described in this article were identified from a list of >230 trials that were returned upon searching the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform web portal using the search term 'dengue' on December 31(st), 2015. None of the handful of drugs tested so far has yielded encouraging results. Early trial experience has served to emphasize the challenge of drug testing in the short therapeutic time window available, the need for tools to predict 'high-risk' patients early on and the limitations of the existing pre-clinical model systems. Significant investment of efforts and resources is a must before the availability of a safe, effective and inexpensive dengue drug becomes a reality. Currently, supportive fluid therapy remains the only option available for dengue treatment.

  19. Complex subtype diversity of HIV-1 among drug users in major Kenyan cities.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Kamini; Oyaro, Micah; Padayachi, Nagavelli; Zulu, Thando Mbali; de Oliveira, Tulio; Wylie, John; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2017-01-09

    Drug users are increasingly recognized as a key population driving HIV spread in sub-Saharan Africa. To determine HIV-1 subtypes circulating in this population group and explore possible geographic differences, we analyzed HIV-1 sequences among drug users from Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu in Kenya. We sequenced gag and env from 55 drug users. Subtype analysis from 220 gag clonal sequences from 54/55 participants (median=4/participant) showed that 44.4% were A, 16.7% were C, 3.7% were D and 35.2% were intersubtype recombinants. Of 156 env clonal sequences from 48/55 subjects (median=3/participant), 45.8% were subtype A, 14.6% were C, 6.3% were D and 33.3% were recombinants. Comparative analysis of both genes showed that 30 (63.8%) participants had concordant subtypes while 17 (36.2%) were discordant. We identified one genetically-linked transmission pair and 2 cases of dual infection. These data are indicative of extensive HIV-1 intersubtype recombination in Kenya and suggest decline in subtype D prevalence.

  20. Tuberculosis screening and compliance with return for skin test reading among active drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Malotte, C K; Rhodes, F; Mais, K E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the independent and combined effects of different levels of monetary incentives and a theory-based educational intervention on return for tuberculosis (TB) skin test reading in a sample of active injection drug and crack cocaine users. Prevalence of TB infection in this sample was also determined. METHODS: Active or recent drug users (n = 1004), recruited via street outreach techniques, were skin tested for TB. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 levels of monetary incentive ($5 and $10) provided at return for skin test reading, alone or in combination with a brief motivational education session. RESULTS: More than 90% of those who received $10 returned for skin test reading, in comparison with 85% of those who received $5 and 33% of those who received no monetary incentive. The education session had no impact on return for skin test reading. The prevalence of a positive tuberculin test was 18.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Monetary incentives dramatically increase the return rate for TB skin test reading among drug users who are at high risk of TB infection. PMID:9585747

  1. Individual and network factors associated with prevalent hepatitis C infection among rural Appalachian injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Havens, Jennifer R; Lofwall, Michelle R; Frost, Simon D W; Oser, Carrie B; Leukefeld, Carl G; Crosby, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    We determined the factors associated with hepatitis C (HCV) infection among rural Appalachian drug users. This study included 394 injection drug users (IDUs) participating in a study of social networks and infectious disease risk in Appalachian Kentucky. Trained staff conducted HCV, HIV, and herpes simplex-2 virus (HSV-2) testing, and an interviewer-administered questionnaire measured self-reported risk behaviors and sociometric network characteristics. The prevalence of HCV infection was 54.6% among rural IDUs. Lifetime factors independently associated with HCV infection included HSV-2, injecting for 5 or more years, posttraumatic stress disorder, injection of cocaine, and injection of prescription opioids. Recent (past-6-month) correlates of HCV infection included sharing of syringes (adjusted odds ratio = 2.24; 95% confidence interval = 1.32, 3.82) and greater levels of eigenvector centrality in the drug network. One factor emerged that was potentially unique to rural IDUs: the association between injection of prescription opioids and HCV infection. Therefore, preventing transition to injection, especially among prescription opioid users, may curb transmission, as will increased access to opioid maintenance treatment, novel treatments for cocaine dependence, and syringe exchange.

  2. Liking and wanting of drug and non-drug rewards in active cocaine users

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, RZ; Woicik, PA; Moeller, SJ; Telang, F; Jayne, M; Wong, C; Wang, GJ; Fowler, JS; Volkow, ND

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the subjective value attributed to drug rewards specifically as it compares with the value attributed to primary non-drug rewards in addicted individuals. The objective of this study is to assess ‘liking’ and ‘wanting’ of expected ‘drug’ rewards as compared to ‘food’ and ‘sex’ while respondents report about three different situations (‘current’, and hypothetical ‘in general’, and ‘under drug influence’). In all, 20 cocaine-addicted individuals (mean abstinence = 2 days) and 20 healthy control subjects were administered the STRAP-R (Sensitivity To Reinforcement of Addictive and other Primary Rewards) questionnaire after receiving an oral dose of the dopamine agonist methylphenidate (20 mg) or placebo. The reinforcers’ relative value changed within the addicted sample when reporting about the ‘under drug influence’ situation (drug > food; otherwise, drug < food). This change was highest in the addicted individuals with the youngest age of cocaine use onset. Moreover, ‘drug’ ‘wanting’ exceeded ‘drug’ ‘liking’ in the addicted subjects when reporting about this situation during methylphenidate. Thus, cocaine-addicted individuals assign the highest subjective valence to ‘drug’ rewards but only when recalling cue-related situations. When recalling this situation, they also report higher ‘drug’ ‘wanting’ than hedonic ‘liking’, a motivational shift that was only significant during methylphenidate. Together, these valence shifts may underlie compulsive stimulant abuse upon pharmacological or behavioural cue exposure in addicted individuals. Additional studies are required to assess the reliability of the STRAP-R in larger samples and to examine its validity in measuring the subjective value attributed to experienced reinforcers or in predicting behaviour. PMID:18801822

  3. Homeless drug users and information technology: a qualitative study with potential implications for recovery from drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Stevenson, Caral

    2014-09-01

    Having access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) is a prerequisite to meaningful participation in society. This paper seeks to: i. explore the engagement of homeless drug users (HDUs) with ICTs and ii. discuss the findings with reference to recovery from drug dependence. The study design was qualitative and longitudinal, involving data collected in 2012-13 via 52 semi-structured interviews with 30 homeless drug users (25 men; five women). Participants were recruited from 17 hostels in two English cities. Interview data were analyzed using Framework. HDUs had access to ICTs, used ICTs, and wanted to engage with them more. Experiences of digital exclusion were a function of participants' inability to afford ICTs, the relatively cheap and poor quality technology available to them, limited knowledge about ICTs, and lack of support in using them. That HDUs were often unable to take full advantage of technology because they had nobody to explain what their devices could do or to show them how they worked was ironic given that using ICTs to (re)establish and maintain relationships were functions of technology that HDUs particularly liked. The physical, human, cultural, and social capital of HDUs influenced their access to, and use of, ICTs. Equally, ICTs were themselves an important recovery resource. Services and others should endeavor to provide HDUs with easy access to good quality technology, as well as offers of support and education so that all individuals have the knowledge and confidence to make optimum use of the technology that is available to them.

  4. Criminality of heroin users presenting to an Australian hospital-based drug and alcohol unit.

    PubMed

    Desland, M; Batey, R

    1990-06-01

    The rates of criminality of two groups of heroin users presenting to Westmead Hospital were studied. Forty-seven heroin users referred by a structured court diversion scheme (DACAP) were compared with 45 self-referred heroin users. Demographic data, heroin use measures, non-narcotic drug use, and alcohol use were collected by semi-structured interview. Official records were used for measures of criminality. This provided a comprehensive profile of conviction and incarceration rates. Each sample was compared on the age at presentation, intensity and duration of heroin use, and presenting rates of criminality. Results demonstrated the DACAP sample was significantly less heroin involved at presentation with a marginally shorter history of use. Comparisons on criminality demonstrated no difference between samples on six measures. The DACAP group recorded significantly higher levels on two criminality measures, the reverse of what was hypothesized. It is suggested that the DACAP diversion scheme generates a distinct subpopulation of heroin users, characterized by younger age, lower education, less marital attachment, poorer employment history, earlier onset of antisocial behaviour and comparable criminality. Identifiable subpopulations of heroin users appear to be generated by the different referral sources: legal or health oriented. The utility of diverting a more criminally and socially dysfunctional group to treatment agencies is discussed.

  5. The prevalence and correlates of single cigarette selling among urban disadvantaged drug users in Baltimore, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Latkin, Carl A; Murray, Laura I; Clegg Smith, Katherine; Cohen, Joanna E; Knowlton, Amy R

    2013-10-01

    Selling of single cigarettes, also known as loosies, is a public health concern. Loosies allow for those with fewer resources to buy cigarettes without having to purchase a pack. Selling of loosies may cue smoking behaviors. In the US, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations have high rates of smoking and illicit drug use and the selling of loosies appears to be linked to the urban informal economy. We examined the proportion and frequency of cigarette selling and roles in the informal economy associated with selling loosies among a sample of urban drug users. There were 801 participants, recruited by community outreach, assessed at baseline, who were enrolled in an HIV prevention intervention for drug users. Most (89%) smoked cigarettes in the prior 30 days, of whom 92% smoked daily. Self-reported selling of cigarettes was common with 58% reporting that they had sold cigarettes within the last six months; 20.4% reported selling cigarettes a few times a week and 7.4% reported daily selling of cigarettes. In a stepwise regression model, four sources of income were associated with frequent cigarette selling: providing street security (OR=2.214, 95% CI 1.177-4.164), selling food stamps (OR=1.461, 95% CI 1.003-2.126), pawning items (OR=2.15, 95% CI 1.475-3.135), and selling drugs (OR=1.634, 95% CI 1.008-2.648). There is a high rate of selling loosies among urban substance users. The wide availability of loosies may promote smoking. Smoking cessation programs with drug treatment and economic development programs may help to reduce economic pressures to sell loosies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Treating Drug Addiction in the Minority Communities: The Decade Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Joseph S.

    While scholars are not in accord on the basic causes of contemporary drug abuse among minority Americans, most do agree that the social milieu of the drug abuser is fundamental. It has been urged that racism, poverty, police brutality and harrassment, the economics of addiction, the hopelessness of ghetto life, peer pressure, educational…

  7. Patterns, Trends, and Meanings of Drug Use by Dance-Drug Users in Edinburgh, Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sarah C. E.; Hayward, Emma

    2004-01-01

    A survey of drug use in the past year was completed by 124 clubbers (50% male, 50% female, age range 14-44, mean 24 years). Participants were self selecting and recruited in clubs and pre-club bars. Prevalence rates for alcohol, cannabis, and ecstasy were over 80%; 63% reported cocaine and 53% amphetamine use, 15%-43% used ketamine, psilocybin,…

  8. Patterns, Trends, and Meanings of Drug Use by Dance-Drug Users in Edinburgh, Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sarah C. E.; Hayward, Emma

    2004-01-01

    A survey of drug use in the past year was completed by 124 clubbers (50% male, 50% female, age range 14-44, mean 24 years). Participants were self selecting and recruited in clubs and pre-club bars. Prevalence rates for alcohol, cannabis, and ecstasy were over 80%; 63% reported cocaine and 53% amphetamine use, 15%-43% used ketamine, psilocybin,…

  9. Insights from Preclinical Choice Models on Treating Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Negus, S Stevens

    2017-02-01

    Substance-use disorders are a global public health problem that arises from behavioral misallocation between drug use and more adaptive behaviors maintained by nondrug alternatives (e.g., food or money). Preclinical drug self-administration procedures that incorporate a concurrently available nondrug reinforcer (e.g., food) provide translationally relevant and distinct dependent measures of behavioral allocation (i.e., to assess the relative reinforcing efficacy of the drug) and behavioral rate (i.e., to assess motor competence). In particular, preclinical drug versus food 'choice' procedures have produced increasingly concordant results with both human laboratory drug self-administration studies and double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials. Accordingly, here we provide a heuristic framework of substance-use disorders based on a behavioral-centric perspective and recent insights from these preclinical choice procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Respondent-driven sampling to assess characteristics and estimate the number of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wattana, Wantanee; van Griensven, Frits; Rhucharoenpornpanich, Orratai; Manopaiboon, Chomnad; Thienkrua, Warunee; Bannatham, Rattana; Fox, Kimberley; Mock, Philip A; Tappero, Jordan W; Levine, William C

    2007-10-08

    Since early in Thailand's HIV epidemic, HIV seroprevalence among injection drug users (IDUs) in Bangkok has been around 40%. As Thailand moves to strengthen HIV prevention and care programs for Bangkok IDUs, information on current patterns of drug use and an estimate of the size and composition of the IDU population are essential. We used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to recruit Bangkok IDUs who reported injecting in the past 6 months. IDUs were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to compare IDUs currently or previously in treatment with those never treated. RDS software was used to estimate IDU population size based on the proportion in treatment. Of 963 IDUs recruited, 828 (86%) were men. One hundred and twelve IDUs (12%) reported never having attended a drug treatment clinic. Young age, unemployment, injection of single drug, and never having been HIV tested were significantly associated with never-in-treatment status. The estimated proportion of IDUs in treatment was 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.60). Dividing the known number of IDUs in treatment (1981 IDUs attending Bangkok drug treatment clinics during October 2003 through March 2004) by this proportion, we estimated the number of IDUs in Bangkok during the period of RDS to be 3595 (95% confidence interval, 3296-3810). Data obtained through RDS, although subject to limitations from co-existing government drug control policies and possible under-recruitment of out-of-treatment IDUs, will be useful in informing policy, strengthening prevention approaches, and improving methods to monitor the HIV epidemic among Thai IDUs.

  11. Exploratory Study on Drug Users' Perspectives on Quality of Life: More than Health-Related Quality of Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maeyer, Jessica; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Broekaert, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In drug treatment outcome literature, a focus on objective and socially desirable indicators of change (e.g. no drug use) has predominated, while outcome indicators that are important for drug users themselves (e.g. quality of life, satisfaction with treatment) have largely been neglected. Nonetheless, Quality of Life (QoL) has become an important…

  12. Factorial Structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)-18 among Chinese Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jichuan; Kelly, Brian C; Liu, Tieqiao; Zhang, Guanbai; Hao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) has been widely used for mental health screenings in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the validation of its application to Chinese populations has been very limited. The objective of this research is to assess the factorial structure of the BSI-18 within a Chinese drug using population. METHODS AND RESULTS A total sample of 303 drug users recruited via Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) from Changsha, China was used for the study. Our results show: 1) The BSI-18 item scores are highly skewed; 2) With dichotomous items measures (1-problem at least moderately caused respondent discomfort during the past week; 0-otherwise), our findings support the designed 3-factor solution of the BSI-18 (somatization, depression, and anxiety); 3) The BSI-18 has a hierarchical factorial structure with 3 first-order factors and an underlying second-order factor (general psychological distress); 4) Tentative support should also be given to a single dimension of general psychological distress in Chinese drug using populations. Our study recommends a useful alternative approach for evaluating the factorial structure of the BSI-18 – i.e. CFA with dichotomous item measures. Both the total BSI-18 score and the three subscales (SOM, DEP, and ANX) can be used in applications of the BSI-18. CONCLUSION Overall, our findings suggest the BSI-18 is useful with Chinese drug users, and shows potential for use with non-Western and substance using populations more generally. PMID:23906998

  13. The Health Intervention Project: HIV risk reduction among African American women drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Sterk, Claire E.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the Health Intervention Project, an intervention for African American women in Atlanta, Georgia, who are crack cocaine users. METHODS:A formative phase involved ethnographic mapping of the physical and social infrastructure of the study communities and in-depth interviews with women crack cocaine users. Key findings that were incorporated into the intervention program included the exchange of sex for money or drugs, the women's experience with trauma and abuse, the role of men and male partners, the women's roles as mothers and members of extended families, their identity as African Americans, and their desire to reduce their risk for HIV/AIDS related to their drug use and sexual behavior. Individualized intervention sessions were designed to meet the women's needs. The motivation intervention emphasized self-motivation for behavioral change with the assistance of the interventionist, who facilitated the women's goal identification, action plan, and problem-solving skills. The negotiation intervention focused on improving technical and assertive communication skills. An action plan was developed, and the women worked on negotiation skills, self-control regarding sexual and drug-use encounters, assertiveness in sexual and drug-use interactions, and conflict resolution. CONCLUSION: Effective prevention and intervention programs must be framed within an appropriate racial, ethnic, and cultural context. Future research is needed to better understand risk in its social context, including the impact of community factors. PMID:12435832

  14. Overcoming barriers to prevention, care, and treatment of hepatitis C in illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Edlin, Brian R; Kresina, Thomas F; Raymond, Daniel B; Carden, Michael R; Gourevitch, Marc N; Rich, Josiah D; Cheever, Laura W; Cargill, Victoria A

    2005-04-15

    Injection drug use accounts for most of the incident infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States and other developed countries. HCV infection is a complex and challenging medical condition in injection drug users (IDUs). Elements of care for hepatitis C in illicit drug users include prevention counseling and education; screening for transmission risk behavior; testing for HCV and human immunodeficiency virus infection; vaccination against hepatitis A and B viruses; evaluation for comorbidities; coordination of substance-abuse treatment services, psychiatric care, and social support; evaluation of liver disease; and interferon-based treatment for HCV infection. Caring for patients who use illicit drugs presents challenges to the health-care team that require patience, experience, and an understanding of the dynamics of substance use and addiction. Nonetheless, programs are successfully integrating hepatitis C care for IDUs into health-care settings, including primary care, methadone treatment and other substance-abuse treatment programs, infectious disease clinics, and clinics in correctional facilities.

  15. Overcoming Barriers to Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Hepatitis C in Illicit Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Edlin, Brian R.; Kresina, Thomas F.; Raymond, Daniel B.; Carden, Michael R.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Rich, Josiah D.; Cheever, Laura W.; Cargill, Victoria A.

    2005-01-01

    Injection drug use accounts for most of the incident infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the United States and other developed countries. HCV infection is a complex and challenging medical condition in injection drug users (IDUs). Elements of care for hepatitis C in illicit drug users include prevention counseling and education; screening for transmission risk behavior; testing for HCV and human immunodeficiency virus infection; vaccination against hepatitis A and B viruses; evaluation for comorbidities; coordination of substance-abuse treatment services, psychiatric care, and social support; evaluation of liver disease; and interferon-based treatment for HCV infection. Caring for patients who use illicit drugs presents challenges to the health-care team that require patience, experience, and an understanding of the dynamics of substance use and addiction. Nonetheless, programs are successfully integrating hepatitis C care for IDUs into health-care settings, including primary care, methadone treatment and other substance-abuse treatment programs, infectious disease clinics, and clinics in correctional facilities. PMID:15768335

  16. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  17. Clustered drug and sexual HIV risk among a sample of middle-aged injection drug users, Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Noor, Syed W B; Ross, Michael W; Lai, Dejian; Risser, Jan M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a clustered pattern of high-risk drug using and sexual behaviors among younger injection drug users (IDUs), however, no studies have looked at this clustering pattern in relatively older IDUs. This analysis examines the interplay and overlap of drug and sexual HIV risk among a sample of middle-aged, long-term IDUs in Houston, Texas. Our study includes 452 eligible IDUs, recruited into the 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance project. Four separate multiple logistic regression models were built to examine the odds of reporting a given risk behavior. We constructed the most parsimonious multiple logistic regression model using a manual backward stepwise process. Participants were mostly male, older (mean age: 49.5±6.63), and nonHispanic Black. Prevalence of receptive needle sharing as well as having multiple sex partners and having unprotected sex with a partner in exchange for money, drugs, or other things at last sex were high. Unsafe injecting practices were associated with high-risk sexual behaviors. IDUs, who used a needle after someone else had injected with it had higher odds of having more than three sex partners (odds ratio (OR) = 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-3.12) in last year and who shared drug preparation equipment had higher odds of having unprotected sex with an exchange partner (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.66-9.09) at last sex. Additionally, homelessness was associated with unsafe injecting practices but not with high-risk sexual behaviors. Our results show that a majority of the sample IDUs are practicing sexual as well as drug-using HIV risk behaviors. The observed clustering pattern of drug and sexual risk behavior among this middle-aged population is alarming and deserve attention of HIV policy-makers and planners.

  18. The Association between Depression and Medication Nonpersistence in New Users of Antidiabetic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Carlotta; Moisan, Jocelyne; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Guénette, Line

    2017-06-01

    To measure the association between depression and nonpersistence with antidiabetic drugs (ADs) among new users of oral ADs and to estimate factors associated with nonpersistence among these new users with depression. We used administrative claims data to identify an adult cohort (≥18 years) of new oral AD users who were free of depression. We followed the patients from AD initiation until either discontinuation, ineligibility for the public drug plan, death, or the end of the study. A proportional hazard Cox regression model with depression as a time-dependent variable was used to compute the adjusted hazard ratio of nonpersistence. A proportional hazard Cox regression model was also used to identify factors associated with nonpersistence in the subcohort of patients with depression. We identified 114,366 new oral AD users, of whom 4,808 were diagnosed with depression during the follow-up. A greater proportion (55.4%) of patients with depression (vs. 42.5% without depression) discontinued their treatment during the follow-up. The adjusted hazard ratio of nonpersistence with ADs was 1.52 (95% confidence interval 1.41-1.63). Among patients with depression, independent factors associated with nonpersistence included younger age at oral AD initiation (<45 years) and starting treatment with drugs other than metformin (especially polytherapy with insulin). Patients with depression are more likely to discontinue their treatment. Health care professionals should pay attention to patients on AD therapy who also suffer from depression, especially if the patients are young or are using insulin because these patients are at an increased risk of nonpersistence. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pattern mining for extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from user comments.

    PubMed

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%.

  20. Pattern Mining for Extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from User Comments

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%. PMID:22195162

  1. Hepatitis C virus infection and injection drug users: prevention, risk factors, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Backmund, Markus; Reimer, Jens; Meyer, Kirsten; Gerlach, J Tilman; Zachoval, Reinhart

    2005-04-15

    Injection drug users (IDUs) are the largest group of persons infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), with a prevalence of 50%-90%. The transmission of HCV is not the effect of the drug injected but of sharing contaminated equipment. For the sake of prevention, we have to know which factors are more likely to lead to HCV seroconversion and which particular situations and environments are risk factors for equipment sharing. As far as therapy is concerned, some studies have shown that treatment for HCV infection in IDUs during substitution treatment for drug dependency is as successful as is treatment of patients who are not IDUs. Screening and early treatment of IDUs could play an important role in controlling HCV infection. The rate of reinfection may not as high as supposed. All studies dealing with treatment for HCV infection in IDUs have stressed the necessity of collaboration among hepatologists and specialists in addiction medicine, social workers, and psychotherapists.

  2. Treat Jail Detainees' Drug Abuse to Lower HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  3. Drugs to Treat Overactive Bladder: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug may be available for a low monthly cost through programs offered by large chain stores, like Costco, CVS, Kmart, Kroger, Sam’s Club, Target, Walmart, and Walgreens. Some of these stores have ...

  4. Drug policing assemblages: Repressive drug policies and the zonal banning of drug users in Denmark's club land.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Thomas F; Houborg, Esben; Pedersen, Michael M

    2017-03-01

    Zonal banning of disorderly and intoxicated young people has moved to centre stage in debates about nightlife governance. Whereas existing research has primarily focused on the use of zonal banning orders to address problems of alcohol-related harm and disorder, this article highlights how zonal banning is also used to target drug-using clubbers in Denmark. Based on ethnographic observations and interviews with nightlife control agents in two Danish cities, the article aims to provide new insights into how the enforcement of national drug policies on drug-using clubbers, is shaped by plural nightlife policing complexes. The paper demonstrates how the policing of drug-using clubbers is a growing priority for both police and private security agents. The article also demonstrates how the enforcement of zonal bans on drug-using clubbers involves complex collaborative relations between police, venue owners and private security agents. The paper argues that a third-party policing perspective combined with assemblage theory is useful for highlighting how the enforcement of national drug policies and nightlife banning systems is shaped by their embeddedness in local 'drug policing assemblages' characterized by inter-agency relation-building, the creative combination of public and private (legal) resources and internal power struggles. It also provides evidence of how drug policing assemblages give rise to many different, and often surprising, forms of jurisdiction involving divergent performances of spaces-, objects- and authorities of governance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Unofficial policy: access to housing, housing information and social services among homeless drug users in Hartford, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Convey, Mark; Hilario, Helena; Corbett, A Michelle; Weeks, Margaret

    2007-03-07

    Much research has shown that the homeless have higher rates of substance abuse problems than housed populations and that substance abuse increases individuals' vulnerability to homelessness. However, the effects of housing policies on drug users' access to housing have been understudied to date. This paper will look at the "unofficial" housing policies that affect drug users' access to housing. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 65 active users of heroin and cocaine at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Participants were purposively sampled to reflect a variety of housing statuses including homeless on the streets, in shelters, "doubled-up" with family or friends, or permanently housed in subsidized, unsubsidized or supportive housing. Key informant interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with 15 housing caseworkers. Data were analyzed to explore the processes by which drug users receive information about different housing subsidies and welfare benefits, and their experiences in applying for these. A number of unofficial policy mechanisms limit drug users' access to housing, information and services, including limited outreach to non-shelter using homeless regarding housing programs, service provider priorities, and service provider discretion in processing applications and providing services. Unofficial policy, i.e. the mechanisms used by caseworkers to ration scarce housing resources, is as important as official housing policies in limiting drug users' access to housing. Drug users' descriptions of their experiences working with caseworkers to obtain permanent, affordable housing, provide insights as to how access to supportive and subsidized housing can be improved for this population.

  6. Drug users' sexual relationships and the social organisation of risk: the sexual relationship as a site of risk management.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, T; Quirk, A

    1998-01-01

    Research on "risk behaviour" in the time of AIDS has emphasised how social relationships influence individuals' responses to risk. Yet the social relationship remains an under-utilised unit of analysis in risk behaviour research. Drawing on qualitative research with illicit drug users in London, this paper illustrates how drug users' sexual relationships act as key sites of risk management in individuals' drug use and everyday lifestyles. First, while recent research has almost exclusively focused on the dangers of disease transmission, our findings show that drug users perceived their sexual relationships as influencing a variety of risks associated with heroin and other opioid drugs. Here, two types of relationships--"gear" and "straight" relationships--were perceived to be particularly important. Second, while research has tended to focus on drug and health risks as an outcome of relationships, drug users' accounts emphasise that managing risks to their relationships is an important facet of everyday risk management made complicated by drug use. It is argued that risk is a product of social interactions, and that the sexual relationship is an important site of risk management in this process. Future interventions should target drug users' sexual relationships as agents of risk management and behaviour change.

  7. The role of harm reduction in controlling HIV among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Alex; McLeod, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Injecting drug users (IDU) now account for one in 10 new HIV infections world wide. Yet it has been known since the early 1990s that HIV among IDU can be effectively, safely and cost-effectively controlled by the early and vigorous implementation of a comprehensive package of strategies known as ’harm reduction’. This concept means that decreasing drug-related harms is accorded an even higher priority than reduction of drug consumption. Strategies required involve: explicit and peer-based education about the risk of HIV from sharing injecting equipment; needle syringe programmes; drug treatment (including especially opiate substitution treatment) and community development. Many countries experiencing or threatened by an HIV epidemic among IDU have now adopted harm reduction but often implementation has been too little and too late. Although coverage is slowly improving in many countries, HIV is still spreading faster among IDU than harm reduction programmes while coverage in correctional centres lags far behind community settings. The scientific debate about harm reduction is now over. National and international support for harm reduction is growing while almost all the major UN organizations responsible for drug policy now support harm reduction. Only a small number of countries, led by the USA, are still vehemently opposed to harm reduction. Excessive reliance on drug law enforcement remains the major barrier to increased adoption of harm reduction. Sometimes zealous drug law enforcement undermines harm reduction. A more balanced approach to drug law enforcement is required with illicit drug use recognized primarily as a health and social problem. PMID:18641473

  8. Injection drug users trained by overdose prevention programs: Responses to witnessed overdoses

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Wagner, Karla D.; Silva, Karol; Kecojevic, Aleksander; Iverson, Ellen; McNeely, Miles; Kral, Alex H.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the growing public health problem of drug overdose, community-based organizations have initiated overdose prevention programs (OPP), which distribute naloxone, an opioid antagonist, and teach overdose response techniques. Injection drug users (IDUs) have been targeted for this intervention due to their high risk for drug overdose. Limited research attention has focused on factors that may inhibit or prevent IDUs who have been trained by OPPs to undertake recommended response techniques when responding to a drug overdose. IDUs (n=30) trained by two OPPs in Los Angeles were interviewed in 2010–11 about responses to their most recently witnessed drug overdose using an instrument containing both open and closed-ended questions. Among the 30 witnessed overdose events, the victim recovered in 29 cases while the outcome was unknown in one case. Participants responded to overdoses using a variety of techniques taught by OPP. Injecting the victim with naloxone was the most common recommended response while other recommended responses included stimulating the victim with knuckles, calling 911, and giving rescue breathing. Barriers preventing participants from employing recommended response techniques in certain circumstances included prior successes using folk remedies to revive a victim, concerns over attracting police to the scene, and issues surrounding access to or use of naloxone. Practical solutions, such as developing booster sessions to augment OPP, are encouraged to increase the likelihood that trained participants respond to a drug overdose with the full range of recommended techniques. PMID:22847602

  9. Injecting drug users and their health seeking behavior: a cross-sectional study in dhaka, bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed; Biswas, Tuhin; Bhuiyan, Faiz Ahmed; Islam, Md Serajul; Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Nessa, Hurun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs) are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD and median (IQR) age of the participants were 32.5 ± 21.3 and 33 (27-38) years, respectively, with only 9.2% females. Injection buprenorphine was the drug of choice for 40% of participants, and 58% of the participants first started drug use with smoking cannabis. 73.3% of participants shared needles sometimes and 57.5% were willing to use the needle exchange programs. 60% of the participants had no knowledge about the diseases spread by injection. Condom use during the last intercourse with regular partners was 11.7% and with any partners 15.8%. Conclusion. IDUs in Bangladesh are a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS due to lack of knowledge and risky behaviors. Education and interventions specifically aimed at IDUs are needed, because traditional education may not reach IDUs or influence their behavior.

  10. Injecting Drug Users and Their Health Seeking Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tuhin; Bhuiyan, Faiz Ahmed; Islam, Md. Serajul; Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Nessa, Hurun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs) are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD and median (IQR) age of the participants were 32.5 ± 21.3 and 33 (27–38) years, respectively, with only 9.2% females. Injection buprenorphine was the drug of choice for 40% of participants, and 58% of the participants first started drug use with smoking cannabis. 73.3% of participants shared needles sometimes and 57.5% were willing to use the needle exchange programs. 60% of the participants had no knowledge about the diseases spread by injection. Condom use during the last intercourse with regular partners was 11.7% and with any partners 15.8%. Conclusion. IDUs in Bangladesh are a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS due to lack of knowledge and risky behaviors. Education and interventions specifically aimed at IDUs are needed, because traditional education may not reach IDUs or influence their behavior. PMID:25692067

  11. Prescription drugs purchased through the internet: Who are the end users?

    PubMed Central

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Cicero, Theodore J.; Rosenblum, Andrew; Ahwah, Candice; Bailey, J. Elise; Dart, Richard C.; Burke, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Although prescription drugs are readily available on the Internet, little is known about the prevalence of Internet use for the purchase of medications without a legitimate prescription, and the characteristics of those that obtain non-prescribed drugs through online sources. The scientific literature on this topic is limited to anecdotal reports or studies plagued by small sample sizes. Within this context, the focus of this paper is an examination of five national data sets from the U.S. with the purpose of estimating: (1) how common obtaining prescription medications from the Internet actually is, (2) who are the typical populations of “end users” of these non-prescribed medications, and (3) which drugs are being purchased without a prescription. Three of the data sets are drawn from the RADARS® (Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance) System, a comprehensive series of studies designed to collect timely and geographically specific data on the abuse and diversion of a number of prescription stimulants and opioid analgesics. The remaining data sets include the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) and the Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey. Our analysis yielded uniformly low rates of prescription drug acquisition from online sources across all five data systems we examined. The consistency of this finding across very diverse populations suggests that the Internet is a relatively minor source for illicit purchases of prescription medications by the individual end-users of these drugs. PMID:20227199

  12. Changes in HIV risk behavior among injecting drug users: the impact of 21 versus 90 days of methadone detoxification.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, M Y; Bux, D A; Lidz, V; French, J F; Baxter, R C; Platt, J J

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that long-term methadone detoxification would produce greater HIV risk reduction among injecting drug users (IDU) than short-term detoxification. Random assignment to 21 or 90 days of free detoxification. Storefront offices in two cities, with referrals to outpatient methadone detoxification. Out-of-treatment IDU (n = 1803), recruited through street outreach and word of mouth, between April 1990 and March 1991. Of these, 62.6% were successfully located for 6-month follow-up. Self-reported drug injection and sexual practices at baseline and follow-up. Substantial reductions in risk behavior were observed at follow-up. Substantial percentages of subjects reported less frequent drug injection (54%), use of shooting galleries (85%), needle-sharing (67%), and number of sex partners (73%), and more frequent use of bleach to disinfect needles (67%) and condom use (31%). There were no significant differences in behavioral change between 21 and 90-day treatment, and subjects who entered treatment did not report significantly greater risk reduction than untreated subjects. Discriminant analyses showed a marginal effect for duration of treatment on risk reduction, although results were inconsistent. Large scale behavioral risk reduction appears to be occurring in this population regardless of treatment condition. In minimal service methadone detoxification, subjects treated under a longer-term detoxification protocol demonstrated no greater risk reduction than those receiving short-term detoxification.

  13. Patterns of major depression and drug-related problems amongst heroin users across 36 months.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Mills, Katherine; Teesson, Maree; Ross, Joanne; Williamson, Anna; Havard, Alys

    2009-03-31

    The study aimed to determine patterns of major depression (MD) across 36 months, and the relationship to outcomes for the treatment of heroin dependence. As part of a longitudinal cohort study, 429 heroin users were interviewed at 36 month follow-up. MD declined from 23.8% at baseline to 8.2% at 36 months. Females were more likely to have MD at both baseline (31.1 vs. 19.8) and 36 months (11.9 vs. 6.1%). Those with MD at baseline were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with MD at a follow-up interview (40.2 vs. 15.9%) and at 36 months (14.7 vs. 6.1%). Antidepressant use did not decrease across 36 months amongst either gender. Baseline MD was not related to treatment exposure across 36 months. There were large and significant declines in drug use and drug-related problems, and improvements in physical health with no group differences evident at 36 months. Despite improvements in global mental health, at both baseline and 36 months those with MD at baseline had significantly lower SF12 mental health scores. It was concluded that, with the exception of depression, the prognosis of depressed heroin users is not worse than that of non-depressed users.

  14. Sexual Violence in the Context of Drug Use Among Young Adult Opioid Users in New York City.

    PubMed

    Jessell, Lauren; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Guarino, Honoria; Vakharia, Sheila P; Syckes, Cassandra; Goodbody, Elizabeth; Ruggles, Kelly V; Friedman, Sam

    2015-08-03

    Drug and alcohol use have been associated with increased risk for sexual violence, but there is little research on sexual violence within the context of drug use among young adult opioid users. The current mixed-methods study explores young adult opioid users' sexual experiences in the context of their drug use. Forty-six New York City young adults (ages 18-32) who reported lifetime nonmedical use of prescription opioids (POs) completed in-depth, semistructured interviews, and 164 (ages 18-29) who reported heroin and/or nonmedical PO use in the past 30 days completed structured assessments that inquired about their drug use and sexual behavior and included questions specific to sexual violence. Participants reported frequent incidents of sexual violence experienced both personally and by their opioid using peers. Participants described sexual violence, including sexual assault, as occurring within a context characterized by victimization of users who were unconscious as a result of substance use, implicit and explicit exchanges of sex for drugs and/or money that increased risk for sexual violence, negative sexual perceptions ascribed to drug users, and participants' own internalized stigma. Recommendations to reduce sexual violence among young adult opioid users include education for users and service providers on the risk of involvement in sexual violence within drug using contexts and efforts to challenge perceptions of acceptability regarding sexual violence.

  15. Homeless drug users' awareness and risk perception of peer "Take Home Naloxone" use – a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat; Oldham, Nicola; Francis, Katharine; Jones, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    Background Peer use of take home naloxone has the potential to reduce drug related deaths. There appears to be a paucity of research amongst homeless drug users on the topic. This study explores the acceptability and potential risk of peer use of naloxone amongst homeless drug users. From the findings the most feasible model for future treatment provision is suggested. Methods In depth face-to-face interviews conducted in one primary care centre and two voluntary organisation centres providing services to homeless drug users in a large UK cosmopolitan city. Interviews recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically by framework techniques. Results Homeless people recognise signs of a heroin overdose and many are prepared to take responsibility to give naloxone, providing prior training and support is provided. Previous reports of the theoretical potential for abuse and malicious use may have been overplayed. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to recommend providing "over the counter" take home naloxone" to UK homeless injecting drug users. However a programme of peer use of take home naloxone amongst homeless drug users could be feasible providing prior training is provided. Peer education within a health promotion framework will optimise success as current professionally led health promotion initiatives are failing to have a positive impact amongst homeless drug users. PMID:17014725

  16. Fatigue in cancer patients treated with cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, Per; Aulin, Johan; Hugerth, Matilda; Wallenberg, Sofia; Wagenius, Gunnar

    2006-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a significant and distressing problem for the cancer patient, affecting their physical and psychosocial function negatively, and reducing their quality of life. The aims of this study were to assess frequency, severity, and the consequence of fatigue in cancer outpatients receiving cytotoxic drugs, using an existing international fatigue scale applied for Swedish use. The study used a non-randomized, prospective design to evaluate fatigue and its impact on quality of life in outpatients receiving cytotoxic drugs. Once a week, 147 cancer patients, in an outpatient ward for cytotoxic drug administration, filled out questionnaires containing 13 items from the Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and five additional questions. Prevalence of fatigue was 92% in the week after all patients had received cytotoxic drugs, and patients were statistically significantly more fatigued during than before treatment. The degree of fatigue was highest the week after treatment, and declined over the following week. Other symptoms, especially depressed mood, showed a strong correlation with cancer and cytotoxic-induced fatigue. Lung and breast cancer patients experienced the highest degree of fatigue. Some cytotoxic drug regimens were, apart from the underlying disease, associated with high fatigue scores, eg, those with cyclophosphamide or gemcitabine. Patients not receiving first line treatment scored significantly higher fatigue with more influence on daily living. The study verified that fatigue is a common side effect, and affects quality of life negatively, even for outpatients receiving cytotoxic drugs. The clinical oncology pharmacist must inform patients that a severe tiredness, fatigue, may follow cytotoxic drug administration.

  17. [Expensive new drugs for treating cancer: a dilemma].

    PubMed

    Tax, Sofie E M; van der Hoeven, J J M Koos

    2014-01-01

    The number of new cancer patients in the Netherlands is increasing annually: there were approximately 100,000 new cases in 2010 and there will be more than 120,000 in 2020. The number of systemic therapies available for these patients is growing rapidly, and spending on anticancer drug doubled within ten years, to EUR 733 m in 2013. During the past few years the amount spent on new targeted drugs was compensated by the expiration of patents for frequently used cytostatics such as paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabin, oxaliplatin and irinotecan. Immunotherapy is now available for patients with metastatic melanoma and the new 'checkpoint inhibitors' look promising for other cancers, including lung cancer, renal cell cancer, and bladder cancer. These drugs, as well as the numerous new targeted agents, are very expensive. The price for 4 cycles of ipilimumab for a patient with metastatic melanoma is approximately EUR 80,000. A special committee of the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF) released a report on the increasing costs of anticancer treatments and gave recommendations concerning how to address this issue. First of all, cost savings have to be achieved by lowering the price of the innovative drugs. The search for companion diagnostics should be encouraged, in order to avoid unnecessary drug administration. And, if these measures are not sufficient, the government should consider determining a price-ceiling for these treatments. A differentiation between treatments with curative intention or long-term survival benefits and those which only have marginal effects, would appear to be logical.

  18. [Overdose of heroin and influencing factors in intravenous drug users in parts of Yunnan].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Luo, W; Cao, X B; Zhang, B; Wu, Z Y

    2016-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of overdose of heroin and risk factors in intravenous drug users(IDUs)in Yunnan Province. During July-August of 2015, IDUs were recruited from four methadone maintenance treatment(MMT)clinics and two compulsory drug rehabilitation centers in Honghe and Dehong prefectures, Yunnan province. The information about IDUs ' demographic characteristics and drug use history, overdose of heroin in previous12 months and the latest overdose of heroin were collected through face to face questionnaire survey. The factors associated with overdose of heroin were evaluated with logistic regression models. Of the 340 IDUs surveyed, 85.3%(290/340)were males, the mean age was 37.7±8.7 years, 65.6%(223/340)were Han ethnicity, and 49.4%(167/338)were HIV positive, 22.6%(77/340)reported having used club-related drugs(such as ephedrine, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines and ketamine)in the previous 12 months. Of the 340 IDUs, 41.8%(142/340)had at least one overdose of heroin in their lifetime(median: 3 overdoses)and 15.6%(53/340)had at least one overdose of heroin(median : 1 overdose use)in previous 12 months. The mean age of the 53 IDUs was(36.7 ± 8.4)years, and 83.0%(44/53)of them were males, the average drug use history was(16.5 ± 7.6)years. Dosage increase(26.4%, 14/53)and multidrug use(28.3%, 15/53)were the main causes for overdose of heroin. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that methadone maintenance treatment during the past year(OR=0.534, 95%CI: 0.290-0.980)was independently associated with decreased risk of overdose of heroin, needle sharing in the past 6 months(OR=2.735, 95%CI: 1.383-5.407)and being forced to receive drug rehabilitation for less than one year(OR=2.881, 95% CI: 1.226-6.767)were independently associated with increased risk of overdose of heroin. Overdose of heroin is common among IDUs in Yunnan. It is necessary to encourage IDUs to receive MMT and strengthen the health education about the prevention of overdose of heroin

  19. Profiles of risk: a qualitative study of injecting drug users in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Emran M; Movaghar, Afarin Rahimia; Green, Traci Craig; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2006-03-18

    In Iran, there are an estimated 200,000 injecting drug users (IDUs). Injecting drug use is a relatively new phenomenon for this country, where opium smoking was the predominant form of drug use for hundreds of years. As in many countries experiencing a rise in injecting drug use, HIV/AIDS in Iran is associated with the injection of drugs, accounting for transmission of more than two-thirds of HIV infections. This study aimed to: describe the range of characteristics of IDUs in Tehran, Iran's capital city; 2) examine the injecting-related HIV risk behaviors of IDUs, and 3) suggest necessary interventions to prevent HIV transmission among IDUs and their families and sex partners. Using rapid assessment and response methods with a qualitative focus, six districts of Tehran were selected for study. A total of 81 key informants from different sectors and 154 IDUs were selected by purposeful, opportunistic and snowball sampling, then interviewed. Ethnographic observations were done for mapping and studying injecting-related HIV risk settings and behaviors. Modified content analysis methods were used to analyze the data and extract typologies of injecting drug users in Tehran. Evidence of injecting drug use and drug-related harm was found in 5 of 6 study districts. Several profiles of IDUs were identified: depending on their socioeconomic status and degree of stability, IDUs employed different injecting behaviors and syringe hygiene practices. The prevalence of sharing injection instruments ranged from 30-100%. Varied magnitudes of risk were evident among the identified IDU typologies in terms of syringe disinfection methods, level of HIV awareness, and personal hygiene exhibited. At the time of research, there were no active HIV prevention programs in existence in Tehran. The recent rise of heroin injection in Iran is strongly associated with HIV risk. Sharing injection instruments is a common and complex behavior among Iranian IDUs. For each profile of IDU we identified

  20. Mucosal fixed drug eruption in a patient treated with ornidazole.

    PubMed

    Marya, Charu Mohan; Sharma, Gaurav; Parashar, Vijay P; Dahiya, Vandana

    2012-03-27

    Therapeutic drugs have been observed to cause a wide spectrum of adverse oral effects such as dry mouth, gingival enlargement, taste disturbance, oral mucosal ulceration, halitosis, etc. A rare case of intra-oral fixed drug eruption (FDE) induced by ornidazole presenting on the hard palate, an extremely rare site for FDE, in a 40-year-old male is reported. Ornidazole is a relatively newer 5-nitroimidazole derivative commonly prescribed for Amoebic dysentery in developing countries. FDE is a rare adverse drug effect characterized by onset of round/oval, erythematous macules on the skin or mucosa that can be associated with itching and burning sensation. The exact mechanism causing FDE is unknown.

  1. Incarceration experiences among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M-J; Fairbairn, Nadia; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Lai, Calvin; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2009-12-30

    Since 2003 Thailand has waged an aggressive "war on drugs" campaign focused on arresting and incarcerating suspected drug users and dealers. However, little is known about incarceration experiences among IDU in the wake of the recent war on drugs. Therefore, we sought to examine incarceration experiences among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. We examined the prevalence of incarceration among community-recruited IDU participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with a self-reported history of incarceration. We also examined the prevalence of injection drug use and syringe sharing within prisons. 252 IDU were recruited in August 2008; 66 (26.2%) were female and the median age was 36.5 years. In total, 197 (78.2%) participants reported a history of incarceration. In multivariate analyses, reporting a history of incarceration was associated with a history of compulsory drug treatment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.95 - 12.48), non-fatal overdose (AOR = 3.69; 95%CI: 1.45 - 9.39), syringe sharing (AOR = 2.20; 95%CI: 1.12 - 4.32), and female gender (AOR = 0.41; 95%CI: 0.20 - 0.82). Among those who reported a history of incarceration, 59 (29.9%) reported injection drug use in prison, and 48 (81.4%) of these individuals reported sharing syringes in prison. Incarceration was not associated with the number of injections performed in the previous week (p = 0.202). Over three-quarters of the IDU participating in this study reported a history of incarceration, and 30% of these individuals reported injection drug use within prison. Further, an alarmingly high level of syringe sharing within prison was reported, and incarceration was not associated with reductions in drug use. These findings provide further evidence of the need for community diversion strategies, as well as harm reduction programs, in Thai prisons.

  2. Assessing geographic and individual level factors associated with arrests among injection drug users in California.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alexis N; Bluthenthal, Ricky N; Neilands, Torsten; Kral, Alex H

    2011-11-01

    Law enforcement strategies to reduce street-based drug activity are often concentrated in neighborhoods with high levels of social and economic disadvantage. Intensive street-level policing is associated with fear and reluctance on the part of injection drug users (IDUs) to utilize syringe exchange programs (SEPs). We aim to build on previous research by analyzing the influence of zip code and individual level factors on the probability of arrest among IDUs in California. Individual characteristics and behaviors were more strongly associated with arrest than zip code characteristics. However, living in a disadvantaged zip code exerted a protective effect against arrest after adjusting for individual level factors (AOR 0.7, 95% 0.5, 0.9). Further efforts to contextualize the circumstances surrounding an arrest, including the characteristics of the geographic setting, may be useful for understanding how law enforcement practices impact the success of SEPs and the health of injection drug users. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Social networks and HCV viraemia in anti-HCV-positive rural drug users.

    PubMed

    Young, A M; Jonas, A B; Havens, J R

    2013-02-01

    Although social networks are known to play an important role in drug-using behaviours associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, literature on social networks and HCV is inconsistent. This exploratory study examined HCV RNA distribution within a social network of anti-HCV-positive non-medical prescription opioid users (NMPOUs) in rural Appalachia. Participants were tested serologically for HCV RNA, and behavioural, demographic, and network data were collected using interview-administered questionnaires. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression. Behavioural and demographic characteristics did not differ by RNA status. In the multivariate model, recent injecting drug users (IDUs) were more likely to be RNA positive [odds ratio (OR) 4·06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·04-15·83], and turnover into an IDU's drug network was significantly protective (OR 0·15, 95% CI 0·03-0·75). This is the first study to date to examine HCV distribution in rural NMPOUs from a network perspective and demonstrates that network characteristics significantly contribute to the epidemiology of HCV in this understudied, high-risk population.

  4. A choice-based screening method for compulsive drug users in rats.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Augier, Eric; Vouillac, Caroline; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-07-01

    We describe a protocol for screening compulsive drug users among cocaine self-administering rats, the most frequently used animal model in addiction research. Rats are first trained on several alternating days to self-administer either cocaine (i.v.) or saccharin-sweetened water (by mouth)--a potent, albeit nonessential, nondrug reward. Then rats are allowed to choose between the two rewards over several days until the preference stabilizes. Most rats choose to stop using cocaine and pursue the alternative reward. Only a minority of Wistar strain rats (generally 15%) persist in taking the drug, regardless of the severity of past cocaine use and even when made hungry and offered the possibility to relieve their physiological need. Persistence of cocaine use in the face of a high-stakes choice is a core defining feature of compulsion. This choice-based screening method for compulsive drug users is easy to implement, has several important applications, and compares well with other methods in the field.

  5. Exploring the Attractiveness of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) among Experienced Drug Users.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan G C; Nabben, Ton; Keiman, Daan; Haanschoten, Gijs; Korf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) appear yearly on the European market (81 for the first time in 2013, adding to a total of over 350 NPS). Using semi-structured interviews with 25 Dutch experienced recreational drug users, the role of the Internet and friends in gathering and exchanging information about NPS was elaborated. Furthermore, we investigated how NPS were acquired and which aspects make NPS more or less attractive, including their legal status. It appeared that the Internet was an important source of information about NPS in general. Personal experiences with NPS were preferably shared face-to-face with friends, as for privacy reasons users were cautious to post their experiences on web sites and forums. NPS were usually obtained or bought from friends or-to a lesser extent-purchased via the Internet. The preference for a specific NPS depended on the desired effects (mostly stimulant or psychedelic), price (similar to MDMA or amphetamine), duration of effect (preferably around four hours), and setting (at home, at festivals, or in nightlife). Legal status was not relevant for the decision to use NPS. Most NPS are not superior to the already marketed drugs, and do not displace conventional illicit drugs.

  6. An evaluation of high-risk behaviors among female drug users based on Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Ilika, F; Jamshidimanesh, M; Hoseini, M; Saffari, M; Peyravi, H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Because of the physiological nature of the female reproductive system, women are susceptible to infectious diseases, especially STD and AIDS. Addiction and high-risk behaviors also grow danger of these diseases. The reason of this paper was to examine high-risk behaviors among female drug users based on the Health Belief Model. Methods. Participants of this study were 106 female drug users aged 18 years and older; by the undermost level of literacy skills and been involved in sexual relationships. They came to Drop-In-Centers (DIC) in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Data study was controlled by using a logistic reflux investigation and Pearson correlation analysis. Results. The conclusion showed that women's overall awareness was moderate. There were a considerable relationship among awareness and years old (p=0.006), awareness and education (p> 0.0001), and awareness and conjugal situation (p=0.062). Perceived sensitivity and severity were clearly compared by education level (p=0.007) and (p=0.014), respectively. Mean scores of perceived benefits and perceived severity of high-risk behaviors were estimated to be superior to other components. Conclusion. Awareness and perceived susceptibility must be raised regarding the educational schedule, which is according to the health belief model in the addiction field, to reduce perceived barriers to risky behavior prevention of women who use drugs.

  7. Characteristics of hepatitis C infection in injecting drug users in Zadar County, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Medić, Alan; Dzelalija, Boris; Sonicki, Zdenko; Zekanović, Drazen

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine additional risk factors that could increase the prevalence of hepatitis C (HCV) infection among injecting drug users (IDU). The study included 327 heroin addicts registered in Zadar County, Croatia. The participants were divided into two groups according to their HCV status. HCV-positive and HCV-negative study participants were compared. HCV-positive group started injecting heroin at earlier age (median 18.5 years) than HCV-negative group (median 20.0 years) (p = 0.032) and had been injecting heroin for a significantly longer period (median 5 years vs. median 4 years, respectively; p < 0.001). IDUs in HCV-positive group shared their injecting equipment significantly more often than IDUs in HCV-negative group (p < 0.001; chi2 = 32.7). The main reasons for starting drugs were curiosity, psychological reasons (depression and/or neurosis), and peer or partner pressure in HCV-positive group, and fun, curiosity, and peer pressure in HCV-negative group (p = 0.051; chi2 = 23.6). Earlier onset of heroin use, longer heroin use, sharing injection equipment, curiosity, and psychological problems as reasons for starting drugs were associated with higher prevalence of HCV infection among injecting heroin users in Zadar County.

  8. Sexual identity and drug use harm among high-risk, active substance users.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clifton; Vallance, Kate; Stockwell, Tim; Macdonald, Scott; Martin, Gina; Ivsins, Andrew; Marsh, David C; Michelow, Warren; Roth, Eric; Duff, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that sexual minorities are at greater risk for illicit substance use and related harm than their heterosexual counterparts. This study examines a group of active drug users to assess whether sexual identity predicts increased risk of substance use and harm from ecstasy, ketamine, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and crack. Structured interviews were conducted with participants aged 15 years and older in Vancouver and Victoria, BC, Canada, during 2008-2012. Harm was measured with the World Health Organization's AUDIT and ASSIST tools. Regression analysis controlling for age, gender, education, housing and employment revealed lesbian, gay or bisexual individuals were significantly more likely to have used ecstasy, ketamine and alcohol in the past 30 days compared to heterosexual participants. Inadequate housing increased the likelihood of crack use among both lesbian, gay and bisexuals and heterosexuals, but with considerably higher odds for the lesbian, gay and bisexual group. Lesbian, gay and bisexual participants reported less alcohol harm but greater ecstasy and ketamine harm, the latter two categorised by the ASSIST as amphetamine and hallucinogen harms. Results suggest encouraging harm reduction among sexual minority, high-risk drug users, emphasising ecstasy and ketamine. The impact of stable housing on drug use should also be considered.

  9. Perceptions of risk in research participation among underserved minority drug users.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Ratliff, Eric A; McCurdy, Sheryl; Timpson, Sandra; Williams, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Research with underserved minority drug users is essential to quality health care and prevention. Understanding how participants perceive risk in research is necessary to inform research regulators so that research protections are neither lax, exposing participants to harm, nor overly stringent, thereby denying access to beneficial research. Data from 37 semistructured interviews of underserved, African-American crack cocaine users, collected from February to May 2006 in a large, urban setting, were analyzed using content analysis. In three hypothetical studies, participants recognized risks as relative and articulated and evaluated specific risks. Research regulators may enhance the accuracy of risk assessment in research by incorporating the views of participants. Study implications and limitations are noted. Future research on risk perception in research participation is suggested.

  10. Screening for antisocial personality disorder in drug users--a qualitative exploratory study on feasibility.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Benedikt; Haydon, Emma; Kim, Gregory; Rehm, Jürgen; El-Guebaly, Nady

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about co-occurring personality disorders in drug users is important for planning therapy and prevention. The objective of this study was to assess whether the SCID-II (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R) Screen for antisocial personality disorder was feasible and acceptable in a population of opioid users. A qualitative study on veridicality and emotional quality in responses to SCID-II Screen was carried out by personal interview in a multifunctional addiction centre. The subjects were 10 outpatient participants (six female, four male) in methadone substitution treatment. The SCID-II Screen triggered a high level of emotions. Some questions were mainly interpreted from a victim's perspective, even though the intention was the perpetrator's view. Questions were seen as sex-biased. Provision of support to deal with potential emotional problems should be supplied. Potential revision should be considered to include the female perspective in the screen.

  11. Buprenorphine: a newer drug for treating neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2012-01-01

    Neonates may be exposed to various legal and illicit substances during gestation, including cigarettes, alcohol, narcotics, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, and stimulants. Many of these substances can result in varying degrees of drug withdrawal after delivery. Polysubstance use can complicate the clinical evaluation of a newborn both in terms of assessment of withdrawal and treatment of symptoms. For the purpose of this column, the focus is on those infants with in utero narcotic exposure. The primary circumstances under which pregnant women use narcotics are illicit drug abuse, prescribed narcotic maintenance as treatment for abuse, and treatment of chronic pain conditions.

  12. Tobacco and e-cigarette use amongst illicit drug users in Australia.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Rachel; Sindicich, Natasha; Entwistle, Gavin; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Peacock, Amy; Matthews, Allison; Bruno, Raimondo; Alati, Rosa; Burns, Lucy

    2016-02-01

    To examine the rates and patterns of tobacco and e-cigarette use amongst two samples of illicit drug users in Australia. Data were obtained from the 2015 Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS) and the 2015 Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System (EDRS). These studies comprised cross-sectional samples of 888 people who inject drugs (PWID) and 763 regular psychostimulant users (RPU). Tobacco was consumed by the majority of both samples, however, use in the 6 months preceding interview was significantly higher amongst PWID (92.2%) than RPU (82.4% [OR 2.53 95% CI 1.86-3.44]). Inversely, PWID were less likely to have a history of e-cigarette use: 31.5% of PWID reported lifetime use of e-cigarettes (vs. 57.0% of RPU [OR 0.35 95% CI 0.28-0.42]) and 18.1% reported use in the 6 months preceding interview (vs. 33.7% of RPU [OR 0.44 95% CI 0.35-0.55]). PWID were more than three times as likely than RPU to report using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool (OR 3.09 95% CI 2.03-4.71), but were less likely to use e-liquids that contained nicotine (OR 0.52 95% CI 0.32-0.83). Higher levels of poly drug use, daily tobacco use, recent use of synthetic cannabinoids and employment status were found to be significantly associated with e-cigarette use. The use of e-cigarettes was relatively common amongst Australian samples of PWID and RPU. Whilst the majority of PWID reported using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool, it appears that RPU are using them for experimental or recreational purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Behaviors on drug-abuse and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases among drug users in Tianjin, China, from 2011 to 2015].

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Zhou, N; Li, J; Ning, T L; Guo, W

    2016-02-01

    To understand the change of behavioral characteristics among drug users (DUS) in Tianjin and the prevalence rates of major sexually transmitted disease infections. A series of cross-sectional surveys were used. Between April and June, 2011 to 2015, a cross-sectional survey with face to face interview, was undertaken. Interview was conducted among DUS who entered the drug rehabilitation center and blood samples were drawn to test for HIV/syphilis/HCV infections. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between the infection of major sexually transmitted diseases and drug abuse or sexual behavior. 2 000 DUS were included during the 5-year study, with the average age of the DUS as 34.5 ± 8.7. Female accounted for 17.9% and club drug (new drugs) users accounted 45.4% of the participants, with its proportion increasing over the years. Comparing to traditional drug users, club drug users showed more sexual activities with partners, but lower proportion of condom use. Prevalence rates of HIV/Syphilis and HCV were 1.3%, 11.0%, 52.0%, respectively. The prevalence of syphilis among club drug users was significantly higher than those on traditional-drug use (χ(2)=67.778,P<0.001). Data from Binary logistic regression analysis showed that club drug use (adjusted OR=1.607, 95% CI:1.191-2.170) and females (adjusted OR=5.287, 95%CI: 3.824-7.311) were associated with syphilis infection among DUS. Drug abuse behavior changed among the drug abuse in Tianjin. Proportion of club drug use continued to increase so as the risk of infected sexually transmitted diseases.

  14. Brief Intervention for Drug Users Presenting in Emergency Departments (NIDA CTN Protocol 0047: SMART-ED)

    PubMed Central

    Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Donovan, Dennis M.; Mandler, Raul N.; Perl, Harold I.; Forcehimes, Alyssa A.; Crandall, Cameron; Lindblad, Robert; Oden, Neal L.; Sharma, Gaurav; Metsch, Lisa; Lyons, Michael S.; McCormack, Ryan; Konstantopoulos, Wendy Macias; Douaihy, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    %) or the BI-B group (244/275, 89%). Hair analysis differences between groups at other time points were not significant. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this sample of drug users seeking emergency medical treatment, a relatively robust brief intervention did not improve substance use outcomes. More work is needed to determine how drug use disorders may be addressed effectively in the ED. PMID:25179753

  15. Confronting the AIDS epidemic among i.v. drug users: does ethnic culture matter?

    PubMed

    Singer, M

    1991-01-01

    The AIDS education and prevention literature contains numerous calls for the development of culturally relevant efforts to reach members of ethnic minority populations. In the AIDS literature on IV drug users (IVDUs), however, this issue finds less emphasis despite the disproportionate rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in minority IVDUs. The reason appears to be the sense in the drug field that the primary culture of the IVDU is drug culture rather than ethnic culture. This paper explores this issue in light of a review of recent research on IVDUs, ethnicity, and AIDS risk behavior. Specifically, this review covers literature on 6 topics in light of ethnic differences: changing patterns of IV drug use prevalence, AIDS prevalence among IVDUs, needle-related AIDS risk, polydrug use, sexual risk among IVDUs, and the drug subculture. Finding that ethnic culture does matter in infection patterns and risk behavior, this paper examines a typology for the analysis of discontinuities in intercultural communication and presents a framework for comparing alternative models for overcoming cultural barriers to effective AIDS education with IVDUs.

  16. Correlates of lending needles/syringes among HIV-seropositive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Metsch, Lisa R; Pereyra, Margaret; Purcell, David W; Latkin, Carl A; Malow, Robert; Gómez, Cynthia A; Latka, Mary H

    2007-11-01

    Among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs), we examined the correlates of lending needles/syringes with HIV-negative and unknown status injection partners. HIV-positive IDUs (N=738) from 4 cities in the United States who reported injection drug use with other IDUs in the past 3 months participated in an audio computer-assisted self-administered interview. Eighteen percent of study participants self-reported having lent their needles to HIV-negative or unknown status injection partners. Multivariate analyses showed that 6 variables were significantly associated with this high-risk injecting practice. Older IDUs, high school graduates, and those reporting more supportive peer norms for safer drug use were less likely to lend needles/syringes. Admission to a hospital for drug treatment in the past 6 months, having injected with >1 person in the past 3 months, and having more psychiatric symptoms were all associated with more risk. These findings underscore the need for a continued prevention focus on HIV-positive IDUs that recognizes the combination of drug use, mental health factors, and social factors that might affect this high-risk injecting practice, which could be associated with HIV and hepatitis C transmission.

  17. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte N E

    2007-10-30

    International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs) can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support); better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs); and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes). Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members); personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent); and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive). A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified.

  18. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Joanne; sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2007-01-01

    Background International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs) can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Results Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support); better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs); and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes). Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members); personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent); and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive). Conclusion A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified. PMID:17971204

  19. HIV risks among injecting drug users in Vietnam: a review of the research evidence.

    PubMed

    Do, Khoi; Minichiello, Victor; Hussain, Rafat

    2012-09-01

    Injecting drug use plays a critical role in the transmission of HIV in Vietnam. This paper provides a comprehensive review of studies on risks of HIV infection among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Vietnam. Current research evidence shows that the age at which drug initiation starts is becoming younger and the transition time between non-injecting to injecting drug use becoming shorter. The practice of needle sharing and unprotected sex was quite common among the IDUs. Although most of the IDUs generally had good knowledge of HIV transmission routes, most IDUs were not aware of their infection status. Data from a national surveillance programme shows that a third of the IDUs were HIV positive. Amongst all HIV positive cases, almost two-thirds had a history of intravenous drug use. A number of studies have identified a range of risk factors and barriers to minimize the risk of HIV infection in IDUs. This paper discusses these issues and makes recommendations for changes to HIV/AIDS policies, programme interventions as well as future research on the topic.

  20. Drug Delivery by Tattooing to Treat Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Shio, Marina Temi; Paquet, Marilene; Martel, Caroline; Bosschaerts, Tom; Stienstra, Stef; Olivier, Martin; Fortin, Anny

    2014-01-01

    This study establishes a proof-of-concept that a tattoo device can target intra-dermal drug delivery against cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). The selected drug is oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) formulated as liposomes, particles known to be prone to macrophage ingestion. We first show that treatment of cultured Leishmania-infected macrophages with OlPC-liposomes results in a direct dose-dependent killing of intracellular parasites. Based on this, in vivo efficacy is demonstrated using a 10 day tattooing-mediated treatment in mice infected with L. major and L. mexicana. In both models this regimen results in rapid clinical recovery with complete regression of skin lesions by Day 28. Parasite counts and histopathology examination confirm high treatment efficacy at the parasitic level. Low amount of drug required for tattooing combined with fast clinical recovery may have a positive impact on CL patient management. This first example of tattoo-mediated drug delivery could open to new therapeutic interventions in the treatment of skin diseases. PMID:24561704

  1. Drug delivery to captive Asian elephants - treating Goliath.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Ramiro; Hunter, Robert P

    2004-07-01

    Captive Asian elephants have been maintained in captivity by humans for over 4000 years. Despite this association, there is little published literature on the treatment of elephant diseases or methods of drug administration to these animals. Elephants in captivity are generally healthy and require few therapeutic interventions over the course of their lifetime. However, when they become acutely ill, treatment becomes a serious issue. The successful and consistent administration of therapeutics to elephants is formidable in an animal that presents significant limitations in drug delivery options. The single most important factor in administering drugs to an elephant is the animal's cooperation in accepting the medication. Working around elephants can be very dangerous and this is magnified when working around sick or injured animals where the elephant is subject to increased stress, pain, and unusual situations associated with treatment. The large body size of the Asian elephant produces a separate set of issues. In this paper, methods of drug administration and their associated limitations will be reviewed. Considerations of medicating such large animals can serve to highlight the problems and principles of treatment that are inherent in these species.

  2. Cataract occurrence in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Souza, Valéria Barreto Novais e; Moura Filho, Francisco José Rodrigues de; Souza, Fábio Gomes de Matos e; Rocha, Camila Farias; Furtado, Fernando Antônio Mendes Lopes; Gonçalves, Tiago Bessa Almeida; Vasconcelos, Karla Feitosa Ximenes

    2008-09-01

    Typical antipsychotic drugs, mainly phenothiazines, have been associated with cataract formation for over forty years. Recently, there has been a concern about atypical antipsychotic drugs' potential for inducing this lenticular pathology. Accordingly, we sought to determine the cataract rate and other ocular side effects in patients on long-term therapy with antipsychotic drugs. Eighty outpatients with DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia from two settings who met pre determined inclusion criteria were submitted to an ophthalmological evaluation for ocular abnormalities with emphasis in the lens and cornea. They were divided into two groups: group 1 (n = 52) comprised patients who had been predominantly on typical antipsychotics for at least two years and group 2 (n = 28) patients who had been predominantly on atypical antipsychotics for at least two years. Cataract was found in 26 patients (33%) with predominance of anterior capsular cataract. The cataract rate among patients from group 1 (40%) was higher than among those from group 2 (18%). Visual acuity was reduced in 21 patients (26%). No changes were observed neither in the cornea nor in the retina. Patients using antipsychotic drugs should be submitted to a periodic ophthalmological evaluation.

  3. Characterization of Occult Hepatitis B Infection Among Injecting Drug Users in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Asli, Maryam; Kandelouei, Tahmineh; Rahimyan, Koroush; Davoodbeglou, Foad; Vaezjalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and its associated risk factors, together with the molecular characterization of the virus in injecting drug users of Tehran. Patients and Methods The study consisted of 229 injecting drug users. Serum samples were collected and tested for the presence of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HBV B virus DNA was extracted from the serum samples, and a fragment of the S gene was amplified using the nested polymerase chain reaction. The genotype, subgenotypes, subtype, and S gene mutation of HBV were determined by direct sequencing. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbor-joining method. Results Sixty-four (28%) participants were HBcAb positive, 59 cases were HBcAb positive and HBsAg negative, and 5 cases were HBsAg positive. Hepatitis B DNA was found in three HBsAg-positive cases. Thirteen of 59 (22%) individuals were hepatitis B DNA positive. The phylogenetic tree of hepatitis B DNA showed the existence of genotype D. The only significant correlation was between sharing a syringe and OBI. Conclusions In comparison with the rate of HBcAb positivity reported in other Iranian studies, the rate was higher in the present study. There were a few variations, genotypes, and subtypes among the infected injecting drug users. Further investigations are needed to unravel the molecular characterization of OBI. PMID:27226802

  4. Injection Drug User Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL): Findings from a content validation study

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Anita M; Palepu, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Background Quality of life studies among injection drug users have primarily focused on health-related measures. The chaotic life-style of many injection drug users (IDUs), however, extends far beyond their health, and impacts upon social relationships, employment opportunities, housing, and day to day survival. Most current quality of life instruments do not capture the realities of people living with addictions. The Injection Drug Users' Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL) was developed to reflect the life areas of relevance to IDUs. The present study examined the content validity of the IDUQOL using judgmental methods based on subject matter experts' (SMEs) ratings of various elements of this measure (e.g., appropriateness of life areas or items, names and descriptions of life areas, instructions for administration and scoring). Methods Six SMEs were provided with a copy of the IDUQOL and its administration and scoring manual and a detailed content validation questionnaire. Two commonly used judgmental measures of inter-rater agreement, the Content Validity Index (CVI) and the Average Deviation Mean Index (ADM), were used to evaluate SMEs' agreement on ratings of IDUQOL elements. Results A total of 75 elements of the IDUQOL were examined. The CVI results showed that all elements were endorsed by the required number of SMEs or more. The ADM results showed that acceptable agreement (i.e., practical significance) was obtained for all elements but statistically significant agreement was missed for nine elements. For these elements, SMEs' feedback was examined for ways to improve the elements. Open-ended feedback also provided suggestions for other revisions to the IDUQOL. Conclusion The results of the study provided strong evidence in support of the content validity of the IDUQOL and direction for the revision of some IDUQOL elements. PMID:17663783

  5. Hepatitis C and HIV in injecting drug users in Armenia, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Berbesi-Fernández, Dedsy; Segura-Cardona, Ángela; Montoya-Vélez, Liliana; Castaño-Perez, Guillermo A

    2015-12-15

    A constant and progressive increase in the availability of heroin in Colombia in recent decades and the intravenous use  of this drug have established the need to prevent a possible epidemic of HIV and hepatitis C. This research determined the sero-prevalence of hepatitis C and HIV according to sociodemographic characteristics and risk behaviors in people who inject drugs in Armenia, Colombia. This is a cross-sectional study on 265 users captured through respondent-driven sampling after informed consent. Sero-prevalence of hepatitis C was 22.3 % [95% CI 12.3 % -23.5 %]; for HIV infection, it was 2.6 % [95% CI 0.4 to 6.0]; 67.5% reported injecting for more than two years, 35 % shared needles and syringes, and 12.4 % had used a condom during their last sexual intercourse. Users who did not purchase syringes in drugstores in the last six months are 2.7 times [95% CI 1.32 to 5.48] more likely to contract hepatitis C; daily injection frequency was higher in HIV- positive cases [OR 2.87; 95% CI 0.55 to 15.9] but nonsignificant. One fourth of respondents are infected with HIV or hepatitis C, either as a single infection or co-infection. This study identified risk practices such as sharing needles and low condom use in the last six months, worldwide documented and discussed risk factors. This research is a first step in the search for strategies to prevent the spread of HIV infection and hepatitis C in networks of injecting drug users.

  6. Hepatitis C genotype distribution and homology among geographically disparate injecting drug users in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Todd, Catherine S; Nasir, Abdul; Bradfield, Andrea; Lei, Esther; Poltavee, Kultida; Savadsuk, Hathairat; Kim, Jerome H; Scott, Paul T; de Souza, Mark; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence is high among injecting drug users in Afghanistan, but transmission dynamics are poorly understood. Samples from HCV-infected injecting drug users were sequenced to determine circulating genotypes and potential transmission linkages. Serum samples were obtained from injecting drug user participants in Hirat, Jalalabad, and Mazar-i-Sharif between 2006 and 2008 with reactive anti-HCV rapid tests. Specimens with detected HCV viremia were amplified and underwent sequence analysis. Of 113 samples evaluated, 25 samples (35.2%) were only typeable in NS5B, nine samples (12.7%) were only typeable in CE1, and 37 samples (52.1%) were genotyped in both regions. Of those with typeable HCV, all were Afghan males with a mean age of 31.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 8.0) years and mean duration of injecting of 3.9 (SD ± 4.3) years. Most reported residence outside Afghanistan in the last decade (90.1%) and prior incarceration (76.8%). HCV genotypes detected were: 1a, (35.2%, n = 25), 3a (62.0%, n = 44), and 1b (2.8%, n = 2). Cluster formation was detected in NS5B and CE1 and were generally from within the same city. All participants within clusters reported being a refugee in Iran compared to 93.5% of those outside clusters. Only 22.2% (4/11) of those within clusters had been refugees in Pakistan and these four individuals had also been refugees in Iran. Predominance of genotype 3a and the association between HCV viremia and having been a refugee in Iran potentially reflects migration between Afghanistan and Iran among IDUs from Mazar-i-Sharif and Hirat and carry implications for harm reduction programs for this migratory population.

  7. Methadone maintenance treatment and HIV risk-taking behaviour among injecting drug users in Berlin.

    PubMed

    Stark, K; Müller, R; Bienzle, U; Guggenmoos-Holzmann, I

    1996-10-01

    To determine whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is effective in reducing the levels of HIV risk-taking behaviour (borrowing and lending of injection equipment, irregular condom use) among injecting drug users (IDUs), and to identify independent predictors of the borrowing of used syringes. Cross sectional study of IDUs in MMT and not in MMT, using standardised interviews for collection of sociodemographic and behavioural data, and laboratory tests for detecting HIV antibodies. The 612 IDUs were recruited at different services for drug users such as treatment centres, walk in agencies, a hospital, and on the streets. Of all IDUs, 41% had borrowed and 34% had passed on used injection equipment in the previous six months. In univariate analysis, IDUs receiving MMT had injected less frequently and were significantly less likely to borrow and lend syringes. In logistic regression analysis, MMT was protective against the borrowing of syringes (adjusted odds ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.2, 0.8), but not against syringe lending nor against sexual risk behaviour (i.e., numbers of sex partners, lack of condom use). Important independent predictors of the borrowing of syringes were injecting drug use in prison, use of sedatives, and sex with another IDU in the previous six months. MMT may play a significant role in reducing the levels of borrowing of syringes among IDUs. However, additional prevention measures are needed which should specifically address sexual risk behaviour and target subgroups of IDUs with high levels of needle sharing, such as IDUs who have been in prison and and those who are sedative users.

  8. Intentional Medication Non-Adherence Due to Interactive Toxicity Beliefs among HIV Positive Active Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Kalichman, Moira O.; Cherry, Charsey; Hoyt, Ginger; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cin