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Sample records for drug-resistant hiv-1 infection

  1. Transmitted drug resistance in nonsubtype B HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Philip A; Kantor, Rami

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 nonsubtype B variants account for the majority of HIV infections worldwide. Drug resistance in individuals who have never undergone antiretroviral therapy can lead to early failure and limited treatment options and, therefore, is an important concern. Evaluation of reported transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is challenging owing to varying definitions and study designs, and is further complicated by HIV-1 subtype diversity. In this article, we discuss the importance of various mutation lists for TDR definition, summarize TDR in nonsubtype B HIV-1 and highlight TDR reporting and interpreting challenges in the context of HIV-1 diversity. When examined carefully, TDR in HIV-1 non-B protease and reverse transcriptase is still relatively low in most regions. Whether it will increase with time and therapy access, as observed in subtype-B-predominant regions, remains to be determined. PMID:20161523

  2. Sentinel Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance, Acute Infection and Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; McFarland, Willi; Louie, Brian; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Philip, Susan S.; Grant, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection. Methodology/Principal Findings A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868) were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA). HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36). Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%). Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001), unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001), sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02), and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03). Conclusions New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first

  3. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Delaugerre, Constance; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stephane; Warszawski, Josiane; Cornet, Dorine; Dollfus, Catherine; Schneider, Veronique; Burgard, Marianne; Faye, Albert; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tubiana, Roland; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%): drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available) and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8) suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10) and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8) suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%), drug resistance was archived in

  4. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Ramirez, Luis E.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Roberto; Harris, D. Robert; Hazra, Rohan

    2010-01-01

    Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV) naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study). Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2%) ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent. PMID:22331986

  5. Diminished representation of HIV-1 variants containing select drug resistance-conferring mutations in primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan; Brenner, Bluma; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Moisi, Daniela; Rosberger, Zeev; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark A

    2004-12-15

    This study compared the incidence of HIV-1 variants harboring mutations conferring resistance to thymidine analogues, ie, thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNMs), lamivudine (3TC) (ie, M184V), and protease inhibitors (PIs) acquired in primary HIV infection (PHI) (n = 59) to their observed prevalence in a corresponding potential transmitter (PT) population of persons harboring resistant infections (n = 380). Both of these populations in the context of this cohort analysis possessed similar demographics. Whereas the frequencies of observed TAMs, NNMs, M184V, and protease-associated mutations (PRAMs) were similar in the PT groups, the prevalence of M184V and major PI mutations were significantly lower in the PHI group (PHI/PT ratios of 0.14 and 0.39, respectively). There was a decreased prevalence in the PHI population of resistant viruses co-expressing NNMs or TAMs with M184V compared with viruses that harbored NNMs or TAMs in the absence of M184V (P < 0.0001). It was also observed that individuals in the PT subgroups who harbored RT mutations or PRAMs with M184V had lower levels of plasma viremia than individuals who lacked M184V (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that both decreased viremia and viral fitness in the case of M184V-containing HIV-1 variants may impact on viral transmissibility.

  6. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  7. Comparisons of Primary HIV-1 Drug Resistance between Recent and Chronic HIV-1 Infection within a Sub-Regional Cohort of Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Ditangco, Rossana; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Li, Patrick C. K.; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Sohn, Annette H.; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) has raised concerns after rapid global antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up. There are limited data on the epidemiology of primary HIVDR in resource-limited settings in Asia. We aimed to determine the prevalence and compare the distribution of HIVDR in a cohort of ART-naïve Asian patients with recent and chronic HIV-1 infection. Methods Multicenter prospective study was conducted in ART-naïve patients between 2007 and 2010. Resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) were assessed using the World Health Organization 2009 list for surveillance of primary HIVDR. Results A total of 458 patients with recent and 1,340 patients with chronic HIV-1 infection were included in the analysis. The overall prevalence of primary HIVDR was 4.6%. Recently infected patients had a higher prevalence of primary HIVDR (6.1% vs. 4.0%, p = 0.065) and frequencies of RAMs to protease inhibitors (PIs; 3.9% vs. 1.0%, p<0.001). Among those with recent infection, the most common RAMs to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) were M184I/V and T215D/E/F/I/S/Y (1.1%), to non-NRTIs was Y181C (1.3%), and to PIs was M46I (1.5%). Of patients with chronic infection, T215D/E/F/I/S/Y (0.8%; NRTI), Y181C (0.5%; non-NRTI), and M46I (0.4%; PI) were the most common RAMs. K70R (p = 0.016) and M46I (p = 0.026) were found more frequently among recently infected patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis in patients with chronic infection, heterosexual contact as a risk factor for HIV-1 infection was less likely to be associated with primary HIVDR compared to other risk categories (odds ratio 0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.20–0.59, p<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of primary HIVDR was higher among patients with recent than chronic HIV-1 infection in our cohort, but of borderline statistical significance. Chronically infected patients with non-heterosexual risks for HIV were more likely to have

  8. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  9. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran.

    PubMed

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Mansouri, Seyed Ali; Sadeghi, Leila; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  10. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Recently Infected Individuals at Men Who Have Sex with Men Sentinel Surveillance Points in Hebei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinli; Kang, Xianjiang; Chen, Suliang; Zhao, Hongru; Liu, Yongjian; Zhao, Cuiying; Zhang, Yuqi; Li, Jingyun; Cui, Ze; Wang, Xianfeng

    2015-10-01

    For this study, 50 HIV-1 plasma samples of recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) were amplified and sequenced. Multiple subtypes were identified by phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 gag, env, and pol gene regions, including CRF01_AE (56.0%), CRF07_BC (30.0%), subtype B (12.0%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 6.0%). CRF01_AE was the most frequent genotype in the epidemic. Three recombination patterns of URFs were identified: 01BC, 01B, and 01C. The rate of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutation (M46L) was 2.08% (1/48). URFs and TDR first identified in this study suggest that HIV-1 prevalence is more and more complicated, and HIV-1 drug-resistant strains have begun to spread among at risk populations in Hebei. Our findings can provide vital information for an efficient surveillance system and strategic HIV prevention and control measures in China by revealing the evolutionary status and HIV-1 TDR of HIV-1 strains among recently infected MSM in Hebei Province.

  11. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Recently Infected Individuals at Men Who Have Sex with Men Sentinel Surveillance Points in Hebei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinli; Kang, Xianjiang; Chen, Suliang; Zhao, Hongru; Liu, Yongjian; Zhao, Cuiying; Zhang, Yuqi; Li, Jingyun; Cui, Ze; Wang, Xianfeng

    2015-10-01

    For this study, 50 HIV-1 plasma samples of recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) were amplified and sequenced. Multiple subtypes were identified by phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 gag, env, and pol gene regions, including CRF01_AE (56.0%), CRF07_BC (30.0%), subtype B (12.0%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 6.0%). CRF01_AE was the most frequent genotype in the epidemic. Three recombination patterns of URFs were identified: 01BC, 01B, and 01C. The rate of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutation (M46L) was 2.08% (1/48). URFs and TDR first identified in this study suggest that HIV-1 prevalence is more and more complicated, and HIV-1 drug-resistant strains have begun to spread among at risk populations in Hebei. Our findings can provide vital information for an efficient surveillance system and strategic HIV prevention and control measures in China by revealing the evolutionary status and HIV-1 TDR of HIV-1 strains among recently infected MSM in Hebei Province. PMID:26200883

  12. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistance Mutations in Chronically Infected Individuals Receiving or Naïve to HAART in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Sherri T.; Viswanath, Ragupathy; Zhao, Jiangqin; Kinge, Thompson; Anyangwe, Christopher; Tinyami, Erick T.; Haldar, Bijayesh; Powell, Rebecca L.R.; Jarido, Veronica; Hewlett, Indira K.; Nyambi, Phillipe N.

    2010-01-01

    The most common first-line, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) received by individuals infected with HIV-1 in Cameroon is the combination therapy Triomune, comprised of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and one non-NRTI (NNRTI). To examine the efficacy of these drugs in Cameroon, where diverse non-B HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant viruses predominate, the reverse transcriptase (RT) viral sequences in patient plasma were analyzed for the presence of mutations that confer drug resistance. Forty-nine HIV-1-positive individuals were randomly selected from those receiving care in HIV/AIDS outpatient clinics in the South-West and North-West Regions of Cameroon. Among the 28 patients receiving HAART, 39% (11/28) had resistance to NRTIs, and 46% (13/28) to NNRTIs after a median of 12 months from the start of therapy. Among those with drug-resistance mutations, there was a median of 14 months from the start of HAART, versus 9 months for those without; no difference was observed in the average viral load (10,997 copies/ml vs. 8,056 copies/ml). In contrast, drug-naïve individuals had a significantly higher average viral load (27,929 copies/ml) than those receiving HAART (9,527 copies/ml). Strikingly, among the 21 drug-naïve individuals, 24% harbored viruses with drug-resistance mutations, suggesting that HIV-1 drug-resistant variants are being transmitted in Cameroon. Given the high frequency of resistance mutations among those on first-line HAART, coupled with the high prevalence of HIV-1 variants with drug-resistance mutations among drug-naïve individuals, this study emphasizes the need for extensive monitoring of resistance mutations and the introduction of a second-line HAART strategy in Cameroon. PMID:20029816

  13. HIV-1 infection and pregnancy in young women in Brazil: socioeconomic and drug resistance profiles in a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Yanna Andressa Ramos; Reis, Mônica Nogueira Guarda; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe socioeconomic and antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance profiles among young pregnant women infected with HIV-1. Setting A public health antenatal programme responsible for screening ∼90 000 pregnant women per year for nine different infectious diseases in Central Western Brazil. Participants 96 young pregnant women (15–24 years) infected with HIV-1. Primary and secondary outcome measures Standard interviews and blood samples were taken at the time of recruitment, at the first medical appointment after confirmation of diagnosis of HIV-1 infection, and before ARV prophylaxis initiation. Clinical and laboratory data were retrieved from medical files. HIV-1 pol gene sequences (entire protease/PR, partial reverse transcriptase/RT) were obtained from plasma RNA. ARV resistance mutations (CPR/Stanford HIV-1; International AIDS Society-USA databases) were identified. Results The median age was 21 years; most reported <8 years education; 73% were recently diagnosed. Approximately 20% (19/96) presented late for antenatal care (after 26 gestational weeks), while 49% reported ≥2 previous pregnancies. Possible heterosexual transmission by an HIV-1 infected partner (17%) and commercial sex work (2%) were reported. The median of CD4 cell count was 526 cells/mm3; the median viral load was: 10 056 copies/mL in ARV-naïve (48/96) patients and 5881 copies/mL in ARV-exposed (48/96) patients. Two probable seroconversion cases during pregnancy were identified in adolescents. One mother-to-child transmission case (1.0%) was observed. Transmitted drug resistance among ARV-naïve patients was 9.3% (CI 95% 3.3% to 19.6%); secondary drug resistance among ARV-exposed patients was 12.5% (CI 95% 4.7% to 25.6%). Conclusions Despite high access to antenatal care, the low socioeconomic-educational profiles seen in these young HIV-1-infected women highlight the necessity of improved public health educational and preventive strategies regarding HIV infection

  14. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    PubMed

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented.

  15. Profile of the HIV Epidemic in Cape Verde: Molecular Epidemiology and Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected Patients from Distinct Islands of the Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M.; Guimarães, Monick L.; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010–2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1–75) and 47 (IQR = 12–84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be

  16. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    PubMed

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented

  17. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  18. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  19. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D M; Mellors, John W; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2015-12-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  20. Global epidemiology of drug resistance after failure of WHO recommended first-line regimens for adult HIV-1 infection: a multicentre retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for controlling HIV-1 infection through wide-scale treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Potent tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-containing regimens are increasingly used to treat and prevent HIV, although few data exist for frequency and risk factors of acquired drug resistance in regions hardest hit by the HIV pandemic. We aimed to do a global assessment of drug resistance after virological failure with first-line tenofovir-containing ART. Methods The TenoRes collaboration comprises adult HIV treatment cohorts and clinical trials of HIV drug resistance testing in Europe, Latin and North America, sub-Saharan Africa, and Asia. We extracted and harmonised data for patients undergoing genotypic resistance testing after virological failure with a first-line regimen containing tenofovir plus a cytosine analogue (lamivudine or emtricitabine) plus a non-nucleotide reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI; efavirenz or nevirapine). We used an individual participant-level meta-analysis and multiple logistic regression to identify covariates associated with drug resistance. Our primary outcome was tenofovir resistance, defined as presence of K65R/N or K70E/G/Q mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene. Findings We included 1926 patients from 36 countries with treatment failure between 1998 and 2015. Prevalence of tenofovir resistance was highest in sub-Saharan Africa (370/654 [57%]). Pre-ART CD4 cell count was the covariate most strongly associated with the development of tenofovir resistance (odds ratio [OR] 1·50, 95% CI 1·27–1·77 for CD4 cell count <100 cells per μL). Use of lamivudine versus emtricitabine increased the risk of tenofovir resistance across regions (OR 1·48, 95% CI 1·20–1·82). Of 700 individuals with tenofovir resistance, 578 (83%) had cytosine analogue resistance (M184V/I mutation), 543 (78%) had major NNRTI resistance, and 457 (65%) had both. The mean plasma

  1. Transmitted Drug Resistance and Antiretroviral Treatment Outcomes in Non-Subtype B HIV1- Infected Patients in South East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Lee, Man Po; Sirisanthana, Thira; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Mustafa, Mahiran; Ditangco, Rossana; Merati, Tuti; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Singtoroj, Thida; Kantor, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Background We compared treatment outcomes of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in patients on fully or partially sensitive drug regimens. Methods Factors associated with survival and failure were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards and discrete time conditional logistic models. Results TDR, found in 60/1471 (4.1%) Asian treatment naïve patients, was one of the significant predictors of failure. Patients with TDR to >1 drug in their regimen were >3 times as likely to fail compared to no TDR. Conclusion TDR was associated with failure in the context of non-fully sensitive regimens. Efforts are needed to incorporate resistance testing into national treatment programs. PMID:24413039

  2. Differential Persistence of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutation Classes

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Sucupira, Maria C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Hartogensis, Wendy; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Kallas, Esper G.; Janini, Luiz M.; Liegler, Teri; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deeks, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance (TDR) mutations can become replaced over time by emerging wild-type viral variants with improved fitness. The impact of class-specific mutations on this rate of mutation replacement is uncertain. Methods. We studied participants with acute and/or early HIV infection and TDR in 2 cohorts (San Francisco, California, and São Paulo, Brazil). We followed baseline mutations longitudinally and compared replacement rates between mutation classes with use of a parametric proportional hazards model. Results. Among 75 individuals with 195 TDR mutations, M184V/I became undetectable markedly faster than did nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations (hazard ratio, 77.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7–408.2; P < .0001), while protease inhibitor and NNRTI replacement rates were similar. Higher plasma HIV-1 RNA level predicted faster mutation replacement, but this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.71 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, .90–3.25 log10 copies/mL; P = .11). We found substantial person-to-person variability in mutation replacement rates not accounted for by viral load or mutation class (P < .0001). Conclusions. The rapid replacement of M184V/I mutations is consistent with known fitness costs. The long-term persistence of NNRTI and protease inhibitor mutations suggests a risk for person-to-person propagation. Host and/or viral factors not accounted for by viral load or mutation class are likely influencing mutation replacement and warrant further study. PMID:21451005

  3. Persistence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T

    2013-11-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models.

  4. Determination of drug resistance and virus typology in HIV-1-positive pediatric patients in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yoldaş, Ozlem; Ağaçfidan, Ali; Lübke, Nadine; Somer, Ayper; Hançerli, Selda; Verheyen, Jens; Kaiser, Rolf; Akgül, Baki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of drug resistance of HIV-1 in pediatric patients from Istanbul, Turkey. Genotypic drug resistance testing revealed transmission of drug resistance from mother to child in 20%. Due to rising numbers of children with HIV-1, baseline resistance testing is recommended for Turkey.

  5. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Ben; de Oliveira, Tulio; Seebregts, Chris; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS) which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  6. Trends in Transmission of Drug Resistance and Prevalence of Non-B Subtypes in Patients with Acute or Recent HIV-1 Infection in Barcelona in the Last 16 Years (1997-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, David; Parera, Marta; López-Diéguez, María; Romero, Anabel; Agüero, Fernando; Marcos, María Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Zamora, Laura; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Gatell, José María; Pumarola, Tomás; Miró, José María

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and non-B subtypes in patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection in Barcelona during the period 1997-2012. Methods Patients from the “Hospital Clínic Primary HIV-1 Infection Cohort” with a genotyping test performed within 180 days of infection were included. The 2009 WHO List of Mutations for Surveillance of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance was used for estimating the prevalence of TDR and phylogenetic analysis for subtype determination. Results 189 patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection were analyzed in 4 time periods (1997-2000, n=28; 2001-4, n=42; 2005-8, n=55 and 2009-12, n=64). The proportion of patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection with respect to the total of newly HIV-diagnosed patients in our center increased over the time and was 2.18%, 3.82%, 4.15% and 4.55% for the 4 periods, respectively (p=0.005). The global prevalence of TDR was 9%, or 17.9%, 9.5%, 3.6% and 9.4% by study period (p=0.2). The increase in the last period was driven by protease-inhibitor and nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitor resistance mutations while non-nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase inhibitor TDR and TDR of more than one family decreased. The overall prevalence of non-B subtypes was 11.1%, or 0%, 4.8%, 9.1% and 20.3 by study period (p=0.01). B/F recombinants, B/G recombinants and subtype F emerged in the last period. We also noticed an increase in the number of immigrant patients (p=0.052). The proportion of men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) among patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection increased over the time (p=0.04). Conclusions The overall prevalence of TDR in patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection in Barcelona was 9%, and it has stayed relatively stable in recent years. Non-B subtypes and immigrants proportions progressively increased. PMID:26039689

  7. HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Newly Diagnosed Antiretroviral-Naive Patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Sargin, Fatma; Inan, Dilara; Sevgi, Dilek Y; Celikbas, Aysel K; Yasar, Kadriye; Kaptan, Figen; Kutlu, Selda; Fisgin, Nuriye T; Inci, Ayse; Ceran, Nurgul; Karaoglan, Ilkay; Cagatay, Atahan; Celen, Mustafa K; Koruk, Suda T; Ceylan, Bahadir; Yildirmak, Taner; Akalın, Halis; Korten, Volkan; Willke, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication is rapid and highly error-prone. Transmission of a drug-resistant HIV-1 strain is possible and occurs within the HIV-1-infected population. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs) in 1,306 newly diagnosed untreated HIV-1-infected patients from 21 cities across six regions of Turkey between 2010 and 2015. TDRMs were identified according to the criteria provided by the World Health Organization's 2009 list of surveillance drug resistance mutations. The HIV-1 TDRM prevalence was 10.1% (133/1,306) in Turkey. Primary drug resistance mutations (K65R, M184V) and thymidine analogue-associated mutations (TAMs) were evaluated together as nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutations. NRTI TDRMs were found in 8.1% (107/1,306) of patients. However, TAMs were divided into three categories and M41L, L210W, and T215Y mutations were found for TAM1 in 97 (7.4%) patients, D67N, K70R, K219E/Q/N/R, T215F, and T215C/D/S mutations were detected for TAM2 in 52 (3.9%) patients, and M41L + K219N and M41L + T215C/D/S mutations were detected for the TAM1 + TAM2 profile in 22 (1.7%) patients, respectively. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated TDRMs were detected in 3.3% (44/1,306) of patients (L100I, K101E/P, K103N/S, V179F, Y188H/L/M, Y181I/C, and G190A/E/S) and TDRMs to protease inhibitors were detected in 2.3% (30/1,306) of patients (M46L, I50V, I54V, Q58E, L76V, V82A/C/L/T, N83D, I84V, and L90M). In conclusion, long-term and large-scale monitoring of regional levels of HIV-1 TDRMs informs treatment guidelines and provides feedback on the success of HIV-1 prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:26414663

  8. Evolving patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in Poland in the years 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Stańczak, Grzegorz P; Stańczak, Janusz J; Marczyńska, Magdalena; Firlag-Burkacka, Ewa; Wiercińska-Drapało, Alicja; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena; Jabłonowska, Elzbieta; Małolepsza, Ewa; Dyda, Tomasz; Zabek, Piotr; Horban, Andrzej

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the rate of transmission of drug resistant human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) variants among therapy-naïve HIV positive patients in Poland in the year 2008, to compare the data with the results from the years 2000 to 2007 and to monitor patterns of HIV-1 subtypes present in Polish population and their evolution. Complete protease and part of reverse transcriptase regions were sequenced from the sera of patients directed to the laboratory for drug resistance testing. The Stanford's HIVdb program was used for the interpretation of results and subtyping. The variants scoring at least "intermediate resistance" for at least one drug were considered as resistant. The results obtained were compared to those obtained in the years 2000-2007. A total of 95 patients were enrolled in the 2008 study. Homosexual transmission of infection was documented in more than 55% of all cases. The overall prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was 5.3% (3.9% in 2007, 5.8% in 2006, and 14.1% in the years 2002-2005). The study from the years 2000 to 2001 revealed 28.7% prevalence. Preliminary analysis of the first half of 2009 shows the ratio of 7.8%. In four (4.2%) cases drug resistance was associated with protease inhibitors class, in one case (1.1%) with resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors class. In four cases (4.2%) non-B subtype was identified (C, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG). An increase of percentage of drug resistant mutants-from 3.9% (2007) to 5.3% (2008)-was recognized. In this study, TDR was limited to single classes of antiretroviral drugs. HIV-1 subtype B prevails in Poland. PMID:20513098

  9. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  10. Declining prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in antiretroviral treatment-exposed individuals in Western Europe.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Andrea; Dunn, David; Zazzi, Maurizio; Camacho, Ricardo; Torti, Carlo; Fanti, Iuri; Kaiser, Rolf; Sönnerborg, Anders; Codoñer, Francisco M; Van Laethem, Kristel; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Bansi, Loveleen; Ghisetti, Valeria; van de Vijver, David A M C; Asboe, David; Prosperi, Mattia C F; Di Giambenedetto, Simona

    2013-04-15

    HIV-1 drug resistance represents a major obstacle to infection and disease control. This retrospective study analyzes trends and determinants of resistance in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-exposed individuals across 7 countries in Europe. Of 20 323 cases, 80% carried at least one resistance mutation: these declined from 81% in 1997 to 71% in 2008. Predicted extensive 3-class resistance was rare (3.2% considering the cumulative genotype) and peaked at 4.5% in 2005, decreasing thereafter. The proportion of cases exhausting available drug options dropped from 32% in 2000 to 1% in 2008. Reduced risk of resistance over calendar years was confirmed by multivariable analysis.

  11. Short communication: Prevalence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Paul; Charpentier, Charlotte; Visseaux, Benoit; Nuta, Cecilia; Adu, Eric; Chapplain, Jean-Marc; Baysah, Maima; Walters-Doe, Sylvia; Tattevin, Pierre; Peytavin, Gilles; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Descamps, Diane

    2014-09-01

    No data on HIV-transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are available in Liberia in which the HIV prevalence in the general population is estimated at 1.5%. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of TDR in HIV-1 from recently diagnosed and untreated patients living in Monrovia, Liberia. The study was performed in the John F. Kennedy Medical Center and in the Redemption Hospital, both located in Monrovia. All newly HIV-1 diagnosed patients attending voluntary counseling testing centers and antiretroviral therapy naive were consecutively included. Protease and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions sequencing was performed using the ANRS procedures (www.hivfrenchresistance.org). Drug resistance mutations (DRM) were identified according to the 2009 updated WHO surveillance DRM list. Among the 116 HIV-1-infected patients enrolled in the study, 85 (73%) were women. Protease and RT sequencing was successful in 109 (94%) and 102 (88%) samples, respectively. Seventy-five (66%) patients were infected with CRF02_AG. One DRM was observed in six samples, leading to a TDR prevalence of 5.9% (CI 95%=1.7-10.1). DRM were observed in two patients (2.0%; CI 95%=0.0-4.7), four patients (3.9%; CI 95%=0.1-7.7), and one patient (0.9%; CI 95%=0.0-2.7) for nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTI), non-NRTI (NNRTI), and protease inhibitors, respectively. Overall, one patient exhibited dual class-resistant viruses, harboring NRTI and NNRTI resistance mutations (1.0%; CI 95%=0.0-2.9). This first survey study in Liberia reported a TDR prevalence of 5.9%, classified as moderate according to the WHO criteria, indicating that further surveillance is warranted to follow the level and evolution of TDR prevalence in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients. PMID:24946849

  12. Multiple drug resistant mechanisms against darunavir, amprenavir, and nelfinavir of HIV-1 PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Xiu, Zhilong

    2013-02-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is infecting more humans and is expanding faster in the world. The illness interferes with the immune system, making people with AIDS much more likely to get infections, including opportunistic infections and tumors that do not affect people with working immune systems. HIV-1 PR is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. It is, therefore, necessary to develop some inhibitors against HIV-1 PR. In this work, we executed molecular dynamics (MDs) simulation of HIV-1 PR with drugs darunavir (DRV), amprenavir (APV), nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the resistant mechanism of L10I, G48V, I54V, and L90M mutations of this PR, aiming at designing promising drugs. The comparative analysis suggests that the existences of dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at P1' subsite, 4-aminophenylsulfonamide at P2' subsite, and bis-tetrahydrofuranylurethane at P2 subsite are helpful for maintaining the high affinity of the inhibitor for the protease and exhibiting high potency against multiple drug resistance (MDR) mutant protease.

  13. Evaluation of a Cost Effective In-House Method for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping Using Plasma Samples

    PubMed Central

    Chaturbhuj, Devidas N.; Nirmalkar, Amit P.; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Tripathy, Srikanth P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Validation of a cost effective in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping using plasma samples. Design The validation includes the establishment of analytical performance characteristics such as accuracy, reproducibility, precision and sensitivity. Methods The accuracy was assessed by comparing 26 paired Virological Quality Assessment (VQA) proficiency testing panel sequences generated by in-house and ViroSeq Genotyping System 2.0 (Celera Diagnostics, US) as a gold standard. The reproducibility and precision were carried out on five samples with five replicates representing multiple HIV-1 subtypes (A, B, C) and resistance patterns. The amplification sensitivity was evaluated on HIV-1 positive plasma samples (n = 88) with known viral loads ranges from 1000–1.8 million RNA copies/ml. Results Comparison of the nucleotide sequences generated by ViroSeq and in-house method showed 99.41±0.46 and 99.68±0.35% mean nucleotide and amino acid identity respectively. Out of 135 Stanford HIVdb listed HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, partial discordance was observed at 15 positions and complete discordance was absent. The reproducibility and precision study showed high nucleotide sequence identities i.e. 99.88±0.10 and 99.82±0.20 respectively. The in-house method showed 100% analytical sensitivity on the samples with HIV-1 viral load >1000 RNA copies/ml. The cost of running the in-house method is only 50% of that for ViroSeq method (112$ vs 300$), thus making it cost effective. Conclusions The validated cost effective in-house method may be used to collect surveillance data on the emergence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance in resource limited countries. Moreover, the wide applications of a cost effective and validated in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance testing will facilitate the decision making for the appropriate management of HIV infected patients. PMID:24533056

  14. HIV-1 Diversity, Transmission Dynamics and Primary Drug Resistance in Angola

    PubMed Central

    Bártolo, Inês; Zakovic, Suzana; Martin, Francisco; Palladino, Claudia; Carvalho, Patrícia; Camacho, Ricardo; Thamm, Sven; Clemente, Sofia; Taveira, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess HIV-1 diversity, transmission dynamics and prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in Angola, five years after ART scale-up. Methods Population sequencing of the pol gene was performed on 139 plasma samples collected in 2009 from drug-naive HIV-1 infected individuals living in Luanda. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using phylogenetic analysis. Drug resistance mutations were identified using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool (CPR). Transmission networks were determined using phylogenetic analysis of all Angolan sequences present in the databases. Evolutionary trends were determined by comparison with a similar survey performed in 2001. Results 47.1% of the viruses were pure subtypes (all except B), 47.1% were recombinants and 5.8% were untypable. The prevalence of subtype A decreased significantly from 2001 to 2009 (40.0% to 10.8%, P = 0.0019) while the prevalence of unique recombinant forms (URFs) increased>2-fold (40.0% to 83.1%, P<0.0001). The most frequent URFs comprised untypable sequences with subtypes H (U/H, n = 7, 10.8%), A (U/A, n = 6, 9.2%) and G (G/U, n = 4, 6.2%). Newly identified U/H recombinants formed a highly supported monophyletic cluster suggesting a local and common origin. TDR mutation K103N was found in one (0.7%) patient (1.6% in 2001). Out of the 364 sequences sampled for transmission network analysis, 130 (35.7%) were part of a transmission network. Forty eight transmission clusters were identified; the majority (56.3%) comprised sequences sampled in 2008–2010 in Luanda which is consistent with a locally fuelled epidemic. Very low genetic distance was found in 27 transmission pairs sampled in the same year, suggesting recent transmission events. Conclusions Transmission of drug resistant strains was still negligible in Luanda in 2009, five years after the scale-up of ART. The dominance of small and recent transmission clusters and the emergence of new URFs are consistent with a rising

  15. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  16. Prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among Spanish prison inmates.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, J; Sáiz de la Hoya, P; Portilla, J; Marco, A; Sánchez-Payá, J; Moreno, S

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the prevalence of HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations among HIV-1-infected prison inmates in Spain. Treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients with an HIV RNA viral load of >/=2,000 copies/ml were included. To ensure that the study population was representative of the entire HIV-infected Spanish inmate population, a two-stage conglomerate for selection of the sample was used. In the first stage, 15 prisons were randomly selected, and in the second stage, 38 patients (30 treatment-experienced and 8 treatment-naive) per centre were randomly selected. Genotyping was performed by automatic sequencing. Resistance testing was performed on viral strains from 184 inmates from 12 prisons. Valid sequences were obtained from 133 inmates (90 treatment-experienced and 43 treatment-naive inmates). Most (92.5%) were men and had acquired HIV infection by intravenous drug use (91%); their mean age was 35 years. One or more key resistance mutations were detected in 5 (11.6%) treatment-naive and in 35 (38.6%) treatment-experienced patients. Among treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients, resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was found in 3 (6.9%) and in 20 (22.2%) patients, respectively, resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in 3 (6.9%) and in 21 (23.3%) patients, and resistance to protease inhibitors in 3 (6.9%) and in 14 (15.5%) patients. Multidrug resistance was detected in 1 of the 43 (2.3%) treatment-naive patients. These findings support the use of resistance testing in HIV-infected inmates who must begin antiretroviral therapy, given the high rate of primary resistance to drugs frequently included in the initial treatment regimens. PMID:17043836

  17. Decomposing the energetic impact of drug-resistant mutations: the example of HIV-1 protease-DRV binding.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yufeng; Schiffer, Celia

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is a major drug target for AIDS therapy. With the appearance of drug-resistant HIV-1 protease variants, understanding the mechanism of drug resistance becomes critical for rational drug design. Computational methods can provide more details about inhibitor-protease binding than crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. The latest FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor is Darunavir (DRV). Herein, each DRV atom is evaluated by free energy component analysis for its contribution to the binding affinity with wild-type protease and ACT, a drug-resistant variant. This information can contribute to the rational design of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  18. Prevalence of Drug Resistance and Associated Mutations in a Population of HIV-1(+) Puerto Ricans: 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Torres, Lycely Del C; De La Rosa, Alexandra; Cumba, Luz; Boukli, Nawal; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Cubano, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    This is a continuation of our efforts to maintain a record of the evolution of HIV-1 infection in Puerto Rico by monitoring the expression levels of antiretroviral drug-resistance-associated mutations. Samples from 2,500 patients from 2006-2010 were analyzed using the TruGene HIV-1 genotyping kit and the OpenGene DNA sequencing system. Results show that 58.8% of males and 65.3% of females had HIV-1 with resistance to at least one medication. The average number of HIV mutations was 6.0 in males and 6.1 in females. Statistically significant differences between men and women were recorded in the levels of HIV-1 expressed mutations and antiretroviral drug resistance. The most prevalent antiretroviral medication resistance shifted from zalcitabine to nevirapine and efavirenz in the five-year period. M184V and L63P were the dominant mutations for the reverse transcriptase and the protease genes, respectively, but an increase in the incidence of minority mutations was observed.

  19. Prevalence of Drug Resistance and Associated Mutations in a Population of HIV-1+ Puerto Ricans: 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda-Torres, Lycely del C.; De La Rosa, Alexandra; Cumba, Luz; Boukli, Nawal; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Cubano, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a continuation of our efforts to maintain a record of the evolution of HIV-1 infection in Puerto Rico by monitoring the expression levels of antiretroviral drug-resistance-associated mutations. Samples from 2,500 patients from 2006–2010 were analyzed using the TruGene HIV-1 genotyping kit and the OpenGene DNA sequencing system. Results show that 58.8% of males and 65.3% of females had HIV-1 with resistance to at least one medication. The average number of HIV mutations was 6.0 in males and 6.1 in females. Statistically significant differences between men and women were recorded in the levels of HIV-1 expressed mutations and antiretroviral drug resistance. The most prevalent antiretroviral medication resistance shifted from zalcitabine to nevirapine and efavirenz in the five-year period. M184V and L63P were the dominant mutations for the reverse transcriptase and the protease genes, respectively, but an increase in the incidence of minority mutations was observed. PMID:22593823

  20. Drug Resistance Mutations Alter Dynamics of Inhibitor-Bound HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yufeng; Myint, Wazo; Paulsen, Janet L; Schiffer, Celia A; Ishima, Rieko; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese

    2014-08-12

    Under the selective pressure of therapy, HIV-1 protease mutants resistant to inhibitors evolve to confer drug resistance. Such mutations can impact both the dynamics and structures of the bound and unbound forms of the enzyme. Flap+ is a multidrug-resistant variant of HIV-1 protease with a combination of primary and secondary resistance mutations (L10I, G48V, I54V, V82A) and a strikingly altered thermodynamic profile for darunavir (DRV) binding relative to the wild-type protease. We elucidated the impact of these mutations on protein dynamics in the DRV-bound state using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR relaxation experiments. Both methods concur in that the conformational ensemble and dynamics of protease are impacted by the drug resistance mutations in Flap+ variant. Surprisingly this change in ensemble dynamics is different from that observed in the unliganded form of the same variant (Cai, Y. et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 3452-3462). Our comparative analysis of both inhibitor-free and bound states presents a comprehensive picture of the altered dynamics in drug-resistant mutant HIV-1 protease and underlies the importance of incorporating dynamic analysis of the whole system, including the unliganded state, into revealing drug resistance mechanisms. PMID:25136270

  1. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  2. Prevalence of and Viral Outcomes Associated with Primary HIV-1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Buskin, SE; Zhang, S; Thibault, CS

    2012-01-01

    Primary, or transmitted, HIV antiretroviral resistance is an ongoing concern despite continuing development of new antiretroviral therapies. We examined HIV surveillance data, including both patient demographic characteristics and laboratory data, combined with HIV genotypic test results to evaluate the comprehensiveness of drug resistance surveillance, prevalence of primary drug resistance, and impact, if any, of primary resistance on population-based virological outcomes. The King County, WA Variant, Atypical, and Resistant HIV Surveillance (VARHS) system increased coverage of eligible genotypic testing – within three months of an HIV diagnosis among antiretroviral naïve individuals -- from – 15% in 2003 to 69% in 2010. VARHS under-represented females, Blacks, Native Americans, and injection drug users. Primary drug resistance was more common among males, individuals aged 20 – 29 years, men who had sex with men, and individuals with an initial CD4+ lymphocyte count of 200 cells/µL and higher. High level resistance to two or three antiretroviral classes declined over time. Over 90% of sequences were HIV-1 subtype B. The proportion of individuals with a most recent viral load (closest to April 2011) that was undetectable (<50 copies/mL) was not statistically significantly associated with primary drug resistance. This was true for both number and type of antiretroviral drug class; although small numbers of specimens with drug resistance may have limited our statistical power. In summary, although we found disparities in testing coverage and prevalence of drug resistance, we were unable to detect a significantly deleterious impact of primary drug resistance based on a most recent viral load. PMID:23049668

  3. Exploitation of the Low Fidelity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Reverse Transcriptase and the Nucleotide Composition Bias in the HIV-1 Genome To Alter the Drug Resistance Development of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, Maria-José; Pérez-Pérez, Maria-Jesus; San-Félix, Ana; Velázquez, Sonsoles; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Anderson, John N.; Karlsson, Anna

    2001-01-01

    The RNA genome of the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is significantly richer in adenine nucleotides than the statistically equal distribution of the four different nucleotides that is expected. This compositional bias may be due to the guanine-to-adenine (G→A) nucleotide hypermutation of the HIV genome, which has been explained by dCTP pool imbalances during reverse transcription. The adenine nucleotide bias together with the poor fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase markedly enhances the genetic variation of HIV and may be responsible for the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains. We have now attempted to counteract the normal mutational pattern of HIV-1 in response to anti-HIV-1 drugs by altering the endogenous deoxynucleoside triphosphate pool ratios with antimetabolites in virus-infected cell cultures. We showed that administration of these antimetabolic compounds resulted in an altered drug resistance pattern due to the reversal of the predominant mutational flow of HIV (G→A) to an adenine-to-guanine (A→G) nucleotide pattern in the intact HIV-1-infected lymphocyte cultures. Forcing the virus to change its inherent nucleotide bias may lead to better control of viral drug resistance development. PMID:11390579

  4. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  5. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  6. Structural Aspects of Drug Resistance and Inhibition of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamalendra; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) has been the target of numerous approved anti-AIDS drugs that are key components of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapies (HAART). It remains the target of extensive structural studies that continue unabated for almost twenty years. The crystal structures of wild-type or drug-resistant mutant HIV RTs in the unliganded form or in complex with substrates and/or drugs have offered valuable glimpses into the enzyme’s folding and its interactions with DNA and dNTP substrates, as well as with nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTIs) drugs. These studies have been used to interpret a large body of biochemical results and have paved the way for innovative biochemical experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of catalysis and drug inhibition of polymerase and RNase H functions of RT. In turn, the combined use of structural biology and biochemical approaches has led to the discovery of novel mechanisms of drug resistance and has contributed to the design of new drugs with improved potency and ability to suppress multi-drug resistant strains. PMID:20376302

  7. Extreme Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation in a Drug Resistant Variant of HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    King, Nancy M.; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloglu, Türkan; Yılmaz, Neşe Kurt; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been the historic paradigm of rational structure-based drug design, where structural and thermodynamic analyses have assisted in the discovery of novel inhibitors. While the total enthalpy and entropy change upon binding determine the affinity, often the thermodynamics are considered in terms of inhibitor properties only. In the current study, profound changes are observed in the binding thermodynamics of a drug resistant variant compared to wild-type HIV-1 protease, irrespective of the inhibitor bound. This variant (Flap+) has a combination of flap and active site mutations and exhibits extremely large entropy-enthalpy compensation compared to wild-type protease, 5–15 kcal/mol, while losing only 1–3 kcal/mol in total binding free energy for any of six FDA approved inhibitors. Although entropy-enthalpy compensation has been previously observed for a variety of systems, never have changes of this magnitude been reported. The co-crystal structures of Flap+ protease with four of the inhibitors were determined and compared with complexes of both the wildtype protease and another drug resistant variant that does not exhibit this energetic compensation. Structural changes conserved across the Flap+ complexes, which are more pronounced for the flaps covering the active site, likely contribute to the thermodynamic compensation. The finding that drug resistant mutations can profoundly modulate the relative thermodynamic properties of a therapeutic target independent of the inhibitor presents a new challenge for rational drug design. PMID:22712830

  8. Prevalence of HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance and Its Impacts on HIV-1 Virological Failures in Jiangsu, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Lu, Jing; Wang, Jinge; Yan, Hongjing; Li, Jianjun; Xu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhi; Qiu, Tao; Ding, Ping; Huan, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been shown to improve survival of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and to reduce HIV-1 transmission. Therefore, the Chinese central government initiated a national program to provide ART free of charge to HIV-1 patients. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu province to determine the level of drug resistance (DR) in HIV-1 infected patients and the correlates of DR in virological failures in 2012. Approximately 10.4% of the HIV-1 patients in the study experienced virological failure after one year of ART and were divided into drug sensitive and drug resistant groups based on genotype determination. The viral loads (VLs) in the drug resistant group were significantly lower than the drug sensitive group. There were two independent predictors of virological failure: male gender and increasing duration of treatment. The primary mutations observed in the study were against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) which were M184V (79.45%) and K103N (33.70%) in nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). The overall rate of DR in Jiangsu province is still relatively low among treated patients. However, close monitoring of drug resistance in male patients in the early stages of treatment is vital to maintaining and increasing the benefits of HIV ART achieved to date. PMID:27807537

  9. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Antiviral Drug Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) contributes to the development of resistance to all anti-AIDS drugs by introducing mutations into the viral genome. At the molecular level, mutations in RT result in resistance to RT inhibitors. Eight nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NRTIs) and five non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) are approved HIV-1 drugs. Structures of RT have been determined in complexes with substrates and/or inhibitors, and the structures have revealed different conformational and functional states of the enzyme. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to NRTIs and NNRTIs, and their complex relationships, may help in designing new drugs that are periodically required to overcome existing as well as emerging trends of drug resistance. PMID:23602471

  10. Dynamical Network of HIV-1 Protease Mutants Reveals the Mechanism of Drug Resistance and Unhindered Activity.

    PubMed

    Appadurai, Rajeswari; Senapati, Sanjib

    2016-03-15

    HIV-1 protease variants resist drugs by active and non-active-site mutations. The active-site mutations, which are the primary or first set of mutations, hamper the stability of the enzyme and resist the drugs minimally. As a result, secondary mutations that not only increase protein stability for unhindered catalytic activity but also resist drugs very effectively arise. While the mechanism of drug resistance of the active-site mutations is through modulating the active-site pocket volume, the mechanism of drug resistance of the non-active-site mutations is unclear. Moreover, how these allosteric mutations, which are 8-21 Å distant, communicate to the active site for drug efflux is completely unexplored. Results from molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the primary mechanism of drug resistance of the secondary mutations involves opening of the flexible protease flaps. Results from both residue- and community-based network analyses reveal that this precise action of protease is accomplished by the presence of robust communication paths between the mutational sites and the functionally relevant regions: active site and flaps. While the communication is more direct in the wild type, it traverses across multiple intermediate residues in mutants, leading to weak signaling and unregulated motions of flaps. The global integrity of the protease network is, however, maintained through the neighboring residues, which exhibit high degrees of conservation, consistent with clinical data and mutagenesis studies. PMID:26892689

  11. Transmitted Drug Resistance in Persons with Acute/Early HIV-1 in San Francisco, 2002-2009

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Liegler, Teri; Vittinghoff, Eric; Hartogensis, Wendy; Bacchetti, Peter; Poole, Lauren; Loeb, Lisa; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Hecht, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance (TDR) is an ongoing public health problem, representing 10–20% of new HIV infections in many geographic areas. TDR usually arises from two main sources: individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who are failing to achieve virologic suppression, and individuals who acquired TDR and transmit it while still ART-naïve. TDR rates can be impacted when novel antiretroviral medications are introduced that allow for greater virologic suppression of source patients. Although several new HIV medications were introduced starting in late 2007, including raltegravir, maraviroc, and etravirine, it is not known whether the prevalence of TDR was subsequently affected in 2008–2009. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed population sequence genotyping on individuals who were diagnosed with acute or early HIV (<6 months duration) and who enrolled in the Options Project, a prospective cohort, between 2002 and 2009. We used logistic regression to compare the odds of acquiring drug-resistant HIV before versus after the arrival of new ART (2005–2007 vs. 2008–2009). From 2003–2007, TDR rose from 7% to 24%. Prevalence of TDR was then 15% in 2008 and in 2009. While the odds of acquiring TDR were lower in 2008–2009 compared to 2005–2007, this was not statistically significant (odds ratio 0.65, 95% CI 0.31–1.38; p = 0.27). Conclusions Our study suggests that transmitted drug resistance rose from 2003–2007, but this upward trend did not continue in 2008 and 2009. Nevertheless, the TDR prevalence in 2008–2009 remained substantial, emphasizing that improved management strategies for drug-resistant HIV are needed if TDR is to be further reduced. Continued surveillance for TDR will be important in understanding the full impact of new antiretroviral medications. PMID:21170322

  12. Fungal Biofilms, Drug Resistance, and Recurrent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar V.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A biofilm is a surface-associated microbial community. Diverse fungi are capable of biofilm growth. The significance of this growth form for infection biology is that biofilm formation on implanted devices is a major cause of recurrent infection. Biofilms also have limited drug susceptibility, making device-associated infection extremely difficult to treat. Biofilm-like growth can occur during many kinds of infection, even when an implanted device is not present. Here we summarize the current understanding of fungal biofilm formation, its genetic control, and the basis for biofilm drug resistance. PMID:25274758

  13. Molecular dynamics studies on HIV-1 protease drug resistance and folding pathways.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, F; Micheletti, C; Carloni, P; Maritan, A

    2001-06-01

    Drug resistance to HIV-1 protease involves the accumulation of multiple mutations in the protein. We investigate the role of these mutations by using molecular dynamics simulations that exploit the influence of the native-state topology in the folding process. Our calculations show that sites contributing to phenotypic resistance of FDA-approved drugs are among the most sensitive positions for the stability of partially folded states and should play a relevant role in the folding process. Furthermore, associations between amino acid sites mutating under drug treatment are shown to be statistically correlated. The striking correlation between clinical data and our calculations suggest a novel approach to the design of drugs tailored to bind regions crucial not only for protein function, but for folding as well.

  14. Influence of Drug Resistance Mutations on the Activity of HIV-1 Subtypes A and B Integrases: a Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, O A; Zatsepin, T S; Agapkina, Yu Yu; Isaguliants, M G; Gottikh, M B

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) DNA into the genome of an infected cell is one of the key steps in the viral replication cycle. The viral enzyme integrase (IN), which catalyzes the integration, is an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. However, the HIV-1 therapy often results in the IN gene mutations inducing viral resistance to integration inhibitors. To assess the impact of drug resistance mutations on the activity of IN of HIV-1 subtype A strain FSU-A, which is dominant in Russia, variants of the consensus IN of this subtype containing the primary resistance mutations G118R and Q148K and secondary compensatory substitutions E138K and G140S were prepared and characterized. Comparative study of these enzymes with the corresponding mutants of IN of HIV-1 subtype B strains HXB-2 was performed. The mutation Q148K almost equally reduced the activity of integrases of both subtypes. Its negative effect was partially compensated by the secondary mutations E138K and G140S. Primary substitution G118R had different influence on the activity of proteins of the subtypes A and B, and the compensatory effect of the secondary substitution E138K also depended on the viral subtype. Comparison of the mutants resistance to the known strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a new inhibitor XZ-259 (a dihydro-1H-isoindol derivative), showed that integrases of both subtypes with the Q148K mutation were insensitive to raltegravir and elvitegravir but were effectively inhibited by XZ-259. The substitution G118R slightly reduced the efficiency of IN inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir and caused no resistance to XZ_259.

  15. Structure-Based Design of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh,A.; Sridhar, P.; Leshchenko, S.; Hussain, A.; Li, J.; Kovalevsky, A.; Walters, D.; Wedelind, J.; Grum-Tokars, V.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Structure-based design and synthesis of novel HIV protease inhibitors are described. The inhibitors are designed specifically to interact with the backbone of HIV protease active site to combat drug resistance. Inhibitor 3 has exhibited exceedingly potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potency. Furthermore, this inhibitor maintains impressive potency against a wide spectrum of HIV including a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. The inhibitors incorporated a stereochemically defined 5-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furanyl urethane as the P2-ligand into the (R)-(hydroxyethylamino)sulfonamide isostere. Optically active (3aS,5R,6aR)-5-hydroxy-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furan was prepared by an enzymatic asymmetrization of meso-diacetate with acetyl cholinesterase, radical cyclization, and Lewis acid-catalyzed anomeric reduction as the key steps. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of inhibitor 3-bound HIV-1 protease (1.35 Angstroms resolution) revealed extensive interactions in the HIV protease active site including strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone. This design strategy may lead to novel inhibitors that can combat drug resistance.

  16. Change in the Prevalence of HIV-1 and the Rate of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Viet; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Cuong Hung; Saina, Matilda Chelimo; Hoang, Huyen Thi Thanh; Tran, Vuong Thi; Bi, Xiuqiong; Pham, Thuc Van; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported a significant decrease in HIV-1 prevalence, with no increase in drug-resistant HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDU), female sex workers (FSW), and blood donors (BD), in Haiphong, Vietnam, from 2007 to 2009. In 2012, 388 IDU, 51 FSW, and 200 BD were recruited for further analysis. None had a history of antiretroviral treatment. From 2007 to 2012, HIV-1 prevalence was reduced from 35.9% to 18.6% (p<0.001), 23.1% to 9.8% (p<0.05), and 2.9% to 1% (p=0.29) in IDU, FSW, and BD, respectively. Of 79 anti-HIV-1 antibody-positive samples, 61 were successfully analyzed for the pol-reverse transcriptase (RT) region. All HIV-1 strains were CRF01_AE. Nonnucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations, Y181C/I, were detected in three subjects; one had the nucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations L74V and M184V and one had E138K. The prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong increased slightly from 1.8% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2012 (p=0.06). PMID:25970090

  17. Identification of new, emerging HIV-1 unique recombinant forms and drug resistant viruses circulating in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Cameroon is characterized by a high degree of viral genetic diversity with circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) being predominant. The goal of our study was to determine recent trends in virus evolution and emergence of drug resistance in blood donors and HIV positive patients. Methodology Blood specimens of 73 individuals were collected from three cities and a few villages in Cameroon and viruses were isolated by co-cultivation with PBMCs. Nested PCR was performed for gag p17 (670 bp) pol (840 bp) and Env gp41 (461 bp) genes. Sequences were phylogenetically analyzed using a reference set of sequences from the Los Alamos database. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences revealed that 65% (n = 48) of strains were CRF02_AG, 4% (n = 3) subtype F2, 1% each belonged to CRF06 (n = 1), CRF11 (n = 1), subtype G (n = 1), subtype D (n = 1), CRF22_01A1 (n = 1), and 26% (n = 18) were Unique Recombinant Forms (URFs). Most URFs contained CRF02_AG in one or two HIV gene fragments analyzed. Furthermore, pol sequences of 61 viruses revealed drug resistance in 55.5% of patients on therapy and 44% of drug naïve individuals in the RT and protease regions. Overall URFs that had a primary HIV subtype designation in the pol region showed higher HIV-1 p24 levels than other recombinant forms in cell culture based replication kinetics studies. Conclusions Our results indicate that although CRF02_AG continues to be the predominant strain in Cameroon, phylogenetically the HIV epidemic is continuing to evolve as multiple recombinants of CRF02_AG and URFs were identified in the individuals studied. CRF02_AG recombinants that contained the pol region of a primary subtype showed higher replicative advantage than other variants. Identification of drug resistant strains in drug-naïve patients suggests that these viruses are being transmitted in the population studied. Our findings support the need for continued molecular surveillance in this region

  18. Human APOBEC3G drives HIV-1 evolution and the development of drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tamoy; Kim, Eun - Young; Koning, Fransje; Malim, Michael; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is an innate virus restriction factor that induces deamination of specific cytidine residues in single-stranded human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Whereas destructive hA3G editing leads to a profound loss of HIV-1 infectivity, more limited editing could be a source of adaptation and diversification. Here we show that the presence of hA3G in T-cells can drive the development of diversity in HIV-1 populations and that under selection pressure imposed by the nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3TC ((-)2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine), a single point mutation that confers 3TC resistance, methionine 184 to isoleucine (M1841), emerges rapidly and reaches fixation. These results provide strong evidence that mutation by hA3G is an important source of genetic variation on which natural selection acts to shape the structure of the viral population and drive the tempo of HIV-1 evolution.

  19. HIV-1 Drug Resistance in the iPrEx Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liegler, Teri; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Bentley, L. Gordon; Atchison, Robert; Schmidt, Timothy; Javier, Jacqueline; Mehrotra, Megha; Eden, Christopher; Glidden, David V.; McMahan, Vanessa; Anderson, Peter L.; Li, Peilin; Wong, Joseph K.; Buchbinder, Susan; Guanira, Juan V.; Grant, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The iPrEx study demonstrated that combination oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) protects against HIV acquisition in men who have sex with men and transgender women. Selection for drug resistance could offset PrEP benefits. Methods. Phenotypic and genotypic clinical resistance assays characterized major drug resistant mutations. Minor variants with FTC/TDF mutations K65R, K70E, M184V/I were measured using 454 deep sequencing and a novel allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) diagnostic tolerant to sequence heterogeneity. Results. Control of primer-binding site heterogeneity resulted in improved accuracy of minor variant measurements by AS-PCR. Of the 48 on-study infections randomized to FTC/TDF, none showed FTC/TDF mutations by clinical assays despite detectable drug levels in 8 participants. Two randomized to FTC/TDF had minor variant M184I detected at 0.53% by AS-PCR or 0.75% by deep sequencing, only 1 of which had low but detectable drug levels. Among those with acute infection at randomization to FTC/TDF, M184V or I mutations that were predominant at seroconversion waned to background levels within 24 weeks after discontinuing drug. Conclusions. Drug resistance was rare in iPrEx on-study FTC/TDF-randomized seroconverters, and only as low-frequency minor variants. FTC resistance among those initiating PrEP with acute infection waned rapidly after drug discontinuation. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00458393. PMID:24740633

  20. Contribution of Gag and Protease to HIV-1 Phenotypic Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Giandhari, Jennifer; Basson, Adriaan E.; Sutherland, Katherine; Parry, Chris M.; Cane, Patricia A.; Coovadia, Ashraf; Kuhn, Louise; Hunt, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are used as a first-line regimen in HIV-1-infected children. Here we investigated the phenotypic consequences of amino acid changes in Gag and protease on lopinavir (LPV) and ritonavir (RTV) susceptibility among pediatric patients failing PI therapy. The Gag-protease from isolates from 20 HIV-1 subtype C-infected pediatric patients failing an LPV and/or RTV-based regimen was phenotyped using a nonreplicative in vitro assay. Changes in sensitivity to LPV and RTV relative to that of the matched baseline (pretherapy) sample were calculated. Gag and protease amino acid substitutions associated with PI failure were created in a reference clone by site-directed mutagenesis and assessed. Predicted phenotypes were determined using the Stanford drug resistance algorithm. Phenotypic resistance or reduced susceptibility to RTV and/or LPV was observed in isolates from 10 (50%) patients, all of whom had been treated with RTV. In most cases, this was associated with protease resistance mutations, but substitutions at Gag cleavage and noncleavage sites were also detected. Gag amino acid substitutions were also found in isolates from three patients with reduced drug susceptibilities who had wild-type protease. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that some amino acid changes in Gag contributed to PI resistance but only in the presence of major protease resistance-associated substitutions. The isolates from all patients who received LPV exclusively were phenotypically susceptible. Baseline isolates from the 20 patients showed a large (47-fold) range in the 50% effective concentration of LPV, which accounted for most of the discordance seen between the experimentally determined and the predicted phenotypes. Overall, the inclusion of the gag gene and the use of matched baseline samples provided a more comprehensive assessment of the effect of PI-induced amino acid changes on PI resistance. The lack of phenotypic resistance to LPV supports the continued use of

  1. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance and Impact of Transmitted Resistance on Treatment Success in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Houareau, Claudia; Werning, Johanna; Keeren, Kathrin; Somogyi, Sybille; Kollan, Christian; Jessen, Heiko; Dupke, Stephan; Hamouda, Osamah

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyse the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance, TDR, and the impact of TDR on treatment success in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort. Methods Genotypic resistance analysis was performed in treatment-naïve study patients whose sample was available 1,312/1,564 (83.9% October 2008). A genotypic resistance result was obtained for 1,276/1,312 (97.3%). The resistance associated mutations were identified according to the surveillance drug resistance mutations list recommended for drug-naïve patients. Treatment success was determined as viral suppression below 500 copies/ml. Results Prevalence of TDR was stable at a high level between 1996 and 2007 in the German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort (N = 158/1,276; 12.4%; CIwilson 10.7–14.3; p for trend = 0.25). NRTI resistance was predominant (7.5%) but decreased significantly over time (CIWilson: 6.2–9.1, p for trend = 0.02). NNRTI resistance tended to increase over time (NNRTI: 3.5%; CIWilson: 2.6–4.6; p for trend  = 0.07), whereas PI resistance remained stable (PI: 3.0%; CIWilson: 2.1–4.0; p for trend  = 0.24). Resistance to all drug classes was frequently caused by singleton resistance mutations (NRTI 55.6%, PI 68.4%, NNRTI 99.1%). The majority of NRTI-resistant strains (79.8%) carried resistance-associated mutations selected by the thymidine analogues zidovudine and stavudine. Preferably 2NRTI/1PIr combinations were prescribed as first line regimen in patients with resistant HIV as well as in patients with susceptible strains (susceptible 45.3%; 173/382 vs. resistant 65.5%; 40/61). The majority of patients in both groups were treated successfully within the first year after ART-initiation (susceptible: 89.9%; 62/69; resistant: 7/9; 77.8%). Conclusion Overall prevalence of TDR remained stable at a high level but trends of resistance against drug classes differed over time. The significant decrease of NRTI-resistance in patients newly infected with

  2. Low Incidence of HIV-1C Acquired Drug Resistance 10 Years after Roll-Out of Antiretroviral Therapy in Ethiopia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Andargachew; Maier, Melanie; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations has mainly been linked to the duration and composition of antiretroviral treatment (ART), as well as the level of adherence. This study reports the incidence and pattern of acquired antiretroviral drug resistance mutations and long-term outcomes of ART in a prospective cohort from Northwest Ethiopia. Two hundred and twenty HIV-1C infected treatment naïve patients were enrolled and 127 were followed-up for up to 38 months on ART. ART initiation and patients' monitoring was based on the WHO clinical and immunological parameters. HIV viral RNA measurement and drug resistance genotyping were done at baseline (N = 160) and after a median time of 30 (IQR, 27-38) months on ART (N = 127). Viral suppression rate (HIV RNA levels ≤ 400 copies/ml) after a median time of 30 months on ART was found to be 88.2% (112/127), which is in the range for HIV drug resistance prevention suggested by WHO. Of those 15 patients with viral load >400 copies/ml, six harboured one or more drug resistant associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region. Observed NRTIs resistance associated mutations were the lamivudine-induced mutation M184V (n = 4) and tenofovir associated mutation K65R (n = 1). The NNRTIs resistance associated mutations were K103N (n = 2), V106M, Y181S, Y188L, V90I, K101E and G190A (n = 1 each). Thymidine analogue mutations and major drug resistance mutations in the protease (PR) region were not detected. Most of the patients (13/15) with virologic failure and accumulated drug resistance mutations had not met the WHO clinical and/or immunological failure criteria and continued the failing regimen. The incidence and pattern of acquired antiretroviral drug resistance mutations is lower and less complex than previous reports from sub Saharan Africa countries. Nevertheless, the data suggest the need for virological monitoring and resistance testing for early detection of failure. Moreover, adherence reinforcement will

  3. Effects of drug-resistant mutations on the dynamic properties of HIV-1 protease and inhibition by Amprenavir and Darunavir.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the dynamic properties of wild-type HIV-1 protease and its two multi-drug-resistant variants (Flap + (L10I/G48V/I54V/V82A) and Act (V82T/I84V)) as well as their binding with APV and DRV inhibitors. The hydrophobic interactions between flap and 80 s (80's) loop residues (mainly I50-I84' and I50'-I84) play an important role in maintaining the closed conformation of HIV-1 protease. The double mutation in Act variant weakens the hydrophobic interactions, leading to the transition from closed to semi-open conformation of apo Act. APV or DRV binds with HIV-1 protease via both hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. The hydrophobic interactions from the inhibitor is aimed to the residues of I50 (I50'), I84 (I84'), and V82 (V82') which create hydrophobic core clusters to further stabilize the closed conformation of flaps, and the hydrogen bonding interactions are mainly focused with the active site of HIV-1 protease. The combined change in the two kinds of protease-inhibitor interactions is correlated with the observed resistance mutations. The present study sheds light on the microscopic mechanism underlying the mutation effects on the dynamics of HIV-1 protease and the inhibition by APV and DRV, providing useful information to the design of more potent and effective HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:26012849

  4. Measuring glutathione redox potential of HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Ashima; Munshi, MohamedHusen; Khan, Sohrab Zafar; Fatima, Sadaf; Arya, Rahul; Jameel, Shahid; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Redox signaling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The majority of HIV redox research relies on measuring redox stress using invasive technologies, which are unreliable and do not provide information about the contributions of subcellular compartments. A major technological leap emerges from the development of genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs), which provide sensitive and compartment-specific insights into redox homeostasis. Here, we exploited a roGFP-based specific bioprobe of glutathione redox potential (E(GSH); Grx1-roGFP2) and measured subcellular changes in E(GSH) during various phases of HIV-1 infection using U1 monocytic cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1). We show that although U937 and U1 cells demonstrate significantly reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial E(GSH) (approximately -310 mV), active viral replication induces substantial oxidative stress (E(GSH) more than -240 mV). Furthermore, exposure to a physiologically relevant oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induces significant deviations in subcellular E(GSH) between U937 and U1, which distinctly modulates susceptibility to apoptosis. Using Grx1-roGFP2, we demonstrate that a marginal increase of about ∼25 mV in E(GSH) is sufficient to switch HIV-1 from latency to reactivation, raising the possibility of purging HIV-1 by redox modulators without triggering detrimental changes in cellular physiology. Importantly, we show that bioactive lipids synthesized by clinical drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivate HIV-1 through modulation of intracellular E(GSH). Finally, the expression analysis of U1 and patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells demonstrated a major recalibration of cellular redox homeostatic pathways during persistence and active replication of HIV.

  5. HIV-1 infection in Juba, southern Sudan.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M C; Khalid, I O; El Tigani, A

    1995-05-01

    Thirty years of civil war in the Sudan have resulted in the isolation of the southern provinces which border Central and East Africa. Consequently, little is known about the epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in this region. To estimate the prevalence of HIV-1 infection in southern Sudan and the risk factors associated with disease transmission, a seroepidemiologic survey was conducted in the township of Juba. Study subjects invited to participate in this study included medical outpatients, inpatients hospitalized for active tuberculosis, and female prostitutes. A total of 401 subjects participated in the study. HIV-1 infection was confirmed in 25 subjects. The prevalence of HIV-1 infection was 19% (8/42) among tuberculosis patients, 16% (8/50) among prostitutes, and 3% (9/309) among outpatients. A significantly higher prevalence of HIV-1 infection was found among female prostitutes when compared to female outpatients: 16% (8/50) vs. 2% (4/178), P < 0.001. Correspondingly, the prevalence of seropositives was significantly higher among male outpatients reporting a history of sexual relations with prostitutes during the prior 10 years compared to male outpatients denying relations with prostitutes: 14% (5/37) vs. 0% (0/94), P = 0.0011. A history of a sexually transmitted disease (STD) was also associated with HIV-1 infection among male outpatients. The findings of this study indicate that HIV-1 infection is highly prevalent in southern Sudan and that prostitutes and their sexual partners represent a major reservoir of HIV infection in this population. This epidemiologic pattern resembles that seen in the African nations neighboring southern Sudan.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  7. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  8. Effects of drug-resistant mutations on the dynamic properties of HIV-1 protease and inhibition by Amprenavir and Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the dynamic properties of wild-type HIV-1 protease and its two multi-drug-resistant variants (Flap + (L10I/G48V/I54V/V82A) and Act (V82T/I84V)) as well as their binding with APV and DRV inhibitors. The hydrophobic interactions between flap and 80 s (80’s) loop residues (mainly I50-I84’ and I50’-I84) play an important role in maintaining the closed conformation of HIV-1 protease. The double mutation in Act variant weakens the hydrophobic interactions, leading to the transition from closed to semi-open conformation of apo Act. APV or DRV binds with HIV-1 protease via both hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. The hydrophobic interactions from the inhibitor is aimed to the residues of I50 (I50’), I84 (I84’), and V82 (V82’) which create hydrophobic core clusters to further stabilize the closed conformation of flaps, and the hydrogen bonding interactions are mainly focused with the active site of HIV-1 protease. The combined change in the two kinds of protease-inhibitor interactions is correlated with the observed resistance mutations. The present study sheds light on the microscopic mechanism underlying the mutation effects on the dynamics of HIV-1 protease and the inhibition by APV and DRV, providing useful information to the design of more potent and effective HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:26012849

  9. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  10. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping from antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve and first-line treatment failures in Djiboutian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study we report the prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistant HIV-1 genotypes of virus isolated from Djiboutian patients who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) and from ART naïve patients. Patients and methods A total of 35 blood samples from 16 patients who showed first-line ART failure (>1000 viral genome copies/ml) and 19 ART-naïve patients were collected in Djibouti from October 2009 to December 2009. Both the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified and sequenced using National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS) protocols. The Stanford HIV database algorithm was used for interpretation of resistance data and genotyping. Results Among the 16 patients with first-line ART failure, nine (56.2%) showed reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strains: two (12.5%) were resistant to nucleoside (NRTI), one (6.25%) to non-nucleoside (NNRTI) reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and six (37.5%) to both. Analysis of the DNA sequencing data indicated that the most common mutations conferring drug resistance were M184V (38%) for NRTI and K103N (25%) for NNRTI. Only NRTI primary mutations K101Q, K103N and the PI minor mutation L10V were found in ART naïve individuals. No protease inhibitor resistant strains were detected. In our study, we found no detectable resistance in ∼ 44% of all patients who experienced therapeutic failure which was explained by low compliance, co-infection with tuberculosis and malnutrition. Genotyping revealed that 65.7% of samples were infected with subtype C, 20% with CRF02_AG, 8.5% with B, 2.9% with CRF02_AG/C and 2.9% with K/C. Conclusion The results of this first study about drug resistance mutations in first-line ART failures show the importance of performing drug resistance mutation test which guides the choice of a second-line regimen. This will improve the management of HIV-infected Djiboutian patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics studies on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase triphosphate binding site: implications for nucleoside-analog drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Alber, F; Carloni, P

    2000-12-01

    Quantum-chemical methods are used to shed light on the functional role of residues involved in the resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase against nucleoside-analog drugs. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for models representing the adduct between the triphosphate substrate and the nucleoside binding site. The triphosphate is considered either deprotonated or protonated at the gamma-position. Although the protonated form already experiences large rearrangements in the ps time scale, the fully deprotonated state exhibits a previously unrecognized low-barrier hydrogen bond between Lys65 and gamma-phosphate. Absence of this interaction in Lys65-->Arg HIV-1 RT might play a prominent role in the resistance of this mutant for nucleoside analogs (Gu Z et al., 1994b, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:275-281; Zhang D et al., 1994, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:282-287). Water molecules present in the active site, not detected in the X-ray structure, form a complex H-bond network. Among these waters, one may be crucial for substrate recognition as it bridges Gln151 and Arg72 with the beta-phosphate. Absence of this stabilizing interaction in Gln151-->Met HIV-1 RT mutant may be a key factor for the known drug resistance of this mutant toward dideoxy-type drugs and AZT (Shirasaka T et al., 1995, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 92:2398-2402: Iversen AK et al., 1996, J Virol 70:1086-1090).

  12. HemaSpot, a Novel Blood Storage Device for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, K; DeLong, A; Balamane, M; Schreier, L; Orido, M; Chepkenja, M; Kemboi, E; D'Antuono, M; Chan, P A; Emonyi, W; Diero, L; Coetzer, M; Kantor, R

    2016-01-01

    HemaSpot, a novel dried-blood storage filter device, was used for HIV-1 pol resistance testing in 30 fresh United States blood samples and 54 previously frozen Kenyan blood samples. Genotyping succeeded in 79% and 58% of samples, respectively, improved with shorter storage and higher viral load, and had good (86%) resistance mutation concordance to plasma.

  13. Analysis of 454 sequencing error rate, error sources, and artifact recombination for detection of Low-frequency drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 454 sequencing technology is a promising approach for characterizing HIV-1 populations and for identifying low frequency mutations. The utility of 454 technology for determining allele frequencies and linkage associations in HIV infected individuals has not been extensively investigated. We evaluated the performance of 454 sequencing for characterizing HIV populations with defined allele frequencies. Results We constructed two HIV-1 RT clones. Clone A was a wild type sequence. Clone B was identical to clone A except it contained 13 introduced drug resistant mutations. The clones were mixed at ratios ranging from 1% to 50% and were amplified by standard PCR conditions and by PCR conditions aimed at reducing PCR-based recombination. The products were sequenced using 454 pyrosequencing. Sequence analysis from standard PCR amplification revealed that 14% of all sequencing reads from a sample with a 50:50 mixture of wild type and mutant DNA were recombinants. The majority of the recombinants were the result of a single crossover event which can happen during PCR when the DNA polymerase terminates synthesis prematurely. The incompletely extended template then competes for primer sites in subsequent rounds of PCR. Although less often, a spectrum of other distinct crossover patterns was also detected. In addition, we observed point mutation errors ranging from 0.01% to 1.0% per base as well as indel (insertion and deletion) errors ranging from 0.02% to nearly 50%. The point errors (single nucleotide substitution errors) were mainly introduced during PCR while indels were the result of pyrosequencing. We then used new PCR conditions designed to reduce PCR-based recombination. Using these new conditions, the frequency of recombination was reduced 27-fold. The new conditions had no effect on point mutation errors. We found that 454 pyrosequencing was capable of identifying minority HIV-1 mutations at frequencies down to 0.1% at some nucleotide positions. Conclusion

  14. HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Second-line Treatment in Children Randomized to Switch at Low versus Higher RNA Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Linda; Melvin, Ann; Fiscus, Susan; Saidi, Yacine; Nastouli, Eleni; Harper, Lynda; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Babiker, Abdel; McKinney, Ross; Gibb, Diana; Tudor-Williams, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold. Methods PENPACT-1 had a 2x2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based ART, and switch at a 1000c/ml versus 30000c/ml threshold. Switch-criteria were: not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or CDC-C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000c/ml before switch, re-suppression and at 4-year/trial-end. Results Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000c/ml (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30000c/ml (PI-30000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000c/ml (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30000c/ml (NNRTI-30000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000c/ml switch-criteria during 5 years follow-up. In 30000c/ml threshold arms, median time from 1000c/ml to 30000c/ml switch-criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P=0.81). In NNRTI-30000 more NRTI resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000c/ml (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30000). Sixty-two children started abacavir+lamivudine, 166 lamivudine+zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir+lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30000, 64% NNRTI-1000 and 100% NNRTI-30000 were <400c/ml 24 weeks later. Conclusion Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet re-suppressed on second-line. An abacavir+lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance. PMID:26322666

  15. HIV-1 infection kinetics in tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Spouge, J I; Shrager, R I; Dimitrov, D S

    1996-11-01

    Despite intensive experimental work on HIV-1, very little theoretical work has focused on HIV-1 spread in tissue culture. This article uses two systems of ordinary differential equations to model two modes of viral spread, cell-free virus and cell-to-cell contact. The two models produce remarkably similar qualitative results. Simulations using realistic parameter regimes showed that starting with a small fraction of cells infected, both cell-free viral spread and direct cell-to-cell transmission give an initial exponential phase of viral growth, followed by either a crash or a gradual decline, extinguishing the culture. Under some conditions, an oscillatory phase may precede the extinction. Some previous models of in vivo HIV-1 infection oscillate, but only in unrealistic parameter regimes. Experimental tissue infections sometimes display several sequential cycles of oscillation, however, so our models can at least mimic them qualitatively. Significantly, the models show that infective oscillations can be explained by infection dynamics; biological heterogeneity is not required. The models also display proportionality between infected cells and cell-free virus, which is reassuringly consistent with assumptions about the equivalence of several measures of viral load, except that the proportionality requires a relatively constant total cell concentration. Tissue culture parameter values can be determined from accurate, controlled experiments. Therefore, if verified, our models should make interpreting experimental data and extrapolating it to in vivo conditions sharper and more reliable.

  16. Design, Synthesis, Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, in particular inhibitors containing 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp-29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies. PMID:22708897

  17. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  18. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase drug-resistant mutant strains: implications for the mechanism of polymerase action.

    PubMed

    Kroeger Smith, M B; Michejda, C J; Hughes, S H; Boyer, P L; Janssen, P A; Andries, K; Buckheit, R W; Smith, R H

    1997-12-01

    A computer model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) either alone, or complexed with a non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI), was constructed using crystal coordinate data from a subset of the protein surrounding the binding pocket region. Molecular mechanics calculations were carried out on solvated wild-type RT and RT that contained modifications corresponding to resistance-engendering mutations. Results from the calculations revealed that the r.m.s. difference between 12 modified proteins and that of wild-type RT could be qualitatively correlated with the measured polymerase activity of the enzyme in the presence of these mutations. In addition, the level of activity was related to the measured distance between the primer grip and dNTP binding regions of the protein. These data suggest a direct correlation between RT structure and function. Complexes of RT-8-C1 TIBO and RT-alpha-APA were also minimized in models containing modifications corresponding to key drug-resistant mutants. The variant complexes all showed weaker binding than wild-type RT, while giving rise to similar, but critical changes in the protein. Therefore, the design of new inhibitors should center on obtaining stronger binding drugs to key drug-resistant RT variants.

  19. More effective drugs lead to harder selective sweeps in the evolution of drug resistance in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Alison F; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Holmes, Susan P; Shafer, Robert W; Petrov, Dmitri A; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2016-01-01

    In the early days of HIV treatment, drug resistance occurred rapidly and predictably in all patients, but under modern treatments, resistance arises slowly, if at all. The probability of resistance should be controlled by the rate of generation of resistance mutations. If many adaptive mutations arise simultaneously, then adaptation proceeds by soft selective sweeps in which multiple adaptive mutations spread concomitantly, but if adaptive mutations occur rarely in the population, then a single adaptive mutation should spread alone in a hard selective sweep. Here, we use 6717 HIV-1 consensus sequences from patients treated with first-line therapies between 1989 and 2013 to confirm that the transition from fast to slow evolution of drug resistance was indeed accompanied with the expected transition from soft to hard selective sweeps. This suggests more generally that evolution proceeds via hard sweeps if resistance is unlikely and via soft sweeps if it is likely. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10670.001 PMID:26882502

  20. The Evolution of HIV-1 group M Genetic Variability in Southern Cameroon is characterized by Several Emerging Recombinant Forms of CRF02_AG and viruses with drug resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Agyingi, Lucy; Mayr, Luzia M; Kinge, Thompson; Orock, George Enow; Ngai, Johnson; Asaah, Bladine; Mpoame, Mbida; Hewlett, Indira; Nyambi, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in Cameroon is marked by a broad genetic diversity dominated by Circulating Recombinant Forms (CRFs). Studies performed more than a decade ago in urban settings of Southern Cameroon revealed a dominance of the CRF02_AG and clade A variants in >90% of the infected subjects; however, little is known about the evolving viral variants circulating in this region. To document circulating HIV viral diversity, four regions of the viral genome (gag, PR, reverse transcriptase, env) in 116 HIV-1 positive individuals in Limbe, Southern Cameroon, were PCR-amplified. Sequences obtained at the RT and protease regions were analyzed for mutations that conferred drug resistance using the Stanford Drug Resistance Database. The present study reveals a broad genetic diversity characterized by several unique recombinant forms (URF) accounting for 36% of infections, 48.6% of patients infected with CRF02_AG, and the emergence of CRF22_01A1 in 7.2% of patients. Three out of 15 (20%) treated patients and 13 out of 93 (13.9%) drug naïve patients harbor drug resistance mutations to RT inhibitors, while 3.2% of drug naïve patients harbor drug resistance mutations associated with protease inhibitors. The high proportion (13.9%) of drug resistance mutations among the drug naïve patients reveals the ongoing transmission of these viruses in this region of Cameroon and highlights the need for drug resistance testing before starting treatment for patients infected with HIV-1. PMID:24248638

  1. Use of Dried Plasma Spots for HIV-1 Viral Load Determination and Drug Resistance Genotyping in Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Auad, Juan Pablo; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma. Teresa; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring antiretroviral therapy using measurements of viral load (VL) and the genotyping of resistance mutations is not routinely performed in low- to middle-income countries because of the high costs of the commercial assays that are used. The analysis of dried plasma spot (DPS) samples on filter paper may represent an alternative for resource-limited settings. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of analyzing DPS samples to determine VL and identify drug resistance mutations (DRM) in a group of HIV-1 patients. The VL was measured from 22 paired plasma and DPS samples. In these samples, the average VL was 4.7 log10 copies/mL in liquid plasma and 4.1 log10 copies/mL in DPS, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.83. A 1.1 kb fragment of HIV pol could be amplified in 14/22 (63.6%) of the DPS samples and the same value was amplified in plasma samples. A collection of ten paired DPS and liquid plasma samples was evaluated for the presence of DRM; an excellent correlation was found in the identification of DRM between the paired samples. All HIV-1 pol sequences that were obtained corresponded to HIV subtype B. The analysis of DPS samples offers an attractive alternative for monitoring ARV therapy in resource-limited settings. PMID:26779533

  2. Field study of dried blood spot specimens for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping.

    PubMed

    Parry, C M; Parkin, N; Diallo, K; Mwebaza, S; Batamwita, R; DeVos, J; Bbosa, N; Lyagoba, F; Magambo, B; Jordan, M R; Downing, R; Zhang, G; Kaleebu, P; Yang, C; Bertagnolio, S

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at -80 °C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  3. Field Study of Dried Blood Spot Specimens for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Parry, C. M.; Diallo, K.; Mwebaza, S.; Batamwita, R.; DeVos, J.; Bbosa, N.; Lyagoba, F.; Magambo, B.; Jordan, M. R.; Downing, R.; Zhang, G.; Kaleebu, P.; Bertagnolio, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at −80°C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  5. Meta-analysis and time series modeling allow a systematic review of primary HIV-1 drug-resistant prevalence in Latin America and Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; De Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Da Silva, Ronaldo Celerino; Kamada, Anselmo Jiro; Guimarães, Rafael Lima; Brandão, Lucas André Cavalcanti; Coelho, Hemílio Fernandes Campos; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Here we review the prevalence of HIV-1 primary drug resistance in Latin America and Caribbean using meta-analysis as well as time-series modeling. We also discuss whether there could be a drawback to HIV/AIDS programs due to drug resistance in Latin America and Caribbean in the next years. We observed that, although some studies report low or moderate primary drug resistance prevalence in Caribbean countries, this evidence needs to be updated. In other countries, such as Brazil and Argentina, the prevalence of drug resistance appears to be rising. Mutations conferring resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most frequent in the analyzed populations (70% of all mutational events). HIV-1 subtype B was the most prevalent in Latin America and the Caribbean, although subtype C and B/F recombinants have significant contributions in Argentina and Brazil. Thus, we suggest that primary drug resistance in Latin America and the Caribbean could have been underestimated. Clinical monitoring should be improved to offer better therapy, reducing the risk for HIV-1 resistance emergence and spread, principally in vulnerable populations, such as men who have sex with men transmission group, sex workers and intravenous drug users.

  6. Amprenavir complexes with HIV-1 protease and its drug-resistant mutants altering hydrophobic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-10-22

    The structural and kinetic effects of amprenavir (APV), a clinical HIV protease (PR) inhibitor, were analyzed with wild-type enzyme and mutants with single substitutions of V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M that are common in drug resistance. Crystal structures of the APV complexes at resolutions of 1.02-1.85 {angstrom} reveal the structural changes due to the mutations. Substitution of the larger side chains in PR{sub V32I}, PR{sub I54M} and PR{sub L90M} resulted in the formation of new hydrophobic contacts with flap residues, residues 79 and 80, and Asp25, respectively. Mutation to smaller side chains eliminated hydrophobic interactions in the PR{sub I50V} and PR{sub I54V} structures. The PR{sub I84V}-APV complex had lost hydrophobic contacts with APV, the PR{sub V32I}-APV complex showed increased hydrophobic contacts within the hydrophobic cluster and the PR{sub I50V} complex had weaker polar and hydrophobic interactions with APV. The observed structural changes in PR{sub I84V}-APV, PR{sub V32I}-APV and PR{sub I50V}-APV were related to their reduced inhibition by APV of six-, 10- and 30-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type PR. The APV complexes were compared with the corresponding saquinavir complexes. The PR dimers had distinct rearrangements of the flaps and 80's loops that adapt to the different P1{prime} groups of the inhibitors, while maintaining contacts within the hydrophobic cluster. These small changes in the loops and weak internal interactions produce the different patterns of resistant mutations for the two drugs.

  7. HIV-1 RNA quantification in CRF02_AG HIV-1 infection: too easy to make mistakes.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, Paola; Taramasso, Lucia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Sticchi, Laura; Nigro, Nicola; Barresi, Renata; Viscoli, Claudio; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients newly infected by HIV-1 non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) is increasing worldwide, including in the western countries. We report on a primary HIV-1 infection in a Caucasian patient. A routine quantitative assay (Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 2.0, BioMérieux SA) showed 6,700 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. A combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) consistent with low baseline HIV-1 RNA was started. Few days later, the analysis performed with REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool - Version 3.0 attributed the HIV-1 sequence to the CRF02_AG recombinant form. Therefore, a second real-time PCR assay was performed, using the Versant HIV-1 RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics) which revealed a HIV-1 RNA of 230,000 copies/ml. Consequently, the ongoing cART was potentiated. This case suggests that the wide genetic variability of HIV-1 subtypes may affect the capability of the commonly used assays to detect and accurately quantify HIV-1 RNA in non-B subtypes and CRFs. In presence of CRFs different commercial HIV-1 RNA tests should be performed to find the most reliable for viral load quantification at the diagnosis, because it influences the choice of cART, and during the follow-up. Indeed, international guidelines for HIV-1 infection management suggest to monitor patient' HIV-RNA with the same assay over the course of treatment. As different commercial tests can be performed in the same laboratory with considerable difficulty, the laboratory should select an assay that is suitable not only for the more prevalent strain, but also for less frequent ones that, nevertheless, can occur. Then, knowing and investigating the spread of non-B strains has essential clinical and laboratory implications. PMID:27196556

  8. Prevalence Of Drug Resistance And Associated Mutations In A Population Of HIV-1+ Puerto Ricans In 2005

    PubMed Central

    Cubano, Luis A.; Cumba, Luz; Sepúlveda-Torres, Lycely del C.; Boukli, Nawal; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    This is a continuation of our efforts to maintain a record of the evolution of HIV-1 infection in Puerto Rico by monitoring the expression levels of antiretroviral resistance-associated mutations. Samples from 2005 were analyzed (458: 270 males, 137 females, 51 anonymous), using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System. Results show that 60.1% of males and 50.2% of females had HIV-1 with resistance to at least one medication. The average number of HIV mutations in males was 6.27, while the average number of HIV mutations in females was 5.49. The highest levels of resistance were to Zalcitabine, Lamivudine, and Stavudine. The reverse transcriptase mutations with the highest frequency of expression were M184V, K103N and D67N. Protease mutations with the highest rate of expression were L63P, M36I and L90M. Significant differences between men and women were recorded in the levels of HIV-1 expressed mutations and resistance. PMID:23875516

  9. Prevalence of drug resistance and associated mutations in a population of Hiv-1+ Puerto Ricans in 2005.

    PubMed

    Cubano, Luis A; Cumba, Luz; del Sepúlveda-Torres, Lycely C; Boukli, Nawal; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy

    2010-01-01

    This is a continuation of our efforts to maintain a record of the evolution of HIV-1 infection in Puerto Rico by monitoring the expression levels of antiretroviral resistance-associated mutations. Samples from 2005 were analyzed (458: 270 males, 137 females, 51 anonymous), using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System. Results show that 60.1% of males and 50.2% of females had HIV-1 with resistance to at least one medication. The average number of HIV mutations in males was 6.27, while the average number of HIV mutations in females was 5.49. The highest levels of resistance were to Zalcitabine, Lamivudine, and Stavudine. The reverse transcriptase mutations with the highest frequency of expression were M184V, K103N and D67N. Protease mutations with the highest rate of expression were L63P, M361 and L90M. Significant differences between men and women were recorded in the levels of HIV-1 expressed mutations and resistance.

  10. Molecular mechanisms and design principles for promiscuous inhibitors to avoid drug resistance: lessons learned from HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Tidor, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and ranges from highly selective to broadly promiscuous. The ability to modulate specificity at will is particularly important for drug development, and discovery of mechanisms contributing to binding specificity is crucial for our basic understanding of biology and for applications in health care. In this study, we used computational molecular design to create a large dataset of diverse small molecules with a range of binding specificities. We then performed structural, energetic, and statistical analysis on the dataset to study molecular mechanisms of achieving specificity goals. The work was done in the context of HIV-1 protease inhibition and the molecular designs targeted a panel of wild-type and drug-resistant mutant HIV-1 protease structures. The analysis focused on mechanisms for promiscuous binding to bind robustly even to resistance mutants. Broadly binding inhibitors tended to be smaller in size, more flexible in chemical structure, and more hydrophobic in nature compared to highly selective ones. Furthermore, structural and energetic analyses illustrated mechanisms by which flexible inhibitors achieved binding; we found ligand conformational adaptation near mutation sites and structural plasticity in targets through torsional flips of asymmetric functional groups to form alternative, compensatory packing interactions or hydrogen bonds. As no inhibitor bound to all variants, we designed small cocktails of inhibitors to do so and discovered that they often jointly covered the target set through mechanistic complementarity. Furthermore, using structural plasticity observed in experiments, and potentially in simulations, is suggested to be a viable means of designing adaptive inhibitors that are promiscuous binders.

  11. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  12. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  13. Systems mapping of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Sui, Yihan; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yaqun; Wang, Ningtao; Liu, Jingyuan; Li, Yao; Goodenow, Maureen; Yin, Li; Wang, Zuoheng; Wu, Rongling

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models of viral dynamics in vivo provide incredible insights into the mechanisms for the nonlinear interaction between virus and host cell populations, the dynamics of viral drug resistance, and the way to eliminate virus infection from individual patients by drug treatment. The integration of these mathematical models with high-throughput genetic and genomic data within a statistical framework will raise a hope for effective treatment of infections with HIV virus through developing potent antiviral drugs based on individual patients' genetic makeup. In this opinion article, we will show a conceptual model for mapping and dictating a comprehensive picture of genetic control mechanisms for viral dynamics through incorporating a group of differential equations that quantify the emergent properties of a system. PMID:23092371

  14. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:27199430

  15. Short communication: high prevalence of drug resistance in HIV type 1-infected children born in Honduras and Belize 2001 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Parham, Leda; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Murillo, Wendy; Naver, Lars; Largaespada, Natalia; Albert, Jan; Karlsson, Annika C

    2011-10-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has had a great impact on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1. However, development of drug resistance, which could be subsequently transmitted to the child, is a major concern. In Honduras and Belize the prevalence of drug resistance among HIV-1-infected children remains unknown. A total of 95 dried blood spot samples was obtained from HIV-1-infected, untreated children in Honduras and Belize born during 2001 to 2004, when preventive antiretroviral therapy was often suboptimal and consisted of monotherapy with nevirapine or zidovudine. Partial HIV-1 pol gene sequences were successfully obtained from 66 children (Honduras n=55; Belize n=11). Mutations associated with drug resistance were detected in 13% of the Honduran and 27% of the Belizean children. Most of the mutations detected in Honduras (43%) and all mutations detected in Belize were associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which was expected from the wide use of nevirapine to prevent MTCT during the study period. In addition, although several mothers reported that they had not received antiretroviral therapy, mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors were found in Honduras. This suggests prior and unreported use of these drugs, or that these women had been infected with resistant virus. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, the presence of drug resistance-associated mutations in HIV-1-infected Honduran and Belizean children.

  16. Development and Customization of a Color-Coded Microbeads-Based Assay for Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lijun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Shiino, Teiichiro; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Ishida, Takaomi; Gao, George F.; Matsushita, Masaki; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Hosoya, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance (DR) of HIV-1 can be examined genotypically or phenotypically. Although sequencing is the gold standard of the genotypic resistance testing (GRT), high-throughput GRT targeted to the codons responsible for DR may be more appropriate for epidemiological studies and public health research. Methods We used a Japanese database to design and synthesize sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) for the detection of wild-type sequences and 6 DR mutations in the clade B HIV-1 reverse transcriptase region. We coupled SSOP to microbeads of the Luminex 100 xMAP system and developed a GRT based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-SSOP-Luminex method. Results Sixteen oligoprobes for discriminating DR mutations from wild-type sequences at 6 loci were designed and synthesized, and their sensitivity and specificity were confirmed using isogenic plasmids. The PCR-SSOP-Luminex DR assay was then compared to direct sequencing using 74 plasma specimens from treatment-naïve patients or those on failing treatment. In the majority of specimens, the results of the PCR-SSOP-Luminex DR assay were concordant with sequencing results: 62/74 (83.8%) for M41, 43/74 (58.1%) for K65, 70/74 (94.6%) for K70, 55/73 (75.3%) for K103, 63/73 (86.3%) for M184 and 68/73 (93.2%) for T215. There were a number of specimens without any positive signals, especially for K65. The nucleotide position of A2723G, A2747G and C2750T were frequent polymorphisms for the wild-type amino acids K65, K66 and D67, respectively, and 14 specimens had the D67N mutation encoded by G2748A. We synthesized 14 additional oligoprobes for K65, and the sensitivity for K65 loci improved from 43/74 (58.1%) to 68/74 (91.9%). Conclusions We developed a rapid high-throughput assay for clade B HIV-1 DR mutations, which could be customized by synthesizing oligoprobes suitable for the circulating viruses. The assay could be a useful tool especially for public health research in both resource-rich and

  17. The use of dried blood spot specimens for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping in young children initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salimo, Anna T.; Ledwaba, Johanna; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J.; Technau, Karl-Günter; Kuhn, Louise; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Paired plasma and dried blood spots (DBS) from 232 South African HIV-infected children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) were genotyped for drug resistance mutations, most of who had prior exposure to ART for prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were most commonly detected in both specimen types, particularly Y181C/I and K103N/S. Resistance interpretation concordance was achieved in 97% of pairs with 7 children having mutations detected in DBS only. These results validate the preferential use of DBS specimens for HIVDR genotyping in this patient group. PMID:26192603

  18. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  19. N(6)-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m(6)A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1-3) bind to m(6)A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1-3 proteins recognize m(6)A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4(+) T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1-3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1-3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m(6)A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m(6)A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m(6)A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. PMID:27371828

  20. Increasing HIV-1 pretreatment drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating treatment between 2006 and 2014 in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael H; Silverman, Rachel; Beck, Ingrid A; Yatich, Nelly; Dross, Sandra; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer; Bii, Stephen; Tapia, Kenneth; Stern, Joshua; Chohan, Bhavna; Sakr, Samah R; Kiarie, James N; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2016-06-19

    Antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya were tested for HIV-1 drug resistance at codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, M184V, and K65R using an oligonucleotide ligation assay. Prevalence of pretreatment drug resistance increased from 3.89% in 2006 to 10.93% in 2014 (P < 0.001), and 95% of those with resistance had at least one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation. Resistance to tenofovir (K65R) was found in 2014 but not in 2006. PMID:27058353

  1. Resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors used in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Wainberg, Mark A; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors that target the retroviral enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) have played an indispensable role in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection. They can be grouped into two distinct therapeutic groups, namely the nucleoside and nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs), and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). NRTIs form the backbones of most first- and second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens formulated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. They are also used to prevent mother-to-child transmission, and as pre-exposure prophylaxis in individuals at risk of HIV-1 infection. The NNRTIs nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz and rilpivirine also used to form part of first-line ART regimens, although this is no longer recommended, while etravirine can be used in salvage ART regimens. A single-dose of NVP administered to both mother and child has routinely been used in resource-limited settings to reduce the rate of HIV-1 transmission. Unfortunately, the development of HIV-1 resistance to RT inhibitors can compromise the efficacy of these antiviral drugs in both the treatment and prevention arenas. Here, we provide an up-to-date review on drug-resistance mutations in HIV-1 RT, and discuss their cross-resistance profiles, molecular mechanisms and clinical significance. PMID:26517190

  2. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  3. Short Communication: Population-Based Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Cameroonian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy According to the World Health Organization Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Désiré; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Akonie, Haniel Ze; Kouanfack, Charles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Colizzi, Vittorio; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ndjolo, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    With ongoing earlier enrollment on and rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon, there are increasing risks of transmitted HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at population levels. We, therefore, evaluated the threshold of HIVDR in a population initiating ART, to inform on the effectiveness of first-line regimens, considering HIV-1 diversity, plasma viral load (PVL), and CD4-based disease progression. A total of 53 adults [median (interquartile range, IQR) CD4: 162 cell/mm(3) (48-284); median (IQR) PVL: 5.34 log10 RNA (4.17-6.42) copies/ml] initiating ART in 2014 at the Yaoundé Central Hospital were enrolled for HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase sequencing. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were interpreted using the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list versus the Stanford HIVdb algorithm version 7.0. Level of DRMs was low (3.77%) versus moderate (7.55%), respectively, following the WHO list (T69D, K103N) versus Stanford HIVdb (T69D, A98G, K103N, K238T), respectively. Prevailing clade was CRF02_AG (71.70%). Based on Stanford HIVdb, a slightly higher proportion of patients with DRMs were found among ones infected with CRF02_AG than in those non-CRF02_AG infected (7.89% vs. 6.67%, p = 1.000), with lower PVL (7.69% <5.5 vs. 0% ≥5.5 log10 RNA copies/ml, p = .488) and with higher CD4 counts (9.52% CD4 ≥200 vs. 3.33% CD4 <200 cells/mm(3), p = .749). Thresholds of DRMs suggest that standard first-line regimens currently used in Cameroon may remain effective at population levels, despite scale-up of ART in the country, pending adherence, and closed virological monitoring. With an intent-to-diagnose approach, the discrepant levels of DRMs support using Stanford HIVdb to evaluate initial ART, while revising the WHO list for surveillance.

  4. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  5. Short Communication: Population-Based Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Cameroonian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy According to the World Health Organization Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Désiré; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Akonie, Haniel Ze; Kouanfack, Charles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Colizzi, Vittorio; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ndjolo, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    With ongoing earlier enrollment on and rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon, there are increasing risks of transmitted HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at population levels. We, therefore, evaluated the threshold of HIVDR in a population initiating ART, to inform on the effectiveness of first-line regimens, considering HIV-1 diversity, plasma viral load (PVL), and CD4-based disease progression. A total of 53 adults [median (interquartile range, IQR) CD4: 162 cell/mm(3) (48-284); median (IQR) PVL: 5.34 log10 RNA (4.17-6.42) copies/ml] initiating ART in 2014 at the Yaoundé Central Hospital were enrolled for HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase sequencing. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were interpreted using the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list versus the Stanford HIVdb algorithm version 7.0. Level of DRMs was low (3.77%) versus moderate (7.55%), respectively, following the WHO list (T69D, K103N) versus Stanford HIVdb (T69D, A98G, K103N, K238T), respectively. Prevailing clade was CRF02_AG (71.70%). Based on Stanford HIVdb, a slightly higher proportion of patients with DRMs were found among ones infected with CRF02_AG than in those non-CRF02_AG infected (7.89% vs. 6.67%, p = 1.000), with lower PVL (7.69% <5.5 vs. 0% ≥5.5 log10 RNA copies/ml, p = .488) and with higher CD4 counts (9.52% CD4 ≥200 vs. 3.33% CD4 <200 cells/mm(3), p = .749). Thresholds of DRMs suggest that standard first-line regimens currently used in Cameroon may remain effective at population levels, despite scale-up of ART in the country, pending adherence, and closed virological monitoring. With an intent-to-diagnose approach, the discrepant levels of DRMs support using Stanford HIVdb to evaluate initial ART, while revising the WHO list for surveillance. PMID:26602836

  6. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T.; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007–2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5–10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  7. Impaired IL-2 expression in latent HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Lim, Hoyong; Park, Jihwan; Roh, Tae-Young; Kang, Chun; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2015-08-01

    Regarding the T cell function in HIV-1 infection, activation of T cells is enhanced in acutely HIV-1-infected T cells upon stimuli. However, T cell immune responses underlying the activation of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling molecules and interleukin (IL)-2 production in latently HIV-1-infected cells are poorly understood. The expression and activation of TCR components and its downstream molecules in acutely and latently HIV-1-infected T cells were compared using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for mRNA expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for levels of IL-2 in phytohemagglutinin M (PHA-M). The levels of T cell surface molecules and TCR signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were greatly decreased without changes in their mRNA levels. In addition, downstream TCR-signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were not activated even in the presence of PHA-M. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the presence of PHA-M was weakly induced in latently HIV-1-infected cells but was greater in acutely HIVNL4-3-infected cells. Finally, the production of IL-2 was significantly decreased in latently HIV-1-infected cells compared with uninfected parent cells. Thus, IL-2-related immunological functions in latently HIV-1-infected T cells were markedly impaired even in the presence of stimuli.

  8. Development and application of a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot-based genotyping assay for global surveillance of HIV-1 drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfu; McNulty, Amanda; Diallo, Karidia; Zhang, Jing; Titanji, Boghuma; Kassim, Sidibe; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Aberle-Grasse, John; Kibuka, Tabitha; Ndumbe, Peter M; Vedapuri, Shanmugam; Zhou, Zhiyong; Chilima, Benson; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-09-01

    As antiretroviral therapy (ART) is scaled up in resource-limited countries, surveillance for HIV drug resistance (DR) is vital to ensure sustained effectiveness of first-line ART. We have developed and applied a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot (DBS)-based genotyping assay for surveillance of HIV-1 DR in international settings. In 2005 and 2006, 171 DBS samples were collected under field conditions from newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals from Malawi (n = 58), Tanzania (n = 60), and China (n =53). In addition, 30 DBS and 40 plasma specimens collected from ART patients in China and Cameroon, respectively, were also tested. Of the 171 DBS analyzed at the protease and RT regions, 149 (87.1%) could be genotyped, including 49 (81.7%) from Tanzania, 47 (88.7%) from China, and 53 (91.4%) from Malawi. Among the 70 ART patient samples analyzed, 100% (30/30) of the Chinese DBS and 90% (36/40) of the Cameroonian plasma specimens were genotyped, including 8 samples with a viral load of <400 copies/ml. The results of phylogenetic analyses indicated that the subtype, circulating recombinant form (CRF), and unique recombinant form (URF) distribution was as follows: 73 strains were subtype C (34%), 37 were subtype B (17.2%), 24 each were CRF01_AE or CRF02_AG (11.2% each), 22 were subtype A1 (10.2%), and 9 were unclassifiable (UC) (4.2%). The remaining samples were minor strains comprised of 6 that were CRF07_BC (2.8%), 5 that were CRF10_CD (2.3%), 3 each that were URF_A1C and CRF08_BC (1.4%), 2 each that were G, URF_BC, and URF_D/UC (0.9%), and 1 each that were subtype F1, subtype F2, and URF_A1D (0.5%). Our results indicate that this broadly sensitive genotyping assay can be used to genotype DBS collected from areas with diverse HIV-1 group M subtypes and CRFs. Thus, the assay is likely to become a useful screening tool in the global resistance surveillance and monitoring of HIV-1 where multiple subtypes and CRFs are found.

  9. Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Mechanisms of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance: An Individual-Patient- and Sequence-Level Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Blanco, Jose Luis; Jordan, Michael R.; Taylor, Jonathan; Lemey, Philippe; Varghese, Vici; Hamers, Raph L.; Bertagnolio, Silvia; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; Albert, Jan; Avi, Radko; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Bessong, Pascal O.; Brooks, James I.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Busch, Michael P.; Bussmann, Hermann; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Chin, Bum Sik; D’Aquin, Toni T.; De Gascun, Cillian F.; Derache, Anne; Descamps, Diane; Deshpande, Alaka K.; Djoko, Cyrille F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fleury, Herve; Frange, Pierre; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hattori, Junko; Holguin, Africa; Hunt, Gillian M.; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Katzenstein, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Kim, Jerome H.; Kim, Sung Soon; Li, Yanpeng; Lutsar, Irja; Morris, Lynn; Ndembi, Nicaise; NG, Kee Peng; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Peeters, Martine; Poljak, Mario; Price, Matt A.; Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Rolland, Morgane; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey M.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soriano, Vincent V.; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Stanojevic, Maja; Stefani, Mariane A.; Sugiura, Wataru; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Tanuri, Amilcar; Tee, Kok Keng; Truong, Hong-Ha M.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Vidal, Nicole; Yang, Chunfu; Yang, Rongge; Yebra, Gonzalo; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to understand the molecular epidemiology of TDR and to identify the HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations responsible for TDR in different regions and virus subtypes. Methods and Findings We reviewed all GenBank submissions of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences with or without protease and identified 287 studies published between March 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, with more than 25 recently or chronically infected ARV-naïve individuals. These studies comprised 50,870 individuals from 111 countries. Each set of study sequences was analyzed for phylogenetic clustering and the presence of 93 surveillance drug-resistance mutations (SDRMs). The median overall TDR prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), south/southeast Asia (SSEA), upper-income Asian countries, Latin America/Caribbean, Europe, and North America was 2.8%, 2.9%, 5.6%, 7.6%, 9.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. In SSA, there was a yearly 1.09-fold (95% CI: 1.05–1.14) increase in odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up attributable to an increase in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance. The odds of NNRTI-associated TDR also increased in Latin America/Caribbean (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06–1.25), North America (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12–1.26), Europe (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01–1.13), and upper-income Asian countries (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12–1.55). In SSEA, there was no significant change in the odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92–1.02). An analysis limited to sequences with mixtures at less than 0.5% of their nucleotide positions—a proxy for recent infection—yielded trends comparable to those obtained using the complete dataset. Four

  10. Progesterone augments cell susceptibility to HIV-1 and HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infections.

    PubMed

    Ragupathy, Viswanath; Xue, Wang; Tan, Ji; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Gao, Yamei; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-10-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women, oral or injectable progesterone containing contraceptive pills may enhance HIV-1 acquisition in vivo, and the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. In developing countries, Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) co-infection has been shown to be a risk for increase of HIV-1 acquisition and, if co-infected women use progesterone pills, infections may increase several fold. In this study, we used an in vitro cell culture system to study the effects of progesterone on HIV-1 replication and to explore the molecular mechanism of progesterone effects on infected cells. In our in vitro model, CEMss cells (lymphoblastoid cell line) were infected with either HIV-1 alone or co-infected with HSV-2. HIV-1 viral load was measured with and without sex hormone treatment. Progesterone-treated cells showed an increase in HIV-1 viral load (1411.2 pg/mL) compared with cells without progesterone treatment (993.1 pg/mL). Increased cell death was noted with HSV-2 co-infection and in progesterone-treated cells. Similar observations were noted in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cells derived from three female donors. Progesterone-treated cells also showed reduced antiviral efficacy. Inflammatory cytokines and associations with biomarkers of disease progression were explored. Progesterone upregulated inflammatory cytokines and chemokines conversely and downregulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression. Nuclear protein analysis by electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the association of progesterone with progesterone response element (PRE), which may lead to downregulation of Bcl-2. These data indicate that progesterone treatment enhances HIV-1 replication in infected cells and co-infection with HSV-2 may further fuel this process. PMID:27538988

  11. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here, we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26635799

  12. Structured treatment interruptions to control HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Maserati, R; Foli, A; Seminari, E; Timpone, J; Lisziewicz, J

    2000-01-22

    Structured treatment interruptions progressively lowered the rate of viral rebound in some HIV-1 infected patients. This approach should be explored as an alternative to continuous antiretroviral therapies.

  13. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Thomson, Michael M.; Montero, Vanessa; Sánchez, Monica; Sánchez, Ana Maria; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC) in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs), 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs), and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01)]. Sixty eight (42.2%) of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions. PMID:26010948

  14. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  15. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  16. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  17. [Inhibitory effect of human saliva on HIV-1 infectivity].

    PubMed

    Etsuko, K; Wei, S

    2001-08-01

    Human saliva is known to decrease human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity in vitro. The purpose of this study was to confirm these findings and to explore the mechanism of action of saliva. Whole saliva from seronegative donors was incubated with HIV-1IIIB chronically infected MOLT 4 cells (MOLT 4/HIV-1IIIB cells) or cell-free HIV-1IIIB or KMT strains. We monitored viral infectivity by using MAGI/CCR5 cells. Whole saliva with Na levels less than 20 mEq/l rapidly damaged MOLT 4/HIV-1IIIB cells, thereby HIV infection to MAGI/CCR5 cells by MOLT 4/HIV-1IIIB cells was nearly abolished. On the contrary, in the cace of whole saliva with Na levels more than 23 mEq/l which damaged few cells, cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1IIIB was prevented by more than 50%. The infectivity of cell-free HIV-1IIIB to MAGI/CCR5 cells was abolished after incubating and filtering the HIV with whole saliva. Depletion of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) from whole saliva resulted in a 11-28% decrease in the anti HIV-1KMT activity of saliva. Preincubation of host cells with whole saliva led to an enhancement of the HIV infection rather than inhibition. Whole saliva had no effect on the expression level of the cellular receptors (CD4, CXCR4 and CCR5). These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of whole saliva on HIV-1 infectivity is directly linked to the virus itself rather than on the host cell. Moreover, the physical entrapment of cell-free HIV-1 by whole saliva seems to have major salivaly defence mechanisms against HIV-1 infection through the oral cavity. PMID:16578966

  18. Selection of drug-resistant HIV-1 during the early phase of viral decay is uncommon in treatment-naïve patients initiated on a three- or four-drug antiretroviral regimen including lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Bergroth, Tobias; Ekici, Halime; Gisslén, Magnus; Loes, Sabine Kinloch-de; Goh, Li-Ean; Freedman, Andrew; Lampe, Fiona; Johnson, Margaret A; Sönnerborg, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Therapy failure due to drug resistance development is a common phenomenon in HIV-infected patients. However, when the drug pressure leads to the earliest selection of drug-resistant HIV-1 populations is still unclear. In this study, the extent to which selection of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase M184I/V mutations occur during the initial phase of viral decay in treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) was examined. Plasma virus from three cohorts of treatment-naïve patients initiating quadruple (n = 43), triple (n = 14) or dual (n = 15) lamivudine-containing ART were analyzed for M184I/V during the first 6 months of therapy using direct sequencing and a sensitive selective real-time PCR method. Among quadruple ART patients, who all were treated at primary HIV-1 infection, only one patient developed M184V after 6 weeks of therapy, having had wild-type virus at baseline. No mutations were found in chronically infected patients on triple ART. In patients on dual therapy, M184I/V mutants were found frequently. Selection of M184I/V mutants was found to be rare during the initial phase of viral decay after initiation of ART in adherent patients given a three or four-drug combination, in contrast to those receiving a less potent regimen. The results suggest that triple and quadruple lamivudine + PI or PI/r containing ART given to treatment-naïve adherent patients is potent enough to prevent development of resistance during the first months of therapy.

  19. Glutamate metabolism in HIV-1 infected macrophages: Role of HIV-1 Vpr.

    PubMed

    Datta, Prasun K; Deshmane, Satish; Khalili, Kamel; Merali, Salim; Gordon, John C; Fecchio, Chiara; Barrero, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 infected macrophages play a significant role in the neuropathogenesis of AIDS. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) not only facilitates HIV-1 infection but also contribute to long-lived persistence in macrophages. Our previous studies using SILAC-based proteomic analysis showed that the expression of critical metabolic enzymes in the glycolytic pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were altered in response to Vpr expression in macrophages. We hypothesized that Vpr-induced modulation of glycolysis and TCA cycle regulates glutamate metabolism and release in HIV-1 infected macrophages. We assessed the amount of specific metabolites induced by Vpr and HIV-1 in macrophages at the intracellular and extracellular level in a time-dependent manner utilizing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) targeted metabolomics. In addition, stable isotope-labeled glucose and an MRM targeted metabolomics assay were used to evaluate the de novo synthesis and release of glutamate in Vpr overexpressing macrophages and HIV-1 infected macrophages, throughout the metabolic flux of glycolytic pathway and TCA cycle activation. The metabolic flux studies demonstrated an increase in glucose uptake, glutamate release and accumulation of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and glutamine in the extracellular milieu in Vpr expressing and HIV-1 infected macrophages. Interestingly, glutamate pools and other intracellular intermediates (glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), citrate, malate, α-KG, and glutamine) showed a decreased trend except for fumarate, in contrast to the glutamine accumulation observed in the extracellular space in Vpr overexpressing macrophages. Our studies demonstrate that dysregulation of mitochondrial glutamate metabolism induced by Vpr in HIV-1 infected macrophages commonly seen, may contribute to neurodegeneration via excitotoxic mechanisms in the context of NeuroAIDS. PMID:27245560

  20. Platelets and HIV-1 infection: old and new aspects.

    PubMed

    Torre, Donato; Pugliese, Agostino

    2008-09-01

    In this review we summarize the data on interaction of platelets with HIV-1 infection. Thrombocytopenia is a common finding among HIV-1 infected patients; several combined factors contribute to low peripheral platelet counts, which are present during all the stages of the disease. In addition, a relationship between platelet count, plasma viral load and disease progression has been reported, and this shows the potential influence platelets may have on the natural history of HIV-1 disease. Several lines of evidence have shown that platelets are an integral part of inflammation, and can be also potent effector cells of innate immune response as well as of adaptive immunity. Thus, we rewieved the role of inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines as activators of platelets during HIV-1 infection. Moreover, platelets show a direct interaction with HIV-1 itself, through different pathogenic mechanisms as binding, engulfment, internalisation of HIV-1, playing a role in host defence during HIV-1 infection, by limiting viral spread and probably by inactivating viral particles. Platelets may also play an intriguing role on endothelial dysfunction present in HIV-1 infection, and this topic begins to receive systematic study, inasmuch as interaction between platelets and endothelial cells is important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in HIV-1 infected patients, especially in those patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Finally, this review attempts to better define the state of this emerging issue, to focus areas of potential clinical relevance, and to suggest several directions for future research.

  1. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. PMID:26774171

  2. Short Communication: Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV-1-Infected Brazilian Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Mariza Gonçalvez; Côrtes, Fernanda Heloise; Guimarães, Monick Lindermeyer; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Bongertz, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tests for the detection of the humoral immune response to HIV-1 have to be standardized and established, demanding regional efforts. For this purpose the neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay for HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells was introduced in Brazil. Twenty plasma samples from HIV-1-infected individuals were assayed: 10 progressors and 10 long-term nonprogressors. These were tested against eight env-pseudotyped viruses (psVs) in the TZM-bl NAb assay and against HIV-1 strain HTLV/IIIB (HIV-1 IIIB) in primary lymphocytes. Forty-four percent of the samples showed neutralizing titers for psVs and 55% for HIV-1 IIIB. Plasma from progressors showed a broader neutralization and a higher potency. The introduction of these reference reagents encourages the participation of Brazil in future comparative assessments of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. PMID:23145941

  3. HIV-1 Capsid: The Multifaceted Key Player in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Edward M.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a mature, infectious HIV-1 virion, the viral genome is housed within a conical capsid core comprised of the viral capsid (CA) protein. The CA protein, and the structure into which it assembles, facilitate virtually every step of infection through a series of interactions with multiple host cell factors. This review describes our understanding of the interactions between the viral capsid core and several cellular factors that enable efficient HIV-1 genome replication, timely core disassembly, nuclear import and the integration of the viral genome into the genome of the target cell. We then discuss how elucidating these interactions can reveal new targets for therapeutic interactions against HIV-1. PMID:26179359

  4. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Kunz, Andrea; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Nitsche, Andreas; Theuring, Stefanie; Bannert, Norbert; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Harms, Gundel; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Methods Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F). In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System. Results Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29) of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29) by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24). By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41). The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2–3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml), resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage. Conclusions Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in

  5. HIV-1 infection, microenvironment and endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Pietro; Caruso, Arnaldo; Caccuri, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 promotes a generalized immune activation that involves the main targets of HIV-1 infection but also cells that are not sensitive to viral infection. ECs display major dysfunctions in HIV+ patients during long-standing viral infection that persist even in the current cART era, in which new-generation drugs have reduced dysmetabolic side effects and successfully impeded viral replication. In vivo studies have failed to demonstrate the presence of replicating virus in ECs suggesting that a direct role of the virus is unlikely, and implying that the mechanism accounting for vascular dysfunction may rely on the indirect action of molecules released in the microenvironment by HIV-1-infected cells. This article reviews the current understanding of how HIV-1 infection can contribute to vascular dysfunction. In particular, we discuss the emerging role played by different HIV-1 proteins in driving inflammation and EC dysregulation, and highlight the need to target them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27602413

  6. Prevalence of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in HIV-1-Positive Treatment-Naive Pregnant Women in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo (Kento-Mwana Project).

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, Bianca; Saladini, Francesco; Sticchi, Laura; Mayinda Mboungou, Franc A; Barresi, Renata; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Calzi, Anna; Zazzi, Maurizio; Icardi, Giancarlo; Viscoli, Claudio; Bisio, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    The Kento-Mwana project was carried out in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo, to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. To determine the prevalence of different subtypes and transmitted drug resistance-associated mutations, 95 plasma samples were collected at baseline from HIV-1-positive naive pregnant women enrolled in the project during the years 2005-2008. Full protease and partial reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed and 68/95 (71.6%) samples were successfully sequenced. Major mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors were detected in 4/68 (5.9%), 3/68 (4.4%), and 2/68 (2.9%) samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 isolates showed a high prevalence of unique recombinant forms (24/68, 35%), followed by CRF45_cpx (7/68, 10.3%) and subsubtype A3 and subtype G (6/68 each, 8.8%). Although the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations appears to be currently limited, baseline HIV-1 genotyping is highly advisable in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy scale-up in resource-limited settings to optimize treatment and prevent perinatal transmission. PMID:25970260

  7. HIV-1 subtype characteristics of infected persons living in southwestern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Davanos, Nikolaos; Panos, George; Gogos, Charalambos A; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2015-01-01

    Background The rapid replication rate of HIV-1, coupled with a high mutation rate and recombination, is the underlying force driving its genetic diversity. In the infected individual, a population of highly related but nonidentical strains exists. At the population level, multiple subtypes often cocirculate, leading to the generation of intersubtype recombinant forms. As a result, the geographic distribution of subtypes and recombinant forms is complex and uneven. Genetic subtyping of HIV-1 isolates has been shown to be helpful for understanding the genetic evolution, the worldwide spread of the virus, and the evaluation of drug resistance. Materials and methods We determined the genetic heterogeneity of HIV-1 group M in southwestern Greece. Protease and partial reverse-transcriptase sequences were generated from 150 HIV-1-infected individuals attending the Division of Infectious Diseases of Patras University Hospital, Greece, from 2006 to 2012, and analyzed using online subtyping tools and phylogenetic methods. Results The majority of the infected individuals were male (77%). HIV-1 subtype A1 was responsible for 51.3% of infections, followed by subtypes B (34%), G (4%), F1 (2%), and the circulating recombinant forms 02_AG (2.7%), 14_BG (1.3%), 35_AD (1.3%), and 01_AE (0.7%). Additionally, we identified three cases with a recombinant B/CRF02_AG strain (2%) and one with a recombinant G/GRF_AG strain. Sexual transmission was responsible for 96.3% of cases. Heterosexual transmission was responsible for 70.2% of subtype-A1 infections, whereas subtype B was transmitted by men who have sex with men in 75.5% of cases. Protease substitutions I13V, E35D, M36I, R57K, H69K, and L89M, which serve as drug-resistance support mutations in subtype B, were present in the majority of subtype-A1 sequences of the population. Conclusion HIV-1 infection in southwestern Greece is sexually transmitted and highly heterogeneous. Subtype A1 has surpassed subtype B, and is the most prevalent

  8. Raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Cecilia

    2008-08-01

    Merck & Co has developed and launched raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in treatment-experienced adult patients who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. This drug is the lead from a series of integrase strand transfer inhibitors and, by April 2008, it had been launched in Canada, the US, the UK, France, Germany and Spain, and had been filed for approval in Japan.

  9. HIV-1 infection may be on the rise in Peru.

    PubMed

    The results of a national survey have indicated that "... HIV-1 infection is epidemic in Peru among groups at high risk of sexually and parenterally transmitted diseases," a multicenter group reported (AIDS 1996; 10: 1141-1145). Although the risk of infection appears to be very low in the general population, it may possibly be increasing, according to Dr. Michael C. McCarthy, US National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. McCarthy's group evaluated over 140,000 serum samples for antibodies to HIV-1 between January 1986 and December 1990 in Peru. HIV-1 antibody was detected in 26% of samples from homosexual men, 10% of samples from male sexually transmitted disease patients, and 13% of samples from drug users. 10% of the samples from hemophiliacs and unlicensed female prostitutes were positive for antibodies to HIV-1. In general, he concluded that the patterns of the HIV-1 epidemic in Peru are similar to those seen in Brazil and "... are also similar to initial transmission patterns of HIV-1 infection of North America." However, McCarthy also noted a substantial increase in the prevalence of HIV-1 infection between the beginning and the end of the survey period. Although there was a low prevalence of HIV-1 infection among military personnel and among women seen at prenatal clinics, a "low but rising prevalence of HIV-1 antibody" among military personnel points to a potential increase in the general population. "The fact that many HIV-1 antibody-positive men were married and reported bisexual behavior (28%) highlights the potential of this group to transmit HIV-1 to female partners," he added.

  10. Multifarious immunotherapeutic approaches to cure HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Imami, Nesrina; Herasimtschuk, Anna A

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy in the context of treated HIV-1 infection aims to improve immune responses to achieve better control of the virus. To date, multifaceted immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to reduce immune activation and increase CD4 T-lymphocyte counts, further to the effects of antiretroviral therapy alone, in addition to improving HIV-1-specific T-cell responses. While sterilizing cure of HIV-1 would involve elimination of all replication-competent virus, a functional cure in which the host has long-lasting control of viral replication may be more feasible. In this commentary, we discuss novel strategies aimed at targeting the latent viral reservoir with cure of HIV-1 infection being the ultimate goal, an achievement that would have considerable impact on worldwide HIV-1 infection.

  11. Pretreatment HIV Drug Resistance and HIV-1 Subtype C Are Independently Associated With Virologic Failure: Results From the Multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Smeaton, Laura; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Wallis, Carol L.; Tripathy, Srikanth; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugham; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Reitsma, Marissa; Hart, Stephen; Mellors, John W.; Halvas, Elias; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; La Rosa, Alberto; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Lama, Javier R.; Rassool, Mohammed; Santos, Breno R.; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Hakim, James; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Campbell, Thomas B.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Evaluation of pretreatment HIV genotyping is needed globally to guide treatment programs. We examined the association of pretreatment (baseline) drug resistance and subtype with virologic failure in a multinational, randomized clinical trial that evaluated 3 antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens and included resource-limited setting sites. Methods. Pol genotyping was performed in a nested case-cohort study including 270 randomly sampled participants (subcohort), and 218 additional participants failing ART (case group). Failure was defined as confirmed viral load (VL) >1000 copies/mL. Cox proportional hazards models estimated resistance–failure association. Results. In the representative subcohort (261/270 participants with genotypes; 44% women; median age, 35 years; median CD4 cell count, 151 cells/µL; median VL, 5.0 log10 copies/mL; 58% non-B subtypes), baseline resistance occurred in 4.2%, evenly distributed among treatment arms and subtypes. In the subcohort and case groups combined (466/488 participants with genotypes), used to examine the association between resistance and treatment failure, baseline resistance occurred in 7.1% (9.4% with failure, 4.3% without). Baseline resistance was significantly associated with shorter time to virologic failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; P = .035), and after adjusting for sex, treatment arm, sex–treatment arm interaction, pretreatment CD4 cell count, baseline VL, and subtype, was still independently associated (HR, 2.1; P = .05). Compared with subtype B, subtype C infection was associated with higher failure risk (HR, 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–2.35), whereas non-B/C subtype infection was associated with longer time to failure (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, .22–.98). Conclusions. In this global clinical trial, pretreatment resistance and HIV-1 subtype were independently associated with virologic failure. Pretreatment genotyping should be considered whenever feasible. Clinical Trials

  12. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance. PMID:24278679

  13. Identification of Siglec-1 null individuals infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; McLaren, Paul J; Erkizia, Itziar; Martin, Maureen P; Benet, Susana; Rotger, Margalida; Dalmau, Judith; Ouchi, Dan; Wolinsky, Steven M; Penugonda, Sudhir; Günthard, Huldrych F; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-1/CD169 is a myeloid-cell surface receptor critical for HIV-1 capture and infection of bystander target cells. To dissect the role of SIGLEC1 in natura, we scan a large population genetic database and identify a loss-of-function variant (Glu88Ter) that is found in ∼1% of healthy people. Exome analysis and direct genotyping of 4,233 HIV-1-infected individuals reveals two Glu88Ter homozygous and 97 heterozygous subjects, allowing the analysis of ex vivo and in vivo consequences of SIGLEC1 loss-of-function. Cells from these individuals are functionally null or haploinsufficient for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and trans-infection ex vivo. However, Siglec-1 protein truncation does not have a measurable impact on HIV-1 acquisition or AIDS outcomes in vivo. This result contrasts with the known in vitro functional role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1 trans-infection. Thus, it provides evidence that the classical HIV-1 infectious routes may compensate for the lack of Siglec-1 in fuelling HIV-1 dissemination within infected individuals. PMID:27510803

  14. Identification of Siglec-1 null individuals infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; McLaren, Paul J.; Erkizia, Itziar; Martin, Maureen P.; Benet, Susana; Rotger, Margalida; Dalmau, Judith; Ouchi, Dan; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-1/CD169 is a myeloid-cell surface receptor critical for HIV-1 capture and infection of bystander target cells. To dissect the role of SIGLEC1 in natura, we scan a large population genetic database and identify a loss-of-function variant (Glu88Ter) that is found in ∼1% of healthy people. Exome analysis and direct genotyping of 4,233 HIV-1-infected individuals reveals two Glu88Ter homozygous and 97 heterozygous subjects, allowing the analysis of ex vivo and in vivo consequences of SIGLEC1 loss-of-function. Cells from these individuals are functionally null or haploinsufficient for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and trans-infection ex vivo. However, Siglec-1 protein truncation does not have a measurable impact on HIV-1 acquisition or AIDS outcomes in vivo. This result contrasts with the known in vitro functional role of Siglec-1 in HIV-1 trans-infection. Thus, it provides evidence that the classical HIV-1 infectious routes may compensate for the lack of Siglec-1 in fuelling HIV-1 dissemination within infected individuals. PMID:27510803

  15. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guodong; Ma, Aijing; Dou, Xianghua; Zhao, Liling; Wang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A) and inhibitor (GRL-0519) complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT) complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors. PMID:27240358

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in the Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Genes for HIV-1 Subtype C by Use of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; Zhou, Zhiyong; DeVos, Joshua; Wagar, Nick; Diallo, Karidia; Zulu, Isaac; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Stringer, Jeffrey S. A.; Weidle, Paul J.; Ndongmo, Clement B.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Kagoli, Matthew; Nkengasong, John

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput, sensitive, and cost-effective HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) detection assays are needed for large-scale monitoring of the emergence and transmission of HIVDR in resource-limited settings. Using suspension array technology, we have developed a multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay that can simultaneously detect major HIVDR mutations at 20 loci. Forty-five allele-specific primers tagged with unique 24-base oligonucleotides at the 5′ end were designed to detect wild-type and mutant alleles at the 20 loci of HIV-1 subtype C. The MAS assay was first established and optimized with three plasmid templates (C-wt, C-mut1, and C-mut2) and then evaluated using 148 plasma specimens from HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals. All the wild-type and mutant alleles were unequivocally distinguished with plasmid templates, and the limits of detection were 1.56% for K219Q and K219E, 3.13% for L76V, 6.25% for K65R, K70R, L74V, L100I, K103N, K103R, Q151M, Y181C, and I47V, and 12.5% for M41L, K101P, K101E, V106A, V106M, Y115F, M184V, Y188L, G190A, V32I, I47A, I84V, and L90M. Analyses of 148 plasma specimens revealed that the MAS assay gave 100% concordance with conventional sequencing at eight loci and >95% (range, 95.21% to 99.32%) concordance at the remaining 12 loci. The differences observed were caused mainly by 24 additional low-abundance alleles detected by the MAS assay. Ultradeep sequencing analysis confirmed 15 of the 16 low-abundance alleles. This multiplex, sensitive, and straightforward result-reporting assay represents a new efficient genotyping tool for HIVDR surveillance and monitoring. PMID:23985909

  17. Field Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots for Routine HIV-1 Viral Load and Drug Resistance Monitoring in Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Monleau, Marjorie; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X. T.; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at −20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory

  18. Field evaluation of dried blood spots for routine HIV-1 viral load and drug resistance monitoring in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia.

    PubMed

    Monleau, Marjorie; Aghokeng, Avelin F; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X T; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-02-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at -20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory performance

  19. HIV type-1 group O infection in Gabon: low prevalence rate but circulation of genetically diverse and drug-resistant HIV type-1 group O strains.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Florian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Sica, Jeanne; Zamba, Chantal; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric; Rouet, François

    2013-07-01

    The goals of this study conducted in Gabon were to determine the prevalence rate of HIV-1 group O (HIV-1/O) infections and to characterize the genetic diversity of HIV-1/O strains as well as implications on antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance. During 2010-2011, 1,176 samples from HIV-positive subjects were tested at the CIRMF (Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville) retrovirology laboratory using an in-house serotyping assay. Plasma HIV-1/O RNA viral loads (VL) were determined using the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay. After full genome sequencing, drug resistance patterns were analyzed using two different algorithms (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les hépatites virales and Stanford). Overall, four subjects (0.34%) were diagnosed as HIV-1/O infected. One subject, untreated by ARVs, died 2 months after HIV-1/O diagnosis. One was lost to follow-up. Two additional patients, treated with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens, showed CD4 counts <200/mm(3) and VL results of 101,000 and 10,050 cp/ml. After full-length genome sequencing of these two strains, we found a wide range of natural polymorphism in the protease (≥15 substitutions) and gp41 (N42D mutation) genes, as well as in the gag and gag-pol cleavage sites. No resistance mutation was detected in the integrase gene. These two strains harbored the Y181C mutation making them resistant to NNRTIs. M41L, M184V, and T215Y mutations were also found for one strain, making it resistant to all NRTIs by the Stanford algorithm. Even if HIV-1/O infection is low in Gabon, an accurate diagnosis and a reliable virological follow-up are required in Central Africa to optimize ARV treatments of HIV-1/O-infected patients.

  20. Moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance and high HIV-1 genetic diversity in patients from Mato Grosso State, Central Western Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriana Santarém; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2011-08-01

    Few reports have described the molecular characteristics of the AIDS epidemic within the interior regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimensions. To help fill this gap, the prevalence of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity in Mato Grosso State, central western Brazil are reported. Drug-naïve patients (n = 105) were recruited at a reference center in Cuiabá/Mato Grosso State located across the border with Bolivia and considered a southern gate to the Amazon forest. For 92 HIV-1 isolates, the protease and partial reverse transcriptase fragments were amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced. Drug resistance was analyzed by the Calibrated Population Resistance tool and the International AIDS Society-USA database. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by REGA and phylogenetic analyses. Recombinant viruses were analyzed by SIMPLOT. Drug resistance mutations were observed in 5.4%: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations M41L (n = 1), D67N (n = 1), and K219E (n = 1), the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation K103N (n = 1) and the protease inhibitor mutation L90M (n = 1). Around 20% of the isolates were recombinants: different patterns of B/F1 mosaics (n = 11), four B/C, one F1/C/B, one F1/C, and one D/F1. Subtype B(PR) B(RT) represented 71.7%, 5.4% were of subtype C(PR) C(RT) and 3.3% were of subtype F1(PR) F1(RT) . A moderate prevalence of transmitted resistance and the co-circulation of subtypes B, F1, C, different recombinants, including the first report of subtype D, were found in Mato Grosso State, far from the epicenter of the epidemic. These results highlight the importance of monitoring transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 genetic diversity in the interior regions of Brazil.

  1. Trends and Predictors of Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) and Clusters with TDR in a Local Belgian HIV-1 Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Ferreira, Fossie; Li, Guangdi; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Khouri, Ricardo; Derdelinckx, Inge; De Munter, Paul; Kücherer, Claudia; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Nielsen, Claus; Littsola, Kirsi; Wensing, Annemarie; Stanojevic, Maja; Paredes, Roger; Balotta, Claudia; Albert, Jan; Boucher, Charles; Gomez-Lopez, Arley; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Van Ranst, Marc; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study epidemic trends and predictors for transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in our region, its clinical impact and its association with transmission clusters. We included 778 patients from the AIDS Reference Center in Leuven (Belgium) diagnosed from 1998 to 2012. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing and TDR was estimated using the WHO-2009 surveillance list. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian techniques. The cohort was predominantly Belgian (58.4%), men who have sex with men (MSM) (42.8%), and chronically infected (86.5%). The overall TDR prevalence was 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7–11.9), 6.5% (CI: 5.0–8.5) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), 2.2% (CI: 1.4–3.5) for non-NRTI (NNRTI), and 2.2% (CI: 1.4–3.5) for protease inhibitors. A significant parabolic trend of NNRTI-TDR was found (p = 0.019). Factors significantly associated with TDR in univariate analysis were male gender, Belgian origin, MSM, recent infection, transmission clusters and subtype B, while multivariate and Bayesian network analysis singled out subtype B as the most predictive factor of TDR. Subtype B was related with transmission clusters with TDR that included 42.6% of the TDR patients. Thanks to resistance testing, 83% of the patients with TDR who started therapy had undetectable viral load whereas half of the patients would likely have received a suboptimal therapy without this test. In conclusion, TDR remained stable and a NNRTI up-and-down trend was observed. While the presence of clusters with TDR is worrying, we could not identify an independent, non-sequence based predictor for TDR or transmission clusters with TDR that could help with guidelines or public health measures. PMID:25003369

  2. Evaluation of Immune Survival Factors in Pediatric HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    SHEARER, WILLIAM T.; EASLEY, KIRK A.; GOLDFARB, JOHANNA; JENSON, HAL B.; ROSENBLATT, HOWARD M.; KOVACS, ANDREA; MCINTOSH, KENNETH

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, CD19+/20+ B cells, and serum immunoglobulins (Igs) have been implicated as survival factors for pediatric HIV-1 infection. To determine which of these immune factors might be important in predicting survival, we studied HIV-1 vertically infected (HIV-1+) children over a 5-year period. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and Igs were measured in 298 HIV-1+ children, who were classified as survivors or nonsurvivors, and in 463 HIV-1 vertically exposed and noninfected (HIV-1–) children. Measurements of other possible survival factors were included in this study: albumin, hemoglobin, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and HIV-1 RNA levels. Survivors had significantly higher CD4+ T-cell, CD8+ T-cell, and CD19+/CD20+ B-cell counts and serum IgG levels, but lower serum IgA and IgM levels than nonsurvivors. Serum albumin and blood hemoglobin levels were higher, but serum LDH and HIV-1 RNA levels were lower in the survivors compared to non-survivors. In univariable analysis, factors affecting survival were baseline CD4+ T-cell and CD8+ T-cell counts, IgG, albumin, hemoglobin, LDH, and HIV-1 RNA (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, high baseline CD4+ T-cell count, IgG and albumin levels, and low baseline HIV-1 RNA load remained important factors for survival. Serum IgG level has been identified as an immune factor that independently predicts survival, in addition to the already established CD4+ T-cell count. The HIV-1 RNA and serum albumin levels also predicted survival. PMID:11144332

  3. EFFECT OF TRANSLOCATION DEFECTIVE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE INHIBITORS ON THE ACTIVITY OF N348I, A CONNECTION SUBDOMAIN DRUG RESISTANT HIV-1 REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE MUTANT

    PubMed Central

    MICHAILIDIS, E.; SINGH, K.; RYAN, E.M.; HACHIYA, A.; ONG, Y.T.; KIRBY, K.A.; MARCHAND, B.; KODAMA, E.N.; MITSUYA, H.; PARNIAK, M.A.; SARAFIANOS, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). We have previously shown that its exceptional antiviral activity stems from a unique mechanism of action that is based primarily on blocking translocation of RT; therefore we named EFdA a Translocation Defective RT Inhibitor (TDRTI). The N348I mutation at the connection subdomain (CS) of HIV-1 RT confers clinically significant resistance to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). In this study we tested EFdA-triphosphate (TP) together with a related compound, ENdA-TP (4′-ethynyl-2-amino-2′-deoxyadenosine triphosphate) against HIV-1 RTs that carry clinically relevant drug resistance mutations: N348I, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F/N348I, and A62V/V75I/F77L/F116Y/Q151M. We demonstrate that these enzymes remain susceptible to TDRTIs. Similar to WT RT, the N348I RT is inhibited by EFdA mainly at the point of incorporation through decreased translocation. In addition, the N348I substitution decreases the RNase H cleavage of DNA terminated with EFdA-MP (T/PEFdA-MP). Moreover, N348I RT unblocks EFdA-terminated primers with similar efficiency as the WT enzyme, and further enhances EFdA unblocking in the background of AZT-resistance mutations. This study provides biochemical insights into the mechanism of inhibition of N348I RT by TDRTIs and highlights the excellent efficacy of this class of inhibitors against WT and drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs. PMID:23273211

  4. Effect of translocation defective reverse transcriptase inhibitors on the activity of N348I, a connection subdomain drug resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutant.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, E; Singh, K; Ryan, E M; Hachiya, A; Ong, Y T; Kirby, K A; Marchand, B; Kodama, E N; Mitsuya, H; Parniak, M A; Sarafianos, S G

    2012-01-01

    4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). We have previously shown that its exceptional antiviral activity stems from a unique mechanism of action that is based primarily on blocking translocation of RT; therefore we named EFdA a Translocation Defective RT Inhibitor (TDRTI). The N348I mutation at the connection subdomain (CS) of HIV-1 RT confers clinically significant resistance to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). In this study we tested EFdA-triphosphate (TP) together with a related compound, ENdA-TP (4'-ethynyl-2-amino-2'-deoxdyadenosine triphosphate) against HIV-1 RTs that carry clinically relevant drug resistance mutations: N348I, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F/N348I, and A62V/V5I/F77L/F116Y/Q151M. We demonstrate that these enzymes remain susceptible to TDRTIs. Similar to WT RT, the N348I RT is inhibited by EFdA mainly at the point of incorporation through decreased translocation. In addition, the N348I substitution decreases the RNase H cleavage of DNA terminated with EFdA-MP (T/P(EFdA-MP)). Moreover, N348I RT unblocks EFdA-terminated primers with similar efficiency as the WT enzyme, and further enhances EFdA unblocking in the background of AZT-resistance mutations. This study provides biochemical insights into the mechanism of inhibition of N348I RT by TDRTIs and highlights the excellent efficacy of this class of inhibitors against WT and drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs. PMID:23273211

  5. (Alkylamino) piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizine analogs are potent, broad-spectrum nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of drug-resistant isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and select for drug-resistant variants of HIV-1IIIB with reduced replication phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, R A; Slade, D E; Kopta, L A; Poppe, S M; Poel, T J; Newport, S W; Rank, K B; Biles, C; Morge, R A; Dueweke, T J; Yagi, Y; Romero, D L; Thomas, R C; Sharma, S K; Tarpley, W G

    1996-01-01

    The (alkylamino)piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizines (AAP-BHAPs) are a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific inhibitors which were identified by targeted screening of recombinant reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes carrying key nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance-conferring mutations and NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1. Phenotypic profiling of the two most potent AAP-BHAPs, U-95133 and U-104489, against in vitro-selected drug-resistant HIV-1 variants carrying the NNRTI resistance-conferring mutation (Tyr->Cys) at position 181 of the HIV-1 RT revealed submicromolar 90% inhibitory concentration estimates for these compounds. Moreover, U-104489 demonstrated potent activity against BHA-P-resistant HIV-1MF harboring the Pro-236->Leu RT substitution and significantly suppressed the replication of clinical isolates of HIV-1 resistant to both delavirdine (BHAP U-90152T) and zidovudine. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of AAP-BHAPresistant HIV-1IIIB variants revealed that high-level resistance to the AAP-BHAPs was mediated by a Gly-190->Glu substitution in RT, which had a deleterious effect on the integrity and enzymatic activity of virion-associated RT heterodimers, as well as the replication capacity of these resistant viruses. PMID:8648704

  6. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  7. Increasing HIV-1 Drug Resistance Between 2010 and 2012 in Adults Participating in Population-Based HIV Surveillance in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Danaviah, Siva; Lessells, Richard; Elshareef, Muna; Tanser, Frank; Wilkinson, Eduan; Pillay, Sureshnee; Mthiyane, Hloniphile; Mwambi, Henry; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As more human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients access combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), higher proportions of newly infected patients may be infected with drug-resistant viruses. Regular surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is required in southern Africa where high rates of transmission persist despite rapid expansion of ART. Dried blood spot samples from cART-naive participants from two rounds of an annual population-based HIV surveillance program in rural KwaZulu-Natal were tested for HIV RNA, and samples with HIV RNA >10,000 copies/ml were genotyped for drug resistance. The 2009 surveillance of drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list was used for drug resistance interpretation. The data were added to previously published data from the same program, and the χ2 test for trend was used to test for trend in estimated prevalence of any TDR. Seven hundred and one participants' data were analyzed: 67 (2010), 381 (2011), and 253 (2012). No TDR was detected in 2010. Years 2011 and 2012 had 18 participants with SDRMs 4.7% and 7.1%, respectively (p = .02, χ2 test for trend). The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation, K103N, was the most common mutation, occurring in 27 (3.8%) of the participants, while nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) SDRMs were detected in 10 (1.4%) of the participants, of whom eight had only a single NRTI SDRM. The increase in levels of drug resistance observed in this population could be a signal of increasing transmission of drug-resistant HIV. Thus, continued surveillance is critical to inform public health policies around HIV treatment and prevention. PMID:27002368

  8. Increasing HIV-1 Drug Resistance Between 2010 and 2012 in Adults Participating in Population-Based HIV Surveillance in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Manasa, Justen; Danaviah, Siva; Lessells, Richard; Elshareef, Muna; Tanser, Frank; Wilkinson, Eduan; Pillay, Sureshnee; Mthiyane, Hloniphile; Mwambi, Henry; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-08-01

    As more human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients access combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), higher proportions of newly infected patients may be infected with drug-resistant viruses. Regular surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is required in southern Africa where high rates of transmission persist despite rapid expansion of ART. Dried blood spot samples from cART-naive participants from two rounds of an annual population-based HIV surveillance program in rural KwaZulu-Natal were tested for HIV RNA, and samples with HIV RNA >10,000 copies/ml were genotyped for drug resistance. The 2009 surveillance of drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list was used for drug resistance interpretation. The data were added to previously published data from the same program, and the χ(2) test for trend was used to test for trend in estimated prevalence of any TDR. Seven hundred and one participants' data were analyzed: 67 (2010), 381 (2011), and 253 (2012). No TDR was detected in 2010. Years 2011 and 2012 had 18 participants with SDRMs 4.7% and 7.1%, respectively (p = .02, χ(2) test for trend). The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation, K103N, was the most common mutation, occurring in 27 (3.8%) of the participants, while nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) SDRMs were detected in 10 (1.4%) of the participants, of whom eight had only a single NRTI SDRM. The increase in levels of drug resistance observed in this population could be a signal of increasing transmission of drug-resistant HIV. Thus, continued surveillance is critical to inform public health policies around HIV treatment and prevention. PMID:27002368

  9. Antiretroviral Therapy and Central Nervous System HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Price, Richard W.; Spudich, Serena

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) HIV-1 infection begins during primary viremia and continues throughout the course of untreated systemic infection. While frequently accompanied by local inflammatory reactions detectable in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), CNS HIV-1 infection is not usually clinically apparent. In a minority of patients, CNS HIV-1 infection evolves late in the course of systemic infection into encephalitis, which compromises brain function and presents clinically as AIDS dementia complex (ADC). Combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a major impact on all aspects of HIV-1 CNS infection and disease. In those with asymptomatic infection, HAART usually effectively suppresses CSF HIV-1 and markedly reduces the incidence of symptomatic ADC. In those presenting with ADC, HAART characteristically prevents neurological progression and leads to variable, and at times substantial, recovery. Treatment has similarly reduced CNS opportunistic infections. With better control of these severe disorders, attention has turned to the possible consequences of chronic silent infection, and the issue of whether indolent, low-grade brain injury might require earlier treatment intervention. PMID:18447615

  10. CRF01_AE/B/C, a Novel Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Recombinant in Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Xin, Ruolei; Li, Zheng; Feng, Yi; Lu, Hongyan; Liao, Lingjie; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming; Xing, Hui

    2015-07-01

    We report a unique HIV-1 recombinant strain (URF) from an HIV-positive man who has sex with men (MSM) in Beijing, China. This virus genome has insertions and multiple drug-resistant mutations to both nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), as well as a complex intersubtype recombinant structure with 11 breakpoints. Phylogenetic analysis of the near full-length genome (NFLG) shows that this URF is comprised of gene regions originating from three circulating viral strains: CRF01_AE, subtype B, and subtype C. The parental CRF01_AE regions of the recombinant cluster with a previously described cluster 4 sublineage of CRF01_AE. The B regions of the recombinant cluster within the B (United States-European origin) subtype and the three subtype C regions cluster with a strain detected in China in 1998. The detection and characterization of this complex drug-resistant URF indicate an ongoing generation of recombinant strains among MSM, and will help to provide insight into our understanding of the dynamics and complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic in China. PMID:25962473

  11. Disseminated human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection in SCID- hu mice after peripheral inoculation with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A small animal model that could be infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) after peripheral inoculation would greatly facilitate the study of the pathophysiology of acute HIV-1 infection. The utility of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (SCID-hu mice) for studying peripheral HIV-1 infection in vivo has been hampered by the requirement for direct intraimplant injection of HIV-1 and the continued restriction of the resultant HIV-1 infection to the human thymus and liver (hu-thy/liv) implant. This may have been due to the very low numbers of human T cells present in the SCID-hu mouse peripheral lymphoid compartment. Since the degree of the peripheral reconstitution of SCID-hu mice with human T cells may be a function of the hu-thy/liv implant size, we increased the quantity of hu-thy/liv tissue implanted under the renal capsule and implanted hu-thy/liv tissue under the capsules of both kidneys. This resulted in SCID-hu mice in which significant numbers of human T cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleens, and lymph nodes. After intraimplant injection of HIV-1 into these modified SCID-hu mice, significant HIV-1 infection was detected by quantitative coculture not only in the hu- thy/liv implant, but also in the spleen and peripheral blood. This indicated that HIV-1 infection can spread from the thymus to the peripheral lymphoid compartment. More importantly, a similar degree of infection of the hu-thy/liv implant and peripheral lymphoid compartment occurred after peripheral intraperitoneal inoculation with HIV-1. Active viral replication was indicated by the detection of HIV-1 gag DNA, HIV-1 gag RNA, and spliced tat/rev RNA in the hu-thy/liv implants, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), spleens, and lymph nodes of these HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice. As a first step in using our modified SCID-hu mouse model to investigate the pathophysiological consequences of HIV-1 infection, the effect of HIV-1 infection on the

  12. The HEPT Analogue WPR-6 Is Active against a Broad Spectrum of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains of Different Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weisi; Zhao, Jianxiong; Sun, Jianping; Yin, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Junyi; Jiang, Shibo; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Ma, Liying

    2015-08-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are important components of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) used to treat human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1). However, because of the emergence of drug resistance and the adverse effects of current anti-HIV drugs, it is essential to develop novel NNRTIs with an excellent safety profile, improved activity against NNRTI-resistant viruses, and enhanced activity against clinical isolates of different subtypes. Here, we have identified 1-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-iodopyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (WPR-6), a novel NNRTI with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2 to 4 nM against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 and an EC50 of 7 to 14 nM against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain 7391 with a therapeutic index of >1 × 10(4). A panel of five representative clinical virus isolates of different subtypes circulating predominantly in China was highly sensitive to WPR-6, with EC50s ranging from 1 to 6 nM. In addition, WPR-6 showed excellent antiviral potency against the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses containing the K103N and Y181C mutations. To determine whether WPR-6 selects for novel resistant mutants, in vitro resistance selection was conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 on MT-4 cells. The results demonstrated that V106I and Y188L were the two dominant NNRTI-associated resistance mutations detected in the breakthrough viruses. Taken together, these in vitro data indicate that WPR-6 has greater efficacy than the reference HEPT analogue TNK651 and the marketed drug nevirapine against HIV-1. However, to develop it as a new NNRTI, further improvement of its pharmacological properties is warranted. PMID:26055365

  13. Constructing the Average Natural History of HIV-1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diambra, L.; Capurro, A.; Malta, C. P.

    2007-05-01

    Many aspects of the natural course of the HIV-1 infection remains unclear, despite important efforts towards understanding its long-term dynamics. Using a scaling approach that places progression markers (viral load, CD4+, CD8+) of many individuals on a single average natural course of disease progression, we introduce the concept of inter-individual scaling and time scaling. Our quantitative assessment of the natural course of HIV-1 infection indicates that the dynamics of the evolution for the individual that developed AIDS (opportunistic infections) is different from that of the individual that did not develop AIDS. This means that the rate of progression is not relevant for the infection evolution.

  14. Prevention of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission in Burkina Faso: evaluation of vertical transmission by PCR, molecular characterization of subtypes and determination of antiretroviral drugs resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sagna, Tani; Bisseye, Cyrille; Compaore, Tegewende R.; Kagone, Therese S.; Djigma, Florencia W.; Ouermi, Djeneba; Pirkle, Catherine M.; Zeba, Moctar T. A.; Bazie, Valerie J. T.; Douamba, Zoenabo; Moret, Remy; Pietra, Virginio; Koama, Adjirita; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Sia, Joseph D.; Nikiema, Jean-Baptiste; Simpore, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Vertical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is a public health problem in Burkina Faso. The main objective of this study on the prevention of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission was to determine the residual risk of HIV transmission in infants born to mothers receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Moreover, we detect HIV antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance among mother–infant pairs and identify subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRF) in Burkina Faso. Design In this study, 3,215 samples of pregnant women were analyzed for HIV using rapid tests. Vertical transmission was estimated by polymerase chain reaction in 6-month-old infants born to women who tested HIV positive. HIV-1 resistance to ARV, subtypes, and CRFs was determined through ViroSeq kit using the ABI PRISM 3,130 sequencer. Results In this study, 12.26% (394/3,215) of the pregnant women were diagnosed HIV positive. There was 0.52% (2/388) overall vertical transmission of HIV, with rates of 1.75% (2/114) among mothers under prophylaxis and 0.00% (0/274) for those under HAART. Genetic mutations were also isolated that induce resistance to ARV such as M184V, Y115F, K103N, Y181C, V179E, and G190A. There were subtypes and CRF of HIV-1 present, the most common being: CRF06_CPX (58.8%), CRF02_AG (35.3%), and subtype G (5.9%). Conclusions ARV drugs reduce the residual rate of HIV vertical transmission. However, the virus has developed resistance to ARV, which could limit future therapeutic options when treatment is needed. Resistance to ARV therefore requires a permanent interaction between researchers, physicians, and pharmacists, to strengthen the network of monitoring and surveillance of drug resistance in Burkina Faso. PMID:25630709

  15. Assessment of Recent HIV-1 Infection by a Line Immunoassay for HIV-1/2 Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Gebhardt, Martin D; Tomasik, Zuzana; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Bürgisser, Philippe; Matter, Lukas; Gorgievski, Meri; Dubs, Rolf; Schultze, Detlev; Steffen, Ingrid; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Güntert, Bruno; Staub, Roger; Daneel, Synove; Vernazza, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the number of recent HIV infections is important for epidemiologic surveillance. Over the past decade approaches have been developed to estimate this number by testing HIV-seropositive specimens with assays that discriminate the lower concentration and avidity of HIV antibodies in early infection. We have investigated whether this “recency” information can also be gained from an HIV confirmatory assay. Methods and Findings The ability of a line immunoassay (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score, Innogenetics) to distinguish recent from older HIV-1 infection was evaluated in comparison with the Calypte HIV-1 BED Incidence enzyme immunoassay (BED-EIA). Both tests were conducted prospectively in all HIV infections newly diagnosed in Switzerland from July 2005 to June 2006. Clinical and laboratory information indicative of recent or older infection was obtained from physicians at the time of HIV diagnosis and used as the reference standard. BED-EIA and various recency algorithms utilizing the antibody reaction to INNO-LIA's five HIV-1 antigen bands were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. A total of 765 HIV-1 infections, 748 (97.8%) with complete test results, were newly diagnosed during the study. A negative or indeterminate HIV antibody assay at diagnosis, symptoms of primary HIV infection, or a negative HIV test during the past 12 mo classified 195 infections (26.1%) as recent (≤ 12 mo). Symptoms of CDC stages B or C classified 161 infections as older (21.5%), and 392 patients with no symptoms remained unclassified. BED-EIA ruled 65% of the 195 recent infections as recent and 80% of the 161 older infections as older. Two INNO-LIA algorithms showed 50% and 40% sensitivity combined with 95% and 99% specificity, respectively. Estimation of recent infection in the entire study population, based on actual results of the three tests and adjusted for a test's sensitivity and specificity, yielded 37% for BED-EIA compared to 35% and 33% for the two

  16. Molecular characterisation of newly identified HIV-1 infections in Curitiba, Brazil: preponderance of clade C among males with recent infections.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Thomaz, Mariana; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Harrad, David; Oliveira, Cristina Mendes; Oliveira, Carmem Aparecida de Freitas; Batista, João Paulo Gervasio; Ito, Tomoko Sezazake; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo

    2008-12-01

    As in many areas of Brazil, the AIDS epidemic in Curitiba is relatively stable, but surveillance is important to support public policy. The molecular characteristics of HIV may be instrumental for monitoring epidemic trends. We evaluated plasma HIV-1 RNA (n = 37) from 38 cases presenting with positive serology, who were among 820 consenting volunteers visiting the downtown counselling and serology testing centre. Seroprevalence was 4.6% (CI 95% 3.2-6.3) and the estimated HIV incidence, as defined by the BED assay, was 2.86 persons/years (CI 95% 1.04-4.68). An additional set of contemporaneous, anonymous samples from a local laboratory was also analysed (n = 20). Regions of the HIV-1 polymerase (n = 57) and envelope (n = 34) were evaluated for subtyping, determination of mosaic structure, primary drug resistance mutations (pDRM), envelope V3 loop motifs and amino acid signatures related to viral tropism. HIV-1 clade B was observed in 53% of cases; HIV-1C in 30% and BC mosaics in 14%, with one F genome and one CF mosaic. Clade C infection was associated with recent infections among males (p < 0.03). Stanford surveillance pDRM was observed in 8.8% of sequences, with 7% showing high level resistance to at least one antiretroviral drug. Tropism for CXCR4 co-receptor was predicted in 18% of envelope sequences, which were exclusively among clade B genomes and cases with serological reactivity to chronic infection.

  17. Myelopathy in a previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Eyer-Silva, W A; Auto, I; Pinto, J F; Morais-de-Sá, C A

    2001-01-01

    A wide variety of disorders of diverse pathogenic mechanisms can trigger spinal cord dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients. The most common such condition is HIV-1-associated myelopathy (HM) which characteristically complicates advanced HIV-1 disease in patients with low CD4 cell counts and previous AIDS-defining diagnoses. We describe an unusual presentation of HM in a previously asymptomatic patient with a relatively preserved CD4 cell count (458 cells/mm3) who was even unaware of his serological status. The patient presented with a clinically severe, slowly progressive myelopathy and could not walk unassisted. Significant neurological improvement could be obtained as rapidly as within 4 weeks after the institution of an antiretroviral combination of only two nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (zidovudine and didanosine). An HIV-1 protease inhibitor was also prescribed at that point but could only be added to intensify the regimen 3 months later, when significant neurological improvement had already been recorded. We also review the disorders reported to derange spinal cord function in previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients.

  18. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  19. Synergistic reduction of HIV-1 infectivity by 5-azacytidine and inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Roth, Megan E; Xie, Jiashu; Daly, Michele B; Clouser, Christine L; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Kim, Baek; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-06-01

    Although many compounds have been approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency type-1 (HIV-1) infection, additional anti-HIV-1 drugs (particularly those belonging to new drug classes) are still needed due to issues such as long-term drug-associated toxicities, transmission of drug-resistant variants, and development of multi-class resistance. Lethal mutagenesis represents an antiviral strategy that has not yet been clinically translated for HIV-1 and is based on the use of small molecules to induce excessive levels of deleterious mutations within the viral genome. Here, we show that 5-azacytidine (5-aza-C), a ribonucleoside analog that induces the lethal mutagenesis of HIV-1, and multiple inhibitors of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) interact in a synergistic fashion to more effectively reduce the infectivity of HIV-1. In these drug combinations, RNR inhibitors failed to significantly inhibit the conversion of 5-aza-C to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, suggesting that 5-aza-C acts primarily as a deoxyribonucleoside even in the presence of RNR inhibitors. The mechanism of antiviral synergy was further investigated for the combination of 5-aza-C and one specific RNR inhibitor, resveratrol, as this combination improved the selectivity index of 5-aza-C to the greatest extent. Antiviral synergy was found to be primarily due to the reduced accumulation of reverse transcription products rather than the enhancement of viral mutagenesis. To our knowledge, these observations represent the first demonstration of antiretroviral synergy between a ribonucleoside analog and RNR inhibitors, and encourage the development of additional ribonucleoside analogs and RNR inhibitors with improved antiretroviral activity. PMID:27117260

  20. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  1. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M

    2016-03-18

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  2. Detection of HIV-1 minority variants containing the K103N drug-resistance mutation using a simple method to amplify RNA targets (SMART).

    PubMed

    Morabito, Kenneth; Kantor, Rami; Tai, Warren; Schreier, Leeann; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-05-01

    The simple method for amplifying RNA targets (SMART) was used to detect K103N, a common HIV-1 reverse transcriptase drug-resistance mutation. Novel amplifiable SMART probes served as reporter molecules for RNA sequences that are captured and separated on a microfluidic platform under zero-flow conditions. Assays were performed both off chip and in a microchip reservoir using a modified version of real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, without the noncyclic phase, and 65°C preheat. A total of 6000 copies/mL of the synthetic sequences were detected within 180 minutes of amplification. Although the sensitivity of research platforms is higher, SMART has the potential to offer comparable sensitivity and speed to commercially available viral load and HIV detection kits. Furthermore, SMART uses an inexpensive, practical, and more accurate isothermal exponential amplification technique. The use of molecular beacons resulted in relatively fast real-time detection (<180 minutes); however, they were also shown to hinder the amplification process when compared with end point detection. Finally, SMART probes were used for modeling of K103N concentrations within an unknown sample. Only 1% of the SMART probes was detected within the wild-type population (6 × 10(8) copies/mL). These results establish the groundwork for point-of-care drug resistance and viral load monitoring in clinical samples, which can revolutionize HIV patient care globally.

  3. Quantitative Image Analysis of HIV-1 Infection in Lymphoid Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Ashley T.; Henry, Keith; Zupancic, Mary; Sedgewick, Gerald; Faust, Russell A.; Melroe, Holly; Cavert, Winston; Gebhard, Kristin; Staskus, Katherine; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Dailey, Peter J.; Balfour, Henry H., Jr.; Erice, Alejo; Perelson, Alan S.

    1996-11-01

    Tracking human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection at the cellular level in tissue reservoirs provides opportunities to better understand the pathogenesis of infection and to rationally design and monitor therapy A quantitative technique was developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid tissues. Image analysis and in situ hybridization were combined to show that in the presymptomatic stages of infection there is a large, relatively stable pool of virions on the surfaces of follicular dendritic cells and a smaller pool of productively infected cells Despite evidence of constraints on HIV-1 replication in the infected cell population in lymphoid tissues, estimates of the numbers of these cells and the virus they could produce are consistent with the quantities of virus that have been detected in the bloodstream. The cellular sources of virus production and storage in lymphoid tissues can now be studied with this approach over the course of infection and treatment.

  4. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Brown, C Titus; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these "functional" pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit.

  5. Drug-Induced Reactivation of Apoptosis Abrogates HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Saxena, Deepti; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; Luchessi, Augusto D.; Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Hoque, Mainul; Spino, Michael; Gandolfi, Darlene D'Alliessi; Heller, Debra S.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Park, Myung Hee; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Cone, Richard A.; Holland, Bart; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 blocks apoptosis, programmed cell death, an innate defense of cells against viral invasion. However, apoptosis can be selectively reactivated in HIV-infected cells by chemical agents that interfere with HIV-1 gene expression. We studied two globally used medicines, the topical antifungal ciclopirox and the iron chelator deferiprone, for their effect on apoptosis in HIV-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Both medicines activated apoptosis preferentially in HIV-infected cells, suggesting that the drugs mediate escape from the viral suppression of defensive apoptosis. In infected H9 cells, ciclopirox and deferiprone enhanced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, initiating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis to execution, as evidenced by caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteolysis, DNA degradation, and apoptotic cell morphology. In isolate-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ciclopirox collapsed HIV-1 production to the limit of viral protein and RNA detection. Despite prolonged monotherapy, ciclopirox did not elicit breakthrough. No viral re-emergence was observed even 12 weeks after drug cessation, suggesting elimination of the proviral reservoir. Tests in mice predictive for cytotoxicity to human epithelia did not detect tissue damage or activation of apoptosis at a ciclopirox concentration that exceeded by orders of magnitude the concentration causing death of infected cells. We infer that ciclopirox and deferiprone act via therapeutic reclamation of apoptotic proficiency (TRAP) in HIV-infected cells and trigger their preferential elimination. Perturbations in viral protein expression suggest that the antiretroviral activity of both drugs stems from their ability to inhibit hydroxylation of cellular proteins essential for apoptosis and for viral infection, exemplified by eIF5A. Our findings identify ciclopirox and deferiprone as prototypes of selectively cytocidal

  6. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  7. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance: X-ray structure analysis of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease dimer/saquinavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash C.; Das, Amit; Rao, D.R.; Hosur, M.V.

    2010-06-11

    The mutation G48V in HIV-1 protease is a major resistance mutation against the drug saquinavir. Recently, G48V mutation is found to co-exist with the mutation C95F in AIDS patients treated with saquinavir. We report here the three-dimensional crystal structure of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease/saquinavir complex. The structure indicates following as the possible causes of drug resistance: (1) loss of direct van der Waals interactions between saquinavir and enzyme residues PHE-53 and PRO-1081, (2) loss of water-mediated hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl oxygen atoms in saquinavir and amide nitrogen atoms of flap residues 50 and 1050, (3) changes in inter-monomer interactions, which could affect the energetics of domain movements associated with inhibitor-binding, and (4) significant reduction in the stability of the mutant dimer. The present structure also provides a rationale for the clinical observation that the resistance mutations C95F/G48V/V82A occur as a cluster in AIDS patients.

  8. Compartmentalization of drug resistance-associated mutations in a treatment-naive HIV-infected female.

    PubMed

    Tirado, Grissell; Jove, Gloria; Kumar, Rakesh; Noel, Richard J; Reyes, Evelyn; Sepulveda, Gladys; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Kumar, Anil

    2004-06-01

    Development of a drug-resistant variant of HIV-1 has been one of the major concerns contributing to the transmission of the virus. A 40-year-old woman presented to the clinic with micosis and oral candidiasis. The subject was referred for HIV-1 diagnosis. Subsequent investigations revealed a very low CD4 T cell count (48 cell/microl blood) and high plasma HIV-1 RNA load (4.33 x 10(5) copy/ml). A 1.3-kb pol fragment was sequenced in virus collected from plasma and the vaginal compartment. Plasma virus had no mutation in reverse transcriptase and one mutation in protease (L63P). On the other hand vaginal virus contained L63P and M184V mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively. These mutations were accompanied by several other mutations in previously identified CTL epitopic regions of the two genes. In the absence of antiretroviral treatment, a drug-resistant mutant was thought to develop because of immune pressure. This is the first report describing the role of immune pressure in the development of a drug-resistant virus.

  9. Optimization of the Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay, a Rapid and Inexpensive Test for Detection of HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations, for Non-North American Variants

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ingrid A.; Crowell, Claudia; Kittoe, Robin; Bredell, Helba; Machaba, Molefe; Willamson, Carolyn; Janssens, Wouter; Jallow, Sabelle; van der Groen, Guido; Shao, Yiming; Jacob, Mini; Samuel, N. M.; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Cassol, Sharon; Alemnji, George; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the feasibility of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA), a specific, sensitive, and economical ligase-based point mutation assay designed to detect HIV-1 drug–resistance mutations at 12 codons of HIV-1 subtype B pol, for potential use in resource-poor settings. Methods Specimens from HIV-1infected individuals collected by 7 international laboratories, including subtypes A, B, C, D, F, G, J, and recombinants AE and AG, were tested by the OLA developed for HIV-1 subtype B. Common polymorphisms that interfered with reactivity of the OLA were identified and modified probes designed and evaluated. Results 92.5% (2410) of 2604 codons in specimens from 217 individuals were successfully genotyped by the subtype B OLA. A high rate (range 8.3%–31.2%) of indeterminate results (negative OLA reaction for both mutant and wild type) was observed for 5 codons. Modified probes at reverse transcriptase codons 151 and 184 and protease codon 90 increased the rate of valid OLA to 96.1%. Conclusions The OLA designed for HIV-1 subtype B genotyped most pol codons in non-B subtypes from Asia and Africa but was improved by addition of several modified probes. International laboratories experienced in molecular techniques were able to perform the OLA. PMID:18614915

  10. Performance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance Testing at Low-Level Viremia and Its Ability to Predict Future Virologic Outcomes and Viral Evolution in Treatment-Naive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Serna, A.; Min, J. E.; Woods, C.; Chan, D.; Lima, V. D.; Montaner, J. S. G.; Harrigan, P. R.; Swenson, L. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low-level viremia (LLV; human immunodeficiency virus [HIV-1] RNA 50–999 copies/mL) occurs frequently in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), but there are few or no data available demonstrating that HIV-1 drug resistance testing at a plasma viral load (pVL) <1000 copies/mL provides potentially clinically useful information. Here, we assess the ability to perform resistance testing by genotyping at LLV and whether it is predictive of future virologic outcomes in patients beginning ART. Methods. Resistance testing by genotyping at LLV was attempted on 4915 plasma samples from 2492 patients. A subset of previously ART-naive patients was analyzed who achieved undetectable pVL and subsequently rebounded with LLV (n = 212). A genotypic sensitivity score (GSS) was calculated based on therapy and resistance testing results by genotyping, and stratified according to number of active drugs. Results. Eighty-eight percent of LLV resistance assays produced useable sequences, with higher success at higher pVL. Overall, 16 of 212 (8%) patients had pretherapy resistance. Thirty-eight of 196 (19%) patients without pretherapy resistance evolved resistance to 1 or more drug classes, primarily the nucleoside reverse transcriptase (14%) and/or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (9%) inhibitors. Patients with resistance at LLV (GSS <3) had a 2.1-fold higher risk of virologic failure (95% confidence interval, 1.2- to 3.7-fold) than those without resistance (P = .007). Progressively lower GSS scores at LLV were associated with a higher increase in pVL over time (P < .001). Acquisition of additional resistance mutations to a new class of antiretroviral drugs during LLV was not found in a subset of patients. Conclusions. Routine HIV-1 genotyping of LLV samples can be performed with a reasonably high success rate, and the results appear predictive of future virologic outcomes. PMID:24429436

  11. Recent developments in the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection: targeting the latent reservoir for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2014-07-01

    HIV-1 infection can now be readily controlled with combination antiretroviral therapy. However, the virus persists indefinitely in a stable latent reservoir in resting CD4(+) T cells. This reservoir generally prevents cure of the infection with combination antiretroviral therapy alone. However, several recent cases of potential HIV-1 cure have generated renewed optimism. Here we review these cases and consider new developments in our understanding of the latent reservoir. In addition, we consider clinical aspects of curative strategies to provide a more realistic picture of what a generally applicable cure for HIV-1 infection is likely to entail.

  12. Human herpes virus-6 increases HIV-1 expression in co-infected T cells via nuclear factors binding to the HIV-1 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ensoli, B; Lusso, P; Schachter, F; Josephs, S F; Rappaport, J; Negro, F; Gallo, R C; Wong-Staal, F

    1989-01-01

    Human Herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) can co-infect with HIV-1 human CD4+ T-cells, leading to accelerated cell death, and factors in HHV-6-infected cells stimulate HIV-1 LTR directed gene expression. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of HIV-1 activation by HHV-6 and localized the cis-acting sequences of HIV-1 LTR responsive to trans-activation. Increased HIV-1 LTR directed gene expression is obtained in HIV-1 infected cells co-infected with HHV-6, or in HHV-6 infected cells co-transfected with the HIV-1 tat gene. Parallel increases of HIV-1-specific transcripts are seen by in situ hybridization in HHV-6/HIV-1 doubly infected cells as compared to single HIV-1 infection. Similarly, infection by HHV-6 increases the steady-state level of HIV-1 LTR mRNA that parallels CAT enzymatic activity, suggesting a transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional activation. Sequences necessary for HIV-1 LTR activation by HHV-6 are distinct from those required for that tat response and map to a region of the HIV-1 LTR from -103 to -48. The HIV-1 enhancer sequence (-105 to -80) is sufficient to confer HHV-6 inducibility to a heterologous promoter, and nuclear protein(s) activated or induced by HHV-6 infection specifically bind to the NF kappa B motifs of the HIV-1 enhancer region.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2573513

  13. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  14. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Flavonoid Myricetin on HIV-1 Infection in a Dual-Chamber In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01–100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research. PMID:25546350

  15. Neuromuscular Diseases Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are common in HIV, occurring at all stages of disease and affecting all parts of the peripheral nervous system. These disorders have diverse etiologies including HIV itself, immune suppression and dysregulation, co-morbid illnesses and infections, and side effects of medications. In this article, we review the following HIV-associated conditions: distal symmetric polyneuropathy, inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex, autonomic neuropathy, progressive polyradiculopathy due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, myopathy and other rarer disorders. PMID:19771594

  16. APOBEC3H Haplotypes and HIV-1 Pro-Viral vif DNA Sequence Diversity in Early Untreated HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, PA; Karaouni, A; Woo, JM; Schmidt, T; Oksenberg, JR; Hecht, FM; Liegler, TJ; Barbour, JD

    2011-01-01

    We examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the APOBEC3 locus on chromosome 22, paired to population sequences of pro-viral HIV-1 vif of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), from 96 recently HIV-1 infected treatment naïve adults. We found evidence for the existence of an APOBEC3H linkage disequilibrium (LD) block associated with variation in GA->AA, or APOBEC3F signature, sequence changes in pro-viral HIV-1 vif sequence (top significant 10 SNPs with a top-significant p=4.8×10−3). We identified a common 5 position risk haplotype distal to APOBEC3H (A3Hrh). These markers were in high LD (D′ = 1; r2=0.98) to a previously described A3H ‘RED’ haplotype containing a variant (E121) with enhanced susceptibility to HIV-1 Vif (Zhen et al 2009 [1]). This association is confirmed by a haplotype analysis: Homozygote carriers of the A3Hrh had lower GA->AA (A3F) sequence editing on pro-viral HIV-1 vif sequence (p = 0.01), and lower HIV-1 RNA levels over time during early, untreated HIV-1 infection, (p = 0.015 mixed effects model). This effect may be due to enhanced susceptibility of A3H forms to HIV-1 Vif mediated viral suppression of sequence editing activity, slowing viral diversification and escape from immune responses. PMID:21167246

  17. HIV-1 Superinfection Resembles Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheward, Daniel J.; Ntale, Roman; Garrett, Nigel J.; Woodman, Zenda L.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Williamson, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of superinfection as a model to identify correlates of protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on whether the superinfecting transmission resembles primary infection, which has not been established. Here, we characterize the genetic bottleneck in superinfected individuals for the first time. In all 3 cases, superinfection produced a spike in viral load and could be traced to a single, C-C chemokine receptor 5–tropic founder virus with shorter, less glycosylated variable regions than matched chronic viruses. These features are consistent with primary HIV transmission and provide support for the use of superinfection as a model to address correlates of protection against HIV. PMID:25754982

  18. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  19. Enrichment of intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in a dual infection system using HIV-1 strain-specific siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in the form of unique or stable circulating recombinants forms (CRFs) are responsible for over 20% of infections in the worldwide epidemic. Mechanisms controlling the generation, selection, and transmission of these intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants still require further investigation. All intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants are generated and evolve from initial dual infections, but are difficult to identify in the human population. In vitro studies provide the most practical system to study mechanisms, but the recombination rates are usually very low in dual infections with primary HIV-1 isolates. This study describes the use of HIV-1 isolate-specific siRNAs to enrich intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants and inhibit the parental HIV-1 isolates from a dual infection. Results Following a dual infection with subtype A and D primary HIV-1 isolates and two rounds of siRNA treatment, nearly 100% of replicative virus was resistant to a siRNA specific for an upstream target sequence in the subtype A envelope (env) gene as well as a siRNA specific for a downstream target sequence in the subtype D env gene. Only 20% (10/50) of the replicating virus had nucleotide substitutions in the siRNA-target sequence whereas the remaining 78% (39/50) harbored a recombination breakpoint that removed both siRNA target sequences, and rendered the intersubtype D/A recombinant virus resistant to the dual siRNA treatment. Since siRNAs target the newly transcribed HIV-1 mRNA, the siRNAs only enrich intersubtype env recombinants and do not influence the recombination process during reverse transcription. Using this system, a strong bias is selected for recombination breakpoints in the C2 region, whereas other HIV-1 env regions, most notably the hypervariable regions, were nearly devoid of intersubtype recombination breakpoints. Sequence conservation plays an important role in selecting for recombination breakpoints, but the lack of breakpoints in many conserved

  20. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Donna L; Sullivan, Vickie; Owen, S Michele; Curtis, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC) or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus. PMID:25993381

  1. Performance of rapid tests for discrimination between HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infections.

    PubMed

    Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Bocobza, Jonathan; Brunet, Sylvie; Damond, Florence; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Barin, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Major differences exist between HIV-1 and HIV-2 in terms of epidemiology, pathogenicity, sensitivity to antiretrovirals. Determining the type of HIV infecting a patient is essential for management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of simple/rapid tests to differentiate between HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infections. We analyzed 116 samples from patients infected with HIV-1 (n = 61), HIV-2 (n = 47), or HIV-1+HIV-2 (n = 8) at the chronic stage of infection. Each sample was tested with SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0, ImmunoFlow HIV1-HIV2, ImmunoFlow HIV1-HIV2 (WB), Genie III HIV-1/HIV-2, ImmunoComb HIV1&2 BiSpot. HIV-1, or HIV-2 single infection was identified with a sensitivity ranging from 90% to 100%. The ability to detect dual infection was less sensitive (12.5-100%). SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0, ImmunoFlow HIV1-HIV2, and Genie III were unable to detect HIV-1 group O infection in one, one and two cases, respectively. The specificity of detection of HIV-1, HIV-2, or HIV-1+HIV-2 antibodies differed greatly (36-100%). ImmunoComb BiSpot had the highest sensitivity values (99-100% for HIV-1, 98% for HIV-2, and 75-87.5% for dual infection) and specificity values (94-100% for HIV-1, 100% for HIV-2, and 97-100% for dual infection). In conclusion, this study showed that no single rapid test had a perfect sensitivity/specificity ratio, particularly in the case of the double infections.

  2. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  3. Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection Increases Apoptosis and HIV-1 Replication in HIV-1 Infected Jurkat Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Biswas, Santanu; Zhao, Jiangqin; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Ye, Zhiping; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-02-02

    Influenza virus infection has a significant impact on public health, since it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is not well-known whether influenza virus infection affects cell death and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in HIV-1-infected patients. Using a lymphoma cell line, Jurkat, we examined the in vitro effects of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infection on cell death and HIV-1 RNA production in infected cells. We found that pH1N1 infection increased apoptotic cell death through Fas and Bax-mediated pathways in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells. Infection with pH1N1 virus could promote HIV-1 RNA production by activating host transcription factors including nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-ĸB), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-related pathways. The replication of HIV-1 latent infection could be reactivated by pH1N1 infection through TCR and apoptotic pathways. These data indicate that HIV-1 replication can be activated by pH1N1 virus in HIV-1-infected cells resulting in induction of cell death through apoptotic pathways.

  4. Quantitative image analysis of HIV-1 infection in lymphoid tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, A.T.; Zupancic, M.; Cavert, W.

    1996-11-08

    Tracking human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection at the cellular level in tissue reservoirs provides opportunities to better understand the pathogenesis of infection and to rationally design and monitor therapy. A quantitative technique was developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid tissues. Image analysis and in situ hybridization were combined to show that in the presymptomatic stages of infection there is a large, relatively stable pool of virions on the surfaces of follicular dendritic cells and a smaller pool of productivity infected cells. Despite evidence of constraints on HIV-1 replication in the infected cell population in lymphoid tissues, estimates of the numbers of these cells and the virus they could produce are consistent with the quantities of virus that have been detected in the bloodstream. The cellular sources of virus production and storage in lymphoid tissues can now be studied with this approach over the course of infection and treatment. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Sub-Epidemics Explain Localized High Prevalence of Reduced Susceptibility to Rilpivirine in Treatment-Naive HIV-1-Infected Patients: Subtype and Geographic Compartmentalization of Baseline Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Van Laethem, Kristel; Gomes, Perpetua; Baele, Guy; Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The latest nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) rilpivirine (RPV) is indicated for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) patients initiating antiretroviral treatment, but the extent of genotypic RPV resistance in treatment-naive patients outside clinical trials is poorly defined. Study Design: This retrospective observational study of clinical data from Belgium and Portugal evaluates genotypic information from HIV-1 drug-naive patients obtained for the purpose of drug resistance testing. Rilpivirine resistance-associated mutations (RPV-RAMs) were defined based on clinical trials, phenotypic studies, and expert-based resistance algorithms. Viral susceptibility to RPV alone and to the single-tablet regimen was estimated using expert-based resistance algorithms. Results: In 4,631 HIV-1 treatment-naive patients infected with diverse HIV-1 subtypes, major RPV-RAMs were detected in 4.6%, while complete viral susceptibility to RPV was estimated in 95% of patients. Subtype C- and F1-infected patients displayed the highest levels of reduced viral susceptibility at baseline, respectively 13.2% and 9.3%, mainly due to subtype- and geographic-dependent occurrence of RPV-RAMs E138A and A98G as natural polymorphisms. Strikingly, a founder effect in Portugal resulted in a 138A prevalence of 13.2% in local subtype C-infected treatment-naive patients. The presence of transmitted drug resistance did not impact our estimates. Conclusion: RPV is the first HIV-1 inhibitor for which, in the absence of transmitted drug resistance, intermediate or high-level genotypic resistance can be detected in treatment-naive patients. The extent of RPV susceptibility in treatment-naive patients differs depending on the HIV-1 subtype and dynamics of local compartmentalized epidemics. The highest prevalence of reduced susceptibility was found to be 15.7% in Portuguese subtype C-infected treatment-naive patients. In this context, even in the absence of

  6. Impact of Drug Resistance-Associated Amino Acid Changes in HIV-1 Subtype C on Susceptibility to Newer Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Basson, Adriaan E.; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Parry, Chris M.; El-Khatib, Ziad; Charalambous, Salome; De Oliveira, Tulio; Pillay, Deenan; Hoffmann, Christopher; Katzenstein, David; Shafer, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the phenotypic susceptibility of HIV-1 subtype C isolates, with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance-associated amino acid changes, to newer NNRTIs. A panel of 52 site-directed mutants and 38 clinically derived HIV-1 subtype C clones was created, and the isolates were assessed for phenotypic susceptibility to etravirine (ETR), rilpivirine (RPV), efavirenz (EFV), and nevirapine (NVP) in an in vitro single-cycle phenotypic assay. The amino acid substitutions E138Q/R, Y181I/V, and M230L conferred high-level resistance to ETR, while K101P and Y181I/V conferred high-level resistance to RPV. Y181C, a major NNRTI resistance-associated amino acid substitution, caused decreased susceptibility to ETR and, to a lesser extent, RPV when combined with other mutations. These included N348I and T369I, amino acid changes in the connection domain that are not generally assessed during resistance testing. However, the prevalence of these genotypes among subtype C sequences was, in most cases, <1%. The more common EFV/NVP resistance-associated substitutions, such as K103N, V106M, and G190A, had no major impact on ETR or RPV susceptibility. The low-level resistance to RPV and ETR conferred by E138K was not significantly enhanced in the presence of M184V/I, unlike for EFV and NVP. Among patient samples, 97% were resistant to EFV and/or NVP, while only 24% and 16% were resistant to ETR and RPV, respectively. Overall, only a few, relatively rare NNRTI resistance-associated amino acid substitutions caused resistance to ETR and/or RPV in an HIV-1 subtype C background, suggesting that these newer NNRTIs would be effective in NVP/EFV-experienced HIV-1 subtype C-infected patients. PMID:25421485

  7. The Individualized Genetic Barrier Predicts Treatment Response in a Large Cohort of HIV-1 Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beerenwinkel, Niko; Montazeri, Hesam; Schuhmacher, Heike; Knupfer, Patrick; von Wyl, Viktor; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel; Hirschel, Bernard; Cavassini, Matthias; Vernazza, Pietro; Bernasconi, Enos; Yerly, Sabine; Böni, Jürg; Klimkait, Thomas; Cellerai, Cristina; Günthard, Huldrych F.

    2013-01-01

    The success of combination antiretroviral therapy is limited by the evolutionary escape dynamics of HIV-1. We used Isotonic Conjunctive Bayesian Networks (I-CBNs), a class of probabilistic graphical models, to describe this process. We employed partial order constraints among viral resistance mutations, which give rise to a limited set of mutational pathways, and we modeled phenotypic drug resistance as monotonically increasing along any escape pathway. Using this model, the individualized genetic barrier (IGB) to each drug is derived as the probability of the virus not acquiring additional mutations that confer resistance. Drug-specific IGBs were combined to obtain the IGB to an entire regimen, which quantifies the virus' genetic potential for developing drug resistance under combination therapy. The IGB was tested as a predictor of therapeutic outcome using between 2,185 and 2,631 treatment change episodes of subtype B infected patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study Database, a large observational cohort. Using logistic regression, significant univariate predictors included most of the 18 drugs and single-drug IGBs, the IGB to the entire regimen, the expert rules-based genotypic susceptibility score (GSS), several individual mutations, and the peak viral load before treatment change. In the multivariate analysis, the only genotype-derived variables that remained significantly associated with virological success were GSS and, with 10-fold stronger association, IGB to regimen. When predicting suppression of viral load below 400 cps/ml, IGB outperformed GSS and also improved GSS-containing predictors significantly, but the difference was not significant for suppression below 50 cps/ml. Thus, the IGB to regimen is a novel data-derived predictor of treatment outcome that has potential to improve the interpretation of genotypic drug resistance tests. PMID:24009493

  8. The L76V drug resistance mutation decreases the dimer stability and rate of autoprocessing of HIV-1 protease by reducing internal hydrophobic contacts.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Zhang, Ying; Sayer, Jane M; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W; Weber, Irene T

    2011-05-31

    The mature HIV-1 protease (PR) bearing the L76V drug resistance mutation (PR(L76V)) is significantly less stable, with a >7-fold higher dimer dissociation constant (K(d)) of 71 ± 24 nM and twice the sensitivity to urea denaturation (UC(50) = 0.85 M) relative to those of PR. Differential scanning calorimetry showed decreases in T(m) of 12 °C for PR(L76V) in the absence of inhibitors and 5-7 °C in the presence of inhibitors darunavir (DRV), saquinavir (SQV), and lopinavir (LPV), relative to that of PR. Isothermal titration calorimetry gave a ligand dissociation constant of 0.8 nM for DRV, ∼160-fold higher than that of PR, consistent with DRV resistance. Crystal structures of PR(L76V) in complexes with DRV and SQV were determined at resolutions of 1.45-1.46 Å. Compared to the corresponding PR complexes, the mutated Val76 lacks hydrophobic interactions with Asp30, Lys45, Ile47, and Thr74 and exhibits closer interactions with Val32 and Val56. The bound DRV lacks one hydrogen bond with the main chain of Asp30 in PR(L76V) relative to PR, possibly accounting for the resistance to DRV. SQV shows slightly improved polar interactions with PR(L76V) compared to those with PR. Although the L76V mutation significantly slows the N-terminal autoprocessing of the precursor TFR-PR(L76V) to give rise to the mature PR(L76V), the coselected M46I mutation counteracts the effect by enhancing this rate but renders the TFR-PR(M46I/L76V) precursor less responsive to inhibition by 6 μM LPV while preserving inhibition by SQV and DRV. The correlation of lowered stability, higher K(d), and impaired autoprocessing with reduced internal hydrophobic contacts suggests a novel molecular mechanism for drug resistance.

  9. The L76V Drug Resistance Mutation Decreases the Dimer Stability and Rate of Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease by Reducing Internal Hydrophobic Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Zhang, Ying; Sayer, Jane M.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2011-09-06

    The mature HIV-1 protease (PR) bearing the L76V drug resistance mutation (PR{sub L76V}) is significantly less stable, with a >7-fold higher dimer dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 71 {+-} 24 nM and twice the sensitivity to urea denaturation (UC{sub 50} = 0.85 M) relative to those of PR. Differential scanning calorimetry showed decreases in T{sub m} of 12 C for PR{sub L76V} in the absence of inhibitors and 5-7 C in the presence of inhibitors darunavir (DRV), saquinavir (SQV), and lopinavir (LPV), relative to that of PR. Isothermal titration calorimetry gave a ligand dissociation constant of 0.8 nM for DRV, {approx}160-fold higher than that of PR, consistent with DRV resistance. Crystal structures of PR{sub L76V} in complexes with DRV and SQV were determined at resolutions of 1.45-1.46 {angstrom}. Compared to the corresponding PR complexes, the mutated Val76 lacks hydrophobic interactions with Asp30, Lys45, Ile47, and Thr74 and exhibits closer interactions with Val32 and Val56. The bound DRV lacks one hydrogen bond with the main chain of Asp30 in PR{sub L76V} relative to PR, possibly accounting for the resistance to DRV. SQV shows slightly improved polar interactions with PR{sub L76V} compared to those with PR. Although the L76V mutation significantly slows the N-terminal autoprocessing of the precursor TFR-PR{sub L76V} to give rise to the mature PR{sub L76V}, the coselected M46I mutation counteracts the effect by enhancing this rate but renders the TFR-PRM46I/L76V precursor less responsive to inhibition by 6 {micro}M LPV while preserving inhibition by SQV and DRV. The correlation of lowered stability, higher K{sub d}, and impaired autoprocessing with reduced internal hydrophobic contacts suggests a novel molecular mechanism for drug resistance.

  10. Prevalent Polymorphisms in Wild-Type HIV-1 Integrase Are Unlikely To Engender Drug Resistance to Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572)

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samiul; Madsen, Heather; Horton, Joseph; DeAnda, Felix; Martin-Carpenter, Louise; Sato, Akihiko; Cuffe, Robert; Chen, Shuguang; Underwood, Mark; Nichols, Garrett

    2013-01-01

    The majority of HIV-1 integrase amino acid sites are highly conserved, suggesting that most are necessary to carry out the critical structural and functional roles of integrase. We analyzed the 34 most variable sites in integrase (>10% variability) and showed that prevalent polymorphic amino acids at these positions did not affect susceptibility to the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572), as demonstrated both in vitro (in site-directed mutagenesis studies) and in vivo (in a phase IIa study of dolutegravir monotherapy in HIV-infected individuals). Ongoing clinical trials will provide additional data on the virologic activity of dolutegravir across subject viruses with and without prevalent polymorphic substitutions. PMID:23295935

  11. Low-frequency drug-resistant HIV-1 and risk of virological failure to first-line NNRTI-based ART: a multicohort European case–control study using centralized ultrasensitive 454 pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schuurman, Rob; Däumer, Martin; Aitken, Sue; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Geretti, Anna Maria; Booth, Clare L.; Kaiser, Rolf; Michalik, Claudia; Jansen, Klaus; Masquelier, Bernard; Bellecave, Pantxika; Kouyos, Roger D.; Castro, Erika; Furrer, Hansjakob; Schultze, Anna; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Brun-Vezinet, Francoise; Paredes, Roger; Metzner, Karin J.; Paredes, Roger; Metzner, Karin J.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Schuurman, Rob; Brun-Vezinet, Francoise; Günthard, Huldrych; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Masquelier, Bernard; Dabis, F.; Bruyand, M.; Chêne, G.; Dabis, F.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Wittkop, L.; André, K.; Bonnal, F.; Bonnet, F.; Bernard, N.; Caunègre, L.; Cazanave, C.; Ceccaldi, J.; Chossat, I.; Courtaud, K.; Dauchy, F. A.; De Witte, S.; Dupon, M.; Dupont, A.; Duffau, P.; Dutronc, H.; Farbos, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Gemain, M. C.; Gerard, Y.; Greib, C.; Hessamfar, M.; Lacoste, D.; Lataste, P.; Lazaro, E.; Longy-Boursier, M.; Malvy, D.; Meraud, J. P.; Mercié, P.; Monlun, E.; Morlat, P.; Neau, D.; Ochoa, A.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Pistone, T.; Receveur, M. C.; Schmeltz, J. Roger; Tchamgoué, S.; Vandenhende, M. A.; Vareil, M.O.; Viallard, J. F.; Moreau, J. F.; Pellegrin, I.; Fleury, H.; Lafon, M. E.; Masquelier, B.; Reigadas, S.; Trimoulet, P.; Bouchet, S.; Breilh, D.; Molimard, M.; Titier, K.; Haramburu, F.; Miremont-Salamé., G.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Decoin, M.; Delaune, J.; Delveaux, S.; D'Ivernois, C.; Hanapier, C.; Leleux, O.; Lenaud, E.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, B.; Sicard, X.; Geffard, S.; Le Marec, F.; Conte, V.; Frosch, A.; Leray, J.; Palmer, G.; Touchard, D.; Bonnet, F.; Breilh, D.; Chêne, G.; Dabis, F.; Dupon, M.; Fleury, H.; Malvy, D.; Mercié, P.; Morlat, P.; Neau, D.; Pellegrin, I.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Bouchet, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Lacoste, D.; Tchamgoué, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Losso, M.; Kundro, M.; Ramos Mejia, J. M.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; De Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Florence, E.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Dragsted, U. B.; Nielsen, L. N.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J. P.; Girard, P. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Duvivier, C.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Bickel, M.; Bogner, J.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Gottfredsson, M.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; HassounRambam, G.; Elinav, H.; HaouziHadassah, M.; EspositoI, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Vullo, V.; Moroni, M.; Andreoni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; Monforte, A. D'Arminio; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Carletti, F.; Carrara, S.; Castrogiovanni, A.; Di Caro, A.; Petrone, F.; Prota, G.; Quartu, S.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Mazzoccato, S.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, C.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Chiodera, A.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; D'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Tincati, C.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Sasset, L.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; De Luca, A.; Rossetti, B.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Bassetti, M.; Londero, A.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Brockmeyer, N. H.; Skaletz-Rorowski, A.; Dupke, S.; Baumgarten, A.; Carganico, A.; Köppe, S.; Kreckel, P.; Lauenroth-Mai, E.; Freiwald-Rausch, M.; Gölz, J.; Moll, A.; Zeitz, M.; Hower, M.; Reuter, S.; Jensen, B.; Harrer, T.; Esser, S.; Brodt, H. R.; Plettenberg, A.; Stöhr, A.; Buhk, T.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Stoll, M.; Schmidt, R.; Kuhlmann, B.; Mosthaf, F. A.; Rieke, A.; Becker, W.; Volkert, R.; Jäger, H.; Hartl, H.; Mutz, A.; Ulmer, A.; Müller, M.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Kouyos, R.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Staehelin, C.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is still debated if pre-existing minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants (MVs) affect the virological outcomes of first-line NNRTI-containing ART. Methods This Europe-wide case–control study included ART-naive subjects infected with drug-susceptible HIV-1 as revealed by population sequencing, who achieved virological suppression on first-line ART including one NNRTI. Cases experienced virological failure and controls were subjects from the same cohort whose viraemia remained suppressed at a matched time since initiation of ART. Blinded, centralized 454 pyrosequencing with parallel bioinformatic analysis in two laboratories was used to identify MVs in the 1%–25% frequency range. ORs of virological failure according to MV detection were estimated by logistic regression. Results Two hundred and sixty samples (76 cases and 184 controls), mostly subtype B (73.5%), were used for the analysis. Identical MVs were detected in the two laboratories. 31.6% of cases and 16.8% of controls harboured pre-existing MVs. Detection of at least one MV versus no MVs was associated with an increased risk of virological failure (OR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.35–5.60, P = 0.005); similar associations were observed for at least one MV versus no NRTI MVs (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 0.76–6.77, P = 0.140) and at least one MV versus no NNRTI MVs (OR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.12–5.18, P = 0.024). A dose–effect relationship between virological failure and mutational load was found. Conclusions Pre-existing MVs more than double the risk of virological failure to first-line NNRTI-based ART. PMID:25336166

  12. Molecular diversity of HIV-1 and surveillance of transmitted drug resistance variants among treatment Naïve patients, 5 years after active introduction of HAART in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lai Yee; Razak, Siti Nur Humaira; Lee, Yeat Mei; Sri La Sri Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Azwa, Raja Iskandar; Tee, Kok Keng; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of antiretroviral treatment programs have led to the growing concern for the development of antiretroviral drug resistance. The aims were to assess the prevalence of drug resistant HIV-1 variants and to identify circulating subtypes among HAART-naïve patients. Plasma specimens from N = 100 HIV+ HAART-naïve adult were collected between March 2008 and August 2010 and viral RNA were extracted for nested PCR and sequenced. PR-RT sequences were protein aligned and checked for transmitted drug resistance mutations. Phylogenetic reconstruction and recombination analysis were performed to determine the genotypes. Based on the WHO consensus guidelines, none of the recruited patients had any transmitted drug resistance mutations. When analyzed against the Stanford guidelines, 35% of patients had at least one reported mutation that may reduce drug susceptibility to PI (24%), NRTI (5%), and NNRTI (14%). The commonly detected mutation that may affect current first line therapy was V179D (3%), which may lead to reduced susceptibility to NNRTI. The predominant circulating HIV-1 genotypes were CRF01_AE (51%) and CRF33_01B (17%). The prevalence of unique recombinant forms (URF) was 7%; five distinct recombinant structures involving CRF01_AE and subtype B' were observed, among them a cluster of three isolates that could form a novel circulating recombinant form (CRF) candidate. Transmitted drug resistance prevalence among HAART-naïve patients was low in this cohort of patients in Kuala Lumpur despite introduction of HAART 5 years ago. Owing to the high genetic diversity, continued molecular surveillance can identify the persistent emergence of HIV-1 URF and novel CRF with significant epidemiological impact.

  13. Different Effects of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Resistance Mutations on Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Recognition between HIV-1 Subtype B and Subtype A/E Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Nozomi; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Murakoshi, Hayato; Tran, Giang Van; Chikata, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Madoka; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations on cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition has been analyzed in HIV-1 subtype B infections, but it remains unclear in infections by other HIV-1 subtypes that are epidemic in countries where antiretroviral drugs are not effectively used. We investigated the effect of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistance mutations (Y181C, Y181I, and Y181V) on epitope recognition by CTLs specific for 3 different HIV-1 epitopes (HLA-A*02:01-restricted IV10, HLA-B*35:01-restricted NY9, and HLA-C*12:02-restricted KY9) in subtype B and subtype A/E infections and the accumulation of these mutations in treatment-naive Japanese and Vietnamese. These NNRTI-resistance mutations critically affected NY9-specific and KY9-specific T cell responses in the subtype B infections, whereas they showed a different effect on IV10-specific T cell responses among the subtype B-infected individuals. These mutations affected IV10-specific T cell responses but weakly affected NY9-specific T cell responses in the subtype A/E infections. The substitution at position 3 of NY9 epitope which was found in the subtype A/E virus differently influenced the peptide binding to HLA-B*35:01, suggesting that the differences in peptide binding may result in the differences in T cell recognition between the subtype B virus and A/E virus infections. The Y181C mutation was found to be accumulating in treatment-naive Vietnamese infected with the subtype A/E virus. The present study demonstrated different effects of NNRTI-resistance RT181 mutations on CTL responses between the 2 subtype infections. The Y181C mutation may influence HIV-1 control by the CTLs in Vietnam, since this mutation has been accumulating in treatment-naive Vietnamese. IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy leads to the emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1, resulting in virological and clinical failures. Though HIV-1-specific CTLs play a critical role in HIV-1 infection

  14. COMMD1/Murr1 Reinforces HIV-1 Latent Infection through IκB-α Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Manabu; Kudo, Eriko; Kariya, Ryusho; Goto, Hiroki; Matsuda, Kouki; Hattori, Shinichiro; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; McDonald, Fiona; Suico, Mary Ann; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Kai, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transcription factor NF-κB is important for HIV-1 transcription initiation in primary HIV-1 infection and reactivation in latently HIV-1-infected cells. However, comparative analysis of the regulation and function of NF-κB in latently HIV-1-infected cells has not been done. Here we show that the expression of IκB-α, an endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB, is enhanced by latent HIV-1 infection via induction of the host-derived factor COMMD1/Murr1 in myeloid cells but not in lymphoid cells by using four sets of latently HIV-1-infected cells and the respective parental cells. IκB-α protein was stabilized by COMMD1, which attenuated NF-κB signaling during Toll-like receptor ligand and tumor necrosis factor alpha treatment and enhanced HIV-1 latency in latently HIV-1-infected cells. Activation of the phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–JAK pathway is involved in COMMD1 induction in latently HIV-1-infected cells. Our findings indicate that COMMD1 induction is the NF-κB inhibition mechanism in latently HIV-1-infected cells that contributes to innate immune deficiency and reinforces HIV-1 latency. Thus, COMMD1 might be a double-edged sword that is beneficial in primary infection but not beneficial in latent infection when HIV-1 eradication is considered. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 latency is a major barrier to viral eradication in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. In this study, we found that COMMD1/Murr1, previously identified as an HIV-1 restriction factor, inhibits the proteasomal degradation of IκB-α by increasing the interaction with IκB-α in latently HIV-1-infected myeloid cells. IκB-α protein was stabilized by COMMD1, which attenuated NF-κB signaling during the innate immune response and enhanced HIV-1 latency in latently HIV-1-infected cells. Activation of the PI3K-JAK pathway is involved in COMMD1 induction in latently HIV-1-infected cells. Thus, the host-derived factor COMMD1 is beneficial in suppressing primary infection but enhances

  15. Elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bruel, Timothée; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Amraoui, Sonia; Malbec, Marine; Richard, Léa; Bourdic, Katia; Donahue, Daniel Aaron; Lorin, Valérie; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; Mouquet, Hugo; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Fc region of HIV-1 Env-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is required for suppressing viraemia, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here, we identify bNAbs that exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell culture and kill HIV-1-infected lymphocytes through natural killer (NK) engagement. These antibodies target the CD4-binding site, the glycans/V3 and V1/V2 loops on gp120, or the gp41 moiety. The landscape of Env epitope exposure at the surface and the sensitivity of infected cells to ADCC vary considerably between viral strains. Efficient ADCC requires sustained cell surface binding of bNAbs to Env, and combining bNAbs allows a potent killing activity. Furthermore, reactivated infected cells from HIV-positive individuals expose heterogeneous Env epitope patterns, with levels that are often but not always sufficient to trigger killing by bNAbs. Our study delineates the parameters controlling ADCC activity of bNAbs, and supports the use of the most potent antibodies to clear the viral reservoir. PMID:26936020

  16. Elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Amraoui, Sonia; Malbec, Marine; Richard, Léa; Bourdic, Katia; Donahue, Daniel Aaron; Lorin, Valérie; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; Mouquet, Hugo; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Fc region of HIV-1 Env-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is required for suppressing viraemia, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here, we identify bNAbs that exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell culture and kill HIV-1-infected lymphocytes through natural killer (NK) engagement. These antibodies target the CD4-binding site, the glycans/V3 and V1/V2 loops on gp120, or the gp41 moiety. The landscape of Env epitope exposure at the surface and the sensitivity of infected cells to ADCC vary considerably between viral strains. Efficient ADCC requires sustained cell surface binding of bNAbs to Env, and combining bNAbs allows a potent killing activity. Furthermore, reactivated infected cells from HIV-positive individuals expose heterogeneous Env epitope patterns, with levels that are often but not always sufficient to trigger killing by bNAbs. Our study delineates the parameters controlling ADCC activity of bNAbs, and supports the use of the most potent antibodies to clear the viral reservoir. PMID:26936020

  17. Selective elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by Env-directed, HIV-1-based virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Peretti, Silvia; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pugliese, Katherina; Federico, Maurizio . E-mail: federico@iss.it

    2006-02-05

    We recently showed that both replicating and resting cells cultivated with ganciclovir (GCV) were killed when challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped HIV-1-based virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the Nef7 (i.e., an HIV-1 Nef mutant incorporating in virions at high levels)/herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) fusion product. On this basis, a novel anti-HIV therapeutic approach based on Nef7/TK VLPs expressing X4 or R5 HIV cell receptor complexes has been attempted. We here report that (CD4-CXCR4) and (CD4-CCR5) Nef7-based VLPs efficiently enter cells infected by X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. Importantly, the delivery of the VLP-associated Nef7/TK led to cell death upon GCV treatment. Of interest, VLPs were effective also against non-replicating, HIV-1-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV-targeted VLPs represent a promising candidate for the treatment of persistently HIV-1-infected cells that are part of virus reservoirs resistant to HAART therapies.

  18. Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-1 Infection and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D. V.; Kendall, M. A.; Ive, P.; Kumwenda, J.; Swindells, S.; Qasba, S. S.; Luetkemeyer, A. F.; Hogg, E.; Rooney, J.; Wu, X.; Hosseinipour, M. C.; Lalloo, U.; Veloso, V. G.; Some, F. F.; Kumarasamy, N.; Padayatchi, N.; Santos, B. R.; Reid, S.; Hakim, J.; Mohapi, L.; Mugyenyi, P.; Sanchez, J.; Lama, J. R.; Pape, J. W.; Sattler, F. R.; Asmelash, A.; Moko, E.; Sawe, F.; Andersen, J.; Sanne, I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is indicated during tuberculosis (TB) treatment of patients infected with HIV-1, but the urgency to start ART at TB diagnosis for patients of varying levels of immune compromise is not known. Methods We conducted an open label, randomized study comparing immediate (within 2 weeks of TB treatment initiation) to early (8–12 weeks) ART among HIV-1 infected patients with CD4+ lymphocytes < 250/mm3 and suspected TB. The primary study endpoint was proportion of patients who survived without an AIDS-defining illness at 48 weeks. Results 809 patients with median baseline CD4+ lymphocytes of 77 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA of 5.43 log10 copies/mL were enrolled. In the immediate arm, 12.9% of patients experienced an AIDS-defining illness or death by 48 weeks compared to 16.1% in the early arm (p=0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) for difference: −1.8%, 8.1%). In patients with screening CD4+ lymphocytes <50 cells/mm3, 15.5% of patients on the immediate arm vs. 26.6% on early ART experienced an AIDS defining illness or death (p=0.02; difference CI: 1.5%, 20.5%). TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was more common with immediate ART (11% vs. 5%: p=0.002). Viral suppression at 48 weeks was 74% and did not differ between arms (p=0.38). Conclusion Overall, immediate ART did not reduce AIDS-defining illnesses and death compared to early ART. For persons with CD4+ lymphocytes < 50 cells/mm3, immediate ART had 42% less AIDS defining illnesses and death compared to early ART. (ClinicalTrial.gov number NCT00108862.) PMID:22010914

  19. Transmitted drug-resistance in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adult population in El Salvador, Central America.

    PubMed

    Holguín, Á; Yebra, G; Martín, L; de Pineda, A T; Ruiz, L E; Quezada, A Y; Nieto, A I; Escobar, G

    2013-12-01

    El Salvador harbours one of the largest Central American human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics, but few studies have analysed it in depth. Here, we describe the presence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and HIV variants in the HIV-infected adult population in El Salvador. Dried blood spots from 119 HIV-infected antiretroviral-naive adults attended in El Salvador were collected in 2011. The TDR was assessed according to the list recommended by the WHO. HIV-1 variants were described using phylogeny. Pol sequences could be amplified in 88 patients (50.6% men), with a mean age of 35 years. Almost all (96.7%) were infected with HIV through sexual practice and 58.7% were recently diagnosed. The mean CD4(+) count was 474 cells/mm(3) and 43.1% and 15.5% of patients showed moderate (<500 CD4 cells) or severe (<200) immune suppression, respectively. HIV-1 viral load was >100 000 copies/mL in 24.7% of patients and <2000 copies/mL in 9.1%. Five samples (5.7%) harboured any TDR mutation: 2.3% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), and 1.4% for protease inhibitor (PI). All showed only one TDR single-class resistance mutation: M184I (two cases) for NRTI, K101E and K103N for NNRTI and L23I for PI. All viruses excepting one (URF_BG) belonged to subtype B. No phylogenetic TDR networks were found. In conclusion, we report a TDR prevalence of 5.7% in El Salvador, lower than in other Central American studies. Periodical studies are essential to monitor and prevent TDR emergence in low-income and middle-income regions. Also, more efforts are needed to promote early diagnosis and prevention of infection in El Salvador.

  20. Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells with combinations of HIV-1-specific inhibitors results in a different resistance pattern than does treatment with single-drug therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Karlsson, A; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Camarasa, M J; Tarpley, W G; De Clercq, E

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected CEM cells were treated by the HIV-1-specific inhibitors bis-heteroarylpiperazine (BHAP), 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methylimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1 H)-on e (TIBO) R82913, nevirapine, and the N3-methylthymine derivative of [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3'-spiro- 5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide) (TSAO-m3T), as single agents or in combination, at escalating concentrations. When used individually, the compounds led to the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains within two to five subcultivations. The resulting strains were designated HIV-1/BHAP, HIV-1/TIBO, HIV-1/Nev, and HIV-1/TSAO-m3T, respectively. The mutant viruses showed the following amino acid substitutions in their reverse transcriptase (RT): Leu-100-->Ile for HIV-1/BHAP; Lys-103-->Asn for HIV-1/TIBO; Val-106-->Ala for HIV-1/Nev; and Glu-138-->Lys for HIV-1/TSAO-m3T. Both the Tyr-181-->Cys and Val-106-->Ala mutations were found in another mutant emerging following treatment with nevirapine at escalating concentrations. The BHAP-resistant virus remained fully sensitive to the inhibitory effects of nevirapine and TSAO-m3T, whereas the TSAO-m3T-resistant virus remained fully sensitive to the inhibitory effects of nevirapine and BHAP. When different pairs of nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (i.e., BHAP plus TSAO-m3T, nevirapine plus TSAO-m3T, TIBO plus TSAO-m3T, nevirapine plus TIBO, and BHAP plus nevirapine) were used, resistant virus emerged as fast as with single-drug therapy. In all cases the Tyr-181-->Cys mutation appeared; the virus showed markedly reduced sensitivity to all HIV-1-specific inhibitors but retained sensitivity to 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside analogs such as zidovudine, ddC, and ddI. Our findings argue against simultaneous combination of two different nonnucleoside RT inhibitors that are unable to inhibit HIV-1 mutant strains containing the Tyr-181-->Cys mutation when administered as single

  1. KI and WU polyomaviruses and CD4+ cell counts in HIV-1-infected patients, Italy.

    PubMed

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco

    2010-09-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1-positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1-positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1-positive patients.

  2. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection and Progression to AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Rathore, Anurag; Vidyant, Sanjukta; Kakkar, Kavita; Dhole, Tapan N.

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22377730

  3. Analysis on the infections change and measures for the multiple drug-resistant bacteria of neurology.

    PubMed

    Zang, Wenju

    2016-05-01

    To analyze the bacterial infection situations and the separation situations of multiple drug-resistant bacteria of the neurology of Zhengzhou People's hospital from Feb. 2012 to Dec. 2014. The patients data of neurology were retrieved by means of the doctor workstation system. The infection sites, the classification and drug-resistant feature of bacteria were classified and summarized in Excel. Finally, Compared with the infection sites, the classification and drug-resistant feature of bacteria at different year. The data obtained use SPSS 19.0 software to do statistical analysis. The infection rate of bacteria in neurology from Year 2012 to 2014 declined from 4.99% to 3.41%. But the constitution of the infection sites of bacteria had no significant changes. Staphylococcus aureus still was the majority in the infections of gram-positive bacteria, and Escherichia coli was the majority in the infections of gram-negative bacteria, and there were no significant changes in the ranking of the past three years. The separation rate of Acihetobacter baumanii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in gram-negative bacteria gradually escalated. There were definite efficiencies in the prevention and control of the bacterial infections in neurology in the past three years. But the situation of prevention and control was still severe at the same time. PMID:27383494

  4. Moyamoya Syndrome in South African Children With HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Charles K; Shapson-Coe, Alexander; Govender, Rajeshree; van Toorn, Ronald; Ndondo, Alvin; Wieselthaler, Nicky; Eley, Brian; Mubaiwa, Lawrence; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2016-07-01

    A national multicenter study identified 17 South African children with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection and HIV-associated vasculopathy. Five of the children (all indigenous African ancestry) had progressive vascular disease, consistent with moyamoya syndrome. Median presentation age 5.8 years (range 2.2-11). The children with moyamoya syndrome presented with abnormal CD4 counts and raised viral loads. Clinical features included motor deficits, neuroregression, and intellectual disability. Neuroimaging supported progressive vascular disease with preceding clinically silent disease course. Neurologic recovery occurred in 1 patient with improved CD4 counts. Four of the 5 children presented during the era when access to antiretroviral therapy was limited, suggesting that with improved management of HIV-1, progressive vasculopathy is less prevalent. However the insidious disease course illustrated indicates that the syndrome can progress "silently," and manifest with misleading phenotypes such as cognitive delay or regression. Sub-Saharan Africa has limited access to neuroimaging and affected children may be underdiagnosed. PMID:26961262

  5. Molecular Epidemiology and Transmission Dynamics of Recent and Long-Term HIV-1 Infections in Rural Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Zeh, Clement; Inzaule, Seth C.; Ondoa, Pascale; Nafisa, Lillian G.; Kasembeli, Alex; Otieno, Fredrick; Vandenhoudt, Hilde; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Mills, Lisa A.; Nkengasong, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify unique characteristics of recent versus established HIV infections and describe sexual transmission networks, we characterized circulating HIV-1 strains from two randomly selected populations of ART-naïve participants in rural western Kenya. Methods Recent HIV infections were identified by the HIV-1 subtype B, E and D, immunoglobulin G capture immunoassay (IgG BED-CEIA) and BioRad avidity assays. Genotypic and phylogenetic analyses were performed on the pol gene to identify transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations, characterize HIV subtypes and potential transmission clusters. Factors associated with recent infection and clustering were assessed by logistic regression. Results Of the 320 specimens, 40 (12.5%) were concordantly identified by the two assays as recent infections. Factors independently associated with being recently infected were age ≤19 years (P = 0.001) and history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the past six months (P = 0.004). HIV subtype distribution differed in recently versus chronically infected participants, with subtype A observed among 53% recent vs. 68% chronic infections (p = 0.04) and subtype D among 26% recent vs. 12% chronic infections (p = 0.012). Overall, the prevalence of primary drug resistance was 1.16%. Of the 258 sequences, 11.2% were in monophyletic clusters of between 2–4 individuals. In multivariate analysis factors associated with clustering included having recent HIV infection P = 0.043 and being from Gem region P = 0.002. Conclusions Recent HIV-1 infection was more frequent among 13–19 year olds compared with older age groups, underscoring the ongoing risk and susceptibility of younger persons for acquiring HIV infection. Our findings also provide evidence of sexual networks. The association of recent infections with clustering suggests that early infections may be contributing significant proportions of onward transmission highlighting the need for early diagnosis and treatment

  6. Comparison of Ahlstrom grade 226, Munktell TFN, and Whatman 903 filter papers for dried blood spot specimen collection and subsequent HIV-1 load and drug resistance genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Rottinghaus, Erin; Bile, Ebi; Modukanele, Mosetsanagape; Maruping, Maruping; Mine, Madisa; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected onto filter paper have eased the difficulty of blood collection in resource-limited settings. Currently, Whatman 903 (W-903) filter paper is the only filter paper that has been used for HIV load and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing. We therefore evaluated two additional commercially available filter papers, Ahlstrom grade 226 (A-226) and Munktell TFN (M-TFN), for viral load (VL) testing and HIVDR genotyping using W-903 filter paper as a comparison group. DBS specimens were generated from 344 adult patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana. The VL was measured with NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v2.0, and genotyping was performed for those specimens with a detectable VL (≥ 2.90 log(10) copies/ml) using an in-house method. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a strong concordance in quantitative VL analysis between W-903 and A-226 (bias = -0.034 ± 0.246 log(10) copies/ml [mean difference ± standard deviation]) and W-903 and M-TFN (bias = -0.028 ± 0.186 log(10) copies/ml) filter papers, while qualitative VL analysis for virological failure determination, defined as a VL of ≥ 3.00 log(10) copies/ml, showed low sensitivities for A-266 (71.54%) and M-TFN (65.71%) filter papers compared to W-903 filter paper. DBS collected on M-TFN filter paper had the highest genotyping efficiency (100%) compared to W-903 and A-226 filter papers (91.7%) and appeared more sensitive in detecting major HIVDR mutations. DBS collected on A-226 and M-TFN filter papers performed similarly to DBS collected on W-903 filter paper for quantitative VL analysis and HIVDR detection. Together, the encouraging genotyping results and the variability observed in determining virological failure from this small pilot study warrant further investigation of A-226 and M-TFN filter papers as specimen collection devices for HIVDR monitoring surveys.

  7. Dynamics of immunoglobulin sequence diversity in HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Kenneth B.; Gall, Astrid; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Fidler, S. J.; Kaye, S.; Weber, J. N.; McClure, M. O.; Kellam, Paul; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in immunoglobulin (Ig) sequencing technology are leading to new perspectives on immune system dynamics. Much research in this nascent field has focused on resolving immune responses to viral infection. However, the dynamics of B-cell diversity in early HIV infection, and in response to anti-retroviral therapy, are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate these dynamics through bulk Ig sequencing of samples collected over 2 years from a group of eight HIV-1 infected patients, five of whom received anti-retroviral therapy during the first half of the study period. We applied previously published methods for visualizing and quantifying B-cell sequence diversity, including the Gini index, and compared their efficacy to alternative measures. While we found significantly greater clonal structure in HIV-infected patients versus healthy controls, within HIV patients, we observed no significant relationships between statistics of B-cell clonal expansion and clinical variables such as viral load and CD4+ count. Although there are many potential explanations for this, we suggest that important factors include poor sampling resolution and complex B-cell dynamics that are difficult to summarize using simple summary statistics. Importantly, we find a significant association between observed Gini indices and sequencing read depth, and we conclude that more robust analytical methods and a closer integration of experimental and theoretical work is needed to further our understanding of B-cell repertoire diversity during viral infection. PMID:26194755

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr Functions as an Immediate-Early Protein during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hrimech, Mohammed; Yao, Xiao-Jian; Bachand, François; Rougeau, Nicole; Cohen, Éric A.

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr is a virion-associated protein which facilitates HIV-1 infection of nondividing cells by contributing to the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex (PIC). Vpr was also shown to induce a cell cycle G2 arrest in infected proliferating cells that optimizes HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-directed gene expression and viral production. However, it is unclear whether this activity is mediated primarily early by virion-associated Vpr or alternatively late during infection when Vpr is de novo expressed. We report here that in the absence of de novo expression, virion-associated Vpr induces a transient G2 arrest that can subsequently lead to cell killing by apoptosis. Interestingly, the induction of both cell cycle G2 arrest and apoptosis by virion-associated Vpr requires viral entry but not viral replication, since reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor treatments do not prevent these Vpr effects. These results raise the possibility that in vivo both infectious and noninfectious viruses contribute to the dysfunction and killing of CD4+ cells. In addition, our results reveal that virion-associated Vpr stimulates viral replication in proliferating cells after establishing a cell cycle G2 arrest by increasing LTR-directed gene expression. Importantly, this Vpr-mediated LTR activation appears to be a requirement for subsequent optimal Tat transactivation. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that in addition to participating in the HIV PIC nuclear transport in nondividing cells, virion-associated Vpr activates HIV-1 LTR-directed gene expression by manipulating the host cell cycle. From this, we conclude that Vpr functions as an immediate-early protein during HIV-1 infection. PMID:10196306

  9. Changes in plasma cytokines after treatment of ascaris lumbricoides infection in individuals with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Blish, Catherine A; Sangaré, Laura; Herrin, Bradley R; Richardson, Barbra A; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L

    2010-06-15

    Albendazole treatment of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ascaris lumbricoides co-infection has led to significantly improved CD4(+) cell counts and a trend for lower plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in a previous randomized placebo-controlled trial. To define mechanisms by which deworming contributed to changes in markers of HIV-1 disease progression, plasma cytokine levels were evaluated. Albendazole treatment, compared with placebo, was associated with significantly decreased plasma interleukin (IL) 10 levels (P = .01)ot associated with significant changes in levels of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Treatment of A. lumbricoides co-infection may delay HIV-1 disease progression by reducing helminth-induced, IL-10-mediated immunosuppression.

  10. Changes in plasma cytokines after treatment of ascaris lumbricoides infection in individuals with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Blish, Catherine A; Sangaré, Laura; Herrin, Bradley R; Richardson, Barbra A; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L

    2010-06-15

    Albendazole treatment of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ascaris lumbricoides co-infection has led to significantly improved CD4(+) cell counts and a trend for lower plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in a previous randomized placebo-controlled trial. To define mechanisms by which deworming contributed to changes in markers of HIV-1 disease progression, plasma cytokine levels were evaluated. Albendazole treatment, compared with placebo, was associated with significantly decreased plasma interleukin (IL) 10 levels (P = .01)ot associated with significant changes in levels of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Treatment of A. lumbricoides co-infection may delay HIV-1 disease progression by reducing helminth-induced, IL-10-mediated immunosuppression. PMID:20441516

  11. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Helfer, Markus; Kraus, Birgit; Wolff, Horst; Wild, Christian; Schneider, Martha; Voolstra, Christian R.; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:25144758

  12. Rare emergence of drug resistance in HIV-1 treatment-naïve patients after 48 weeks of treatment with elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide.

    PubMed

    Margot, Nicolas A; Kitrinos, Kathryn M; Fordyce, Marshall; McCallister, Scott; Miller, Michael D; Callebaut, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a novel prodrug of the NtRTI tenofovir (TFV), delivers TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) to target cells more efficiently than the current prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), with a 90% reduction in TFV plasma exposure. TAF, within the fixed dose combination of elvitegravir /cobicistat / emtricitabine (FTC)/TAF (E/C/F/TAF), has been evaluated in one Phase 2 and two Phase 3 randomized, double-blinded studies in HIV-infected treatment-naive patients, comparing E/C/F/TAF to E/C/F/TDF. In these studies, the TAF-containing group demonstrated non-inferior efficacy to the TDF-containing comparator group with 91.9% of E/C/F/TAF patients having <50 copies/mL of HIV-1 RNA at week 48. An integrated resistance analysis across these three studies was conducted, including HIV-1 genotypic analysis at screening, and genotypic/phenotypic analysis for patients with HIV-1 RNA>400 copies/mL at virologic failure. Pre-existing primary resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) were observed at screening among the 1903 randomized and treated patients: 7.5% had NRTI-RAMs, 18.2% had NNRTI-RAMs, and 3.4% had primary PI-RAMs. Pre-treatment RAMs did not influence treatment response at Week 48. In the E/C/F/TAF group, resistance development was rare; seven patients (0.7%, 7/978) developed NRTI-RAMs, five of whom (0.5%, 5/978) also developed primary INSTI-RAMs. In the E/C/F/TDF group, resistance development was also rare; seven patients (0.8%, 7/925) developed NRTI-RAMs, four of whom (0.4%, 4/925) also developed primary INSTI-RAMs. An additional analysis by deep sequencing in virologic failures revealed minimal differences compared to population sequencing. Overall, resistance development was rare in E/C/F/TAF-treated patients, and the pattern of emergent mutations was similar to E/C/F/TDF. PMID:26892863

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 Tat-mediated LTR transactivation and HIV-1 infection by anti-Tat single chain intrabodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mhashilkar, A M; Bagley, J; Chen, S Y; Szilvay, A M; Helland, D G; Marasco, W A

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable regions of anti-HIV-1 Tat, exon 1 or exon 2 specific monoclonal antibodies have been used to construct single chain intracellular antibodies 'intrabodies' for expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These anti-Tat single chain intrabodies (anti-Tat sFvs) are additionally modified with a C-terminal human C kappa domain to increase cytoplasmic stability and/or the C-terminal SV40 nuclear localization signal to direct the nascent intrabody to the nuclear compartment, respectively. The anti-Tat sFvs with specific binding activity against the N-terminal activation domain of Tat, block Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 LTR as well as intracellular trafficking of Tat in mammalian cells. As a result, the transformed lymphocytes expressing anti-Tat sFvs are resistant to HIV-1 infection. Thus, these studies demonstrate that stably expressed single chain intrabodies and their modified forms can effectively target molecules in the cytoplasm and nuclear compartments of eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, these studies suggest that anti-Tat sFvs used either alone or in combination with other genetically based strategies may be useful for the gene therapy of HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Images PMID:7537216

  14. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Danielle P; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D; White, Kirsten L

    2015-12-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  15. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Danielle P.; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D.; White, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  16. Whole-genome sequencing targets drug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Punina, N V; Makridakis, N M; Remnev, M A; Topunov, A F

    2015-01-01

    During the past two decades, the technological progress of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) had changed the fields of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, and, currently, is changing the underlying principles, approaches, and fundamentals of Public Health, Epidemiology, Health Economics, and national productivity. Today's WGS technologies are able to compete with conventional techniques in cost, speed, accuracy, and resolution for day-to-day control of infectious diseases and outbreaks in clinical laboratories and in long-term epidemiological investigations. WGS gives rise to an exciting future direction for personalized Genomic Epidemiology. One of the most vital and growing public health problems is the emerging and re-emerging of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections in the communities and healthcare settings, reinforced by a decline in antimicrobial drug discovery. In recent years, retrospective analysis provided by WGS has had a great impact on the identification and tracking of MDR microorganisms in hospitals and communities. The obtained genomic data are also important for developing novel easy-to-use diagnostic assays for clinics, as well as for antibiotic and therapeutic development at both the personal and population levels. At present, this technology has been successfully applied as an addendum to the real-time diagnostic methods currently used in clinical laboratories. However, the significance of WGS for public health may increase if: (a) unified and user-friendly bioinformatics toolsets for easy data interpretation and management are established, and (b) standards for data validation and verification are developed. Herein, we review the current and future impact of this technology on diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and control of MDR infectious bacteria in clinics and on the global scale. PMID:26243131

  17. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace; Egessa, John J; Mubezi, Sezi; Kusemererwa, Sylvia; Bii, Dennis K; Bulya, Nulu; Mugume, Francis; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  18. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P < 0.0001) and mean differences of measurement, conducted according to Bland-Altman method, was low (0.115 log10  copies/ml). The Aptima HIV quantified the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard diluted from 2000 to 31 cp/ml (5,700-88 IU/ml) at expected values with excellent linearity (R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P < 0.0001) and mean differences of measurement, conducted according to Bland-Altman method, was low (0.115 log10  copies/ml). The Aptima HIV quantified the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard diluted from 2000 to 31 cp/ml (5,700-88 IU/ml) at expected values with excellent linearity (R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864171

  20. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture.

  1. Akt inhibitors as an HIV-1 infected macrophage-specific anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Pauline; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Monteiro-Filho, Carlos MR; Planelles, Vicente; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kim, Baek

    2008-01-01

    Background Unlike CD4+ T cells, HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit extended life span even upon stress, consistent with their in vivo role as long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs. Results Here, we demonstrate that PI3K/Akt inhibitors, including clinically available Miltefosine, dramatically reduced HIV-1 production from long-living virus-infected macrophages. These PI3K/Akt inhibitors hyper-sensitize infected macrophages to extracellular stresses that they are normally exposed to, and eventually lead to cell death of infected macrophages without harming uninfected cells. Based on the data from these Akt inhibitors, we were able to further investigate how HIV-1 infection utilizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to establish the cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 infection, which extends the lifespan of infected macrophages, a key viral reservoir. First, we found that HIV-1 infection activates the well characterized pro-survival PI3K/Akt pathway in primary human macrophages, as reflected by decreased PTEN protein expression and increased Akt kinase activity. Interestingly, the expression of HIV-1 or SIV Tat is sufficient to mediate this cytoprotective effect, which is dependent on the basic domain of Tat – a region that has previously been shown to bind p53. Next, we observed that this interaction appears to contribute to the downregulation of PTEN expression, since HIV-1 Tat was found to compete with PTEN for p53 binding; this is known to result in p53 destabilization, with a consequent reduction in PTEN protein production. Conclusion Since HIV-1 infected macrophages display highly elevated Akt activity, our results collectively show that PI3K/Akt inhibitors may be a novel therapy for interfering with the establishment of long-living HIV-1 infected reservoirs. PMID:18237430

  2. Multiploid inheritance of HIV-1 during cell-to-cell infection.

    PubMed

    Del Portillo, Armando; Tripodi, Joseph; Najfeld, Vesna; Wodarz, Dominik; Levy, David N; Chen, Benjamin K

    2011-07-01

    During cell-to-cell transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), many viral particles can be simultaneously transferred from infected to uninfected CD4 T cells through structures called virological synapses (VS). Here we directly examine how cell-free and cell-to-cell infections differ from infections initiated with cell-free virus in the number of genetic copies that are transmitted from one generation to the next, i.e., the genetic inheritance. Following exposure to HIV-1-expressing cells, we show that target cells with high viral uptake are much more likely to become infected. Using T cells that coexpress distinct fluorescent HIV-1 variants, we show that multiple copies of HIV-1 can be cotransmitted across a single VS. In contrast to cell-free HIV-1 infection, which titrates with Poisson statistics, the titration of cell-associated HIV-1 to low rates of overall infection generates a constant fraction of the newly infected cells that are cofluorescent. Triple infection was also readily detected when cells expressing three fluorescent viruses were used as donor cells. A computational model and a statistical model are presented to estimate the degree to which cofluorescence underestimates coinfection frequency. Lastly, direct detection of HIV-1 proviruses using fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that significantly more HIV-1 DNA copies are found in primary T cells infected with cell-associated virus than in those infected with cell-free virus. Together, the data suggest that multiploid inheritance is common during cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. From this study, we suggest that cell-to-cell infection may explain the high copy numbers of proviruses found in infected cells in vivo and may provide a mechanism through which HIV preserves sequence heterogeneity in viral quasispecies through genetic complementation.

  3. Genetic determinants of pediatric HIV-1 infection: vertical transmission and disease progression among children.

    PubMed Central

    Matt, C.; Roger, M.

    2001-01-01

    It is very likely that perinatal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is influenced by a combination of virologic and host factors. A greater understanding of the role played by various risk factors for HIV-1 infection is crucial for the design of new preventive and therapeutic strategies. In recent years, a number of studies have suggested that host genetic factors are important determinants of both the susceptibility to perinatal HIV-1 infection and the subsequent pathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Control of HIV-1 infection involves the processing of specific viral peptides and their presentation to cells of the immune system by highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. The contribution of multiple HLA class I and II alleles in modulating pediatric HIV/AIDS outcomes has now been confirmed by several independent groups. Penetration of HIV-1 into cells is mediated by interaction between CD4 and chemokine receptors that serve as entry coreceptors. Genetic polymorphisms in chemokine ligand and chemokine receptor genes have recently been associated both with mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission and disease progression in children. These observations suggest a key role for genetic factors in pediatric HIV-1 infection. This article describes the current state of knowledge regarding host genetic influences on pediatric HIV-1 infection and discusses the role of these genes in HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:11778647

  4. Long-term HIV-1 infection induces an antiviral state in primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pujantell, Maria; Badia, Roger; Ramirez, Cristina; Puig, Teresa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ballana, Ester; Esté, José A; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 infection is thought to impair type I interferon (IFN-I) production in macrophages, a cell type that is also relatively resistant to HIV-1 cytotoxic effects. Here, we show that monocyte differentiation into macrophages by M-CSF led to cell proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection that induced cell cycle arrest and increased cell death. Established HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages induced the upregulation of the pattern recognition receptors MDA5 and Rig-I that serve as virus sensors; production of interferon-β, and transcription of interferon-stimulated genes including CXCL10. Infected macrophages showed increased expression of p21 and subsequent inactivation of cyclin-CDK2 activity leading to a hypo-phosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and deactivation of E2F1-dependent transcription and CDK1 downregulation. Additionally, HIV-1 infection limited deoxynucleotide pool by downregulation of the ribonucleotide reductase subunit R2 (RNR2) and reactivation of the HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD1 together with increased cell death. In conclusion, HIV-1 induced an innate antiviral mechanism associated to IFN-I production, interferon stimulated gene activation, and p21-mediated G2/M arrest leading to elevated levels of cell death in monocyte derived macrophages. Upregulation of MDA5 and Rig-I may serve as targets for the development of antiviral strategies leading to the elimination of HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:27510577

  5. Class-Sparing Regimens for Initial Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Peeples, Lynne; Powderly, William G.; Klingman, Karin L.; Garren, Kevin W.; George, Tania; Rooney, James F.; Brizz, Barbara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Murphy, Robert L.; Swindells, Susan; Havlir, Diane; Mellors, John W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of either efavirenz or lopinavir–ritonavir plus two nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is recommended for initial therapy for patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but which of the two regimens has greater efficacy is not known. The alternative regimen of lopinavir–ritonavir plus efavirenz may prevent toxic effects associated with NRTIs. METHODS In an open-label study, we compared three regimens for initial therapy: efavirenz plus two NRTIs (efavirenz group), lopinavir–ritonavir plus two NRTIs (lopinavir–ritonavir group), and lopinavir–ritonavir plus efavirenz (NRTI-sparing group). We randomly assigned 757 patients with a median CD4 count of 191 cells per cubic millimeter and a median HIV-1 RNA level of 4.8 log10 copies per milliliter to the three groups. RESULTS At a median follow-up of 112 weeks, the time to virologic failure was longer in the efavirenz group than in the lopinavir–ritonavir group (P = 0.006) but was not significantly different in the NRTI-sparing group from the time in either of the other two groups. At week 96, the proportion of patients with fewer than 50 copies of plasma HIV-1 RNA per milliliter was 89% in the efavirenz group, 77% in the lopinavir–ritonavir group, and 83% in the NRTI-sparing group (P = 0.003 for the comparison between the efavirenz group and the lopinavir–ritonavir group). The groups did not differ significantly in the time to discontinuation because of toxic effects. At virologic failure, antiretroviral resistance mutations were more frequent in the NRTI-sparing group than in the other two groups. CONCLUSIONS Virologic failure was less likely in the efavirenz group than in the lopinavir–ritonavir group. The virologic efficacy of the NRTI-sparing regimen was similar to that of the efavirenz regimen but was more likely to be associated with drug resistance. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00050895.) PMID:18480202

  6. Trends in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) load among HIV-1-infected children with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Engels, E A; Rosenberg, P S; Katki, H; Goedert, J J; Biggar, R J

    2001-08-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons, virus load (serum/plasma level of HIV) predicts outcome. Virus load trends have been characterized in adults and infants but not in children. Virus load trends in 22 male children with hemophilia who acquired HIV-1 postnatally (age 0.7-5.2 years at seroconversion) were studied. The mean HIV-1 load 2 years after seroconversion was 4.40 log10 copies/mL, and the mean change over time (slope) was 0.03 log10 copies/(mL x year). Significant among-children variation was apparent: a random effects model predicted that 95% of children had early virus loads 3.75-5.04 log10 copies/mL and slopes -0.07 to 0.12 log10 copies/(mL x year). Higher early virus loads and higher slopes were each associated with increased mortality (P=.006 and P=.03, respectively). In conclusion, those subjects had virus load trends similar to those in adults. Early virus loads were lower than those in vertically infected infants, which suggests that factors changing soon after birth affect viral replication.

  7. Hybrid spreading mechanisms and T cell activation shape the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M; Jolly, Clare

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments' influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  8. HIV-1 Infection and the PPARγ-Dependent Control of Adipose Tissue Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Giralt, Marta; Domingo, Pere; Villarroya, Francesc

    2009-01-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-dependent master transcription factor controlling adipocyte differentiation as well as multiple biological processes taking place in other cells present in adipose tissue depots such as macrophages. Recent research indicates that HIV-1 infection-related events may alter adipose tissue biology through several mechanisms involving PPARγ, ranging from direct effects of HIV-1-encoded proteins on adipocytes to the promotion of a proinflammatory environment that interferes with PPARγ actions. This effect of HIV-1 on adipose tissue cells can occur even in the absence of direct infection of adipocytes, as soluble HIV-1-encoded proteins such as Vpr may enter cells and inhibit PPARγ action. Moreover, repression of PPARγ actions may relieve inhibitory pathways of HIV-1 gene transcription, thus enhancing HIV-1 effects in infected cells. HIV-1 infection-mediated interference of PPARγ-dependent pathways in adipocytes and other cells inside adipose depots such as macrophages is likely to create an altered local environment that, after antiretroviral treatment, leads to lipodystrophy in HIV-1-infected and HAART-treated patients. PMID:19081837

  9. Recent Advances in Lentiviral Vaccines for HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Norton, Thomas D; Miller, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine to prevent and/or cure HIV remains a global health priority. Given their central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are being increasingly explored as immunotherapeutic strategies to enhance HIV-specific T cells in infected individuals and, thus, promote immune responses that may help facilitate a functional cure. HIV-1-based lentiviral (LV) vectors have inherent advantages as DC vaccine vectors due to their ability to transduce non-dividing cells and integrate into the target cell genomic DNA, allowing for expression of encoded antigens over the lifespan of the cell. Moreover, LV vectors may express additional immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory proteins that enhance DC function and direct antigen-specific T cells responses. Recent basic and clinical research efforts have broadened our understanding of LV vectors as DC-based vaccines. In this review, we provide an overview of the pre-clinical and clinical LV vector vaccine studies for treating HIV to date. We also discuss advances in LV vector designs that have enhanced DC transduction efficiency, target cell specificity, and immunogenicity, and address potential safety concerns regarding LV vector-based vaccines. PMID:27446074

  10. Recent Advances in Lentiviral Vaccines for HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Thomas D.; Miller, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine to prevent and/or cure HIV remains a global health priority. Given their central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are being increasingly explored as immunotherapeutic strategies to enhance HIV-specific T cells in infected individuals and, thus, promote immune responses that may help facilitate a functional cure. HIV-1-based lentiviral (LV) vectors have inherent advantages as DC vaccine vectors due to their ability to transduce non-dividing cells and integrate into the target cell genomic DNA, allowing for expression of encoded antigens over the lifespan of the cell. Moreover, LV vectors may express additional immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory proteins that enhance DC function and direct antigen-specific T cells responses. Recent basic and clinical research efforts have broadened our understanding of LV vectors as DC-based vaccines. In this review, we provide an overview of the pre-clinical and clinical LV vector vaccine studies for treating HIV to date. We also discuss advances in LV vector designs that have enhanced DC transduction efficiency, target cell specificity, and immunogenicity, and address potential safety concerns regarding LV vector-based vaccines. PMID:27446074

  11. Multiple Introduction and Naturally Occuring Drug Resistance of HCV among HIV-Infected Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan: An Origin of China’s HIV/HCV Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Ma, Yanling; Chen, Huichao; Luo, Hongbing; Dai, Jie; Song, Lijun; Yang, Chaojun; Mei, Jingyuan; Yang, Li; Dong, Lijuan; Jia, Manhong; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) epidemic in China historically stemmed from intravenous drug users (IDUs) in Yunnan. Due to a shared transmission route, hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-1 co-infection is common. Here, we investigated HCV genetic characteristics and baseline drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. Methods Blood samples of 432 HIV-1/HCV co-infected IDUs were collected from January to June 2014 in six prefectures of Yunnan Province. Partial E1E2 and NS5B genes were sequenced. Phylogenetic, evolutionary and genotypic drug resistance analyses were performed. Results Among the 293 specimens successfully genotyped, seven subtypes were identified, including subtypes 3b (37.9%, 111/293), 3a (21.8%, 64/293), 6n (14.0%, 41/293), 1b (10.6%, 31/293), 1a (8.2%, 24/293), 6a (5.1%, 15/293) and 6u (2.4%, 7/293). The distribution of HCV subtypes was mostly related to geographic location. Subtypes 3b, 3a, and 6n were detected in all six prefectures, however, the other four subtypes were detected only in parts of the six prefectures. Phylogeographic analyses indicated that 6n, 1a and 6u originated in the western prefecture (Dehong) and spread eastward and showed genetic relatedness with those detected in Burmese. However, 6a originated in the southeast prefectures (Honghe and Wenshan) bordering Vietnam and was transmitted westward. These subtypes exhibited different evolutionary rates (between 4.35×10−4 and 2.38×10−3 substitutions site-1 year-1) and times of most recent common ancestor (tMRCA, between 1790.3 and 1994.6), suggesting that HCV was multiply introduced into Yunnan. Naturally occurring resistance-associated mutations (C316N, A421V, C445F, I482L, V494A, and V499A) to NS5B polymerase inhibitors were detected in direct-acting antivirals (DAAs)-naïve IDUs. Conclusion This work reveals the temporal-spatial distribution of HCV subtypes and baseline HCV drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. The findings enhance our

  12. Interaction between Tat and Drugs of Abuse during HIV-1 Infection and Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maubert, Monique E.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Rivera, Nina T.; Wigdahl, Brian; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    In many individuals, drug abuse is intimately linked with HIV-1 infection. In addition to being associated with one-third of all HIV-1 infections in the United States, drug abuse also plays a role in disease progression and severity in HIV-1-infected patients, including adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Specific systems within the brain are known to be damaged in HIV-1-infected individuals and this damage is similar to that observed in drug abuse. Even in the era of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), CNS pathogenesis occurs with HIV-1 infection, with a broad range of cognitive impairment observed, collectively referred to as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). A number of HIV-1 proteins (Tat, gp120, Nef, Vpr) have been implicated in the etiology of pathogenesis and disease as a result of the biologic activity of the extracellular form of each of the proteins in a number of tissues, including the CNS, even in ART-suppressed patients. In this review, we have made Tat the center of attention for a number of reasons. First, it has been shown to be synthesized and secreted by HIV-1-infected cells in the CNS, despite the most effective suppression therapies available to date. Second, Tat has been shown to alter the functions of several host factors, disrupting the molecular and biochemical balance of numerous pathways contributing to cellular toxicity, dysfunction, and death. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of ART suppression with regard to controlling the genesis and progression of neurocognitive impairment are currently under debate in the field and are yet to be fully determined. In this review, we discuss the individual and concerted contributions of HIV-1 Tat, drug abuse, and ART with respect to damage in the CNS, and how these factors contribute to the development of HAND in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:26793168

  13. [Advances in the research of treating multi-drug resistant bacterial infections].

    PubMed

    Peng, Y; Fu, Y X

    2016-09-20

    It is imperative to research the treatment strategy for infections caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, as there are increasing reports showing that more and more patients are decimated by the infections of MDR bacteria and the development of antimicrobial drugs is in downturn. Current researches mainly focus on the following three aspects: developing new antimicrobial agents with the aid of basic scientific achievements in finding new antibacterial targets, achieving antimicrobial purpose by specific lysis of host bacteria with phages of high specificity, and killing bacteria potently by destroying its cytomembrane using broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27647070

  14. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase Gene for HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and Subtype B in China Using Sequenom MassARRAY® System

    PubMed Central

    He, Liufen; Cai, Kanru; Jiang, Qiang; Zhou, Boping; To, Sabrina Wai-Chi; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The development of a rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV-DR) testing system is a challenge for areas consisting different HIV-1 strains. In this study, we established a broadly reactive multiplex assay that could simultaneously detect major drug resistance mutations at 8 loci, which are associated with resistance to commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), in specimens of HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and subtype B, the three major circulating strains in China, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided by Sequenom MassARRAY® system. To establish the assay, pol gene fragments were prepared from the plasma viral RNA of 159 patients by nested PCR and the presence of wild type and mutant alleles at the 8 loci were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. In terms of loci, the detection rate of the alleles was greater than 97% for M41L, K65R, M184V and G190A, 91.2% for K101E/Q/P, 91.2% for T215F/Y, 89.9% for K103N/S and 80.5% for L210W. In terms of individuals, 80% of the alleles were detected in 95.4% CRF01_AE patients, 100% CRF07_BC patients and 83.3% subtype B patients. Importantly, the MALDI-TOF MS results were concordant to the drug resistance profiles of patients obtained from conventional sequencing analysis after excluded the failed detections. Using plasmid templates, the assay was estimated to be sensitive to detect drug resistant variants at level about 20% of the circulating viral population. The capability of this assay to detect mixed viral populations was further verified by two different patient specimens. In conclusion, this study evaluated the use of Sequenom MassARRAY® system for high-throughput detection of HIV-DR mutations towards the commonly used reverse transcriptase inhibitors in China. PMID:27092551

  15. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase Gene for HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and Subtype B in China Using Sequenom MassARRAY® System.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ka-Wai; Peng, Qiaoli; He, Liufen; Cai, Kanru; Jiang, Qiang; Zhou, Boping; To, Sabrina Wai-Chi; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The development of a rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV-DR) testing system is a challenge for areas consisting different HIV-1 strains. In this study, we established a broadly reactive multiplex assay that could simultaneously detect major drug resistance mutations at 8 loci, which are associated with resistance to commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), in specimens of HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and subtype B, the three major circulating strains in China, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided by Sequenom MassARRAY® system. To establish the assay, pol gene fragments were prepared from the plasma viral RNA of 159 patients by nested PCR and the presence of wild type and mutant alleles at the 8 loci were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. In terms of loci, the detection rate of the alleles was greater than 97% for M41L, K65R, M184V and G190A, 91.2% for K101E/Q/P, 91.2% for T215F/Y, 89.9% for K103N/S and 80.5% for L210W. In terms of individuals, 80% of the alleles were detected in 95.4% CRF01_AE patients, 100% CRF07_BC patients and 83.3% subtype B patients. Importantly, the MALDI-TOF MS results were concordant to the drug resistance profiles of patients obtained from conventional sequencing analysis after excluded the failed detections. Using plasmid templates, the assay was estimated to be sensitive to detect drug resistant variants at level about 20% of the circulating viral population. The capability of this assay to detect mixed viral populations was further verified by two different patient specimens. In conclusion, this study evaluated the use of Sequenom MassARRAY® system for high-throughput detection of HIV-DR mutations towards the commonly used reverse transcriptase inhibitors in China. PMID:27092551

  16. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-07-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1-resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1-specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1-specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy-mediated functional cure.

  17. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  18. Simian-Tropic HIV as a Model To Study Drug Resistance against Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wares, Melissa; Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Sandstrom, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance represents a key aspect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment failure. It is important to develop nonhuman primate models for studying issues of drug resistance and the persistence and transmission of drug-resistant viruses. However, relatively little work has been conducted using either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or SIV/HIV recombinant viruses for studying resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Here, we used a T-cell-tropic SIV/HIV recombinant virus in which the capsid and vif regions of HIV-1 were replaced with their SIV counterparts (simian-tropic HIV-1 [stHIV-1](SCA,SVIF)) to study the impact of a number of drug resistance substitutions in the integrase coding region at positions E92Q, G118R, E138K, Y143R, S153Y, N155H, and R263K on drug resistance, viral infectivity, and viral replication capacity. Our results show that each of these substitutions exerted effects that were similar to their effects in HIV-1. Substitutions associated with primary resistance against dolutegravir were more detrimental to stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) infectiousness than were resistance substitutions associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir, consistent with data that have been reported for HIV-1. These findings support the role of stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) as a useful model with which to evaluate the role of INSTI resistance substitutions on viral persistence, transmissibility, and pathogenesis in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:25583721

  19. Metabolomics of bronchoalveolar lavage differentiate healthy HIV-1-infected subjects from controls.

    PubMed

    Cribbs, Sushma K; Park, Youngja; Guidot, David M; Martin, Greg S; Brown, Lou Ann; Lennox, Jeffrey; Jones, Dean P

    2014-06-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy, pneumonias from pathogens such as pneumococcus continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected individuals. Respiratory infections occur despite high CD4 counts and low viral loads; therefore, better understanding of lung immunity and infection predictors is necessary. We tested whether metabolomics, an integrated biosystems approach to molecular fingerprinting, could differentiate such individual characteristics. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf ) was collected from otherwise healthy HIV-1-infected individuals and healthy controls. A liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry method was used to detect metabolites in BALf. Statistical and bioinformatic analyses used false discovery rate (FDR) and orthogonally corrected partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) to identify groupwise discriminatory factors as the top 5% of metabolites contributing to 95% separation of HIV-1 and control. We enrolled 24 subjects with HIV-1 (median CD4=432) and 24 controls. A total of 115 accurate mass m/z features from C18 and AE analysis were significantly different between HIV-1 subjects and controls (FDR=0.05). Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed clusters of metabolites, which discriminated the samples according to HIV-1 status (FDR=0.05). Several of these did not match any metabolites in metabolomics databases; mass-to-charge 325.065 ([M+H](+)) was significantly higher (FDR=0.05) in the BAL of HIV-1-infected subjects and matched pyochelin, a siderophore-produced Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Metabolic profiles in BALf differentiated healthy HIV-1-infected subjects and controls. The lack of association with known human metabolites and inclusion of a match to a bacterial metabolite suggest that the differences could reflect the host's lung microbiome and/or be related to subclinical infection in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:24417396

  20. Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity against Reactivated HIV-1-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Shi; Richard, Jonathan; Lichtfuss, Marit; Smith, Amos B.; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno N.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Parsons, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 does not diminish the established latent reservoir. A possible cure approach is to reactivate the quiescent genome from latency and utilize immune responses to eliminate cells harboring reactivated HIV-1. It is not known whether antibodies within HIV-1-infected individuals can recognize and eliminate cells reactivated from latency through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that reactivation of HIV-1 expression in the latently infected ACH-2 cell line elicited antibody-mediated NK cell activation but did not result in antibody-mediated killing. The lack of CD4 expression on these HIV-1 envelope (Env)-expressing cells likely resulted in poor recognition of CD4-induced antibody epitopes on Env. To examine this further, cultured primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-1+ subjects were used as targets for ADCC. These ex vivo-expanded primary cells were modestly susceptible to ADCC mediated by autologous or heterologous HIV-1+ serum antibodies. Importantly, ADCC mediated against these primary cells could be enhanced following incubation with a CD4-mimetic compound (JP-III-48) that exposes CD4-induced antibody epitopes on Env. Our studies suggest that with sufficient reactivation and expression of appropriate Env epitopes, primary HIV-1-infected cells can be targets for ADCC mediated by autologous serum antibodies and innate effector cells. The results of this study suggest that further investigation into the potential of ADCC to eliminate reactivated latently infected cells is warranted. IMPORTANCE An HIV-1 cure remains elusive due to the persistence of long-lived latently infected cells. An HIV-1 cure strategy, termed “shock and kill,” aims to reactivate HIV-1 expression in latently infected cells and subsequently eliminate the reactivated cells through immune-mediated killing. While recent research efforts have focused on reversing HIV-1 latency, it remains unclear whether preexisting immune

  1. Properties of HIV-1 associated cholesterol in addition to raft formation are important for virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, David; Jones, Kate L; Smyth, Redmond P; Pereira, Cândida F; Bittman, Robert; Jaworowski, Anthony; Mak, Johnson

    2015-12-01

    The overall HIV-1 membrane lipid contents resemble lipid rafts, and we have previously demonstrated that raft-promoting properties of virus-associated cholesterol (with modifications in either the 3β-OH group or AB rings) are important for HIV-1 infectivity. As cholesterol is present in both rafts and non-rafts domains of HIV-1 membrane, we question whether the interpretation of rafts property of virus-associated cholesterol being an absolute requirement for HIV-1 function is too simplistic. The carbon side chain of cholesterol is the third component of cholesterol that can affect the fluidity of membrane depending on its context within the lipid membrane bilayers. In this work, we have used synthetic cholesterol analogues that have different lengths of carbon side chain for our investigation. In contrast to our previous report, we have found that cholesterol side chain analogues that lack in vitro defined raft promoting-property is able to support HIV-1 replication. More specifically, cholesterol analogues with side chains of intermediate length have greater capacity to support HIV-1 infection, suggesting HIV-1 is able to maintain function using cholesterol variants that promote a range of non-rafts- to rafts-properties. Our data demonstrate cholesterol properties other than raft-promoting function also contribute to the infectivity of HIV-1.

  2. Therapy-Emergent Drug Resistance to Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors in HIV-1 Patients: A Subgroup Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongren; Huang, Xiaojun; Qin, Zhen; Deng, Zhaomin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are a novel class of anti-HIV agents that show high activity in inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Currently, licensed INSTIs include raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG); these drugs have played a critical role in AIDS therapy, serving as additional weapons in the arsenal for treating patients infected with HIV-1. To date, long-term data regarding clinical experience with INSTI use and the emergence of resistance remain scarce. However, the literature is likely now sufficiently comprehensive to warrant a meta-analysis of resistance to INSTIs. Methods Our team implemented a manuscript retrieval protocol using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) via the Web of Science, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We screened the literature based on inclusion and exclusion criteria and then performed a quality analysis and evaluation using RevMan software, Stata software, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). We also performed a subgroup analysis. Finally, we calculated resistance rates and risk ratios (RRs) for the three types of drugs. Results We identified 26 references via the database search. A meta-analysis of the RAL data revealed that the resistance rate was 3.9% (95% CI = 2.9%-4.9%) for the selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the RAL resistance rate reached 40.9% (95% CI = 8.8%-72.9%) for the selected observational studies (OBSs). The rates of resistance to RAL that were associated with HIV subtypes A, B, and C as well as with more complex subtypes were 0.1% (95% CI = -0.7%-0.9%), 2.5% (95% CI = 0.5%-4.5%), 4.6% (95% CI = 2.7%-6.6%) and 2.2% (95% CI = 0.7%-3.7%), respectively. The rates of resistance to EVG and DTG were 1.2% (95% CI = 0.2%-2.2%) and 0.1% (95% CI = -0.2%-0.5%), respectively. Furthermore, we found that the RRs for antiviral resistance were 0.414 (95% CI = 0.210–0

  3. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2.

  4. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2. PMID:26821323

  5. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Achenbach, Jenna; Shen, Yue; Palaia, Jana; Rahkola, Jeremy T; Nick, Heidi J; Smythies, Lesley E; McConnell, Michelle; Fowler, Mary G; Smith, Phillip D; Janoff, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT). Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs) and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process. PMID:26680219

  6. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  7. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  8. HIV-1 Entry and Trans-Infection of Astrocytes Involves CD81 Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Turville, Stuart G.; HItchen, Tina L.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M.; Salimi, Hamid; Roche, Michael J.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are extensively infected with HIV-1 in vivo and play a significant role in the development of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Despite their extensive infection, little is known about how astrocytes become infected, since they lack cell surface CD4 expression. In the present study, we investigated the fate of HIV-1 upon infection of astrocytes. Astrocytes were found to bind and harbor virus followed by biphasic decay, with HIV-1 detectable out to 72 hours. HIV-1 was observed to associate with CD81-lined vesicle structures. shRNA silencing of CD81 resulted in less cell-associated virus but no loss of co-localization between HIV-1 and CD81. Astrocytes supported trans-infection of HIV-1 to T-cells without de novo virus production, and the virus-containing compartment required 37°C to form, and was trypsin-resistant. The CD81 compartment observed herein, has been shown in other cell types to be a relatively protective compartment. Within astrocytes, this compartment may be actively involved in virus entry and/or spread. The ability of astrocytes to transfer virus, without de novo viral synthesis suggests they are capable of sequestering and protecting virus and thus, they could potentially facilitate viral dissemination in the CNS. PMID:24587404

  9. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  10. First Two Cases of Fungal Infections Associated with Multi-drug Resistant Yeast, Fereydounia khargensis.

    PubMed

    Tap, Ratna Mohd; Ramli, Nur Yasmin; Sabaratnam, Parameswari; Hashim, Rohaidah; Bakri, Ahmed Rafezzan Ahmed; Bee, Lim Bee; Ginsapu, Stephanie Jane; Ahmad, Rahimah; Razak, Mohd Fuat Abd; Ahmad, Norazah

    2016-08-01

    The number of new fungal pathogens is increasing due to growing population of immunocompromised patients and advanced identification techniques. Fereydounia khargensis is a yeast and was first described in 2014 from environmental samples. As far as we know, this is the first report of human infections associated with F. khargensis. The yeasts were isolated from blood of a HIV-positive patient and pleural fluid of chronic renal failure patient. Amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer and the large subunit regions confirmed the identity of the isolates. Both isolates showed multi-drug resistance to antifungal agents tested. PMID:27010640

  11. The Brain in AIDS: Central Nervous System HIV-1 Infection and AIDS Dementia Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the complicated infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in its late stages of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex. Explains the syndrome's development of abnormalities in cognition, motor performance, and behavior. (TW)

  12. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Amy Liese; Cole, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT) are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa. PMID:27025760

  13. Metabolic profiling during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Montero, Catherine; Schinazi, Raymond F; Munger, Joshua; Kim, Baek

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated cellular metabolism profiles of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). First, HIV-2 GL-AN displays faster production kinetics and greater amounts of virus as compared to HIV-1s: YU-2, 89.6 and JR-CSF. Second, quantitative LC-MS/MS metabolomics analysis demonstrates very similar metabolic profiles in glycolysis and TCA cycle metabolic intermediates between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected macrophages, with a few notable exceptions. The most striking metabolic change in MDMs infected with HIV-2 relative to HIV-1-infected MDMs was the increased levels of quinolinate, a metabolite in the tryptophan catabolism pathway that has been linked to HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. Third, both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected MDMs showed elevated levels of ribose-5-phosphate, a key metabolic component in nucleotide biosynthesis. Finally, HIV-2 infected MDMs display increased dNTP concentrations as predicted by Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Collectively, these data show differential metabolic changes during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of macrophages.

  14. Dendritic Cells in HIV-1 and HCV Infection: Can They Help Win the Battle?

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Mohit; Khan, Zafar K; Talal, Andrew H; Jain, Pooja

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infections with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As sentinels of our immune system, dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating and regulating a potent antiviral immune response. Recent advances in our understanding of the role of DCs during HIV-1 and HCV infection have provided crucial insights into the mechanisms employed by these viruses to impair DC functions in order to evade an effective immune response against them. Modulation of the immunological synapse between DC and T-cell, as well as dysregulation of the crosstalk between DCs and natural killer (NK) cells, are emerging as two crucial mechanisms. This review focuses on understanding the interaction of HIV-1 and HCV with DCs not only to understand the immunopathogenesis of chronic HIV-1 and HCV infection, but also to explore the possibilities of DC-based immunotherapeutic approaches against them. Host genetic makeup is known to play major roles in infection outcome and rate of disease progression, as well as response to anti-viral therapy in both HIV-1 and HCV-infected individuals. Therefore, we highlight the genetic variations that can potentially affect DC functions, especially in the setting of chronic viral infection. Altogether, we address if DCs’ potential as critical effectors of antiviral immune response could indeed be utilized to combat chronic infection with HIV-1 and HCV. PMID:25512691

  15. Dendritic Cells in HIV-1 and HCV Infection: Can They Help Win the Battle?

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Mohit; Khan, Zafar K; Talal, Andrew H; Jain, Pooja

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infections with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As sentinels of our immune system, dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating and regulating a potent antiviral immune response. Recent advances in our understanding of the role of DCs during HIV-1 and HCV infection have provided crucial insights into the mechanisms employed by these viruses to impair DC functions in order to evade an effective immune response against them. Modulation of the immunological synapse between DC and T-cell, as well as dysregulation of the crosstalk between DCs and natural killer (NK) cells, are emerging as two crucial mechanisms. This review focuses on understanding the interaction of HIV-1 and HCV with DCs not only to understand the immunopathogenesis of chronic HIV-1 and HCV infection, but also to explore the possibilities of DC-based immunotherapeutic approaches against them. Host genetic makeup is known to play major roles in infection outcome and rate of disease progression, as well as response to anti-viral therapy in both HIV-1 and HCV-infected individuals. Therefore, we highlight the genetic variations that can potentially affect DC functions, especially in the setting of chronic viral infection. Altogether, we address if DCs' potential as critical effectors of antiviral immune response could indeed be utilized to combat chronic infection with HIV-1 and HCV. PMID:25512691

  16. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-2-Infected Patients Is Less Affected by Antiretroviral Treatment-sCD163 in HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 Dually Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Hønge, Bo L; Andersen, Morten N; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Correira, Faustino G; Jakobsen, Martin R; Laursen, Alex; Erikstrup, Christian; Møller, Holger J; Wejse, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The course of disease among HIV-2, HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients is different. We investigated the macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) dynamics in 212 HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. There were no differences in sCD163 levels at baseline or during follow-up without antiretroviral therapy (ART). At follow-up on ART, median sCD163 levels were decreased for HIV-1-infected patients (P < 0.001), but not among HIV-2 (P = 0.093) or HIV-1/2 dually infected patients (P = 0.145). The larger decrease in sCD163 levels among HIV-1-infected patients during ART may indicate an HIV type-dependent differential effect of ART on macrophage activation during HIV infection. PMID:26825178

  17. Crystal structures of 8-Cl and 9-Cl TIBO complexed with wild-type HIV-1 RT and 8-Cl TIBO complexed with the Tyr181Cys HIV-1 RT drug-resistant mutant.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Ding, J; Hsiou, Y; Clark, A D; Moereels, H; Koymans, L; Andries, K; Pauwels, R; Janssen, P A; Boyer, P L; Clark, P; Smith, R H; Kroeger Smith, M B; Michejda, C J; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1996-12-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is an important target for chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AIDS; the TIBO compounds are potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 RT (NNRTIs). Crystal structures of HIV-1 RT complexed with 8-Cl TIBO (R86183, IC50 = 4.6 nM) and 9-Cl TIBO (R82913, IC50 = 33 nM) have been determined at 3.0 A resolution. Mutant HIV-1 RT, containing Cys in place of Tyr at position 181 (Tyrl81Cys), is highly resistant to many NNRTIs and HIV-1 variants containing this mutation have been selected in both cell culture and clinical trials. We also report the crystal structure of Tyrl81Cys HIV-1 RT in complex with 8-Cl TIBO (IC50 = 130 nM) determined at 3.2 A resolution. Averaging of the electron density maps computed for different HIV-1 RT/NNRTI complexes and from diffraction datasets obtained using a synchrotron source from frozen (-165 degrees C) and cooled (-10 degrees C) crystals of the same complex was employed to improve the quality of electron density maps and to reduce model bias. The overall locations and conformations of the bound inhibitors in the complexes containing wild-type HIV-1 RT and the two TIBO inhibitors are very similar, as are the overall shapes and volumes of the non-nucleoside inhibitor-binding pocket (NNIBP). The major differences between the two wild-type HIV-1 RT/TIBO complexes occur in the vicinity of the TIBO chlorine substituents and involve the polypeptide segments around the beta5-beta6 connecting loop (residues 95 to 105) and the beta13-beta14 hairpin (residues 235 and 236). In all known structures of HIV-1 RT/NNRTI complexes, including these two, the position of the beta12-beta13 hairpin or the "primer grip" is significantly displaced relative to the position in the structure of HIV-1 RT complexed with a double-stranded DNA and in unliganded HIV-1 RT structures. Since the primer grip helps to position the template-primer, this displacement suggests that binding of NNRTIs

  18. Immunological and pharmacological strategies to reactivate HIV-1 from latently infected cells: a possibility for HIV-1 paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, M; Clemente, M I; Serramía, M J; Moreno, S; Muñoz, E; Muñoz-Fernández, M A

    2015-07-01

    The limitations to establishing a viral reservoir facilitated by early cART in children could play a critical role in achieving natural control of viral replication upon discontinuation of cART, which could be defined as 'functional cure'. Viral reservoirs could provide a persistent source of recrudescent viraemia after withdrawal of cART, despite temporary remission of HIV-1 infection, as observed in the 'Mississippi baby'. Intensification of cART has been proposed as a strategy to control residual replication and to diminish the reservoirs. The effects of cART intensification with maraviroc persisted after discontinuation of the drug in HIV-1-infected adults. However, in HIV-1-infected children, the emergence of CXCR4-using variants occurs very early, and the use of CCR5 antagonists in these children as intensification therapy may not be the best alternative. New treatments to eradicate HIV-1 are focused on the activation of viral production from latently infected cells to purge and clear HIV-1 reservoirs. This strategy involves the use of a wide range of small molecules called latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as givinostat, belinostat and panobinostat, and class I-selective HDACis that include oxamflatin, NCH-51 and romidepsin, are the most advanced in clinical testing for HIV-1 LRAs. Panobinostat and romidepsin show an efficient reactivation profile in J89GFP cells, a lymphocyte HIV-1 latently infected cell line considered a relevant model to study post-integration HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Clinical trials with panobinostat and romidepsin have been performed in children with other pathologies and it could be reasonable to design a clinical trial using these drugs in combination with cART in HIV-1-infected children.

  19. The SCID-hu mouse as a model for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aldrovandi, G M; Feuer, G; Gao, L; Jamieson, B; Kristeva, M; Chen, I S; Zack, J A

    1993-06-24

    During normal fetal ontogeny, one of the first organs to harbour CD4-positive cells is the thymus. This organ could therefore be one of the earliest targets infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in utero. HIV-1-infected cells and pathological abnormalities of the thymus have been seen in HIV-1-infected adults and children, and in some fetuses aborted from infected women. Studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis have been hampered by lack of a suitable animal model system. Here we use the SCID-hu mouse as a model to investigate the effect of virus infection on human tissue. The mouse is homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) defect. The model is constructed by implanting human fetal liver and thymus under the mouse kidney capsule. A conjoint human organ develops, which allows normal maturation of human thymocytes. After direct inoculation of HIV-1 into these implants, we observed severe depletion of human CD4-bearing cells within a few weeks of infection. This correlated with increasing virus load in the implants. Thus the SCID-hu mouse may be a useful in vivo system for the study of HIV-1-induced pathology.

  20. Nef enhances HIV-1 infectivity via association with the virus assembly complex

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Mingli; Aiken, Christopher

    2008-04-10

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Nef enhances virus infectivity by facilitating an early post-entry step of infection. Nef acts in the virus producer cell, leading to a beneficial modification to HIV-1 particles. Nef itself is incorporated into HIV-1 particles, where it is cleaved by the viral protease during virion maturation. To probe the role of virion-associated Nef in HIV-1 infection, we generated a fusion protein consisting of the host protein cyclophilin A (CypA) linked to the amino terminus of Nef. The resulting CypA-Nef protein enhanced the infectivity of Nef-defective HIV-1 particles and was specifically incorporated into the virions via association with Gag during particle assembly. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of CypA-Nef binding to Gag prevented incorporation of CypA-Nef into virions and inhibited infectivity enhancement. Our results indicate that infectivity enhancement by Nef requires its association with a component of the assembling HIV-1 particle.

  1. IL-15 promotes activation and expansion of CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Freeman, Michael L.; Mudd, Joseph C.; Shive, Carey L.; Reynaldi, Arnold; Estes, Jacob D.; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Anderson, Jodi; Schacker, Timothy W.; Davenport, Miles P.; McCune, Joseph M.; Hunt, Peter W.; Lee, Sulggi A.; Debernardo, Robert L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Canaday, David H.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Sieg, Scott F.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-1infected patients, increased numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells are linked to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Here, we identified a bystander mechanism that promotes CD8 T cell activation and expansion in untreated HIV-1infected patients. Compared with healthy controls, untreated HIV-1infected patients have an increased population of proliferating, granzyme B+, CD8+ T cells in circulation. Vβ expression and deep sequencing of CDR3 revealed that in untreated HIV-1 infection, cycling memory CD8 T cells possess a broad T cell repertoire that reflects the repertoire of the resting population. This suggests that cycling is driven by bystander activation, rather than specific antigen exposure. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with IL-15 induced a cycling, granzyme B+ phenotype in CD8+ T cells. Moreover, elevated IL-15 expression in the lymph nodes of untreated HIV-1infected patients correlated with circulating CD8+ T cell counts and was normalized in these patients following antiretroviral therapy. Together, these results suggest that IL-15 drives bystander activation of CD8+ T cells, which predicts disease progression in untreated HIV-1infected patients and suggests that elevated IL-15 may also drive CD8+ T cell expansion that is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in treated patients. PMID:27322062

  2. The Role of Sexually Transmitted Infections in HIV-1 Progression: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Helen M.; Carpenter, Robert J.; Macalino, Grace E.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2013-01-01

    Due to shared routes of infection, HIV-infected persons are frequently coinfected with other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Studies have demonstrated the bidirectional relationships between HIV and several STIs, including herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), hepatitis B and C viruses, human papilloma virus, syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomonas. HIV-1 may affect the clinical presentation, treatment outcome, and progression of STIs, such as syphilis, HSV-2, and hepatitis B and C viruses. Likewise, the presence of an STI may increase both genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, enhancing the transmissibility of HIV-1, with important public health implications. Regarding the effect of STIs on HIV-1 progression, the most studied interrelationship has been with HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection, with recent studies showing that antiherpetic medications slow the time to CD4 <200 cells/µL and antiretroviral therapy among coinfected patients. The impact of other chronic STIs (hepatitis B and C) on HIV-1 progression requires further study, but some studies have shown increased mortality rates. Treatable, nonchronic STIs (i.e., syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomonas) typically have no or transient impacts on plasma HIV RNA levels that resolve with antimicrobial therapy; no long-term effects on outcomes have been shown. Future studies are advocated to continue investigating the complex interplay between HIV-1 and other STIs. PMID:26316953

  3. Tailored enrichment strategy detects low abundant small noncoding RNAs in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The various classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression across divergent types of organisms. While a rapidly increasing number of sncRNAs has been identified over recent years, the isolation of sncRNAs of low abundance remains challenging. Virally encoded sncRNAs, particularly those of RNA viruses, can be expressed at very low levels. This is best illustrated by HIV-1 where virus encoded sncRNAs represent approximately 0.1-1.0% of all sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected cells or were found to be undetected. Thus, we applied a novel, sequence targeted enrichment strategy to capture HIV-1 derived sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes and macrophages that allows a greater than 100-fold enrichment of low abundant sncRNAs. Results Eight hundred and ninety-two individual HIV-1 sncRNAs were cloned and sequenced from nine different sncRNA libraries derived from five independent experiments. These clones represent up to 90% of all sncRNA clones in the generated libraries. Two hundred and sixteen HIV-1 sncRNAs were distinguishable as unique clones. They are spread throughout the HIV-1 genome, however, forming certain clusters, and almost 10% show an antisense orientation. The length of HIV-1 sncRNAs varies between 16 and 89 nucleotides with an unexpected peak at 31 to 50 nucleotides, thus, longer than cellular microRNAs or short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Exemplary HIV-1 sncRNAs were also generated in cells infected with different primary HIV-1 isolates and can inhibit HIV-1 replication. Conclusions HIV-1 infected cells generate virally encoded sncRNAs, which might play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Furthermore, the enormous capacity to enrich low abundance sncRNAs in a sequence specific manner highly recommends our selection strategy for any type of investigation where origin or target sequences of the sought-after sncRNAs are known. PMID:22458358

  4. Engineering Cellular Resistance to HIV-1 Infection In Vivo Using a Dual Therapeutic Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Burke, Bryan P; Levin, Bernard R; Zhang, Jane; Sahakyan, Anna; Boyer, Joshua; Carroll, Maria V; Colón, Joanna Camba; Keech, Naomi; Rezek, Valerie; Bristol, Gregory; Eggers, Erica; Cortado, Ruth; Boyd, Maureen P; Impey, Helen; Shimizu, Saki; Lowe, Emily L; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E; Kim, Sohn G; Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Breton, Louis R; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Chen, Irvin S Y; Kitchen, Scott G; An, Dong Sung; Symonds, Geoff P

    2015-01-01

    We described earlier a dual-combination anti-HIV type 1 (HIV-1) lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46) that downregulates CCR5 expression of transduced cells via RNAi and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of cell membrane-anchored C46 antiviral peptide. This combinatorial approach has two points of inhibition for R5-tropic HIV-1 and is also active against X4-tropic HIV-1. Here, we utilize the humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (BLT) mouse model to characterize the in vivo efficacy of LVsh5/C46 (Cal-1) vector to engineer cellular resistance to HIV-1 pathogenesis. Human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) either nonmodified or transduced with LVsh5/C46 vector were transplanted to generate control and treatment groups, respectively. Control and experimental groups displayed similar engraftment and multilineage hematopoietic differentiation that included robust CD4+ T-cell development. Splenocytes isolated from the treatment group were resistant to both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 during ex vivo challenge experiments. Treatment group animals challenged with R5-tropic HIV-1 displayed significant protection of CD4+ T-cells and reduced viral load within peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues up to 14 weeks postinfection. Gene-marking and transgene expression were confirmed stable at 26 weeks post-transplantation. These data strongly support the use of LVsh5/C46 lentiviral vector in gene and cell therapeutic applications for inhibition of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25872029

  5. SERINC3 and SERINC5 restrict HIV-1 infectivity and are counteracted by Nef

    PubMed Central

    Usami, Yoshiko; Wu, Yuanfei; Göttlinger, Heinrich G.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 Nef and the unrelated murine leukemia virus glycoGag strongly enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virions produced in certain cell types in a clathrin-dependent manner. Here we show that Nef and glycoGag prevent the incorporation of the multipass transmembrane proteins SERINC3 and SERINC5 into HIV-1 virions to an extent that correlates with infectivity enhancement. Silencing of SERINC3 together with SERINC5 precisely phenocopied the effects of Nef and glycoGag on HIV-1 infectivities. The infectivity of nef-deficient virions increased more than 100-fold when produced in double-knockout human CD4+ T cells that lack both SERINC3 and SERINC5, and re-expression experiments confirmed that the absence of SERINC3 and SERINC5 accounted for the infectivity enhancement. Furthermore, SERINC3 and SERINC5 together restricted HIV-1 replication, and this restriction was evaded by Nef. SERINC3 and SERINC5 are highly expressed in primary human HIV-1 target cells, and inhibiting their downregulation by Nef is a potential strategy to combat HIV/AIDS. PMID:26416733

  6. Prognostic value of a CCR5 defective allele in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Romiti, M. L.; Colognesi, C.; Cancrini, C.; Mas, A.; Berrino, M.; Salvatori, F.; Orlandi, P.; Jansson, M.; Palomba, E.; Plebani, A.; Bertran, J. M.; Hernandez, M.; de Martino, M.; Amoroso, A.; Tovo, P. A.; Rossi, P.; Espanol, T.; Scarlatti, G.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A deletion of 32 base pairs in the CCR5 gene (delta32 CCR5) has been linked to resistance to HIV-1 infection in exposed adults and to the delay of disease progression in infected adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To determine the role of delta32 CCR5 in disease progression of HIV-1 infected children born to seropositive mothers, we studied a polymerase chain reaction in 301 HIV-1 infected, 262 HIV-1 exposed-uninfected and 47 HIV-1 unexposed-uninfected children of Spanish and Italian origin. Infected children were further divided into two groups according to their rate of HIV-1 disease progression: rapid progressors who developed severe clinical and/or immunological conditions within the second year of life, and delayed progressors with any other evolution of disease. Among the latter were the long-term, non-progressors (LTNP) who presented with mild or no symptoms of HIV-1 infection above 8 years of age. Viral phenotype was studied for 45 delayed progressors. RESULTS: No correlation was found between delta32 CCR5 and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. However, the frequency of the deletion was substantially higher in LTNP, compared with delayed (p = 0.019) and rapid progressors (p = 0.0003). In children carrying the delta32 CCRS mutation, the presence of MT-2 tropic virus isolate was associated with a severe immune suppression (p = 0.028); whereas, the presence of MT-2 negative viruses correlated with LTNP (p = 0.010). CONCLUSIONS: Given the rapidity and simplicity of the assay, the delta32 CCR5 mutation may be a useful predictive marker to identify children with delayed disease progression who, consequently, may not require immediate antiretroviral treatment. PMID:10803406

  7. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis among HIV-Infected Patients Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Durban, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hom, Jeffrey K.; Wang, Bingxia; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Mazibuko, Matilda; Allen, Jenny; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Bassett, Ingrid V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and describe the resistance patterns in patients commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Consecutive HIV-infected adults (≥18y/o) initiating HIV care were enrolled from May 2007–May 2008, regardless of signs or symptoms of active TB. Prior TB history and current TB treatment status were self-reported. Subjects expectorated sputum for culture (MGIT liquid and 7H11 solid medium). Positive cultures were tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line anti-tuberculous drugs. The prevalence of drug-resistant TB, stratified by prior TB history and current TB treatment status, was assessed. Results 1,035 subjects had complete culture results. Median CD4 count was 92/µl (IQR 42–150/µl). 267 subjects (26%) reported a prior history of TB and 210 (20%) were receiving TB treatment at enrollment; 191 (18%) subjects had positive sputum cultures, among whom the estimated prevalence of resistance to any antituberculous drug was 7.4% (95% CI 4.0–12.4). Among those with prior TB, the prevalence of resistance was 15.4% (95% CI 5.9–30.5) compared to 5.2% (95% CI 2.1–8.9) among those with no prior TB. 5.1% (95% CI 2.4–9.5) had rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Conclusions The prevalence of TB resistance to at least one drug was 7.4% among adults with positive TB cultures initiating ART in Durban, South Africa, with 5.1% having rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Improved tools for diagnosing TB and drug resistance are urgently needed in areas of high HIV/TB prevalence. PMID:22912845

  8. Immunologic abnormalities related to antigenaemia during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    De Paoli, P; Battistin, S; Crovatto, M; Modolo, M L; Carbone, A; Tirelli, U; Santini, G

    1988-01-01

    The expression of phenotypic markers on T and B lymphocytes in long-term human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive, antigen negative patients, in seropositive, antigen positive individuals without AIDS and in seronegative intravenous drug abusers was examined by two colour flow cytometry. Seropositive, antigen positive patients showed decreased CD4+ lymphocyte numbers, causing lower CD4/CD8 ratios when compared to seropositive, antigen negative subjects. While CD4 CDw29+ (4B4) lymphocytes are selectively reduced in seropositive, antigen negative individuals, both CD4 CDw29+ and CD4 CD45R+ (2H4) lymphocytes are decreased when antigenaemia is present. An increased percentage of CD3 HLA DR+ activated T lymphocytes and of CD20+ (B1) Leu 8 negative activated B cells was seen in HIV-1 seropositive antigen positive patients. These results demonstrate that, in long-term seropositive individuals, antigenaemia is associated with peculiar phenotypic changes of lymphocyte subsets. PMID:2976619

  9. Is Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis More Prevalent in HIV-Infected Patients in Korea?

    PubMed

    Lee, Shinwon; Lee, Sun Hee; Mok, Jeong Ha; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Kye Hyung; Lee, Jeong Eun; Lee, Seung Geun; Chung, Joo Seop; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2016-11-01

    The epidemiological synergy between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) is a major threat to public health. However, the association between HIV and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is not clear. To explore the association between HIV and MDR-TB infection, a case-control study was performed in Korea. A total of 1606 culture-proven TB patients (45 HIV vs. 1561 non-HIV) from January 2006 to October 2014 were included in this analysis. MDR-TB rates were 11.1% and 8.2% in the HIV and non-HIV groups, respectively (p=0.42), thus indicating that MDR-TB was not significantly associated with HIV infection in Korea. PMID:27593882

  10. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells.

    PubMed

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Dudek, Nadine L; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M; Korber, Bette T M; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T-cell responses against pathogens such as HIV-1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo-assisted database searching to define the HLA class I-associated immunopeptidome of HIV-1-infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV-1-derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV-1-infected human primary CD4(+) T cells and the C8166 human T-cell line. Importantly, one-third of eluted HIV-1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV-1 infection and provide novel targets for T-cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  11. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  12. The impact of host genetic variation on infection with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Paul J; Carrington, Mary

    2015-06-01

    The outcome after infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a complex phenotype determined by interactions among the pathogen, the human host and the surrounding environment. An impact of host genetic variation on HIV-1 susceptibility was identified early in the pandemic, with a major role attributed to the genes encoding class I human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and the chemokine receptor CCR5. Studies using genome-wide data sets have underscored the strength of these associations relative to variants located throughout the rest of the genome. However, the extent to which additional polymorphisms influence HIV-1 disease progression, and how much of the variability in outcome can be attributed to host genetics, remain largely unclear. Here we discuss findings concerning the functional impact of associated variants, outline methods for quantifying the host genetic component and examine how available genome-wide data sets may be leveraged to discover gene variants that affect the outcome of HIV-1 infection.

  13. Interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is associated with viremia of early HIV-1 infection in Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, SoYong; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Shin, YoungHyun; Kim, SeungHyun; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-05-01

    Cytokines/chemokines play key roles in modulating disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although it is known that early HIV-1 infection is associated with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, the relationship between cytokine levels and HIV-1 pathogenesis is not clear. The concentrations of 18 cytokines/chemokines in 30 HIV-1 negative and 208 HIV-1 positive plasma samples from Korean patients were measured by the Luminex system. Early HIV-1 infection was classified according to the Fiebig stage (FS) based on the characteristics of the patients infected with HIV-1. Concentrations of interleukin-12 (IL-12), interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and regulated upon activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) were increased significantly during the early stage of HIV-1 infection (FS II-IV) compared with the HIV-1-negative group. Of these cytokines, an elevated level of IP-10 was the only factor to be correlated positively with a higher viral load during the early stages of HIV-1 infection (FS II-IV) in Koreans (R = 0.52, P < 0.0005). Therefore, these results suggest that IP-10 may be an indicator for HIV-1 viremia and associated closely with viral replication in patients with early HIV-1 infection.

  14. Higher frequency of HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses in African American children vertically infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Elizabeth R; Barbour, Jason D; Karlsson, R Karl; Jordan, Kimberly A; Sandberg, Johan K; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenberg, Michael G; Nixon, Douglas F

    2005-11-15

    The progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and plasma levels of HIV may differ between racial groups. We compared HIV-specific T cell responses between vertically HIV-1-infected Hispanic and African American children. Subjects were matched for sex, age, viral load, and CD4(+) cell count in 18 pairs; T cell responses were measured by cytokine-enhanced interferon- gamma assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with HIV consensus peptides from Gag, Nef, and Tat. The influence of ethnicity, sex, age, viral load, and CD4(+) cell count on T cell responses was determined through linear regression analyses. After adjustment for CD4(+) count, age, and log(10) viral load, African American children demonstrated significantly higher Gag responses (average, 486 spot-forming cells higher; P=.01) than Hispanic children; this was significantly driven by robust responses in African American girls near the age of puberty, many of whom carried the human leukocyte antigen class I B*58 allele.

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  16. Rapid HIV-1 Disease Progression in Individuals Infected with a Virus Adapted to Its Host Population.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Jiro; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Shimizu, Akihisa; Zhu, Dayong; Han, Chungyong; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Gao, George F; Brumme, Zabrina L; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 escape from CTL is predictable based on the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles expressed by the host. As such, HIV-1 sequences circulating in a population of hosts will harbor escape mutations specific to the HLA alleles of that population. In theory, this should increase the frequency of escape mutation transmission to persons expressing the restricting HLA allele, thereby compromising host immunity to the incoming HIV-1 strain. However, the clinical impact of infection with HIV-1 containing immune escape mutations has not conclusively been demonstrated. Japan's population features limited HLA diversity which is driving population-level HIV adaptation: for example, >60% of Japanese express HLA-A*24:02 and its associated Nef-Y135F escape mutation represents the population consensus. As such, Japan is an ideal population in which to examine this phenomenon. Here, we combine genetic and immunological analyses to identify A*24:02-positive individuals likely to have been infected with Y135F-containing HIV-1. Over a ~5 year follow-up, these individuals exhibited significantly lower CD4 counts compared to individuals inferred to have been infected with wild-type HIV-1. Our results support a significant negative clinical impact of pathogen adaptation to host pressures at the population level. PMID:26953793

  17. Gene expression profiling reveals Nef induced deregulation of lipid metabolism in HIV-1 infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Surya; Trivedi, Jay; Mitra, Debashis

    2016-03-25

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) encodes a 27 kDa Negative Factor or Nef protein, which is increasingly proving to be a misnomer. Nef seems to be crucial for AIDS progression as individuals infected with nef-deleted strain of HIV were reported to become Long Term Non Progressors (LTNP). These findings necessitate tracing of Nef's footprint on landscape of cellular transcriptome favoring HIV-1 pathogenesis. We have tried to explore effect of Nef on cellular gene expression profile in conjunction with rest of HIV-1 proteins. Our results show that 237 genes are differentially regulated due to the presence of Nef during infection, which belong to several broad categories like "signaling", "apoptosis", "transcription" and "lipid metabolism" in gene ontology analysis. Furthermore, our results show that Nef causes disruption of lipid content in HIV-1 infected T cells. Molecular inhibitors of lipid metabolism like Atorvastatin and Ranolazine were found to have profound effect on wild type virus as compared to nef-deleted HIV-1. Thus our results suggest that interference in lipid metabolism is a potential mechanism through which Nef contributes in enhancing HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:26915805

  18. Rapid HIV-1 Disease Progression in Individuals Infected with a Virus Adapted to Its Host Population.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Jiro; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Shimizu, Akihisa; Zhu, Dayong; Han, Chungyong; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Gao, George F; Brumme, Zabrina L; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 escape from CTL is predictable based on the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles expressed by the host. As such, HIV-1 sequences circulating in a population of hosts will harbor escape mutations specific to the HLA alleles of that population. In theory, this should increase the frequency of escape mutation transmission to persons expressing the restricting HLA allele, thereby compromising host immunity to the incoming HIV-1 strain. However, the clinical impact of infection with HIV-1 containing immune escape mutations has not conclusively been demonstrated. Japan's population features limited HLA diversity which is driving population-level HIV adaptation: for example, >60% of Japanese express HLA-A*24:02 and its associated Nef-Y135F escape mutation represents the population consensus. As such, Japan is an ideal population in which to examine this phenomenon. Here, we combine genetic and immunological analyses to identify A*24:02-positive individuals likely to have been infected with Y135F-containing HIV-1. Over a ~5 year follow-up, these individuals exhibited significantly lower CD4 counts compared to individuals inferred to have been infected with wild-type HIV-1. Our results support a significant negative clinical impact of pathogen adaptation to host pressures at the population level.

  19. 3BNC117 a Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Suppresses Viremia in HIV-1-Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, Marina; Klein, Florian; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Seaman, Michael S.; West, Anthony P.; Buckley, Noreen; Kremer, Gisela; Nogueira, Lilian; Braunschweig, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Shimeliovich, Irina; Ben Avraham-Shulman, Sivan; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Platten, Martin; Lehmann, Clara; Burke, Leah A.; Hawthorne, Thomas; Gorelick, Robert J.; Walker, Bruce D.; Keler, Tibor; Gulick, Roy M.; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 immunotherapy with a combination of first generation monoclonal antibodies was largely ineffective in pre-clinical and clinical settings and was therefore abandoned1–3. However, recently developed single cell based antibody cloning methods have uncovered a new generation of far more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-14,5. These antibodies can prevent infection and suppress viremia in humanized mice (hu-mice) and nonhuman primates, but their potential for human HIV-1 immunotherapy has not been evaluated6–10. Here we report the results of a first-in-man dose escalation phase 1 clinical trial of 3BNC117, a potent human CD4 binding site antibody11, in uninfected and HIV-1-infected individuals. 3BNC117 infusion was well tolerated and demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetics. A single 30 mg/kg infusion of 3BNC117 reduced the viral load (VL) in HIV-1-infected individuals by 0.8 – 2.5 log10 and viremia remained significantly reduced for 28 days. Emergence of resistant viral strains was variable, with some individuals remaining sensitive to 3BNC117 for a period of 28 days. We conclude that as a single agent 3BNC117 is safe and effective in reducing HIV-1 viremia, and that immunotherapy should be explored as a new modality for HIV-1 prevention, therapy, and cure. PMID:25855300

  20. Rapid HIV-1 Disease Progression in Individuals Infected with a Virus Adapted to Its Host Population

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Akihisa; Zhu, Dayong; Han, Chungyong; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Gao, George F.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 escape from CTL is predictable based on the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles expressed by the host. As such, HIV-1 sequences circulating in a population of hosts will harbor escape mutations specific to the HLA alleles of that population. In theory, this should increase the frequency of escape mutation transmission to persons expressing the restricting HLA allele, thereby compromising host immunity to the incoming HIV-1 strain. However, the clinical impact of infection with HIV-1 containing immune escape mutations has not conclusively been demonstrated. Japan’s population features limited HLA diversity which is driving population-level HIV adaptation: for example, >60% of Japanese express HLA-A*24:02 and its associated Nef-Y135F escape mutation represents the population consensus. As such, Japan is an ideal population in which to examine this phenomenon. Here, we combine genetic and immunological analyses to identify A*24:02-positive individuals likely to have been infected with Y135F-containing HIV-1. Over a ~5 year follow-up, these individuals exhibited significantly lower CD4 counts compared to individuals inferred to have been infected with wild-type HIV-1. Our results support a significant negative clinical impact of pathogen adaptation to host pressures at the population level. PMID:26953793

  1. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles.

    PubMed

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia. PMID:27505169

  2. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia. PMID:27505169

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  4. Treatment of primary HIV-1 infection with cyclosporin A coupled with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rizzardi, G. Paolo; Harari, Alexandre; Capiluppi, Brunella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Chave, Jean-Philippe; Lazzarin, Adriano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    Primary HIV-1 infection causes extensive immune activation, during which CD4+ T cell activation supports massive HIV-1 production. We tested the safety and the immune-modulating effects of combining cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during primary HIV-1 infection. Nine adults with primary HIV-1 infection were treated with CsA along with HAART. At week 8, all patients discontinued CsA but maintained HAART. Viral replication was suppressed to a comparable extent in the CsA + HAART cohort and in 29 control patients whose primary infection was treated with HAART alone. CsA restored normal CD4+ T cell levels, both in terms of percentage and absolute numbers. The increase in CD4+ T cells was apparent within a week and persisted throughout the study period. CsA was not detrimental to virus-specific CD8+ or CD4+ T cell responses. At week 48, the proportion of IFN-γ–secreting CD4+ and CD4+CCR7– T cells was significantly higher in the CsA + HAART cohort than in the HAART-alone cohort. In conclusion, rapid shutdown of T cell activation in the early phases of primary HIV-1 infection can have long-term beneficial effects and establish a more favorable immunologic set-point. Appropriate, immune-based therapeutic interventions may represent a valuable complement to HAART for treating HIV infection. PMID:11877476

  5. The impact of pregnancy on the HIV-1-specific T cell function in infected pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Hygino, Joana; Vieira, Morgana M; Kasahara, Taissa M; Xavier, Luciana F; Blanco, Bernardo; Guillermo, Landi V C; Filho, Renato G S; Saramago, Carmen S M; Lima-Silva, Agostinho A; Oliveira, Ariane L; Guimarães, Vander; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2012-12-01

    Evidences indicate that pregnancy can alter the Ag-specific T-cell responses. This work aims to evaluate the impact of pregnancy on the in vitro HIV-1-specific immune response. As compared with non-pregnant patients, lower T-cell proliferation and higher IL-10 production were observed in T-cell cultures from pregnant patients following addition of either mitogens or HIV-1 antigens. In our system, the main T lymphocyte subset involved in producing IL-10 was CD4(+)FoxP3(-). Depletion of CD4(+) cells elevated TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Interestingly, the in vitro HIV-1 replication was lower in cell cultures from pregnant patients, and it was inversely related to IL-10 production. In these cultures, the neutralization of IL-10 by anti-IL-10 mAb elevated TNF-α release and HIV-1 replication. In conclusion, our results reveal that pregnancy-related events should favor the expansion of HIV-1-specific IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T-cells in HIV-1-infected women, which should, in the scenario of pregnancy, help to reduce the risk of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

  6. Epigenetics of μ-Opioid receptors: Intersection with HIV-1 infection of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Patrick M.; Dave, Rajnish S.; Datta, Prasun K.; Khalili, Kamel

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of intravenous drugs, such as heroin, has become a major public health concern due to the increased risk of HIV-1 infection. Opioids such as heroin were originally identified and subsequently abused for their analgesic effects. However, many investigations have found additional effects of opioids, including regulation of the immune system. As such, chronic opioid abuse has been shown to promote HIV-1 pathogenesis and facilitate HIV-1-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. Clinical opioids, such as morphine and methadone, as well as illicit opioids, such as heroin, exert their effects primarily through interactions with the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). However, the mechanisms by which opioids enhance neurocognitive dysfunction through MOR-mediated signaling pathways are not completely understood. New findings in the regulation of MOR expression, particularly epigenetic and transcriptional regulation as well as alternative splicing, sheds new insights into possible mechanisms of HIV-1 and opiate synergy. In this review, we identify mechanisms regulating MOR expression and propose novel mechanisms by which opioids and HIV-1 may modulate this regulation. Additionally, we suggest that differential regulation of newly identified MOR isoforms by opioids and HIV-1 has functional consequence in enhancing HIV-1 neurocognitive dysfunction. PMID:22034138

  7. Blocking of integrins inhibits HIV-1 infection of human cervical mucosa immune cells with free and complement-opsonized virions

    PubMed Central

    Tjomsland, Veronica; Ellegård, Rada; Kjölhede, Preben; Wodlin, Ninni Borendal; Hinkula, Jorma; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Larsson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The initial interaction between HIV-1 and the host occurs at the mucosa during sexual intercourse. In cervical mucosa, HIV-1 exists both as free and opsonized virions and this might influence initial infection. We used cervical explants to study HIV-1 transmission, the effects of opsonization on infectivity, and how infection can be prevented. Complement opsonization enhanced HIV-1 infection of dendritic cells (DCs) compared with that by free HIV-1, but this increased infection was not observed with CD4+ T cells. Blockage of the α4-, β7-, and β1-integrins significantly inhibited HIV-1 infection of both DCs and CD4+ T cells. We found a greater impairment of HIV-1 infection in DCs for complement-opsonized virions compared with that of free virions when αM/β2- and α4-integrins were blocked. Blocking the C-type lectin receptor macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) inhibited infection of emigrating DCs but had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. We show that blocking of integrins decreases the HIV-1 infection of both mucosal DCs and CD4+ T cells emigrating from the cervical tissues. These findings may provide the basis of novel microbicidal strategies that may help limit or prevent initial infection of the cervical mucosa, thereby reducing or averting systemic HIV-1 infection. PMID:23686382

  8. Potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase display a two-step, slow-binding inhibition mechanism which is absent in a drug-resistant T66I/M154I mutant.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Edward P; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gartland, Margaret J; Lang, Scott; Halsey, Wendy; Sathe, Ganesh; Carter, H Luke; Weaver, Kurt L

    2009-02-24

    Two-metal binding HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs) are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 in vitro and in patients. We report here for the first time the kinetics of inhibition of integrase-catalyzed strand transfer. First, the IC(50) values for each of six structurally distinct INIs decreased when a preincubation was included: S-1360 (1.3 microM vs 0.12 microM), L-731,988 (130 nM vs 9 nM), L-870,810 (130 nM vs 4 nM), raltegravir (300 nM vs 9 nM), elvitegravir (90 nM vs 6 nM), and GSK364735 (90 nM vs 6 nM). When reactions with these INIs were initiated with integrase, progress curve analyses indicated time-dependent inhibition, which could be fitted to a two-step mechanism of binding. Overall fitted K(i) values matched the IC(50) values measured with a preincubation: S-1360 (0.17 microM), L-731,988 (34 nM), L-870,810 (2.4 nM), raltegravir (10 nM), elvitegravir (4.0 nM), and GSK364735 (2.5 nM). To begin to understand the mechanism for this slow onset of inhibition and its possible impact on drug resistance, studies of resistance mutations were initiated. T66I/M154I exhibited little if any time-dependent inhibition by any of the six INIs, as measured by differences in potency upon preincubation or by progress curve analysis. These data demonstrate that slow binding is a signature of two-metal binding INIs, and that the second slow step is required for full potency. We discuss a possible structural explanation of the second slow step of inhibition and also the relationship between loss of time-dependent inhibition and drug resistance of this important new class of HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs.

  9. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Viehman, J. Alexander; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Due to various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most β-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant, or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii. PMID:25091170

  10. [Neurological findings in a group of children and adolescents exposed and infected by HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cristiane; Gouvêa, Aída; Machado, Daisy; Cunegundes, Kelly; Beltrão, Suênia; Bononi, Fabiana; Succi, Regina Célia

    2005-09-01

    The CNS infection by HIV-1 in infancy could be present immediately after infection or became manifest later. Microcephalia, mental retardation, pyramidal signs, humor and behavioral disorders and antiretroviral therapy complications are common. This is an observational, sectional and descriptive study about findings on neurological examination of 173 patients in a group of children and adolescents infected and exposed to HIV-1 in perinatal period. Most of them had more than one neurological finding or different diagnosis. The more common findings were: encephalopathy, mental retardation, language delay, pyramidal signs, hyporeflexia. The neurological examination was abnormal in 67% of all patients even in seroreverters. We suggest that this group has a high risk to neurological disease and the development of co-morbidity is directly correlated to clinical deterioration by HIV-1 infection.

  11. Interleukin 18 and cardiovascular disease in HIV-1 infection: a partner in crime?

    PubMed

    Torre, Donato; Pugliese, Agostino

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been frequent in HIV-infected patients both before and after the advent of antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The pathogenic basis for the increase of cardiovascular disease, in particular myocardial lesions, may involve HIV-1 itself or other mechanisms including endothelial dysfunction, activation of proinflammatory cytokines, and changes in platelets, which lead to atherosclerotic lesions of blood vessels. In the last decade, among the proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 18 seems to play a central role in the inflammatory cascade, leading to development of atherosclerotic disease and the occurrence of ischemic heart disease in uninfected HIV-1 people. Increased levels of interleukin 18 were observed in HIV-1 infected patients. This review attempts to evaluate the role of interleukin 18 in cardiovascular disease, especially in myocardial infarction, in HIV-1 infection, as well as the relationship between interleukin 18 and atherosclerotic plaque formation. Two other characteristic aspects in HIV-1 infection, metabolic syndrome and lipodystrophy, will be evaluated in light of activity of interleukin 18. Moreover, the role of platelets and interleukin 18 as an important linkage between chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, experimental an animal model of rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus clearly demonstrates the involvement of interleukin 18 in myocardial lesions, and that circulating levels of interleukin 18 are important predictors of coronary heart disease. In conclusion, interleukin 18 may be considered a partner in crime with other factors, including endothelial dysfunction, increased expression and production of adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines in determining cardiovascular disease.

  12. Genetic and immunological host factors associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, K A; Wilkinson, D A; Krowka, J F; Koup, R A; Padian, N S

    1998-01-01

    The probability of HIV transmission depends on the interplay of many different factors related to infectiousness of the HIV-infected partner, susceptibility of the HIV-uninfected partner, and biological characteristics of HIV strains. Here, we review recent studies of host immunological and genetic factors which may affect susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. These factors are summarized in Table 1. We propose how to explore biological correlates of susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in epidemiological studies, discuss the strengths and limitations of this research, and address the implications for public health. PMID:9632989

  13. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism 172K suppresses the effect of clinically relevant drug resistance mutations to both nucleoside and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T; Schuckmann, Matthew M; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-08-24

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT(172K)) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the k(cat)/K(m) values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT(172K) decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT(172K) results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT(172R) and RT(172K) bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  14. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Polymorphism 172K Suppresses the Effect of Clinically Relevant Drug Resistance Mutations to Both Nucleoside and Non-nucleoside RT Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T.; Schuckmann, Matthew M.; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT172K) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the kcat/Km values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT172K decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT172K results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT172R and RT172K bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  15. CD4+ T cells from elite controllers resist HIV-1 infection by selective upregulation of p21

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huabiao; Li, Chun; Huang, Jinghe; Cung, Thai; Seiss, Katherine; Beamon, Jill; Carrington, Mary F.; Porter, Lindsay C.; Burke, Patrick S.; Yang, Yue; Ryan, Bethany J.; Liu, Ruiwu; Weiss, Robert H.; Pereyra, Florencia; Cress, William D.; Brass, Abraham L.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Walker, Bruce D.; Yu, Xu G.; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Elite controllers represent a unique group of HIV-1infected persons with undetectable HIV-1 replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. However, the mechanisms contributing to effective viral immune defense in these patients remain unclear. Here, we show that compared with HIV-1 progressors and HIV-1–negative persons, CD4+ T cells from elite controllers are less susceptible to HIV-1 infection. This partial resistance to HIV-1 infection involved less effective reverse transcription and mRNA transcription from proviral DNA and was associated with strong and selective upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (also known as cip-1 and waf-1). Experimental blockade of p21 in CD4+ T cells from elite controllers resulted in a marked increase of viral reverse transcripts and mRNA production and led to higher enzymatic activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), which serves as a transcriptional coactivator of HIV-1 gene expression. This suggests that p21 acts as a barrier against HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells from elite controllers by inhibiting a cyclin-dependent kinase required for effective HIV-1 replication. These data demonstrate a mechanism of host resistance to HIV-1 in elite controllers and may open novel perspectives for clinical strategies to prevent or treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:21403397

  16. The HIV-1 Protein Vpr Targets the Endoribonuclease Dicer for Proteasomal Degradation to Boost Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Klockow, Laurieann Casey; Sharifi, Hamayun J.; Wen, Xiaoyun; Flagg, Meg; Furuya, Andrea K. M.; Nekorchuk, Michael; de Noronha, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 protein Vpr enhances macrophage infection, triggers G2 cell cycle arrest, and targets cells for NK-cell killing. Vpr acts through the CRL4DCAF1 ubiquitin ligase complex to cause G2 arrest and trigger expression of NK ligands. Corresponding ubiquitination targets have not been identified. UNG2 and SMUG1 are the only known substrates for Vpr-directed depletion through CRL4DCAF1. Here we identify the endoribonuclease Dicer as a target of HIV-1 Vpr-directed proteasomal degradation through CRL4DCAF1. We show that HIV-1 Vpr inhibits short hairpin RNA function as expected upon reduction of Dicer levels. Dicer inhibits HIV-1 replication in T cells. We demonstrate that Dicer also restricts HIV-1 replication in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and that reducing Dicer expression in MDMs enhances HIV-1 infection in a Vpr-dependent manner. Our results support a model in which Vpr complexes with human Dicer to boost its interaction with the CRL4DCAF1 ubiquitin ligase complex and its subsequent degradation. PMID:23849790

  17. KI and WU Polyomaviruses and CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-1infected Patients, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-01-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1–positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1–positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1–positive patients. PMID:20735940

  18. Association of complement receptor 2 polymorphisms with innate resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Herrero, R; Real, L M; Rivero-Juárez, A; Pineda, J A; Camacho, Á; Macías, J; Laplana, M; Konieczny, P; Márquez, F J; Souto, J C; Soria, J M; Saulle, I; Lo Caputo, S; Biasin, M; Rivero, A; Fibla, J; Caruz, A

    2015-03-01

    HIV-1 induces activation of complement through the classical and lectin pathways. However, the virus incorporates several membrane-bound or soluble regulators of complement activation (RCA) that inactivate complement. HIV-1 can also use the complement receptors (CRs) for complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (Ć-ADE). We hypothesize that hypofunctional polymorphisms in RCA or CRs may protect from HIV-1 infection. For this purpose, 139 SNPs located in 19 RCA and CRs genes were genotyped in a population of 201 Spanish HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (HESN) and 250 HIV-1-infected patients. Two SNPs were associated with infection susceptibility, rs1567190 in CR2 (odds ratio (OR) = 2.27, P = 1 × 10(-4)) and rs2842704 in C4BPA (OR = 2.11, P = 2 × 10(-4)). To replicate this finding, we analyzed a cohort of Italian, sexually HESN individuals. Although not significant (P = 0.25, OR = 1.57), similar genotypic proportions were obtained for the CR2 marker rs1567190. The results of the two association analyses were combined through a random effect meta-analysis, with a significant P-value of 2.6 x 10(-5) (OR = 2.07). Furthermore, we found that the protective CR2 genotype is correlated with lower levels CR2 mRNA as well as differences in the ratio of the long and short CR2 isoforms.

  19. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  20. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-3 Alpha (MIP-3α)/CCL20 in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Detels, Roger; Chang, L Cindy; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled HIV infection progresses to the depletion of systemic and mucosal CD4 and AIDS. Early HIV infection may be associated with increases in the concentration of MIP-3α in the blood and gut fluids. MIP-3α/CCL20 is the only chemokine known to interact with CCR6 receptors which are expressed on immature dendritic cells and both effector and memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The role and prognostic value of blood levels of MIP-3α in HIV-infected individuals has yet to be described. Methods We determined the serum levels of MIP-3α, and IFN-γ, in 167 HIV-1-infected and 27 HIV-1-uninfected men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). The blood biomarkers were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the cell phenotypes using flow cytometry. Results Median serum levels of MIP-3α in HIV-1-infected and uninfected men was significantly different (p<0.0001) and were 21.3 pg/mL and 6.4 pg/mL respectively. The HIV-1-infected men with CD4+ T cell count <200 cells/μL showed the highest median serum MIP-3α (23.1 pg/mL). Serum levels of MIP-3α in HIV-1 infected (n=167) were negatively correlated with absolute number of CD4+ T cell (p=0.01) and were positively correlated with CD38 molecules on CD8+ T cells (p=0.0002) and with serum levels of IFN-γ (0.006). Conclusion Serum levels of MIP-3α concomitantly increase with plasma levels of IFN-γ, CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells, and decreased of absolute CD4+ T cells in HIV-1-infected men. A higher blood level of MIP-3α may be representation of locally high level of MIP-3α and more recruitment of immature dendritic cell at site of infection. Involvement of CCR6/CCL20 axis and epithelial cells at the recto-colonel level may enhance sexual transmission of HIV-1 in MSM and may be useful as a prognostic marker in HIV-1-infection and AIDS. PMID:27617163

  1. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-3 Alpha (MIP-3α)/CCL20 in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Detels, Roger; Chang, L Cindy; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled HIV infection progresses to the depletion of systemic and mucosal CD4 and AIDS. Early HIV infection may be associated with increases in the concentration of MIP-3α in the blood and gut fluids. MIP-3α/CCL20 is the only chemokine known to interact with CCR6 receptors which are expressed on immature dendritic cells and both effector and memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The role and prognostic value of blood levels of MIP-3α in HIV-infected individuals has yet to be described. Methods We determined the serum levels of MIP-3α, and IFN-γ, in 167 HIV-1-infected and 27 HIV-1-uninfected men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). The blood biomarkers were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the cell phenotypes using flow cytometry. Results Median serum levels of MIP-3α in HIV-1-infected and uninfected men was significantly different (p<0.0001) and were 21.3 pg/mL and 6.4 pg/mL respectively. The HIV-1-infected men with CD4+ T cell count <200 cells/μL showed the highest median serum MIP-3α (23.1 pg/mL). Serum levels of MIP-3α in HIV-1 infected (n=167) were negatively correlated with absolute number of CD4+ T cell (p=0.01) and were positively correlated with CD38 molecules on CD8+ T cells (p=0.0002) and with serum levels of IFN-γ (0.006). Conclusion Serum levels of MIP-3α concomitantly increase with plasma levels of IFN-γ, CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells, and decreased of absolute CD4+ T cells in HIV-1-infected men. A higher blood level of MIP-3α may be representation of locally high level of MIP-3α and more recruitment of immature dendritic cell at site of infection. Involvement of CCR6/CCL20 axis and epithelial cells at the recto-colonel level may enhance sexual transmission of HIV-1 in MSM and may be useful as a prognostic marker in HIV-1-infection and AIDS.

  2. GM-3 Lactone Mimetic Interacts with CD4 and HIV-1 Env Proteins, Hampering HIV-1 Infection without Inducing a Histopathological Alteration.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Pastori, Claudia; Gherardi, Stefano; Venuti, Assunta; Cerreto, Antonella; Sanvito, Francesca; Toma, Lucio; Lopalco, Lucia; Nativi, Cristina

    2016-08-12

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are involved in HIV-1 entry. GM-3 ganglioside, a widespread GSL, affects HIV entry and infection in different ways, depending on the concentration, through its anchoring activity in lipid rafts. This explains why the induction of an altered GSLs metabolism was a tempting approach to reducing HIV-1 cell infection. This study assayed the biological properties of a synthetic GM-3 lactone mimetic, 1, aimed at blocking HIV-1 infection without inducing the adverse events expected by an altered metabolism of GLSs in vivo. The mimetic, conjugated to immunogenic protein ovalbumin and multivalently presented, was able to bind the CD4 molecule with high affinity and block its engagement with gp120, thus inhibiting virus entry. Elicited antimimetic antibodies were also able to block HIV-1 infection in vitro, with activity complementary to that observed for 1. These preliminary results show that the use of GSLs mimetics can be a novel promising mode to block HIV-1 infection and that 1 and other GSL mimetics deserve further attention. PMID:27626296

  3. Antiretroviral drug concentrations in semen of HIV-1 infected men.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S; Pereira, A S

    2001-02-01

    Because semen is a major vehicle for the sexual transmission of HIV-1, control of viral replication within the sanctuary of the male genital tract should be a goal of antiretroviral therapy. Local immune responses, virus specific factors, and the degree of viral and cellular trafficking all appear to be important in controlling viral replication and evolution. However, the most important factor influencing viral replication and evolution within the male genital tract may be the disposition of antiretroviral agents into genital tissues and fluids. This review proposes possible mechanisms of antiretroviral distribution into the male genital tract by using other sanctuary barriers; such as the placenta, renal tubules, and blood-brain barrier; as models. In addition, this review summarises recent clinical studies regarding the disposition of currently available antiretroviral drugs into the seminal plasma and discusses some of the difficulties in interpreting drug concentration in the genital tract. PMID:11158684

  4. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Rickabaugh, Tammy M; Baxter, Ruth M; Sehl, Mary; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Hultin, Patricia M; Hultin, Lance E; Quach, Austin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Jamieson, Beth D

    2015-01-01

    Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young (20-35) and older (36-56) adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, p<1 x 10(-200) and 0.47, p<1 x 10(-200). Weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3) was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70) and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31). Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015). In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9); βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5); βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001). Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6), odds ratio=1.91). These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that are

  5. The IL-6 system in HIV-1-infection and in HAART-related fat redistribution syndromes.

    PubMed

    Saumoy, Maria; López-Dupla, Miguel; Veloso, Sergi; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Domingo, Pere; Broch, Montserrat; Miranda, Merce; Coll, Blai; Saurí, Amadeu; Vendrell, Joan; Richart, Cristóbal; Vidal, Francesc

    2008-04-23

    We determined the IL-6 -174 G>C single nucleotide polymorphism, IL-6 mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and IL-6 plasma levels in HIV-1-infected patients with and without lipodystrophy and uninfected controls. HIV-1-infected patients had a greater prevalence of the IL-6 -174 C/C genotype and the C allele, higher SAT IL-6 mRNA expression and plasma IL-6 levels than controls. The IL-6 -174 G>C genotype distribution and allele frequencies, SAT IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 plasma levels were non-significantly different between HIV-1-infected patients with and without lipodystrophy.

  6. A Cyclophilin Homology Domain-Independent Role for Nup358 in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Anne M.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Guevera, Rebekah; Morrison, James H.; Peretz, Mary; Fadel, Hind J.; Hamada, Masakazu; van Deursen, Jan; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    The large nucleoporin Nup358/RanBP2 forms eight filaments that project from the nuclear pore into the cytoplasm where they function as docking platforms for nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors. RNAi screens have implicated Nup358 in the HIV-1 life cycle. The 164 C-terminal amino acids of this 3,224 amino acid protein are a cyclophilin homology domain (Nup358Cyp), which has potential to bind the HIV-1 capsid and regulate viral progress to integration. Here we examined the virological role of Nup358 in conditional knockout mouse cells and in RNAi-depleted human CD4+ T cells. Cre-mediated gene knockout was toxic and diminished HIV-1 infectivity. However, cellular health and HIV-1 susceptibility were coordinately preserved if, prior to gene inactivation, a transposon was used to express all of Nup358 or only the N-terminal 1340 amino acids that contain three FG repeats and a Ran-binding domain. HIV-1, but not N74D capsid-mutant HIV-1, was markedly sensitive to TNPO3 depletion, but they infected 1–1340 segment-complemented Nup358 knockout cells equivalently. Human and mouse CypA both rescued HIV-1 in CypA gene −/− Jurkat cells and TRIM-Nup358Cyp fusions derived from each species were equally antiviral; each also inhibited both WT and N74D virus. In the human CD4+ T cell line SupT1, abrupt Nup358 depletion reduced viral replication but stable Nup358-depleted cells replicated HIV-1 normally. Thus, human CD4+ T cells can accommodate to loss of Nup358 and preserve HIV-1 susceptibility. Experiments with cylosporine, viruses with capsids that do not bind cyclophilins, and growth arrest did not uncover viral dependency on the C-terminal domains of Nup358. Our data reinforce the virological importance of TNPO3 and show that Nup358 supports nuclear transport functions important for cellular homeostasis and for HIV-1 nuclear import. However, the results do not suggest direct roles for the Nup358 cyclophilin or SUMO E3 ligase domains in engaging the HIV-1 capsid prior to

  7. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A.; Madson, Christian J.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Belshan, Michael

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  8. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied. The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells. A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children. B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02). Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:26166114

  9. nViremia and drug resistance among HIV-1 patients on antiretroviral treatment – a cross-sectional study in Soweto, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    El-Khatib, Ziad; Ekström, Anna Mia; Ledwaba, Johanna; Mohapi, Lerato; Laher, Fatima; Karstaedt, Alan; Charalambous, Salome; Petzold, Max; Katzenstein, David; Morris, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Background: We assessed risk factors for viremia and drug resistance (DR) among long-term recipients of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa. Methods: In 2008, we conducted a cross-sectional study among patients receiving ART for ≥12 months. Genotypic resistance testing was performed on individuals with a viral load >400 RNA copies/ml. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. Results: Of 998 subjects, 75% were women with a median age of 41. Most (64%) had been on treatment for >3 years. The prevalence of viremia was 14% (n=139); 12% (102/883) on first-line (i.e. NNRTI based regimen) and 33% (37/115) on second-line (i.e. PI based regimen) ART. Of viremic patients, 78% had DR mutations. For NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs the prevalence of mutations was 64%, 81% and 2% among first-line and 29%, 54% and 6% among second-line failures respectively. M184V/I, K103N and V106A/M were the most common mutations. Significant risk factors associated with viremia on first-line included concurrent tuberculosis treatment (OR 6.4, 2.2-18.8, p<0.01) and a recent history of poor adherence (OR 2.7, 1.3-5.6, p=0.01). Among second-line failures, attending a public clinic (OR 4.6, 1.8-11.3, p<0.01) and not having a refrigerator at home (OR 6.7, 1.2-37.5, p=0.03) were risk factors for virological failure. Conclusions: Risk factors for viral failure were line-regimen dependent. Second-line ART recipients had a higher rate of viremia, albeit with infrequent PI DR mutations. Measures to maintain effective virologic suppression should include increased adherence counseling, attention to concomitant tuberculosis treatment and heat-stable formulations of second-line ART regimens. PMID:20453629

  10. HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) Proviral Reservoirs Decay Continuously Under Sustained Virologic Control in HIV-1Infected Children Who Received Early Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luzuriaga, Katherine; Tabak, Barbara; Garber, Manuel; Chen, Ya Hui; Ziemniak, Carrie; McManus, Margaret M.; Murray, Danielle; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infants controls HIV-1 replication and reduces mortality. Methods. Plasma viremia (lower limit of detection, <2 copies/mL), T-cell activation, HIV-1–specific immune responses, and the persistence of cells carrying replication-competent virus were quantified during long-term effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 4 perinatally HIV-1infected youth who received treatment early (the ET group) and 4 who received treatment late (the LT group). Decay in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA levels was also measured over time in the ET youth. Results. Plasma viremia was not detected in any ET youth but was detected in all LT youth (median, 8 copies/mL; P = .03). PBMC proviral load was significantly lower in ET youth (median, 7 copies per million PBMCs) than in LT youth (median, 181 copies; P = .03). Replication-competent virus was recovered from all LT youth but only 1 ET youth. Decay in proviral DNA was noted in all 4 ET youth in association with limited T-cell activation and with absent to minimal HIV-1–specific immune responses. Conclusions. Initiation of early effective cART during infancy significantly limits circulating levels of proviral and replication-competent HIV-1 and promotes continuous decay of viral reservoirs. Continued cART with reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs over time may facilitate HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:24850788

  11. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs.

  12. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs. PMID:26544580

  13. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  14. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages.

  15. Alterations in the Fecal Microbiota of Patients with HIV-1 Infection: An Observational Study in A Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Zongxin; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Cheng, Yiwen; Li, Lanjuan; Wu, Nanping

    2016-01-01

    The available evidence suggests that alterations in gut microbiota may be tightly linked to the increase in microbial translocation and systemic inflammation in patients with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection. We profiled the fecal microbiota as a proxy of gut microbiota by parallel barcoded 454-pyrosequencing in 67 HIV-1-infected patients (32 receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART] and 35 HAART naïve) and 16 healthy controls from a Chinese population. We showed that α-diversity indices did not differ significantly between the healthy control and HIV-1-infected patients. The ratio of Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes increased significantly in HIV-1-infected patients. Several key bacterial phylotypes, including Prevotella, were prevalent in HIV-1-infected patients; whereas Phascolarctobacterium, Clostridium XIVb, Dialister and Megamonas were significantly correlated with systemic inflammatory cytokines. After short-term, effective HAART, the viral loads of HIV-1 were reduced; however, the diversity and composition of the fecal microbiota were not completely restored. and the dysbiosis remained among HIV-1-infected subjects undergoing HAART. Our detailed analysis demonstrated that dysbiosis of fecal microbiota might play an active role in HIV-1 infection. Thus, new insights may be provided into therapeutics that target the microbiota to attenuate the progression of HIV disease and to reduce the risk of gut-linked disease in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27477587

  16. Of Mice and Monkeys: Can Animal Models Be Utilized to Study Neurological Consequences of Pediatric HIV-1 Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Carryl, Heather; Swang, Melanie; Lawrence, Jerome; Curtis, Kimberly; Kamboj, Herman; Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; De Paris, Kristina; Burke, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a global health crisis. Children are much more susceptible to HIV-1 neurological impairments than adults, which can be exacerbated by coinfections. Neurological characteristics of pediatric HIV-1 infection suggest dysfunction in the frontal cortex as well as the hippocampus; limited MRI data indicate global cerebral atrophy, and pathological data suggest accelerated neuronal apoptosis in the cortex. An obstacle to pediatric HIV-1 research is a human representative model system. Host-species specificity of HIV-1 limits the ability to model neurological consequences of pediatric HIV-1 infection in animals. Several models have been proposed including neonatal intracranial injections of HIV-1 viral proteins in rats and perinatal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of infant macaques. Nonhuman primate models recapitulate the complexity of pediatric HIV-1, neuropathogenesis while rodent models are able to elucidate the role specific viral proteins exert on neurodevelopment. Nonhuman primate models show similar behavioral and neuropathological characteristics to pediatric HIV-1 infection and offer a stage to investigate early viral mechanisms, latency reservoirs, and therapeutic interventions. Here we review the relative strengths and limitations of pediatric HIV-1 model systems. PMID:26034832

  17. Cumulative mechanisms of lymphoid tissue fibrosis and T cell depletion in HIV-1 and SIV infections

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Smith, Anthony J.; Wietgrefe, Stephen W.; Southern, Peter J.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Burton, Gregory F.; Silvestri, Guido; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Carlis, John V.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of HIV-1 and SIV infections is CD4+ T cell depletion. Both direct cell killing and indirect mechanisms related to immune activation have been suggested to cause the depletion of T cells. We have now identified a mechanism by which immune activation-induced fibrosis of lymphoid tissues leads to depletion of naive T cells in HIV-1 infected patients and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The T regulatory cell response to immune activation increased procollagen production and subsequent deposition as fibrils via the TGF-β1 signaling pathway and chitinase 3-like-1 activity in fibroblasts in lymphoid tissues from patients infected with HIV-1. Collagen deposition restricted T cell access to the survival factor IL-7 on the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network, resulting in apoptosis and depletion of T cells, which, in turn, removed a major source of lymphotoxin-β, a survival factor for FRCs during SIV infection in rhesus macaques. The resulting loss of FRCs and the loss of IL-7 produced by FRCs may thus perpetuate a vicious cycle of depletion of T cells and the FRC network. Because this process is cumulative, early treatment and antifibrotic therapies may offer approaches to moderate T cell depletion and improve immune reconstitution during HIV-1 infection. PMID:21393864

  18. HIV-1 requires Arf6-mediated membrane dynamics to efficiently enter and infect T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    García-Expósito, Laura; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Puigdomènech, Isabel; Machado, José-David; Blanco, Julià; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    As the initial barrier to viral entry, the plasma membrane along with the membrane trafficking machinery and cytoskeleton are of fundamental importance in the viral cycle. However, little is known about the contribution of plasma membrane dynamics during early human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Considering that ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) regulates cellular invasion via several microorganisms by coordinating membrane trafficking, our aim was to study the function of Arf6-mediated membrane dynamics on HIV-1 entry and infection of T lymphocytes. We observed that an alteration of the Arf6–guanosine 5′-diphosphate/guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP/GDP) cycle, by GDP-bound or GTP-bound inactive mutants or by specific Arf6 silencing, inhibited HIV-1 envelope–induced membrane fusion, entry, and infection of T lymphocytes and permissive cells, regardless of viral tropism. Furthermore, cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission of primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes was inhibited by Arf6 knockdown. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that Arf6 mutants provoked the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-biphosphate–associated structures on the plasma membrane of permissive cells, without affecting CD4-viral attachment but impeding CD4-dependent HIV-1 entry. Arf6 silencing or its mutants did not affect fusion, entry, and infection of vesicular stomatitis virus G–pseudotyped viruses or ligand-induced CXCR4 or CCR5 endocytosis, both clathrin-dependent processes. Therefore we propose that efficient early HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes requires Arf6-coordinated plasma membrane dynamics that promote viral fusion and entry. PMID:21346189

  19. Detection and management of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients from lower income countries

    PubMed Central

    Ballif, Marie; Nhandu, Venerandah; Wood, Robin; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Carter, E. Jane; Cortes, Claudia P.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Diero, Lameck; Graber, Claire; Renner, Lorna; Hawerlander, Denise; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Du, Quy Tuan; Sterling, Timothy R.; Egger, Matthias; Fenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Setting Drug resistance threatens tuberculosis (TB) control, particularly among HIV-infected persons. Objective We surveyed antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs from lower-income countries on prevention and management of drug-resistant TB. Design We used online questionnaires to collect program-level data in 47 ART programs in Southern Africa (14), East Africa (8), West Africa (7), Central Africa (5), Latin America (7) and Asia-Pacific (6 programs) in 2012. Patient-level data were collected on 1,002 adult TB patients seen at 40 of the participating ART programs. Results Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing was available at 36 (77%) ART programs, but only used for 22% of all TB patients. Molecular drug resistance testing was available at 33 (70%) programs and used for 23% of all TB patients. Twenty ART programs (43%) provided directly observed therapy (DOT) during the whole treatment, 16 (34%) during intensive phase only and 11 (23%) did not follow DOT. Fourteen (30%) ART programs reported no access to second-line TB regimens; 18 (38%) reported TB drug shortages. Conclusions Capacity to diagnose and treat drug-resistant TB was limited across ART programs in lower income countries. DOT was not always implemented and drug supply was regularly interrupted, which may contribute to the global emergence of drug resistance. PMID:25299866

  20. Drug resistance profile and serotype of streptococcus of pneumoniae infected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiefei; Huang, Nannan; Wang, Guangzhou; Yu, Fengqin

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the surveillance of drug resistance and serotype monitoring of steptococcus pneumoniae in hospitalized children. the pathogenic bacteria isolation and identification methods were employed to do the bacteria isolation identification and drug sensitive test on the specimens from Women & Infants Hospital of Zhengzhou. From the specimens, there were 134 detected strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the drug resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were respectively 97.7% and 89.9%, and the drug resistance to tetracycline, azithromycin and paediatric compound sulfamethoxazole were respectively 86. 3%, 58. 3%, 51. 2%. The vancomycin resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae were often not found. the Streptococcus pneumoniae in children were generally with drug resistant in Zhengzhou area. It shall strengthen drug resistance surveillance, and reasonably choose antibacterial agents. PMID:27592480

  1. Exosomes Derived from HIV-1-infected Cells Contain Trans-activation Response Element RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 104–106 copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 103 copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  2. Antiretroviral drug concentrations in semen of HIV-1 infected men

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S.; Pereira, A.

    2001-01-01

    website extra A table detailing antiretroviral drugs appears on the STI website. www.sextransinf.com Because semen is a major vehicle for the sexual transmission of HIV-1, control of viral replication within the sanctuary of the male genital tract should be a goal of antiretroviral therapy. Local immune responses, virus specific factors, and the degree of viral and cellular trafficking all appear to be important in controlling viral replication and evolution. However, the most important factor influencing viral replication and evolution within the male genital tract may be the disposition of antiretroviral agents into genital tissues and fluids. This review proposes possible mechanisms of antiretroviral distribution into the male genital tract by using other sanctuary barriers; such as the placenta, renal tubules, and blood-brain barrier; as models. In addition, this review summarises recent clinical studies regarding the disposition of currently available antiretroviral drugs into the seminal plasma and discusses some of the difficulties in interpreting drug concentration in the genital tract. Key Words: HIV; semen; antiretrovirals; drug concentrations; pharmacokinetics; protein binding PMID:11158684

  3. Improved guanide compounds which bind the CXCR4 co-receptor and inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Royce A; Pincus, Seth H; Song, Kejing; Shepard, Joyce B; Weaver, Alan J; Labib, Mohamed E; Teintze, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4 is a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection and is involved in signaling cell migration and proliferation. In a previous study of non-peptide, guanide-based CXCR4-binding compounds, spermine and spermidine phenylguanides inhibited HIV-1 entry at low micromolar concentrations. Subsequently, crystal structures of CXCR4 were used to dock a series of naphthylguanide derivatives of the polyamines spermidine and spermine. Synthesis and evaluation of the naphthylguanide compounds identified our best compound, spermine tris-1-naphthylguanide, which bound CXCR4 with an IC(50) of 40 nM and inhibited the infection of TZM-bl cells with X4, but not R5, strains of HIV-1 with an IC(50) of 50-100 nM.

  4. Prevalence of HLA-B*57:01 allele in Argentinean HIV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Moragas, M; Belloso, W H; Baquedano, M S; Gutierrez, M I; Bissio, E; Larriba, J M; Fay, F; Aulicino, P; Gurevich, J M; Yaunguzian, M F; Maldonado, A C; Falistocco, C; Sen, L; Mangano, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir (ABC hypersensitivity syndrome, AHS) is strongly associated with the presence of the HLA-B*57:01 allele. This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of HLA-B*57:01 allele in Argentinean HIV-1 infected patients. We analyzed the presence of HLA-B*57:01 allele in 1646 HIV-1 infected patients from different regions of Argentina. This allele was detected in 81 patients; most of them corresponded to patients living in the central region of the country. The prevalence of HLA-B*57:01 was 4.9%, similar to other Caucasian populations and higher than other data reported for South American populations. This strongly supports screening for the presence of HLA-B*57:01 in abacavir treatment of HIV-1 in our country. PMID:25922880

  5. Blocking of HIV-1 Infectivity by a Soluble, Secreted Form of the CD4 Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas H.; Byrn, Randal A.; Marsters, Scot A.; Gregory, Timothy; Groopman, Jerome E.; Capon, Daniel J.

    1987-12-01

    The initial event in the infection of human T lymphocytes, macrophages, and other cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is the attachment of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to its cellular receptor, CD4. As a step toward designing antagonists of this binding event, soluble, secreted forms of CD4 were produced by transfection of mammalian cells with vectors encoding versions of CD4 lacking its transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The soluble CD4 so produced binds gp120 with an affinity and specificity comparable to intact CD4 and is capable of neutralizing the infectivity of HIV-1. These studies reveal that the high-affinity CD4-gp120 interaction does not require other cell or viral components and may establish a novel basis for therapeutic intervention in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  6. IL-8 Alterations in HIV-1 Infected Children With Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pananghat, Ambili Nair; Aggarwal, Heena; Prakash, Somi Sankaran; Makhdoomi, Muzamil Ashraf; Singh, Ravinder; Lodha, Rakesh; Ali, Shakir; Srinivas, Maddur; Das, Bimal Kumar; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Luthra, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Disease progression in HIV-1 infected children is faster than in adults. Less than 5% of the infected children maintain stable CD4 counts beyond 7 years of infection and are termed long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs). Delineating the host immune response in antiretroviral naïve (ART) and treated HIV-1 infected children at different disease stages will help in understanding the immunopathogenesis of the disease. A total of 79 asymptomatic, perinatally HIV-1 infected children (50 ART naïve and 29 ART treated) and 8 seronegative donors were recruited in this study. T- and B-cell activation PCR arrays were performed from the cDNA, using total RNA extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 14 HIV-1 infected children at different stages of the disease. The differentially expressed genes were identified. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed for the (interleukin-8) IL-8 gene and its transcriptional mediators, that is, SHP2, GRB2, and IL-8R (IL-8 receptor/CXCR1). Plasma levels of IL-8 were measured by flow cytometry. Gene array data revealed a higher expression of IL-8 in the ART naïve HIV-1 infected progressors and in ART nonresponders than LTNPs and ART responders, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated a significant higher expression of IL-8 (P < 0.001), its receptor CXCR1 (P = 0.03) and the upstream signaling molecule SHP2 (P = 0.04) in the progressors versus LTNPs. Plasma levels of IL-8 were significantly higher in progressors versus LTNPs (P < 0.001), and ART nonresponders versus ART responders (P < 0.001). A significant negative correlation of plasma levels of IL-8 with CD4 counts (cells/μL) was observed in HIV-1 infected ART naïve subjects (r = −0.488; P < 0.001), while the IL-8 levels positively correlated with viral load in the ART treated children (r = 0.5494; P < 0.001). ART naïve progressors on follow up demonstrated a significant reduction in the mRNA expression (P = 0

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India. PMID:27795257

  8. Chitosan-hyaluronic acid/nano silver composite sponges for drug resistant bacteria infected diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Anisha, B S; Biswas, Raja; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an antimicrobial sponge composed of chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA) and nano silver (nAg) as a wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) infected with drug resistant bacteria. nAg (5-20 nm) was prepared and characterized. The nanocomposite sponges were prepared by homogenous mixing of chitosan, HA and nAg followed by freeze drying to obtain a flexible and porous structure. The prepared sponges were characterized using SEM and FT-IR. The porosity, swelling, biodegradation and haemostatic potential of the sponges were also studied. Antibacterial activity of the prepared sponges was analysed using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Chitosan-HA/nAg composite sponges showed potent antimicrobial property against the tested organisms. Sponges containing higher nAg (0.005%, 0.01% and 0.02%) concentrations showed antibacterial activity against MRSA. Cytotoxicity and cell attachment studies were done using human dermal fibroblast cells. The nanocomposite sponges showed a nAg concentration dependent toxicity towards fibroblast cells. Our results suggest that this nanocomposite sponges could be used as a potential material for wound dressing for DFU infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria if the optimal concentration of nAg exhibiting antibacterial action with least toxicity towards mammalian cells is identified.

  9. Chitosan-hyaluronic acid/nano silver composite sponges for drug resistant bacteria infected diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Anisha, B S; Biswas, Raja; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an antimicrobial sponge composed of chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA) and nano silver (nAg) as a wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) infected with drug resistant bacteria. nAg (5-20 nm) was prepared and characterized. The nanocomposite sponges were prepared by homogenous mixing of chitosan, HA and nAg followed by freeze drying to obtain a flexible and porous structure. The prepared sponges were characterized using SEM and FT-IR. The porosity, swelling, biodegradation and haemostatic potential of the sponges were also studied. Antibacterial activity of the prepared sponges was analysed using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Chitosan-HA/nAg composite sponges showed potent antimicrobial property against the tested organisms. Sponges containing higher nAg (0.005%, 0.01% and 0.02%) concentrations showed antibacterial activity against MRSA. Cytotoxicity and cell attachment studies were done using human dermal fibroblast cells. The nanocomposite sponges showed a nAg concentration dependent toxicity towards fibroblast cells. Our results suggest that this nanocomposite sponges could be used as a potential material for wound dressing for DFU infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria if the optimal concentration of nAg exhibiting antibacterial action with least toxicity towards mammalian cells is identified. PMID:24060281

  10. Dual and recombinant infections: an integral part of the HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, A.; Tanuri, A.; Schechter, M.; Rayfield, M. A.; Hu, D. J.; Cabral, M. C.; Bandea, C. I.; Baggs, J.; Pieniazek, D.

    1999-01-01

    We systematically evaluated multiple and recombinant infections in an HIV-infected population selected for vaccine trials. Seventy-nine HIV-1 infected persons in a clinical cohort study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were evaluated for 1 year. A combination of molecular screening assays and DNA sequencing showed 3 dual infections (3.8%), 6 recombinant infections (7.6%), and 70 (88.6%) infections involving single viral subtypes. In the three dual infections, we identified HIV-1 subtypes F and B, F and D, and B and D; in contrast, the single and recombinant infections involved only HIV-1 subtypes B and F. The recombinants had five distinct B/F mosaic patterns: Bgag-p17/Bgag-p24/Fpol/Benv, Fgag-p17/Bgag-p24/Fpol/Fenv, Bgag-p17/B-Fgag-p24/Fpol/Fenv, Bgag-p17/B-Fgag-p24/Fpol/Benv, and Fgag-p17/B-Fgag-p24/Fpol/Fenv. No association was found between dual or recombinant infections and demographic or clinical variables. These findings indicate that dual and recombinant infections are emerging as an integral part of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Brazil and emphasize the heterogenous character of epidemics emerging in countries where multiple viral subtypes coexist. PMID:10081673

  11. Comparison of the Cepheid GeneXpert and Abbott M2000 HIV-1 real time molecular assays for monitoring HIV-1 viral load and detecting HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ceffa, Susanna; Luhanga, Richard; Andreotti, Mauro; Brambilla, Davide; Erba, Fulvio; Jere, Haswel; Mancinelli, Sandro; Giuliano, Marina; Palombi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Assessing treatment efficacy and early infant diagnosis (EID) are critical issues in HIV disease management. Point-of-care assays may greatly increase the possibility to access laboratory monitoring also in rural areas. Recently two new laboratory tests have been developed by Cepheid (Sunnyvale, California) the Xpert HIV-1 Viral Load for viral load determination and the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative for early infant diagnosis. We conducted a study in Blantyre, Malawi, comparing the 2 methods versus the Abbott real time quantitative and qualitative assays, for viral load and EID respectively. We tested 300 plasma samples for viral load determination and 200 samples for infant diagnosis. HIV-1 RNA values of the 274 samples quantified by both assays were highly correlated (Pearson r=0.95, R(2)=0.90). In 90.9% of the cases the two methods were concordant in defining the HIV-1 RNA levels as detectable or undetectable. For EID, the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative assay yielded the same identical results as the Abbott assay. Both the quantitative and the qualitative Xpert assays are promising tools to monitor treatment efficacy in HIV patients receiving treatment and for early diagnosis in HIV-exposed infants. PMID:26709099

  12. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral co-infections among HIV-1 infected individuals in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infections among HIV-1 infected individuals are growing worldwide health problems characterized by lack of effective vaccines, need for expensive treatment, chronicity of morbidity and associated mortality. Their prevalence and distribution patterns continue to vary across geographical locations with high prevalence being detected among high risk populations. To determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV among HIV-1 infected individuals, blood samples were collected from consenting study subjects visiting comprehensive HIV clinics in Nairobi during the period between October and December 2009. Methods Blood samples from volunteers were screened with ELISA tests for detecting HIV, HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibodies. Results In a total of three (300) hundred infected individuals consisting of 129 (43%) males and 171 (57%) females 15.3% (46/300) were HIV-1 co-infected with either HBV or HCV or both, 10.3% (31/300) with HIV-1 and HCV and 6% (18/300) with HIV-1 and HBV infections. However, only three individuals (1%) were coinfected with the three viruses (HIV/HBV/HCV). Conclusion Though, low levels of co-infection with all three viruses were reported, there could be higher prevalence rates than reported here especially among high risk populations. PMID:24016453

  13. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  14. Thymic Function Is Most Severely Impaired in Chronic HIV-1 Infection, but Individuals With Faster Disease Progression During Early HIV-1 Infection Expressed Lower Levels of RTEs.

    PubMed

    He, Sijia; Zhang, Zining; Fu, Yajing; Qin, Chaolong; Li, Sha; Han, Xiaoxu; Xu, Junjie; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong

    2015-12-15

    In HIV disease course, the decline of peripheral CD4 T-cell count correlates with rapid disease progression. The supply of peripheral naive T cells by the thymus requires precursor T-cell proliferation within the thymus. In the setting of HIV-1 infection, when both naive and memory T cells are progressively depleted, the contribution of thymic dysfunction in CD4 depletion needs to be studied. Previous research has shown that thymic function may also be impaired in HIV-1 infection. However, it is inconclusive regarding whether this impairment occurred at the early time or during the chronic phase. In addition, the relationship between thymic dysfunction and disease progression remains unknown. In this study, we examined the thymic function in 65 HIV-infected individuals. Among them, 17 were in acute phase, 15 were in early chronic phase, 15 were in chronic phase with no ART (antiretroviral therapy), and 18 were on ART. We also included 11 uninfected individuals as controls. We measured the peripheral blood levels of T-cell receptor rearrangement excision circles and PTK7 and CD31 expressions for the frequency of circulating recent thymic emigrants. We observed that the 2 indicators of thymic function, sj/β-TREC and PTK7, seemed to be lower in the chronic infection group than those in the acute and early chronic groups. Both indicators returned to the normal level after ART. However, after 1-year follow-up of patients with early HIV-1 infection, rapid progressors (n = 4) had lower PTK7 and CD31 expressions than chronic progressors (n = 6). PMID:26569175

  15. Thymic Function Is Most Severely Impaired in Chronic HIV-1 Infection, but Individuals With Faster Disease Progression During Early HIV-1 Infection Expressed Lower Levels of RTEs.

    PubMed

    He, Sijia; Zhang, Zining; Fu, Yajing; Qin, Chaolong; Li, Sha; Han, Xiaoxu; Xu, Junjie; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong

    2015-12-15

    In HIV disease course, the decline of peripheral CD4 T-cell count correlates with rapid disease progression. The supply of peripheral naive T cells by the thymus requires precursor T-cell proliferation within the thymus. In the setting of HIV-1 infection, when both naive and memory T cells are progressively depleted, the contribution of thymic dysfunction in CD4 depletion needs to be studied. Previous research has shown that thymic function may also be impaired in HIV-1 infection. However, it is inconclusive regarding whether this impairment occurred at the early time or during the chronic phase. In addition, the relationship between thymic dysfunction and disease progression remains unknown. In this study, we examined the thymic function in 65 HIV-infected individuals. Among them, 17 were in acute phase, 15 were in early chronic phase, 15 were in chronic phase with no ART (antiretroviral therapy), and 18 were on ART. We also included 11 uninfected individuals as controls. We measured the peripheral blood levels of T-cell receptor rearrangement excision circles and PTK7 and CD31 expressions for the frequency of circulating recent thymic emigrants. We observed that the 2 indicators of thymic function, sj/β-TREC and PTK7, seemed to be lower in the chronic infection group than those in the acute and early chronic groups. Both indicators returned to the normal level after ART. However, after 1-year follow-up of patients with early HIV-1 infection, rapid progressors (n = 4) had lower PTK7 and CD31 expressions than chronic progressors (n = 6).

  16. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  17. Viral Genetic Diversity and Polymorphisms in a Cohort of HIV-1-Infected Patients Eligible for Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Diallo, Karidia; Zheng, Du-Ping; Rottinghaus, Erin K.; Bassey, Orji; Yang, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Studying the genetic diversity and natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 would benefit our understanding of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) development and predict treatment outcomes. In this study, we have characterized the HIV-1 genetic diversity and natural polymorphisms at the 5′ region of the pol gene encompassing the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) from 271 plasma specimens collected in 2008 from HIV-1-infected patients who were eligible for initiating antiretroviral therapy in Abuja (Nigeria). The analysis indicated that the predominant subtype was subtype G (31.0%), followed by CRF02-AG (19.2 %), CRF43-02G (18.5%), and A/CRF36-cpx (11.4%); the remaining (19.9%) were other subtypes and circulating (CRF) and unique (URF) recombinant forms. Recombinant viruses (68.6%) were the major viral strains in the region. Eighty-four subtype G sequences were further mainly classified into two major and two minor clusters; sequences in the two major clusters were closely related to the HIV-1 strains in two of the three major subtype G clusters detected worldwide. Those in the two minor clusters appear to be new subtype G strains circulating only in Abuja. The pretreatment DR prevalence was < 3%; however, numerous natural polymorphisms were present. Eleven polymorphic mutations (G16E, K20I, L23P, E35D, M36I, N37D/S/T, R57K, L63P, and V82I) were detected in the PR that were subtype or CRF specific while only three mutations (D123N, I135T, and I135V) were identified in the RT. Overall, this study indicates an evolving HIV-1 epidemic in Abuja with recombinant viruses becoming the dominant strains and the emergence of new subtype G strains; pretreatment HIVDR was low and the occurrence of natural polymorphism in the PR region was subtype or CRF dependent. PMID:25582324

  18. Recurrent thrombosis in an HIV-1 infected child

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Though thromboembolic complications in HIV infected patients have been described in literature, recurrent thrombosis is very rare. We present a six-year-old HIV infected boy who presented with recurrent thrombosis. He initially had renal artery thrombosis, then middle cerebral artery thrombosis and finally hepatic vein thrombosis that was fatal. PMID:23188939

  19. Schistosoma mansoni, nematode infections, and progression to active tuberculosis among HIV-1-infected Ugandans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael; Miiro, George; Nkurunziza, Peter; Watera, Christine; Quigley, Maria A; Dunne, David W; Whitworth, James A G; Elliott, Alison M

    2006-05-01

    Rates of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa are highest among people infected with HIV. Searching for additional risk factors in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandan adults, we previously found that a type 2 cytokine bias and eosinophilia were associated with progression to active TB. A possible role for helminth infection was assessed in this study. We analyzed TB incidence in 462 members of this cohort who were screened for filarial infections, gastrointestinal nematodes, and schistosomiasis. Progression to TB was not associated with gastrointestinal nematodes (rate ratio [RR], 1.18; confidence intervals [CIs], 0.66-2.10) or Mansonella perstans (RR, 0.42; CI, 0.13-1.34). A weak association between Schistosoma mansoni infection and TB was found (RR, 1.42; CI, 0.86-2.34); after adjusting for potential explanatory variables and using more stringent diagnostic criteria, the association was strengthened (RR, 2.31; 1.00-5.33). This analysis suggests an effect of S. mansoni infection on progression to active TB among HIV-1-infected Ugandans. PMID:16687687

  20. LILRB2 interaction with HLA class I correlates with control of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bashirova, Arman A; Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Jones, Des C; Qi, Ying; Apps, Richard; Gao, Xiaojiang; Burke, Patrick S; Taylor, Craig J; Rogich, Jerome; Wolinsky, Steven; Bream, Jay H; Duggal, Priya; Hussain, Shehnaz; Martinson, Jeremy; Weintrob, Amy; Kirk, Gregory D; Fellay, Jacques; Buchbinder, Susan P; Goedert, James J; Deeks, Steven G; Pereyra, Florencia; Trowsdale, John; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Telenti, Amalio; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Rachel L; Carrington, Mary; Yu, Xu G

    2014-03-01

    Natural progression of HIV-1 infection depends on genetic variation in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I locus, and the CD8+ T cell response is thought to be a primary mechanism of this effect. However, polymorphism within the MHC may also alter innate immune activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by changing interactions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules with leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), a group of immunoregulatory receptors mainly expressed on myelomonocytic cells including dendritic cells (DCs). We used previously characterized HLA allotype-specific binding capacities of LILRB1 and LILRB2 as well as data from a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals (N = 5126) to test whether LILR-HLA class I interactions influence viral load in HIV-1 infection. Our analyses in persons of European descent, the largest ethnic group examined, show that the effect of HLA-B alleles on HIV-1 control correlates with the binding strength between corresponding HLA-B allotypes and LILRB2 (p = 10(-2)). Moreover, overall binding strength of LILRB2 to classical HLA class I allotypes, defined by the HLA-A/B/C genotypes in each patient, positively associates with viral replication in the absence of therapy in patients of both European (p = 10(-11)-10(-9)) and African (p = 10(-5)-10(-3)) descent. This effect appears to be driven by variations in LILRB2 binding affinities to HLA-B and is independent of individual class I allelic effects that are not related to the LILRB2 function. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments suggest that strong LILRB2-HLA binding negatively affects antigen-presenting properties of DCs. Thus, we propose an impact of LILRB2 on HIV-1 disease outcomes through altered regulation of DCs by LILRB2-HLA engagement. PMID:24603468

  1. LILRB2 Interaction with HLA Class I Correlates with Control of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying; Apps, Richard; Gao, Xiaojiang; Burke, Patrick S.; Taylor, Craig J.; Rogich, Jerome; Wolinsky, Steven; Bream, Jay H.; Duggal, Priya; Hussain, Shehnaz; Martinson, Jeremy; Weintrob, Amy; Kirk, Gregory D.; Fellay, Jacques; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Goedert, James J.; Deeks, Steven G.; Pereyra, Florencia; Trowsdale, John; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Telenti, Amalio; Walker, Bruce D.; Allen, Rachel L.; Carrington, Mary; Yu, Xu G.

    2014-01-01

    Natural progression of HIV-1 infection depends on genetic variation in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I locus, and the CD8+ T cell response is thought to be a primary mechanism of this effect. However, polymorphism within the MHC may also alter innate immune activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by changing interactions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules with leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), a group of immunoregulatory receptors mainly expressed on myelomonocytic cells including dendritic cells (DCs). We used previously characterized HLA allotype-specific binding capacities of LILRB1 and LILRB2 as well as data from a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals (N = 5126) to test whether LILR-HLA class I interactions influence viral load in HIV-1 infection. Our analyses in persons of European descent, the largest ethnic group examined, show that the effect of HLA-B alleles on HIV-1 control correlates with the binding strength between corresponding HLA-B allotypes and LILRB2 (p = 10−2). Moreover, overall binding strength of LILRB2 to classical HLA class I allotypes, defined by the HLA-A/B/C genotypes in each patient, positively associates with viral replication in the absence of therapy in patients of both European (p = 10−11–10−9) and African (p = 10−5–10−3) descent. This effect appears to be driven by variations in LILRB2 binding affinities to HLA-B and is independent of individual class I allelic effects that are not related to the LILRB2 function. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments suggest that strong LILRB2-HLA binding negatively affects antigen-presenting properties of DCs. Thus, we propose an impact of LILRB2 on HIV-1 disease outcomes through altered regulation of DCs by LILRB2-HLA engagement. PMID:24603468

  2. HIV-1-infected macrophages induce astrogliosis by SDF-1{alpha} and matrix metalloproteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Mika; Wang, Xin; Baba, Masanori . E-mail: baba@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-04

    Brain macrophages/microglia and astrocytes are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). To clarify their interaction and contribution to the pathogenesis, HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages were used as a model of brain macrophages/microglia, and their effects on human astrocytes in vitro were examined. The culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages induced significant astrocyte proliferation, which was annihilated with a neutralizing antibody to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1{alpha} or a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. In these astrocytes, CXCR4, MMP, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression and SDF-1{alpha} production were significantly up-regulated. The supernatants of infected macrophages were always more effective than those of uninfected cells. Moreover, the enhanced production of SDF-1{alpha} was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor. These results indicate that the activated and HIV-1-infected macrophages can indirectly induce astrocyte proliferation through up-regulating SDF-1{alpha} and MMP production, which implies a mechanism of astrogliosis in HAD.

  3. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  4. Viral Evolution and Cytotoxic T Cell Restricted Selection in Acute Infant HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Knight, Miguel A; Slyker, Jennifer; Payne, Barbara Lohman; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky; de Silva, Thushan I; Chohan, Bhavna; Khasimwa, Brian; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; John-Stewart, Grace; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 infected infants experience poor viral containment and rapid disease progression compared to adults. Viral factors (e.g. transmitted cytotoxic T- lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations) or infant factors (e.g. reduced CTL functional capacity) may explain this observation. We assessed CTL functionality by analysing selection in CTL-targeted HIV-1 epitopes following perinatal infection. HIV-1 gag, pol and nef sequences were generated from a historical repository of longitudinal specimens from 19 vertically infected infants. Evolutionary rate and selection were estimated for each gene and in CTL-restricted and non-restricted epitopes. Evolutionary rate was higher in nef and gag vs. pol, and lower in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag and nef. Selection pressure was stronger in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag. The analysis also showed that infants with non-severe immunosuppression had stronger selection in CTL-restricted vs. non-restricted epitopes in gag and nef. Evidence of stronger CTL selection was absent in infants with severe immunosuppression. These data indicate that infant CTLs can exert selection pressure on gag and nef epitopes in early infection and that stronger selection across CTL epitopes is associated with favourable clinical outcomes. These results have implications for the development of paediatric HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:27403940

  5. Viral Evolution and Cytotoxic T Cell Restricted Selection in Acute Infant HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Knight, Miguel A.; Slyker, Jennifer; Payne, Barbara Lohman; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; de Silva, Thushan I.; Chohan, Bhavna; Khasimwa, Brian; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; John-Stewart, Grace; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 infected infants experience poor viral containment and rapid disease progression compared to adults. Viral factors (e.g. transmitted cytotoxic T- lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations) or infant factors (e.g. reduced CTL functional capacity) may explain this observation. We assessed CTL functionality by analysing selection in CTL-targeted HIV-1 epitopes following perinatal infection. HIV-1 gag, pol and nef sequences were generated from a historical repository of longitudinal specimens from 19 vertically infected infants. Evolutionary rate and selection were estimated for each gene and in CTL-restricted and non-restricted epitopes. Evolutionary rate was higher in nef and gag vs. pol, and lower in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag and nef. Selection pressure was stronger in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag. The analysis also showed that infants with non-severe immunosuppression had stronger selection in CTL-restricted vs. non-restricted epitopes in gag and nef. Evidence of stronger CTL selection was absent in infants with severe immunosuppression. These data indicate that infant CTLs can exert selection pressure on gag and nef epitopes in early infection and that stronger selection across CTL epitopes is associated with favourable clinical outcomes. These results have implications for the development of paediatric HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:27403940

  6. Polymorphisms in the IFNγ, IL-10, and TGFβ Genes May Be Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim Freitas, Felipe; Souza Lima, Sandra; Feitosa, Rosimar Neris Martins; Azevedo, Vânia Nakauth; Ishak, Marluísa de O. Guimarães; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study investigated possible associations between the TNFα-308G/A, IFN+874A/T, IL-6-174C/G, IL-10-1082A/G, and TGFβ-509C/T polymorphisms with HIV-1 infection, in addition to correlation of the polymorphisms with clinical markers of AIDS progression, such as levels of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and plasma viral load. Methods. A total of 216 individuals who were infected with HIV-1 and on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 294 individuals from the uninfected control group were analyzed. Results. All individuals evaluated were negative for total anti-HBc, anti-HCV, anti-T. pallidum, and anti-HTLV-1/2. The polymorphisms were identified by PCR-RFLP. Individuals presenting the IFN+874A allele as well as the AA genotype were more frequent in the HIV-1 infected group compared to the control group (P < 0.05), in addition to having lower levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes. The CD8+ T lymphocytes count was significantly lower in individuals with the IL-10-1082 GG genotype. The TGFβ-509TT genotype was associated with higher plasma viral load. Conclusions. The results suggest that the presence of the IFN+874A allele confers susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and a decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, the genotype associated with high serum levels of TGFβ may be associated with an increase in plasma viral load. PMID:25802474

  7. HIV-1-Specific CD8 T Cells Exhibit Limited Cross-Reactivity during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Du, Victor Y; Bansal, Anju; Carlson, Jonathan; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Salazar, Maria G; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; Josephs, Tracy M; Heath, Sonya L; Price, David A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hunter, Eric; Goepfert, Paul A

    2016-04-15

    Prior work has demonstrated that HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells can cross-recognize variant epitopes. However, most of these studies were performed in the context of chronic infection, where the presence of viral quasispecies makes it difficult to ascertain the true nature of the original antigenic stimulus. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated the extent of CD8 T cell cross-reactivity in patients with acute HIV-1 clade B infection. In each case, we determined the transmitted founder virus sequence to identify the autologous epitopes restricted by individual HLA class I molecules. Our data show that cross-reactive CD8 T cells are infrequent during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, in the uncommon instances where cross-reactive responses were detected, the variant epitopes were poorly recognized in cytotoxicity assays. Molecular analysis revealed that similar antigenic structures could be cross-recognized by identical CD8 T cell clonotypes mobilized in vivo, yet even subtle differences in a single TCR-accessible peptide residue were sufficient to disrupt variant-specific reactivity. These findings demonstrate that CD8 T cells are highly specific for autologous epitopes during acute HIV-1 infection. Polyvalent vaccines may therefore be required to provide optimal immune cover against this genetically labile pathogen. PMID:26983786

  8. Aortic endothelium in HIV-1 infection: chronic injury, activation, and increased leukocyte adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Zietz, C.; Hotz, B.; Stürzl, M.; Rauch, E.; Penning, R.; Löhrs, U.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical and serological studies provide evidence for a pathogenetically relevant vasculopathy in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); however, the morphological status of the endothelium under conditions of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is only sparsely documented. In this study we adapted an en face preparation technique of endothelium for use in immunohistochemistry and investigated the aortic endothelium of pre-AIDS and AIDS patients (n = 32) in comparison with an HIV-negative group (n = 17). The control group showed a regular pattern of evenly distributed aortic endothelial cells, whereas the endothelial cell pattern in the HIV-1-infected patients was clearly disturbed. Simultaneously, the degree of leukocyte adherence on the aortic endothelium increased significantly. These changes were accompanied by an up-regulation of the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin (ELAM-1). The endothelium turnover increased, and one-half of the HIV-1-infected patients exhibited HLA-DR (major histocompatibility complex class II) antigen in the aortic endothelium. Our results provide evidence for a profound and repeated injury with regeneration and activation of the endothelium in HIV-1 infection. Injury as well as activation of the endothelium impairs its normal regulatory properties. This could have consequences for the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier; it might influence the immunologically important interaction of the endothelium with T cells; and it might trigger Kaposi's sarcoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8952525

  9. HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells exhibit limited cross-reactivity during acute infection

    PubMed Central

    Du, Victor Y.; Bansal, Anju; Carlson, Jonathan; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; Josephs, Tracy M.; Heath, Sonya; Price, David A.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hunter, Eric; Goepfert, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells can cross-recognize variant epitopes. However, the majority of these studies were performed in the context of chronic infection, where the presence of viral quasispecies makes it difficult to ascertain the true nature of the original antigenic stimulus. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated the extent of CD8 T-cell cross-reactivity in patients with acute HIV-1 clade B infection. In each case, we determined the transmitted founder virus sequence to identify the autologous epitopes restricted by individual HLA class I molecules. Our data show that cross-reactive CD8 T cells are infrequent during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, in the uncommon instances where cross-reactive responses were detected, the variant epitopes were poorly recognized in cytotoxicity assays. Molecular analysis revealed that similar antigenic structures could be cross-recognized by identical CD8 T-cell clonotypes mobilized in vivo, yet even subtle differences in a single TCR-accessible peptide residue were sufficient to disrupt variant-specific reactivity. These findings demonstrate that CD8 T cells are highly specific for autologous epitopes during acute HIV-1 infection. Polyvalent vaccines may therefore be required to provide optimal immune cover against this genetically labile pathogen. PMID:26983786

  10. Importance of an Early HIV Antibody Differentiation Immunoassay for Detection of Dual Infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2

    PubMed Central

    Zbinden, Andrea; Dürig, Roland; Shah, Cyril; Böni, Jürg; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-2 is primarily endemic in West Africa and India, however, in time of global migration, a possible HIV-2 infection or co-infection with HIV-1 should be recognized right at the time of HIV diagnosis, in order to enable optimized antiretroviral treatment. Laboratory HIV testing consists of a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test and subsequent confirmation and type differentiation by a serological test formatted as a multi-line or multi-spot assay. CDC has proposed a revised alternative HIV diagnostic strategy which, in case of a reactive result in a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test, comprises an HIV-1 nucleic acid test (NAT) for HIV confirmation instead of an antibody differentiation immunoassay (ADI). Only a negative NAT must be further investigated by an ADI, thus saving expenses for ADI in most instances. We have investigated this alternative strategy with respect to its recognition of dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. Methods and Results Anonymized data of HIV notifications of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Switzerland between 2007 and 2014 were analysed retrospectively. In a total of 4'679 notifications, we found 35 HIV-2 infections, 9 (25.7%) of which were dually infected with HIV-1. In 7 of the 9 dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections, HIV-1 RNA testing at the time of HIV diagnosis was positive with concentrations from 102 to 94'300 copies/mL plasma. HIV-1 RNA data were not available for the other two cases. Conclusions The alternative CDC strategy would have missed the concomitant HIV-2 infection in at least 7, but probably even more, of the 9 dually infected patients, as the detectable HIV-1 RNA would have precluded a supplemental ADI. Early ADI is mandatory for diagnosis of dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection and guidance of appropriate therapy. PMID:27310138

  11. HIV-1 Transmission during Early Infection in Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Phylodynamic Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Volz, Erik M.; Ionides, Edward; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Brandt, Mary-Grace; Mokotoff, Eve; Koopman, James S.

    2013-12-10

    Conventional epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases is focused on characterization of incident infections and estimation of the number of prevalent infections. Advances in methods for the analysis of the population-level genetic variation of viruses can potentially provide information about donors, not just recipients, of infection. Genetic sequences from many viruses are increasingly abundant, especially HIV, which is routinely sequenced for surveillance of drug resistance mutations. In this study, we conducted a phylodynamic analysis of HIV genetic sequence data and surveillance data from a US population of men who have sex with men (MSM) and estimated incidence and transmission rates bymore » stage of infection.« less

  12. HIV-1 Transmission during Early Infection in Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Phylodynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Volz, Erik M.; Ionides, Edward; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Brandt, Mary-Grace; Mokotoff, Eve; Koopman, James S.

    2013-12-10

    Conventional epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases is focused on characterization of incident infections and estimation of the number of prevalent infections. Advances in methods for the analysis of the population-level genetic variation of viruses can potentially provide information about donors, not just recipients, of infection. Genetic sequences from many viruses are increasingly abundant, especially HIV, which is routinely sequenced for surveillance of drug resistance mutations. In this study, we conducted a phylodynamic analysis of HIV genetic sequence data and surveillance data from a US population of men who have sex with men (MSM) and estimated incidence and transmission rates by stage of infection.

  13. Differential Expression of CD163 on Monocyte Subsets in Healthy and HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tippett, Emma; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Westhorpe, Clare; Cameron, Paul U.; Brew, Bruce J.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Jaworowski, Anthony; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004), supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16− monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16− monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively), which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16− subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16− monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD163

  14. Phagosome Migration and Velocity Measured in Live Primary Human Macrophages Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Deschamps, Chantal; Dumas, Audrey; Niedergang, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells that play a major role at the crossroads between innate and specific immunity. They can be infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and because of their resistance to its cytopathic effects they can be considered to be persistent viral reservoirs. In addition, HIV-infected macrophages exhibit defective functions that contribute to the development of opportunistic diseases. The exact mechanism by which HIV-1 impairs the phagocytic response of macrophages was unknown. We had previously shown that the uptake of various particulate material by macrophages was inhibited when they were infected with HIV-1. This inhibition was only partial and phagosomes did form within HIV-infected macrophages. Therefore, we focused on analyzing the fate of these phagosomes. Phagosome maturation is accompanied by migration of these compartments towards the cell center, where they fuse with lysosomes, generating phagolysosomes, responsible for degradation of the ingested material. We used IgG-opsonized Sheep Red Blood Cells as a target for phagocytosis. To measure the speed of centripetal movement of phagosomes in individual HIV-infected macrophages, we used a combination of bright field and fluorescence confocal microscopy. We established a method to calculate the distance of phagosomes towards the nucleus, and then to calculate the velocity of the phagosomes. HIV-infected cells were identified thanks to a GFP-expressing virus, but the method is applicable to non-infected cells or any type of infection or treatment. PMID:27684087

  15. Oligomerization Requirements for MX2-Mediated Suppression of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Goujon, Caroline; Pollpeter, Darja; Betancor, Gilberto; Apolonia, Luis; Bergeron, Julien R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2/MXB) is an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and was recently identified as a late postentry suppressor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, inhibiting the nuclear accumulation of viral cDNAs. Although the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein is believed to be the viral determinant of MX2-mediated inhibition, the precise mechanism of antiviral action remains unclear. The MX family of dynamin-like GTPases also includes MX1/MXA, a well-studied inhibitor of a range of RNA and DNA viruses, including influenza A virus (FLUAV) and hepatitis B virus but not retroviruses. MX1 and MX2 are closely related and share similar domain architectures and structures. However, MX2 possesses an extended N terminus that is essential for antiviral function and confers anti-HIV-1 activity on MX1 [MX1(NMX2)]. Higher-order oligomerization is required for the antiviral activity of MX1 against FLUAV, with current models proposing that MX1 forms ring structures that constrict around viral nucleoprotein complexes. Here, we performed structure-function studies to investigate the requirements for oligomerization of both MX2 and chimeric MX1(NMX2) for the inhibition of HIV-1 infection. The oligomerization state of mutated proteins with amino acid substitutions at multiple putative oligomerization interfaces was assessed using a combination of covalent cross-linking and coimmunoprecipitation. We show that while monomeric MX2 and MX1(NMX2) mutants are not antiviral, higher-order oligomerization does not appear to be required for full antiviral activity of either protein. We propose that lower-order oligomerization of MX2 is sufficient for the effective inhibition of HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Interferon plays an important role in the control of virus replication during acute infection in vivo. Recently, cultured cell experiments identified human MX2 as a key effector in the interferon-mediated postentry block to HIV-1 infection. MX2 is a member of a family

  16. Sensing of HIV-1 Infection in Tzm-bl Cells with Reconstituted Expression of STING

    PubMed Central

    Trotard, Maud; Tsopoulidis, Nikolaos; Tibroni, Nadine; Willemsen, Joschka; Binder, Marco; Ruggieri, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Production of proinflammatory cytokines indicative of potent recognition by the host innate immune system has long been recognized as a hallmark of the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. The first components of the machinery by which primary HIV target cells sense infection have recently been described; however, the mechanistic dissection of innate immune recognition and viral evasion would be facilitated by an easily accessible cell line model. Here we describe that reconstituted expression of the innate signaling adaptor STING enhanced the ability of the well-established HIV reporter cell line Tzm-bl to sense HIV infection and to convert this information into nuclear translocation of IRF3 as well as expression of cytokine mRNA. STING-dependent immune sensing of HIV-1 required virus entry and reverse transcription but not genome integration. Particularly efficient recognition was observed for an HIV-1 variant lacking expression of the accessory protein Vpr, suggesting a role of the viral protein in circumventing STING-mediated immune signaling. Vpr as well as STING significantly impacted the magnitude and breadth of the cytokine mRNA expression profile induced upon HIV-1 infection. However, cytoplasmic DNA sensing did not result in detectable cytokine secretion in this cell system, and innate immune recognition did not affect infection rates. Despite these deficits in eliciting antiviral effector functions, these results establish Tzm-bl STING and Tzm-bl STING IRF3.GFP cells as useful tools for studies aimed at dissecting mechanisms and regulation of early innate immune recognition of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE Cell-autonomous immune recognition of HIV infection was recently established as an important aspect by which the host immune system attempts to fend off HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic studies on host cell recognition and viral evasion are hampered by the resistance of many primary HIV target cells to detailed experimental manipulation. We describe here

  17. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-31

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  18. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-01

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  19. Tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptides inhibit HIV-1 infection via coreceptor mimicry.

    PubMed

    Cimbro, Raffaello; Peterson, Francis C; Liu, Qingbo; Guzzo, Christina; Zhang, Peng; Miao, Huiyi; Van Ryk, Donald; Ambroggio, Xavier; Hurt, Darrell E; De Gioia, Luca; Volkman, Brian F; Dolan, Michael A; Lusso, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification that facilitates protein-protein interaction. Two sulfated tyrosines (Tys173 and Tys177) were recently identified within the second variable (V2) loop of the major HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and shown to contribute to stabilizing the intramolecular interaction between V2 and the third variable (V3) loop. Here, we report that tyrosine-sulfated peptides derived from V2 act as structural and functional mimics of the CCR5 N-terminus and potently block HIV-1 infection. Nuclear magnetic and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that a tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptide (pV2α-Tys) adopts a CCR5-like helical conformation and directly interacts with gp120 in a CD4-dependent fashion, competing with a CCR5 N-terminal peptide. Sulfated V2 mimics, but not their non-sulfated counterparts, inhibit HIV-1 entry and fusion by preventing coreceptor utilization, with the highly conserved C-terminal sulfotyrosine, Tys177, playing a dominant role. Unlike CCR5 N-terminal peptides, V2 mimics inhibit a broad range of HIV-1 strains irrespective of their coreceptor tropism, highlighting the overall structural conservation of the coreceptor-binding site in gp120. These results document the use of receptor mimicry by a retrovirus to occlude a key neutralization target site and provide leads for the design of therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. PMID:27389109

  20. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains. PMID:26996307

  1. Alterations in the gut microbiota associated with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lozupone, Catherine A; Li, Marcella; Campbell, Thomas B; Flores, Sonia C; Linderman, Derek; Gebert, Matthew J; Knight, Rob; Fontenot, Andrew P; Palmer, Brent E

    2013-09-11

    Understanding gut microbiota alterations associated with HIV infection and factors that drive these alterations may help explain gut-linked diseases prevalent with HIV. 16S rRNA sequencing of feces from HIV-infected individuals revealed that HIV infection is associated with highly characteristic gut community changes, and antiretroviral therapy does not consistently restore the microbiota to an HIV-negative state. Despite the chronic gut inflammation characteristic of HIV infection, the associated microbiota showed limited similarity with other inflammatory states and instead showed increased, rather than decreased, diversity. Meta-analysis revealed that the microbiota of HIV-infected individuals in the U.S. was most similar to a Prevotella-rich community composition typically observed in healthy individuals in agrarian cultures of Malawi and Venezuela and related to that of U.S. individuals with carbohydrate-rich, protein- and fat-poor diets. By evaluating innate and adaptive immune responses to lysates from bacteria that differ with HIV, we explore the functional drivers of these compositional differences. PMID:24034618

  2. HIV-1 Infection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells and Their Role in Trafficking and Viral Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Alexaki, Aikaterini; Wigdahl, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Patients with HIV-1 often present with a wide range of hematopoietic abnormalities, some of which may be due to the presence of opportunistic infections and to therapeutic drug treatments. However, many of these abnormalities are directly related to HIV-1 replication in the bone marrow (BM). Although the most primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are resistant to HIV-1 infection, once these cells begin to differentiate and become committed HPCs they become increasingly susceptible to HIV-1 infection and permissive to viral gene expression and infectious virus production. Trafficking of BM-derived HIV-1-infected monocytes has been shown to be involved in the dissemination of HIV-1 into the central nervous system (CNS), and it is possible that HIV-1 replication in the BM and infection of BM HPCs may be involved in the early steps leading to the development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) as an end result of this cellular trafficking process. In addition, the growth and development of HPCs in the BM of patients with HIV-1 has also been shown to be impaired due to the presence of HIV-1 proteins and changes in the cytokine milieu, potentially leading to an altered maturation process and to increased cell death within one or more BM cell lineages. Changes in the growth and differentiation process of HPCs may be involved in the generation of monocyte populations that are more susceptible and/or permissive to HIV-1, and have potentially altered trafficking profiles to several organs, including the CNS. A monocyte subpopulation with these features has been shown to expand during the course of HIV-1 disease, particularly in HAD patients, and is characterized by low CD14 expression and the presence of cell surface CD16. PMID:19112504

  3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  4. Relationship between Functional Profile of HIV-1 Specific CD8 T Cells and Epitope Variability with the Selection of Escape Mutants in Acute HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Nilu; Liu, Michael K. P.; Turnbull, Emma L.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Hawkins, Natalie; Self, Steve; Watson, Sydeaka; Betts, Michael R.; Gay, Cynthia; McGhee, Kara; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.; Gray, Clive M.; Borrow, Persephone; Roederer, Mario; McMichael, Andrew J.; Weinhold, Kent J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the functional profile of CD8+ T-cell responses directed against autologous transmitted/founder HIV-1 isolates during acute and early infection, and examined whether multifunctionality is required for selection of virus escape mutations. Seven anti-retroviral therapy-naïve subjects were studied in detail between 1 and 87 weeks following onset of symptoms of acute HIV-1 infection. Synthetic peptides representing the autologous transmitted/founder HIV-1 sequences were used in multiparameter flow cytometry assays to determine the functionality of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T memory cells. In all seven patients, the earliest T cell responses were predominantly oligofunctional, although the relative contribution of multifunctional cell responses increased significantly with time from infection. Interestingly, only the magnitude of the total and not of the poly-functional T-cell responses was significantly associated with the selection of escape mutants. However, the high contribution of MIP-1β-producing CD8+ T-cells to the total response suggests that mechanisms not limited to cytotoxicity could be exerting immune pressure during acute infection. Lastly, we show that epitope entropy, reflecting the capacity of the epitope to tolerate mutational change and defined as the diversity of epitope sequences at the population level, was also correlated with rate of emergence of escape mutants. PMID:21347345

  5. HIV Drug-resistant Strains as Epidemiologic Sentinels

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Robert M.; Porco, Travis C.; Getz, Wayne M.

    2006-01-01

    Observed declines in drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors among persons recently infected with HIV-1 in monitored subpopulations can be interpreted as a positive sign and lead public health officials to decrease efforts towards HIV prevention. By means of a mathematical model, we identified 3 processes that can account for the observed decline: increase in high-risk behavior, decrease in proportion of acutely infected persons whose conditions are treated, and change in treatment efficacy. These processes, singly or in combination, can lead to increases or decreases in disease and drug-resistance prevalence in the general population. We discuss the most appropriate public health response under each scenario and emphasize how further data collection and analyses are required to more reliably evaluate the observed time trends and the relative importance of forces shaping the epidemic. Our study highlights how drug resistance markers can be used as epidemiologic sentinels to devise public health solutions. PMID:16494741

  6. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2012-04-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with specific pharmacological agents. To date, an arsenal of 24 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs are available for treatment of HIV-1 infections. These drugs are distributed into six distinct classes based on their molecular mechanism and resistance profiles: (1) nucleoside-analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), (2) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), (3) integrase inhibitors, (4) protease inhibitors (PIs), (5) fusion inhibitors, and (6) coreceptor antagonists. In this article, we will review the basic principles of antiretroviral drug therapy, the mode of drug action, and the factors leading to treatment failure (i.e., drug resistance).

  7. Drug resistance among newly-diagnosed HIV-infected children in the era of more efficacious antiretroviral prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Hunt, Gillian; Technau, Karl-Günter; Coovadia, Ashraf; Ledwaba, Johanna; Pickerill, Sam; Penazzato, Martina; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Mellins, Claude A.; Black, Vivian; Morris, Lynn; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the era of more efficacious prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens, documenting the profile of drug resistance in HIV-infected infants and young children is critical to our efforts to improve care and treatment for children. Methods HIV drug resistance mutations in plasma virus were ascertained using population sequencing among 230 newly-diagnosed HIV-infected children under 2 years of age recruited in Johannesburg, South Africa, during 2011. By this time, more effective PMTCT regimens, including combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for pregnant women, were being implemented. Results Two-thirds (67.4%) of HIV-infected children had been exposed to some form of maternal (89%) and/or infant (97%) PMTCT. Among PMTCT-exposed, 56.8% had non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), 14.8% nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), and 1.3% protease inhibitor (PI) mutations. NNRTI mutations were strongly related to younger age. The remaining third (32.6%) had no reported or recorded PMTCT exposures but resistance to NNRTI was detected in 24.0%, NRTI in 10.7% and PI in 1.3%. Conclusion The new PMTCT strategies dramatically reduce the number of children who acquire infection but among those who do become infected, NNRTI resistance prevalence is high. In this South African setting with high PMTCT coverage, almost a quarter of children with no reported or recorded PMTCT also have drug resistance mutations. PMTCT history is an inadequate means of ruling out pre-treatment drug resistance. Our results support the use of PI-based first-line regimens in HIV-infected infants and young children regardless of PMTCT history. PMID:24785949

  8. Linkages between HIV-1 specificity for CCR5 or CXCR4 and in vitro usage of alternative coreceptors during progressive HIV-1 subtype C infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C (C-HIV) is spreading rapidly and is now responsible for >50% of HIV-1 infections worldwide, and >95% of infections in southern Africa and central Asia. These regions are burdened with the overwhelming majority of HIV-1 infections, yet we know very little about the pathogenesis of C-HIV. In addition to CCR5 and CXCR4, the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) may engage a variety of alternative coreceptors for entry into transfected cells. Whilst alternative coreceptors do not appear to have a broad role in mediating the entry of HIV-1 into primary cells, characterizing patterns of alternative coreceptor usage in vitro can provide valuable insights into mechanisms of Env-coreceptor engagement that may be important for HIV-1 pathogenesis. Results Here, we characterized the ability of luciferase reporter viruses pseudotyped with HIV-1 Envs (n = 300) cloned sequentially from plasma of 21 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve subjects experiencing progression from chronic to advanced C-HIV infection over an approximately 3-year period, who either exclusively maintained CCR5-using (R5) variants (n = 20 subjects) or who experienced a coreceptor switch to CXCR4-using (X4) variants (n = 1 subject), to utilize alternative coreceptors for entry. At a population level, CCR5 usage by R5 C-HIV Envs was strongly linked to usage of FPRL1, CCR3 and CCR8 as alternative coreceptors, with the linkages to FPRL1 and CCR3 usage becoming statistically more robust as infection progressed from chronic to advanced stages of disease. In contrast, acquisition of an X4 Env phenotype at advanced infection was accompanied by a dramatic loss of FPRL1 usage. Env mutagenesis studies confirmed a direct link between CCR5 and FPRL1 usage, and showed that the V3 loop crown, but not other V3 determinants of CCR5-specificity, was the principal Env determinant governing the ability of R5 C-HIV Envs from one particular subject to engage

  9. Rethinking the Heterosexual Infectivity of HIV-1: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Kimberly A.; Poole, Charles; Pettifor, Audrey E.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies of cumulative HIV incidence suggest that co-factors such as genital ulcer disease (GUD), HIV disease stage, and circumcision influence HIV transmission; however, the heterosexual infectivity of HIV-1 is commonly cited as a fixed value (∼0·001, or 1 transmission per thousand contacts). We sought to estimate transmission co-factor effects on the heterosexual infectivity of HIV-1 and to quantify the extent to which study methods have affected infectivity estimates. Methods We conducted a systematic search (through April 2008) of PubMed, Web of Science, and relevant bibliographies to identify articles estimating the heterosexual infectivity of HIV-1. We used meta-regression and stratified random-effects meta-analysis to assess differences in infectivity by co-factors and study methods. Findings Infectivity estimates were extremely heterogeneous, ranging from zero transmissions after more than 100 penile-vaginal contacts in some sero-discordant couples to one transmission for every 3·1 episodes of heterosexual anal intercourse. Estimates were only weakly associated with study methods. Infectivity differences (95% confidence intervals), expressed as number of transmissions per 1000 contacts, were 8 (0-16) comparing uncircumcised to circumcised male susceptibles, 6 (3-9) comparing susceptible individuals with and without GUD, 2 (1-3) comparing late-stage to mid-stage index cases, and 3 (0-5) comparing early-stage to mid-stage index cases. Interpretation A single value for the heterosexual infectivity of HIV-1 fails to reflect the variation associated with important co-factors. The commonly cited value of ∼0·001 was estimated among stable couples with low prevalences of high-risk co-factors, and represents a lower bound. Co-factor effects are important to include in epidemic models, policy considerations, and prevention messages. PMID:18684670

  10. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I; Majetschak, Matthias; Hope, Thomas J; Campbell, Edward M

    2016-06-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection.

  11. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I; Majetschak, Matthias; Hope, Thomas J; Campbell, Edward M

    2016-06-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection. PMID:27327622

  12. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I.; Majetschak, Matthias; Campbell, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection. PMID:27327622

  13. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Dong, Z; Hecht, DK; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; Wilson, CC

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T cell activation, inflammation and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1 infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared to uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1 infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation and blood T cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  14. Association of cervical SIL and HIV-1 infection among Zimbabwean women in an HIV/STI prevention study.

    PubMed

    Chirenje, Z M; Loeb, L; Mwale, M; Nyamapfeni, P; Kamba, M; Padian, N

    2002-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on women attending family planning clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe to determine the prevalence of cervical neoplasia among HIV-1 positive women relative to an HIV-1 negative control group. Five hundred and fifty four women were recruited and the prevalence of HIV-1 was 36.8%. Cervical cytology was abnormal in 25.6% of HIV-infected women compared to only 6.7% HIV-1 seronegative women. Cervical neoplasia was significantly associated with HIV infection (chi(2)=42.4, P<0.001). Cellular changes typical of HPV infection (koilocytocis) were recorded in 6.4% of HIV infected women compared with 1.7% of HIV-1-uninfected women (chi(2)=8.43, P=0.004). HIV-1-positive women had twice the risk of having abnormal cervical cells than HIV-negative women (relative risk 2.47, odds ratio 10.14, P<0.001). Therefore the introduction of national cervical screening programme in HIV-1 endemic countries like Zimbabwe where the highest burden of pre-malignant lesions is among HIV-1-infected women needs careful planning because these women have other competing health needs including high rates of opportunistic infections. PMID:12437897

  15. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein blocks HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stantchev, Tzanko S; Markovic, Ingrid; Telford, William G; Clouse, Kathleen A; Broder, Christopher C

    2007-02-01

    Binding of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) to its cellular receptors elicits a variety of signaling events, including the activation of select tyrosine kinases. To evaluate the potential role of such signaling, we examined the effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, on HIV-1 entry and infection of human macrophages using a variety of assays. Without altering cell viability, cell surface expression of CD4 and CCR5 or their abilities to interact with Env, genistein inhibited infection of macrophages by reporter gene-encoding, beta-lactamase containing, or wild type virions, as well as Env-mediated cell-fusion. The observation that genistein blocked virus infection if applied before, during or immediately after the infection period, but not 24h later; coupled with a more pronounced inhibition of infection in the reporter gene assays as compared to both beta-lactamase and p24 particle entry assays, imply that genistein exerts its inhibitory effects on both entry and early post-entry steps. These findings suggest that other exploitable targets, or steps, of the HIV-1 infection process may exist and could serve as additional opportunities for the development of new therapeutics.

  16. Quantification of infectious HIV-1 plasma viral load using a boosted in vitro infection protocol.

    PubMed

    Rusert, Peter; Fischer, Marek; Joos, Beda; Leemann, Christine; Kuster, Herbert; Flepp, Markus; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra

    2004-08-15

    Methods currently used for HIV-1 viral load measurements are very sensitive, but cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious particles. Here we describe the development of a novel, sensitive, and highly reproducible method that allows rapid isolation and quantification of infectious particles from patient plasma. By immobilizing HIV-1 particles in human plasma to platelets using polybrene, we observed a 10- to 1000-fold increase in infectivity over infection protocols using free virus particles. Using this method, we evaluated infectivity in plasma from 52 patients at various disease stages. At plasma viral loads of 1000-10000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml 18%, at 10,000-50,000 copies/ml 73%, at 50,000-100,000 copies/ml 90%, and above 100,000 copies 96% of cultures were positive. We found that infectious titers among patients vary distinctively but are characteristic for a patient over extended time periods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that by evaluating infectious titers in conjunction with total HIV RNA loads, subtle effects of treatment intervention on viremia levels can be detected. The immobilization procedure does not interfere with viral entry and does not restore the infectivity of neutralized virus. Therefore, this assay system can be utilized to investigate the influence of substances that specifically affect virion infectivity such as neutralizing antibodies, soluble CD4, or protease inhibitors. Measuring viral infectivity may thereby function as an additional, useful marker in monitoring disease progression and evaluating efficacy of antivirals in vivo.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Integration: a Potential Target for Microbicides To Prevent Cell-Free or Cell-Associated HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas-Aranda, Katty; Van Herrewege, Yven; Hazuda, Daria; Lewi, Paul; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto; Cara, Andrea; Vanham, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Conceptually, blocking human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration is the last possibility for preventing irreversible cellular infection. Using cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells, which represent primary targets in sexual transmission, we demonstrated that blocking integration with integrase strand transfer inhibitors (InSTIs), particularly L-870812, could consistently block cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection. In a pretreatment setting in which the compound was present before and during infection and was afterwards gradually diluted during the culture period, the naphthyridine carboxamide L-870812 blocked infection with the cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 Ba-L strain at concentrations of, respectively, 1,000 and 10,000 nM. The potency of L-870812 was similar to that of the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor R-9-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl) adenine (PMPA) but one or two orders of magnitude lower than those of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC781 and TMC120. In contrast, the diketo acid RDS derivative InSTIs showed clear-cut but weaker antiviral activity than L-870812. Moreover, L-870812 completely blocked subtype C and CRFO2_AG primary isolates, which are prevalent in the African heterosexual epidemic. Furthermore, the addition of micromolar concentrations of L-870812 even 24 h after infection could still block both cell-free and cell-associated Ba-L, opening the prospect of postexposure prophylaxis. Finally, an evaluation of the combined activity of L-870812 with either T20, zidovudine, PMPA, UC781, or TMC120 against replication-deficient HIV-1 Ba-L (env) pseudovirus suggested synergistic activity for all combinations. Importantly, compounds selected for the study by using the coculture model were devoid of acute or delayed cytotoxic effects at HIV-blocking concentrations. Therefore, these findings provide evidence supporting consideration of HIV-1 integration as a target for

  18. Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Antiretroviral-Naive Patients with Established HIV Type 1 Infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and Review of the Latin American and Caribbean Literature

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barbara S.; Rojas Fermín, Rita A.; Reyes, Emily Virginia; Vaughan, Catherine; José, Lina; Javier, Carmen; Franco Estévez, Ramona; Donastorg Cabral, Yeycy; Batista, Arelis; Lie, Yolanda; Coakley, Eoin; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Emergence of HIV resistance is a concerning consequence of global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To date, there is no published information about HIV resistance from the Dominican Republic. The study's aim was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors in a sample of chronically HIV-1-infected patients in one clinic in Santo Domingo. The data are presented in the context of a review of the TDR literature from Latin America and the Caribbean. Genotype testing was successfully performed on 103 treatment-naive adults planning to initiate antiretroviral therapy; the World Health Organization (WHO) list of surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) was used to determine the presence of TDR mutations. WHO SDRM were identified in eight patients (7.8%); none had received sdNVP. There were no significant differences in epidemiologic or clinical variables between those with or without WHO SDRM. The prevalence of WHO SDRM was 1.0% and 6.8% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, respectively. No WHO SDRMs for protease inhibitors were identified. Among 12 studies of TDR in the region with a sample size of at least 100 subjects, the reported prevalence of SDRM ranged from 2.8% to 8.1%. The most commonly identified SDRM was K103N. This information adds to our understanding of the epidemiology of TDR in the region and the possible role such mutations could play in undermining first-line treatment. Ongoing surveillance is clearly needed to better understand the TDR phenomenon in the Caribbean. PMID:21851324

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin inhibits de novo HIV-1 infections.

    PubMed

    Jønsson, Kasper L; Tolstrup, Martin; Vad-Nielsen, Johan; Kjær, Kathrine; Laustsen, Anders; Andersen, Morten N; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Søgaard, Ole S; Østergaard, Lars; Denton, Paul W; Jakobsen, Martin R

    2015-07-01

    Adjunct therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin increases plasma viremia in HIV patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, a potential concern is that reversing HIV latency with an HDACi may reactivate the virus in anatomical compartments with suboptimal cART concentrations, leading to de novo infection of susceptible cells in these sites. We tested physiologically relevant romidepsin concentrations known to reactivate latent HIV in order to definitively address this concern. We found that romidepsin significantly inhibited HIV infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4(+) T cells but not in monocyte-derived macrophages. In addition, romidepsin impaired HIV spreading in CD4(+) T cell cultures. When we evaluated the impact of romidepsin on quantitative viral outgrowth assays with primary resting CD4(+) T cells, we found that resting CD4(+) T cells exposed to romidepsin exhibited reduced proliferation and viability. This significantly lowered assay sensitivity when measuring the efficacy of romidepsin as an HIV latency reversal agent. Altogether, our data indicate that romidepsin-based HIV eradication strategies are unlikely to reseed a latent T cell reservoir, even under suboptimal cART conditions, because romidepsin profoundly restricts de novo HIV infections.

  20. The phosphorylation of HIV-1 Gag by atypical protein kinase C facilitates viral infectivity by promoting Vpr incorporation into virions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is the main structural protein that mediates the assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) from an infected cell membrane. The Gag C-terminal p6 domain contains short sequence motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. Gag p6 has also been found to be phosphorylated during HIV-1 infection and this event may affect virus replication. However, the kinase that directs the phosphorylation of Gag p6 toward virus replication remains to be identified. In our present study, we identified this kinase using a proteomic approach and further delineate its role in HIV-1 replication. Results A proteomic approach was designed to systematically identify human protein kinases that potently interact with HIV-1 Gag and successfully identified 22 candidates. Among this panel, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) was found to phosphorylate HIV-1 Gag p6. Subsequent LC-MS/MS and immunoblotting analysis with a phospho-specific antibody confirmed both in vitro and in vivo that aPKC phosphorylates HIV-1 Gag at Ser487. Computer-assisted structural modeling and a subsequent cell-based assay revealed that this phosphorylation event is necessary for the interaction between Gag and Vpr and results in the incorporation of Vpr into virions. Moreover, the inhibition of aPKC activity reduced the Vpr levels in virions and impaired HIV-1 infectivity of human primary macrophages. Conclusion Our current results indicate for the first time that HIV-1 Gag phosphorylation on Ser487 is mediated by aPKC and that this kinase may regulate the incorporation of Vpr into HIV-1 virions and thereby supports virus infectivity. Furthermore, aPKC inhibition efficiently suppresses HIV-1 infectivity in macrophages. aPKC may therefore be an intriguing therapeutic target for HIV-1 infection. PMID:24447338

  1. Reconciling Longitudinal Naive T-Cell and TREC Dynamics during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mugwagwa, Tendai; de Boer, Anne Bregje; Otto, Sigrid A.; Hazenberg, Mette D.; Tesselaar, Kiki; de Boer, Rob J.; Borghans, José A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Naive T cells in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals have a reduced T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) content. Previous mathematical models have suggested that this is due to increased naive T-cell division. It remains unclear, however, how reduced naive TREC contents can be reconciled with a gradual loss of naive T cells in HIV-1 infection. We performed longitudinal analyses in humans before and after HIV-1 seroconversion, and used a mathematical model to investigate which processes could explain the observed changes in naive T-cell numbers and TRECs during untreated HIV-1 disease progression. Both CD4+ and CD8+ naive T-cell TREC contents declined biphasically, with a rapid loss during the first year and a much slower loss during the chronic phase of infection. While naive CD8+ T-cell numbers hardly changed during follow-up, naive CD4+ T-cell counts continually declined. We show that a fine balance between increased T-cell division and loss in the peripheral naive T-cell pool can explain the observed short- and long-term changes in TRECs and naive T-cell numbers, especially if T-cell turnover during the acute phase is more increased than during the chronic phase of infection. Loss of thymic output, on the other hand, does not help to explain the biphasic loss of TRECs in HIV infection. The observed longitudinal changes in TRECs and naive T-cell numbers in HIV-infected individuals are most likely explained by a tight balance between increased T-cell division and death, suggesting that these changes are intrinsically linked in HIV infection. PMID:27010200

  2. Nonhuman TRIM5 Variants Enhance Recognition of HIV-1-Infected Cells by CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Moyano, Esther; Ruiz, Alba; Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Rodriguez-Plata, Maria T.; Peña, Ruth; Blondeau, Caroline; Selwood, David L.; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Moris, Arnaud; Clotet, Bonaventura; Goulder, Philip; Towers, Greg J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5) restricts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a species-specific manner by uncoating viral particles while activating early innate responses. Although the contribution of TRIM5 proteins to cellular immunity has not yet been studied, their interactions with the incoming viral capsid and the cellular proteasome led us to hypothesize a role for them. Here, we investigate whether the expression of two nonhuman TRIM5 orthologs, rhesus TRIM5α (RhT5) and TRIM-cyclophilin A (TCyp), both of which are potent restrictors of HIV-1, could enhance immune recognition of infected cells by CD8+ T cells. We illustrate how TRIM5 restriction improves CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. Moreover, when TRIM5 activity was blocked by the nonimmunosuppressive analog of cyclosporine (CsA), sarcosine-3(4-methylbenzoate)–CsA (SmBz-CsA), we found a significant reduction in CD107a/MIP-1β expression in HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. This finding underscores the direct link between TRIM5 restriction and activation of CD8+ T-cell responses. Interestingly, cells expressing RhT5 induced stronger CD8+ T-cell responses through the specific recognition of the HIV-1 capsid by the immune system. The underlying mechanism of this process may involve TRIM5-specific capsid recruitment to cellular proteasomes and increase peptide availability for loading and presentation of HLA class I antigens. In summary, we identified a novel function for nonhuman TRIM5 variants in cellular immunity. We hypothesize that TRIM5 can couple innate viral sensing and CD8+ T-cell activation to increase species barriers against retrovirus infection. IMPORTANCE New therapeutics to tackle HIV-1 infection should aim to combine rapid innate viral sensing and cellular immune recognition. Such strategies could prevent seeding of the viral reservoir and the immune damage that occurs during acute infection. The nonhuman TRIM5 variants, rhesus TRIM5α (RhT5) and TRIM

  3. The prevalence of HSV-2 infection in HIV-1 discordant couples.

    PubMed

    Duan, S; Ding, Y; Wu, Z; Rou, K; Yang, Y; Wang, J; Gao, M; Ye, R; Xiang, L; He, N

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of HSV-2 discordance and concordance in HIV-1-discordant couples. This study used the baseline data from a cohort study of HIV-1-discordant couples in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province, China. Of 954 participating couples, 42·4% were affected by HSV-2, of which 20·4% were HSV-2-concordant positive, 7·6% were HSV-2-discordant where the male was HSV-2 positive, and 14·4% were HSV-2 discordant where the female was HSV-2 positive. Compared to HSV-2-negative concordance, HSV-2 discordance with an HSV-2-positive male spouse was significantly associated with characteristics of the male spouse, including Han ethnicity and being in a second marriage. HSV-2 discordance with an HSV-2-positive female spouse was significantly associated with characteristics of the female spouse, including Han ethnicity, having engaged in commercial sex, having a sexual relationship of <3 years and being HIV-1 infected. Compared to HSV-2 discordance, HSV-2-positive concordance was significantly associated with an education level of middle school or higher for both spouses, a sexual relationship of ⩾3 years, more frequent sex and having an HIV-1-infected male spouse. The findings highlight the need for HSV-2 prevention and treatment efforts to reduce HSV-2 transmission in this population, and emphasize the importance of implementing prevention interventions early in couples' relationships.

  4. Testing for HIV-1 infection in a public developmental center.

    PubMed

    Blair, CaraLee R; Gill, Chandler E; Taylor, Henry M; McGowan, Catherine C; Charles, P David

    2009-09-01

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection in an individual who recently moved from a developmental center prompted the center to offer HIV testing to current and former residents. The guardians of 199 (93 percent) of the Center's current residents consented to testing. The remaining 14 current residents (seven percent) were not tested because informed consent for testing was not received. Consent for testing of 41 former residents was also obtained. All people who underwent testing were seronegative. Whether former residents who were not included in the present analysis received testing from other sources is not known. PMID:19791542

  5. Testing for HIV-1 infection in a public developmental center.

    PubMed

    Blair, CaraLee R; Gill, Chandler E; Taylor, Henry M; McGowan, Catherine C; Charles, P David

    2009-09-01

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection in an individual who recently moved from a developmental center prompted the center to offer HIV testing to current and former residents. The guardians of 199 (93 percent) of the Center's current residents consented to testing. The remaining 14 current residents (seven percent) were not tested because informed consent for testing was not received. Consent for testing of 41 former residents was also obtained. All people who underwent testing were seronegative. Whether former residents who were not included in the present analysis received testing from other sources is not known.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Infection in HIV-1 Infected Women in Catalonia (Spain): Implications for Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stuardo, Valeria; Agustí, Cristina; Godinez, José Manuel; Montoliu, Alexandra; Torné, Aureli; Tarrats, Antoni; Alcalde, Carmen; Martín, Dolores; Fernández-Montoli, Eulalia; Vanrell, Cristina; Solé, Josefa; Canet, Yolanda; Marqueta, José Manuel; Mohamed, Jadiyettu; Cuenca, Isabel; Lonca, Montserrat; Sirera, Guillem; Ferrer, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Lloveras, Belen; Miro, Josep María; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Casabona, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background High-risk human Papillomavirus infection is a necessary factor for cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and invasive cervical cancer. In HIV-1-infected women, HPV infection is more prevalent and a higher risk of cervical cancer has been identified. We aimed to calculate the prevalence of infection by HR-HPV, determine the factors associated with this infection and abnormal cytology findings and to describe the history of cervical cancer screening in HIV-1-infected women. Methods We enrolled 479 HIV-1infected women from the PISCIS cohort. Each patient underwent a gynecological check-up, PAP smear, HPV AND Hybrid capture, HPV genotyping, and colposcopy and biopsy, if necessary. We applied questionnaires to obtain information on sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and cervical screening variables. We present a cross-sectional analysis. Results Median age was 42 years. The prevalence of HR-HPV infection was 33.2% and that of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) was 3.8%. The most common genotypes were 16(23%), 53(20.3%), and 52(16.2%). The factor associated with HR-HPV infection was age <30 years (odds ratio[OR],2.5; 95%confidence interval[CI],1.1–5.6). The factors associated with the presence of HSIL or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were CD4T-lymphocyte count <200cells/mm3 versus >500cells/mm3 (OR,8.4; 95%CI,3.7–19.2), HIV-1 viral load >10,000copies/mL versus <400copies/mL (OR,2.1; 95%CI,1.0–4.4), and use of oral contraceptives (OR,2.0; 95%CI,1.0–3.9). Sixty percent of HIV-1infected women had had one Pap smear within the last 2 years. Conclusions The high prevalence of HPV infection and cervical lesions in the HIV-1infected population in Catalonia, as well as the low coverage and frequency of screening in this group, means that better preventive efforts are necessary and should include vaccination against HPV, better accessibility to screening programs, training of health care professionals, and

  7. Cellular HIV type 1 DNA levels are equivalent among drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral naive patients.

    PubMed

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Hezka, Johana; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Mamais, Ioannis; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of resistance against current antiretroviral drugs to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an increasingly important concern to the continuous success of antiretroviral therapy to HIV-1-infected patients. In the past decade, a number of studies reported that the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed patients has reached an overall 9% prevalence worldwide. Also, a number of studies using longitudinal HIV-1 patient study cohorts demonstrated that the cellular HIV-1 DNA level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has a prognostic value for the progression of HIV-1 disease independently of plasma HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 count. Using a previously established molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR methodology, cellular HIV-1 DNA levels were quantified in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral-naive patients in Northern Greece recruited between 2009 and 2010 using a predefined enrolling strategy, in an effort to investigate whether there is any relationship between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. As part of the same study, DNA sequences encoding the env (C2-C5 region of gp120) were also amplified from PBMC-extracted DNA in order to determine the genotypic coreceptor tropism and genetic subtype. Cellular HIV-1 DNA levels had a median of 3.309 log10 HIV-1 copies per 10(6) PBMCs and demonstrated no correlation between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. An absence of association between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels with plasma viral HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 levels was also found reconfirming the previously published study. Genotypic analysis of coreceptor tropism indicated that 96% of samples, independently of the presence or not of genotypic drug resistance, were CCR5-tropic. Overall, the findings reconfirmed the previously proposed proposition that transmitted drug resistance does not have an impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. Also, CCR5

  8. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  9. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs. PMID:24517971

  10. Reactive arthritis responding to antiretroviral therapy in an HIV-1-infected individual.

    PubMed

    Scott, C; Brand, A; Natha, M

    2012-05-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an autoimmune seronegative spondyloarthropathy that occurs in response to a urogenital or enteric infection. Several studies have reported a link between ReA and HIV infection. We report a case of an HIV-1-infected patient diagnosed with a disabling ReA who failed to respond to conventional therapy but whose symptoms resolved rapidly after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART). Clinicians may not be cognizant to this phenomenon and so this case report serves to remind clinicians that initiation of antiretroviral therapy should be considered in HIV-infected patients with ReA who are refractory to standard therapy.

  11. Vpr Enhances Tumor Necrosis Factor Production by HIV-1-Infected T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Richard, Léa; Rua, Réjane; Porrot, Françoise; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr displays different activities potentially impacting viral replication, including the arrest of the cell cycle in the G2 phase and the stimulation of apoptosis and DNA damage response pathways. Vpr also modulates cytokine production by infected cells, but this property remains partly characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of Vpr on the production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We report that Vpr significantly increases TNF secretion by infected lymphocytes. De novo production of Vpr is required for this effect. Vpr mutants known to be defective for G2 cell cycle arrest induce lower levels of TNF secretion, suggesting a link between these two functions. Silencing experiments and the use of chemical inhibitors further implicated the cellular proteins DDB1 and TAK1 in this activity of Vpr. TNF secreted by HIV-1-infected cells triggers NF-κB activity in bystander cells and allows viral reactivation in a model of latently infected cells. Thus, the stimulation of the proinflammatory pathway by Vpr may impact HIV-1 replication in vivo. IMPORTANCE The role of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr remains only partially characterized. This protein is important for viral pathogenesis in infected individuals but is dispensable for viral replication in most cell culture systems. Some of the functions described for Vpr remain controversial. In particular, it remains unclear whether Vpr promotes or instead prevents proinflammatory and antiviral immune responses. In this report, we show that Vpr promotes the release of TNF, a proinflammatory cytokine associated with rapid disease progression. Using Vpr mutants or inhibiting selected cellular genes, we show that the cellular proteins DDB1 and TAK1 are involved in the release of TNF by HIV-infected cells. This report provides novel insights into how Vpr manipulates TNF production and helps clarify the role of Vpr in innate immune responses and inflammation

  12. Cross-reactive lysis of human targets infected with prototypic and clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains by murine anti-HIV-1 IIIB env-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chada, S; DeJesus, C E; Townsend, K; Lee, W T; Laube, L; Jolly, D J; Chang, S M; Warner, J F

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of murine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB env cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to recognize and lyse HIV-1-infected cells, we have constructed a human cell line (Hu/Dd) expressing both the CD4 receptor and the murine H-2Dd major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I protein. This cell line can be productively infected with HIV-1 and can also function as a target for murine CD8+, class I MHC-restricted CTL directed against the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 IIIB. The ability of BALB/c anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL to specifically recognize and lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with divergent HIV-1 strains was tested by using both prototypic and clinical HIV-1 strains. CTL generated by immunization of mice with syngeneic cells expressing either the native or V3 loop-deleted (delta V3) envelope glycoprotein from HIV-1 IIIB were able to recognize and specifically lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with the HIV-1 prototypic isolates IIIB, MN, WMJ II, SF2, and CC as well as several HIV-1 clinical isolates. These results demonstrate that CTL determinants for HIV-1 env exist outside the hypervariable V3 region, anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL appear to recognize common determinants on diverse HIV-1 strains, and classification of HIV-1 strains based on neutralizing antibody reactivities does not appear to correspond to CTL recognition and lysis. The results sugge