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Sample records for drug-target interaction networks

  1. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanghe; Wang, Qi; Wang, Tengjiao

    2017-01-01

    The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target's homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper.

  2. Some Remarks on Prediction of Drug-Target Interaction with Network Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Yan, Xiao-Ying

    2017-01-01

    System-level understanding of the relationships between drugs and targets is very important for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. The experimental methods used to determine drug-target interactions are usually time-consuming, tedious and expensive, and sometimes lack reproducibility. Thus, it is highly desired to develop computational methods for efficiently and effectively analyzing and detecting new drug-target interaction pairs. With the explosive growth of different types of omics data, such as genome, pharmacology, phenotypic, and other kinds of molecular networks, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict Drug-Target Interactions (DTI). In this review, we make a survey on the recent advances in predicting drug-target interaction with network-based models from the following aspects: i) Available public data sources and benchmark datasets; ii) Drug/target similarity metrics; iii) Network construction; iv) Common network algorithms; v) Performance comparison of existing network-based DTI predictors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

    2016-02-01

    The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions.

  4. Using compound similarity and functional domain composition for prediction of drug-target interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; He, Zhi-Song; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2010-11-01

    Study of interactions between drugs and target proteins is an essential step in genomic drug discovery. It is very hard to determine the compound-protein interactions or drug-target interactions by experiment alone. As supplementary, effective prediction model using machine learning or data mining methods can provide much help. In this study, a prediction method based on Nearest Neighbor Algorithm and a novel metric, which was obtained by combining compound similarity and functional domain composition, was proposed. The target proteins were divided into the following groups: enzymes, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors. As a result, four predictors with the optimal parameters were established. The overall prediction accuracies, evaluated by jackknife cross-validation test, for four groups of target proteins are 90.23%, 94.74%, 97.80%, and 97.51%, respectively, indicating that compound similarity and functional domain composition are very effective to predict drug-target interaction networks.

  5. DINIES: drug-target interaction network inference engine based on supervised analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Kotera, Masaaki; Moriya, Yuki; Sawada, Ryusuke; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2014-07-01

    DINIES (drug-target interaction network inference engine based on supervised analysis) is a web server for predicting unknown drug-target interaction networks from various types of biological data (e.g. chemical structures, drug side effects, amino acid sequences and protein domains) in the framework of supervised network inference. The originality of DINIES lies in prediction with state-of-the-art machine learning methods, in the integration of heterogeneous biological data and in compatibility with the KEGG database. The DINIES server accepts any 'profiles' or precalculated similarity matrices (or 'kernels') of drugs and target proteins in tab-delimited file format. When a training data set is submitted to learn a predictive model, users can select either known interaction information in the KEGG DRUG database or their own interaction data. The user can also select an algorithm for supervised network inference, select various parameters in the method and specify weights for heterogeneous data integration. The server can provide integrative analyses with useful components in KEGG, such as biological pathways, functional hierarchy and human diseases. DINIES (http://www.genome.jp/tools/dinies/) is publicly available as one of the genome analysis tools in GenomeNet.

  6. Predicting drug-target interactions by dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ming; Bryant, Stephen H.; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization (DNILMF) algorithm to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). The prediction procedure consists of four steps: (1) inferring new drug/target profiles and constructing profile kernel matrix; (2) diffusing drug profile kernel matrix with drug structure kernel matrix; (3) diffusing target profile kernel matrix with target sequence kernel matrix; and (4) building DNILMF model and smoothing new drug/target predictions based on their neighbors. We compare our algorithm with the state-of-the-art method based on the benchmark dataset. Results indicate that the DNILMF algorithm outperforms the previously reported approaches in terms of AUPR (area under precision-recall curve) and AUC (area under curve of receiver operating characteristic) based on the 5 trials of 10-fold cross-validation. We conclude that the performance improvement depends on not only the proposed objective function, but also the used nonlinear diffusion technique which is important but under studied in the DTI prediction field. In addition, we also compile a new DTI dataset for increasing the diversity of currently available benchmark datasets. The top prediction results for the new dataset are confirmed by experimental studies or supported by other computational research. PMID:28079135

  7. Predicting drug-target interactions by dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming; Bryant, Stephen H.; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dual-network integrated logistic matrix factorization (DNILMF) algorithm to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). The prediction procedure consists of four steps: (1) inferring new drug/target profiles and constructing profile kernel matrix; (2) diffusing drug profile kernel matrix with drug structure kernel matrix; (3) diffusing target profile kernel matrix with target sequence kernel matrix; and (4) building DNILMF model and smoothing new drug/target predictions based on their neighbors. We compare our algorithm with the state-of-the-art method based on the benchmark dataset. Results indicate that the DNILMF algorithm outperforms the previously reported approaches in terms of AUPR (area under precision-recall curve) and AUC (area under curve of receiver operating characteristic) based on the 5 trials of 10-fold cross-validation. We conclude that the performance improvement depends on not only the proposed objective function, but also the used nonlinear diffusion technique which is important but under studied in the DTI prediction field. In addition, we also compile a new DTI dataset for increasing the diversity of currently available benchmark datasets. The top prediction results for the new dataset are confirmed by experimental studies or supported by other computational research.

  8. Predicting Drug-Target Interaction Networks Based on Functional Groups and Biological Features

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-He; Hu, Le-Le; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-01-01

    Background Study of drug-target interaction networks is an important topic for drug development. It is both time-consuming and costly to determine compound-protein interactions or potential drug-target interactions by experiments alone. As a complement, the in silico prediction methods can provide us with very useful information in a timely manner. Methods/Principal Findings To realize this, drug compounds are encoded with functional groups and proteins encoded by biological features including biochemical and physicochemical properties. The optimal feature selection procedures are adopted by means of the mRMR (Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy) method. Instead of classifying the proteins as a whole family, target proteins are divided into four groups: enzymes, ion channels, G-protein- coupled receptors and nuclear receptors. Thus, four independent predictors are established using the Nearest Neighbor algorithm as their operation engine, with each to predict the interactions between drugs and one of the four protein groups. As a result, the overall success rates by the jackknife cross-validation tests achieved with the four predictors are 85.48%, 80.78%, 78.49%, and 85.66%, respectively. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that the network prediction system thus established is quite promising and encouraging. PMID:20300175

  9. Data on overlapping brain disorders and emerging drug targets in human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Podder, Avijit; Latha, N

    2017-06-01

    Intercommunication of Dopamine Receptors (DRs) with their associate protein partners is crucial to maintain regular brain function in human. Majority of the brain disorders arise due to malfunctioning of such communication process. Hence, contributions of genetic factors, as well as phenotypic indications for various neurological and psychiatric disorders are often attributed as sharing in nature. In our earlier research article entitled "Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network" (Podder et al., 2014) [1], we had depicted a holistic interaction map of human Dopamine Receptors. Given emphasis on the topological parameters, we had characterized the functionality along with the vulnerable properties of the network. In support of this, we hereby provide an additional data highlighting the genetic overlapping of various brain disorders in the network. The data indicates the sharing nature of disease genes for various neurological and psychiatric disorders in dopamine receptors connecting protein-protein interactions network. The data also indicates toward an alternative approach to prioritize proteins for overlapping brain disorders as valuable drug targets in the network.

  10. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-05-03

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as "indispensable," "neutral," or "dispensable," which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network's control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets.

  11. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as “indispensable,” “neutral,” or “dispensable,” which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network’s control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets. PMID:27091990

  12. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biological background, 1 PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets were identified, 21 of which were verified by literatures to be associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS. 42 drugs targeting to 13 PCOS potential drug targets were investigated experimentally or clinically for PCOS. Evaluated by independent datasets, the whole PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets could not only reveal the drug response, but also distinguish the statuses between normal and disease. Our identified PPDT-Module and PCOS potential drug targets would shed light on the treatment of PCOS. And our approach would provide valuable insights to research on the pathogenesis and drug response of other diseases. PMID:27191267

  13. Gaussian interaction profile kernels for predicting drug-target interaction.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Twan; Nabuurs, Sander B; Marchiori, Elena

    2011-11-01

    The in silico prediction of potential interactions between drugs and target proteins is of core importance for the identification of new drugs or novel targets for existing drugs. However, only a tiny portion of all drug-target pairs in current datasets are experimentally validated interactions. This motivates the need for developing computational methods that predict true interaction pairs with high accuracy. We show that a simple machine learning method that uses the drug-target network as the only source of information is capable of predicting true interaction pairs with high accuracy. Specifically, we introduce interaction profiles of drugs (and of targets) in a network, which are binary vectors specifying the presence or absence of interaction with every target (drug) in that network. We define a kernel on these profiles, called the Gaussian Interaction Profile (GIP) kernel, and use a simple classifier, (kernel) Regularized Least Squares (RLS), for prediction drug-target interactions. We test comparatively the effectiveness of RLS with the GIP kernel on four drug-target interaction networks used in previous studies. The proposed algorithm achieves area under the precision-recall curve (AUPR) up to 92.7, significantly improving over results of state-of-the-art methods. Moreover, we show that using also kernels based on chemical and genomic information further increases accuracy, with a neat improvement on small datasets. These results substantiate the relevance of the network topology (in the form of interaction profiles) as source of information for predicting drug-target interactions. Software and Supplementary Material are available at http://cs.ru.nl/~tvanlaarhoven/drugtarget2011/. tvanlaarhoven@cs.ru.nl; elenam@cs.ru.nl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction networks based on drug chemical structure and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengwei; Han, Pengyong; You, Zhu-Hong; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yusen; Yu, Haiquan; Nie, Ru; Chen, Xing

    2017-09-11

    Analysis of drug-target interactions (DTIs) is of great importance in developing new drug candidates for known protein targets or discovering new targets for old drugs. However, the experimental approaches for identifying DTIs are expensive, laborious and challenging. In this study, we report a novel computational method for predicting DTIs using the highly discriminative information of drug-target interactions and our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. More specifically, each target protein sequence is transformed as the position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM), in which the evolutionary information is retained; then the local binary pattern (LBP) operator is used to calculate the LBP histogram descriptor. For a drug molecule, a novel fingerprint representation is utilized to describe its chemical structure information representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments. When applying the proposed method to the four datasets (Enzyme, GPCR, Ion Channel and Nuclear Receptor) for predicting DTIs, we obtained good average accuracies of 93.16%, 89.37%, 91.73% and 92.22%, respectively. Furthermore, we compared the performance of the proposed model with that of the state-of-the-art SVM model and other previous methods. The achieved results demonstrate that our method is effective and robust and can be taken as a useful tool for predicting DTIs.

  15. The Human Kinome Targeted by FDA Approved Multi-Target Drugs and Combination Products: A Comparative Study from the Drug-Target Interaction Network Perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying Hong; Wang, Pan Pan; Li, Xiao Xu; Yu, Chun Yan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Xue, Wei Wei; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human kinome is one of the most productive classes of drug target, and there is emerging necessity for treating complex diseases by means of polypharmacology (multi-target drugs and combination products). However, the advantages of the multi-target drugs and the combination products are still under debate. A comparative analysis between FDA approved multi-target drugs and combination products, targeting the human kinome, was conducted by mapping targets onto the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome. The approach of network medicine illustrating the drug-target interactions was applied to identify popular targets of multi-target drugs and combination products. As identified, the multi-target drugs tended to inhibit target pairs in the human kinome, especially the receptor tyrosine kinase family, while the combination products were able to against targets of distant homology relationship. This finding asked for choosing the combination products as a better solution for designing drugs aiming at targets of distant homology relationship. Moreover, sub-networks of drug-target interactions in specific disease were generated, and mechanisms shared by multi-target drugs and combination products were identified. In conclusion, this study performed an analysis between approved multi-target drugs and combination products against the human kinome, which could assist the discovery of next generation polypharmacology.

  16. The Human Kinome Targeted by FDA Approved Multi-Target Drugs and Combination Products: A Comparative Study from the Drug-Target Interaction Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun Yan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Xue, Wei Wei; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human kinome is one of the most productive classes of drug target, and there is emerging necessity for treating complex diseases by means of polypharmacology (multi-target drugs and combination products). However, the advantages of the multi-target drugs and the combination products are still under debate. A comparative analysis between FDA approved multi-target drugs and combination products, targeting the human kinome, was conducted by mapping targets onto the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome. The approach of network medicine illustrating the drug-target interactions was applied to identify popular targets of multi-target drugs and combination products. As identified, the multi-target drugs tended to inhibit target pairs in the human kinome, especially the receptor tyrosine kinase family, while the combination products were able to against targets of distant homology relationship. This finding asked for choosing the combination products as a better solution for designing drugs aiming at targets of distant homology relationship. Moreover, sub-networks of drug-target interactions in specific disease were generated, and mechanisms shared by multi-target drugs and combination products were identified. In conclusion, this study performed an analysis between approved multi-target drugs and combination products against the human kinome, which could assist the discovery of next generation polypharmacology. PMID:27828998

  17. Drug target prioritization by perturbed gene expression and network information

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Zerrin; Baldow, Christoph; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drugs bind to their target proteins, which interact with downstream effectors and ultimately perturb the transcriptome of a cancer cell. These perturbations reveal information about their source, i.e., drugs’ targets. Here, we investigate whether these perturbations and protein interaction networks can uncover drug targets and key pathways. We performed the first systematic analysis of over 500 drugs from the Connectivity Map. First, we show that the gene expression of drug targets is usually not significantly affected by the drug perturbation. Hence, expression changes after drug treatment on their own are not sufficient to identify drug targets. However, ranking of candidate drug targets by network topological measures prioritizes the targets. We introduce a novel measure, local radiality, which combines perturbed genes and functional interaction network information. The new measure outperforms other methods in target prioritization and proposes cancer-specific pathways from drugs to affected genes for the first time. Local radiality identifies more diverse targets with fewer neighbors and possibly less side effects. PMID:26615774

  18. Toward more realistic drug-target interaction predictions.

    PubMed

    Pahikkala, Tapio; Airola, Antti; Pietilä, Sami; Shakyawar, Sushil; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2015-03-01

    A number of supervised machine learning models have recently been introduced for the prediction of drug-target interactions based on chemical structure and genomic sequence information. Although these models could offer improved means for many network pharmacology applications, such as repositioning of drugs for new therapeutic uses, the prediction models are often being constructed and evaluated under overly simplified settings that do not reflect the real-life problem in practical applications. Using quantitative drug-target bioactivity assays for kinase inhibitors, as well as a popular benchmarking data set of binary drug-target interactions for enzyme, ion channel, nuclear receptor and G protein-coupled receptor targets, we illustrate here the effects of four factors that may lead to dramatic differences in the prediction results: (i) problem formulation (standard binary classification or more realistic regression formulation), (ii) evaluation data set (drug and target families in the application use case), (iii) evaluation procedure (simple or nested cross-validation) and (iv) experimental setting (whether training and test sets share common drugs and targets, only drugs or targets or neither). Each of these factors should be taken into consideration to avoid reporting overoptimistic drug-target interaction prediction results. We also suggest guidelines on how to make the supervised drug-target interaction prediction studies more realistic in terms of such model formulations and evaluation setups that better address the inherent complexity of the prediction task in the practical applications, as well as novel benchmarking data sets that capture the continuous nature of the drug-target interactions for kinase inhibitors. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. iDrug-Target: predicting the interactions between drug compounds and target proteins in cellular networking via benchmark dataset optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Liu, Zi; Cheng, Xiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Information about the interactions of drug compounds with proteins in cellular networking is very important for drug development. Unfortunately, all the existing predictors for identifying drug-protein interactions were trained by a skewed benchmark data-set where the number of non-interactive drug-protein pairs is overwhelmingly larger than that of the interactive ones. Using this kind of highly unbalanced benchmark data-set to train predictors would lead to the outcome that many interactive drug-protein pairs might be mispredicted as non-interactive. Since the minority interactive pairs often contain the most important information for drug design, it is necessary to minimize this kind of misprediction. In this study, we adopted the neighborhood cleaning rule and synthetic minority over-sampling technique to treat the skewed benchmark datasets and balance the positive and negative subsets. The new benchmark datasets thus obtained are called the optimized benchmark datasets, based on which a new predictor called iDrug-Target was developed that contains four sub-predictors: iDrug-GPCR, iDrug-Chl, iDrug-Ezy, and iDrug-NR, specialized for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), ion channels, enzymes, and NR (nuclear receptors), respectively. Rigorous cross-validations on a set of experiment-confirmed datasets have indicated that these new predictors remarkably outperformed the existing ones for the same purpose. To maximize users' convenience, a public accessible Web server for iDrug-Target has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDrug-Target/ , by which users can easily get their desired results. It has not escaped our notice that the aforementioned strategy can be widely used in many other areas as well.

  20. Predicting drug-target interactions using restricted Boltzmann machines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: In silico prediction of drug-target interactions plays an important role toward identifying and developing new uses of existing or abandoned drugs. Network-based approaches have recently become a popular tool for discovering new drug-target interactions (DTIs). Unfortunately, most of these network-based approaches can only predict binary interactions between drugs and targets, and information about different types of interactions has not been well exploited for DTI prediction in previous studies. On the other hand, incorporating additional information about drug-target relationships or drug modes of action can improve prediction of DTIs. Furthermore, the predicted types of DTIs can broaden our understanding about the molecular basis of drug action. Results: We propose a first machine learning approach to integrate multiple types of DTIs and predict unknown drug-target relationships or drug modes of action. We cast the new DTI prediction problem into a two-layer graphical model, called restricted Boltzmann machine, and apply a practical learning algorithm to train our model and make predictions. Tests on two public databases show that our restricted Boltzmann machine model can effectively capture the latent features of a DTI network and achieve excellent performance on predicting different types of DTIs, with the area under precision-recall curve up to 89.6. In addition, we demonstrate that integrating multiple types of DTIs can significantly outperform other predictions either by simply mixing multiple types of interactions without distinction or using only a single interaction type. Further tests show that our approach can infer a high fraction of novel DTIs that has been validated by known experiments in the literature or other databases. These results indicate that our approach can have highly practical relevance to DTI prediction and drug repositioning, and hence advance the drug discovery process. Availability: Software and datasets are available

  1. Predicting Drug-Target Interactions Using Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shinhyuk; Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2013-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting drug-target interactions have become important in drug research because they can help to reduce the time, cost, and failure rates for developing new drugs. Recently, with the accumulation of drug-related data sets related to drug side effects and pharmacological data, it has became possible to predict potential drug-target interactions. In this study, we focus on drug-drug interactions (DDI), their adverse effects () and pharmacological information (), and investigate the relationship among chemical structures, side effects, and DDIs from several data sources. In this study, data from the STITCH database, from drugs.com, and drug-target pairs from ChEMBL and SIDER were first collected. Then, by applying two machine learning approaches, a support vector machine (SVM) and a kernel-based L1-norm regularized logistic regression (KL1LR), we showed that DDI is a promising feature in predicting drug-target interactions. Next, the accuracies of predicting drug-target interactions using DDI were compared to those obtained using the chemical structure and side effects based on the SVM and KL1LR approaches, showing that DDI was the data source contributing the most for predicting drug-target interactions. PMID:24278248

  2. Comparison of FDA Approved Kinase Targets to Clinical Trial Ones: Insights from Their System Profiles and Drug-Target Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyu; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Hong; Li, Yinghong; Yu, Chunyan; Tian, Yubin

    2016-01-01

    Kinase is one of the most productive classes of established targets, but the majority of approved drugs against kinase were developed only for cancer. Intensive efforts were therefore exerted for releasing its therapeutic potential by discovering new therapeutic area. Kinases in clinical trial could provide great opportunities for treating various diseases. However, no systematic comparison between system profiles of established targets and those of clinical trial ones was conducted. The reveal of probable difference or shift of trend would help to identify key factors defining druggability of established targets. In this study, a comparative analysis of system profiles of both types of targets was conducted. Consequently, the systems profiles of the majority of clinical trial kinases were identified to be very similar to those of established ones, but percentages of established targets obeying the system profiles appeared to be slightly but consistently higher than those of clinical trial targets. Moreover, a shift of trend in the system profiles from the clinical trial to the established targets was identified, and popular kinase targets were discovered. In sum, this comparative study may help to facilitate the identification of the druggability of established drug targets by their system profiles and drug-target interaction networks. PMID:27547755

  3. Predicting drug-target interactions using probabilistic matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Cobanoglu, Murat Can; Liu, Chang; Hu, Feizhuo; Oltvai, Zoltán N; Bahar, Ivet

    2013-12-23

    Quantitative analysis of known drug-target interactions emerged in recent years as a useful approach for drug repurposing and assessing side effects. In the present study, we present a method that uses probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) for this purpose, which is particularly useful for analyzing large interaction networks. DrugBank drugs clustered based on PMF latent variables show phenotypic similarity even in the absence of 3D shape similarity. Benchmarking computations show that the method outperforms those recently introduced provided that the input data set of known interactions is sufficiently large--which is the case for enzymes and ion channels, but not for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors. Runs performed on DrugBank after hiding 70% of known interactions show that, on average, 88 of the top 100 predictions hit the hidden interactions. De novo predictions permit us to identify new potential interactions. Drug-target pairs implicated in neurobiological disorders are overrepresented among de novo predictions.

  4. Drug-target interaction prediction: databases, web servers and computational models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Feng; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Yongdong

    2016-07-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions is an important process in drug discovery. Although high-throughput screening and other biological assays are becoming available, experimental methods for drug-target interaction identification remain to be extremely costly, time-consuming and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, various computational models have been developed to predict potential drug-target associations on a large scale. In this review, databases and web servers involved in drug-target identification and drug discovery are summarized. In addition, we mainly introduced some state-of-the-art computational models for drug-target interactions prediction, including network-based method, machine learning-based method and so on. Specially, for the machine learning-based method, much attention was paid to supervised and semi-supervised models, which have essential difference in the adoption of negative samples. Although significant improvements for drug-target interaction prediction have been obtained by many effective computational models, both network-based and machine learning-based methods have their disadvantages, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of the network-based drug discovery and network approach for personalized drug discovery based on personalized medicine, genome sequencing, tumor clone-based network and cancer hallmark-based network. Finally, we discussed the new evaluation validation framework and the formulation of drug-target interactions prediction problem by more realistic regression formulation based on quantitative bioactivity data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. An eigenvalue transformation technique for predicting drug-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qifan; Xu, Xin; Li, Rong; Dong, Yongcheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Ziyan; Li, Yizhou; Li, Menglong

    2015-09-09

    The prediction of drug-target interactions is a key step in the drug discovery process, which serves to identify new drugs or novel targets for existing drugs. However, experimental methods for predicting drug-target interactions are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the in silico prediction of drug-target interactions has recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, we propose an eigenvalue transformation technique and apply this technique to two representative algorithms, the Regularized Least Squares classifier (RLS) and the semi-supervised link prediction classifier (SLP), that have been used to predict drug-target interaction. The results of computational experiments with these techniques show that algorithms including eigenvalue transformation achieved better performance on drug-target interaction prediction than did the original algorithms. These findings show that eigenvalue transformation is an efficient technique for improving the performance of methods for predicting drug-target interactions. We further show that, in theory, eigenvalue transformation can be viewed as a feature transformation on the kernel matrix. Accordingly, although we only apply this technique to two algorithms in the current study, eigenvalue transformation also has the potential to be applied to other algorithms based on kernels.

  6. Drug-target interaction prediction from PSSM based evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The labor-intensive and expensive experimental process of drug-target interaction prediction has motivated many researchers to focus on in silico prediction, which leads to the helpful information in supporting the experimental interaction data. Therefore, they have proposed several computational approaches for discovering new drug-target interactions. Several learning-based methods have been increasingly developed which can be categorized into two main groups: similarity-based and feature-based. In this paper, we firstly use the bi-gram features extracted from the Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) of proteins in predicting drug-target interactions. Our results demonstrate the high-confidence prediction ability of the Bigram-PSSM model in terms of several performance indicators specifically for enzymes and ion channels. Moreover, we investigate the impact of negative selection strategy on the performance of the prediction, which is not widely taken into account in the other relevant studies. This is important, as the number of non-interacting drug-target pairs are usually extremely large in comparison with the number of interacting ones in existing drug-target interaction data. An interesting observation is that different levels of performance reduction have been attained for four datasets when we change the sampling method from the random sampling to the balanced sampling.

  7. DT-Web: a web-based application for drug-target interaction and drug combination prediction through domain-tuned network-based inference

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a costly and time-consuming step in drug discovery and design. Computational methods capable of predicting reliable DTI play an important role in the field. Algorithms may aim to design new therapies based on a single approved drug or a combination of them. Recently, recommendation methods relying on network-based inference in connection with knowledge coming from the specific domain have been proposed. Description Here we propose a web-based interface to the DT-Hybrid algorithm, which applies a recommendation technique based on bipartite network projection implementing resources transfer within the network. This technique combined with domain-specific knowledge expressing drugs and targets similarity is used to compute recommendations for each drug. Our web interface allows the users: (i) to browse all the predictions inferred by the algorithm; (ii) to upload their custom data on which they wish to obtain a prediction through a DT-Hybrid based pipeline; (iii) to help in the early stages of drug combinations, repositioning, substitution, or resistance studies by finding drugs that can act simultaneously on multiple targets in a multi-pathway environment. Our system is periodically synchronized with DrugBank and updated accordingly. The website is free, open to all users, and available at http://alpha.dmi.unict.it/dtweb/. Conclusions Our web interface allows users to search and visualize information on drugs and targets eventually providing their own data to compute a list of predictions. The user can visualize information about the characteristics of each drug, a list of predicted and validated targets, associated enzymes and transporters. A table containing key information and GO classification allows the users to perform their own analysis on our data. A special interface for data submission allows the execution of a pipeline, based on DT-Hybrid, predicting new targets with the corresponding p

  8. DT-Web: a web-based application for drug-target interaction and drug combination prediction through domain-tuned network-based inference.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Salvatore; Bonnici, Vincenzo; Cancemi, Damiano; Ferro, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Pulvirenti, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a costly and time-consuming step in drug discovery and design. Computational methods capable of predicting reliable DTI play an important role in the field. Algorithms may aim to design new therapies based on a single approved drug or a combination of them. Recently, recommendation methods relying on network-based inference in connection with knowledge coming from the specific domain have been proposed. Here we propose a web-based interface to the DT-Hybrid algorithm, which applies a recommendation technique based on bipartite network projection implementing resources transfer within the network. This technique combined with domain-specific knowledge expressing drugs and targets similarity is used to compute recommendations for each drug. Our web interface allows the users: (i) to browse all the predictions inferred by the algorithm; (ii) to upload their custom data on which they wish to obtain a prediction through a DT-Hybrid based pipeline; (iii) to help in the early stages of drug combinations, repositioning, substitution, or resistance studies by finding drugs that can act simultaneously on multiple targets in a multi-pathway environment. Our system is periodically synchronized with DrugBank and updated accordingly. The website is free, open to all users, and available at http://alpha.dmi.unict.it/dtweb/. Our web interface allows users to search and visualize information on drugs and targets eventually providing their own data to compute a list of predictions. The user can visualize information about the characteristics of each drug, a list of predicted and validated targets, associated enzymes and transporters. A table containing key information and GO classification allows the users to perform their own analysis on our data. A special interface for data submission allows the execution of a pipeline, based on DT-Hybrid, predicting new targets with the corresponding p-values expressing the reliability of

  9. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  10. Detecting drug targets with minimum side effects in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wang, R-S; Zhang, X-S; Chen, L

    2009-11-01

    High-throughput techniques produce massive data on a genome-wide scale which facilitate pharmaceutical research. Drug target discovery is a crucial step in the drug discovery process and also plays a vital role in therapeutics. In this study, the problem of detecting drug targets was addressed, which finds a set of enzymes whose inhibition stops the production of a given set of target compounds and meanwhile minimally eliminates non-target compounds in the context of metabolic networks. The model aims to make the side effects of drugs as small as possible and thus has practical significance of potential pharmaceutical applications. Specifically, by exploiting special features of metabolic systems, a novel approach was proposed to exactly formulate this drug target detection problem as an integer linear programming model, which ensures that optimal solutions can be found efficiently without any heuristic manipulations. To verify the effectiveness of our approach, computational experiments on both Escherichia coli and Homo sapiens metabolic pathways were conducted. The results show that our approach can identify the optimal drug targets in an exact and efficient manner. In particular, it can be applied to large-scale networks including the whole metabolic networks from most organisms.

  11. Mining significant substructure pairs for interpreting polypharmacology in drug-target network.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Ichigaku; Tsuda, Koji; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    2011-02-23

    A current key feature in drug-target network is that drugs often bind to multiple targets, known as polypharmacology or drug promiscuity. Recent literature has indicated that relatively small fragments in both drugs and targets are crucial in forming polypharmacology. We hypothesize that principles behind polypharmacology are embedded in paired fragments in molecular graphs and amino acid sequences of drug-target interactions. We developed a fast, scalable algorithm for mining significantly co-occurring subgraph-subsequence pairs from drug-target interactions. A noteworthy feature of our approach is to capture significant paired patterns of subgraph-subsequence, while patterns of either drugs or targets only have been considered in the literature so far. Significant substructure pairs allow the grouping of drug-target interactions into clusters, covering approximately 75% of interactions containing approved drugs. These clusters were highly exclusive to each other, being statistically significant and logically implying that each cluster corresponds to a distinguished type of polypharmacology. These exclusive clusters cannot be easily obtained by using either drug or target information only but are naturally found by highlighting significant substructure pairs in drug-target interactions. These results confirm the effectiveness of our method for interpreting polypharmacology in drug-target network.

  12. Predicting drug-target interactions through integrative analysis of chemogenetic assays in yeast.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Marja A; Aittokallio, Tero

    2013-04-05

    Chemical-genomic and genetic interaction profiling approaches are widely used to study mechanisms of drug action and resistance. However, there exist a number of scoring algorithms customized to different experimental assays, the relative performance of which remains poorly understood, especially with respect to different types of chemogenetic assays. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a test bed, we carried out a systematic evaluation among the main drug target analysis approaches in terms of predicting global drug-target interaction networks. We found drastic differences in their performance across different chemical-genomic assay types, such as those based on heterozygous and homozygous diploid or haploid deletion mutant libraries. Moreover, a relatively small overlap in the predicted targets was observed between those approaches that use either chemical-genomic screening alone or combined with genetic interaction profiling. A rank-based integration of the complementary scoring approaches led to improved overall performance, demonstrating that genetic interaction profiling provides added information on drug target prediction. Optimal performance was achieved when focusing specifically on the negative tail of the genetic interactions, suggesting that combining synthetic lethal interactions with chemical-genetic interactions provides highest information on drug-target interactions. A network view of rapamycin-interacting genes, pathways and complexes was used as an example to demonstrate the benefits of such integrated and optimized analysis of chemogenetic assays in yeast.

  13. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-04-07

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  14. Screening drug-target interactions with positive-unlabeled learning.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lihong; Zhu, Wen; Liao, Bo; Duan, Yu; Chen, Min; Chen, Yi; Yang, Jialiang

    2017-08-14

    Identifying drug-target interaction (DTI) candidates is crucial for drug repositioning. However, usually only positive DTIs are deposited in known databases, which challenges computational methods to predict novel DTIs due to the lack of negative samples. To overcome this dilemma, researchers usually randomly select negative samples from unlabeled drug-target pairs, which introduces a lot of false-positives. In this study, a negative sample extraction method named NDTISE is first developed to screen strong negative DTI examples based on positive-unlabeled learning. A novel DTI screening framework, PUDTI, is then designed to infer new drug repositioning candidates by integrating NDTISE, probabilities that remaining ambiguous samples belong to the positive and negative classes, and an SVM-based optimization model. We investigated the effectiveness of NDTISE on a DTI data provided by NCPIS. NDTISE is much better than random selection and slightly outperforms NCPIS. We then compared PUDTI with 6 state-of-the-art methods on 4 classes of DTI datasets from human enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors. PUDTI achieved the highest AUC among the 7 methods on all 4 datasets. Finally, we validated a few top predicted DTIs through mining independent drug databases and literatures. In conclusion, PUDTI provides an effective pre-filtering method for new drug design.

  15. Nanomechanics of Drug-target Interactions and Antibacterial Resistance Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Watari, Moyu; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity1-5. The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-scale precision allows disruptions of the biomechanics of model bacterial cell wall targets to be tracked in real time. Despite offering considerable advantages, multiple cantilever sensor arrays have never been applied in quantifying drug-target binding interactions. Here, we report on the use of silicon multiple cantilever arrays coated with alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers mimicking bacterial cell wall matrix to quantitatively study antibiotic binding interactions. To understand the impact of vancomycin on the mechanics of bacterial cell wall structures1,6,7. We developed a new model1 which proposes that cantilever bending can be described by two independent factors; i) namely a chemical factor, which is given by a classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm, from which we calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and ii) a geometrical factor, essentially a measure of how bacterial peptide receptors are distributed on the cantilever surface. The surface distribution of peptide receptors (p) is used to investigate the dependence of geometry and ligand loading. It is shown that a threshold value of p ~10% is critical to sensing applications. Below which there is no detectable bending signal while above this value, the bending signal increases almost linearly, revealing that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor combined by the mechanical connectivity of reacted regions and provides a new paradigm for design of

  16. Nanomechanics of drug-target interactions and antibacterial resistance detection.

    PubMed

    Ndieyira, Joseph W; Watari, Moyu; McKendry, Rachel A

    2013-10-25

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-scale precision allows disruptions of the biomechanics of model bacterial cell wall targets to be tracked in real time. Despite offering considerable advantages, multiple cantilever sensor arrays have never been applied in quantifying drug-target binding interactions. Here, we report on the use of silicon multiple cantilever arrays coated with alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers mimicking bacterial cell wall matrix to quantitatively study antibiotic binding interactions. To understand the impact of vancomycin on the mechanics of bacterial cell wall structures. We developed a new model(1) which proposes that cantilever bending can be described by two independent factors; i) namely a chemical factor, which is given by a classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm, from which we calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and ii) a geometrical factor, essentially a measure of how bacterial peptide receptors are distributed on the cantilever surface. The surface distribution of peptide receptors (p) is used to investigate the dependence of geometry and ligand loading. It is shown that a threshold value of p ~10% is critical to sensing applications. Below which there is no detectable bending signal while above this value, the bending signal increases almost linearly, revealing that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor combined by the mechanical connectivity of reacted regions and provides a new paradigm for design of powerful

  17. Computational Drug Target Screening through Protein Interaction Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Quezada, Elías; Uriarte, Eugenio; Costanzi, Stefano; Borges, Fernanda; Viña, Dolores; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    The development of computational methods to discover novel drug-target interactions on a large scale is of great interest. We propose a new method for virtual screening based on protein interaction profile similarity to discover new targets for molecules, including existing drugs. We calculated Target Interaction Profile Fingerprints (TIPFs) based on ChEMBL database to evaluate drug similarity and generated new putative compound-target candidates from the non-intersecting targets in each pair of compounds. A set of drugs was further studied in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme through molecular docking and experimental assays. The drug ethoxzolamide and the natural compound piperlongumine, present in Piper longum L, showed hMAO-B activity with IC50 values of 25 and 65 μM respectively. Five candidates, including lapatinib, SB-202190, RO-316233, GW786460X and indirubin-3′-monoxime were tested against human COX-1. Compounds SB-202190 and RO-316233 showed a IC50 in hCOX-1 of 24 and 25 μM respectively (similar range as potent inhibitors such as diclofenac and indomethacin in the same experimental conditions). Lapatinib and indirubin-3′-monoxime showed moderate hCOX-1 activity (19.5% and 28% of enzyme inhibition at 25 μM respectively). Our modeling constitutes a multi-target predictor for large scale virtual screening with potential in lead discovery, repositioning and drug safety. PMID:27845365

  18. Analysis of adverse drug reactions using drug and drug target interactions and graph-based methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Fang; Xiao, Ke-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ting; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to integrate knowledge about drugs, drug targets, and topological methods. The goals were to build a system facilitating the study of adverse drug events, to make it easier to find possible explanations, and to group similar drug-drug interaction cases in the adverse drug reaction reports from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We developed a system that analyses adverse drug reaction (ADR) cases reported by the FDA. The system contains four modules. First, we integrate drug and drug target databases that provide information related to adverse drug reactions. Second, we classify drug and drug targets according to anatomical therapeutic chemical classification (ATC) and drug target ontology (DTO). Third, we build drug target networks based on drug and drug target databases. Finally, we apply topological analysis to reveal drug interaction complexity for each ADR case reported by the FDA. We picked 1952 ADR cases from the years 2005-2006. Our dataset consisted of 1952 cases, of which 1471 cases involved ADR targets, 845 cases involved absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) targets, and 507 cases involved some drugs acting on the same targets, namely, common targets (CTs). We then investigated the cases involving ADR targets, ADME targets, and CTs using the ATC system and DTO. In the cases that led to death, the average number of common targets (NCTs) was 0.879 and the average of average clustering coefficient (ACC) was 0.067. In cases that did not lead to death, the average NCTs was 0.551, and the average of ACC was 0.039. We implemented a system that can find possible explanations and cluster similar ADR cases reported by the FDA. We found that the average of ACC and the average NCTs in cases leading to death are higher than in cases not leading to death, suggesting that the interactions in cases leading to death are generally more complicated than in cases not leading to death. This indicates that our system

  19. Drug-target networks for Tanshinone IIA identified by data mining.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tanshinone IIA is a pharmacologically active compound isolated from Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine for the management of cardiac diseases and other disorders. But its underlying molecular mechanisms of action are still unclear. The present investigation utilized a data mining approach based on network pharmacology to uncover the potential protein targets of Tanshinone IIA. Network pharmacology, an integrated multidisciplinary study, incorporates systems biology, network analysis, connectivity, redundancy, and pleiotropy, providing powerful new tools and insights into elucidating the fine details of drug-target interactions. In the present study, two separate drug-target networks for Tanshinone IIA were constructed using the Agilent Literature Search (ALS) and STITCH (search tool for interactions of chemicals) methods. Analysis of the ALS-constructed network revealed a target network with a scale-free topology and five top nodes (protein targets) corresponding to Fos, Jun, Src, phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA), and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1), whereas analysis of the STITCH-constructed network revealed three top nodes corresponding to cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), cytochrome P450 A1 (CYP1A1), and nuclear factor kappa B1 (NFκB1). The discrepancies were probably due to the differences in the divergent computer mining tools and databases employed by the two methods. However, it is conceivable that all eight proteins mediate important biological functions of Tanshinone IIA, contributing to its overall drug-target network. In conclusion, the current results may assist in developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of in a simple, compact, and visual manner. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Systematic Prediction of Multiple Drug-Target Interactions from Chemical, Genomic, and Pharmacological Data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xue; Li, Yan; Zhao, Huihui; Fang, Yupeng; Li, Xiuxiu; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2012-01-01

    In silico prediction of drug-target interactions from heterogeneous biological data can advance our system-level search for drug molecules and therapeutic targets, which efforts have not yet reached full fruition. In this work, we report a systematic approach that efficiently integrates the chemical, genomic, and pharmacological information for drug targeting and discovery on a large scale, based on two powerful methods of Random Forest (RF) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The performance of the derived models was evaluated and verified with internally five-fold cross-validation and four external independent validations. The optimal models show impressive performance of prediction for drug-target interactions, with a concordance of 82.83%, a sensitivity of 81.33%, and a specificity of 93.62%, respectively. The consistence of the performances of the RF and SVM models demonstrates the reliability and robustness of the obtained models. In addition, the validated models were employed to systematically predict known/unknown drugs and targets involving the enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs, and nuclear receptors, which can be further mapped to functional ontologies such as target-disease associations and target-target interaction networks. This approach is expected to help fill the existing gap between chemical genomics and network pharmacology and thus accelerate the drug discovery processes. PMID:22666371

  1. Protein network prediction and topological analysis in Leishmania major as a tool for drug target selection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a virulent parasitic infection that causes a worldwide disease burden. Most treatments have toxic side-effects and efficacy has decreased due to the emergence of resistant strains. The outlook is worsened by the absence of promising drug targets for this disease. We have taken a computational approach to the detection of new drug targets, which may become an effective strategy for the discovery of new drugs for this tropical disease. Results We have predicted the protein interaction network of Leishmania major by using three validated methods: PSIMAP, PEIMAP, and iPfam. Combining the results from these methods, we calculated a high confidence network (confidence score > 0.70) with 1,366 nodes and 33,861 interactions. We were able to predict the biological process for 263 interacting proteins by doing enrichment analysis of the clusters detected. Analyzing the topology of the network with metrics such as connectivity and betweenness centrality, we detected 142 potential drug targets after homology filtering with the human proteome. Further experiments can be done to validate these targets. Conclusion We have constructed the first protein interaction network of the Leishmania major parasite by using a computational approach. The topological analysis of the protein network enabled us to identify a set of candidate proteins that may be both (1) essential for parasite survival and (2) without human orthologs. These potential targets are promising for further experimental validation. This strategy, if validated, may augment established drug discovery methodologies, for this and possibly other tropical diseases, with a relatively low additional investment of time and resources. PMID:20875130

  2. Computational Discovery of Putative Leads for Drug Repositioning through Drug-Target Interaction Prediction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    De novo experimental drug discovery is an expensive and time-consuming task. It requires the identification of drug-target interactions (DTIs) towards targets of biological interest, either to inhibit or enhance a specific molecular function. Dedicated computational models for protein simulation and DTI prediction are crucial for speed and to reduce the costs associated with DTI identification. In this paper we present a computational pipeline that enables the discovery of putative leads for drug repositioning that can be applied to any microbial proteome, as long as the interactome of interest is at least partially known. Network metrics calculated for the interactome of the bacterial organism of interest were used to identify putative drug-targets. Then, a random forest classification model for DTI prediction was constructed using known DTI data from publicly available databases, resulting in an area under the ROC curve of 0.91 for classification of out-of-sampling data. A drug-target network was created by combining 3,081 unique ligands and the expected ten best drug targets. This network was used to predict new DTIs and to calculate the probability of the positive class, allowing the scoring of the predicted instances. Molecular docking experiments were performed on the best scoring DTI pairs and the results were compared with those of the same ligands with their original targets. The results obtained suggest that the proposed pipeline can be used in the identification of new leads for drug repositioning. The proposed classification model is available at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/dtipred/. PMID:27893735

  3. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-02-08

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs.

  4. SynSysNet: integration of experimental data on synaptic protein–protein interactions with drug-target relations

    PubMed Central

    von Eichborn, Joachim; Dunkel, Mathias; Gohlke, Björn O.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Bauer, Jakob M. J.; Armstrong, J. D.; Schaefer, Martin H.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Le Novere, Nicolas; Croning, Michael D. R.; Grant, Seth G. N.; van Nierop, Pim; Smit, August B.; Preissner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We created SynSysNet, available online at http://bioinformatics.charite.de/synsysnet, to provide a platform that creates a comprehensive 4D network of synaptic interactions. Neuronal synapses are fundamental structures linking nerve cells in the brain and they are responsible for neuronal communication and information processing. These processes are dynamically regulated by a network of proteins. New developments in interaction proteomics and yeast two-hybrid methods allow unbiased detection of interactors. The consolidation of data from different resources and methods is important to understand the relation to human behaviour and disease and to identify new therapeutic approaches. To this end, we established SynSysNet from a set of ∼1000 synapse specific proteins, their structures and small-molecule interactions. For two-thirds of these, 3D structures are provided (from Protein Data Bank and homology modelling). Drug-target interactions for 750 approved drugs and 50 000 compounds, as well as 5000 experimentally validated protein–protein interactions, are included. The resulting interaction network and user-selected parts can be viewed interactively and exported in XGMML. Approximately 200 involved pathways can be explored regarding drug-target interactions. Homology-modelled structures are downloadable in Protein Data Bank format, and drugs are available as MOL-files. Protein–protein interactions and drug-target interactions can be viewed as networks; corresponding PubMed IDs or sources are given. PMID:23143269

  5. Two-stage flux balance analysis of metabolic networks for drug target identification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Efficient identification of drug targets is one of major challenges for drug discovery and drug development. Traditional approaches to drug target identification include literature search-based target prioritization and in vitro binding assays which are both time-consuming and labor intensive. Computational integration of different knowledge sources is a more effective alternative. Wealth of omics data generated from genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques changes the way researchers view drug targets and provides unprecedent opportunities for drug target identification. Results In this paper, we develop a method based on flux balance analysis (FBA) of metabolic networks to identify potential drug targets. This method consists of two linear programming (LP) models, which first finds the steady optimal fluxes of reactions and the mass flows of metabolites in the pathologic state and then determines the fluxes and mass flows in the medication state with the minimal side effect caused by the medication. Drug targets are identified by comparing the fluxes of reactions in both states and examining the change of reaction fluxes. We give an illustrative example to show that the drug target identification problem can be solved effectively by our method, then apply it to a hyperuricemia-related purine metabolic pathway. Known drug targets for hyperuricemia are correctly identified by our two-stage FBA method, and the side effects of these targets are also taken into account. A number of other promising drug targets are found to be both effective and safe. Conclusions Our method is an efficient procedure for drug target identification through flux balance analysis of large-scale metabolic networks. It can generate testable predictions, provide insights into drug action mechanisms and guide experimental design of drug discovery. PMID:21689470

  6. Gene regulatory network inference: evaluation and application to ovarian cancer allows the prioritization of drug targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    of proteins encoded by the 10 highest-confidence target genes, and by 15 genes with differential regulation in normal and cancer conditions, reveals 75% to be potential drug targets. Conclusions Our study represents a concrete application of gene regulatory network inference to ovarian cancer, demonstrating the complete cycle of computational systems biology research, from genome-scale data analysis via network inference, evaluation of methods, to the generation of novel testable hypotheses, their prioritization for experimental validation, and discovery of potential drug targets. PMID:22548828

  7. Hyperlipidemia, Disease Associations, and Top 10 Potential Drug Targets: A Network View.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sneha; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of acquired hyperlipidemia has increased due to sedentary life style and lipid-rich diet. In this work, a lipid-protein-protein interaction network (LPPIN) for acquired hyperlipidemia was prepared by incorporating differentially expressed genes in obese fatty liver as seed nodes, protein interactions from PathwayLinker, and lipid interactions from STITCH4.0. Cholesterol, diacylglycreol, phosphatidylinositol-bis-phosphate, and inositol triphosphate were identified as core lipids that influence the signaling pathways in the LPPIN. RACα serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT1) was a highly essential central protein. The gastrin-CREB pathway was greatly enriched; all enriched pathways in the LPPIN showed crosstalk with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway, correlating with the central role of AKT1 in the network. The disease clusters identified in the LPPIN were cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Type II diabetes. In this context, we note that the commercially approved drug targets for hyperlipidemia in each disease cluster may potentially be repurposed for treatment of the specific disease. We report here top 10 potential drug targets that may mediate progression from hyperlipidemia to the respective disease state. ToppGene Suite was employed to identify candidates followed by a) discarding high closeness centrality nodes, and b) selecting nodes with high bridging centrality. Three potential targets could be mapped to specific disease clusters in the LPPIN. Lipids associated with acquired hyperlipidemia and each disease cluster identified may be useful as prognostic fingerprints. These findings provide an integrative view of lipid-protein interactions leading to acquired hyperlipidemia and the associated diseases, and might prove useful in future translational pharmaceutical research.

  8. 2D MI-DRAGON: a new predictor for protein-ligands interactions and theoretic-experimental studies of US FDA drug-target network, oxoisoaporphine inhibitors for MAO-A and human parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Yañez, Matilde; Riera-Fernandez, Pablo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    There are many pairs of possible Drug-Proteins Interactions that may take place or not (DPIs/nDPIs) between drugs with high affinity/non-affinity for different proteins. This fact makes expensive in terms of time and resources, for instance, the determination of all possible ligands-protein interactions for a single drug. In this sense, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, almost all QSAR models predict activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop multi-target QSAR (mt-QSAR) models. In this work, we introduce the technique 2D MI-DRAGON a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We use the software MARCH-INSIDE (MI) to calculate 3D structural parameters for targets and the software DRAGON was used to calculated 2D molecular descriptors all drugs showing known DPIs present in the Drug Bank (US FDA benchmark dataset). Both classes of parameters were used as input of different Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to seek an accurate non-linear mt-QSAR predictor. The best ANN model found is a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) with profile MLP 21:21-31-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 303 out of 339 DPIs (Sensitivity = 89.38%) and 480 out of 510 nDPIs (Specificity = 94.12%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 92.23%. The validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series with Sensitivity = 92.18% (625/678 DPIs; Specificity = 90.12% (730/780 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 91.06%. 2D MI-DRAGON offers a good opportunity for fast-track calculation of all possible DPIs of one drug enabling us to re-construct large drug-target or DPIs Complex Networks (CNs). For instance, we reconstructed the CN of the US FDA benchmark dataset with 855 nodes 519 drugs+336 targets). We predicted CN with similar topology (observed and predicted values of average distance are equal to 6.7 vs. 6.6). These CNs can be used to explore

  9. Charting the molecular network of the drug target Bcr-Abl

    PubMed Central

    Brehme, Marc; Hantschel, Oliver; Colinge, Jacques; Kaupe, Ines; Planyavsky, Melanie; Köcher, Thomas; Mechtler, Karl; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl causes chronic myeloid leukemia and is the cognate target of tyrosine kinase inhibitors like imatinib. We have charted the protein–protein interaction network of Bcr-Abl by a 2-pronged approach. Using a monoclonal antibody we have first purified endogenous Bcr-Abl protein complexes from the CML K562 cell line and characterized the set of most tightly-associated interactors by MS. Nine interactors were subsequently subjected to tandem affinity purifications/MS analysis to obtain a molecular interaction network of some hundred cellular proteins. The resulting network revealed a high degree of interconnection of 7 “core” components around Bcr-Abl (Grb2, Shc1, Crk-I, c-Cbl, p85, Sts-1, and SHIP-2), and their links to different signaling pathways. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that tyrosine kinase inhibitors lead to a disruption of this network. Certain components still appear to interact with Bcr-Abl in a phosphotyrosine-independent manner. We propose that Bcr-Abl and other drug targets, rather than being considered as single polypeptides, can be considered as complex protein assemblies that remodel upon drug action. PMID:19380743

  10. Genome evolution predicts genetic interactions in protein complexes and reveals cancer drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaowen; Kensche, Philip R.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Notebaart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic interactions reveal insights into cellular function and can be used to identify drug targets. Here we construct a new model to predict negative genetic interactions in protein complexes by exploiting the evolutionary history of genes in parallel converging pathways in metabolism. We evaluate our model with protein complexes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that the predicted protein pairs more frequently have a negative genetic interaction than random proteins from the same complex. Furthermore, we apply our model to human protein complexes to predict novel cancer drug targets, and identify 20 candidate targets with empirical support and 10 novel targets amenable to further experimental validation. Our study illustrates that negative genetic interactions can be predicted by systematically exploring genome evolution, and that this is useful to identify novel anti-cancer drug targets. PMID:23851603

  11. The RAS-Effector Interaction as a Drug Target.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Salter, E Alan; Piazza, Gary A

    2017-01-15

    About a third of all human cancers harbor mutations in one of the K-, N-, or HRAS genes that encode an abnormal RAS protein locked in a constitutively activated state to drive malignant transformation and tumor growth. Despite more than three decades of intensive research aimed at the discovery of RAS-directed therapeutics, there are no FDA-approved drugs that are broadly effective against RAS-driven cancers. Although RAS proteins are often said to be "undruggable," there is mounting evidence suggesting it may be feasible to develop direct inhibitors of RAS proteins. Here, we review this evidence with a focus on compounds capable of inhibiting the interaction of RAS proteins with their effectors that transduce the signals of RAS and that drive and sustain malignant transformation and tumor growth. These reports of direct-acting RAS inhibitors provide valuable insight for further discovery and development of clinical candidates for RAS-driven cancers involving mutations in RAS genes or otherwise activated RAS proteins. Cancer Res; 77(2); 221-6. ©2017 AACR.

  12. Controllability in cancer metabolic networks according to drug targets as driver nodes.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine.

  13. Controllability in Cancer Metabolic Networks According to Drug Targets as Driver Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine. PMID:24282504

  14. Influence networks based on coexpression improve drug target discovery for the development of novel cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for novel molecularly targeted drugs will continue to rise as we move forward toward the goal of personalizing cancer treatment to the molecular signature of individual tumors. However, the identification of targets and combinations of targets that can be safely and effectively modulated is one of the greatest challenges facing the drug discovery process. A promising approach is to use biological networks to prioritize targets based on their relative positions to one another, a property that affects their ability to maintain network integrity and propagate information-flow. Here, we introduce influence networks and demonstrate how they can be used to generate influence scores as a network-based metric to rank genes as potential drug targets. Results We use this approach to prioritize genes as drug target candidates in a set of ER + breast tumor samples collected during the course of neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. We show that influential genes, those with high influence scores, tend to be essential and include a higher proportion of essential genes than those prioritized based on their position (i.e. hubs or bottlenecks) within the same network. Additionally, we show that influential genes represent novel biologically relevant drug targets for the treatment of ER + breast cancers. Moreover, we demonstrate that gene influence differs between untreated tumors and residual tumors that have adapted to drug treatment. In this way, influence scores capture the context-dependent functions of genes and present the opportunity to design combination treatment strategies that take advantage of the tumor adaptation process. Conclusions Influence networks efficiently find essential genes as promising drug targets and combinations of targets to inform the development of molecularly targeted drugs and their use. PMID:24495353

  15. Quantitative and Systems Pharmacology. 1. In Silico Prediction of Drug-Target Interaction of Natural Products to Enable of new Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiansong; Wu, Zengrui; Cai, Chuipu; Wang, Qi; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Feixiong

    2017-09-28

    Natural products with diverse chemical scaffolds have been recognized as an invaluable source of compounds in drug discovery and development. However, systematic identification of drug targets for natural products at the human proteome level via various experimental assays is highly expensive and time-consuming. In this study, we proposed a systems pharmacology infrastructure to predict new drug targets and anticancer indications of natural products. Specifically, we reconstructed a global drug-target network with 7,314 interactions connecting 751 targets and 2,388 natural products and built predictive network models via a balanced substructure-drug-target network-based inference approach. A high area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.96 was yielded for predicting new targets of natural products during cross-validation. The new predicted targets of natural products (e.g., resveratrol, genistein and kaempherol) with high scores were validated by various literatures. We further built the statistical network models for identification of new anticancer indications of natural products through integration of both experimentally validated and computationally predicted drug-target interactions of natural products with the known cancer proteins. We showed that the significantly predicted anticancer indications of multiple natural products (e.g., naringenin, disulfiram and metformin) with new mechanism-of-action were validated by various published experimental evidences. In summary, this study offers powerful computational systems pharmacology approaches and tools for development of novel targeted cancer therapies by exploiting the polypharmacology of natural products.

  16. SELF-BLM: Prediction of drug-target interactions via self-training SVM

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Jongsoo; Nam, Hojung

    2017-01-01

    Predicting drug-target interactions is important for the development of novel drugs and the repositioning of drugs. To predict such interactions, there are a number of methods based on drug and target protein similarity. Although these methods, such as the bipartite local model (BLM), show promise, they often categorize unknown interactions as negative interaction. Therefore, these methods are not ideal for finding potential drug-target interactions that have not yet been validated as positive interactions. Thus, here we propose a method that integrates machine learning techniques, such as self-training support vector machine (SVM) and BLM, to develop a self-training bipartite local model (SELF-BLM) that facilitates the identification of potential interactions. The method first categorizes unlabeled interactions and negative interactions among unknown interactions using a clustering method. Then, using the BLM method and self-training SVM, the unlabeled interactions are self-trained and final local classification models are constructed. When applied to four classes of proteins that include enzymes, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, and nuclear receptors, SELF-BLM showed the best performance for predicting not only known interactions but also potential interactions in three protein classes compare to other related studies. The implemented software and supporting data are available at https://github.com/GIST-CSBL/SELF-BLM. PMID:28192537

  17. PhID: an open-access integrated pharmacology interactions database for drugs, targets, diseases, genes, side-effects and pathways.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhe; Tu, Weizhong; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Qian-Nan

    2017-09-14

    The current network pharmacology study encountered a bottleneck with a lot of public data scattered in different databases. There is the lack of open-access and consolidated platform that integrates this information for systemic research. To address this issue, we have developed PhID, an integrated pharmacology database which integrates >400,000 pharmacology elements (drug, target, disease, gene, side-effect, and pathway) and >200,000 element interactions in branches of public databases. The PhID has three major applications: (1) assists scientists searching through the overwhelming amount of pharmacology elements interaction data by names, public IDs, molecule structures, or molecular sub-structures; (2) helps visualizing pharmacology elements and their interactions with a web-based network graph; (3) provides prediction of drug-target interactions through two modules: PreDPI-ki and FIM, by which users can predict drug-target interactions of the PhID entities or some drug-target pairs they interest. To get a systems-level understanding of drug action and disease complexity, PhID as a network pharmacology tool was established from the perspective of data layer, visualization layer and prediction model layer to present information untapped by current databases. Database URL: http://phid.ditad.org/.

  18. A systematic prediction of drug-target interactions using molecular fingerprints and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-An; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing

    2016-11-21

    Drug-Target Interactions (DTI) play a crucial role in discovering new drug candidates and finding new proteins to target for drug development. Although the number of detected DTI obtained by high-throughput techniques has been increasing, the number of known DTI is still limited. On the other hand, the experimental methods for detecting the interactions among drugs and proteins are costly and inefficient. Therefore, computational approaches for predicting DTI are drawing increasing attention in recent years. In this paper, we report a novel computational model for predicting the DTI using extremely randomized trees model and protein amino acids information. More specifically, the protein sequence is represented as a Pseudo Substitution Matrix Representation (Pseudo-SMR) descriptor in which the influence of biological evolutionary information is retained. For the representation of drug molecules, a novel fingerprint feature vector is utilized to describe its substructure information. Then the DTI pair is characterized by concatenating the two vector spaces of protein sequence and drug substructure. Finally, the proposed method is explored for predicting the DTI on four benchmark datasets: Enzyme, Ion Channel, GPCRs and Nuclear Receptor. The experimental results demonstrate that this method achieves promising prediction accuracies of 89.85%, 87.87%, 82.99% and 81.67%, respectively. For further evaluation, we compared the performance of Extremely Randomized Trees model with that of the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine classifier. And we also compared the proposed model with existing computational models, and confirmed 15 potential drug-target interactions by looking for existing databases. The experiment results show that the proposed method is feasible and promising for predicting drug-target interactions for new drug candidate screening based on sizeable features.

  19. Extracting sets of chemical substructures and protein domains governing drug-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Pauwels, Edouard; Saigo, Hiroto; Stoven, Véronique

    2011-05-23

    The identification of rules governing molecular recognition between drug chemical substructures and protein functional sites is a challenging issue at many stages of the drug development process. In this paper we develop a novel method to extract sets of drug chemical substructures and protein domains that govern drug-target interactions on a genome-wide scale. This is made possible using sparse canonical correspondence analysis (SCCA) for analyzing drug substructure profiles and protein domain profiles simultaneously. The method does not depend on the availability of protein 3D structures. From a data set of known drug-target interactions including enzymes, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors, we extract a set of chemical substructures shared by drugs able to bind to a set of protein domains. These two sets of extracted chemical substructures and protein domains form components that can be further exploited in a drug discovery process. This approach successfully clusters protein domains that may be evolutionary unrelated but that bind a common set of chemical substructures. As shown in several examples, it can also be very helpful for predicting new protein-ligand interactions and addressing the problem of ligand specificity. The proposed method constitutes a contribution to the recent field of chemogenomics that aims to connect the chemical space with the biological space.

  20. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H

    2016-02-25

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision-recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets.

  1. Updates on drug-target network; facilitating polypharmacology and data integration by growth of DrugBank database.

    PubMed

    Barneh, Farnaz; Jafari, Mohieddin; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Network pharmacology elucidates the relationship between drugs and targets. As the identified targets for each drug increases, the corresponding drug-target network (DTN) evolves from solely reflection of the pharmaceutical industry trend to a portrait of polypharmacology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potentials of DrugBank database in advancing systems pharmacology. We constructed and analyzed DTN from drugs and targets associations in the DrugBank 4.0 database. Our results showed that in bipartite DTN, increased ratio of identified targets for drugs augmented density and connectivity of drugs and targets and decreased modular structure. To clear up the details in the network structure, the DTNs were projected into two networks namely, drug similarity network (DSN) and target similarity network (TSN). In DSN, various classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with distinct therapeutic categories were linked together based on shared targets. Projected TSN also showed complexity because of promiscuity of the drugs. By including investigational drugs that are currently being tested in clinical trials, the networks manifested more connectivity and pictured the upcoming pharmacological space in the future years. Diverse biological processes and protein-protein interactions were manipulated by new drugs, which can extend possible target combinations. We conclude that network-based organization of DrugBank 4.0 data not only reveals the potential for repurposing of existing drugs, also allows generating novel predictions about drugs off-targets, drug-drug interactions and their side effects. Our results also encourage further effort for high-throughput identification of targets to build networks that can be integrated into disease networks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  3. Systematic Identification of Anti-Fungal Drug Targets by a Metabolic Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaltdorf, Martin; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K.; Liang, Chunguang; Binder, Jasmin; Dietl, Anna-Maria; Meir, Zohar; Haas, Hubertus; Osherov, Nir; Krappmann, Sven; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    New antimycotic drugs are challenging to find, as potential target proteins may have close human orthologs. We here focus on identifying metabolic targets that are critical for fungal growth and have minimal similarity to targets among human proteins. We compare and combine here: (I) direct metabolic network modeling using elementary mode analysis and flux estimates approximations using expression data, (II) targeting metabolic genes by transcriptome analysis of condition-specific highly expressed enzymes, and (III) analysis of enzyme structure, enzyme interconnectedness (“hubs”), and identification of pathogen-specific enzymes using orthology relations. We have identified 64 targets including metabolic enzymes involved in vitamin synthesis, lipid, and amino acid biosynthesis including 18 targets validated from the literature, two validated and five currently examined in own genetic experiments, and 38 further promising novel target proteins which are non-orthologous to human proteins, involved in metabolism and are highly ranked drug targets from these pipelines. PMID:27379244

  4. Metabolic Network Analysis-Based Identification of Antimicrobial Drug Targets in Category A Bioterrorism Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents. PMID:24454817

  5. A Drug-Target Network-Based Approach to Evaluate the Efficacy of Medicinal Plants for Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiangyong; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2013-01-01

    The use of plants as natural medicines in the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has long been of special interest. In this work, we developed a docking score-weighted prediction model based on drug-target network to evaluate the efficacy of medicinal plants for T2DM. High throughput virtual screening from chemical library of natural products was adopted to calculate the binding affinity between natural products contained in medicinal plants and 33 T2DM-related proteins. The drug-target network was constructed according to the strength of the binding affinity if the molecular docking score satisfied the threshold. By linking the medicinal plant with T2DM through drug-target network, the model can predict the efficacy of natural products and medicinal plant for T2DM. Eighteen thousand nine hundred ninety-nine natural products and 1669 medicinal plants were predicted to be potentially bioactive. PMID:24223610

  6. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions for Drug Repositioning Only Based on Genomic Expression Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shufeng; Wan, Chunling; Qin, Shengying; Li, Can; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2013-01-01

    Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI). However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap). Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1) some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2) in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects. PMID:24244130

  7. GWAS and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of links between genome variation and complex disease. Among other benefits, it is expected that these insights will lead to new therapeutic strategies, particularly the identification of new drug targets. In this paper, we evaluate the power of GWAS studies to find drug targets by examining how many existing drug targets have been directly 'rediscovered' by this technique, and the extent to which GWAS results may be leveraged by network information to discover known and new drug targets. Results We find that only a very small fraction of drug targets are directly detected in the relevant GWAS studies. We investigate two possible explanations for this observation. First, we find evidence of negative selection acting on drug target genes as a consequence of strong coupling with the disease phenotype, so reducing the incidence of SNPs linked to the disease. Second, we find that GWAS genes are substantially longer on average than drug targets and than all genes, suggesting there is a length related bias in GWAS results. In spite of the low direct relationship between drug targets and GWAS reported genes, we found these two sets of genes are closely coupled in the human protein network. As a consequence, machine-learning methods are able to recover known drug targets based on network context and the set of GWAS reported genes for the same disease. We show the approach is potentially useful for identifying drug repurposing opportunities. Conclusions Although GWA studies do not directly identify most existing drug targets, there are several reasons to expect that new targets will nevertheless be discovered using these data. Initial results on drug repurposing studies using network analysis are encouraging and suggest directions for future development. PMID:25057111

  8. Emory University: MEDICI (Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions) for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has developed a computational methodology to combine high-throughput knockdown data with known protein network topologies to infer the importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for the survival of cancer cells.  Applying these data to the Achilles shRNA results, the CCLE cell line characterizations, and known and newly identified PPIs provides novel insights for potential new drug targets for cancer therapies and identifies important PPI hubs.

  9. Antimalarial drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum predicted by stage-specific metabolic network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite enormous efforts to combat malaria the disease still afflicts up to half a billion people each year of which more than one million die. Currently no approved vaccine is available and resistances to antimalarials are widely spread. Hence, new antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. Results Here, we present a computational analysis of the metabolism of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malaria pathogen. We assembled a compartmentalized metabolic model and predicted life cycle stage specific metabolism with the help of a flux balance approach that integrates gene expression data. Predicted metabolite exchanges between parasite and host were found to be in good accordance with experimental findings when the parasite's metabolic network was embedded into that of its host (erythrocyte). Knock-out simulations identified 307 indispensable metabolic reactions within the parasite. 35 out of 57 experimentally demonstrated essential enzymes were recovered and another 16 enzymes, if additionally the assumption was made that nutrient uptake from the host cell is limited and all reactions catalyzed by the inhibited enzyme are blocked. This predicted set of putative drug targets, shown to be enriched with true targets by a factor of at least 2.75, was further analyzed with respect to homology to human enzymes, functional similarity to therapeutic targets in other organisms and their predicted potency for prophylaxis and disease treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that the set of essential enzymes predicted by our flux balance approach represents a promising starting point for further drug development. PMID:20807400

  10. RFDT: A Rotation Forest-based Predictor for Predicting Drug-Target Interactions using Drug Structure and Protein Sequence Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Yan, Xin; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-14

    Identification of interaction between drugs and target proteins plays an important role in discovering new drug candidates. However, through the experimental method to identify the drug-target interactions remain to be extremely time-consuming, expensive and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, it is urgent to develop new computational methods to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). In this article, a novel computational model is developed for predicting potential drug-target interactions under the theory that each drug-target interaction pair can be represented by the structural properties from drugs and evolutionary information derived from proteins. Specifically, the protein sequences are encoded as Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) descriptor which contains information of biological evolutionary and the drug molecules are encoded as fingerprint feature vector which represents the existence of certain functional groups or fragments. Four benchmark datasets involving enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with Rotation Forest (RF) model. The proposed method achieved the prediction accuracy of 91.3%, 89.1%, 84.1% and 71.1% for four datasets respectively. In order to make our method more persuasive, we compared our classifier with the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. We also compared the proposed method with other excellent methods. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in the prediction of DTI, and can provide assistance for new drug research and development.

  11. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of real-time dynamics of drug-target interactions by ultralong nanowalls.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Gübeli, Raphael J; Güder, Firat; Weber, Wilfried; Zacharias, Margit

    2013-11-07

    Detecting drug-target interactions in real-time is a powerful approach for drug discovery and analytics. We show here for the first time the ultra fast electrical real-time detection and quantification of antibiotics using a novel biohybrid nanosensor. The biomolecular sensing is performed on ultralong (mm range) high aspect ratio nanowall (50 nm width) surfaces functionalized with operator DNA tetO which is specifically bound by the sensor protein TetR. This sensor protein is released from the operator DNA in a dose dependent manner by exposing the device functionalized with this bound DNA-protein complex to tetracycline antibiotics. As a result, the electrical conductance is accordingly modulated by these surface net charge changes. The switching mechanism of sensor proteins attached at the functionalized surfaces and releasing them again by antibiotics is demonstrated. With the here presented device the detection limit is below the limits of prevailing detection methods. Moreover, the study is extended to detect antibiotic residues in spiked organic milk from cows far below the maximum residual level of the European Union. In spiked milk samples a detection limit for tetracycline concentrations in the 100 fM level was achieved. The nanowall devices are fabricated by atomic layer deposition-based spacer lithography on full wafer scale which is a simple approach capable for mass production.

  13. Understanding of known drug-target interactions in the catalytic pocket of neuraminidase subtype N1.

    PubMed

    Malaisree, Maturos; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Decha, Panita; Intharathep, Pathumwadee; Aruksakunwong, Ornjira; Hannongbua, Supot

    2008-06-01

    To provide detailed information and insight into the drug-target interaction, structure, solvation, and dynamic and thermodynamic properties, the three known-neuraminidase inhibitors-oseltamivir (OTV), zanamivir (ZNV), and peramivir (PRV)-embedded in the catalytic site of neuraminidase (NA) subtype N1 were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. In terms of ligand conformation, there were major differences in the structures of the guanidinium and the bulky groups. The atoms of the guanidinium group of PRV were observed to form many more hydrogen bonds with the surrounded residues and were much less solvated by water molecules, in comparison with the other two inhibitors. Consequently, D151 lying on the 150-loop (residues 147-152) of group-1 neuraminidase (N1, N4, N5, and N8) was considerably shifted to form direct hydrogen bonds with the --OH group of the PRV, which was located rather far from the 150-loop. For the bulky group, direct hydrogen bonds were detected only between the hydrophilic side chain of ZNV and residues R224, E276, and E277 of N1 with rather weak binding, 20-70% occupation. This is not the case for OTV and PRV, in which flexibility and steric effects due to the hydrophobic side chain lead to the rearrangement of the surrounded residues, that is, the negatively charged side chain of E276 was shifted and rotated to form hydrogen bonds with the positively charged moiety of R224. Taking into account all the ligand-enzyme interaction data, the gas phase MM interaction energy of -282.2 kcal/mol as well as the binding free energy (DeltaG(binding)) of -227.4 kcal/mol for the PRV-N1 are significantly lower than those of the other inhibitors. The ordering of DeltaG(binding) of PRV < ZNV < OTV agrees well with the ordering of experimental IC(50) value. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Pioneering topological methods for network-based drug-target prediction by exploiting a brain-network self-organization theory.

    PubMed

    Durán, Claudio; Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine M; Haupt, V Joachim; Schroeder, Michael; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2017-04-26

    The bipartite network representation of the drug-target interactions (DTIs) in a biosystem enhances understanding of the drugs' multifaceted action modes, suggests therapeutic switching for approved drugs and unveils possible side effects. As experimental testing of DTIs is costly and time-consuming, computational predictors are of great aid. Here, for the first time, state-of-the-art DTI supervised predictors custom-made in network biology were compared-using standard and innovative validation frameworks-with unsupervised pure topological-based models designed for general-purpose link prediction in bipartite networks. Surprisingly, our results show that the bipartite topology alone, if adequately exploited by means of the recently proposed local-community-paradigm (LCP) theory-initially detected in brain-network topological self-organization and afterwards generalized to any complex network-is able to suggest highly reliable predictions, with comparable performance with the state-of-the-art-supervised methods that exploit additional (non-topological, for instance biochemical) DTI knowledge. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the novel predictions revealed that each class of methods prioritizes distinct true interactions; hence, combining methodologies based on diverse principles represents a promising strategy to improve drug-target discovery. To conclude, this study promotes the power of bio-inspired computing, demonstrating that simple unsupervised rules inspired by principles of topological self-organization and adaptiveness arising during learning in living intelligent systems (like the brain) can efficiently equal perform complicated algorithms based on advanced, supervised and knowledge-based engineering. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Drug-target interaction prediction from chemical, genomic and pharmacological data in an integrated framework

    PubMed Central

    Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Kotera, Masaaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: In silico prediction of drug–target interactions from heterogeneous biological data is critical in the search for drugs and therapeutic targets for known diseases such as cancers. There is therefore a strong incentive to develop new methods capable of detecting these potential drug–target interactions efficiently. Results: In this article, we investigate the relationship between the chemical space, the pharmacological space and the topology of drug–target interaction networks, and show that drug–target interactions are more correlated with pharmacological effect similarity than with chemical structure similarity. We then develop a new method to predict unknown drug–target interactions from chemical, genomic and pharmacological data on a large scale. The proposed method consists of two steps: (i) prediction of pharmacological effects from chemical structures of given compounds and (ii) inference of unknown drug–target interactions based on the pharmacological effect similarity in the framework of supervised bipartite graph inference. The originality of the proposed method lies in the prediction of potential pharmacological similarity for any drug candidate compounds and in the integration of chemical, genomic and pharmacological data in a unified framework. In the results, we make predictions for four classes of important drug–target interactions involving enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors. Our comprehensively predicted drug–target interaction networks enable us to suggest many potential drug–target interactions and to increase research productivity toward genomic drug discovery. Supplementary information: Datasets and all prediction results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/pharmaco/. Availability: Softwares are available upon request. Contact: yoshihiro.yamanishi@ensmp.fr PMID:20529913

  16. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Josue D.; Giuste, Felipe O.; Du, Yuhong; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Johns, Margaret A.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology. Here we introduce a computational method (MEDICI) to predict PPI essentiality by combining gene knockdown studies with network models of protein interaction pathways in an analytic framework. Our method uses network topology to model how gene silencing can disrupt PPIs, relating the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs to experimentally observed protein essentialities. This model is then deconvolved to recover the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs. We demonstrate the validity of our approach via prediction of sensitivities to compounds based on PPI essentiality and differences in essentiality based on genetic mutations. We further show that lung cancer patients have improved overall survival when specific PPIs are no longer present, suggesting that these PPIs may be potentially new targets for therapeutic development. Software is freely available at https://github.com/cooperlab/MEDICI. Datasets are available at https://ctd2.nci.nih.gov/dataPortal. PMID:28118365

  17. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    Harati, Sahar; Cooper, Lee A D; Moran, Josue D; Giuste, Felipe O; Du, Yuhong; Ivanov, Andrei A; Johns, Margaret A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Moreno, Carlos S

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology. Here we introduce a computational method (MEDICI) to predict PPI essentiality by combining gene knockdown studies with network models of protein interaction pathways in an analytic framework. Our method uses network topology to model how gene silencing can disrupt PPIs, relating the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs to experimentally observed protein essentialities. This model is then deconvolved to recover the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs. We demonstrate the validity of our approach via prediction of sensitivities to compounds based on PPI essentiality and differences in essentiality based on genetic mutations. We further show that lung cancer patients have improved overall survival when specific PPIs are no longer present, suggesting that these PPIs may be potentially new targets for therapeutic development. Software is freely available at https://github.com/cooperlab/MEDICI. Datasets are available at https://ctd2.nci.nih.gov/dataPortal.

  18. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  19. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound.

  20. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-04-20

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound.

  1. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound. PMID:27095146

  2. Gene Network Analysis of Metallo Beta Lactamase Family Proteins Indicates the Role of Gene Partners in Antibiotic Resistance and Reveals Important Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Parimelzaghan, Anitha; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2016-06-01

    Metallo Beta (β) Lactamases (MBL) are metal dependent bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze the β-lactam antibiotics. In recent years, MBL have received considerable attention because it inactivates most of the β-lactam antibiotics. Increase in dissemination of MBL encoding antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria often results in unsuccessful treatments. Gene interaction network of MBL provides a complete understanding on the molecular basis of MBL mediated antibiotic resistance. In our present study, we have constructed the MBL network of 37 proteins with 751 functional partners from pathogenic bacterial spp. We found 12 highly interconnecting clusters. Among the 37 MBL proteins considered in the present study, 22 MBL proteins are from B3 subclass, 14 are from B1 subclass and only one is from B2 subclass. Global topological parameters are used to calculate and compare the probability of interactions in MBL proteins. Our results indicate that the proteins associated within the network have a strong influence in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Interestingly, several drug targets are identified from the constructed network. We believe that our results would be helpful for researchers exploring MBL-mediated antibiotic resistant mechanisms.

  3. Direct AKAP-mediated protein-protein interactions as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Hundsrucker, C; Klussmann, E

    2008-01-01

    A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a diverse family of about 50 scaffolding proteins. They are defined by the presence of a structurally conserved protein kinase A (PKA)-binding domain. AKAPs tether PKA and other signalling proteins such as further protein kinases, protein phosphatases and phosphodiesterases by direct protein-protein interactions to cellular compartments. Thus, AKAPs form the basis of signalling modules that integrate cellular signalling processes and limit these to defined sites. Disruption of AKAP functions by gene targeting, knockdown approaches and, in particular, pharmacological disruption of defined AKAP-dependent protein-protein interactions has revealed key roles of AKAPs in numerous processes, including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractility and vasopressin-mediated water reabsorption in the kidney. Dysregulation of such processes causes diseases, including cardiovascular and renal disorders. In this review, we discuss AKAP functions elucidated by gene targeting and knockdown approaches, but mainly focus on studies utilizing peptides for disruption of direct AKAP-mediated protein-protein interactions. The latter studies point to direct AKAP-mediated protein-protein interactions as targets for novel drugs.

  4. Drug Synergy Screen and Network Modeling in Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma Identifies CDK4 and IGF1R as Synergistic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Martin L.; Molinelli, Evan J.; Nair, Jayasree S.; Sheikh, Tahir; Samy, Rita; Jing, Xiaohong; He, Qin; Korkut, Anil; Crago, Aimee M.; Singer, Samuel; Schwartz, Gary K.; Sander, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDLS) is a rare but aggressive cancer with high recurrence and low response rates to targeted therapies. Increasing treatment efficacy may require combinations of targeted agents that counteract the effects of multiple abnormalities. To identify a possible multicomponent therapy, we performed a combinatorial drug screen in a DDLS-derived cell line and identified cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) as synergistic drug targets. We measured the phosphorylation of multiple proteins and cell viability in response to systematic drug combinations and derived computational models of the signaling network. These models predict that the observed synergy in reducing cell viability with CDK4 and IGF1R inhibitors depend on activity of the AKT pathway. Experiments confirmed that combined inhibition of CDK4 and IGF1R cooperatively suppresses the activation of proteins within the AKT pathway. Consistent with these findings, synergistic reductions in cell viability were also found when combining CDK4 inhibition with inhibition of either AKT or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), another receptor similar to IGF1R that activates AKT. Thus, network models derived from context-specific proteomic measurements of systematically perturbed cancer cells may reveal cancer-specific signaling mechanisms and aid in the design of effective combination therapies. PMID:24065146

  5. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Levering, Jennifer; Fiedler, Tomas; Sieg, Antje; van Grinsven, Koen W A; Hering, Silvio; Veith, Nadine; Olivier, Brett G; Klett, Lara; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Teusink, Bas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Kummer, Ursula

    2016-08-20

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes M49. Initially, we based the reconstruction on genome annotations and already existing and curated metabolic networks of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis. This initial draft was manually curated with the final reconstruction accounting for 480 genes associated with 576 reactions and 558 metabolites. In order to constrain the model further, we performed growth experiments of wild type and arcA deletion strains of S. pyogenes M49 in a chemically defined medium and calculated nutrient uptake and production fluxes. We additionally performed amino acid auxotrophy experiments to test the consistency of the model. The established genome-scale model can be used to understand the growth requirements of the human pathogen S. pyogenes and define optimal and suboptimal conditions, but also to describe differences and similarities between S. pyogenes and related lactic acid bacteria such as L. lactis in order to find strategies to reduce the growth of the pathogen and propose drug targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting drug-target interaction for new drugs using enhanced similarity measures and super-target clustering.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Li, Yiming; Leung, Henry C M; Chin, Francis Y L

    2015-07-15

    Predicting drug-target interaction using computational approaches is an important step in drug discovery and repositioning. To predict whether there will be an interaction between a drug and a target, most existing methods identify similar drugs and targets in the database. The prediction is then made based on the known interactions of these drugs and targets. This idea is promising. However, there are two shortcomings that have not yet been addressed appropriately. Firstly, most of the methods only use 2D chemical structures and protein sequences to measure the similarity of drugs and targets respectively. However, this information may not fully capture the characteristics determining whether a drug will interact with a target. Secondly, there are very few known interactions, i.e. many interactions are "missing" in the database. Existing approaches are biased towards known interactions and have no good solutions to handle possibly missing interactions which affect the accuracy of the prediction. In this paper, we enhance the similarity measures to include non-structural (and non-sequence-based) information and introduce the concept of a "super-target" to handle the problem of possibly missing interactions. Based on evaluations on real data, we show that our similarity measure is better than the existing measures and our approach is able to achieve higher accuracy than the two best existing algorithms, WNN-GIP and KBMF2K. Our approach is available at http://web.hku.hk/∼liym1018/projects/drug/drug.html or http://www.bmlnwpu.org/us/tools/PredictingDTI_S2/METHODS.html.

  7. Interaction of carbon monoxide with transition metals: evolutionary insights into drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Motterlini, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The perception that carbon monoxide (CO) is poisonous and life-threatening for mammalian organisms stems from its intrinsic propensity to bind iron in hemoglobin, a reaction that ultimately leads to impaired oxygen delivery to tissues. From evolutionary and chemical perspectives, however, CO is one of the most essential molecules in the formation of biological components and its interaction with transition metals is at the origin of primordial cell signaling. Not surprisingly, mammals have gradually evolved systems to finely control the synthesis and the sensing of this gaseous molecule. Cells are indeed continuously exposed to small quantities of CO produced endogenously during the degradation of heme by constitutive and inducible heme oxygenase enzymes. We have gradually learnt that heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide (CO) serves as a ubiquitous signaling mediator which could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. The development of transition metal carbonyls as prototypic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) represents a novel stratagem for a safer delivery of CO-based pharmaceuticals in the treatment of various pathological disorders. This review will look back at evolution to analyze and argue that a dynamic interaction of CO with specific intracellular metal centers is the common denominator for the diversified beneficial effects mediated by this gaseous molecule.

  8. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  9. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  10. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Tudor I; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg; Yang, Jeremy J; Taboureau, Olivier; Mathias, Stephen L; Kouskoumvekaki, Lrene; Sklar, Larry A; Bologa, Cristian G

    2011-03-14

    Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply bio- and cheminformatics tools using the DRUGS database, containing 3,837 unique small molecules annotated on 1,750 proteins. These are likely to serve as drug targets and antitargets (i.e., associated with side effects, SE). The academic community, the pharmaceutical sector and clinicians alike could benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based on 7,684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the "adverse reactions" section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5x5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE-D-T-CO. This type of data can be used to streamline drug repurposing and may result in novel insights that can lead to the identification of novel drug actions.

  11. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg; Yang, Jeremy J.; Taboureau, Olivier; Mathias, Stephen L.; Kouskoumvekaki, lrene; Sklar, Larry A.; Bologa, Cristian G.

    2012-01-01

    Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply bio- and cheminformatics tools using the DRUGS database, containing 3,837 unique small molecules annotated on 1,750 proteins. These are likely to serve as drug targets and antitargets (i.e., associated with side effects, SE). The academic community, the pharmaceutical sector and clinicians alike could benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based on 7,684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the “adverse reactions” section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5x5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE-D-T-CO. This type of data can be used to streamline drug repurposing and may result in novel insights that can lead to the identification of novel drug actions. PMID:22287994

  12. Modelling the Effect of SPION Size in a Stent Assisted Magnetic Drug Targeting System with Interparticle Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Cregg, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and it is caused by the interaction of genomic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Although chemotherapy is one way of treating cancers, it also damages healthy cells and may cause severe side effects. Therefore, it is beneficial in drug delivery in the human body to increase the proportion of the drugs at the target site while limiting its exposure at the rest of body through Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT). Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are derived from polyol methods and coated with oleic acid and can be used as magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) in an MDT system. Here, we develop a mathematical model for studying the interactions between the MDCPs enriched with three different diameters of SPIONs (6.6, 11.6, and 17.8 nm) in the MDT system with an implanted magnetizable stent using different magnetic field strengths and blood velocities. Our computational analysis allows for the optimal design of the SPIONs enriched MDCPs to be used in clinical applications. PMID:25815370

  13. Genome-Scale Screening of Drug-Target Associations Relevant to Ki Using a Chemogenomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Qian-Nan; He, Min; Xu, Qing-Song; Zhou, Guang-Hua; Zhang, Liu-Xia; Deng, Zi-xin; Liu, Shao

    2013-01-01

    The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in genomic drug discovery. In the present study, the quantitative binding affinities of drug-target pairs are differentiated as a measurement to define whether a drug interacts with a protein or not, and then a chemogenomics framework using an unbiased set of general integrated features and random forest (RF) is employed to construct a predictive model which can accurately classify drug-target pairs. The predictability of the model is further investigated and validated by several independent validation sets. The built model is used to predict drug-target associations, some of which were confirmed by comparing experimental data from public biological resources. A drug-target interaction network with high confidence drug-target pairs was also reconstructed. This network provides further insight for the action of drugs and targets. Finally, a web-based server called PreDPI-Ki was developed to predict drug-target interactions for drug discovery. In addition to providing a high-confidence list of drug-target associations for subsequent experimental investigation guidance, these results also contribute to the understanding of drug-target interactions. We can also see that quantitative information of drug-target associations could greatly promote the development of more accurate models. The PreDPI-Ki server is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/dpiki. PMID:23577055

  14. Yeast genetic interaction screen of human genes associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: identification of MAP2K5 kinase as a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myungjin; Chung, Ah Young; Yachie, Nozomu; Seo, Minchul; Jeon, Hyejin; Nam, Youngpyo; Seo, Yeojin; Kim, Eunmi; Zhong, Quan; Vidal, Marc; Park, Hae Chul; Roth, Frederick P; Suk, Kyoungho

    2017-09-01

    To understand disease mechanisms, a large-scale analysis of human-yeast genetic interactions was performed. Of 1305 human disease genes assayed, 20 genes exhibited strong toxicity in yeast. Human-yeast genetic interactions were identified by en masse transformation of the human disease genes into a pool of 4653 homozygous diploid yeast deletion mutants with unique barcode sequences, followed by multiplexed barcode sequencing to identify yeast toxicity modifiers. Subsequent network analyses focusing on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-associated genes, such as optineurin (OPTN) and angiogenin (ANG), showed that the human orthologs of the yeast toxicity modifiers of these ALS genes are enriched for several biological processes, such as cell death, lipid metabolism, and molecular transport. When yeast genetic interaction partners held in common between human OPTN and ANG were validated in mammalian cells and zebrafish, MAP2K5 kinase emerged as a potential drug target for ALS therapy. The toxicity modifiers identified in this study may deepen our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of ALS and other devastating diseases. © 2017 Jo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Understanding of Drug-Target Interactions: A case Study in Influenza Virus A Subtype H5N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Malaisree, Maturos; Decha, Panita; Laohpongspaisan, Chittima; Aruksakunwong, Ornjira; Intharathep, Pathumwadee; Pianwanit, Somsak; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Megnassan, Eugene; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav; Hannongbua, Supot

    2007-12-01

    This study aims at gaining insight into molecular mechanisms of action of three drug targets of the life cycle of influenza virus A subtype H5N1, namely Hemagglutinin (H5), Neuraminidase (N1) and M2 ion channel (M2), using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics techniques. In hemagglutinin, interest is focused on the high pathogenicity of the H5 due to the -RRRKK- insertion. MD simulations carried out for H5 in both high and low pathogenic forms (HPH5 and LPH5), aimed at understanding why HPH5 was experimentally observed to be 5-fold better cleaved by furin relative to the non-inserted sequence of LPH5. As the results, the cleavage loop of HPH5 was found to fit well and bind strongly into the catalytic site of human furin, serving as a conformation suitable for the proteolytic reaction. The second target, neuraminidase was studied by two different approaches. Firstly with MD simulations, rotation of the -NHAc and—OCHEt2 side chains of oseltamivir (OTV), leading directly to rearrangement of the catalytic cavity, was found to be a primary source of the lower susceptibility of OTV to neuraminidase subtype N1 than to N2 and N9. In addition, three inhibitiors, OTV, zanamivir (ZNV) and peramivir (PRV), complexed with neuraminidase subtype N1 were studied to understand the drug-target interactions. The structural properties, position and conformation of PRV and its side chains are uniformly preferential, i.e., its conformation fits very well with the N1 active site. At the N1 target, another approach, combinatorial chemistry, was used to design a library of new potent inhibitors, which well fit to the active site and the 150-loop residues of N1. Investigation was also extended to the M2 proton channel. Five different protonation states of the selectivity filter residue (His) where 0H, 1H, 2aH, 2dH and 4H represent the systems with none, mono-protonated, di-protonated at adjacent and opposite positions, and tetra-protonated, respectively, were taken into account both

  16. Using an in Silico Approach to Teach 3D Pharmacodynamics of the Drug-Target Interaction Process Focusing on Selective COX2 Inhibition by Celecoxib

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavares, Maurício T.; Primi, Marina C.; Silva, Nuno A. T. F.; Carvalho, Camila F.; Cunha, Micael R.; Parise-Filho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Teaching the molecular aspects of drug-target interactions and selectivity is not always an easy task. In this context, the use of alternative and engaging approaches could help pharmacy and chemistry students better understand this important topic of medicinal chemistry. Herein a 4 h practical exercise that uses freely available software as a…

  17. From chemical graphs in computer-aided drug design to general Markov-Galvez indices of drug-target, proteome, drug-parasitic disease, technological, and social-legal networks.

    PubMed

    Riera-Fernández, Pablo; Munteanu, Cristian R; Dorado, Julian; Martin-Romalde, Raquel; Duardo-Sanchez, Aliuska; González-Diaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    Complex Networks are useful in solving problems in drug research and industry, developing mathematical representations of different systems. These systems move in a wide range from relatively simple graph representations of drug molecular structures to large systems. We can cite for instance, drug-target protein interaction networks, drug policy legislation networks, or drug treatment in large geographical disease spreading networks. In any case, all these networks have essentially the same components: nodes (atoms, drugs, proteins, microorganisms and/or parasites, geographical areas, drug policy legislations, etc.) and edges (chemical bonds, drug-target interactions, drug-parasite treatment, drug use, etc.). Consequently, we can use the same type of numeric parameters called Topological Indices (TIs) to describe the connectivity patterns in all these kinds of Complex Networks despite the nature of the object they represent. The main reason for this success of TIs is the high flexibility of this theory to solve in a fast but rigorous way many apparently unrelated problems in all these disciplines. Another important reason for the success of TIs is that using these parameters as inputs we can find Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) models for different kind of problems in Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD). Taking into account all the above-mentioned aspects, the present work is aimed at offering a common background to all the manuscripts presented in this special issue. In so doing, we make a review of the most common types of complex networks involving drugs or their targets. In addition, we review both classic TIs that have been used to describe the molecular structure of drugs and/or larger complex networks. Next, we use for the first time a Markov chain model to generalize Galvez TIs to higher order analogues coined here as the Markov-Galvez TIs of order k (MGk). Lastly, we illustrate the calculation of MGk values for different classes of

  18. A comparative study of disease genes and drug targets in the human protein interactome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Disease genes cause or contribute genetically to the development of the most complex diseases. Drugs are the major approaches to treat the complex disease through interacting with their targets. Thus, drug targets are critical for treatment efficacy. However, the interrelationship between the disease genes and drug targets is not clear. Results In this study, we comprehensively compared the network properties of disease genes and drug targets for five major disease categories (cancer, cardiovascular disease, immune system disease, metabolic disease, and nervous system disease). We first collected disease genes from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for five disease categories and collected their corresponding drugs based on drugs' Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Then, we obtained the drug targets for these five different disease categories. We found that, though the intersections between disease genes and drug targets were small, disease genes were significantly enriched in targets compared to their enrichment in human protein-coding genes. We further compared network properties of the proteins encoded by disease genes and drug targets in human protein-protein interaction networks (interactome). The results showed that the drug targets tended to have higher degree, higher betweenness, and lower clustering coefficient in cancer Furthermore, we observed a clear fraction increase of disease proteins or drug targets in the near neighborhood compared with the randomized genes. Conclusions The study presents the first comprehensive comparison of the disease genes and drug targets in the context of interactome. The results provide some foundational network characteristics for further designing computational strategies to predict novel drug targets and drug repurposing. PMID:25861037

  19. A comparative study of disease genes and drug targets in the human protein interactome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Zhu, Kevin; Zheng, W; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Disease genes cause or contribute genetically to the development of the most complex diseases. Drugs are the major approaches to treat the complex disease through interacting with their targets. Thus, drug targets are critical for treatment efficacy. However, the interrelationship between the disease genes and drug targets is not clear. In this study, we comprehensively compared the network properties of disease genes and drug targets for five major disease categories (cancer, cardiovascular disease, immune system disease, metabolic disease, and nervous system disease). We first collected disease genes from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for five disease categories and collected their corresponding drugs based on drugs' Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Then, we obtained the drug targets for these five different disease categories. We found that, though the intersections between disease genes and drug targets were small, disease genes were significantly enriched in targets compared to their enrichment in human protein-coding genes. We further compared network properties of the proteins encoded by disease genes and drug targets in human protein-protein interaction networks (interactome). The results showed that the drug targets tended to have higher degree, higher betweenness, and lower clustering coefficient in cancer Furthermore, we observed a clear fraction increase of disease proteins or drug targets in the near neighborhood compared with the randomized genes. The study presents the first comprehensive comparison of the disease genes and drug targets in the context of interactome. The results provide some foundational network characteristics for further designing computational strategies to predict novel drug targets and drug repurposing.

  20. DRUG TARGET PREDICTIONS BASED ON HETEROGENEOUS GRAPH INFERENCE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenhui; Yang, Sen; Li, JING

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in drug development is to understand the hidden relationships among drugs and targets. Computational methods for novel drug target predictions can greatly reduce time and costs compared with experimental methods. In this paper, we propose a network based computational approach for novel drug and target association predictions. More specifically, a heterogeneous drug-target graph, which incorporates known drug-target interactions as well as drug-drug and target-target similarities, is first constructed. Based on this graph, a novel graph-based inference method is introduced. Compared with two state-of-the-art methods, large-scale cross-validation results indicate that the proposed method can greatly improve novel target predictions. PMID:23424111

  1. Predicting Drug Combination Index and Simulating the Network-Regulation Dynamics by Mathematical Modeling of Drug-Targeted EGFR-ERK Signaling Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Yuzong

    2017-01-01

    Synergistic drug combinations enable enhanced therapeutics. Their discovery typically involves the measurement and assessment of drug combination index (CI), which can be facilitated by the development and applications of in-silico CI predictive tools. In this work, we developed and tested the ability of a mathematical model of drug-targeted EGFR-ERK pathway in predicting CIs and in analyzing multiple synergistic drug combinations against observations. Our mathematical model was validated against the literature reported signaling, drug response dynamics, and EGFR-MEK drug combination effect. The predicted CIs and combination therapeutic effects of the EGFR-BRaf, BRaf-MEK, FTI-MEK, and FTI-BRaf inhibitor combinations showed consistent synergism. Our results suggest that existing pathway models may be potentially extended for developing drug-targeted pathway models to predict drug combination CI values, isobolograms, and drug-response surfaces as well as to analyze the dynamics of individual and combinations of drugs. With our model, the efficacy of potential drug combinations can be predicted. Our method complements the developed in-silico methods (e.g. the chemogenomic profile and the statistically-inferenced network models) by predicting drug combination effects from the perspectives of pathway dynamics using experimental or validated molecular kinetic constants, thereby facilitating the collective prediction of drug combination effects in diverse ranges of disease systems.

  2. Predicting Drug Combination Index and Simulating the Network-Regulation Dynamics by Mathematical Modeling of Drug-Targeted EGFR-ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Yuzong

    2017-01-01

    Synergistic drug combinations enable enhanced therapeutics. Their discovery typically involves the measurement and assessment of drug combination index (CI), which can be facilitated by the development and applications of in-silico CI predictive tools. In this work, we developed and tested the ability of a mathematical model of drug-targeted EGFR-ERK pathway in predicting CIs and in analyzing multiple synergistic drug combinations against observations. Our mathematical model was validated against the literature reported signaling, drug response dynamics, and EGFR-MEK drug combination effect. The predicted CIs and combination therapeutic effects of the EGFR-BRaf, BRaf-MEK, FTI-MEK, and FTI-BRaf inhibitor combinations showed consistent synergism. Our results suggest that existing pathway models may be potentially extended for developing drug-targeted pathway models to predict drug combination CI values, isobolograms, and drug-response surfaces as well as to analyze the dynamics of individual and combinations of drugs. With our model, the efficacy of potential drug combinations can be predicted. Our method complements the developed in-silico methods (e.g. the chemogenomic profile and the statistically-inferenced network models) by predicting drug combination effects from the perspectives of pathway dynamics using experimental or validated molecular kinetic constants, thereby facilitating the collective prediction of drug combination effects in diverse ranges of disease systems. PMID:28102344

  3. Predicting Drug Combination Index and Simulating the Network-Regulation Dynamics by Mathematical Modeling of Drug-Targeted EGFR-ERK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Yuzong

    2017-01-19

    Synergistic drug combinations enable enhanced therapeutics. Their discovery typically involves the measurement and assessment of drug combination index (CI), which can be facilitated by the development and applications of in-silico CI predictive tools. In this work, we developed and tested the ability of a mathematical model of drug-targeted EGFR-ERK pathway in predicting CIs and in analyzing multiple synergistic drug combinations against observations. Our mathematical model was validated against the literature reported signaling, drug response dynamics, and EGFR-MEK drug combination effect. The predicted CIs and combination therapeutic effects of the EGFR-BRaf, BRaf-MEK, FTI-MEK, and FTI-BRaf inhibitor combinations showed consistent synergism. Our results suggest that existing pathway models may be potentially extended for developing drug-targeted pathway models to predict drug combination CI values, isobolograms, and drug-response surfaces as well as to analyze the dynamics of individual and combinations of drugs. With our model, the efficacy of potential drug combinations can be predicted. Our method complements the developed in-silico methods (e.g. the chemogenomic profile and the statistically-inferenced network models) by predicting drug combination effects from the perspectives of pathway dynamics using experimental or validated molecular kinetic constants, thereby facilitating the collective prediction of drug combination effects in diverse ranges of disease systems.

  4. A two-step similarity-based method for prediction of drug's target group.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zeng, Wei-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Determination of drug's target protein is very important for studying drug-target interaction network, while drug-target interaction network is a key area in the drug discovery pipeline. Thus correct prediction of drug's target protein is very helpful to promote the development of drug discovery. In this study, we developed a two-step similarity-based method to predict drug's target group. In each step, a similarity score (obtained by graph representation in the first step, and chemical functional group representation in the second step) was employed to make prediction. Since some drugs can target proteins distributing in more than one group of proteins, the method provided a series of candidate target groups for each drug. As a result, the first-order prediction accuracy on training set and test set were 79.01% and 76.43%, respectively, which were much higher than the success rate of a random guess. The results show that using graph representation to encode drug is a good choice in this area. We expect that this contribution will provide some help to understand drug-target interaction network.

  5. In Silico Identification of Proteins Associated with Drug-induced Liver Injury Based on the Prediction of Drug-target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergey; Semin, Maxim; Lagunin, Alexey; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure as well as one of the major reasons for drug withdrawal from clinical trials and the market. Elucidation of molecular interactions associated with DILI may help to detect potentially hazardous pharmacological agents at the early stages of drug development. The purpose of our study is to investigate which interactions with specific human protein targets may cause DILI. Prediction of interactions with 1534 human proteins was performed for the dataset with information about 699 drugs, which were divided into three categories of DILI: severe (178 drugs), moderate (310 drugs) and without DILI (211 drugs). Based on the comparison of drug-target interactions predicted for different drugs' categories and interpretation of those results using clustering, Gene Ontology, pathway and gene expression analysis, we identified 61 protein targets associated with DILI. Most of the revealed proteins were linked with hepatocytes' death caused by disruption of vital cellular processes, as well as the emergence of inflammation in the liver. It was found that interaction of a drug with the identified targets is the essential molecular mechanism of the severe DILI for the most of the considered pharmaceuticals. Thus, pharmaceutical agents interacting with many of the identified targets may be considered as candidates for filtering out at the early stages of drug research. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Interactions of dendrimers with biological drug targets: reality or mystery - a gap in drug delivery and development research.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2016-07-21

    Dendrimers have emerged as novel and efficient materials that can be used as therapeutic agents/drugs or as drug delivery carriers to enhance therapeutic outcomes. Molecular dendrimer interactions are central to their applications and realising their potential. The molecular interactions of dendrimers with drugs or other materials in drug delivery systems or drug conjugates have been extensively reported in the literature. However, despite the growing application of dendrimers as biologically active materials, research focusing on the mechanistic analysis of dendrimer interactions with therapeutic biological targets is currently lacking in the literature. This comprehensive review on dendrimers over the last 15 years therefore attempts to identify the reasons behind the apparent lack of dendrimer-receptor research and proposes approaches to address this issue. The structure, hierarchy and applications of dendrimers are briefly highlighted, followed by a review of their various applications, specifically as biologically active materials, with a focus on their interactions at the target site. It concludes with a technical guide to assist researchers on how to employ various molecular modelling and computational approaches for research on dendrimer interactions with biological targets at a molecular level. This review highlights the impact of a mechanistic analysis of dendrimer interactions on a molecular level, serves to guide and optimise their discovery as medicinal agents, and hopes to stimulate multidisciplinary research between scientific, experimental and molecular modelling research teams.

  7. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the Estrogen Receptor Alpha F domain provides a drug target interface

    PubMed Central

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D.; Piersma, Sander R.; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K. Anton; Jiménez, Connie R.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or antiestrogens that compete for hormone binding. Due to resistance, new treatment modalities are needed and as ERα dimerization is essential for its activity, interference with receptor dimerization offers a new opportunity to exploit in drug design. Here we describe a unique mechanism of how ERα dimerization is negatively controlled by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins at the extreme C terminus of the receptor. Moreover, the small-molecule fusicoccin (FC) stabilizes this ERα/14-3-3 interaction. Cocrystallization of the trimeric ERα/14-3-3/FC complex provides the structural basis for this stabilization and shows the importance of phosphorylation of the penultimate Threonine (ERα-T594) for high-affinity interaction. We confirm that T594 is a distinct ERα phosphorylation site in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using a phospho-T594–specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. In line with its ERα/14-3-3 interaction stabilizing effect, fusicoccin reduces the estradiol-stimulated ERα dimerization, inhibits ERα/chromatin interactions and downstream gene expression, resulting in decreased cell proliferation. Herewith, a unique functional phosphosite and an alternative regulation mechanism of ERα are provided, together with a small molecule that selectively targets this ERα/14-3-3 interface. PMID:23676274

  8. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the estrogen receptor alpha F domain provides a drug target interface.

    PubMed

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D; Piersma, Sander R; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K Anton; Jiménez, Connie R; de Greef, Tom F A; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H

    2013-05-28

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or antiestrogens that compete for hormone binding. Due to resistance, new treatment modalities are needed and as ERα dimerization is essential for its activity, interference with receptor dimerization offers a new opportunity to exploit in drug design. Here we describe a unique mechanism of how ERα dimerization is negatively controlled by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins at the extreme C terminus of the receptor. Moreover, the small-molecule fusicoccin (FC) stabilizes this ERα/14-3-3 interaction. Cocrystallization of the trimeric ERα/14-3-3/FC complex provides the structural basis for this stabilization and shows the importance of phosphorylation of the penultimate Threonine (ERα-T(594)) for high-affinity interaction. We confirm that T(594) is a distinct ERα phosphorylation site in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using a phospho-T(594)-specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. In line with its ERα/14-3-3 interaction stabilizing effect, fusicoccin reduces the estradiol-stimulated ERα dimerization, inhibits ERα/chromatin interactions and downstream gene expression, resulting in decreased cell proliferation. Herewith, a unique functional phosphosite and an alternative regulation mechanism of ERα are provided, together with a small molecule that selectively targets this ERα/14-3-3 interface.

  9. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Farsi, Hasan Ma; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A; Gari, Mamdooh A; Chaudhary, Adeel Ga; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Karim, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC). S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC.

  10. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology.

  11. An integrated strategy for the discovery of drug targets by the analysis of protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, John M.; Askovic, Srdjan; Becklin, Robert R.; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Ho, Yew-Seng J.; Kery, Vladimir; Lai, Shuping; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Pyne, Mike; Robbins, Paul B.; Rechenberg, Moritz Von; Richardson, Bonnie; Savage, Justin; Sheffield, Peter; Thompson, Sam; Weir, Lawrence; Widjaja, Kartika; Xu, Nafei; Zhen, Yuejun; Boniface, J. Jay

    2004-11-01

    Proteomics-based technologies have the potential to accelerate the development of drugs, but such technologies must be well integrated in order to have a positive impact. We describe, herein, a multi-step process for the discovery of protein-protein interactions. It is shown that process stages are interdependent and can influence, either positively or negatively, subsequent steps. Optimization of each step, in the context of the full process, is essential for the overall success of the experiment.

  12. Drug target prioritization in Plasmodium falciparum through metabolic network analysis, and inhibitor designing using virtual screening and docking approach.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Pandey, Saurabh Kumar; Swati, D

    2013-08-01

    The genome sequence of Plasmodium falciparum reveals that many metabolic pathways are unique as compared to its human host. Metabolic Network Analysis was carried out to find the essential enzymes critical for the survival of the pathogen. In the present study, choke point and load point analysis was used to locate putative targets. The identified targets were further checked to confirm that no alternate pathway or human homolog exists. Among the top 15 enzymes obtained from this analysis, we have selected P. falciparum orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (PfODCase) enzyme as it is sequentially and structurally different from that of humans, for searching novel inhibitors. A five-point 3D pharmacophore was generated for the crystal structure of PfODCase complexes with uridine-5'-monophosphate (U5P). The binding site environment shows three H-bond acceptors, one H-bond donor and one negative ionizable feature. This pharmacophore model was used as a 3D query to perform virtual screening experiments against 2,664,779 standard lead compounds obtained from the freely available ZINC database. Top 10 hits obtained from virtual screening were selected for molecular docking experiments against PfODCase in order to verify their results and to have a better insight into their binding modes. Here, docking of U5P with PfODCase is used as a control. We have identified six compounds, among them, few are U5P analogs and others are novel ones with diverse scaffolds. The key residues: Lys42, Asp20, Lys72, Ser127, Ala184, Gln185 and Arg203 at the main binding pocket of PfODCase are responsible for better stability of diverse ligands. These compounds according to their free energy of binding could serve as potent leads for designing novel inhibitors against malarial ODCase enzyme.

  13. Controlling Directed Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanhaiya, Krishna; Czeizler, Eugen; Gratie, Cristian; Petre, Ion

    2017-09-04

    Control theory is a well-established approach in network science, with applications in bio-medicine and cancer research. We build on recent results for structural controllability of directed networks, which identifies a set of driver nodes able to control an a-priori defined part of the network. We develop a novel and efficient approach for the (targeted) structural controllability of cancer networks and demonstrate it for the analysis of breast, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer. We build in each case a protein-protein interaction network and focus on the survivability-essential proteins specific to each cancer type. We show that these essential proteins are efficiently controllable from a relatively small computable set of driver nodes. Moreover, we adjust the method to find the driver nodes among FDA-approved drug-target nodes. We find that, while many of the drugs acting on the driver nodes are part of known cancer therapies, some of them are not used for the cancer types analyzed here; some drug-target driver nodes identified by our algorithms are not known to be used in any cancer therapy. Overall we show that a better understanding of the control dynamics of cancer through computational modelling can pave the way for new efficient therapeutic approaches and personalized medicine.

  14. A weighted and integrated drug-target interactome: drug repurposing for schizophrenia as a use case

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational pharmacology can uniquely address some issues in the process of drug development by providing a macroscopic view and a deeper understanding of drug action. Specifically, network-assisted approach is promising for the inference of drug repurposing. However, the drug-target associations coming from different sources and various assays have much noise, leading to an inflation of the inference errors. To reduce the inference errors, it is necessary and critical to create a comprehensive and weighted data set of drug-target associations. Results In this study, we created a weighted and integrated drug-target interactome (WinDTome) to provide a comprehensive resource of drug-target associations for computational pharmacology. We first collected drug-target interactions from six commonly used drug-target centered data sources including DrugBank, KEGG, TTD, MATADOR, PDSP Ki Database, and BindingDB. Then, we employed the record linkage method to normalize drugs and targets to the unique identifiers by utilizing the public data sources including PubChem, Entrez Gene, and UniProt. To assess the reliability of the drug-target associations, we assigned two scores (Score_S and Score_R) to each drug-target association based on their data sources and publication references. Consequently, the WinDTome contains 546,196 drug-target associations among 303,018 compounds and 4,113 genes. To assess the application of the WinDTome, we designed a network-based approach for drug repurposing using mental disorder schizophrenia (SCZ) as a case. Starting from 41 known SCZ drugs and their targets, we inferred a total of 264 potential SCZ drugs through the associations of drug-target with Score_S higher than two in WinDTome and human protein-protein interactions. Among the 264 SCZ-related drugs, 39 drugs have been investigated in clinical trials for SCZ treatment and 74 drugs for the treatment of other mental disorders, respectively. Compared with the results using other

  15. Properties of Protein Drug Target Classes

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Simon C.; Doig, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of drug targets is a crucial part of any drug development program. We mined the human proteome to discover properties of proteins that may be important in determining their suitability for pharmaceutical modulation. Data was gathered concerning each protein’s sequence, post-translational modifications, secondary structure, germline variants, expression profile and drug target status. The data was then analysed to determine features for which the target and non-target proteins had significantly different values. This analysis was repeated for subsets of the proteome consisting of all G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases and proteases, as well as proteins that are implicated in cancer. Machine learning was used to quantify the proteins in each dataset in terms of their potential to serve as a drug target. This was accomplished by first inducing a random forest that could distinguish between its targets and non-targets, and then using the random forest to quantify the drug target likeness of the non-targets. The properties that can best differentiate targets from non-targets were primarily those that are directly related to a protein’s sequence (e.g. secondary structure). Germline variants, expression levels and interactions between proteins had minimal discriminative power. Overall, the best indicators of drug target likeness were found to be the proteins’ hydrophobicities, in vivo half-lives, propensity for being membrane bound and the fraction of non-polar amino acids in their sequences. In terms of predicting potential targets, datasets of proteases, ion channels and cancer proteins were able to induce random forests that were highly capable of distinguishing between targets and non-targets. The non-target proteins predicted to be targets by these random forests comprise the set of the most suitable potential future drug targets, and should therefore be prioritised when building a drug development programme. PMID

  16. Homodimeric enzymes as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, D; Salo-Ahen, O M H; Ferrari, S; Ponterini, G; Cruciani, G; Carosati, E; Tochowicz, A M; Mangani, S; Wade, R C; Costi, M P

    2010-01-01

    Many enzymes and proteins are regulated by their quaternary structure and/or by their association in homo- and/or hetero-oligomer complexes. Thus, these protein-protein interactions can be good targets for blocking or modulating protein function therapeutically. The large number of oligomeric structures in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.rcsb.org/) reflects growing interest in proteins that function as multimeric complexes. In this review, we consider the particular case of homodimeric enzymes as drug targets. There is intense interest in drugs that inhibit dimerization of a functionally obligate homodimeric enzyme. Because amino acid conservation within enzyme interfaces is often low compared to conservation in active sites, it may be easier to achieve drugs that target protein interfaces selectively and specifically. Two main types of dimerization inhibitors have been developed: peptides or peptidomimetics based on sequences involved in protein-protein interactions, and small molecules that act at hot spots in protein-protein interfaces. Examples include inhibitors of HIV protease and HIV integrase. Studying the mechanisms of action and locating the binding sites of such inhibitors requires different techniques for different proteins. For some enzymes, ligand binding is only detectable in vivo or after unfolding of the complexes. Here, we review the structural features of dimeric enzymes and give examples of inhibition through interference in dimer stability. Several techniques for studying these complex phenomena will be presented.

  17. UniDrug-Target: A Computational Tool to Identify Unique Drug Targets in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chanumolu, Sree Krishna; Rout, Chittaranjan; Chauhan, Rajinder S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Targeting conserved proteins of bacteria through antibacterial medications has resulted in both the development of resistant strains and changes to human health by destroying beneficial microbes which eventually become breeding grounds for the evolution of resistances. Despite the availability of more than 800 genomes sequences, 430 pathways, 4743 enzymes, 9257 metabolic reactions and protein (three-dimensional) 3D structures in bacteria, no pathogen-specific computational drug target identification tool has been developed. Methods A web server, UniDrug-Target, which combines bacterial biological information and computational methods to stringently identify pathogen-specific proteins as drug targets, has been designed. Besides predicting pathogen-specific proteins essentiality, chokepoint property, etc., three new algorithms were developed and implemented by using protein sequences, domains, structures, and metabolic reactions for construction of partial metabolic networks (PMNs), determination of conservation in critical residues, and variation analysis of residues forming similar cavities in proteins sequences. First, PMNs are constructed to determine the extent of disturbances in metabolite production by targeting a protein as drug target. Conservation of pathogen-specific protein's critical residues involved in cavity formation and biological function determined at domain-level with low-matching sequences. Last, variation analysis of residues forming similar cavities in proteins sequences from pathogenic versus non-pathogenic bacteria and humans is performed. Results The server is capable of predicting drug targets for any sequenced pathogenic bacteria having fasta sequences and annotated information. The utility of UniDrug-Target server was demonstrated for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv). The UniDrug-Target identified 265 mycobacteria pathogen-specific proteins, including 17 essential proteins which can be potential drug targets. Conclusions

  18. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    PubMed

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  19. Drug interaction networks: an introduction to translational and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Azuaje, Francisco

    2013-03-15

    This article introduces fundamental concepts to guide the analysis and interpretation of drug-target interaction networks. An overview of the generation and integration of interaction networks is followed by key strategies for extracting biologically meaningful information. The article highlights how this information can enable novel translational and clinically motivated applications. Important advances for the discovery of new treatments and for the detection of adverse drug effects are discussed. Examples of applications and findings originating from cardiovascular research are presented. The review ends with a discussion of crucial challenges and opportunities.

  20. Evaluating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for diseases pathway, target discovery, and drug-design using 'in silico pharmacology'.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Doss C, George Priya; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    In silico pharmacology is a promising field in the current state-of drug discovery. This area exploits "protein-protein Interaction (PPI) network analysis for drug discovery using the drug "target class". To document the current status, we have discussed in this article how this an integrated system of PPI networks contribute to understand the disease pathways, present state-of-the-art drug target discovery and drug discovery process. This review article enhances our knowledge on conventional drug discovery and current drug discovery using in silico techniques, best "target class", universal architecture of PPI networks, the present scenario of disease pathways and protein-protein interaction networks as well as the method to comprehend the PPI networks. Taken all together, ultimately a snapshot has been discussed to be familiar with how PPI network architecture can used to validate a drug target. At the conclusion, we have illustrated the future directions of PPI in target discovery and drug-design.

  1. Uncovering pharmacological mechanisms of Wu-tou decoction acting on rheumatoid arthritis through systems approaches: drug-target prediction, network analysis and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Chunfang; Guo, Qiuyan; Sun, Yanqun; Wang, Danhua; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Yini; Lin, Na; Li, Shao

    2015-01-01

    Wu-tou decoction (WTD) has been extensively used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Due to lack of appropriate methods, pharmacological mechanisms of WTD acting on RA have not been fully elucidated. In this study, a list of putative targets for compositive compounds containing in WTD were predicted by drugCIPHER-CS. Then, the interaction network of the putative targets of WTD and known RA-related targets was constructed and hub nodes were identified. After constructing the interaction network of hubs, four topological features of each hub, including degree, node betweenness, closeness and k-coreness, were calculated and 79 major hubs were identified as candidate targets of WTD, which were implicated into the imbalance of the nervous, endocrine and immune (NEI) systems, leading to the main pathological changes during the RA progression. Further experimental validation also demonstrated the preventive effects of WTD on inflammation and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats and its regulatory effects on candidate targets both in vitro and in vivo systems. In conclusion, we performed an integrative analysis to offer the convincing evidence that WTD may attenuate RA partially by restoring the balance of NEI system and subsequently reversing the pathological events during RA progression. PMID:25820382

  2. Uncovering pharmacological mechanisms of Wu-tou decoction acting on rheumatoid arthritis through systems approaches: drug-target prediction, network analysis and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Chunfang; Guo, Qiuyan; Sun, Yanqun; Wang, Danhua; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Yini; Lin, Na; Li, Shao

    2015-03-30

    Wu-tou decoction (WTD) has been extensively used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Due to lack of appropriate methods, pharmacological mechanisms of WTD acting on RA have not been fully elucidated. In this study, a list of putative targets for compositive compounds containing in WTD were predicted by drugCIPHER-CS. Then, the interaction network of the putative targets of WTD and known RA-related targets was constructed and hub nodes were identified. After constructing the interaction network of hubs, four topological features of each hub, including degree, node betweenness, closeness and k-coreness, were calculated and 79 major hubs were identified as candidate targets of WTD, which were implicated into the imbalance of the nervous, endocrine and immune (NEI) systems, leading to the main pathological changes during the RA progression. Further experimental validation also demonstrated the preventive effects of WTD on inflammation and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats and its regulatory effects on candidate targets both in vitro and in vivo systems. In conclusion, we performed an integrative analysis to offer the convincing evidence that WTD may attenuate RA partially by restoring the balance of NEI system and subsequently reversing the pathological events during RA progression.

  3. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense.

  4. Structure of Protein Interaction Networks and Their Implications on Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, So; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks (PINs) are rich sources of information that enable the network properties of biological systems to be understood. A study of the topological and statistical properties of budding yeast and human PINs revealed that they are scale-rich and configured as highly optimized tolerance (HOT) networks that are similar to the router-level topology of the Internet. This is different from claims that such networks are scale-free and configured through simple preferential-attachment processes. Further analysis revealed that there are extensive interconnections among middle-degree nodes that form the backbone of the networks. Degree distributions of essential genes, synthetic lethal genes, synthetic sick genes, and human drug-target genes indicate that there are advantageous drug targets among nodes with middle- to low-degree nodes. Such network properties provide the rationale for combinatorial drugs that target less prominent nodes to increase synergetic efficacy and create fewer side effects. PMID:19876376

  5. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  6. Interacting neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.; Kinzel, W.; Kanter, I.

    2000-08-01

    Several scenarios of interacting neural networks which are trained either in an identical or in a competitive way are solved analytically. In the case of identical training each perceptron receives the output of its neighbor. The symmetry of the stationary state as well as the sensitivity to the used training algorithm are investigated. Two competitive perceptrons trained on mutually exclusive learning aims and a perceptron which is trained on the opposite of its own output are examined analytically. An ensemble of competitive perceptrons is used as decision-making algorithms in a model of a closed market (El Farol Bar problem or the Minority Game. In this game, a set of agents who have to make a binary decision is considered.); each network is trained on the history of minority decisions. This ensemble of perceptrons relaxes to a stationary state whose performance can be better than random.

  7. Open Challenges in Magnetic Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandip; Nacev, Aleksander; Muro, Silvia; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2014-01-01

    The principle of magnetic drug targeting, wherein therapy is attached to magnetically responsive carriers and magnetic fields are used to direct that therapy to disease locations, has been around for nearly two decades. Yet our ability to safely and effectively direct therapy to where it needs to go, for instance to deep tissue targets, remains limited. To date, magnetic targeting methods have not yet passed regulatory approval or reached clinical use. Below we outline key challenges to magnetic targeting, which include designing and selecting magnetic carriers for specific clinical indications, safely and effectively reaching targets behind tissue and anatomical barriers, real-time carrier imaging, and magnet design and control for deep and precise targeting. Addressing these challenges will require interactions across disciplines. Nanofabricators and chemists should work with biologists, mathematicians and engineers to better understand how carriers move through live tissues and how to optimize carrier and magnet designs to better direct therapy to disease targets. Clinicians should be involved early on and throughout the whole process to ensure the methods that are being developed meet a compelling clinical need and will be practical in a clinical setting. Our hope is that highlighting these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept to a clinically-available treatment that can put therapy where it needs to go in human patients. PMID:25377422

  8. Model-based global sensitivity analysis as applied to identification of anti-cancer drug targets and biomarkers of drug resistance in the ErbB2/3 network

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Galina; Sorokin, Anatoly; Faratian, Dana; Mullen, Peter; Goltsov, Alexey; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-01-01

    High levels of variability in cancer-related cellular signalling networks and a lack of parameter identifiability in large-scale network models hamper translation of the results of modelling studies into the process of anti-cancer drug development. Recently global sensitivity analysis (GSA) has been recognised as a useful technique, capable of addressing the uncertainty of the model parameters and generating valid predictions on parametric sensitivities. Here we propose a novel implementation of model-based GSA specially designed to explore how multi-parametric network perturbations affect signal propagation through cancer-related networks. We use area-under-the-curve for time course of changes in phosphorylation of proteins as a characteristic for sensitivity analysis and rank network parameters with regard to their impact on the level of key cancer-related outputs, separating strong inhibitory from stimulatory effects. This allows interpretation of the results in terms which can incorporate the effects of potential anti-cancer drugs on targets and the associated biological markers of cancer. To illustrate the method we applied it to an ErbB signalling network model and explored the sensitivity profile of its key model readout, phosphorylated Akt, in the absence and presence of the ErbB2 inhibitor pertuzumab. The method successfully identified the parameters associated with elevation or suppression of Akt phosphorylation in the ErbB2/3 network. From analysis and comparison of the sensitivity profiles of pAkt in the absence and presence of targeted drugs we derived predictions of drug targets, cancer-related biomarkers and generated hypotheses for combinatorial therapy. Several key predictions have been confirmed in experiments using human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We also compared GSA-derived predictions with the results of local sensitivity analysis and discuss the applicability of both methods. We propose that the developed GSA procedure can serve as a

  9. Crowd Sourcing a New Paradigm for Interactome Driven Drug Target Identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rohira, Harsha; Bhat, Ashwini G.; Passi, Anurag; Mukherjee, Keya; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Kumar, Vikas; Arora, Anshula; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Subramanian, Ahalyaa; Venkatachalam, Aparna; S, Gayathri; Raj, Sweety; Chitra, Vijaya; Verma, Kaveri; Zaheer, Salman; J, Balaganesh; Gurusamy, Malarvizhi; Razeeth, Mohammed; Raja, Ilamathi; Thandapani, Madhumohan; Mevada, Vishal; Soni, Raviraj; Rana, Shruti; Ramanna, Girish Muthagadhalli; Raghavan, Swetha; Subramanya, Sunil N.; Kholia, Trupti; Patel, Rajesh; Bhavnani, Varsha; Chiranjeevi, Lakavath; Sengupta, Soumi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Atray, Naresh; Gandhi, Swati; Avasthi, Tiruvayipati Suma; Nisthar, Shefin; Anurag, Meenakshi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hasija, Yasha; Dash, Debasis; Sharma, Arun; Scaria, Vinod; Thomas, Zakir; Chandra, Nagasuma; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative ‘Connect to Decode’ (C2D) to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed ‘interactome pathway’ (IPW), encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach. PMID:22808064

  10. Crowd sourcing a new paradigm for interactome driven drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Rohit; Mondal, Anupam Kumar; Jain, Akanksha; Shah, Anup; Vishnoi, Priti; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Rohira, Harsha; Bhat, Ashwini G; Passi, Anurag; Mukherjee, Keya; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Kumar, Vikas; Arora, Anshula; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Subramanian, Ahalyaa; Venkatachalam, Aparna; Gayathri, S; Raj, Sweety; Chitra, Vijaya; Verma, Kaveri; Zaheer, Salman; Balaganesh, J; Gurusamy, Malarvizhi; Razeeth, Mohammed; Raja, Ilamathi; Thandapani, Madhumohan; Mevada, Vishal; Soni, Raviraj; Rana, Shruti; Ramanna, Girish Muthagadhalli; Raghavan, Swetha; Subramanya, Sunil N; Kholia, Trupti; Patel, Rajesh; Bhavnani, Varsha; Chiranjeevi, Lakavath; Sengupta, Soumi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Atray, Naresh; Gandhi, Swati; Avasthi, Tiruvayipati Suma; Nisthar, Shefin; Anurag, Meenakshi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hasija, Yasha; Dash, Debasis; Sharma, Arun; Scaria, Vinod; Thomas, Zakir; Chandra, Nagasuma; Brahmachari, Samir K; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative 'Connect to Decode' (C2D) to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed 'interactome pathway' (IPW), encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach.

  11. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyunghyun; Kim, Docyong; Ha, Suhyun; Lee, Doheon

    2015-01-01

    As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs) could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw. PMID:26469276

  12. Synthetic lethal genetic interactions that decrease somatic cell proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans identify the alternative RFC CTF18 as a candidate cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Jessica; O'Neil, Nigel; Tarailo, Sanja; Stoepel, Jan; Bryan, Jennifer; Rose, Ann; Hieter, Philip

    2009-12-01

    Somatic mutations causing chromosome instability (CIN) in tumors can be exploited for selective killing of cancer cells by knockdown of second-site genes causing synthetic lethality. We tested and statistically validated synthetic lethal (SL) interactions between mutations in six Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIN genes orthologous to genes mutated in colon tumors and five additional CIN genes. To identify which SL interactions are conserved in higher organisms and represent potential chemotherapeutic targets, we developed an assay system in Caenorhabditis elegans to test genetic interactions causing synthetic proliferation defects in somatic cells. We made use of postembryonic RNA interference and the vulval cell lineage of C. elegans as a readout for somatic cell proliferation defects. We identified SL interactions between members of the cohesin complex and CTF4, RAD27, and components of the alternative RFC(CTF18) complex. The genetic interactions tested are highly conserved between S. cerevisiae and C. elegans and suggest that the alternative RFC components DCC1, CTF8, and CTF18 are ideal therapeutic targets because of their mild phenotype when knocked down singly in C. elegans. Furthermore, the C. elegans assay system will contribute to our knowledge of genetic interactions in a multicellular animal and is a powerful approach to identify new cancer therapeutic targets.

  13. Multidrug transporters as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Liang, X-J; Aszalos, A

    2006-08-01

    Transport molecules can significantly affect the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs. An important transport molecule, the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp), is constitutively expressed at several organ sites in the human body. Pgp is expressed at the blood-brain barrier, in the kidneys, liver, intestines and in certain T cells. Other transporters such as the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and MRP2 also contribute to drug distribution in the human body, although to a lesser extent than Pgp. These three transporters, and especially Pgp, are often targets of drugs. Pgp can be an intentional or unintentional target. It is directly targeted when one wants to block its function by a modifier drug so that another drug, also a substrate of Pgp, can penetrate the cell membrane, which would otherwise be impermeable. Unintentional targeting occurs when several drugs are administered to a patient and as a consequence, the physiological function of Pgp is blocked at different organ sites. Like Pgp, MRP1 also has the capacity to mediate transport of many drugs and other compounds. MRP1 has a protective role in preventing accumulation of toxic compounds and drugs in epithelial tissue covering the choroid plexus/cerebrospinal fluid compartment, oral epithelium, sertoli cells, intesticular tubules and urinary collecting duct cells. MRP2 primarily transports weakly basic drugs and bilirubin from the liver to bile. Most compounds that efficiently block Pgp have only low affinity for MRP1 and MRP2. There are only a few effective and specific MRP inhibitors available. Drug targeting of these transporters may play a role in cancer chemotherapy and in the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs.

  14. Network Physiology: Mapping Interactions Between Networks of Physiologic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    The human organism is an integrated network of interconnected and interacting organ systems, each representing a separate regulatory network. The behavior of one physiological system (network) may affect the dynamics of all other systems in the network of physiologic networks. Due to these interactions, failure of one system can trigger a cascade of failures throughout the entire network. We introduce a systematic method to identify a network of interactions between diverse physiologic organ systems, to quantify the hierarchical structure and dynamics of this network, and to track its evolution under different physiologic states. We find a robust relation between network structure and physiologic states: every state is characterized by specific network topology, node connectivity and links strength. Further, we find that transitions from one physiologic state to another trigger a markedly fast reorganization in the network of physiologic interactions on time scales of just a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. This reorganization in network topology occurs simultaneously and globally in the entire network as well as at the level of individual physiological systems, while preserving a hierarchical order in the strength of network links. Our findings highlight the need of an integrated network approach to understand physiologic function, since the framework we develop provides new information which can not be obtained by studying individual systems. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  15. Assessing drug target association using semantic linked data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ding, Ying; Wild, David J

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of public data in chemistry and biology provides new opportunities for large-scale data mining for drug discovery. Systematic integration of these heterogeneous sets and provision of algorithms to data mine the integrated sets would permit investigation of complex mechanisms of action of drugs. In this work we integrated and annotated data from public datasets relating to drugs, chemical compounds, protein targets, diseases, side effects and pathways, building a semantic linked network consisting of over 290,000 nodes and 720,000 edges. We developed a statistical model to assess the association of drug target pairs based on their relation with other linked objects. Validation experiments demonstrate the model can correctly identify known direct drug target pairs with high precision. Indirect drug target pairs (for example drugs which change gene expression level) are also identified but not as strongly as direct pairs. We further calculated the association scores for 157 drugs from 10 disease areas against 1683 human targets, and measured their similarity using a [Formula: see text] score matrix. The similarity network indicates that drugs from the same disease area tend to cluster together in ways that are not captured by structural similarity, with several potential new drug pairings being identified. This work thus provides a novel, validated alternative to existing drug target prediction algorithms. The web service is freely available at: http://chem2bio2rdf.org/slap.

  16. Links between critical proteins drive the controllability of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wuchty, Stefan; Boltz, Toni; Küçük-McGinty, Hande

    2017-04-10

    Focusing on the interactomes of H. sapiens, S. cerevisiae, and E. coli, we investigated interactions between controlling proteins. In particular, we determined critical, intermittent, and redundant proteins based on their tendency to participate in minimum dominating sets (MDSets). Independently of the organisms considered, we found that interactions that involved critical nodes had the most prominent effects on the topology of their corresponding networks. Furthermore, we observed that phosphorylation and regulatory events were considerably enriched when the corresponding transcription factors and kinases were critical proteins, while such interactions were depleted when they were redundant proteins. Moreover, interactions involving critical proteins were enriched with essential genes, disease genes and drug targets, suggesting that such characteristics may be key for the detection of novel drug targets as well as assess their efficacy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  18. Magnetic Drug Targeting in Arterial Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alicia; Puri, Ishwar; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT) is a promising technique to effectively deliver medicinal drugs via functionalized magnetic particles to target sites during the treatment of diseases. In this paper we investigate the interaction of coronary and pulsatile flows laden with superparamagnetic microparticles in a vessel under the influence of a magnetic field induced by a 1 Tesla permanent magnet. Coronary and peripheral pulsatile flows were examined across a range of conditions that are representative of those found within the cardiovascular system. The flow in the model was measured using TRDPIV (Time Resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry) and data was acquired with sampling up to 1 kHz. The data obtained from the experiment indicates that for the range of flows studied, the behavior of the ferrofluid mass is physically abundant. The ferrofluid mass deforms in response to the pulsatility of the flow, generating wavy structures that ultimately shed portions of the ferrofluid downstream in a fashion similar to a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer. This experiment is the first to address the fluid dynamics of the interactions between the flow and the ferrofluid mass over the range of biological conditions.

  19. Hsp70 Protein Complexes as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Assimon, Victoria A.; Gillies, Anne T.; Rauch, Jennifer N.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) plays critical roles in proteostasis and is an emerging target for multiple diseases. However, competitive inhibition of the enzymatic activity of Hsp70 has proven challenging and, in some cases, may not be the most productive way to redirect Hsp70 function. Another approach is to inhibit Hsp70’s interactions with important co-chaperones, such as J proteins, nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing proteins. These co-chaperones normally bind Hsp70 and guide its many diverse cellular activities. Complexes between Hsp70 and co-chaperones have been shown to have specific functions, such as pro-folding, pro-degradation and pro-trafficking. Thus, a promising strategy may be to block protein-protein interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones or to target allosteric sites that disrupt these contacts. Such an approach might shift the balance of Hsp70 complexes and re-shape the proteome and it has the potential to restore healthy proteostasis. In this review, we discuss specific challenges and opportunities related to those goals. By pursuing Hsp70 complexes as drug targets, we might not only develop new leads for therapeutic development, but also discover new chemical probes for use in understanding Hsp70 biology. PMID:22920901

  20. Hsp70 protein complexes as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Assimon, Victoria A; Gillies, Anne T; Rauch, Jennifer N; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) plays critical roles in proteostasis and is an emerging target for multiple diseases. However, competitive inhibition of the enzymatic activity of Hsp70 has proven challenging and, in some cases, may not be the most productive way to redirect Hsp70 function. Another approach is to inhibit Hsp70's interactions with important co-chaperones, such as J proteins, nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing proteins. These co-chaperones normally bind Hsp70 and guide its many diverse cellular activities. Complexes between Hsp70 and co-chaperones have been shown to have specific functions, including roles in pro-folding, pro-degradation and pro-trafficking pathways. Thus, a promising strategy may be to block protein- protein interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones or to target allosteric sites that disrupt these contacts. Such an approach might shift the balance of Hsp70 complexes and re-shape the proteome and it has the potential to restore healthy proteostasis. In this review, we discuss specific challenges and opportunities related to these goals. By pursuing Hsp70 complexes as drug targets, we might not only develop new leads for therapeutic development, but also discover new chemical probes for use in understanding Hsp70 biology.

  1. Topology of molecular interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Molecular interactions are often represented as network models which have become the common language of many areas of biology. Graphs serve as convenient mathematical representations of network models and have themselves become objects of study. Their topology has been intensively researched over the last decade after evidence was found that they share underlying design principles with many other types of networks. Initial studies suggested that molecular interaction network topology is related to biological function and evolution. However, further whole-network analyses did not lead to a unified view on what this relation may look like, with conclusions highly dependent on the type of molecular interactions considered and the metrics used to study them. It is unclear whether global network topology drives function, as suggested by some researchers, or whether it is simply a byproduct of evolution or even an artefact of representing complex molecular interaction networks as graphs. Nevertheless, network biology has progressed significantly over the last years. We review the literature, focusing on two major developments. First, realizing that molecular interaction networks can be naturally decomposed into subsystems (such as modules and pathways), topology is increasingly studied locally rather than globally. Second, there is a move from a descriptive approach to a predictive one: rather than correlating biological network topology to generic properties such as robustness, it is used to predict specific functions or phenotypes. Taken together, this change in focus from globally descriptive to locally predictive points to new avenues of research. In particular, multi-scale approaches are developments promising to drive the study of molecular interaction networks further. PMID:24041013

  2. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    PubMed

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network.

  3. Drug target identification in protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite the fact that diseases caused by protozoan parasites represent serious challenges for public health, animal production and welfare, only a limited panel of drugs has been marketed for clinical applications. Areas covered Herein, the authors investigate two strategies, namely whole organism screening and target-based drug design. The present pharmacopoeia has resulted from whole organism screening, and the mode of action and targets of selected drugs are discussed. However, the more recent extensive genome sequencing efforts and the development of dry and wet lab genomics and proteomics that allow high-throughput screening of interactions between micromolecules and recombinant proteins has resulted in target-based drug design as the predominant focus in anti-parasitic drug development. Selected examples of target-based drug design studies are presented, and calcium-dependent protein kinases, important drug targets in apicomplexan parasites, are discussed in more detail. Expert opinion Despite the enormous efforts in target-based drug development, this approach has not yet generated market-ready antiprotozoal drugs. However, whole-organism screening approaches, comprising of both in vitro and in vivo investigations, should not be disregarded. The repurposing of already approved and marketed drugs could be a suitable strategy to avoid fastidious approval procedures, especially in the case of neglected or veterinary parasitoses. PMID:27238605

  4. Drug target identification in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that diseases caused by protozoan parasites represent serious challenges for public health, animal production and welfare, only a limited panel of drugs has been marketed for clinical applications. Herein, the authors investigate two strategies, namely whole organism screening and target-based drug design. The present pharmacopoeia has resulted from whole organism screening, and the mode of action and targets of selected drugs are discussed. However, the more recent extensive genome sequencing efforts and the development of dry and wet lab genomics and proteomics that allow high-throughput screening of interactions between micromolecules and recombinant proteins has resulted in target-based drug design as the predominant focus in anti-parasitic drug development. Selected examples of target-based drug design studies are presented, and calcium-dependent protein kinases, important drug targets in apicomplexan parasites, are discussed in more detail. Despite the enormous efforts in target-based drug development, this approach has not yet generated market-ready antiprotozoal drugs. However, whole-organism screening approaches, comprising of both in vitro and in vivo investigations, should not be disregarded. The repurposing of already approved and marketed drugs could be a suitable strategy to avoid fastidious approval procedures, especially in the case of neglected or veterinary parasitoses.

  5. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease.

  6. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) represents a paradigm for the wider cancer field. Despite the fact that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have established targeted molecular therapy in CML, patients often face the risk of developing drug resistance, caused by mutations and/or activation of alternative cellular pathways. To optimize drug development, one needs to systematically test all possible combinations of drug targets within the genetic network that regulates the disease. The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a user-friendly computational tool that allows us to do exactly that. We used BMA to build a CML network-model composed of 54 nodes linked by 104 interactions that encapsulates experimental data collected from 160 publications. While previous studies were limited by their focus on a single pathway or cellular process, our executable model allowed us to probe dynamic interactions between multiple pathways and cellular outcomes, suggest new combinatorial therapeutic targets, and highlight previously unexplored sensitivities to Interleukin-3.

  7. Biocomputational strategies for microbial drug target identification.

    PubMed

    Sakharkar, Kishore R; Sakharkar, Meena K; Chow, Vincent T K

    2008-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of about 300 bacteria (mostly pathogenic) have been determined, and many more such projects are currently in progress. The detection of bacterial genes that are non-homologous to human genes and are essential for the survival of the pathogen represent a promising means of identifying novel drug targets. We present a subtractive genomics approach for the identification of putative drug targets in microbial genomes and demonstrate its execution using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an example. The resultant analyses are in good agreement with the results of systematic gene deletion experiments. This strategy enables rapid potential drug target identification, thereby greatly facilitating the search for new antibiotics. It should be recognized that there are limitations to this computational approach for drug target identification. Distant gene relationships may be missed since the alignment scores are likely to have low statistical significance. In conclusion, the results of such a strategy underscore the utility of large genomic databases for in silico systematic drug target identification in the post-genomic era.

  8. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  9. Dynamic and interacting complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark E.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible

  10. Exploring Drug Targets in Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway for Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Qidwai, Tabish; Jamal, Farrukh; Khan, Mohd Y; Sharma, Bechan

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of rapid drug resistance to existing antimalarial drugs in Plasmodium falciparum has created the need for prediction of novel targets as well as leads derived from original molecules with improved activity against a validated drug target. The malaria parasite has a plant plastid-like apicoplast. To overcome the problem of falciparum malaria, the metabolic pathways in parasite apicoplast have been used as antimalarial drug targets. Among several pathways in apicoplast, isoprenoid biosynthesis is one of the important pathways for parasite as its multiplication in human erythrocytes requires isoprenoids. Therefore targeting this pathway and exploring leads with improved activity is a highly attractive approach. This report has explored progress towards the study of proteins and inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. For more comprehensive analysis, antimalarial drug-protein interaction has been covered.

  11. Dynamic interactions in neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arbib, M.A. ); Amari, S. )

    1989-01-01

    The study of neural networks is enjoying a great renaissance, both in computational neuroscience, the development of information processing models of living brains, and in neural computing, the use of neurally inspired concepts in the construction of intelligent machines. This volume presents models and data on the dynamic interactions occurring in the brain, and exhibits the dynamic interactions between research in computational neuroscience and in neural computing. The authors present current research, future trends and open problems.

  12. In silico re-identification of properties of drug target proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baeksoo; Jo, Jihoon; Han, Jonghyun; Park, Chungoo; Lee, Hyunju

    2017-05-31

    is improved and these properties are related to drug targets. We believe that our study will provide a new aspect in inferring drug-target interactions.

  13. Prediction of Chemical-Protein Interactions Network with Weighted Network-Based Inference Method

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Feixiong; Zhou, Yadi; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Chemical-protein interaction (CPI) is the central topic of target identification and drug discovery. However, large scale determination of CPI is a big challenge for in vitro or in vivo experiments, while in silico prediction shows great advantages due to low cost and high accuracy. On the basis of our previous drug-target interaction prediction via network-based inference (NBI) method, we further developed node- and edge-weighted NBI methods for CPI prediction here. Two comprehensive CPI bipartite networks extracted from ChEMBL database were used to evaluate the methods, one containing 17,111 CPI pairs between 4,741 compounds and 97 G protein-coupled receptors, the other including 13,648 CPI pairs between 2,827 compounds and 206 kinases. The range of the area under receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.73 to 0.83 for the external validation sets, which confirmed the reliability of the prediction. The weak-interaction hypothesis in CPI network was identified by the edge-weighted NBI method. Moreover, to validate the methods, several candidate targets were predicted for five approved drugs, namely imatinib, dasatinib, sertindole, olanzapine and ziprasidone. The molecular hypotheses and experimental evidence for these predictions were further provided. These results confirmed that our methods have potential values in understanding molecular basis of drug polypharmacology and would be helpful for drug repositioning. PMID:22815915

  14. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Peter J

    2017-07-14

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  15. Dynamic functional modules in co-expressed protein interaction networks of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular networks represent the backbone of molecular activity within cells and provide opportunities for understanding the mechanism of diseases. While protein-protein interaction data constitute static network maps, integration of condition-specific co-expression information provides clues to the dynamic features of these networks. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure. Although previous studies have identified putative biomarkers or therapeutic targets for heart failure, the underlying molecular mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy remains unclear. Results We developed a network-based comparative analysis approach that integrates protein-protein interactions with gene expression profiles and biological function annotations to reveal dynamic functional modules under different biological states. We found that hub proteins in condition-specific co-expressed protein interaction networks tended to be differentially expressed between biological states. Applying this method to a cohort of heart failure patients, we identified two functional modules that significantly emerged from the interaction networks. The dynamics of these modules between normal and disease states further suggest a potential molecular model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We propose a novel framework to analyze the interaction networks in different biological states. It successfully reveals network modules closely related to heart failure; more importantly, these network dynamics provide new insights into the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. The revealed molecular modules might be used as potential drug targets and provide new directions for heart failure therapy. PMID:20950417

  16. Statistical Mechanics of Temporal and Interacting Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun

    In the last ten years important breakthroughs in the understanding of the topology of complexity have been made in the framework of network science. Indeed it has been found that many networks belong to the universality classes called small-world networks or scale-free networks. Moreover it was found that the complex architecture of real world networks strongly affects the critical phenomena defined on these structures. Nevertheless the main focus of the research has been the characterization of single and static networks. Recently, temporal networks and interacting networks have attracted large interest. Indeed many networks are interacting or formed by a multilayer structure. Example of these networks are found in social networks where an individual might be at the same time part of different social networks, in economic and financial networks, in physiology or in infrastructure systems. Moreover, many networks are temporal, i.e. the links appear and disappear on the fast time scale. Examples of these networks are social networks of contacts such as face-to-face interactions or mobile-phone communication, the time-dependent correlations in the brain activity and etc. Understanding the evolution of temporal and multilayer networks and characterizing critical phenomena in these systems is crucial if we want to describe, predict and control the dynamics of complex system. In this thesis, we investigate several statistical mechanics models of temporal and interacting networks, to shed light on the dynamics of this new generation of complex networks. First, we investigate a model of temporal social networks aimed at characterizing human social interactions such as face-to-face interactions and phone-call communication. Indeed thanks to the availability of data on these interactions, we are now in the position to compare the proposed model to the real data finding good agreement. Second, we investigate the entropy of temporal networks and growing networks , to provide

  17. Chemical proteomics: terra incognita for novel drug target profiling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Boya; Zhou, Shengtao; Zhao, Xia; Bian, Ce; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-01-01

    The growing demand for new therapeutic strategies in the medical and pharmaceutic fields has resulted in a pressing need for novel druggable targets. Paradoxically, however, the targets of certain drugs that are already widely used in clinical practice have largely not been annotated. Because the pharmacologic effects of a drug can only be appreciated when its interactions with cellular components are clearly delineated, an integrated deconvolution of drug-target interactions for each drug is necessary. The emerging field of chemical proteomics represents a powerful mass spectrometry (MS)-based affinity chromatography approach for identifying proteome-wide small molecule-protein interactions and mapping these interactions to signaling and metabolic pathways. This technique could comprehensively characterize drug targets, profile the toxicity of known drugs, and identify possible off-target activities. With the use of this technique, candidate drug molecules could be optimized, and predictable side effects might consequently be avoided. Herein, we provide a holistic overview of the major chemical proteomic approaches and highlight recent advances in this area as well as its potential applications in drug discovery. PMID:22640626

  18. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. Material and methods: In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. Results: According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Conclusion: Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease. PMID:27895852

  19. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  20. Protein interaction networks from literature mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Sigeo

    2005-03-01

    The ability to accurately predict and understand physiological changes in the biological network system in response to disease or drug therapeutics is of crucial importance in life science. The extensive amount of gene expression data generated from even a single microarray experiment often proves difficult to fully interpret and comprehend the biological significance. An increasing knowledge of protein interactions stored in the PubMed database, as well as the advancement of natural language processing, however, makes it possible to construct protein interaction networks from the gene expression information that are essential for understanding the biological meaning. From the in house literature mining system we have developed, the protein interaction network for humans was constructed. By analysis based on the graph-theoretical characterization of the total interaction network in literature, we found that the network is scale-free and semantic long-ranged interactions (i.e. inhibit, induce) between proteins dominate in the total interaction network, reducing the degree exponent. Interaction networks generated based on scientific text in which the interaction event is ambiguously described result in disconnected networks. In contrast interaction networks based on text in which the interaction events are clearly stated result in strongly connected networks. The results of protein-protein interaction networks obtained in real applications from microarray experiments are discussed: For example, comparisons of the gene expression data indicative of either a good or a poor prognosis for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL rearrangements, using our system, showed newly discovered signaling cross-talk.

  1. Amphotericin B formulations and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Torrado, J J; Espada, R; Ballesteros, M P; Torrado-Santiago, S

    2008-07-01

    Amphotericin B is a low-soluble polyene antibiotic which is able to self-aggregate. The aggregation state can modify its activity and pharmacokinetical characteristics. In spite of its high toxicity it is still widely employed for the treatment of systemic fungal infections and parasitic disease and different formulations are marketed. Some of these formulations, such as liposomal formulations, can be considered as classical examples of drug targeting. The pharmacokinetics, toxicity and activity are clearly dependent on the type of amphotericin B formulation. New drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanospheres and microspheres can result in higher concentrations of AMB in the liver and spleen, but lower concentrations in kidney and lungs, so decreasing its toxicity. Moreover, the administration of these drug delivery systems can enhance the drug accessibility to organs and tissues (e.g., bone marrow) otherwise inaccessible to the free drug. During the last few years, new AMB formulations (AmBisome, Abelcet, and Amphotec) with an improved efficacy/toxicity ratio have been marketed. This review compares the different formulations of amphotericin B in terms of pharmacokinetics, toxicity and activity and discusses the possible drug targeting effect of some of these new formulations.

  2. Proteome mining for the identification and in-silico characterization of putative drug targets of multi-drug resistant Clostridium difficile strain 630.

    PubMed

    Lohani, Mohtashim; Dhasmana, Anupam; Haque, Shafiul; Wahid, Mohd; Jawed, Arshad; Dar, Sajad A; Mandal, Raju K; Areeshi, Mohammed Y; Khan, Saif

    2017-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is an enteric pathogen that causes approximately 20% to 30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In recent years, there has been a substantial rise in the rate of C. difficile infections as well as the emergence of virulent and antibiotic resistant C. difficile strains. So, there is an urgent need for the identification of therapeutic potential targets and development of new drugs for the treatment and prevention of C. difficile infections. In the current study, we used a hybrid approach by combining sequence similarity-based approach and protein-protein interaction network topology-based approach to identify and characterize the potential drug targets of C. difficile. A total of 155 putative drug targets of C. difficile were identified and the metabolic pathway analysis of these putative drug targets using DAVID revealed that 46 of them are involved in 9 metabolic pathways. In-silico characterization of these proteins identified seven proteins involved in pathogen-specific peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway. Three promising targets viz. homoserine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and aspartokinase etc. were found to be involved in multiple enzymatic pathways of the pathogen. These 3 drug targets are of particular interest as they can be used for developing effective drugs against multi-drug resistant C. difficile strain 630 in the near future.

  3. A Review of Computational Methods for Predicting Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guohua; Yan, Fengxia; Tan, Duoduo

    2016-11-14

    Drug discovery and development is not only a time-consuming and labor-intensive process but also full of risk. Identifying targets of small molecules helps evaluate safety of drugs and find new therapeutic applications. The biotechnology measures a wide variety of properties related to drug and targets from different perspectives, thus generating a large body of data. This undoubtedly provides a solid foundation to explore relationships between drugs and targets. A large number of computational techniques have recently been developed for drug target prediction. In this paper, we summarize these computational methods and classify them into structure-based, molecular activity-based, side-effect-based and multi-omics-based predictions according to the used data for inference. The multi-omics-based methods are further grouped into two types: classifier-based and network-based predictions. Furthermore,the advantages and limitations of each type of methods are discussed. Finally, we point out the future directions of computational predictions for drug targets.

  4. Identification of Topological Network Modules in Perturbed Protein Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Sardiu, Mihaela E; Gilmore, Joshua M; Groppe, Brad; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2017-03-08

    Biological networks consist of functional modules, however detecting and characterizing such modules in networks remains challenging. Perturbing networks is one strategy for identifying modules. Here we used an advanced mathematical approach named topological data analysis (TDA) to interrogate two perturbed networks. In one, we disrupted the S. cerevisiae INO80 protein interaction network by isolating complexes after protein complex components were deleted from the genome. In the second, we reanalyzed previously published data demonstrating the disruption of the human Sin3 network with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Here we show that disrupted networks contained topological network modules (TNMs) with shared properties that mapped onto distinct locations in networks. We define TMNs as proteins that occupy close network positions depending on their coordinates in a topological space. TNMs provide new insight into networks by capturing proteins from different categories including proteins within a complex, proteins with shared biological functions, and proteins disrupted across networks.

  5. Identification of Topological Network Modules in Perturbed Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Groppe, Brad; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Biological networks consist of functional modules, however detecting and characterizing such modules in networks remains challenging. Perturbing networks is one strategy for identifying modules. Here we used an advanced mathematical approach named topological data analysis (TDA) to interrogate two perturbed networks. In one, we disrupted the S. cerevisiae INO80 protein interaction network by isolating complexes after protein complex components were deleted from the genome. In the second, we reanalyzed previously published data demonstrating the disruption of the human Sin3 network with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Here we show that disrupted networks contained topological network modules (TNMs) with shared properties that mapped onto distinct locations in networks. We define TMNs as proteins that occupy close network positions depending on their coordinates in a topological space. TNMs provide new insight into networks by capturing proteins from different categories including proteins within a complex, proteins with shared biological functions, and proteins disrupted across networks. PMID:28272416

  6. Drug targeting using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas H; Faramarzi, Hossain; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2014-07-01

    The present review aims to show the features of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) which are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Because of some unique features of SLNs such as their unique size dependent properties it offers possibility to develop new therapeutics. A common denominator of all these SLN-based platforms is to deliver drugs into specific tissues or cells in a pathological setting with minimal adverse effects on bystander cells. SLNs are capable to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers which lead to a new prototype in drug delivery which maybe used for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of targeted solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their types such as antibody SLN, magnetic SLN, pH sensitive SLN and cationic SLN.

  7. MINERVA—a platform for visualization and curation of molecular interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Piotr; Ostaszewski, Marek; Satagopam, Venkata; Gebel, Stephan; Mazein, Alexander; Kuzma, Michal; Zorzan, Simone; McGee, Fintan; Otjacques, Benoît; Balling, Rudi; Schneider, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Our growing knowledge about various molecular mechanisms is becoming increasingly more structured and accessible. Different repositories of molecular interactions and available literature enable construction of focused and high-quality molecular interaction networks. Novel tools for curation and exploration of such networks are needed, in order to foster the development of a systems biology environment. In particular, solutions for visualization, annotation and data cross-linking will facilitate usage of network-encoded knowledge in biomedical research. To this end we developed the MINERVA (Molecular Interaction NEtwoRks VisuAlization) platform, a standalone webservice supporting curation, annotation and visualization of molecular interaction networks in Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN)-compliant format. MINERVA provides automated content annotation and verification for improved quality control. The end users can explore and interact with hosted networks, and provide direct feedback to content curators. MINERVA enables mapping drug targets or overlaying experimental data on the visualized networks. Extensive export functions enable downloading areas of the visualized networks as SBGN-compliant models for efficient reuse of hosted networks. The software is available under Affero GPL 3.0 as a Virtual Machine snapshot, Debian package and Docker instance at http://r3lab.uni.lu/web/minerva-website/. We believe that MINERVA is an important contribution to systems biology community, as its architecture enables set-up of locally or globally accessible SBGN-oriented repositories of molecular interaction networks. Its functionalities allow overlay of multiple information layers, facilitating exploration of content and interpretation of data. Moreover, annotation and verification workflows of MINERVA improve the efficiency of curation of networks, allowing life-science researchers to better engage in development and use of biomedical knowledge repositories. PMID

  8. MINERVA-a platform for visualization and curation of molecular interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Piotr; Ostaszewski, Marek; Satagopam, Venkata; Gebel, Stephan; Mazein, Alexander; Kuzma, Michal; Zorzan, Simone; McGee, Fintan; Otjacques, Benoît; Balling, Rudi; Schneider, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Our growing knowledge about various molecular mechanisms is becoming increasingly more structured and accessible. Different repositories of molecular interactions and available literature enable construction of focused and high-quality molecular interaction networks. Novel tools for curation and exploration of such networks are needed, in order to foster the development of a systems biology environment. In particular, solutions for visualization, annotation and data cross-linking will facilitate usage of network-encoded knowledge in biomedical research. To this end we developed the MINERVA (Molecular Interaction NEtwoRks VisuAlization) platform, a standalone webservice supporting curation, annotation and visualization of molecular interaction networks in Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN)-compliant format. MINERVA provides automated content annotation and verification for improved quality control. The end users can explore and interact with hosted networks, and provide direct feedback to content curators. MINERVA enables mapping drug targets or overlaying experimental data on the visualized networks. Extensive export functions enable downloading areas of the visualized networks as SBGN-compliant models for efficient reuse of hosted networks. The software is available under Affero GPL 3.0 as a Virtual Machine snapshot, Debian package and Docker instance at http://r3lab.uni.lu/web/minerva-website/. We believe that MINERVA is an important contribution to systems biology community, as its architecture enables set-up of locally or globally accessible SBGN-oriented repositories of molecular interaction networks. Its functionalities allow overlay of multiple information layers, facilitating exploration of content and interpretation of data. Moreover, annotation and verification workflows of MINERVA improve the efficiency of curation of networks, allowing life-science researchers to better engage in development and use of biomedical knowledge repositories.

  9. Insights into protein interaction networks reveal non-receptor kinases as significant druggable targets for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sundarrajan, Sudharsana; Lulu, Sajitha; Arumugam, Mohanapriya

    2015-07-25

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease of the skin characterized by hyper proliferation and inflammation of the epidermis and dermal components of the skin. T-cell-dependent inflammatory process in skin governs the pathogenesis of psoriasis. An in-silico search strategy was utilized to identify psoriatic therapeutic drug targets. The gene expression profiling of psoriatic skin identified a total of 427 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Gene ontology investigation of DEGs identified genes involved in calcium binding, apoptosis, keratinisation, lipid transportation and homeostasis apart from immune mediated processes. The protein interaction networks identified proteins involved in various signaling mechanisms with high degree of interconnections. The gene modules derived from the main network were enriched with rich kinome. These sub-networks were dominated by the presence of non-receptor kinase family members which are major signal transmitters in immune response. The computational approach has aided in the identification of non-receptor kinases as potential targets for psoriasis drug development.

  10. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  11. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  12. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  13. Identification of Phosphoribosyl-AMP cyclohydrolase, as drug target and its inhibitors in Brucella melitensis bv. 1 16M using metabolic pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Brucella melitensis is a pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium which is known for causing zoonotic diseases (Brucellosis). The organism is highly contagious and has been reported to be used as bioterrorism agent against humans. Several antibiotics and vaccines have been developed but these antibiotics have exhibited the sign of antibiotic resistance or ineffective at lower concentrations, which imposes an urgent need to identify the novel drugs/drug targets against this organism. In this work, metabolic pathways analysis has been performed with different filters such as non-homology with humans, essentially of genes and choke point analysis, leading to identification of novel drug targets. A total of 18 potential drug target proteins were filtered out and used to develop the high confidence protein-protein interaction network The Phosphoribosyl-AMP cyclohydrolase (HisI) protein has been identified as potential drug target on the basis of topological parameters. Further, a homology model of (HisI) protein has been developed using Modeller with multiple template (1W6Q (48%), 1ZPS (55%), and 2ZKN (48%)) approach and validated using PROCHECK and Verify3D. The virtual high throughput screening (vHTS) using DockBlaster tool has been performed against 16,11,889 clean fragments from ZINC database. Top 500 molecules from DockBlaster were docked using Vina. The docking analysis resulted in ZINC04880153 showing the lowest binding energy (-9.1 kcal/mol) with the drug target. The molecular dynamics study of the complex HisI-ZINC04880153 was conducted to analyze the stability and fluctuation of ligand within the binding pocket of HisI. The identified ligand could be analyzed in the wet-lab based experiments for future drug discovery.

  14. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  15. Alignment-free protein interaction network comparison

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Waqar; Rito, Tiago; Reinert, Gesine; Sun, Fengzhu; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological network comparison software largely relies on the concept of alignment where close matches between the nodes of two or more networks are sought. These node matches are based on sequence similarity and/or interaction patterns. However, because of the incomplete and error-prone datasets currently available, such methods have had limited success. Moreover, the results of network alignment are in general not amenable for distance-based evolutionary analysis of sets of networks. In this article, we describe Netdis, a topology-based distance measure between networks, which offers the possibility of network phylogeny reconstruction. Results: We first demonstrate that Netdis is able to correctly separate different random graph model types independent of network size and density. The biological applicability of the method is then shown by its ability to build the correct phylogenetic tree of species based solely on the topology of current protein interaction networks. Our results provide new evidence that the topology of protein interaction networks contains information about evolutionary processes, despite the lack of conservation of individual interactions. As Netdis is applicable to all networks because of its speed and simplicity, we apply it to a large collection of biological and non-biological networks where it clusters diverse networks by type. Availability and implementation: The source code of the program is freely available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources. Contact: w.ali@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161230

  16. P2X Receptors as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    The study of P2X receptors has long been handicapped by a poverty of small-molecule tools that serve as selective agonists and antagonists. There has been progress, particularly in the past 10 years, as cell-based high-throughput screening methods were applied, together with large chemical libraries. This has delivered some drug-like molecules in several chemical classes that selectively target P2X1, P2X3, or P2X7 receptors. Some of these are, or have been, in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis, pain, and cough. Current preclinical research programs are studying P2X receptor involvement in pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, and bladder dysfunction. The determination of the atomic structure of P2X receptors in closed and open (ATP-bound) states by X-ray crystallography is now allowing new approaches by molecular modeling. This is supported by a large body of previous work using mutagenesis and functional expression, and is now being supplemented by molecular dynamic simulations and in silico ligand docking. These approaches should lead to P2X receptors soon taking their place alongside other ion channel proteins as therapeutically important drug targets. PMID:23253448

  17. Zika Virus Protease: An Antiviral Drug Target.

    PubMed

    Kang, CongBao; Keller, Thomas H; Luo, Dahai

    2017-10-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has caused global concern due to its link to severe damage to the brain development of foetuses and neuronal complications in adult patients. A worldwide research effort has been undertaken to identify effective and safe treatment and vaccination options. Among the proposed viral and host components, the viral NS2B-NS3 protease represents an attractive drug target due to its essential role in the virus life cycle. Here, we outline recent progress in studies on the Zika protease. Biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies on different protease constructs provide new insight into the structure and activity of the protease. The unlinked construct displays higher enzymatic activity and better mimics the native state of the enzyme and therefore is better suited for drug discovery. Furthermore, the structure of the free enzyme adopts a closed conformation and a preformed active site. The availability of a lead fragment hit and peptide inhibitors, as well as the attainability of soakable crystals, suggest that the unlinked construct is a promising tool for drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Explorers of the Universe: Interactive Electronic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Marino C.; Burks, Geoffrey; Busby, Michael R.; Cannon, Tiffani; Sotoohi, Goli; Wade, Montanez

    2000-01-01

    This paper details how the Interactive Electronic Network is being utilized by secondary and postsecondary students, and their teachers and professors, to facilitate learning and understanding. The Interactive Electronic Network is couched within the Explorers of the Universe web site in a restricted portion entitled Gateway.

  19. Drug targets for rational design against emerging coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Weber, Erin; Yang, Haitao

    2013-04-01

    The recent, fatal outbreak of the novel coronavirus strain in the Middle East highlights the real threat posed by this unique virus family. Neither pharmaceutical cures nor preventive vaccines are clinically available to fight against coronavirus associated syndromes, not to mention a lack of symptom soothing drugs. Development of treatment options is complicated by the unpredictable, recurring instances of cross-species viral transmission. The vastly distributing virus reservoir and the rapid rate of host-species exchange of coronavirus demands wide spectrum potency in an ideal therapeutic. Through summarizing the available information and progress in coronavirus research, this review provides a systematic assessment of the potential wide-spectrum features on the most popular drug targets including viral proteases, spike protein, RNA polymerases and editing enzymes as well as host-virus interaction pathways associated with coronaviruses.

  20. A Global Comparison of the Human and T. brucei Degradomes Gives Insights about Possible Parasite Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Mashiyama, Susan T.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; Caffrey, Conor R.; McKerrow, James H.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups (“M32” and “C51”) that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html. PMID:23236535

  1. A global comparison of the human and T. brucei degradomes gives insights about possible parasite drug targets.

    PubMed

    Mashiyama, Susan T; Koupparis, Kyriacos; Caffrey, Conor R; McKerrow, James H; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2012-01-01

    We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups ("M32" and "C51") that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html.

  2. The yeast noncoding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Panni, Simona; Prakash, Ananth; Bateman, Alex; Orchard, Sandra

    2017-10-01

    This article describes the creation of the first expert manually curated noncoding RNA interaction networks for S. cerevisiae The RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interaction networks have been carefully extracted from the experimental literature and made available through the IntAct database (www.ebi.ac.uk/intact). We provide an initial network analysis and compare their properties to the much larger protein-protein interaction network. We find that the proteins that bind to ncRNAs in the network contain only a small proportion of classical RNA binding domains. We also see an enrichment of WD40 domains suggesting their direct involvement in ncRNA interactions. We discuss the challenges in collecting noncoding RNA interaction data and the opportunities for worldwide collaboration to fill the unmet need for this data. © 2017 Panni et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. 3D MI-DRAGON: new model for the reconstruction of US FDA drug- target network and theoretical-experimental studies of inhibitors of rasagiline derivatives for AChE.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Alonso, Nerea; Caamaño, Olga; Yañez, Matilde; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2012-01-01

    The number of neurodegenerative diseases has been increasing in recent years. Many of the drug candidates to be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases present specific 3D structural features. An important protein in this sense is the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which is the target of many Alzheimer's dementia drugs. Consequently, the prediction of Drug-Protein Interactions (DPIs/nDPIs) between new drug candidates and specific 3D structure and targets is of major importance. To this end, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out a rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, many previous QSAR models developed to predict DPIs take into consideration only 2D structural information and codify the activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop some 3D multi-target QSAR (3D mt-QSAR) models. In this study, using the 3D MI-DRAGON technique, we have introduced a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We have used the MARCH-INSIDE (MI) and DRAGON software to calculate 3D structural parameters for drugs and targets respectively. Both classes of 3D parameters were used as input to train Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN) algorithms using as benchmark dataset the complex network (CN) made up of all DPIs between US FDA approved drugs and their targets. The entire dataset was downloaded from the DrugBank database. The best 3D mt-QSAR predictor found was an ANN of Multi-Layer Perceptron-type (MLP) with profile MLP 37:37-24-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 274 out of 321 DPIs (Sensitivity = 85.35%) and 1041 out of 1190 nDPIs (Specificity = 87.48%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 87.03%. We have validated the model with external predicting series with Sensitivity = 84.16% (542/644 DPIs; Specificity = 87.51% (2039/2330 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 86.78%. The new CNs of DPIs reconstructed from US FDA can be used to explore large DPI databases in order to discover both new drugs

  4. ING Proteins as Potential Anticancer Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Unoki, M.; Kumamoto, K.; Harris, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent emerging evidence suggests that ING family proteins play roles in carcinogenesis both as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes depending on the family members and on cell status. Previous results from non-physiologic overexpression experiments showed that all five family members induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, thus it had been thought until very recently that all of the family members function as tumor suppressor genes. Therefore restoration of ING family proteins in cancer cells has been proposed as a treatment for cancers. However, ING2 knockdown experiments showed unexpected results: ING2 knockdown led to senescence in normal human fibroblast cells and suppressed cancer cell growth. ING2 is also overexpressed in colorectal cancer, and promotes cancer cell invasion through an MMP13 dependent pathway. Additionally, it was reported that ING2 has two isoforms, ING2a and ING2b. Although expression of ING2a predominates compared with ING2b, both isoforms confer resistance against cell cycle arrest or apoptosis to cancer cells, thus knockdown of both isoforms is critical to remove this resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that ING2 can function as an oncogene in some specific types of cancer cells, indicating restoration of this gene in cancer cells could cause cancer progression. Because knockdown of ING2 suppresses cancer cell invasion and induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, ING2 may be an anticancer drug target. In this brief review, we discuss possible clinical applications of ING2 with the latest knowledge of molecular targeted therapies. PMID:19442116

  5. Hox protein interactions: screening and network building.

    PubMed

    Bergiers, Isabelle; Lambert, Barbara; Daakour, Sarah; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Rezsohazy, René

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mode of action of Hox proteins requires the identification of molecular and cellular pathways they take part in. This includes to characterize the networks of protein-protein interactions involving Hox proteins. In this chapter we propose a strategy and methods to map Hox interaction networks, from yeast two-hybrid and high-throughput yeast two-hybrid interaction screening to bioinformatic analyses based on the software platform Cytoscape.

  6. Dynamic network analysis of protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind; Deri, Joya

    2007-03-01

    Network approaches have recently become a popular tool to study complex systems such as cellular metabolism and protein interactions. A substantial number of analyses of the protein interaction network (PIN) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have considered this network as a static entity, not taking the network's dynamic nature into account. Here, we examine the time-variation of gene regulation superimposed on the PIN by defining mRNA expression profiles throughout the cell cycle as node weights. To characterize these network dynamics, we have both developed a set of novel network measures as well as studied previously published measures for weighted networks. We expect that our approach will provide a deeper understanding of protein regulation during the cell cycle.

  7. Is hippocampal atrophy a future drug target?

    PubMed

    Dhikav, Vikas; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    atrophy would be clinically useful in affecting disease, viz slowing its progression, reducing morbidity, complications or positively affecting the outcome of one or more of its clinically important aspects. If the answer to this is yes, we would have to know at what stage of the disease we use the drugs, dose, duration, follow-up and efficacy. The use of these drugs in the above mentioned conditions can not only test the potential of atrophy as a future drug target, but could also help in learning more about the hippocampus in both health and diseases.

  8. Critical controllability in proteome-wide protein interaction network integrating transcriptome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the number of essential gene entries has considerably increased. However, little is known about the relationships between essential genes and their functional roles in critical network control at both the structural (protein interaction network) and dynamic (transcriptional) levels, in part because the large size of the network prevents extensive computational analysis. Here, we present an algorithm that identifies the critical control set of nodes by reducing the computational time by 180 times and by expanding the computable network size up to 25 times, from 1,000 to 25,000 nodes. The developed algorithm allows a critical controllability analysis of large integrated systems composed of a transcriptome- and proteome-wide protein interaction network for the first time. The data-driven analysis captures a direct triad association of the structural controllability of genes, lethality and dynamic synchronization of co-expression. We believe that the identified optimized critical network control subsets may be of interest as drug targets; thus, they may be useful for drug design and development.

  9. Critical controllability in proteome-wide protein interaction network integrating transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the number of essential gene entries has considerably increased. However, little is known about the relationships between essential genes and their functional roles in critical network control at both the structural (protein interaction network) and dynamic (transcriptional) levels, in part because the large size of the network prevents extensive computational analysis. Here, we present an algorithm that identifies the critical control set of nodes by reducing the computational time by 180 times and by expanding the computable network size up to 25 times, from 1,000 to 25,000 nodes. The developed algorithm allows a critical controllability analysis of large integrated systems composed of a transcriptome- and proteome-wide protein interaction network for the first time. The data-driven analysis captures a direct triad association of the structural controllability of genes, lethality and dynamic synchronization of co-expression. We believe that the identified optimized critical network control subsets may be of interest as drug targets; thus, they may be useful for drug design and development. PMID:27040162

  10. Lethality and entropy of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Manke, Thomas; Demetrius, Lloyd; Vingron, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We characterize protein interaction networks in terms of network entropy. This approach suggests a ranking principle, which strongly correlates with elements of functional importance, such as lethal proteins. Our combined analysis of protein interaction networks and functional profiles in single cellular yeast and multi-cellular worm shows that proteins with large contribution to network entropy are preferentially lethal. While entropy is inherently a dynamical concept, the present analysis incorporates only structural information. Our result therefore highlights the importance of topological features, which appear as correlates of an underlying dynamical property, and which in turn determine functional traits. We argue that network entropy is a natural extension of previously studied observables, such as pathway multiplicity and centrality. It is also applicable to networks in which the processes can be quantified and therefore serves as a link to study questions of structural and dynamical robustness in a unified way.

  11. Systematic Prediction of Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Protein-Protein-Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jialiang; Niu, Chaoqun; Green, Christopher D.; Yang, Lun; Mei, Hongkang; Han, Jing-Dong J.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a major challenge in drug development. Previous attempts have established formal approaches for pharmacokinetic (PK) DDIs, but there is not a feasible solution for pharmacodynamic (PD) DDIs because the endpoint is often a serious adverse event rather than a measurable change in drug concentration. Here, we developed a metric “S-score” that measures the strength of network connection between drug targets to predict PD DDIs. Utilizing known PD DDIs as golden standard positives (GSPs), we observed a significant correlation between S-score and the likelihood a PD DDI occurs. Our prediction was robust and surpassed existing methods as validated by two independent GSPs. Analysis of clinical side effect data suggested that the drugs having predicted DDIs have similar side effects. We further incorporated this clinical side effects evidence with S-score to increase the prediction specificity and sensitivity through a Bayesian probabilistic model. We have predicted 9,626 potential PD DDIs at the accuracy of 82% and the recall of 62%. Importantly, our algorithm provided opportunities for better understanding the potential molecular mechanisms or physiological effects underlying DDIs, as illustrated by the case studies. PMID:23555229

  12. Interactivity vs. fairness in networked linux systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; Crawford, Matt; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    In general, the Linux 2.6 scheduler can ensure fairness and provide excellent interactive performance at the same time. However, our experiments and mathematical analysis have shown that the current Linux interactivity mechanism tends to incorrectly categorize non-interactive network applications as interactive, which can lead to serious fairness or starvation issues. In the extreme, a single process can unjustifiably obtain up to 95% of the CPU! The root cause is due to the facts that: (1) network packets arrive at the receiver independently and discretely, and the 'relatively fast' non-interactive network process might frequently sleep to wait for packet arrival. Though each sleep lasts for a very short period of time, the wait-for-packet sleeps occur so frequently that they lead to interactive status for the process. (2) The current Linux interactivity mechanism provides the possibility that a non-interactive network process could receive a high CPU share, and at the same time be incorrectly categorized as 'interactive.' In this paper, we propose and test a possible solution to address the interactivity vs. fairness problems. Experiment results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  13. Drug target prediction using adverse event report systems: a pharmacogenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Takarabe, Masataka; Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-09-15

    Unexpected drug activities derived from off-targets are usually undesired and harmful; however, they can occasionally be beneficial for different therapeutic indications. There are many uncharacterized drugs whose target proteins (including the primary target and off-targets) remain unknown. The identification of all potential drug targets has become an important issue in drug repositioning to reuse known drugs for new therapeutic indications. We defined pharmacological similarity for all possible drugs using the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse event reporting system (AERS) and developed a new method to predict unknown drug-target interactions on a large scale from the integration of pharmacological similarity of drugs and genomic sequence similarity of target proteins in the framework of a pharmacogenomic approach. The proposed method was applicable to a large number of drugs and it was useful especially for predicting unknown drug-target interactions that could not be expected from drug chemical structures. We made a comprehensive prediction for potential off-targets of 1874 drugs with known targets and potential target profiles of 2519 drugs without known targets, which suggests many potential drug-target interactions that were not predicted by previous chemogenomic or pharmacogenomic approaches. Softwares are available upon request. yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp Datasets and all results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/aers/.

  14. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  15. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  16. Identification of human drug targets using machine-learning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Priyanka; Nath, Abhigyan; Chaube, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Identification of potential drug targets is a crucial task in the drug-discovery pipeline. Successful identification of candidate drug targets in entire genomes is very useful, and computational prediction methods can speed up this process. In the current work we have developed a sequence-based prediction method for the successful identification and discrimination of human drug target proteins, from human non-drug target proteins. The training features include sequence-based features, such as amino acid composition, amino acid property group composition, and dipeptide composition for generating predictive models. The classification of human drug target proteins presents a classic example of class imbalance. We have addressed this issue by using SMOTE (Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique) as a preprocessing step, for balancing the training data with a ratio of 1:1 between drug targets (minority samples) and non-drug targets (majority samples). Using ensemble classification learning method-Rotation Forest and ReliefF feature-selection technique for selecting the optimal subset of salient features, the best model with selected features can achieve 87.1% sensitivity, 83.6% specificity, and 85.3% accuracy, with 0.71 Matthews correlation coefficient (mcc) on a tenfold stratified cross-validation test. The subset of identified optimal features may help in assessing the compositional patterns in human drug targets. For further validation, using a rigorous leave-one-out cross-validation test, the model achieved 88.1% sensitivity, 83.0% specificity, 85.5% accuracy, and 0.712 mcc. The proposed method was tested on a second dataset, for which the current pipeline gave promising results. We suggest that the present approach can be applied successfully as a complementary tool to existing methods for novel drug target prediction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Weighted feature value based Drug Target Protein prediction.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Bo-ra; Jung, Hwiesung; Jang, Woo-Hyuk; Jung, Suk Hoon; Han, Dong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Drug discovery is a long process in which only a few successful new therapeutic discoveries are made and identification of drug target candidate proteins requires considerable time and efforts. However, the accumulation of information on drugs has made it possible to devise new computational methods for classifying drug target candidates. In this paper, we devise a Drug Target Protein (DT-P) classification method by the summation of weighted features which is extracted from known DT-P. The method is validated using Bayesian decision theory and SVM, and it was revealed to achieve high specificity of 89.5% with 88% accuracy.

  18. The dissimilarity of species interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Poisot, Timothée; Canard, Elsa; Mouillot, David; Mouquet, Nicolas; Gravel, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    In a context of global changes, and amidst the perpetual modification of community structure undergone by most natural ecosystems, it is more important than ever to understand how species interactions vary through space and time. The integration of biogeography and network theory will yield important results and further our understanding of species interactions. It has, however, been hampered so far by the difficulty to quantify variation among interaction networks. Here, we propose a general framework to study the dissimilarity of species interaction networks over time, space or environments, allowing both the use of quantitative and qualitative data. We decompose network dissimilarity into interactions and species turnover components, so that it is immediately comparable to common measures of β-diversity. We emphasise that scaling up β-diversity of community composition to the β-diversity of interactions requires only a small methodological step, which we foresee will help empiricists adopt this method. We illustrate the framework with a large dataset of hosts and parasites interactions and highlight other possible usages. We discuss a research agenda towards a biogeographical theory of species interactions.

  19. Unraveling spurious properties of interaction networks with tailored random networks.

    PubMed

    Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures--known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics--we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis.

  20. Unraveling Spurious Properties of Interaction Networks with Tailored Random Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures – known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics – we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis. PMID:21850239

  1. Using Click Chemistry to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0429 TITLE: Using "Click Chemistry " to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...29Mar2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0429 Using click chemistry to identify potential drug targets in Plasmodium 5b...Al-Tsp derivatives begins. Two classes of Tsp derivatives (Al-Tsp) are appropriate for click chemistry (Fig. 1). Class I derivatives carry a

  2. A simple model for studying interacting networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjia; Jolad, Shivakumar; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, R. K. P.

    2011-03-01

    Many specific physical networks (e.g., internet, power grid, interstates), have been characterized in considerable detail, but in isolation from each other. Yet, each of these networks supports the functions of the others, and so far, little is known about how their interactions affect their structure and functionality. To address this issue, we consider two coupled model networks. Each network is relatively simple, with a fixed set of nodes, but dynamically generated set of links which has a preferred degree, κ . In the stationary state, the degree distribution has exponential tails (far from κ), an attribute which we can explain. Next, we consider two such networks with different κ 's, reminiscent of two social groups, e.g., extroverts and introverts. Finally, we let these networks interact by establishing a controllable fraction of cross links. The resulting distribution of links, both within and across the two model networks, is investigated and discussed, along with some potential consequences for real networks. Supported in part by NSF-DMR-0705152 and 1005417.

  3. Heme Aggregation inhibitors: antimalarial drugs targeting an essential biomineralization process.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, J; Linck, R; Wright, D W

    2001-02-01

    Malaria, resulting from the parasites of the genus Plasmodium, places an untold burden on the global population. As recently as 40 years ago, only 10% of the world's population was at risk from malaria. Today, over 40% of the world's population is at risk. Due to increased parasite resistance to traditional drugs and vector resistance to insecticides, malaria is once again resurgent. An emergent theme from current strategies for the development of new antimalarials is that metal homeostasis within the parasite represents an important drug target. During the intra-erythrocytic phase of its life cycle, the malaria parasite can degrade up to 75% of an infected cell's hemoglobin. While hemoglobin proteolysis yields requisite amino acids, it also releases toxic free heme (Fe(III)PPIX). To balance the metabolic requirements for amino acids against the toxic effects of heme, malaria parasites have evolved a detoxification mechanism which involves the formation of a crystalline heme aggregate known as hemozoin. An overview of the biochemistry of the critical detoxification process will place it in the appropriate context with regards to drug targeting and design. Quinoline-ring antimalarial drugs are effective against the intraerythrocytic stages of pigment-producing parasites. Recent work on the mechanism of these compounds suggests that they prevent the formation of hemozoin. Evidence for such a mechanism is reviewed, especially in the context of the newly reported crystal structure of hemozoin. Additionally, novel drugs, such as the hydroxyxanthones, which have many of the characteristics of the quinolines are currently being investigated. Recent work has also highlighted two classes of inorganic complexes that have interesting antimalarial activity: (1) metal-N(4)O(2) Schiff base complexes and (2) porphyrins. The mechanism of action for these complexes is discussed. The use of these complexes as probes for the elucidation of structure-activity relationships in heme

  4. Comparing species interaction networks along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Loïc; Albouy, Camille; Bascompte, Jordi; Farwig, Nina; Graham, Catherine; Loreau, Michel; Maglianesi, Maria Alejandra; Melián, Carlos J; Pitteloud, Camille; Roslin, Tomas; Rohr, Rudolf; Saavedra, Serguei; Thuiller, Wilfried; Woodward, Guy; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Gravel, Dominique

    2017-09-22

    Knowledge of species composition and their interactions, in the form of interaction networks, is required to understand processes shaping their distribution over time and space. As such, comparing ecological networks along environmental gradients represents a promising new research avenue to understand the organization of life. Variation in the position and intensity of links within networks along environmental gradients may be driven by turnover in species composition, by variation in species abundances and by abiotic influences on species interactions. While investigating changes in species composition has a long tradition, so far only a limited number of studies have examined changes in species interactions between networks, often with differing approaches. Here, we review studies investigating variation in network structures along environmental gradients, highlighting how methodological decisions about standardization can influence their conclusions. Due to their complexity, variation among ecological networks is frequently studied using properties that summarize the distribution or topology of interactions such as number of links, connectance, or modularity. These properties can either be compared directly or using a procedure of standardization. While measures of network structure can be directly related to changes along environmental gradients, standardization is frequently used to facilitate interpretation of variation in network properties by controlling for some co-variables, or via null models. Null models allow comparing the deviation of empirical networks from random expectations and are expected to provide a more mechanistic understanding of the factors shaping ecological networks when they are coupled with functional traits. As an illustration, we compare approaches to quantify the role of trait matching in driving the structure of plant-hummingbird mutualistic networks, i.e. a direct comparison, standardized by null models and hypothesis

  5. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  6. Random interactions in higher order neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre; Venkatesh, Santosh S.

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent networks of polynomial threshold elements with random symmetric interactions are studied. Precise asymptotic estimates are derived for the expected number of fixed points as a function of the margin of stability. In particular, it is shown that there is a critical range of margins of stability (depending on the degree of polynomial interaction) such that the expected number of fixed points with margins below the critical range grows exponentially with the number of nodes in the network, while the expected number of fixed points with margins above the critical range decreases exponentially with the number of nodes in the network. The random energy model is also briefly examined and links with higher order neural networks and higher order spin glass models made explicit.

  7. Stapled peptides for intracellular drug targets.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Gregory L; Hilinski, Gerard J

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that engage in intracellular interactions with other proteins are widely considered among the most biologically appealing yet chemically intractable targets for drug discovery. The critical interaction surfaces of these proteins typically lack the deep hydrophobic involutions that enable potent, selective targeting by small organic molecules, and their localization within the cell puts them beyond the reach of protein therapeutics. Considerable interest has therefore arisen in next-generation targeting molecules that combine the broad target recognition capabilities of protein therapeutics with the robust cell-penetrating ability of small molecules. One type that has shown promise in early-stage studies is hydrocarbon-stapled α-helical peptides, a novel class of synthetic miniproteins locked into their bioactive α-helical fold through the site-specific introduction of a chemical brace, an all-hydrocarbon staple. Stapling can greatly improve the pharmacologic performance of peptides, increasing their target affinity, proteolytic resistance, and serum half-life while conferring on them high levels of cell penetration through endocytic vesicle trafficking. Here, we discuss considerations crucial to the successful design and evaluation of potent stapled peptide interactions, our intention being to facilitate the broad application of this technology to intractable targets of both basic biologic interest and potential therapeutic value.

  8. Cellular Signaling Pathways in Insulin Resistance-Systems Biology Analyses of Microarray Dataset Reveals New Drug Target Gene Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Raza, Waseem; Nguyen, Thanh; Bai, Baogang; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and metabolic disorder affecting large set of population of the world. To widen the scope of understanding of genetic causes of this disease, we performed interactive and toxicogenomic based systems biology study to find potential T2DM related genes after cDNA differential analysis. Methods: From the list of 50-differential expressed genes (p < 0.05), we found 9-T2DM related genes using extensive data mapping. In our constructed gene-network, T2DM-related differentially expressed seeder genes (9-genes) are found to interact with functionally related gene signatures (31-genes). The genetic interaction network of both T2DM-associated seeder as well as signature genes generally relates well with the disease condition based on toxicogenomic and data curation. Results: These networks showed significant enrichment of insulin signaling, insulin secretion and other T2DM-related pathways including JAK-STAT, MAPK, TGF, Toll-like receptor, p53 and mTOR, adipocytokine, FOXO, PPAR, P13-AKT, and triglyceride metabolic pathways. We found some enriched pathways that are common in different conditions. We recognized 11-signaling pathways as a connecting link between gene signatures in insulin resistance and T2DM. Notably, in the drug-gene network, the interacting genes showed significant overlap with 13-FDA approved and few non-approved drugs. This study demonstrates the value of systems genetics for identifying 18 potential genes associated with T2DM that are probable drug targets. Conclusions: This integrative and network based approaches for finding variants in genomic data expect to accelerate identification of new drug target molecules for different diseases and can speed up drug discovery outcomes.

  9. Cellular Signaling Pathways in Insulin Resistance-Systems Biology Analyses of Microarray Dataset Reveals New Drug Target Gene Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Raza, Waseem; Nguyen, Thanh; Bai, Baogang; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and metabolic disorder affecting large set of population of the world. To widen the scope of understanding of genetic causes of this disease, we performed interactive and toxicogenomic based systems biology study to find potential T2DM related genes after cDNA differential analysis. Methods: From the list of 50-differential expressed genes (p < 0.05), we found 9-T2DM related genes using extensive data mapping. In our constructed gene-network, T2DM-related differentially expressed seeder genes (9-genes) are found to interact with functionally related gene signatures (31-genes). The genetic interaction network of both T2DM-associated seeder as well as signature genes generally relates well with the disease condition based on toxicogenomic and data curation. Results: These networks showed significant enrichment of insulin signaling, insulin secretion and other T2DM-related pathways including JAK-STAT, MAPK, TGF, Toll-like receptor, p53 and mTOR, adipocytokine, FOXO, PPAR, P13-AKT, and triglyceride metabolic pathways. We found some enriched pathways that are common in different conditions. We recognized 11-signaling pathways as a connecting link between gene signatures in insulin resistance and T2DM. Notably, in the drug-gene network, the interacting genes showed significant overlap with 13-FDA approved and few non-approved drugs. This study demonstrates the value of systems genetics for identifying 18 potential genes associated with T2DM that are probable drug targets. Conclusions: This integrative and network based approaches for finding variants in genomic data expect to accelerate identification of new drug target molecules for different diseases and can speed up drug discovery outcomes. PMID:28179884

  10. Description of interatomic interactions with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajinazar, Samad; Shao, Junping; Kolmogorov, Aleksey N.

    Neural networks are a promising alternative to traditional classical potentials for describing interatomic interactions. Recent research in the field has demonstrated how arbitrary atomic environments can be represented with sets of general functions which serve as an input for the machine learning tool. We have implemented a neural network formalism in the MAISE package and developed a protocol for automated generation of accurate models for multi-component systems. Our tests illustrate the performance of neural networks and known classical potentials for a range of chemical compositions and atomic configurations. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-1410514.

  11. Broadband networks for interactive telemedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Roelofs, Theo A.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Schlag, Peter M.

    2002-08-01

    Using off-the-shelf hardware components and a specially developed high-end software communication system (WinVicos) satellite networks for interactive telemedicine have been designed and developed. These networks allow for various telemedical applications, like intraoperative teleconsultation, second opinioning, teleteaching, telementoring, etc.. Based on the successful GALENOS network, several projects are currently being realized: MEDASHIP (Medical Assistance for Ships); DELTASS (Disaster Emergency Logistic Telemedicine Advanced Satellites Systems) and EMISPHER (Euro-Mediterranean Internet-Satellite Platform for Health, medical Education and Research).

  12. Dynamics of deceptive interactions in social networks.

    PubMed

    Barrio, Rafael A; Govezensky, Tzipe; Dunbar, Robin; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-11-06

    In this paper, we examine the role of lies in human social relations by implementing some salient characteristics of deceptive interactions into an opinion formation model, so as to describe the dynamical behaviour of a social network more realistically. In this model, we take into account such basic properties of social networks as the dynamics of the intensity of interactions, the influence of public opinion and the fact that in every human interaction it might be convenient to deceive or withhold information depending on the instantaneous situation of each individual in the network. We find that lies shape the topology of social networks, especially the formation of tightly linked, small communities with loose connections between them. We also find that agents with a larger proportion of deceptive interactions are the ones that connect communities of different opinion, and, in this sense, they have substantial centrality in the network. We then discuss the consequences of these results for the social behaviour of humans and predict the changes that could arise due to a varying tolerance for lies in society. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Dynamics of deceptive interactions in social networks

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Rafael A.; Govezensky, Tzipe; Dunbar, Robin; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of lies in human social relations by implementing some salient characteristics of deceptive interactions into an opinion formation model, so as to describe the dynamical behaviour of a social network more realistically. In this model, we take into account such basic properties of social networks as the dynamics of the intensity of interactions, the influence of public opinion and the fact that in every human interaction it might be convenient to deceive or withhold information depending on the instantaneous situation of each individual in the network. We find that lies shape the topology of social networks, especially the formation of tightly linked, small communities with loose connections between them. We also find that agents with a larger proportion of deceptive interactions are the ones that connect communities of different opinion, and, in this sense, they have substantial centrality in the network. We then discuss the consequences of these results for the social behaviour of humans and predict the changes that could arise due to a varying tolerance for lies in society. PMID:26510829

  14. STITCH: interaction networks of chemicals and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Michael; von Mering, Christian; Campillos, Monica; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge about interactions between proteins and small molecules is essential for the understanding of molecular and cellular functions. However, information on such interactions is widely dispersed across numerous databases and the literature. To facilitate access to this data, STITCH (‘search tool for interactions of chemicals’) integrates information about interactions from metabolic pathways, crystal structures, binding experiments and drug–target relationships. Inferred information from phenotypic effects, text mining and chemical structure similarity is used to predict relations between chemicals. STITCH further allows exploring the network of chemical relations, also in the context of associated binding proteins. Each proposed interaction can be traced back to the original data sources. Our database contains interaction information for over 68 000 different chemicals, including 2200 drugs, and connects them to 1.5 million genes across 373 genomes and their interactions contained in the STRING database. STITCH is available at http://stitch.embl.de/ PMID:18084021

  15. Drug target identification in sphingolipid metabolism by computational systems biology tools: metabolic control analysis and metabolic pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozbayraktar, F Betül Kavun; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2010-08-01

    Sphingolipids regulate cellular processes that are critically important in cell's fate and function in cancer development and progression. This fact underlies the basics of the novel cancer therapy approach. The pharmacological manipulation of the sphingolipid metabolism in cancer therapeutics necessitates the detailed understanding of the pathway. Two computational systems biology tools are used to identify potential drug target enzymes among sphingolipid pathway that can be further utilized in drug design studies for cancer therapy. The enzymes in sphingolipid pathway were ranked according to their roles in controlling the metabolic network by metabolic control analysis. The physiologically connected reactions, i.e. biologically significant and functional modules of network, were identified by metabolic pathway analysis. The final set of candidate drug target enzymes are selected such that their manipulation leads to ceramide accumulation and long chain base phosphates depletion. The mathematical tools' efficiency for drug target identification performed in this study is validated by clinically available drugs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Monogenic hypercholesterolemias: new genes, new drug targets].

    PubMed

    Mandel'shtam, M Iu; Vasil'ev, V B

    2008-10-01

    This review is focused on recent data on structure and functions of PCSK9 proprotein convertase, a newly identified participant in cholesterol metabolism in mammalian organisms, including humans. Proprotein convertase acts as a molecular chaperone for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, targeting it to the lysosomal degradation pathway. Various mutations increasing the PCSK9 affinity toward the LDL receptor cause autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 gene decrease the blood plasma cholesterol level, thus acting as a protection factor against atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. It is supposed that pharmacological agents inhibiting the interaction between PCSK9 and LDL receptor may substantially amplify the benefits of drugs--statins and cholesterol absorption blockers--in the treatment of all types of hypercholesterolemia, including its widespread multigenic and multifactorial forms.

  17. Histone as future drug target for malaria.

    PubMed

    Rawat, D S; Lumb, V; Sharma, Y D; Pasha, S T; Singh, G

    2007-06-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity in tropical countries and affecting around 100 countries of the world. As per WHO estimates, 300-500 million are being infected and 1-3 million deaths annually due to malaria. With the emerging knowledge about genome sequence of all the three counterparts involved in the disease of malaria, the parasite Plasmodium, vector Anopheles and host Homo sapien have helped the scientists to understand interactions between them. Simultaneous advancement in technology further improves the prospects to discover new targets for vaccines and drugs. Though the malaria vaccine is still far away in this situation there is need to develop a potent and affordable drug(s). Histones are the key protein of chromatin and play an important role in DNA packaging, replication and gene expression. They also show frequent post-translation modifications. The specific combinations of these posttranslational modifications are thought to alter chromatin structure by forming epigenetic bar codes that specify either transient or heritable patterns of genome function. Chromatin regulators and upstream pathways are therefore seen as promising targets for development of therapeutic drugs.

  18. Synchronization in networks with multiple interaction layers

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Charo I.; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Bonamassa, Ivan; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The structure of many real-world systems is best captured by networks consisting of several interaction layers. Understanding how a multilayered structure of connections affects the synchronization properties of dynamical systems evolving on top of it is a highly relevant endeavor in mathematics and physics and has potential applications in several socially relevant topics, such as power grid engineering and neural dynamics. We propose a general framework to assess the stability of the synchronized state in networks with multiple interaction layers, deriving a necessary condition that generalizes the master stability function approach. We validate our method by applying it to a network of Rössler oscillators with a double layer of interactions and show that highly rich phenomenology emerges from this. This includes cases where the stability of synchronization can be induced even if both layers would have individually induced unstable synchrony, an effect genuinely arising from the true multilayer structure of the interactions among the units in the network. PMID:28138540

  19. The Networking of Interactive Bibliographic Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Richard S.; Reintjes, J. Francis

    Research in networking of heterogeneous interactive bibliographic retrieval systems is being conducted which centers on the concept of a virtual retrieval system. Such a virtual system would be created through a translating computer interface that would provide access to the different retrieval systems and data bases in a uniform and convenient…

  20. Identification of potential drug targets based on a computational biology algorithm for venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruiqiang; Li, Lei; Chen, Lina; Li, Wan; Chen, Binbin; Jiang, Jing; Huang, Hao; Li, Yiran; He, Yuehan; Lv, Junjie; He, Weiming

    2017-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, fatal and frequently recurrent disease. Changes in the activity of different coagulation factors serve as a pathophysiological basis for the recurrent risk of VTE. Systems biology approaches provide a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms responsible for recurrent VTE. In this study, a novel computational method was presented to identify the recurrent risk modules (RRMs) based on the integration of expression profiles and human signaling network, which hold promise for achieving new and deeper insights into the mechanisms responsible for VTE. The results revealed that the RRMs had good classification performance to discriminate patients with recurrent VTE. The functional annotation analysis demonstrated that the RRMs played a crucial role in the pathogenesis of VTE. Furthermore, a variety of approved drug targets in the RRM M5 were related to VTE. Thus, the M5 may be applied to select potential drug targets for combination therapy and the extended treatment of VTE.

  1. Predicting the fission yeast protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pancaldi, Vera; Saraç, Omer S; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R; Převorovský, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bähler, Jürg

    2012-04-01

    A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein-protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70-80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt).

  2. Predicting the Fission Yeast Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Pancaldi, Vera; Saraç, Ömer S.; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R.; Převorovský, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bähler, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein–protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70–80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt). PMID:22540037

  3. Network Compression as a Quality Measure for Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Loic; Reimann, Matthias; Stewart, A. Francis; Schroeder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients. PMID:22719828

  4. Network archaeology: uncovering ancient networks from present-day interactions.

    PubMed

    Navlakha, Saket; Kingsford, Carl

    2011-04-01

    What proteins interacted in a long-extinct ancestor of yeast? How have different members of a protein complex assembled together over time? Our ability to answer such questions has been limited by the unavailability of ancestral protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. To overcome this limitation, we propose several novel algorithms to reconstruct the growth history of a present-day network. Our likelihood-based method finds a probable previous state of the graph by applying an assumed growth model backwards in time. This approach retains node identities so that the history of individual nodes can be tracked. Using this methodology, we estimate protein ages in the yeast PPI network that are in good agreement with sequence-based estimates of age and with structural features of protein complexes. Further, by comparing the quality of the inferred histories for several different growth models (duplication-mutation with complementarity, forest fire, and preferential attachment), we provide additional evidence that a duplication-based model captures many features of PPI network growth better than models designed to mimic social network growth. From the reconstructed history, we model the arrival time of extant and ancestral interactions and predict that complexes have significantly re-wired over time and that new edges tend to form within existing complexes. We also hypothesize a distribution of per-protein duplication rates, track the change of the network's clustering coefficient, and predict paralogous relationships between extant proteins that are likely to be complementary to the relationships inferred using sequence alone. Finally, we infer plausible parameters for the model, thereby predicting the relative probability of various evolutionary events. The success of these algorithms indicates that parts of the history of the yeast PPI are encoded in its present-day form.

  5. Is the Mitochondrion a Good Malaria Drug Target?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Christopher D; Buchanan, Hayley D; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2017-03-01

    Rapid emergence of resistance to atovaquone, which targets electron transport in the malaria parasite mitochondrion, relegated its use to prophylaxis and even cast a shadow over the development of drugs targeting other parasite mitochondrial pathways. Here we argue for a renewed focus on the mitochondrion as a drug target, focusing particularly on the issues of resistance. We posit a hypothesis for why atovaquone resistance emerges so quickly, and we explain how facile acquisition of resistance is apparently offset by an inability of parasites to spread this resistance. We also explore the utility and resistance issues for emerging new drugs targeting parasite mitochondria, concluding that the mitochondrion is indeed an excellent target. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Structural and logical analysis of a comprehensive hedgehog signaling pathway to identify alternative drug targets for glioma, colon and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Pradhan, Rachana N; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog is an evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway, widely implicated in controlling various cellular responses such as cellular proliferation and stem cell renewal in human and other organisms, through external stimuli. Aberrant activation of this pathway in human adult stem cell line may cause different types of cancers. Hence, targeting this pathway in cancer therapy has become indispensable, but the non availability of detailed molecular interactions, complex regulations by extra- and intra-cellular proteins and cross talks with other pathways pose a serious challenge to get a coherent understanding of this signaling pathway for making therapeutic strategy. This motivated us to perform a computational study of the pathway and to identify probable drug targets. In this work, from available databases and literature, we reconstructed a complete hedgehog pathway which reports the largest number of molecules and interactions to date. Using recently developed computational techniques, we further performed structural and logical analysis of this pathway. In structural analysis, the connectivity and centrality parameters were calculated to identify the important proteins from the network. To capture the regulations of the molecules, we developed a master Boolean model of all the interactions between the proteins and created different cancer scenarios, such as Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic. We performed perturbation analysis on these cancer conditions to identify the important and minimal combinations of proteins that can be used as drug targets. From our study we observed the under expressions of various oncoproteins in Hedgehog pathway while perturbing at a time the combinations of the proteins GLI1, GLI2 and SMO in Glioma; SMO, HFU, ULK3 and RAS in Colon cancer; SMO, HFU, ULK3, RAS and ERK12 in Pancreatic cancer. This reconstructed Hedgehog signaling pathway and the computational analysis for identifying new combinatory drug targets will be useful for

  7. Structural and Logical Analysis of a Comprehensive Hedgehog Signaling Pathway to Identify Alternative Drug Targets for Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Pradhan, Rachana N.; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog is an evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway, widely implicated in controlling various cellular responses such as cellular proliferation and stem cell renewal in human and other organisms, through external stimuli. Aberrant activation of this pathway in human adult stem cell line may cause different types of cancers. Hence, targeting this pathway in cancer therapy has become indispensable, but the non availability of detailed molecular interactions, complex regulations by extra- and intra-cellular proteins and cross talks with other pathways pose a serious challenge to get a coherent understanding of this signaling pathway for making therapeutic strategy. This motivated us to perform a computational study of the pathway and to identify probable drug targets. In this work, from available databases and literature, we reconstructed a complete hedgehog pathway which reports the largest number of molecules and interactions to date. Using recently developed computational techniques, we further performed structural and logical analysis of this pathway. In structural analysis, the connectivity and centrality parameters were calculated to identify the important proteins from the network. To capture the regulations of the molecules, we developed a master Boolean model of all the interactions between the proteins and created different cancer scenarios, such as Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic. We performed perturbation analysis on these cancer conditions to identify the important and minimal combinations of proteins that can be used as drug targets. From our study we observed the under expressions of various oncoproteins in Hedgehog pathway while perturbing at a time the combinations of the proteins GLI1, GLI2 and SMO in Glioma; SMO, HFU, ULK3 and RAS in Colon cancer; SMO, HFU, ULK3, RAS and ERK12 in Pancreatic cancer. This reconstructed Hedgehog signaling pathway and the computational analysis for identifying new combinatory drug targets will be useful for

  8. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  9. CD4-gp120 interaction interface - a gateway for HIV-1 infection in human: molecular network, modeling and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Deeksha; Podder, Avijit; Pandit, Mansi; Latha, Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    The major causative agent for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 is a predominant subtype of HIV which counts on human cellular mechanism virtually in every aspect of its life cycle. Binding of viral envelope glycoprotein-gp120 with human cell surface CD4 receptor triggers the early infection stage of HIV-1. This study focuses on the interaction interface between these two proteins that play a crucial role for viral infectivity. The CD4-gp120 interaction interface has been studied through a comprehensive protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis and highlighted as a useful step towards identifying potential therapeutic drug targets against HIV-1 infection. We prioritized gp41, Nef and Tat proteins of HIV-1 as valuable drug targets at early stage of viral infection. Lack of crystal structure has made it difficult to understand the biological implication of these proteins during disease progression. Here, computational protein modeling techniques and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to generate three-dimensional models of these targets. Besides, molecular docking was initiated to determine the desirability of these target proteins for already available HIV-1 specific drugs which indicates the usefulness of these protein structures to identify an effective drug combination therapy against AIDS.

  10. Drug targets in the cytokine universe for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuebin; Fang, Lei; Guo, Taylor B; Mei, Hongkang; Zhang, Jingwu Z

    2013-03-01

    In autoimmune disease, a network of diverse cytokines is produced in association with disease susceptibility to constitute the 'cytokine milieu' that drives chronic inflammation. It remains elusive how cytokines interact in such a complex network to sustain inflammation in autoimmune disease. This has presented huge challenges for successful drug discovery because it has been difficult to predict how individual cytokine-targeted therapy would work. Here, we combine the principles of Chinese Taoism philosophy and modern bioinformatics tools to dissect multiple layers of arbitrary cytokine interactions into discernible interfaces and connectivity maps to predict movements in the cytokine network. The key principles presented here have important implications in our understanding of cytokine interactions and development of effective cytokine-targeted therapies for autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CyTargetLinker: a cytoscape app to integrate regulatory interactions in network analysis.

    PubMed

    Kutmon, Martina; Kelder, Thomas; Mandaviya, Pooja; Evelo, Chris T A; Coort, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    The high complexity and dynamic nature of the regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein activity pose a challenge to fully understand the cellular machinery. By deciphering the role of important players, including transcription factors, microRNAs, or small molecules, a better understanding of key regulatory processes can be obtained. Various databases contain information on the interactions of regulators with their targets for different organisms, data recently being extended with the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) project. A systems biology approach integrating our understanding on different regulators is essential in interpreting the regulation of molecular biological processes. We developed CyTargetLinker (http://projects.bigcat.unimaas.nl/cytargetlinker), a Cytoscape app, for integrating regulatory interactions in network analysis. Recently we released CyTargetLinker as one of the first apps for Cytoscape 3. It provides a user-friendly and flexible interface to extend biological networks with regulatory interactions, such as microRNA-target, transcription factor-target and/or drug-target. Importantly, CyTargetLinker employs identifier mapping to combine various interaction data resources that use different types of identifiers. Three case studies demonstrate the strength and broad applicability of CyTargetLinker, (i) extending a mouse molecular interaction network, containing genes linked to diabetes mellitus, with validated and predicted microRNAs, (ii) enriching a molecular interaction network, containing DNA repair genes, with ENCODE transcription factor and (iii) building a regulatory meta-network in which a biological process is extended with information on transcription factor, microRNA and drug regulation. CyTargetLinker provides a simple and extensible framework for biologists and bioinformaticians to integrate different regulatory interactions into their network analysis approaches. Visualization options enable

  12. In vivo imaging of specific drug target binding at subcellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dubach, J.M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L.A.; Weissleder, R.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to measure binding of small molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labeled drug and enables high resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumor in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity. PMID:24867710

  13. In vivo imaging of specific drug-target binding at subcellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubach, J. M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L. A.; Weissleder, R.

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of measuring binding of small-molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labelled drug and enables high-resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumour in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity.

  14. Predicting potential drug-drug interactions by integrating chemical, biological, phenotypic and network data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Liu, Feng; Luo, Fei; Tian, Gang; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-01-05

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major concerns in drug discovery. Accurate prediction of potential DDIs can help to reduce unexpected interactions in the entire lifecycle of drugs, and are important for the drug safety surveillance. Since many DDIs are not detected or observed in clinical trials, this work is aimed to predict unobserved or undetected DDIs. In this paper, we collect a variety of drug data that may influence drug-drug interactions, i.e., drug substructure data, drug target data, drug enzyme data, drug transporter data, drug pathway data, drug indication data, drug side effect data, drug off side effect data and known drug-drug interactions. We adopt three representative methods: the neighbor recommender method, the random walk method and the matrix perturbation method to build prediction models based on different data. Thus, we evaluate the usefulness of different information sources for the DDI prediction. Further, we present flexible frames of integrating different models with suitable ensemble rules, including weighted average ensemble rule and classifier ensemble rule, and develop ensemble models to achieve better performances. The experiments demonstrate that different data sources provide diverse information, and the DDI network based on known DDIs is one of most important information for DDI prediction. The ensemble methods can produce better performances than individual methods, and outperform existing state-of-the-art methods. The datasets and source codes are available at https://github.com/zw9977129/drug-drug-interaction/ .

  15. Sirtuins as potential drug targets for metablic diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies of the sirtuin family of proteins, which possess NAD+/-dependent deacetylase and ADP ribosyltransferase activities, indicate that they regulate many biological functions, such as longevity and metabolism. These findings also suggest that sirtuins might serve as valuable drug targets f...

  16. Pharmacological Validation of Trypanosoma brucei Phosphodiesterases as Novel Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Harry P.; Gould, Matthew K.; Sterk, Geert Jan; Tenor, Hermann; Kunz, Stefan; Luginbuehl, Edith; Seebeck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The development of drugs for neglected infectious diseases often uses parasite-specific enzymes as targets. We here demonstrate that parasite enzymes with highly conserved human homologs may represent a promising reservoir of new potential drug targets. The cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) of Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of the fatal human sleeping sickness, are essential for the parasite. The highly conserved human homologs are well-established drug targets. We here describe what is to our knowledge the first pharmacological validation of trypanosomal PDEs as drug targets. High-throughput screening of a proprietary compound library identified a number of potent hits. One compound, the tetrahydrophthalazinone compound A (Cpd A), was further characterized. It causes a dramatic increase of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Short-term cell viability is not affected, but cell proliferation is inhibited immediately, and cell death occurs within 3 days. Cpd A prevents cytokinesis, resulting in multinucleated, multiflagellated cells that eventually lyse. These observations pharmacologically validate the highly conserved trypanosomal PDEs as potential drug targets. PMID:22291195

  17. Mouse model phenotypes provide information about human drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Hiebert, Tanya; Hardy, Nigel W.; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Dumontier, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Methods for computational drug target identification use information from diverse information sources to predict or prioritize drug targets for known drugs. One set of resources that has been relatively neglected for drug repurposing is animal model phenotype. Results: We investigate the use of mouse model phenotypes for drug target identification. To achieve this goal, we first integrate mouse model phenotypes and drug effects, and then systematically compare the phenotypic similarity between mouse models and drug effect profiles. We find a high similarity between phenotypes resulting from loss-of-function mutations and drug effects resulting from the inhibition of a protein through a drug action, and demonstrate how this approach can be used to suggest candidate drug targets. Availability and implementation: Analysis code and supplementary data files are available on the project Web site at https://drugeffects.googlecode.com. Contact: leechuck@leechuck.de or roh25@aber.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24158600

  18. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  19. Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Aaron R.

    2008-10-01

    An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

  20. BIND—The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Gary D.; Donaldson, Ian; Wolting, Cheryl; Ouellette, B. F. Francis; Pawson, Tony; Hogue, Christopher W. V.

    2001-01-01

    The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND; http://binddb.org) is a database designed to store full descriptions of interactions, molecular complexes and pathways. Development of the BIND 2.0 data model has led to the incorporation of virtually all components of molecular mechanisms including interactions between any two molecules composed of proteins, nucleic acids and small molecules. Chemical reactions, photochemical activation and conformational changes can also be described. Everything from small molecule biochemistry to signal transduction is abstracted in such a way that graph theory methods may be applied for data mining. The database can be used to study networks of interactions, to map pathways across taxonomic branches and to generate information for kinetic simulations. BIND anticipates the coming large influx of interaction information from high-throughput proteomics efforts including detailed information about post-translational modifications from mass spectrometry. Version 2.0 of the BIND data model is discussed as well as implementation, content and the open nature of the BIND project. The BIND data specification is available as ASN.1 and XML DTD. PMID:11125103

  1. Sexually transmitted diseases putative drug target database: a comprehensive database of putative drug targets of pathogens identified by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Malipatil, Vijayakumari; Madagi, Shivkumar; Bhattacharjee, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are the serious public health problems and also impose a financial burden on the economy. Sexually transmitted infections are cured with single or multiple antibiotics. However, in many cases the organism showed persistence even after treatment. In the current study, the set of druggable targets in STD pathogens have been identified by comparative genomics. The subtractive genomics scheme exploits the properties of non-homology, essentiality, membrane localization and metabolic pathway uniqueness in identifying the drug targets. To achieve the effective use of data and to understand properties of drug target under single canopy, an integrated knowledge database of drug targets in STD bacteria was created. Data for each drug targets include biochemical pathway, function, cellular localization, essentiality score and structural details. The proteome of STD pathogens yielded 44 membrane associated proteins possessing unique metabolic pathways when subjected to the algorithm. The database can be accessed at http://biomedresearchasia.org/index.html. Diverse data merged in the common framework of this database is expected to be valuable not only for basic studies in clinical bioinformatics, but also for basic studies in immunological, biotechnological and clinical fields.

  2. The interaction network of the chaperonin CCT.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Carien; Stirling, Peter C; McCormack, Elizabeth A; Filmore, Heather; Paul, Angela; Brost, Renee L; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Leroux, Michel R; Willison, Keith R

    2008-07-09

    The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) has an important function in maintaining cellular homoeostasis by assisting the folding of many proteins, including the cytoskeletal components actin and tubulin. Yet the nature of the proteins and cellular pathways dependent on CCT function has not been established globally. Here, we use proteomic and genomic approaches to define CCT interaction networks involving 136 proteins/genes that include links to the nuclear pore complex, chromatin remodelling, and protein degradation. Our study also identifies a third eukaryotic cytoskeletal system connected with CCT: the septin ring complex, which is essential for cytokinesis. CCT interactions with septins are ATP dependent, and disrupting the function of the chaperonin in yeast leads to loss of CCT-septin interaction and aberrant septin ring assembly. Our results therefore provide a rich framework for understanding the function of CCT in several essential cellular processes, including epigenetics and cell division.

  3. Novel Insight from Computational Virtual Screening Depict the Binding Potential of Selected Phytotherapeutics Against Probable Drug Targets of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Suman; Skariyachan, Sinosh

    2017-02-20

    This study explores computational screening and molecular docking approaches to screen novel herbal therapeutics against probable drug targets of Clostridium difficile. The essential genes were predicted by comparative genome analysis of C. difficile and best homologous organisms using BLAST search at database of essential genes (DEG). The functions of these genes in various metabolic pathways were predicted and some of these genes were considered as potential targets. Three major proteins were selected as putative targets, namely permease IIC component, ABC transporter and histidine kinase. The three-dimensional structures of these targets were predicted by molecular modelling. The herbal bioactive compounds were screened by computer-aided virtual screening and binding potentials against the drug targets were predicted by molecular docking. Quercetin present in Psidium guajava (binding energy of -9.1 kcal/mol), Ellagic acid found in Punica granatum and Psidium guajava (binding energy -9.0 kcal/mol) and Curcumin, present in Curcuma longa (binding energy -7.8 kcal/mol) demonstrated minimum binding energy and more number of interacting residues with the drug targets. Further, comparative study revealed that phytoligands demonstrated better binding affinities to the drug targets in comparison with usual ligands. Thus, this investigation explores the therapeutic probabilities of selected phytoligands against the putative drug targets of C. difficile.

  4. Structure and Interactions in Neurofilament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel; Safinya, Cyrus

    2004-03-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are a major constituent of myelinated axons of nerve cells, which assemble from three subunit proteins of low, medium, and high molecular weight to form a 10 nm diameter rod with sidearms radiating from the center. The sidearm interactions impart structural stability and result in an oriented network of NFs running parallel to the axon. Over or under expression of NF subunits is related to abnormal NF-networks, which are known hallmarks of motor neuron diseases (ALS). Here, we reassemble NFs from subunit proteins purified from bovine spinal cord. We demonstrate the formation of the NF network in vitro where synchrotron x-ray scattering (SSRL) reveals a well-defined interfilament spacing while the defect structure in polarized optical microcopy shows the liquid crystalline nature. The spacing varies depending on subunit molar ratios and salt conditions and we relate this change to the mechanical stability of the lattice. This change in lattice spacing yields insight into the stabilizing interactions between the NF sidearms. Supported by NSF DMR- 0203755, CTS-0103516, and NIH GM-59288.

  5. New drugs targeting Th2 lymphocytes in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Caramori, Gaetano; Groneberg, David; Ito, Kazuhiro; Casolari, Paolo; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Asthma represents a profound worldwide public health problem. The most effective anti-asthmatic drugs currently available include inhaled β2-agonists and glucocorticoids and control asthma in about 90-95% of patients. The current asthma therapies are not cures and symptoms return soon after treatment is stopped even after long term therapy. Although glucocorticoids are highly effective in controlling the inflammatory process in asthma, they appear to have little effect on the lower airway remodelling processes that appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma at currently prescribed doses. The development of novel drugs may allow resolution of these changes. In addition, severe glucocorticoid-dependent and resistant asthma presents a great clinical burden and reducing the side-effects of glucocorticoids using novel steroid-sparing agents is needed. Furthermore, the mechanisms involved in the persistence of inflammation are poorly understood and the reasons why some patients have severe life threatening asthma and others have very mild disease are still unknown. Drug development for asthma has been directed at improving currently available drugs and findings new compounds that usually target the Th2-driven airway inflammatory response. Considering the apparently central role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of asthma, drugs targeting disease-inducing Th2 cells are promising therapeutic strategies. However, although animal models of asthma suggest that this is feasible, the translation of these types of studies for the treatment of human asthma remains poor due to the limitations of the models currently used. The myriad of new compounds that are in development directed to modulate Th2 cells recruitment and/or activation will clarify in the near future the relative importance of these cells and their mediators in the complex interactions with the other pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cells and mediators responsible of the different asthmatic

  6. CRIMALDDI: platform technologies and novel anti-malarial drug targets.

    PubMed

    Vial, Henri; Taramelli, Donatella; Boulton, Ian C; Ward, Steve A; Doerig, Christian; Chibale, Kelly

    2013-11-05

    The Coordination, Rationalization, and Integration of antiMALarial drug Discovery & Development Initiatives (CRIMALDDI) Consortium, funded by the EU Framework Seven Programme, has attempted, through a series of interactive and facilitated workshops, to develop priorities for research to expedite the discovery of new anti-malarials. This paper outlines the recommendations for the development of enabling technologies and the identification of novel targets.Screening systems must be robust, validated, reproducible, and represent human malaria. They also need to be cost-effective. While such systems exist to screen for activity against blood stage Plasmodium falciparum, they are lacking for other Plasmodium spp. and other stages of the parasite's life cycle. Priority needs to be given to developing high-throughput screens that can identify activity against the liver and sexual stages. This in turn requires other enabling technologies to be developed to allow the study of these stages and to allow for the culture of liver cells and the parasite at all stages of its life cycle.As these enabling technologies become available, they will allow novel drug targets to be studied. Currently anti-malarials are mostly targeting the asexual blood stage of the parasite's life cycle. There are many other attractive targets that need to be investigated. The liver stages and the sexual stages will become more important as malaria control moves towards malaria elimination. Sexual development is a process offering multiple targets, even though the mechanisms of differentiation are still not fully understood. However, designing a drug whose effect is not curative but would be used in asymptomatic patients is difficult given current safety thresholds. Compounds active against the liver schizont would have a prophylactic effect and Plasmodium vivax elimination requires effectors against the dormant liver hypnozoites. It may be that drugs to be used in elimination campaigns will also need

  7. Modulatory interactions between the default mode network and task positive networks in resting-state

    PubMed Central

    Di, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The two major brain networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task positive network, typically reveal negative and variable connectivity in resting-state. In the present study, we examined whether the connectivity between the DMN and different components of the task positive network were modulated by other brain regions by using physiophysiological interaction (PPI) on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Spatial independent component analysis was first conducted to identify components that represented networks of interest, including the anterior and posterior DMNs, salience, dorsal attention, left and right executive networks. PPI analysis was conducted between pairs of these networks to identify networks or regions that showed modulatory interactions with the two networks. Both network-wise and voxel-wise analyses revealed reciprocal positive modulatory interactions between the DMN, salience, and executive networks. Together with the anatomical properties of the salience network regions, the results suggest that the salience network may modulate the relationship between the DMN and executive networks. In addition, voxel-wise analysis demonstrated that the basal ganglia and thalamus positively interacted with the salience network and the dorsal attention network, and negatively interacted with the salience network and the DMN. The results demonstrated complex modulatory interactions among the DMNs and task positive networks in resting-state, and suggested that communications between these networks may be modulated by some critical brain structures such as the salience network, basal ganglia, and thalamus. PMID:24860698

  8. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  9. Members of FOX family could be drug targets of cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Li, Wan; Zhao, Ying; Kang, De; Fu, Weiqi; Zheng, Xiangjin; Pang, Xiaocong; Du, Guanhua

    2017-08-19

    FOX families play important roles in biological processes, including metabolism, development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and longevity. Here we are focusing on roles of FOX members in cancers, FOX members and drug resistance, FOX members and stem cells. Finally, FOX members as drug targets of cancer treatment were discussed. Future perspectives of FOXC1 research were described in the end. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Progress in functional genomics approaches to antifungal drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Marianne D; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    Antifungal drug discovery is starting to benefit from the enormous advances in the genomics field, which have occurred in the past decade. As traditional drug screening on existing targets is not delivering the long-awaited potent antifungals, efforts to use novel genetics and genomics-based strategies to aid in the discovery of novel drug targets are gaining increased importance. The current paradigm in antifungal drug target discovery focuses on basically two main classes of targets to evaluate: genes essential for viability and virulence or pathogenicity factors. Here we report on recent advances in genetics and genomics-based technologies that will allow us not only to identify and validate novel fungal drug targets, but hopefully in the longer run also to discover potent novel therapeutic agents. Fungal pathogens have typically presented significant obstacles when subjected to genetics, but the creativity of scientists in the anti-infectives field and the cross-talk with scientists in other areas is now yielding exciting new tools and technologies to tackle the problem of finding potent, specific and non-toxic antifungal therapeutics.

  11. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-16

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  12. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  13. Cooperative tertiary interaction network guides RNA folding

    PubMed Central

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, Robert M.; Woodson1, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-coding RNAs form unique three-dimensional structures, which perform many biochemical and regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting and native PAGE. Double and triple mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on native state stability. Instead, formation of core and peripheral structural motifs are cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native topology of the ribozyme. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses non-native structures and makes the search for the native state more efficient. We suggest that cooperativity in non-coding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures that promote a unique fold despite a rugged energy landscape. PMID:22500801

  14. Protein painting reveals solvent-excluded drug targets hidden within native protein–protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Alessandra; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the contact regions between a protein and its binding partners is essential for creating therapies that block the interaction. Unfortunately, such contact regions are extremely difficult to characterize because they are hidden inside the binding interface. Here we introduce protein painting as a new tool that employs small molecules as molecular paints to tightly coat the surface of protein–protein complexes. The molecular paints, which block trypsin cleavage sites, are excluded from the binding interface. Following mass spectrometry, only peptides hidden in the interface emerge as positive hits, revealing the functional contact regions that are drug targets. We use protein painting to discover contact regions between the three-way interaction of IL1β ligand, the receptor IL1RI and the accessory protein IL1RAcP. We then use this information to create peptides and monoclonal antibodies that block the interaction and abolish IL1β cell signalling. The technology is broadly applicable to discover protein interaction drug targets. PMID:25048602

  15. Instructional Technology: The Information Superhighway, the Internet, Interactive Video Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Kerry S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "It Boggles the Mind" (Odell); "Merging Your Classroom onto the Information Superhighway" (Murphy); "The World's Largest Computer Network" (Fleck); "The Information Highway in Iowa" (Miller); "Interactive Video Networks in Secondary Schools" (Swan et al.); and "Upgrade to Humancentric…

  16. Structural systems pharmacology: a new frontier in discovering novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hepan; Ge, Xiaoxia; Xie, Lei

    2013-08-01

    The modern target-based drug discovery process, characterized by the one-drug-one-gene paradigm, has been of limited success. In contrast, phenotype-based screening produces thousands of active compounds but gives no hint as to what their molecular targets are or which ones merit further research. This presents a question: What is a suitable target for an efficient and safe drug? In this paper, we argue that target selection should take into account the proteome-wide energetic and kinetic landscape of drug-target interactions, as well as their cellular and organismal consequences. We propose a new paradigm of structural systems pharmacology to deconvolute the molecular targets of successful drugs as well as to identify druggable targets and their drug-like binders. Here we face two major challenges in structural systems pharmacology: How do we characterize and analyze the structural and energetic origins of drug-target interactions on a proteome scale? How do we correlate the dynamic molecular interactions to their in vivo activity? We will review recent advances in developing new computational tools for biophysics, bioinformatics, chemoinformatics, and systems biology related to the identification of genome-wide target profiles. We believe that the integration of these tools will realize structural systems pharmacology, enabling us to both efficiently develop effective therapeutics for complex diseases and combat drug resistance.

  17. DDTRP: Database of Drug Targets for Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Ramanandan, Prabhakaran; Brindha, Sridharan; Subhasree, Chelladurai Ramarathnam; Prasad, Abhimanyu; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance is a major threat to public health. Many pathogens have developed resistance to most of the existing antibiotics, and multidrug-resistant and extensively drug resistant strains are extremely difficult to treat. This has resulted in an urgent need for novel drugs. We describe a database called ‘Database of Drug Targets for Resistant Pathogens’ (DDTRP). The database contains information on drugs with reported resistance, their respective targets, metabolic pathways involving these targets, and a list of potential alternate targets for seven pathogens. The database can be accessed freely at http://bmi.icmr.org.in/DDTRP. PMID:21938213

  18. Rho, ROCK and actomyosin contractility in metastasis as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Fanshawe; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the spread of cancer cells around the body and the cause of the majority of cancer deaths. Metastasis is a very complex process in which cancer cells need to dramatically modify their cytoskeleton and cope with different environments to successfully colonize a secondary organ. In this review, we discuss recent findings pointing at Rho-ROCK or actomyosin force (or both) as major drivers of many of the steps required for metastatic success. We propose that these are important drug targets that need to be considered in the clinic to palliate metastatic disease. PMID:27158478

  19. Mining nematode genome data for novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeremy M; Zhang, Yinhua; Kumar, Sanjay; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2005-03-01

    Expressed sequence tag projects have currently produced over 400 000 partial gene sequences from more than 30 nematode species and the full genomic sequences of selected nematodes are being determined. In addition, functional analyses in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have addressed the role of almost all genes predicted by the genome sequence. This recent explosion in the amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data, provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify pre-validated drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. This article describes the various information sources available and strategies that can expedite this process.

  20. Drug targeting systems for cancer therapy: nanotechnological approach.

    PubMed

    Tigli Aydin, R Seda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in cancer treatment remains challenging because of the great nature of tumor cells to be drug resistant. However, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled the delivery of drugs for cancer treatment by passively and actively targeting to tumor cells with nanoparticles. Dramatic improvements in nanotherapeutics, as applied to cancer, have rapidly accelerated clinical investigations. In this review, drug-targeting systems using nanotechnology and approved and clinically investigated nanoparticles for cancer therapy are discussed. In addition, the rationale for a nanotechnological approach to cancer therapy is emphasized because of its promising advances in the treatment of cancer patients.

  1. The OncoPPi network of cancer-focused protein-protein interactions to inform biological insights and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenggang; Ivanov, Andrei A; Su, Rina; Gonzalez-Pecchi, Valentina; Qi, Qi; Liu, Songlin; Webber, Philip; McMillan, Elizabeth; Rusnak, Lauren; Pham, Cau; Chen, Xiaoqian; Mo, Xiulei; Revennaugh, Brian; Zhou, Wei; Marcus, Adam; Harati, Sahar; Chen, Xiang; Johns, Margaret A; White, Michael A; Moreno, Carlos; Cooper, Lee A D; Du, Yuhong; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian

    2017-02-16

    As genomics advances reveal the cancer gene landscape, a daunting task is to understand how these genes contribute to dysregulated oncogenic pathways. Integration of cancer genes into networks offers opportunities to reveal protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with functional and therapeutic significance. Here, we report the generation of a cancer-focused PPI network, termed OncoPPi, and identification of >260 cancer-associated PPIs not in other large-scale interactomes. PPI hubs reveal new regulatory mechanisms for cancer genes like MYC, STK11, RASSF1 and CDK4. As example, the NSD3 (WHSC1L1)-MYC interaction suggests a new mechanism for NSD3/BRD4 chromatin complex regulation of MYC-driven tumours. Association of undruggable tumour suppressors with drug targets informs therapeutic options. Based on OncoPPi-derived STK11-CDK4 connectivity, we observe enhanced sensitivity of STK11-silenced lung cancer cells to the FDA-approved CDK4 inhibitor palbociclib. OncoPPi is a focused PPI resource that links cancer genes into a signalling network for discovery of PPI targets and network-implicated tumour vulnerabilities for therapeutic interrogation.

  2. The OncoPPi network of cancer-focused protein–protein interactions to inform biological insights and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zenggang; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Su, Rina; Gonzalez-Pecchi, Valentina; Qi, Qi; Liu, Songlin; Webber, Philip; McMillan, Elizabeth; Rusnak, Lauren; Pham, Cau; Chen, Xiaoqian; Mo, Xiulei; Revennaugh, Brian; Zhou, Wei; Marcus, Adam; Harati, Sahar; Chen, Xiang; Johns, Margaret A.; White, Michael A.; Moreno, Carlos; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Du, Yuhong; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian

    2017-01-01

    As genomics advances reveal the cancer gene landscape, a daunting task is to understand how these genes contribute to dysregulated oncogenic pathways. Integration of cancer genes into networks offers opportunities to reveal protein–protein interactions (PPIs) with functional and therapeutic significance. Here, we report the generation of a cancer-focused PPI network, termed OncoPPi, and identification of >260 cancer-associated PPIs not in other large-scale interactomes. PPI hubs reveal new regulatory mechanisms for cancer genes like MYC, STK11, RASSF1 and CDK4. As example, the NSD3 (WHSC1L1)–MYC interaction suggests a new mechanism for NSD3/BRD4 chromatin complex regulation of MYC-driven tumours. Association of undruggable tumour suppressors with drug targets informs therapeutic options. Based on OncoPPi-derived STK11-CDK4 connectivity, we observe enhanced sensitivity of STK11-silenced lung cancer cells to the FDA-approved CDK4 inhibitor palbociclib. OncoPPi is a focused PPI resource that links cancer genes into a signalling network for discovery of PPI targets and network-implicated tumour vulnerabilities for therapeutic interrogation. PMID:28205554

  3. Discrete network models of interacting nephrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Rob; Kazmierczak, Ed; Kirley, Michael; Harris, Peter

    2009-11-01

    The kidney is one of the major organs involved in whole-body homeostasis, and exhibits many of the properties of a complex system. The functional unit of the kidney is the nephron, a complex, segmented tube into which blood plasma is filtered and its composition adjusted. Although the behaviour of individual nephrons can fluctuate widely and even chaotically, the behaviour of the kidney remains stable. In this paper, we investigate how the filtration rate of a multi-nephron system is affected by interactions between nephrons. We introduce a discrete-time multi-nephron network model. The tubular mechanisms that have the greatest effect on filtration rate are the transport of sodium and water, consequently our model attempts to capture these mechanisms. Multi-nephron systems also incorporate two competing coupling mechanisms-vascular and hemodynamic-that enforce in-phase and anti-phase synchronisations respectively. Using a two-nephron model, we demonstrate how changing the strength of the hemodynamic coupling mechanism and changing the arterial blood pressure have equivalent effects on the system. The same two-nephron system is then used to demonstrate the interactions that arise between the two coupling mechanisms. We conclude by arguing that our approach is scalable to large numbers of nephrons, based on the performance characteristics of the model.

  4. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  5. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  6. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  7. Drug targeting to myofibroblasts: Implications for fibrosis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Saleh; Bansal, Ruchi; Prakash, Jai

    2017-07-16

    Myofibroblasts are the key players in extracellular matrix remodeling, a core phenomenon in numerous devastating fibrotic diseases. Not only in organ fibrosis, but also the pivotal role of myofibroblasts in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis has recently been highlighted. Myofibroblast targeting has gained tremendous attention in order to inhibit the progression of incurable fibrotic diseases, or to limit the myofibroblast-induced tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we outline the origin of myofibroblasts, their general characteristics and functions during fibrosis progression in three major organs: liver, kidneys and lungs as well as in cancer. We will then discuss the state-of-the art drug targeting technologies to myofibroblasts in context of the above-mentioned organs and tumor microenvironment. The overall objective of this review is therefore to advance our understanding in drug targeting to myofibroblasts, and concurrently identify opportunities and challenges for designing new strategies to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics against fibrosis and cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug Target Validation Methods in Malaria - Protein Interference Assay (PIA) as a Tool for Highly Specific Drug Target Validation.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Kamila A; Lunev, Sergey; Wang, Yuan-Ze; Linzke, Marleen; de Assis Batista, Fernando; Wrenger, Carsten; Groves, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    The validation of drug targets in malaria and other human diseases remains a highly difficult and laborious process. In the vast majority of cases, highly specific small molecule tools to inhibit a proteins function in vivo are simply not available. Additionally, the use of genetic tools in the analysis of malarial pathways is challenging. These issues result in difficulties in specifically modulating a hypothetical drug target's function in vivo. The current "toolbox" of various methods and techniques to identify a protein's function in vivo remains very limited and there is a pressing need for expansion. New approaches are urgently required to support target validation in the drug discovery process. Oligomerisation is the natural assembly of multiple copies of a single protein into one object and this self-assembly is present in more than half of all protein structures. Thus, oligomerisation plays a central role in the generation of functional biomolecules. A key feature of oligomerisation is that the oligomeric interfaces between the individual parts of the final assembly are highly specific. However, these interfaces have not yet been systematically explored or exploited to dissect biochemical pathways in vivo. This mini review will describe the current state of the antimalarial toolset as well as the potentially druggable malarial pathways. A specific focus is drawn to the initial efforts to exploit oligomerisation surfaces in drug target validation. As alternative to the conventional methods, Protein Interference Assay (PIA) can be used for specific distortion of the target protein function and pathway assessment in vivo. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Evolution of biomolecular networks: lessons from metabolic and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takuji; Bork, Peer

    2009-11-01

    Despite only becoming popular at the beginning of this decade, biomolecular networks are now frameworks that facilitate many discoveries in molecular biology. The nodes of these networks are usually proteins (specifically enzymes in metabolic networks), whereas the links (or edges) are their interactions with other molecules. These networks are made up of protein-protein interactions or enzyme-enzyme interactions through shared metabolites in the case of metabolic networks. Evolutionary analysis has revealed that changes in the nodes and links in protein-protein interaction and metabolic networks are subject to different selection pressures owing to distinct topological features. However, many evolutionary constraints can be uncovered only if temporal and spatial aspects are included in the network analysis.

  10. Multiple tipping points and optimal repairing in interacting networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdandzic, Antonio; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Curme, Chester; Vodenska, Irena; Levy-Carciente, Sary; Eugene Stanley, H.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-03-01

    Systems composed of many interacting dynamical networks--such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters--often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. Three fundamental processes that are typically present are failure, damage spread and recovery. Here we develop a model for such systems and find a very rich phase diagram that becomes increasingly more complex as the number of interacting networks increases. In the simplest example of two interacting networks we find two critical points, four triple points, ten allowed transitions and two `forbidden' transitions, as well as complex hysteresis loops. Remarkably, we find that triple points play the dominant role in constructing the optimal repairing strategy in damaged interacting systems. To test our model, we analyse an example of real interacting financial networks and find evidence of rapid dynamical transitions between well-defined states, in agreement with the predictions of our model.

  11. Systems-level modeling of mycobacterial metabolism for the identification of new (multi-)drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rienksma, Rienk A; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Spina, Lucie; Schaap, Peter J; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P

    2014-12-01

    Systems-level metabolic network reconstructions and the derived constraint-based (CB) mathematical models are efficient tools to explore bacterial metabolism. Approximately one-fourth of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome contains genes that encode proteins directly involved in its metabolism. These represent potential drug targets that can be systematically probed with CB models through the prediction of genes essential (or the combination thereof) for the pathogen to grow. However, gene essentiality depends on the growth conditions and, so far, no in vitro model precisely mimics the host at the different stages of mycobacterial infection, limiting model predictions. These limitations can be circumvented by combining expression data from in vivo samples with a validated CB model, creating an accurate description of pathogen metabolism in the host. To this end, we present here a thoroughly curated and extended genome-scale CB metabolic model of Mtb quantitatively validated using 13C measurements. We describe some of the efforts made in integrating CB models and high-throughput data to generate condition specific models, and we will discuss challenges ahead. This knowledge and the framework herein presented will enable to identify potential new drug targets, and will foster the development of optimal therapeutic strategies.

  12. Reconstructing direct and indirect interactions in networked public goods game

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Network reconstruction is a fundamental problem for understanding many complex systems with unknown interaction structures. In many complex systems, there are indirect interactions between two individuals without immediate connection but with common neighbors. Despite recent advances in network reconstruction, we continue to lack an approach for reconstructing complex networks with indirect interactions. Here we introduce a two-step strategy to resolve the reconstruction problem, where in the first step, we recover both direct and indirect interactions by employing the Lasso to solve a sparse signal reconstruction problem, and in the second step, we use matrix transformation and optimization to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions. The network structure corresponding to direct interactions can be fully uncovered. We exploit the public goods game occurring on complex networks as a paradigm for characterizing indirect interactions and test our reconstruction approach. We find that high reconstruction accuracy can be achieved for both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, and a number of empirical networks in spite of insufficient data measurement contaminated by noise. Although a general framework for reconstructing complex networks with arbitrary types of indirect interactions is yet lacking, our approach opens new routes to separate direct and indirect interactions in a representative complex system. PMID:27444774

  13. Reconstructing direct and indirect interactions in networked public goods game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2016-07-01

    Network reconstruction is a fundamental problem for understanding many complex systems with unknown interaction structures. In many complex systems, there are indirect interactions between two individuals without immediate connection but with common neighbors. Despite recent advances in network reconstruction, we continue to lack an approach for reconstructing complex networks with indirect interactions. Here we introduce a two-step strategy to resolve the reconstruction problem, where in the first step, we recover both direct and indirect interactions by employing the Lasso to solve a sparse signal reconstruction problem, and in the second step, we use matrix transformation and optimization to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions. The network structure corresponding to direct interactions can be fully uncovered. We exploit the public goods game occurring on complex networks as a paradigm for characterizing indirect interactions and test our reconstruction approach. We find that high reconstruction accuracy can be achieved for both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, and a number of empirical networks in spite of insufficient data measurement contaminated by noise. Although a general framework for reconstructing complex networks with arbitrary types of indirect interactions is yet lacking, our approach opens new routes to separate direct and indirect interactions in a representative complex system.

  14. Application of RNAi to Genomic Drug Target Validation in Schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Alessandra; Mansour, Nuha R.; Paveley, Ross A.; Carruthers, Ian M.; Besnard, Jérémy; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Bickle, Quentin D.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the possibility of resistance developing to praziquantel (PZQ), has stimulated efforts to develop new drugs for schistosomiasis. In addition to the development of improved whole organism screens, the success of RNA interference (RNAi) in schistosomes offers great promise for the identification of potential drug targets to initiate drug discovery. In this study we set out to contribute to RNAi based validation of putative drug targets. Initially a list of 24 target candidates was compiled based on the identification of putative essential genes in schistosomes orthologous of C. elegans essential genes. Knockdown of Calmodulin (Smp_026560.2) (Sm-Calm), that topped this list, produced a phenotype characterised by waves of contraction in adult worms but no phenotype in schistosomula. Knockdown of the atypical Protein Kinase C (Smp_096310) (Sm-aPKC) resulted in loss of viability in both schistosomula and adults and led us to focus our attention on other kinase genes that were identified in the above list and through whole organism screening of known kinase inhibitor sets followed by chemogenomic evaluation. RNAi knockdown of these kinase genes failed to affect adult worm viability but, like Sm-aPKC, knockdown of Polo-like kinase 1, Sm-PLK1 (Smp_009600) and p38-MAPK, Sm-MAPK p38 (Smp_133020) resulted in an increased mortality of schistosomula after 2-3 weeks, an effect more marked in the presence of human red blood cells (hRBC). For Sm-PLK-1 the same effects were seen with the specific inhibitor, BI2536, which also affected viable egg production in adult worms. For Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-aPKC the in vitro effects were reflected in lower recoveries in vivo. We conclude that the use of RNAi combined with culture with hRBC is a reliable method for evaluating genes important for larval development. However, in view of the slow manifestation of the effects of Sm-aPKC knockdown in adults and the lack of effects of Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-MAPK p38 on adult viability, these

  15. Prioritizing drug targets in Clostridium botulinum with a computational systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmed, Safia; Ali, Amjad; Huang, Hui; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, X Frank; Naz, Anam; Chen, Jake

    2014-07-01

    A computational and in silico system level framework was developed to identify and prioritize the antibacterial drug targets in Clostridium botulinum (Clb), the causative agent of flaccid paralysis in humans that can be fatal in 5 to 10% of cases. This disease is difficult to control due to the emergence of drug-resistant pathogenic strains and the only available treatment antitoxin which can target the neurotoxin at the extracellular level and cannot reverse the paralysis. This study framework is based on comprehensive systems-scale analysis of genomic sequence homology and phylogenetic relationships among Clostridium, other infectious bacteria, host and human gut flora. First, the entire 2628-annotated genes of this bacterial genome were categorized into essential, non-essential and virulence genes. The results obtained showed that 39% of essential proteins that functionally interact with virulence proteins were identified, which could be a key to new interventions that may kill the bacteria and minimize the host damage caused by the virulence factors. Second, a comprehensive comparative COGs and blast sequence analysis of these proteins and host proteins to minimize the risks of side effects was carried out. This revealed that 47% of a set of C. botulinum proteins were evolutionary related with Homo sapiens proteins to sort out the non-human homologs. Third, orthology analysis with other infectious bacteria to assess broad-spectrum effects was executed and COGs were mostly found in Clostridia, Bacilli (Firmicutes), and in alpha and beta Proteobacteria. Fourth, a comparative phylogenetic analysis was performed with human microbiota to filter out drug targets that may also affect human gut flora. This reduced the list of candidate proteins down to 131. Finally, the role of these putative drug targets in clostridial biological pathways was studied while subcellular localization of these candidate proteins in bacterial cellular system exhibited that 68% of the

  16. Cluster Approach to Network Interaction in Pedagogical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chekaleva, Nadezhda V.; Makarova, Natalia S.; Drobotenko, Yulia B.

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in the article is devoted to the analysis of theory and practice of network interaction within the framework of education clusters. Education clusters are considered to be a novel form of network interaction in pedagogical education in Russia. The aim of the article is to show the advantages and disadvantages of the cluster…

  17. Fundamentals of protein interaction network mapping.

    PubMed

    Snider, Jamie; Kotlyar, Max; Saraon, Punit; Yao, Zhong; Jurisica, Igor; Stagljar, Igor

    2015-12-17

    Studying protein interaction networks of all proteins in an organism ("interactomes") remains one of the major challenges in modern biomedicine. Such information is crucial to understanding cellular pathways and developing effective therapies for the treatment of human diseases. Over the past two decades, diverse biochemical, genetic, and cell biological methods have been developed to map interactomes. In this review, we highlight basic principles of interactome mapping. Specifically, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of individual assays, how to select a method appropriate for the problem being studied, and provide general guidelines for carrying out the necessary follow-up analyses. In addition, we discuss computational methods to predict, map, and visualize interactomes, and provide a summary of some of the most important interactome resources. We hope that this review serves as both a useful overview of the field and a guide to help more scientists actively employ these powerful approaches in their research. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Leveraging human genetics to guide drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-07-01

    Identifying appropriate molecular targets is a critical step in drug development. Despite many advantages, the traditional tools of observational epidemiology and cellular or animal models of disease can be misleading in identifying causal pathways likely to lead to successful therapeutics. Here, we review some favorable aspects of human genetics studies that have the potential to accelerate drug target discovery. These include using genetic studies to identify pathways relevant to human disease, leveraging human genetics to discern causal relationships between biomarkers and disease, and studying genetic variation in humans to predict the potential efficacy and safety of inhibitory compounds aimed at molecular targets. We present some examples taken from studies of plasma lipids and coronary artery disease to highlight how human genetics can accelerate therapeutics development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  20. Revisiting AMPA receptors as an antiepileptic drug target.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Michael A

    2011-03-01

    In the 1990s there was intense interest in ionotropic glutamate receptors as therapeutic targets for diverse neurological disorders, including epilepsy. NMDA receptors were thought to play a key role in the generation of seizures, leading to clinical studies of NMDA receptor blocking drugs in epilepsy. Disappointing results dampened enthusiasm for ionotropic glutamate receptors as a therapeutic target. Eventually it became appreciated that another type of ionotropic glutamate receptor, the AMPA receptor, is actually the predominant mediator of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and moreover that AMPA receptors are critical to the generation and spread of epileptic activity. As drugs became available that selectively target AMPA receptors, it was possible to demonstrate that AMPA receptor antagonists have powerful antiseizure activity in in vitro and in vivo models. A decade later, promising clinical studies with AMPA receptor antagonists, including the potent noncompetitive antagonist perampanel, are once again focusing attention on AMPA receptors as a drug target for epilepsy therapy.

  1. Inhibition of bacterial ribosome assembly: a suitable drug target?

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2009-03-01

    The assembly of bacterial ribosomes is viewed with increasing interest as a potential target for new antibiotics. The in vivo synthesis and assembly of ribosomes are briefly reviewed here, highlighting the many ways in which assembly can be perturbed. The process is compared with the model in vitro process from which much of our knowledge is derived. The coordinate synthesis of the ribosomal components is essential for their ordered and efficient assembly; antibiotics interfere with this coordination and therefore affect assembly. It has also been claimed that the binding of antibiotics to nascent ribosomes prevents their assembly. These two contrasting models of antibiotic action are compared and evaluated. Finally, the suitability and tractability of assembly as a drug target are assessed.

  2. Candidate Drug Targets for Prevention or Modification of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Varvel, Nicholas H.; Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent neurological disorder afflicting nearly 50 million people worldwide. The disorder is characterized clinically by recurrent spontaneous seizures attributed to abnormal synchrony of brain neurons. Despite advances in the treatment of epilepsy, nearly one-third of patients are resistant to current therapies, and the underlying mechanisms whereby a healthy brain becomes epileptic remain unresolved. Therefore, researchers have a major impetus to identify and exploit new drug targets. Here we distinguish between epileptic effectors, or proteins that set the seizure threshold, and epileptogenic mediators, which control the expression or functional state of the effector proteins. Under this framework, we then discuss attempts to regulate the mediators to control epilepsy. Further insights into the complex processes that render the brain susceptible to seizures and the identification of novel mediators of these processes will lead the way to the development of drugs to modify disease outcome and, potentially, to prevent epileptogenesis. PMID:25196047

  3. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  4. The path to oncology drug target validation: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Cros, Marta; Schmelzle, Tobias; Stucke, Volker M; Hofmann, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The advent of a variety of genomic, proteomic and other system-based scientific approaches has raised the expectations of identifying novel targets for oncology drug discovery. However, the complexity of human genome cancer alterations requires a careful analysis of the function of candidate targets identified by these efforts. The postulation and testing of a hypothesis that modulation of a protein or pathway will result in a therapeutic effect in a preclinical setting is crucial for target validation activities. In this chapter, we provide an overview on target identification and validation approaches to interrogate the functional and therapeutic relevance of a candidate cancer drug target as an essential step towards justifying the subsequent investment in drug discovery efforts.

  5. Toxoplasma histone acetylation remodelers as novel drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vanagas, Laura; Jeffers, Victoria; Bogado, Silvina S; Dalmasso, Maria C; Sullivan, William J; Angel, Sergio O

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a leading cause of neurological birth defects and a serious opportunistic pathogen. The authors and others have found that Toxoplasma uses a unique nucleosome composition supporting a fine gene regulation together with other factors. Post-translational modifications in histones facilitate the establishment of a global chromatin environment and orchestrate DNA-related biological processes. Histone acetylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications influencing gene expression. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases have been intensively studied as potential drug targets. In particular, histone deacetylase inhibitors have activity against apicomplexan parasites, underscoring their potential as a new class of antiparasitic compounds. In this review, we summarize what is known about Toxoplasma histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases, and discuss the inhibitors studied to date. Finally, the authors discuss the distinct possibility that the unique nucleosome composition of Toxoplasma, which harbors a nonconserved H2Bv variant histone, might be targeted in novel therapeutics directed against this parasite. PMID:23199404

  6. Cognitive 'Omics': Pattern-Based Validation of Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Gyertyán, István

    2017-02-01

    Despite the abundance of cognitive enhancer mechanisms identified in basic research, drugs approved for cognitive disorders are scarce and of limited efficacy. Although the so-called 'gold-standard' animal assays are well suited to the study of fundamental learning processes, they fail to predict clinical efficacy against complex and robust cognitive defects. Preclinical validation of potential drug targets requires new approaches with higher translational value. Here I propose a rodent cognitive test system that encompasses several learning paradigms each modeling a certain human cognitive domain. Cognitive deficits are brought about by several impairing methods and a particular mechanism of action is tested on each defective cognitive function. The outcome is a cognitive efficacy pattern that should then be matched to the cognitive deficit patterns of the clinical disorders. The best fit will highlight the clinical indication with the greatest chance for success.

  7. The structural properties of non-traditional drug targets present new challenges for virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Gowthaman, Ragul; Deeds, Eric J.; Karanicolas, John

    2013-01-01

    Traditional drug targets have historically included signaling proteins that respond to small-molecules and enzymes that use small-molecules as substrates. Increasing attention is now being directed towards other types of protein targets, in particular those that exert their function by interacting with nucleic acids or other proteins rather than small-molecule ligands. Here, we systematically compare existing examples of inhibitors of protein–protein interactions to inhibitors of traditional drug targets. While both sets of inhibitors bind with similar potency, we find that the inhibitors of protein–protein interactions typically bury a smaller fraction of their surface area upon binding to their protein targets. The fact that an average atom is less buried suggests that more atoms are needed to achieve a given potency, explaining the observation that ligand efficiency is typically poor for inhibitors of protein– protein interactions. We then carried out a series of docking experiments, and found a further consequence of these relatively exposed binding modes is that structure-based virtual screening may be more difficult: such binding modes do not provide sufficient clues to pick out active compounds from decoy compounds. Collectively, these results suggest that the challenges associated with such non-traditional drug targets may not lie with identifying compounds that potently bind to the target protein surface, but rather with identifying compounds that bind in a sufficiently buried manner to achieve good ligand efficiency, and thus good oral bioavailability. While the number of available crystal structures of distinct protein interaction sites bound to small-molecule inhibitors is relatively small at present (only 21 such complexes were included in this study), these are sufficient to draw conclusions based on the current state of the field; as additional data accumulate it will be exciting to refine the viewpoint presented here. Even with this limited

  8. Multiple tipping points and optimal repairing in interacting networks

    PubMed Central

    Majdandzic, Antonio; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Curme, Chester; Vodenska, Irena; Levy-Carciente, Sary; Eugene Stanley, H.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Systems composed of many interacting dynamical networks—such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters—often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. Three fundamental processes that are typically present are failure, damage spread and recovery. Here we develop a model for such systems and find a very rich phase diagram that becomes increasingly more complex as the number of interacting networks increases. In the simplest example of two interacting networks we find two critical points, four triple points, ten allowed transitions and two ‘forbidden' transitions, as well as complex hysteresis loops. Remarkably, we find that triple points play the dominant role in constructing the optimal repairing strategy in damaged interacting systems. To test our model, we analyse an example of real interacting financial networks and find evidence of rapid dynamical transitions between well-defined states, in agreement with the predictions of our model. PMID:26926803

  9. Increasing the Structural Coverage of Tuberculosis Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; Fox, David; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Staker, Bart L.; Gardberg, Anna S.; Choi, Ryan; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Myers, Janette; Barrett, Lynn K.; Zhang, Yang; Ferrell, Micah; Mundt, Elizabeth; Thompkins, Katie; Tran, Ngoc; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Abramov, Ariel; Sekar, Aarthi; Serbzhinskiy, Dmitri; Lorimer, Don; Buchko, Garry W.; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. Of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structures would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases. PMID:25613812

  10. Fatty acid biosynthesis as a drug target in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C D; McFadden, G I

    2007-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasitic diseases impose devastating impacts on much of the world's population. The increasing prevalence of drug resistant parasites and the growing number of immuno-compromised individuals are exacerbating the problem to the point that the need for novel, inexpensive drugs is greater now than ever. Discovery of a prokaryotic, Type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway associated with the plastid-like organelle (apicoplast) of Plasmodium and Toxoplasma has provided a wealth of novel drug targets. Since this pathway is both essential and fundamentally different from the cytosolic Type I pathway of the human host, apicoplast FAS has tremendous potential for the development of parasite-specific inhibitors. Many components of this pathway are already the target for existing antibiotics and herbicides, which should significantly reduce the time and cost of drug development. Continuing interest--both in the pharmaceutical and herbicide industries--in fatty acid synthesis inhibitors proffers an ongoing stream of potential new anti-parasitic compounds. It has now emerged that not all apicomplexan parasites have retained the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. No fatty acid biosynthesis enzymes are encoded in the genome of Theileria annulata or T. parva, suggesting that fatty acid synthesis is lacking in these parasites. The human intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium parvum appears to have lost the apicoplast entirely; instead relying on an unusual cytosolic Type I FAS. Nevertheless, newly developed anti-cancer and anti-obesity drugs targeting human Type I FAS may yet prove efficacious against Cryptosporidium and other apicomplexans that rely on this Type I FAS pathway.

  11. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets

    DOE PAGES

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; ...

    2014-12-19

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. We found that of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structuresmore » would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases.« less

  12. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; Fox, David; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Staker, Bart L.; Gardberg, Anna S.; Choi, Ryan; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Myers, Janette; Barrett, Lynn K.; Zhang, Yang; Ferrell, Micah; Mundt, Elizabeth; Thompkins, Katie; Tran, Ngoc; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Abramov, Ariel; Sekar, Aarthi; Serbzhinskiy, Dmitri; Lorimer, Don; Buchko, Garry W.; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2014-12-19

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. We found that of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structures would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases.

  13. Socioeconomic networks with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Rui; Iori, Giulia

    2008-07-01

    We study a modified version of a model previously proposed by Jackson and Wolinsky to account for communication of information and allocation of goods in socioeconomic networks. In the model, the utility function of each node is given by a weighted sum of contributions from all accessible nodes. The weights, parametrized by the variable δ , decrease with distance. We introduce a growth mechanism where new nodes attach to the existing network preferentially by utility. By increasing δ , the network structure evolves from a power-law to an exponential degree distribution, passing through a regime characterized by shorter average path length, lower degree assortativity, and higher central point dominance. In the second part of the paper we compare different network structures in terms of the average utility received by each node. We show that power-law networks provide higher average utility than Poisson random networks. This provides a possible justification for the ubiquitousness of scale-free networks in the real world.

  14. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  15. Architecture and Conservation of the Bacterial DNA Replication Machinery, an Underexploited Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrew; Causer, Rebecca J; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2012-01-01

    New antibiotics with novel modes of action are required to combat the growing threat posed by multi-drug resistant bacteria. Over the last decade, genome sequencing and other high-throughput techniques have provided tremendous insight into the molecular processes underlying cellular functions in a wide range of bacterial species. We can now use these data to assess the degree of conservation of certain aspects of bacterial physiology, to help choose the best cellular targets for development of new broad-spectrum antibacterials. DNA replication is a conserved and essential process, and the large number of proteins that interact to replicate DNA in bacteria are distinct from those in eukaryotes and archaea; yet none of the antibiotics in current clinical use acts directly on the replication machinery. Bacterial DNA synthesis thus appears to be an underexploited drug target. However, before this system can be targeted for drug design, it is important to understand which parts are conserved and which are not, as this will have implications for the spectrum of activity of any new inhibitors against bacterial species, as well as the potential for development of drug resistance. In this review we assess similarities and differences in replication components and mechanisms across the bacteria, highlight current progress towards the discovery of novel replication inhibitors, and suggest those aspects of the replication machinery that have the greatest potential as drug targets. PMID:22206257

  16. Polymeric micelles with stimuli-triggering systems for advanced cancer drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masamichi; Akimoto, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1990s, nanoscale drug carriers have played a pivotal role in cancer chemotherapy, acting through passive drug delivery mechanisms and subsequent pharmaceutical action at tumor tissues with reduction of adverse effects. Polymeric micelles, as supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic polymers, have been considerably developed as promising drug carrier candidates, and a number of clinical studies of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric micelle carriers for cancer chemotherapy applications are now in progress. However, these systems still face several issues; at present, the simultaneous control of target-selective delivery and release of incorporated drugs remains difficult. To resolve these points, the introduction of stimuli-responsive mechanisms to drug carrier systems is believed to be a promising approach to provide better solutions for future tumor drug targeting strategies. As possible trigger signals, biological acidic pH, light, heating/cooling and ultrasound actively play significant roles in signal-triggering drug release and carrier interaction with target cells. This review article summarizes several molecular designs for stimuli-responsive polymeric micelles in response to variation of pH, light and temperature and discusses their potentials as next-generation tumor drug targeting systems.

  17. ATP synthase: a molecular therapeutic drug target for antimicrobial and antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimicrobial/ antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F(1) sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented.

  18. ATP Synthase: A Molecular Therapeutic Drug Target for Antimicrobial and Antitumor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimi-crobial/antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F1 sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented. PMID:23432591

  19. Architecture and conservation of the bacterial DNA replication machinery, an underexploited drug target.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; Causer, Rebecca J; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2012-03-01

    New antibiotics with novel modes of action are required to combat the growing threat posed by multi-drug resistant bacteria. Over the last decade, genome sequencing and other high-throughput techniques have provided tremendous insight into the molecular processes underlying cellular functions in a wide range of bacterial species. We can now use these data to assess the degree of conservation of certain aspects of bacterial physiology, to help choose the best cellular targets for development of new broad-spectrum antibacterials. DNA replication is a conserved and essential process, and the large number of proteins that interact to replicate DNA in bacteria are distinct from those in eukaryotes and archaea; yet none of the antibiotics in current clinical use acts directly on the replication machinery. Bacterial DNA synthesis thus appears to be an underexploited drug target. However, before this system can be targeted for drug design, it is important to understand which parts are conserved and which are not, as this will have implications for the spectrum of activity of any new inhibitors against bacterial species, as well as the potential for development of drug resistance. In this review we assess similarities and differences in replication components and mechanisms across the bacteria, highlight current progress towards the discovery of novel replication inhibitors, and suggest those aspects of the replication machinery that have the greatest potential as drug targets.

  20. Interaction networks: from protein functions to drug discovery. A review.

    PubMed

    Chautard, E; Thierry-Mieg, N; Ricard-Blum, S

    2009-06-01

    Most genes, proteins and other components carry out their functions within a complex network of interactions and a single molecule can affect a wide range of other cell components. A global, integrative, approach has been developed for several years, including protein-protein interaction networks (interactomes). In this review, we describe the high-throughput methods used to identify new interactions and to build large interaction datasets. The minimum information required for reporting a molecular interaction experiment (MIMIx) has been defined as a standard for storing data in publicly available interaction databases. Several examples of interaction networks from molecular machines (proteasome) or organelles (phagosome, mitochondrion) to whole organisms (viruses, bacteria, yeast, fly, and worm) are given and attempts to cover the entire human interaction network are discussed. The methods used to perform the topological analysis of interaction networks and to extract biological information from them are presented. These investigations have provided clues on protein functions, signalling and metabolic pathways, and physiological processes, unraveled the molecular basis of some diseases (cancer, infectious diseases), and will be very useful to identify new therapeutic targets and for drug discovery. A major challenge is now to integrate data from different sources (interactome, transcriptome, phenome, localization) to switch from static to dynamic interaction networks. The merging of a viral interactome and the human interactome has been used to simulate viral infection, paving the way for future studies aiming at providing molecular basis of human diseases.

  1. The architecture of functional interaction networks in the retina.

    PubMed

    Ganmor, Elad; Segev, Ronen; Schneidman, Elad

    2011-02-23

    Sensory information is represented in the brain by the joint activity of large groups of neurons. Recent studies have shown that, although the number of possible activity patterns and underlying interactions is exponentially large, pairwise-based models give a surprisingly accurate description of neural population activity patterns. We explored the architecture of maximum entropy models of the functional interaction networks underlying the response of large populations of retinal ganglion cells, in adult tiger salamander retina, responding to natural and artificial stimuli. We found that we can further simplify these pairwise models by neglecting weak interaction terms or by relying on a small set of interaction strengths. Comparing network interactions under different visual stimuli, we show the existence of local network motifs in the interaction map of the retina. Our results demonstrate that the underlying interaction map of the retina is sparse and dominated by local overlapping interaction modules.

  2. Interaction Control to Synchronize Non-synchronizable Networks.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Chakraborty, Sagar; Witthaut, Dirk; Nagler, Jan; Timme, Marc

    2016-11-17

    Synchronization constitutes one of the most fundamental collective dynamics across networked systems and often underlies their function. Whether a system may synchronize depends on the internal unit dynamics as well as the topology and strength of their interactions. For chaotic units with certain interaction topologies synchronization might be impossible across all interaction strengths, meaning that these networks are non-synchronizable. Here we propose the concept of interaction control, generalizing transient uncoupling, to induce desired collective dynamics in complex networks and apply it to synchronize even such non-synchronizable systems. After highlighting that non-synchronizability prevails for a wide range of networks of arbitrary size, we explain how a simple binary control may localize interactions in state space and thereby synchronize networks. Intriguingly, localizing interactions by a fixed control scheme enables stable synchronization across all connected networks regardless of topological constraints. Interaction control may thus ease the design of desired collective dynamics even without knowledge of the networks' exact interaction topology and consequently have implications for biological and self-organizing technical systems.

  3. Dynamic Interactions for Network Visualization and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    NAM has a graphical user interface which has components such as play , fast forward, rewind, pause, and display speed controller as shown in Figure 2.2...large scale networks. 2.3.3 Vizster Visualizing Online Social Networks. Vizster [21] is a visual- ization system designed and implemented for playful ...interface of the network visualization. 2.4.2.8 Color Coding. Color is very important aspect in developing a user interface. “With respect to learning and

  4. Efficiency of the immunome protein interaction network increases during evolution.

    PubMed

    Ortutay, Csaba; Vihinen, Mauno

    2008-04-22

    Details of the mechanisms and selection pressures that shape the emergence and development of complex biological systems, such as the human immune system, are poorly understood. A recent definition of a reference set of proteins essential for the human immunome, combined with information about protein interaction networks for these proteins, facilitates evolutionary study of this biological machinery. Here, we present a detailed study of the development of the immunome protein interaction network during eight evolutionary steps from Bilateria ancestors to human. New nodes show preferential attachment to high degree proteins. The efficiency of the immunome protein interaction network increases during the evolutionary steps, whereas the vulnerability of the network decreases. Our results shed light on selective forces acting on the emergence of biological networks. It is likely that the high efficiency and low vulnerability are intrinsic properties of many biological networks, which arise from the effects of evolutionary processes yet to be uncovered.

  5. Interactive Naive Bayesian network: A new approach of constructing gene-gene interaction network for cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue W; Lim, Joon S

    2015-01-01

    Naive Bayesian (NB) network classifier is a simple and well-known type of classifier, which can be easily induced from a DNA microarray data set. However, a strong conditional independence assumption of NB network sometimes can lead to weak classification performance. In this paper, we propose a new approach of interactive naive Bayesian (INB) network to weaken the conditional independence of NB network and classify cancers using DNA microarray data set. We selected the differently expressed genes (DEGs) to reduce the dimension of the microarray data set. Then, an interactive parent which has the biggest influence among all DEGs is searched for each DEG. And then we calculate a weight to represent the interactive relationship between a DEG and its parent. Finally, the gene-gene interaction network is constructed. We experimentally test the INB network in terms of classification accuracy using leukemia and colon DNA microarray data sets, then we compare it with the NB network. The INB network can get higher classification accuracies than NB network. And INB network can show the gene-gene interactions visually.

  6. Joint clustering of protein interaction networks through Markov random walk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biological networks obtained by high-throughput profiling or human curation are typically noisy. For functional module identification, single network clustering algorithms may not yield accurate and robust results. In order to borrow information across multiple sources to alleviate such problems due to data quality, we propose a new joint network clustering algorithm ASModel in this paper. We construct an integrated network to combine network topological information based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) datasets and homological information introduced by constituent similarity between proteins across networks. A novel random walk strategy on the integrated network is developed for joint network clustering and an optimization problem is formulated by searching for low conductance sets defined on the derived transition matrix of the random walk, which fuses both topology and homology information. The optimization problem of joint clustering is solved by a derived spectral clustering algorithm. Network clustering using several state-of-the-art algorithms has been implemented to both PPI networks within the same species (two yeast PPI networks and two human PPI networks) and those from different species (a yeast PPI network and a human PPI network). Experimental results demonstrate that ASModel outperforms the existing single network clustering algorithms as well as another recent joint clustering algorithm in terms of complex prediction and Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. PMID:24565376

  7. Characterization of the proteasome interaction network using a QTAX-based tag-team strategy and protein interaction network analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cortnie; Milenkovic, Tijana; Przulj, Natasa; Kaiser, Peter; Huang, Lan

    2008-09-09

    Quantitative analysis of tandem-affinity purified cross-linked (x) protein complexes (QTAX) is a powerful technique for the identification of protein interactions, including weak and/or transient components. Here, we apply a QTAX-based tag-team mass spectrometry strategy coupled with protein network analysis to acquire a comprehensive and detailed assessment of the protein interaction network of the yeast 26S proteasome. We have determined that the proteasome network is composed of at least 471 proteins, significantly more than the total number of proteins identified by previous reports using proteasome subunits as baits. Validation of the selected proteasome-interacting proteins by reverse copurification and immunoblotting experiments with and without cross-linking, further demonstrates the power of the QTAX strategy for capturing protein interactions of all natures. In addition, >80% of the identified interactions have been confirmed by existing data using protein network analysis. Moreover, evidence obtained through network analysis links the proteasome to protein complexes associated with diverse cellular functions. This work presents the most complete analysis of the proteasome interaction network to date, providing an inclusive set of physical interaction data consistent with physiological roles for the proteasome that have been suggested primarily through genetic analyses. Moreover, the methodology described here is a general proteomic tool for the comprehensive study of protein interaction networks.

  8. Problem Solving Interactions on Electronic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael; And Others

    Arguing that electronic networking provides a medium which is qualitatively superior to the traditional classroom for conducting certain types of problem solving exercises, this paper details the Water Problem Solving Project, which was conducted on the InterCultural Learning Network in 1985 and 1986 with students from the United States, Mexico,…

  9. Interaction Control to Synchronize Non-synchronizable Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Malte; Chakraborty, Sagar; Witthaut, Dirk; Nagler, Jan; Timme, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization constitutes one of the most fundamental collective dynamics across networked systems and often underlies their function. Whether a system may synchronize depends on the internal unit dynamics as well as the topology and strength of their interactions. For chaotic units with certain interaction topologies synchronization might be impossible across all interaction strengths, meaning that these networks are non-synchronizable. Here we propose the concept of interaction control, generalizing transient uncoupling, to induce desired collective dynamics in complex networks and apply it to synchronize even such non-synchronizable systems. After highlighting that non-synchronizability prevails for a wide range of networks of arbitrary size, we explain how a simple binary control may localize interactions in state space and thereby synchronize networks. Intriguingly, localizing interactions by a fixed control scheme enables stable synchronization across all connected networks regardless of topological constraints. Interaction control may thus ease the design of desired collective dynamics even without knowledge of the networks’ exact interaction topology and consequently have implications for biological and self-organizing technical systems. PMID:27853266

  10. Specific non-monotonous interactions increase persistence of ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chuan; Zhang, Zhibin

    2014-03-22

    The relationship between stability and biodiversity has long been debated in ecology due to opposing empirical observations and theoretical predictions. Species interaction strength is often assumed to be monotonically related to population density, but the effects on stability of ecological networks of non-monotonous interactions that change signs have not been investigated previously. We demonstrate that for four kinds of non-monotonous interactions, shifting signs to negative or neutral interactions at high population density increases persistence (a measure of stability) of ecological networks, while for the other two kinds of non-monotonous interactions shifting signs to positive interactions at high population density decreases persistence of networks. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of network stabilization caused by specific non-monotonous interaction types through either increasing stable equilibrium points or reducing unstable equilibrium points (or both). These specific non-monotonous interactions may be important in maintaining stable and complex ecological networks, as well as other networks such as genes, neurons, the internet and human societies.

  11. Specific non-monotonous interactions increase persistence of ecological networks

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chuan; Zhang, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between stability and biodiversity has long been debated in ecology due to opposing empirical observations and theoretical predictions. Species interaction strength is often assumed to be monotonically related to population density, but the effects on stability of ecological networks of non-monotonous interactions that change signs have not been investigated previously. We demonstrate that for four kinds of non-monotonous interactions, shifting signs to negative or neutral interactions at high population density increases persistence (a measure of stability) of ecological networks, while for the other two kinds of non-monotonous interactions shifting signs to positive interactions at high population density decreases persistence of networks. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of network stabilization caused by specific non-monotonous interaction types through either increasing stable equilibrium points or reducing unstable equilibrium points (or both). These specific non-monotonous interactions may be important in maintaining stable and complex ecological networks, as well as other networks such as genes, neurons, the internet and human societies. PMID:24478300

  12. Interaction Control to Synchronize Non-synchronizable Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Chakraborty, Sagar; Witthaut, Dirk; Nagler, Jan; Timme, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization constitutes one of the most fundamental collective dynamics across networked systems and often underlies their function. Whether a system may synchronize depends on the internal unit dynamics as well as the topology and strength of their interactions. For chaotic units with certain interaction topologies synchronization might be impossible across all interaction strengths, meaning that these networks are non-synchronizable. Here we propose the concept of interaction control, generalizing transient uncoupling, to induce desired collective dynamics in complex networks and apply it to synchronize even such non-synchronizable systems. After highlighting that non-synchronizability prevails for a wide range of networks of arbitrary size, we explain how a simple binary control may localize interactions in state space and thereby synchronize networks. Intriguingly, localizing interactions by a fixed control scheme enables stable synchronization across all connected networks regardless of topological constraints. Interaction control may thus ease the design of desired collective dynamics even without knowledge of the networks’ exact interaction topology and consequently have implications for biological and self-organizing technical systems.

  13. Characterization and modeling of protein protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria; Flammini, Alessandro; Maritan, Amos; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2005-07-01

    The recent availability of high-throughput gene expression and proteomics techniques has created an unprecedented opportunity for a comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of many biological networks. Global proteomic interaction data, in particular, are synthetically represented as undirected networks exhibiting features far from the random paradigm which has dominated past effort in network theory. This evidence, along with the advances in the theory of complex networks, has triggered an intense research activity aimed at exploiting the evolutionary and biological significance of the resulting network's topology. Here we present a review of the results obtained in the characterization and modeling of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae protein interaction networks obtained with different experimental techniques. We provide a comparative assessment of the topological properties and discuss possible biases in interaction networks obtained with different techniques. We report on dynamical models based on duplication mechanisms that cast the protein interaction networks in the family of dynamically growing complex networks. Finally, we discuss various results and analysis correlating the networks’ topology with the biological function of proteins.

  14. The fragility of protein-protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C. M.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Shinbrot, T.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity to resist perturbations from the environment is crucial to the survival of all organisms. We quantitatively analyze the susceptibility of protein interaction networks of numerous organisms to random and targeted failures. We find for all organisms studied that random rewiring improves protein network robustness, so that actual networks are more fragile than rewired surrogates. This unexpected fragility contrasts with the behavior of networks such as the Internet, whose robustness decreases with random rewiring. We trace this surprising effect to the modular structure of protein networks.

  15. Drug target identification in intracellular and extracellular protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand for novel anti-parasitic drugs due to resistance formation to well-established chemotherapeutically important compounds has increased the demands for a better understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of existing drugs and of drugs in development. While different approaches have been developed to identify the targets and thus mode of action of anti-parasitic compounds, it has become clear that many drugs act not only on one, but possibly several parasite molecules or even pathways. Ideally, these targets are not present in any cells of the host. In the case of apicomplexan parasites, the unique apicoplast, provides a suitable target for compounds binding to DNA or ribosomal RNA of prokaryotic origin. In the case of intracellular pathogens, a given drug might not only affect the pathogen by directly acting on parasite-associated targets, but also indirectly, by altering the host cell physiology. This in turn could affect the parasite development and lead to parasite death. In this review, we provide an overview of strategies for target identification, and present examples of selected drug targets, ranging from proteins to nucleic acids to intermediary metabolism.

  16. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The prospect of FKBP51 as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mathias V; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Holsboer, Florian; Hausch, Felix

    2012-08-01

    The FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is best known as an Hsp90-associated co-chaperone that regulates the responsiveness of steroid hormone receptors. In human genetic association studies, FKBP51 has repeatedly been associated with emotion processing and numerous stress-related affective disorders. It has also been implicated in contributing to the glucocorticoid hyposensitivity observed in New World primates. More recently, several research groups have consistently shown a protective effect of FKBP51 knockout or knockdown on stress endocrinology and stress-coping behavior in animal models of depression and anxiety. The principal druggability of FKBP51 is exemplified by the prototypic FKBP ligands FK506 and rapamycin. Moreover, FKBP51 is highly suited for X-ray co-crystallography, which should facilitate the rational drug design of improved FKBP51 ligands. In summary, FKBP51 has emerged as a promising new drug target for stress-related disorders that should be amenable to drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  19. Dominant drug targets suppress the emergence of antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Liu, Hong-mei; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark; Collett, Marc S; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance can defeat the successful treatment of pathogens that display high mutation rates, as exemplified by RNA viruses. Here we detail a new paradigm in which a single compound directed against a ‘dominant drug target’ suppresses the emergence of naturally occurring drug-resistant variants in mice and cultured cells. All new drug-resistant viruses arise during intracellular replication and initially express their phenotypes in the presence of drug-susceptible genomes. For the targets of most anti-viral compounds, the presence of these drug-susceptible viral genomes does not prevent the selection of drug resistance. Here we show that, for an inhibitor of the function of oligomeric capsid proteins of poliovirus, the expression of drug-susceptible genomes causes chimeric oligomers to form, thus rendering the drug-susceptible genomes dominant. The use of dominant drug targets should suppress drug resistance whenever multiple genomes arise in the same cell and express products in a common milieu. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03830.001 PMID:25365453

  20. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s-1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  1. Carbonic Anhydrase from Porphyromonas Gingivalis as a Drug Target.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2017-07-15

    Periodontitis originates from a microbial synergy causing the development of a mouth microbial imbalance (dysbiosis), consisting of a microbial community composed of anaerobic bacteria. Most studies concerning the treatment of periodontitis have primarily take into account the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, because it is a prominent component of the oral microbiome and a successful colonizer of the oral epithelium. Here, we focus our attention on the study of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) encoded in the genome of this pathogen as a possible drug target. Carbonic anhydrases are a superfamily of metalloenzymes, which catalyze the simple but physiologically crucial reaction of carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons. Bacterial CAs have attracted significant attention for affecting the survival, invasion, and pathogenicity of many microorganisms. The P. gingivalis genome encodes for two CAs belonging to β-CA (PgiCAβ) and γ-CA (PgiCAγ) families. These two enzymes were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. Moreover, they were subject to extensive inhibition studies using the classical CA inhibitors (sulfonamides and anions) with the aim of identifying selective inhibitors of PgiCAβ and PgiCAγ to be used as pharmacological tools for P. gingivalis eradication.

  2. GABAB receptors as drug targets to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Anders

    2009-06-01

    For many years, acid-suppressive therapy has been at the forefront of treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), yet despite the advent of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) some patients continue to experience persistent GERD symptoms. Therapeutic (non-surgical) options for such patients are currently limited. To tackle this clinical issue, research efforts have begun to focus on 'reflux inhibition' as a potential therapeutic target - i.e. inhibition of transient lower esophageal relaxations (TLESRs), the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Preclinical research has identified a number of drug targets through which TLESRs can be modulated, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B (GABA(B)) receptor has emerged as one of the most promising. Studies with baclofen, a well-known agonist of this receptor, have demonstrated that reflux inhibition is a valid concept in the clinical setting in that reducing the incidence of TLESRs improves GERD symptoms. But baclofen is associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) side effects, rendering it undesirable for use as a treatment for GERD. Further development work has yielded a number of novel GABA(B) receptor agonists with reduced CNS side effect profiles, and clinical trials are currently being performed with several agents. Compounds that target TLESRs may therefore present a new add-on treatment for patients with persistent GERD symptoms despite PPI therapy.

  3. Affinity-based methods in drug-target discovery.

    PubMed

    Rylova, Gabriela; Ozdian, Tomas; Varanasi, Lakshman; Soural, Miroslav; Hlavac, Jan; Holub, Dusan; Dzubak, Petr; Hajduch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Target discovery using the molecular approach, as opposed to the more traditional systems approach requires the study of the cellular or biological process underlying a condition or disease. The approaches that are employed by the "bench" scientist may be genetic, genomic or proteomic and each has its rightful place in the drug-target discovery process. Affinity-based proteomic techniques currently used in drug-discovery draw upon several disciplines, synthetic chemistry, cell-biology, biochemistry and mass spectrometry. An important component of such techniques is the probe that is specifically designed to pick out a protein or set of proteins from amongst the varied thousands in a cell lysate. A second component, that is just as important, is liquid-chromatography tandem massspectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS and the supporting theoretical framework has come of age and is the tool of choice for protein identification and quantification. These proteomic tools are critical to maintaining the drug-candidate supply, in the larger context of drug discovery.

  4. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  5. Interaction Networks: Generating High Level Hints Based on Network Community Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Michael; Johnson, Matthew; Barnes, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel data structure, the Interaction Network, for representing interaction-data from open problem solving environment tutors. We show how using network community detecting techniques are used to identify sub-goals in problems in a logic tutor. We then use those community structures to generate high level hints between sub-goals.…

  6. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  7. PEG-g-chitosan nanoparticles functionalized with the monoclonal antibody OX26 for brain drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Monsalve, Yuliana; Tosi, Giovanni; Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Vilella, Antonietta; Zoli, Michele; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; López, Betty L; Sierra, Ligia

    2015-01-01

    Drug targeting to the CNS is challenging due to the presence of blood-brain barrier. We investigated chitosan (Cs) nanoparticles (NPs) as drug transporter system across the blood-brain barrier, based on mAb OX26 modified Cs. Cs NPs functionalized with PEG, modified and unmodified with OX26 (Cs-PEG-OX26) were prepared and chemico-physically characterized. These NPs were administered (intraperitoneal) in mice to define their ability to reach the brain. Brain uptake of OX26-conjugated NPs is much higher than of unmodified NPs, because: long-circulating abilities (conferred by PEG), interaction between cationic Cs and brain endothelium negative charges and OX26 TfR receptor affinity. Cs-PEG-OX26 NPs are promising drug delivery system to the CNS.

  8. "Chameleonic" backbone hydrogen bonds in protein binding and as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, C A; Accordino, S R; Gerbino, D C; Appignanesi, G A

    2015-10-01

    We carry out a time-averaged contact matrix study to reveal the existence of protein backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs) whose net persistence in time differs markedly form their corresponding PDB-reported state. We term such interactions as "chameleonic" BHBs, CBHBs, precisely to account for their tendency to change the structural prescription of the PDB for the opposite bonding propensity in solution. We also find a significant enrichment of protein binding sites in CBHBs, relate them to local water exposure and analyze their behavior as ligand/drug targets. Thus, the dynamic analysis of hydrogen bond propensity might lay the foundations for new tools of interest in protein binding-site prediction and in lead optimization for drug design.

  9. Important biology events and pathways in Brucella infection and implications for novel antibiotic drug targets.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangjun; Xu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella spp. is a common zoonosis in many parts of the world. Humans are infected through contact with infected animals or their dirty products. Many mechanisms are needed for this successful infection, although the mechanisms are still unclear. Host immune response and some signaling molecules play an important role in the infection event. Bacterial pathogens operate by attacking crucial intracellular pathways or some important molecules in each of these pathways for survival in their hosts. The crucial components (molecules) of immunity or pathway play a critical role in the whole process of Brucella infection. Here we summarize the findings of the Brucella-host interactions' immune system and signaling molecular cascades involved in the TLR-initiated immune response to Brucella spp. infection. The paper serves to deepen our understanding of this complex process and to provide some clues regarding the discovery of drug targets for prevention and control.

  10. PBIT: pipeline builder for identification of drug targets for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Shende, Gauri; Haldankar, Harshala; Barai, Ram Shankar; Bharmal, Mohammed Husain; Shetty, Vinit; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-12-30

    PBIT (Pipeline Builder for Identification of drug Targets) is an online webserver that has been developed for screening of microbial proteomes for critical features of human drug targets such as being non-homologous to human proteome as well as the human gut microbiota, essential for the pathogen's survival, participation in pathogen-specific pathways etc. The tool has been validated by analyzing 57 putative targets of Candida albicans documented in literature. PBIT integrates various in silico approaches known for drug target identification and will facilitate high-throughput prediction of drug targets for infectious diseases, including multi-pathogenic infections.

  11. Molecular chaperones as rational drug targets for Parkinson's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kalia, S K; Kalia, L V; McLean, P J

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is caused, in part, by the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia. The presence of intracellular protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, within the surviving nigral neurons is the defining neuropathological feature of the disease. Accordingly, the identification of specific genes mutated in families with Parkinson's disease and of genetic susceptibility variants for idiopathic Parkinson's disease has implicated abnormalities in proteostasis, or the handling and elimination of misfolded proteins, in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Protein folding and the refolding of misfolded proteins are regulated by a network of interactive molecules, known as the chaperone system, which is composed of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. The chaperone system is intimately associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway which are responsible for elimination of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition to their role in proteostasis, some chaperone molecules are involved in the regulation of cell death pathways. Here we review the role of the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, and the cochaperones Hsp40, BAG family members such as BAG5, CHIP and Hip in modulating neuronal death with a focus on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. We also review current progress in preclinical studies aimed at targetting the chaperone system to prevent neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss potential future chaperone-based therapeutics for the symptomatic treatment and possible disease modification of Parkinson's disease.

  12. Food Web Designer: a flexible tool to visualize interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Sint, Daniela; Traugott, Michael

    Species are embedded in complex networks of ecological interactions and assessing these networks provides a powerful approach to understand what the consequences of these interactions are for ecosystem functioning and services. This is mandatory to develop and evaluate strategies for the management and control of pests. Graphical representations of networks can help recognize patterns that might be overlooked otherwise. However, there is a lack of software which allows visualizing these complex interaction networks. Food Web Designer is a stand-alone, highly flexible and user friendly software tool to quantitatively visualize trophic and other types of bipartite and tripartite interaction networks. It is offered free of charge for use on Microsoft Windows platforms. Food Web Designer is easy to use without the need to learn a specific syntax due to its graphical user interface. Up to three (trophic) levels can be connected using links cascading from or pointing towards the taxa within each level to illustrate top-down and bottom-up connections. Link width/strength and abundance of taxa can be quantified, allowing generating fully quantitative networks. Network datasets can be imported, saved for later adjustment and the interaction webs can be exported as pictures for graphical display in different file formats. We show how Food Web Designer can be used to draw predator-prey and host-parasitoid food webs, demonstrating that this software is a simple and straightforward tool to graphically display interaction networks for assessing pest control or any other type of interaction in both managed and natural ecosystems from an ecological network perspective.

  13. Evidence of Probabilistic Behaviour in Protein Interaction Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-31

    Evidence of degree-weighted connectivity in nine PPI networks. a, Homo sapiens (human); b, Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly); c-e, Saccharomyces...illustrates maps for the networks of Homo sapiens and Dro- sophila melanogaster, while maps for the remaining net- works are provided in Additional file 2. As...protein-protein interaction networks. a, Homo sapiens ; b, Drosophila melanogaster. Distances shown as average shortest path lengths L(k1, k2) between

  14. Three-dimensional visualization of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungsook; Byun, Yanga

    2004-03-01

    Protein interaction networks provide us with contextual information within which protein function can be interpreted and will assist many biomedical studies. We have developed a new force-directed layout algorithm for visualizing protein interactions in three-dimensional space. Our algorithm divides nodes into three groups based on their interacting properties: bi-connected sub-graph in the center, terminal nodes at the outermost region, and the rest in between them. Experimental results show that our algorithm efficiently generates a clear and aesthetically pleasing drawing of large-scale protein interaction networks and that it is an order of magnitude faster than other force-directed layouts.

  15. Novel Drugs Targeting the c-Ring of the F1FO-ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Pagliarani, Alessandra; Nesci, S; Ventrella, V

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the role of the ATP synthase/hydrolase, also known as F1FO-complex, as key molecular and enzymatic switch between cell life and death, thus increasing the enzyme attractiveness as drug target in pharmacology. Being inhibition of ATP production usually linked to antiproliferative properties, drugs targeting the enzyme complex have been mainly considered to fight pathogen parasites and cancer. In recent years, a number of natural macrolides, produced by bacterial fermentation and structurally related to the classical enzyme inhibitor oligomycin, have been shown to bind to the membrane-embedded FO sector and to inhibit the enzyme complex by an oligomycin-like mechanism, namely by interacting with the c-ring. Other than natural macrolide antibiotics, which display variegated inhibition power on different F1FO-complexes, synthetic compounds from the diarylquinoline and organotin families also target the c-ring and strongly inhibit the enzyme. Bioinformatic insights address drug design to target FO subunits. Additionally, the possible modulation of the drug inhibition power, by amino acid substitutions or post-translational modifications of c-subunits, adds further interest to the target. The present survey on compounds targeting the c-ring and bi-directionally blocking the transmembrane proton flux which drives ATP synthesis/hydrolysis, discloses new therapeutic options to fight cancer and infections sustained by therapeutically recalcitrant microorganisms. Additionally, c-ring targeting compounds may constitute new tools to eradicate undesired biofilms and to address at the molecular level the therapy of mammalian diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions. In summary, studies on the only partially known molecular interactions within the c-ring of the F1FO-complex may renew hope to counteract mammalian diseases.

  16. Defaunation leads to interaction deficits, not interaction compensation, in an island seed dispersal network.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Evan C; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Rogers, Haldre S

    2017-07-20

    Following defaunation, the loss of interactions with mutualists such as pollinators or seed dispersers may be compensated through increased interactions with remaining mutualists, ameliorating the negative cascading impacts on biodiversity. Alternatively, remaining mutualists may respond to altered competition by reducing the breadth or intensity of their interactions, exacerbating negative impacts on biodiversity. Despite the importance of these responses for our understanding of the dynamics of mutualistic networks and their response to global change, the mechanism and magnitude of interaction compensation within real mutualistic networks remains largely unknown. We examined differences in mutualistic interactions between frugivores and fruiting plants in two island ecosystems possessing an intact or disrupted seed dispersal network. We determined how changes in the abundance and behavior of remaining seed dispersers either increased mutualistic interactions (contributing to "interaction compensation") or decreased interactions (causing an "interaction deficit") in the disrupted network. We found a "rich-get-richer" response in the disrupted network, where remaining frugivores favored the plant species with highest interaction frequency, a dynamic that worsened the interaction deficit among plant species with low interaction frequency. Only one of five plant species experienced compensation and the other four had significant interaction deficits, with interaction frequencies 56-95% lower in the disrupted network. These results do not provide support for the strong compensating mechanisms assumed in theoretical network models, suggesting that existing network models underestimate the prevalence of cascading mutualism disruption after defaunation. This work supports a mutualist biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship, highlighting the importance of mutualist diversity for sustaining diverse and resilient ecosystems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Development of Attention Networks and Their Interactions in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pozuelos, Joan P.; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M.; Castillo, Alejandro; Fuentes, Luis J.; Rueda, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated developmental trajectories of alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks and their interactions over childhood. Two cross-sectional experiments were conducted with different samples of 6-to 12-year-old children using modified versions of the attention network task (ANT). In Experiment 1 (N = 106),…

  18. Development of Attention Networks and Their Interactions in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pozuelos, Joan P.; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M.; Castillo, Alejandro; Fuentes, Luis J.; Rueda, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated developmental trajectories of alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks and their interactions over childhood. Two cross-sectional experiments were conducted with different samples of 6-to 12-year-old children using modified versions of the attention network task (ANT). In Experiment 1 (N = 106),…

  19. Linking Classrooms of the Future through Interactive Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisco, Ponney G.

    This document describes an interactive television (ITV) distance education network designed to service rural schools. Phase one of the network involved the installation of over 14 miles of fiber optic cable linking two high schools, a career center, and the University of Rio Grande; phase two will bring seven high schools in economically depressed…

  20. Linking Classrooms of the Future through Interactive Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisco, Ponney G.

    This document describes an interactive television (ITV) distance education network designed to service rural schools. Phase one of the network involved the installation of over 14 miles of fiber optic cable linking two high schools, a career center, and the University of Rio Grande; phase two will bring seven high schools in economically depressed…

  1. Interacting Social Processes on Interconnected Networks

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Zuzek, Lucila G.; La Rocca, Cristian E.; Vazquez, Federico; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the interplay between two different dynamical processes –one for opinion formation and the other for decision making– on two interconnected networks A and B. The opinion dynamics on network A corresponds to that of the M-model, where the state of each agent can take one of four possible values (S = −2,−1, 1, 2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue. The likelihood to become an extremist (S = ±2) or a moderate (S = ±1) is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r ≥ 0. The decision making dynamics on network B is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where agents can be either in favor (S = +1) or against (S = −1) the issue. The probability that an agent changes its state is proportional to the fraction of neighbors that hold the opposite state raised to a power β. Starting from a polarized case scenario in which all agents of network A hold positive orientations while all agents of network B have a negative orientation, we explore the conditions under which one of the dynamics prevails over the other, imposing its initial orientation. We find that, for a given value of β, the two-network system reaches a consensus in the positive state (initial state of network A) when the reinforcement overcomes a crossover value r*(β), while a negative consensus happens for r < r*(β). In the r − β phase space, the system displays a transition at a critical threshold βc, from a coexistence of both orientations for β < βc to a dominance of one orientation for β > βc. We develop an analytical mean-field approach that gives an insight into these regimes and shows that both dynamics are equivalent along the crossover line (r*, β*). PMID:27689698

  2. Interacting Social Processes on Interconnected Networks.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Zuzek, Lucila G; La Rocca, Cristian E; Vazquez, Federico; Braunstein, Lidia A

    We propose and study a model for the interplay between two different dynamical processes -one for opinion formation and the other for decision making- on two interconnected networks A and B. The opinion dynamics on network A corresponds to that of the M-model, where the state of each agent can take one of four possible values (S = -2,-1, 1, 2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue. The likelihood to become an extremist (S = ±2) or a moderate (S = ±1) is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r ≥ 0. The decision making dynamics on network B is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where agents can be either in favor (S = +1) or against (S = -1) the issue. The probability that an agent changes its state is proportional to the fraction of neighbors that hold the opposite state raised to a power β. Starting from a polarized case scenario in which all agents of network A hold positive orientations while all agents of network B have a negative orientation, we explore the conditions under which one of the dynamics prevails over the other, imposing its initial orientation. We find that, for a given value of β, the two-network system reaches a consensus in the positive state (initial state of network A) when the reinforcement overcomes a crossover value r*(β), while a negative consensus happens for r < r*(β). In the r - β phase space, the system displays a transition at a critical threshold βc, from a coexistence of both orientations for β < βc to a dominance of one orientation for β > βc. We develop an analytical mean-field approach that gives an insight into these regimes and shows that both dynamics are equivalent along the crossover line (r*, β*).

  3. Perspective of microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 as drug target in inflammation-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    Prostaglandin (PG)E2 encompasses crucial roles in pain, fever, inflammation and diseases with inflammatory component, such as cancer, but is also essential for gastric, renal, cardiovascular and immune homeostasis. Cyclooxygenases (COX) convert arachidonic acid to the intermediate PGH2 which is isomerized to PGE2 by at least three different PGE2 synthases. Inhibitors of COX - non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - are currently the only available therapeutics that target PGE2 biosynthesis. Due to adverse effects of COX inhibitors on the cardiovascular system (COX-2-selective), stomach and kidney (COX-1/2-unselective), novel pharmacological strategies are in demand. The inducible microsomal PGE2 synthase (mPGES)-1 is considered mainly responsible for the excessive PGE2 synthesis during inflammation and was suggested as promising drug target for suppressing PGE2 biosynthesis. However, 15 years after intensive research on the biology and pharmacology of mPGES-1, the therapeutic value of mPGES-1 as drug target is still vague and mPGES-1 inhibitors did not enter the market so far. This commentary will first shed light on the structure, mechanism and regulation of mPGES-1 and will then discuss its biological function and the consequence of its inhibition for the dynamic network of eicosanoids. Moreover, we (i) present current strategies for interfering with mPGES-1-mediated PGE2 synthesis, (ii) summarize bioanalytical approaches for mPGES-1 drug discovery and (iii) describe preclinical test systems for the characterization of mPGES-1 inhibitors. The pharmacological potential of selective mPGES-1 inhibitor classes as well as dual mPGES-1/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors is reviewed and pitfalls in their development, including species discrepancies and loss of in vivo activity, are discussed.

  4. Identification of pyruvate kinase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a novel antimicrobial drug target.

    PubMed

    Zoraghi, Roya; See, Raymond H; Axerio-Cilies, Peter; Kumar, Nag S; Gong, Huansheng; Moreau, Anne; Hsing, Michael; Kaur, Sukhbir; Swayze, Richard D; Worrall, Liam; Amandoron, Emily; Lian, Tian; Jackson, Linda; Jiang, Jihong; Thorson, Lisa; Labriere, Christophe; Foster, Leonard; Brunham, Robert C; McMaster, William R; Finlay, B Brett; Strynadka, Natalie C; Cherkasov, Artem; Young, Robert N; Reiner, Neil E

    2011-05-01

    Novel classes of antimicrobials are needed to address the challenge of multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using the architecture of the MRSA interactome, we identified pyruvate kinase (PK) as a potential novel drug target based upon it being a highly connected, essential hub in the MRSA interactome. Structural modeling, including X-ray crystallography, revealed discrete features of PK in MRSA, which appeared suitable for the selective targeting of the bacterial enzyme. In silico library screening combined with functional enzymatic assays identified an acyl hydrazone-based compound (IS-130) as a potent MRSA PK inhibitor (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.1 μM) with >1,000-fold selectivity over human PK isoforms. Medicinal chemistry around the IS-130 scaffold identified analogs that more potently and selectively inhibited MRSA PK enzymatic activity and S. aureus growth in vitro (MIC of 1 to 5 μg/ml). These novel anti-PK compounds were found to possess antistaphylococcal activity, including both MRSA and multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA) strains. These compounds also exhibited exceptional antibacterial activities against other Gram-positive genera, including enterococci and streptococci. PK lead compounds were found to be noncompetitive inhibitors and were bactericidal. In addition, mutants with significant increases in MICs were not isolated after 25 bacterial passages in culture, indicating that resistance may be slow to emerge. These findings validate the principles of network science as a powerful approach to identify novel antibacterial drug targets. They also provide a proof of principle, based upon PK in MRSA, for a research platform aimed at discovering and optimizing selective inhibitors of novel bacterial targets where human orthologs exist, as leads for anti-infective drug development.

  5. Functional Interaction Network Construction and Analysis for Disease Discovery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanming; Haw, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Network-based approaches project seemingly unrelated genes or proteins onto a large-scale network context, therefore providing a holistic visualization and analysis platform for genomic data generated from high-throughput experiments, reducing the dimensionality of data via using network modules and increasing the statistic analysis power. Based on the Reactome database, the most popular and comprehensive open-source biological pathway knowledgebase, we have developed a highly reliable protein functional interaction network covering around 60 % of total human genes and an app called ReactomeFIViz for Cytoscape, the most popular biological network visualization and analysis platform. In this chapter, we describe the detailed procedures on how this functional interaction network is constructed by integrating multiple external data sources, extracting functional interactions from human curated pathway databases, building a machine learning classifier called a Naïve Bayesian Classifier, predicting interactions based on the trained Naïve Bayesian Classifier, and finally constructing the functional interaction database. We also provide an example on how to use ReactomeFIViz for performing network-based data analysis for a list of genes.

  6. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  7. Specialization for resistance in wild host-pathogen interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Luke G; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Properties encompassed by host-pathogen interaction networks have potential to give valuable insight into the evolution of specialization and coevolutionary dynamics in host-pathogen interactions. However, network approaches have been rarely utilized in previous studies of host and pathogen phenotypic variation. Here we applied quantitative analyses to eight networks derived from spatially and temporally segregated host (Linum marginale) and pathogen (Melampsora lini) populations. First, we found that resistance strategies are highly variable within and among networks, corresponding to a spectrum of specialist and generalist resistance types being maintained within all networks. At the individual level, specialization was strongly linked to partial resistance, such that partial resistance was effective against a greater number of pathogens compared to full resistance. Second, we found that all networks were significantly nested. There was little support for the hypothesis that temporal evolutionary dynamics may lead to the development of nestedness in host-pathogen infection networks. Rather, the common patterns observed in terms of nestedness suggests a universal driver (or multiple drivers) that may be independent of spatial and temporal structure. Third, we found that resistance networks were significantly modular in two spatial networks, clearly reflecting spatial and ecological structure within one of the networks. We conclude that (1) overall patterns of specialization in the networks we studied mirror evolutionary trade-offs with the strength of resistance; (2) that specific network architecture can emerge under different evolutionary scenarios; and (3) network approaches offer great utility as a tool for probing the evolutionary and ecological genetics of host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Ogishima, Soichi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction networks are known to exhibit remarkable structures: scale-free and small-world and modular structures. To explain the evolutionary processes of protein interaction networks possessing scale-free and small-world structures, preferential attachment and duplication-divergence models have been proposed as mathematical models. Protein interaction networks are also known to exhibit another remarkable structural characteristic, modular structure. How the protein interaction networks became to exhibit modularity in their evolution? Here, we propose a hypothesis of modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network based on molecular evolutionary evidence. We assigned yeast proteins into six evolutionary ages by constructing a phylogenetic profile. We found that all the almost half of hub proteins are evolutionarily new. Examining the evolutionary processes of protein complexes, functional modules and topological modules, we also found that member proteins of these modules tend to appear in one or two evolutionary ages. Moreover, proteins in protein complexes and topological modules show significantly low evolutionary rates than those not in these modules. Our results suggest a hypothesis of modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network as systems evolution. PMID:25914446

  9. Building a glaucoma interaction network using a text mining approach.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Maha; Nasraoui, Olfa; Cooper, Nigel G F

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biomedical literature and its underlying knowledge base is rapidly expanding, making it beyond the ability of a single human being to read through all the literature. Several automated methods have been developed to help make sense of this dilemma. The present study reports on the results of a text mining approach to extract gene interactions from the data warehouse of published experimental results which are then used to benchmark an interaction network associated with glaucoma. To the best of our knowledge, there is, as yet, no glaucoma interaction network derived solely from text mining approaches. The presence of such a network could provide a useful summative knowledge base to complement other forms of clinical information related to this disease. A glaucoma corpus was constructed from PubMed Central and a text mining approach was applied to extract genes and their relations from this corpus. The extracted relations between genes were checked using reference interaction databases and classified generally as known or new relations. The extracted genes and relations were then used to construct a glaucoma interaction network. Analysis of the resulting network indicated that it bears the characteristics of a small world interaction network. Our analysis showed the presence of seven glaucoma linked genes that defined the network modularity. A web-based system for browsing and visualizing the extracted glaucoma related interaction networks is made available at http://neurogene.spd.louisville.edu/GlaucomaINViewer/Form1.aspx. This study has reported the first version of a glaucoma interaction network using a text mining approach. The power of such an approach is in its ability to cover a wide range of glaucoma related studies published over many years. Hence, a bigger picture of the disease can be established. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first glaucoma interaction network to summarize the known literature. The major findings were a set of

  10. Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach for identifying protein complexes or functional modules, which has become a major research topic in systems biology. In this review, recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks will be presented in detail. The predictions of protein functions and interactions based on modules will be covered. Finally, the performance of different clustering methods will be compared and the directions for future research will be discussed. PMID:21143777

  11. Network simulation reveals significant contribution of network motifs to the age-dependency of yeast protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cheng; Luo, Jiawei; Song, Dan

    2014-07-29

    Advances in proteomic technologies combined with sophisticated computing and modeling methods have generated an unprecedented amount of high-throughput data for system-scale analysis. As a result, the study of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has garnered much attention in recent years. One of the most fundamental problems in studying PPI networks is to understand how their architecture originated and evolved to their current state. By investigating how proteins of different ages are connected in the yeast PPI networks, one can deduce their expansion procedure in evolution and how the ancient primitive network expanded and evolved. Studies have shown that proteins are often connected to other proteins of a similar age, suggesting a high degree of age preference between interacting proteins. Though several theories have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, none of them considered protein-clusters as a contributing factor. Here we first investigate the age-dependency of the proteins from the perspective of network motifs. Our analysis confirms that proteins of the same age groups tend to form interacting network motifs; furthermore, those proteins within motifs tend to be within protein complexes and the interactions among them largely contribute to the observed age preference in the yeast PPI networks. In light of these results, we describe a new modeling approach, based on "network motifs", whereby topologically connected protein clusters in the network are treated as single evolutionary units. Instead of modeling single proteins, our approach models the connections and evolutionary relationships of multiple related protein clusters or "network motifs" that are collectively integrated into an existing PPI network. Through simulation studies, we found that the "network motif" modeling approach can capture yeast PPI network properties better than if individual proteins were considered to be the simplest evolutionary units. Our approach provides a fresh

  12. Adenylating Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylation or adenylate-forming enzymes (AEs) are widely found in nature and are responsible for the activation of carboxylic acids to intermediate acyladenylates, which are mixed anhydrides of AMP. In a second reaction, AEs catalyze the transfer of the acyl group of the acyladenylate onto a nucleophilic amino, alcohol, or thiol group of an acceptor molecule leading to amide, ester, and thioester products, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes for more than 60 adenylating enzymes, many of which represent potential drug targets due to their confirmed essentiality or requirement for virulence. Several strategies have been used to develop potent and selective AE inhibitors including high-throughput screening, fragment-based screening, and the rationale design of bisubstrate inhibitors that mimic the acyladenylate. In this review, a comprehensive analysis of the mycobacterial adenylating enzymes will be presented with a focus on the identification of small molecule inhibitors. Specifically, this review will cover the aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (aaRSs), MenE required for menaquinone synthesis, the FadD family of enzymes including the fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAAL) and the fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs) involved in lipid metabolism, and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation enzyme MbtA that is necessary for mycobactin synthesis. Additionally, the enzymes NadE, GuaA, PanC, and MshC involved in the respective synthesis of NAD, guanine, pantothenate, and mycothiol will be discussed as well as BirA that is responsible for biotinylation of the acyl CoA-carboxylases. PMID:22283817

  13. Novel antibacterial compounds and their drug targets - successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Polski, Andrzej; Sobótka-Polska, Karolina; Pachuta-Stec, Anna; Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Pitucha, Monika

    2016-12-12

    molecular basis of drug resistance, drug targets for novel antibacterial drugs, and new compounds (since year 2010) from different chemical classes with antibacterial activity, focusing on structure-activity relationships.

  14. An immuno-chemo-proteomics method for drug target deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Chaitanya; Zhen, Eugene; Higgs, Richard E; Hale, John E

    2008-08-01

    Chemical proteomics is an emerging technique for drug target deconvolution and profiling the toxicity of known drugs. With the use of this technique, the specificity of a small molecule inhibitor toward its potential targets can be characterized and information thus obtained can be used in optimizing lead compounds. Most commonly, small molecules are immobilized on solid supports and used as affinity chromatography resins to bind targets. However, it is difficult to evaluate the effect of immobilization on the affinity of the compounds to their targets. Here, we describe the development and application of a soluble probe where a small molecule was coupled with a peptide epitope which was used to affinity isolate binding proteins from cell lysate. The soluble probe allowed direct verification that the compound after coupling with peptide epitope retained its binding characteristics. The PKC-alpha inhibitor Bisindolylmaleimide-III was coupled with a peptide containing the FLAG epitope. Following incubation with cellular lysates, the compound and associated proteins were affinity isolated using anti-FLAG antibody beads. Using this approach, we identified the known Bisindolylmaleimide-III targets, PKC-alpha, GSK3-beta, CaMKII, adenosine kinase, CDK2, and quinine reductase type 2, as well as previously unidentified targets PKAC-alpha, prohibitin, VDAC and heme binding proteins. This method was directly compared to the solid-phase method (small molecule was immobilized to a solid support) providing an orthogonal strategy to aid in target deconvolution and help to eliminate false positives originating from nonspecific binding of the proteins to the matrix.

  15. TRPV1 Channel: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy has 2-3% incidence worldwide. However, present antiepileptic drugs provide only partial control of seizures. Calcium ion accumulation in hippocampal neurons has long been known as a major contributor to the etiology of epilepsy. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel and mediator of epilepsy in the hippocampus. TRPV1 is expressed in epileptic brain areas such as CA1 area and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Here the author reviews the patent literature on novel molecules targeting TRPV1 that are currently being investigated in the laboratory and are candidates for future clinical evaluation in the management of epilepsy. A limited number of recent reports have implicated TRPV1 in the induction or treatment of epilepsy suggesting that this may be new area for potential drugs targeting this debilitating disease. Thus activation of TRPV1 by oxidative stress, resiniferatoxin, cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activators (i.e. anandamide) or capsaicin induced epileptic effects, and these effects could be reduced by appropriate inhibitors, including capsazepine (CPZ), 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), resolvins, and CB1 antagonists. It has been also reported that CPZ and IRTX reduced spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission through modulation of glutaminergic systems and desensitization of TRPV1 channels in the hippocampus of rats. Immunocytochemical studies indicated that TRPV1 channel expression increased in the hippocampus of mice and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy Taken together, findings in the current literature support a role for calcium ion accumulation through TRPV1 channels in the etiology of epileptic seizures, indicating that inhibition of TRPV1 in the hippocampus may possibly be a novel target for prevention of epileptic seizures. PMID:26411767

  16. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3) × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5) × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  17. NetworkAnalyst - integrative approaches for protein–protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required - identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. PMID:24861621

  18. Properties of interaction networks underlying the minority game.

    PubMed

    Caridi, Inés

    2014-11-01

    The minority game is a well-known agent-based model with no explicit interaction among its agents. However, it is known that they interact through the global magnitudes of the model and through their strategies. In this work we have attempted to formalize the implicit interactions among minority game agents as if they were links on a complex network. We have defined the link between two agents by quantifying the similarity between them. This link definition is based on the information of the instance of the game (the set of strategies assigned to each agent at the beginning) without any dynamic information on the game and brings about a static, unweighed and undirected network. We have analyzed the structure of the resulting network for different parameters, such as the number of agents (N) and the agent's capacity to process information (m), always taking into account games with two strategies per agent. In the region of crowd effects of the model, the resulting networks structure is a small-world network, whereas in the region where the behavior of the minority game is the same as in a game of random decisions, networks become a random network of Erdos-Renyi. The transition between these two types of networks is slow, without any peculiar feature of the network in the region of the coordination among agents. Finally, we have studied the resulting static networks for the full strategy minority game model, a maximal instance of the minority game in which all possible agents take part in the game. We have explicitly calculated the degree distribution of the full strategy minority game network and, on the basis of this analytical result, we have estimated the degree distribution of the minority game network, which is in accordance with computational results.

  19. Optimization of an interactive distributive computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, V.

    1985-01-01

    The activities under a cooperative agreement for the development of a computer network are briefly summarized. Research activities covered are: computer operating systems optimization and integration; software development and implementation of the IRIS (Infrared Imaging of Shuttle) Experiment; and software design, development, and implementation of the APS (Aerosol Particle System) Experiment.

  20. A web-based protein interaction network visualizer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction between proteins is one of the most important mechanisms in the execution of cellular functions. The study of these interactions has provided insight into the functioning of an organism’s processes. As of October 2013, Homo sapiens had over 170000 Protein-Protein interactions (PPI) registered in the Interologous Interaction Database, which is only one of the many public resources where protein interactions can be accessed. These numbers exemplify the volume of data that research on the topic has generated. Visualization of large data sets is a well known strategy to make sense of information, and protein interaction data is no exception. There are several tools that allow the exploration of this data, providing different methods to visualize protein network interactions. However, there is still no native web tool that allows this data to be explored interactively online. Results Given the advances that web technologies have made recently it is time to bring these interactive views to the web to provide an easily accessible forum to visualize PPI. We have created a Web-based Protein Interaction Network Visualizer: PINV, an open source, native web application that facilitates the visualization of protein interactions (http://biosual.cbio.uct.ac.za/pinv.html). We developed PINV as a set of components that follow the protocol defined in BioJS and use the D3 library to create the graphic layouts. We demonstrate the use of PINV with multi-organism interaction networks for a predicted target from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its interacting partners and its orthologs. Conclusions The resultant tool provides an attractive view of complex, fully interactive networks with components that allow the querying, filtering and manipulation of the visible subset. Moreover, as a web resource, PINV simplifies sharing and publishing, activities which are vital in today’s research collaborative environments. The source code is freely available for download at

  1. In Silico Investigations of Chemical Constituents of Clerodendrum colebrookianum in the Anti-Hypertensive Drug Targets: ROCK, ACE, and PDE5.

    PubMed

    Arya, Hemant; Syed, Safiulla Basha; Singh, Sorokhaibam Sureshkumar; Ampasala, Dinakar R; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2017-06-16

    Understanding the molecular mode of action of natural product is a key step for developing drugs from them. In this regard, this study is aimed to understand the molecular-level interactions of chemical constituents of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., with anti-hypertensive drug targets using computational approaches. The plant has ethno-medicinal importance for the treatment of hypertension and reported to show activity against anti-hypertensive drug targets-Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK), angiotensin-converting enzyme, and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Docking studies showed that three chemical constituents (acteoside, martinoside, and osmanthuside β6) out of 21 reported from the plant to interact with the anti-hypertensive drug targets with good glide score. In addition, they formed H-bond interactions with the key residues Met156/Met157 of ROCK I/ROCK II and Gln817 of PDE5. Further, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of protein-ligand complexes suggest that H-bond interactions between acteoside/osmanthuside β6 and Met156/Met157 (ROCK I/ROCK II), acteoside and Gln817 (PDE5) were stable. The present investigation suggests that the anti-hypertensive activity of the plant is due to the interaction of acteoside and osmanthuside β6 with ROCK and PDE5 drug targets. The identified molecular mode of binding of the plant constituents could help to design new drugs to treat hypertension.

  2. Development of attention networks and their interactions in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pozuelos, Joan P; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Castillo, Alejandro; Fuentes, Luis J; Rueda, M Rosario

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated developmental trajectories of alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks and their interactions over childhood. Two cross-sectional experiments were conducted with different samples of 6- to 12-year-old children using modified versions of the attention network task (ANT). In Experiment 1 (N = 106), alerting and orienting cues were independently manipulated, thus allowing examination of interactions between these 2 networks, as well as between them and the executive attention network. In Experiment 2 (N = 159), additional changes were made to the task in order to foster exogenous orienting cues. Results from both studies consistently revealed separate developmental trajectories for each attention network. Children younger than 7 years exhibited stronger benefits from having an alerting auditory signal prior to the target presentation. Developmental changes in orienting were mostly observed on response accuracy between middle and late childhood, whereas executive attention showed increases in efficiency between 7 years and older ages, and further improvements in late childhood. Of importance, across both experiments, significant interactions between alerting and orienting, as well as between each of these and the executive attention network, were observed. Alerting cues led to speeding shifts of attention and enhancing orienting processes. Also, both alerting and orienting cues modulated the magnitude of the flanker interference effect. These findings inform current theoretical models of human attention and its development, characterizing for the first time, the age-related course of attention networks interactions that, present in adults, stem from further refinements over childhood.

  3. Cortico-Cardio-Respiratory Network Interactions during Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shiogai, Yuri; Dhamala, Mukesh; Oshima, Kumiko; Hasler, Martin

    2012-01-01

    General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX) and pentobarbital (PB). We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used. PMID:23028572

  4. Synchronization in networks with random interactions: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianfeng; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2006-03-01

    Synchronization is an emergent property in networks of interacting dynamical elements. Here we review some recent results on synchronization in randomly coupled networks. Asymptotical behavior of random matrices is summarized and its impact on the synchronization of network dynamics is presented. Robert May's results on the stability of equilibrium points in linear dynamics are first extended to systems with time delayed coupling and then nonlinear systems where the synchronized dynamics can be periodic or chaotic. Finally, applications of our results to neuroscience, in particular, networks of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons, are included.

  5. Evolutionary pressure on the topology of protein interface interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Margaret E; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-10-24

    The densely connected structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks reflects the functional need of proteins to cooperate in cellular processes. However, PPI networks do not adequately capture the competition in protein binding. By contrast, the interface interaction network (IIN) studied here resolves the modular character of protein-protein binding and distinguishes between simultaneous and exclusive interactions that underlie both cooperation and competition. We show that the topology of the IIN is under evolutionary pressure, and we connect topological features of the IIN to specific biological functions. To reveal the forces shaping the network topology, we use a sequence-based computational model of interface binding along with network analysis. We find that the more fragmented structure of IINs, in contrast to the dense PPI networks, arises in large part from the competition between specific and nonspecific binding. The need to minimize nonspecific binding favors specific network motifs, including a minimal number of cliques (i.e., fully connected subgraphs) and many disconnected fragments. Validating the model, we find that these network characteristics are closely mirrored in the IIN of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Features unexpected on the basis of our motif analysis are found to indicate either exceptional binding selectivity or important regulatory functions.

  6. Species traits and interaction rules shape a species-rich seed-dispersal interaction network.

    PubMed

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Pires, Mathias M; Donatti, Camila I; Guimarães, Paulo R; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2017-06-01

    Species phenotypic traits affect the interaction patterns and the organization of seed-dispersal interaction networks. Understanding the relationship between species characteristics and network structure help us understand the assembly of natural communities and how communities function. Here, we examine how species traits may affect the rules leading to patterns of interaction among plants and fruit-eating vertebrates. We study a species-rich seed-dispersal system using a model selection approach to examine whether the rules underlying network structure are driven by constraints in fruit resource exploitation, by preferential consumption of fruits by the frugivores, or by a combination of both. We performed analyses for the whole system and for bird and mammal assemblages separately, and identified the animal and plant characteristics shaping interaction rules. The structure of the analyzed interaction network was better explained by constraints in resource exploitation in the case of birds and by preferential consumption of fruits with specific traits for mammals. These contrasting results when looking at bird-plant and mammal-plant interactions suggest that the same type of interaction is organized by different processes depending on the assemblage we focus on. Size-related restrictions of the interacting species (both for mammals and birds) were the most important factors driving the interaction rules. Our results suggest that the structure of seed-dispersal interaction networks can be explained using species traits and interaction rules related to simple ecological mechanisms.

  7. Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.

    PubMed

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  8. Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

  9. Aberrant intra-salience network dynamic functional connectivity impairs large-scale network interactions in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Wenwen; Sun, Yujing; Hu, Min; Chen, Antao

    2016-12-01

    Aberrant functional interactions between several large-scale networks, especially the central executive network (CEN), the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN), have been postulated as core pathophysiologic features of schizophrenia; however, the attributing factors of which remain unclear. The study employed resting-state fMRI with 77 participants (42 patients and 35 controls). We performed dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) and functional connectivity (FC) analyses to explore the connectivity patterns of these networks. Furthermore, we performed a structural equation model (SEM) analysis to explore the possible role of the SN in modulating network interactions. The results were as follows: (1) The inter-network connectivity showed decreased connectivity strength and increased time-varying instability in schizophrenia; (2) The SN manifested schizophrenic intra-network dysfunctions in both the FC and DFC patterns; (3) The connectivity properties of the SN were effective in discriminating controls from patients; (4) In patients, the dynamic intra-SN connectivity negatively predicted the inter-network FC, and this effect was mediated by intra-SN connectivity strength. These findings suggest that schizophrenia show systematic deficits in temporal stability of large-scale network connectivity. Furthermore, aberrant network interactions in schizophrenia could be attributed to instable intra-SN connectivity and the dysfunction of the SN may be an intrinsic biomarker of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  11. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  12. The autophagy interaction network of the aging model Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Oliver; Hamann, Andrea; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Koch, Ina

    2017-03-27

    Autophagy is a conserved molecular pathway involved in the degradation and recycling of cellular components. It is active either as response to starvation or molecular damage. Evidence is emerging that autophagy plays a key role in the degradation of damaged cellular components and thereby affects aging and lifespan control. In earlier studies, it was found that autophagy in the aging model Podospora anserina acts as a longevity assurance mechanism. However, only little is known about the individual components controlling autophagy in this aging model. Here, we report a biochemical and bioinformatics study to detect the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of P. anserina combining experimental and theoretical methods. We constructed the PPI network of autophagy in P. anserina based on the corresponding networks of yeast and human. We integrated PaATG8 interaction partners identified in an own yeast two-hybrid analysis using ATG8 of P. anserina as bait. Additionally, we included age-dependent transcriptome data. The resulting network consists of 89 proteins involved in 186 interactions. We applied bioinformatics approaches to analyze the network topology and to prove that the network is not random, but exhibits biologically meaningful properties. We identified hub proteins which play an essential role in the network as well as seven putative sub-pathways, and interactions which are likely to be evolutionary conserved amongst species. We confirmed that autophagy-associated genes are significantly often up-regulated and co-expressed during aging of P. anserina. With the present study, we provide a comprehensive biological network of the autophagy pathway in P. anserina comprising PPI and gene expression data. It is based on computational prediction as well as experimental data. We identified sub-pathways, important hub proteins, and evolutionary conserved interactions. The network clearly illustrates the relation of autophagy to aging processes and enables

  13. Predicting protein interactions via parsimonious network history inference.

    PubMed

    Patro, Rob; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-07-01

    Reconstruction of the network-level evolutionary history of protein-protein interactions provides a principled way to relate interactions in several present-day networks. Here, we present a general framework for inferring such histories and demonstrate how it can be used to determine what interactions existed in the ancestral networks, which present-day interactions we might expect to exist based on evolutionary evidence and what information extant networks contain about the order of ancestral protein duplications. Our framework characterizes the space of likely parsimonious network histories. It results in a structure that can be used to find probabilities for a number of events associated with the histories. The framework is based on a directed hypergraph formulation of dynamic programming that we extend to enumerate many optimal and near-optimal solutions. The algorithm is applied to reconstructing ancestral interactions among bZIP transcription factors, imputing missing present-day interactions among the bZIPs and among proteins from five herpes viruses, and determining relative protein duplication order in the bZIP family. Our approach more accurately reconstructs ancestral interactions than existing approaches. In cross-validation tests, we find that our approach ranks the majority of the left-out present-day interactions among the top 2 and 17% of possible edges for the bZIP and herpes networks, respectively, making it a competitive approach for edge imputation. It also estimates relative bZIP protein duplication orders, using only interaction data and phylogenetic tree topology, which are significantly correlated with sequence-based estimates. The algorithm is implemented in C++, is open source and is available at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/ckingsf/software/parana2. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification of Potential Drug Target in Enterobacteriaceae Family: A Homology-Based Method.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, Morteza; Tabatabaiepour, Seyyede Nasim; Tabatabaiepour, Seyyede Zahra; Hosseini Nave, Hossein; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Sohrabi, Seyyed Mohsen

    2017-05-18

    The Enterobacteriaceae is a large family of Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, non-spore forming rod-shaped bacteria that includes harmless and pathogenic organisms. The emergence and development of drug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is complicating the treatment of serious infections. The aim of this study is to predict and characterize putative drug targets in Enterobacteriaceae family employing a homology-based computational method. The final putative drug targets were qualitatively characterized via cellular function prediction, subcellular localization prediction, broad-spectrum, and druggability analyses. Of 6,327 analyzed proteins, 35 proteins were selected as final putative drug targets in Enterobacteriaceae family. These putative drug targets were involved in different vital pathways like metabolism, biosynthesis of macromolecule, and cell division. Predicted drug targets were also localized in the cytoplasm and cytoplasmic membrane of the pathogen that acts as antimicrobial or vaccine targets. Of 35 drug targets, 5 targets were druggable and 30 targets were not druggable and were predicted as novel drug targets, which should be further evaluated to develop new antimicrobial. Thirteen drug targets were considered as broad-spectrum targets. It is expected that results of our study could facilitate the production of novel antibacterial for efficient treatment of infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae pathogens.

  15. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  16. An Approach for Identification of Novel Drug Targets in Streptococcus pyogenes SF370 Through Pathway Analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satendra; Singh, Dev Bukhsh; Singh, Anamika; Gautam, Budhayash; Ram, Gurudayal; Dwivedi, Seema; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2016-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most important pathogens as it is involved in various infections affecting upper respiratory tract and skin. Due to the emergence of multidrug resistance and cross-resistance, S. Pyogenes is becoming more pathogenic and dangerous. In the present study, an in silico comparative analysis of total 65 metabolic pathways of the host (Homo sapiens) and the pathogen was performed. Initially, 486 paralogous enzymes were identified so that they can be removed from possible drug target list. The 105 enzymes of the biochemical pathways of S. pyogenes from the KEGG metabolic pathway database were compared with the proteins from the Homo sapiens by performing a BLASTP search against the non-redundant database restricted to the Homo sapiens subset. Out of these, 83 enzymes were identified as non-human homologous while 30 enzymes of inadequate amino acid length were removed for further processing. Essential enzymes were finally mined from remaining 53 enzymes. Finally, 28 essential enzymes were identified in S. pyogenes SF370 (serotype M1). In subcellular localization study, 18 enzymes were predicted with cytoplasmic localization and ten enzymes with the membrane localization. These ten enzymes with putative membrane localization should be of particular interest. Acyl-carrier-protein S-malonyltransferase, DNA polymerase III subunit beta and dihydropteroate synthase are novel drug targets and thus can be used to design potential inhibitors against S. pyogenes infection. 3D structure of dihydropteroate synthase was modeled and validated that can be used for virtual screening and interaction study of potential inhibitors with the target enzyme.

  17. Construction and analysis of the protein-protein interaction networks for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression are devastating mental diseases, each with distinctive yet overlapping epidemiologic characteristics. Microarray and proteomics data have revealed genes which expressed abnormally in patients. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and mutations are associated with one or more of the three diseases. Nevertheless, there are few studies on the interactions among the disease-associated genes and proteins. Results This study, for the first time, incorporated microarray and protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases to construct the PPI network of abnormally expressed genes in postmortem brain samples of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression patients. The samples were collected from Brodmann area (BA) 10 of the prefrontal cortex. Abnormally expressed disease genes were selected by t-tests comparing the disease and control samples. These genes were involved in housekeeping functions (e.g. translation, transcription, energy conversion, and metabolism), in brain specific functions (e.g. signal transduction, neuron cell differentiation, and cytoskeleton), or in stress responses (e.g. heat shocks and biotic stress). The diseases were interconnected through several “switchboard”-like nodes in the PPI network or shared abnormally expressed genes. A “core” functional module which consisted of a tightly knitted sub-network of clique-5 and -4s was also observed. These cliques were formed by 12 genes highly expressed in both disease and control samples. Conclusions Several previously unidentified disease marker genes and drug targets, such as SBNO2 (schizophrenia), SEC24C (bipolar disorder), and SRRT (major depression), were identified based on statistical and topological analyses of the PPI network. The shared or interconnecting marker genes may explain the shared symptoms of the studied diseases. Furthermore, the “switchboard” genes, such as APP, UBC, and YWHAZ, are proposed as

  18. CIDeR: multifactorial interaction networks in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The pathobiology of common diseases is influenced by heterogeneous factors interacting in complex networks. CIDeR http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/cider/ is a publicly available, manually curated, integrative database of metabolic and neurological disorders. The resource provides structured information on 18,813 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors extracted from the scientific literature. Systematic annotation and interactive graphical representation of disease networks make CIDeR a versatile knowledge base for biologists, analysis of large-scale data and systems biology approaches. PMID:22809392

  19. CIDeR: multifactorial interaction networks in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Martin; Höhn, Veit; Brauner, Barbara; Dunger, Irmtraud; Fobo, Gisela; Frishman, Goar; Montrone, Corinna; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Waegele, Brigitte; Ruepp, Andreas

    2012-07-18

    The pathobiology of common diseases is influenced by heterogeneous factors interacting in complex networks. CIDeR http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/cider/ is a publicly available, manually curated, integrative database of metabolic and neurological disorders. The resource provides structured information on 18,813 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors extracted from the scientific literature. Systematic annotation and interactive graphical representation of disease networks make CIDeR a versatile knowledge base for biologists, analysis of large-scale data and systems biology approaches.

  20. Algorithmic Modeling of Social Interactions Over Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-10

    unless so designated by other documentation. 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211... Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Social Networks, Algorithms, Social Organization, Information Dynamics, Final report REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11...I. Kramer, Cameron Marlow, Lorenzo Coviello, Massimo Franceschetti, Nicholas A. Christakis, James H. Fowler. Detecting Emotional Contagion in

  1. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kuchaiev, Oleksii; Rasajski, Marija; Higham, Desmond J; Przulj, Natasa

    2009-08-01

    Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H), tandem affinity purification (TAP) and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  2. RAIN: RNA–protein Association and Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Junge, Alexander; Refsgaard, Jan C.; Garde, Christian; Pan, Xiaoyong; Santos, Alberto; Alkan, Ferhat; Anthon, Christian; von Mering, Christian; Workman, Christopher T.; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gorodkin, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Protein association networks can be inferred from a range of resources including experimental data, literature mining and computational predictions. These types of evidence are emerging for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as well. However, integration of ncRNAs into protein association networks is challenging due to data heterogeneity. Here, we present a database of ncRNA–RNA and ncRNA–protein interactions and its integration with the STRING database of protein–protein interactions. These ncRNA associations cover four organisms and have been established from curated examples, experimental data, interaction predictions and automatic literature mining. RAIN uses an integrative scoring scheme to assign a confidence score to each interaction. We demonstrate that RAIN outperforms the underlying microRNA-target predictions in inferring ncRNA interactions. RAIN can be operated through an easily accessible web interface and all interaction data can be downloaded. Database URL: http://rth.dk/resources/rain PMID:28077569

  3. Modeling Human Dynamics of Face-to-Face Interaction Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starnini, Michele; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-04-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of interconversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents that perform a random walk in a two-dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  4. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system's model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems.

  5. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system’s model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems. PMID:28246630

  6. iGPCR-drug: a web server for predicting interaction between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the most frequent targets of therapeutic drugs. It is time-consuming and expensive to determine whether a drug and a GPCR are to interact with each other in a cellular network purely by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (dimensional) structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most GPCRs are still unknown. To overcome the situation, a sequence-based classifier, called "iGPCR-drug", was developed to predict the interactions between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking. In the predictor, the drug compound is formulated by a 2D (dimensional) fingerprint via a 256D vector, GPCR by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) generated with the grey model theory, and the prediction engine is operated by the fuzzy K-nearest neighbour algorithm. Moreover, a user-friendly web-server for iGPCR-drug was established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in this paper just for its integrity. The overall success rate achieved by iGPCR-drug via the jackknife test was 85.5%, which is remarkably higher than the rate by the existing peer method developed in 2010 although no web server was ever established for it. It is anticipated that iGPCR-Drug may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the approach presented here can also be extended to study other drug - target interaction networks.

  7. The Gastric H,K ATPase as a Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, George; Shin, Jai Moo; Vagin, Olga; Lambrecht, Nils; Yakubov, Iskandar; Munson, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The recent progress in therapy if acid disease has relied heavily on the performance of drugs targeted against the H,K ATPase of the stomach and the H2 receptor antagonists. It has become apparent in the last decade that the proton pump is the target that has the likelihood of being the most sustainable area of therapeutic application in the regulation of acid suppression. The process of activation of acid secretion requires a change in location of the ATPase from cytoplasmic tubules into the microvilli of the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell. Stimulation of the resting parietal cell, with involvement of F-actin and ezrin does not use significant numbers of SNARE proteins, because their message is depleted in the pure parietal cell transcriptome. The cell morphology and gene expression suggest a tubule fusion-eversion event. As the active H,K ATPase requires efflux of KCl for activity we have, using the transcriptome derived from 99% pure parietal cells and immunocytochemistry, provided evidence that the KCl pathway is mediated by a KCQ1/KCNE2 complex for supplying K+ and CLIC6 for supplying the accompanying Cl−. The pump has been modeled on the basis of the structures of different conformations of the sr Ca ATPase related to the catalytic cycle. These models use the effects of site directed mutations and identification of the binding domain of the K competitive acid pump antagonists or the defined site of binding for the covalent class of proton pump inhibitors. The pump undergoes conformational changes associated with phosphorylation to allow the ion binding site to change exposure from cytoplasmic to luminal exposure. We have been able to postulate that the very low gastric pH is achieved by lysine 791 motion extruding the hydronium ion bound to carboxylates in the middle of the membrane domain. These models also allow description of the K+ entry to form the K+ liganded form of the enzyme and the reformation of the ion site inward conformation thus

  8. The Evolutionary Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Inferred from the Reconstruction of Ancient Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rattei, Thomas; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular functions are based on the complex interplay of proteins, therefore the structure and dynamics of these protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are the key to the functional understanding of cells. In the last years, large-scale PPI networks of several model organisms were investigated. A number of theoretical models have been developed to explain both the network formation and the current structure. Favored are models based on duplication and divergence of genes, as they most closely represent the biological foundation of network evolution. However, studies are often based on simulated instead of empirical data or they cover only single organisms. Methodological improvements now allow the analysis of PPI networks of multiple organisms simultaneously as well as the direct modeling of ancestral networks. This provides the opportunity to challenge existing assumptions on network evolution. We utilized present-day PPI networks from integrated datasets of seven model organisms and developed a theoretical and bioinformatic framework for studying the evolutionary dynamics of PPI networks. A novel filtering approach using percolation analysis was developed to remove low confidence interactions based on topological constraints. We then reconstructed the ancient PPI networks of different ancestors, for which the ancestral proteomes, as well as the ancestral interactions, were inferred. Ancestral proteins were reconstructed using orthologous groups on different evolutionary levels. A stochastic approach, using the duplication-divergence model, was developed for estimating the probabilities of ancient interactions from today's PPI networks. The growth rates for nodes, edges, sizes and modularities of the networks indicate multiplicative growth and are consistent with the results from independent static analysis. Our results support the duplication-divergence model of evolution and indicate fractality and multiplicative growth as general properties of the PPI

  9. Microbial interaction networks in soil and in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetsigian, Kalin

    2012-02-01

    Soil harbors a huge number of microbial species interacting through secretion of antibiotics and other chemicals. What patterns of species interactions allow for this astonishing biodiversity to be sustained, and how do these interactions evolve? I used a combined experimental-theoretical approach to tackle these questions. Focusing on bacteria from the genus Steptomyces, known for their diverse secondary metabolism, I isolated 64 natural strains from several individual grains of soil and systematically measured all pairwise interactions among them. Quantitative measurements on such scale were enabled by a novel experimental platform based on robotic handling, a custom scanner array and automatic image analysis. This unique platform allowed the simultaneous capturing of ˜15,000 time-lapse movies of growing colonies of each isolate on media conditioned by each of the other isolates. The data revealed a rich network of strong negative (inhibitory) and positive (stimulating) interactions. Analysis of this network and the phylogeny of the isolates, together with mathematical modeling of microbial communities, revealed that: 1) The network of interactions has three special properties: ``balance'', ``bi- modality'' and ``reciprocity''; 2) The interaction network is fast evolving; 3) Mathematical modeling explains how rapid evolution can give rise to the three special properties through an interplay between ecology and evolution. These properties are not a result of stable co-existence, but rather of continuous evolutionary turnover of strains with different production and resistance capabilities.

  10. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  11. Exploring Function Prediction in Protein Interaction Networks via Clustering Methods

    PubMed Central

    Trivodaliev, Kire; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks have recently become the focus of research in many fields. Their structure reveals crucial information for the nodes, how they connect and share information. In our work we analyze protein interaction networks as complex networks for their functional modular structure and later use that information in the functional annotation of proteins within the network. We propose several graph representations for the protein interaction network, each having different level of complexity and inclusion of the annotation information within the graph. We aim to explore what the benefits and the drawbacks of these proposed graphs are, when they are used in the function prediction process via clustering methods. For making this cluster based prediction, we adopt well established approaches for cluster detection in complex networks using most recent representative algorithms that have been proven as efficient in the task at hand. The experiments are performed using a purified and reliable Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network, which is then used to generate the different graph representations. Each of the graph representations is later analysed in combination with each of the clustering algorithms, which have been possibly modified and implemented to fit the specific graph. We evaluate results in regards of biological validity and function prediction performance. Our results indicate that the novel ways of presenting the complex graph improve the prediction process, although the computational complexity should be taken into account when deciding on a particular approach. PMID:24972109

  12. Experimental evolution of protein–protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Kaçar, Betül; Gaucher, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The modern synthesis of evolutionary theory and genetics has enabled us to discover underlying molecular mechanisms of organismal evolution. We know that in order to maximize an organism's fitness in a particular environment, individual interactions among components of protein and nucleic acid networks need to be optimized by natural selection, or sometimes through random processes, as the organism responds to changes and/or challenges in the environment. Despite the significant role of molecular networks in determining an organism's adaptation to its environment, we still do not know how such inter- and intra-molecular interactions within networks change over time and contribute to an organism's evolvability while maintaining overall network functions. One way to address this challenge is to identify connections between molecular networks and their host organisms, to manipulate these connections, and then attempt to understand how such perturbations influence molecular dynamics of the network and thus influence evolutionary paths and organismal fitness. In the present review, we discuss how integrating evolutionary history with experimental systems that combine tools drawn from molecular evolution, synthetic biology and biochemistry allow us to identify the underlying mechanisms of organismal evolution, particularly from the perspective of protein interaction networks. PMID:23849056

  13. Evolution of protein-protein interaction networks in yeast.

    PubMed

    Schoenrock, Andrew; Burnside, Daniel; Moteshareie, Houman; Pitre, Sylvain; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Green, James R; Golshani, Ashkan; Dehne, Frank; Wong, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the evolution of protein-protein and genetic interaction networks has been rising in recent years, but the lack of large-scale high quality comparative datasets has acted as a barrier. Here, we carried out a comparative analysis of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks from five closely related yeast species. We used the Protein-protein Interaction Prediction Engine (PIPE), which uses a database of known interactions to make sequence-based PPI predictions, to generate high quality predicted interactomes. Simulated proteomes and corresponding PPI networks were used to provide null expectations for the extent and nature of PPI network evolution. We found strong evidence for conservation of PPIs, with lower than expected levels of change in PPIs for about a quarter of the proteome. Furthermore, we found that changes in predicted PPI networks are poorly predicted by sequence divergence. Our analyses identified a number of functional classes experiencing fewer PPI changes than expected, suggestive of purifying selection on PPIs. Our results demonstrate the added benefit of considering predicted PPI networks when studying the evolution of closely related organisms.

  14. Evolution of protein-protein interaction networks in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schoenrock, Andrew; Burnside, Daniel; Moteshareie, Houman; Pitre, Sylvain; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Green, James R.; Golshani, Ashkan; Dehne, Frank; Wong, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the evolution of protein-protein and genetic interaction networks has been rising in recent years, but the lack of large-scale high quality comparative datasets has acted as a barrier. Here, we carried out a comparative analysis of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks from five closely related yeast species. We used the Protein-protein Interaction Prediction Engine (PIPE), which uses a database of known interactions to make sequence-based PPI predictions, to generate high quality predicted interactomes. Simulated proteomes and corresponding PPI networks were used to provide null expectations for the extent and nature of PPI network evolution. We found strong evidence for conservation of PPIs, with lower than expected levels of change in PPIs for about a quarter of the proteome. Furthermore, we found that changes in predicted PPI networks are poorly predicted by sequence divergence. Our analyses identified a number of functional classes experiencing fewer PPI changes than expected, suggestive of purifying selection on PPIs. Our results demonstrate the added benefit of considering predicted PPI networks when studying the evolution of closely related organisms. PMID:28248977

  15. Branched Motifs Enable Long-Range Interactions in Signaling Networks through Retrograde Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Jesan, Tharmaraj; Sarma, Uddipan; Halder, Subhadra; Saha, Bhaskar; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2013-01-01

    Branched structures arise in the intra-cellular signaling network when a molecule is involved in multiple enzyme-substrate reaction cascades. Such branched motifs are involved in key biological processes, e.g., immune response activated by T-cell and B-cell receptors. In this paper, we demonstrate long-range communication through retrograde propagation between branches of signaling pathways whose molecules do not directly interact. Our numerical simulations and experiments on a system comprising branches with JNK and p38MAPK as terminal molecules respectively that share a common MAP3K enzyme MEKK3/4 show that perturbing an enzyme in one branch can result in a series of changes in the activity levels of molecules “upstream” to the enzyme that eventually reaches the branch-point and affects other branches. In the absence of any evidence for explicit feedback regulation between the functionally distinct JNK and p38MAPK pathways, the experimentally observed modulation of phosphorylation amplitudes in the two pathways when a terminal kinase is inhibited implies the existence of long-range coordination through retrograde information propagation previously demonstrated in single linear reaction pathways. An important aspect of retrograde propagation in branched pathways that is distinct from previous work on retroactivity focusing exclusively on single chains is that varying the type of perturbation, e.g., between pharmaceutical agent mediated inhibition of phosphorylation or suppression of protein expression, can result in opposing responses in the other branches. This can have potential significance in designing drugs targeting key molecules which regulate multiple pathways implicated in systems-level diseases such as cancer and diabetes. PMID:23741327

  16. Integrated inference and evaluation of host-fungi interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Remmele, Christian W; Luther, Christian H; Balkenhol, Johannes; Dandekar, Thomas; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus T

    2015-01-01

    Fungal microorganisms frequently lead to life-threatening infections. Within this group of pathogens, the commensal Candida albicans and the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus are by far the most important causes of invasive mycoses in Europe. A key capability for host invasion and immune response evasion are specific molecular interactions between the fungal pathogen and its human host. Experimentally validated knowledge about these crucial interactions is rare in literature and even specialized host-pathogen databases mainly focus on bacterial and viral interactions whereas information on fungi is still sparse. To establish large-scale host-fungi interaction networks on a systems biology scale, we develop an extended inference approach based on protein orthology and data on gene functions. Using human and yeast intraspecies networks as template, we derive a large network of pathogen-host interactions (PHI). Rigorous filtering and refinement steps based on cellular localization and pathogenicity information of predicted interactors yield a primary scaffold of fungi-human and fungi-mouse interaction networks. Specific enrichment of known pathogenicity-relevant genes indicates the biological relevance of the predicted PHI. A detailed inspection of functionally relevant subnetworks reveals novel host-fungal interaction candidates such as the Candida virulence factor PLB1 and the anti-fungal host protein APP. Our results demonstrate the applicability of interolog-based prediction methods for host-fungi interactions and underline the importance of filtering and refinement steps to attain biologically more relevant interactions. This integrated network framework can serve as a basis for future analyses of high-throughput host-fungi transcriptome and proteome data.

  17. Erosion of interaction networks in reduced and degraded genomes.

    PubMed

    Ochman, Howard; Liu, Renyi; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2007-01-15

    Unlike eukaryotes, which often recruit duplicated genes into existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, the low levels of gene duplication coupled with the high probability of lateral transfer of novel genes alters the manner in which PPI networks can evolve in bacteria. By inferring the PPIs present in the ancestor to contemporary Gammaproteobacteria, we were able to trace the changes in gene repertoires, and their consequences on PPI network evolution, in several bacterial lineages that have independently undergone reductions in genome size and genome contents. As genomes degrade, virtually all multi-partner proteins have lost interactors; however, the overall average number of connections increases due to the preferential elimination of proteins that interact with only one other protein partner. We also studied the effect of lateral gene transfer on PPI network evolution by analyzing the connectivity of genes that have been gained along the Escherichia coli lineage, as well as those acquired genes subsequently silenced in Shigella flexneri, since diverging from the gammaproteobacterial ancestor. The situation in PPI networks, in which newly acquired genes preferentially attach to the hubs of the network, contrasts that observed in metabolic networks, which evolve by the peripheral gain and loss of genes, and in regulatory networks, in which high connectivity increases the propensity of loss.

  18. Global Geometric Affinity for Revealing High Fidelity Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi; Benjamin, William; Sun, Mengtian; Ramani, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis presents an essential role in understanding the functional relationship among proteins in a living biological system. Despite the success of current approaches for understanding the PPI network, the large fraction of missing and spurious PPIs and a low coverage of complete PPI network are the sources of major concern. In this paper, based on the diffusion process, we propose a new concept of global geometric affinity and an accompanying computational scheme to filter the uncertain PPIs, namely, reduce the spurious PPIs and recover the missing PPIs in the network. The main concept defines a diffusion process in which all proteins simultaneously participate to define a similarity metric (global geometric affinity (GGA)) to robustly reflect the internal connectivity among proteins. The robustness of the GGA is attributed to propagating the local connectivity to a global representation of similarity among proteins in a diffusion process. The propagation process is extremely fast as only simple matrix products are required in this computation process and thus our method is geared toward applications in high-throughput PPI networks. Furthermore, we proposed two new approaches that determine the optimal geometric scale of the PPI network and the optimal threshold for assigning the PPI from the GGA matrix. Our approach is tested with three protein-protein interaction networks and performs well with significant random noises of deletions and insertions in true PPIs. Our approach has the potential to benefit biological experiments, to better characterize network data sets, and to drive new discoveries. PMID:21559288

  19. TCGA researchers identify potential drug targets, markers for leukemia risk

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a deadly cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Their wo

  20. TCGA Bladder Cancer Study Reveals Potential Drug Targets - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with the TCGA Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease.

  1. Networked Interactive Video for Group Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eary, John

    2008-01-01

    The National Computing Centre (NCC) has developed an interactive video training system for the Scottish Police College to help train police supervisory officers in crowd control at major spectator events, such as football matches. This approach involves technology-enhanced training in a group-learning environment, and may have significant impact…

  2. Networked Interactive Video for Group Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eary, John

    2008-01-01

    The National Computing Centre (NCC) has developed an interactive video training system for the Scottish Police College to help train police supervisory officers in crowd control at major spectator events, such as football matches. This approach involves technology-enhanced training in a group-learning environment, and may have significant impact…

  3. Chemotherapy and Drug Targeting in the Treatment of Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-29

    of the control of gene expression in both prokarotic and eukaryotic cells . Knowledge of the specific molecular features of DNA recognized by...structure. It consists of networks of thousands of interlocked DNA circles, and each cell has one network within its single niico.hondrion. Nothing is known...immunologically distinct. The presence of multiple DNA polymerases in eukaryotic cells is a well established fact. The use of specific inhibitors has

  4. Drug target prediction using adverse event report systems: a pharmacogenomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Takarabe, Masataka; Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Unexpected drug activities derived from off-targets are usually undesired and harmful; however, they can occasionally be beneficial for different therapeutic indications. There are many uncharacterized drugs whose target proteins (including the primary target and off-targets) remain unknown. The identification of all potential drug targets has become an important issue in drug repositioning to reuse known drugs for new therapeutic indications. Results: We defined pharmacological similarity for all possible drugs using the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse event reporting system (AERS) and developed a new method to predict unknown drug–target interactions on a large scale from the integration of pharmacological similarity of drugs and genomic sequence similarity of target proteins in the framework of a pharmacogenomic approach. The proposed method was applicable to a large number of drugs and it was useful especially for predicting unknown drug–target interactions that could not be expected from drug chemical structures. We made a comprehensive prediction for potential off-targets of 1874 drugs with known targets and potential target profiles of 2519 drugs without known targets, which suggests many potential drug–target interactions that were not predicted by previous chemogenomic or pharmacogenomic approaches. Availability: Softwares are available upon request. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp Supplementary Information: Datasets and all results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/aers/. PMID:22962489

  5. The Interaction of Intrinsic Dynamics and Network Topology in Determining Network Burst Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons’ positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities

  6. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce. We combined seed-based interregional correlation analysis with graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI data during the resting state and sentence production in healthy subjects to investigate the interface and topology of functional networks originating from the key brain regions controlling speech, i.e., the laryngeal/orofacial motor cortex, inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, supplementary motor area, cingulate cortex, putamen, and thalamus. During both resting and speaking, the interactions between these networks were bilaterally distributed and centered on the sensorimotor brain regions. However, speech production preferentially recruited the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and cerebellum into the large-scale network, suggesting the importance of these regions in facilitation of the transition from the resting state to speaking. Furthermore, the cerebellum (lobule VI) was the most prominent region showing functional influences on speech-network integration and segregation. Although networks were bilaterally distributed, interregional connectivity during speaking was stronger in the left vs. right hemisphere, which may have underlined a more homogeneous overlap between the examined networks in the left hemisphere. Among these, the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) established a core network that fully overlapped with all other speech-related networks, determining the extent of network interactions. Our data demonstrate complex interactions of large-scale brain networks controlling speech production and point to the critical role of the LMC, IPL, and cerebellum in the formation of speech production network.

  7. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production

    PubMed Central

    Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce. We combined seed-based interregional correlation analysis with graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI data during the resting state and sentence production in healthy subjects to investigate the interface and topology of functional networks originating from the key brain regions controlling speech, i.e., the laryngeal/orofacial motor cortex, inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, supplementary motor area, cingulate cortex, putamen, and thalamus. During both resting and speaking, the interactions between these networks were bilaterally distributed and centered on the sensorimotor brain regions. However, speech production preferentially recruited the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and cerebellum into the large-scale network, suggesting the importance of these regions in facilitation of the transition from the resting state to speaking. Furthermore, the cerebellum (lobule VI) was the most prominent region showing functional influences on speech-network integration and segregation. Although networks were bilaterally distributed, interregional connectivity during speaking was stronger in the left vs. right hemisphere, which may have underlined a more homogeneous overlap between the examined networks in the left hemisphere. Among these, the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) established a core network that fully overlapped with all other speech-related networks, determining the extent of network interactions. Our data demonstrate complex interactions of large-scale brain networks controlling speech production and point to the critical role of the LMC, IPL, and cerebellum in the formation of speech production network. PMID:25673742

  8. The interaction of intrinsic dynamics and network topology in determining network burst synchrony.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons' positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities.

  9. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  10. Interactive video-on-demand services on cable TV networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath-Kumar, Srihari; Rangan, P. Venkat

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the architectural suitability of Cable TV networks for supporting Interactive Video on Demand. We present the existing cable TV structure and comment on the expected future architecture towards which cable TV networks are rapidly evolving. Practical realization of Interactive Video on Demand is in jeopardy because of an unmanageable peak in the subscribers' viewship pattern. We propose that multimedia servers of suitable capacities be installed at strategic locations in the cable TV network and function as temporary caches for multimedia information delivered from metropolitan repositories. We develop techniques for information caching that take into account the network bandwidth and storage constraints, and transform unmanageable peaks in viewers' demand patter to manageable plateaus.

  11. Relating drug–protein interaction network with drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Pauwels, Edouard; Stoven, Véronique; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the emergence and underlying mechanisms of drug side effects is a challenging task in the drug development process. This underscores the importance of system–wide approaches for linking different scales of drug actions; namely drug-protein interactions (molecular scale) and side effects (phenotypic scale) toward side effect prediction for uncharacterized drugs. Results: We performed a large-scale analysis to extract correlated sets of targeted proteins and side effects, based on the co-occurrence of drugs in protein-binding profiles and side effect profiles, using sparse canonical correlation analysis. The analysis of 658 drugs with the two profiles for 1368 proteins and 1339 side effects led to the extraction of 80 correlated sets. Enrichment analyses using KEGG and Gene Ontology showed that most of the correlated sets were significantly enriched with proteins that are involved in the same biological pathways, even if their molecular functions are different. This allowed for a biologically relevant interpretation regarding the relationship between drug–targeted proteins and side effects. The extracted side effects can be regarded as possible phenotypic outcomes by drugs targeting the proteins that appear in the same correlated set. The proposed method is expected to be useful for predicting potential side effects of new drug candidate compounds based on their protein-binding profiles. Supplementary information: Datasets and all results are available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/smizutan/target-effect/. Availability: Software is available at the above supplementary website. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp, or goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22962476

  12. Integrating protein-protein interaction networks with phenotypes reveals signs of interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zirin, Jonathan; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Yilmazel, Bahar; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A major objective of systems biology is to organize molecular interactions as networks and to characterize information-flow within networks. We describe a computational framework to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and genetic screens to predict the “signs” of interactions (i.e. activation/inhibition relationships). We constructed a Drosophila melanogaster signed PPI network, consisting of 6,125 signed PPIs connecting 3,352 proteins that can be used to identify positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways and protein complexes. We identified an unexpected role for the metabolic enzymes Enolase and Aldo-keto reductase as positive and negative regulators of proteolysis, respectively. Characterization of the activation/inhibition relationships between physically interacting proteins within signaling pathways will impact our understanding of many biological functions, including signal transduction and mechanisms of disease. PMID:24240319

  13. Probing the Extent of Randomness in Protein Interaction Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-11

    elegans [16], Plasmodium falciparum [17], Campylobacter jejuni [18], and Homo sapiens [7]. A number of efforts to compile and, in some cases, curate the...Weighted Connectivity in Two PPI Networks. (A) Helicobacter pylori and (B) Campylobacter jejuni . For k1k2.10, probabilities of interaction P(k1,k2) were...Four PPI Networks and their DCDW Equivalents. (A) Drosophila melanogaster, (B) Campylobacter jejuni , (C) Escherichia coli (HT2), and (D) Escherichia

  14. Prediction and Annotation of Plant Protein Interaction Networks

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Wang, Jun; Yu, Jun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Samudrala, Ram

    2009-02-01

    Large-scale experimental studies of interactions between components of biological systems have been performed for a variety of eukaryotic organisms. However, there is a dearth of such data for plants. Computational methods for prediction of relationships between proteins, primarily based on comparative genomics, provide a useful systems-level view of cellular functioning and can be used to extend information about other eukaryotes to plants. We have predicted networks for Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa indica and japonica and several plant pathogens using the Bioverse (http://bioverse.compbio.washington.edu) and show that they are similar to experimentally-derived interaction networks. Predicted interaction networks for plants can be used to provide novel functional annotations and predictions about plant phenotypes and aid in rational engineering of biosynthesis pathways.

  15. FACETS: multi-faceted functional decomposition of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Boon-Siew; Bhowmick, Sourav S.; Forbes Dewey, C.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The availability of large-scale curated protein interaction datasets has given rise to the opportunity to investigate higher level organization and modularity within the protein–protein interaction (PPI) network using graph theoretic analysis. Despite the recent progress, systems level analysis of high-throughput PPIs remains a daunting task because of the amount of data they present. In this article, we propose a novel PPI network decomposition algorithm called FACETS in order to make sense of the deluge of interaction data using Gene Ontology (GO) annotations. FACETS finds not just a single functional decomposition of the PPI network, but a multi-faceted atlas of functional decompositions that portray alternative perspectives of the functional landscape of the underlying PPI network. Each facet in the atlas represents a distinct interpretation of how the network can be functionally decomposed and organized. Our algorithm maximizes interpretative value of the atlas by optimizing inter-facet orthogonality and intra-facet cluster modularity. Results: We tested our algorithm on the global networks from IntAct, and compared it with gold standard datasets from MIPS and KEGG. We demonstrated the performance of FACETS. We also performed a case study that illustrates the utility of our approach. Contact: seah0097@ntu.edu.sg or assourav@ntu.edu.sg Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at the Bioinformatics online. Availability: Our software is available freely for non-commercial purposes from: http://www.cais.ntu.edu.sg/∼assourav/Facets/ PMID:22908217

  16. FACETS: multi-faceted functional decomposition of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Seah, Boon-Siew; Bhowmick, Sourav S; Dewey, C Forbes

    2012-10-15

    The availability of large-scale curated protein interaction datasets has given rise to the opportunity to investigate higher level organization and modularity within the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network using graph theoretic analysis. Despite the recent progress, systems level analysis of high-throughput PPIs remains a daunting task because of the amount of data they present. In this article, we propose a novel PPI network decomposition algorithm called FACETS in order to make sense of the deluge of interaction data using Gene Ontology (GO) annotations. FACETS finds not just a single functional decomposition of the PPI network, but a multi-faceted atlas of functional decompositions that portray alternative perspectives of the functional landscape of the underlying PPI network. Each facet in the atlas represents a distinct interpretation of how the network can be functionally decomposed and organized. Our algorithm maximizes interpretative value of the atlas by optimizing inter-facet orthogonality and intra-facet cluster modularity. We tested our algorithm on the global networks from IntAct, and compared it with gold standard datasets from MIPS and KEGG. We demonstrated the performance of FACETS. We also performed a case study that illustrates the utility of our approach. Supplementary data are available at the Bioinformatics online. Our software is available freely for non-commercial purposes from: http://www.cais.ntu.edu.sg/~assourav/Facets/

  17. Protein complexes predictions within protein interaction networks using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Emad; Naef, Ahmed; Ahmed, Moataz

    2016-07-25

    Protein-protein interaction networks are receiving increased attention due to their importance in understanding life at the cellular level. A major challenge in systems biology is to understand the modular structure of such biological networks. Although clustering techniques have been proposed for clustering protein-protein interaction networks, those techniques suffer from some drawbacks. The application of earlier clustering techniques to protein-protein interaction networks in order to predict protein complexes within the networks does not yield good results due to the small-world and power-law properties of these networks. In this paper, we construct a new clustering algorithm for predicting protein complexes through the use of genetic algorithms. We design an objective function for exclusive clustering and overlapping clustering. We assess the quality of our proposed clustering algorithm using two gold-standard data sets. Our algorithm can identify protein complexes that are significantly enriched in the gold-standard data sets. Furthermore, our method surpasses three competing methods: MCL, ClusterOne, and MCODE in terms of the quality of the predicted complexes. The source code and accompanying examples are freely available at http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/ics/eramadan/GACluster.zip .

  18. Alignment of protein interaction networks by integer quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenping; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2006-01-01

    With more and more data on protein-protein interaction (PPI) network available, the discovery of conserved patterns in these networks becomes an increasingly important problem. In this paper, to find the conserved substructures, we develop an efficient algorithm for aligning PPI networks based on both the protein sequence similarity and the network architecture similarity, by using integer quadratic programming (IQP). Such an IQP can be relaxed into the corresponding quadratic programming (QP) which in the case of biological data sets almost always ensures the integer solution. Therefore, a QP algorithm can be adopted to efficiently solve this IQP with out any approximation, thereby making PPI network alignment tractable. From the viewpoint of graph theory, the proposed method can identify similar subsets between two graphs, which allow gaps for nodes and edges.

  19. Evaluating Australian football league player contributions using interactive network simulation.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line ". Key pointsA simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposedThe simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a sideEigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the teamThe team centrality measure adequately predicted the team's winning marginA player's net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in

  20. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  1. Information and entropy in neural networks and interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafee, Fariel

    In this dissertation we present a study of certain characteristics of interacting systems that are related to information. The first is periodicity, correlation and other information-related properties of neural networks of integrate-and-fire type. We also form quasiclassical and quantum generalizations of such networks and identify the similarities and differences with the classical prototype. We indicate why entropy may be an important concept for a neural network and why a generalization of the definition of entropy may be required. Like neural networks, large ensembles of similar units that interact also need a generalization of classical information-theoretic concepts. We extend the concept of Shannon entropy in a novel way, which may be relevant when we have such interacting systems, and show how it differs from Shannon entropy and other generalizations, such as Tsallis entropy. We indicate how classical stochasticity may arise in interactions with an entangled environment in a quantum system in terms of Shannon's and generalized entropies and identify the differences. Such differences are also indicated in the use of certain prior probability distributions to fit data as per Bayesian rules. We also suggest possible quantum versions of pattern recognition, which is the principal goal of information processing in most neural networks.

  2. Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2012-10-07

    We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more naturally than previously used summary statistics such as the degree distribution. Furthermore, we include the effects of sampling into the analysis, to properly correct for the incompleteness of existing datasets, and have analysed the performance of our method under various degrees of sampling. We consider a number of models focusing not only on the biologically relevant class of duplication models, but also including models of scale-free network growth that have previously been claimed to describe such data. We find a preference for a duplication-divergence with linear preferential attachment model in the majority of the interaction datasets considered. We also illustrate how our method can be used to perform multi-model inference of network parameters to estimate properties of the full network from sampled data.

  3. Interactive, multiscale navigation of large and complicated biological networks.

    PubMed

    Praneenararat, Thanet; Takagi, Toshihisa; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2011-04-15

    Many types of omics data are compiled as lists of connections between elements and visualized as networks or graphs where the nodes and edges correspond to the elements and the connections, respectively. However, these networks often appear as 'hair-balls'-with a large number of extremely tangled edges-and cannot be visually interpreted. We present an interactive, multiscale navigation method for biological networks. Our approach can automatically and rapidly abstract any portion of a large network of interest to an immediately interpretable extent. The method is based on an ultrafast graph clustering technique that abstracts networks of about 100 000 nodes in a second by iteratively grouping densely connected portions and a biological-property-based clustering technique that takes advantage of biological information often provided for biological entities (e.g. Gene Ontology terms). It was confirmed to be effective by applying it to real yeast protein network data, and would greatly help modern biologists faced with large, complicated networks in a similar manner to how Web mapping services enable interactive multiscale navigation of geographical maps (e.g. Google Maps). Java implementation of our method, named NaviCluster, is available at http://navicluster.cb.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/. thanet@cb.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Interaction network analysis revealed biomarkers in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhuo-Ran; Fu, Pei-De; Su, Zhen-Dong; Qi, Li-Chun; Li, Xue-Qi; Dong, Yu-Mei

    2014-08-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a serious heart disease. The cardiac cells of patients with MI will die due to lack of blood for a long time. In this study, we aimed to find new targets for MI diagnosis and therapy. We downloaded GSE22229 including 12 blood samples from healthy persons and GSE29111 from Gene Expression Omnibus including 36 blood samples from MI patients. Then we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in patients with MI compared to normal controls with p value < 0.05 and |logFC| > 1. Furthermore, interaction network and sub-network of these of these DEGs were constructed by NetBox. Linker genes were screened in the Global Network database. The degree of linker genes were calculated by igraph package in R language. Gene ontology and kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes pathway analysis were performed for DEGs and network modules. A total of 246 DEGs were identified in MI, which were enriched in the immune response. In the interaction network, LCK, CD247, CD3D, FYN, HLA-DRA, IL2, CD8A CD3E, CD4, CD3G had high degree, among which CD3E, CD4, CD3G were DEGs while others were linker genes screened from Global Network database. Genes in the sub-network were also enriched in the immune response pathway. The genes with high degree may be biomarkers for MI diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Building disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps from molecular interaction networks and PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jake Yue

    2009-07-01

    The recently proposed concept of molecular connectivity maps enables researchers to integrate experimental measurements of genes, proteins, metabolites, and drug compounds under similar biological conditions. The study of these maps provides opportunities for future toxicogenomics and drug discovery applications. We developed a computational framework to build disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps. We integrated gene/protein and drug connectivity information based on protein interaction networks and literature mining, without requiring gene expression profile information derived from drug perturbation experiments on disease samples. We described the development and application of this computational framework using Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a primary example in three steps. First, molecular interaction networks were incorporated to reduce bias and improve relevance of AD seed proteins. Second, PubMed abstracts were used to retrieve enriched drug terms that are indirectly associated with AD through molecular mechanistic studies. Third and lastly, a comprehensive AD connectivity map was created by relating enriched drugs and related proteins in literature. We showed that this molecular connectivity map development approach outperformed both curated drug target databases and conventional information retrieval systems. Our initial explorations of the AD connectivity map yielded a new hypothesis that diltiazem and quinidine may be investigated as candidate drugs for AD treatment. Molecular connectivity maps derived computationally can help study molecular signature differences between different classes of drugs in specific disease contexts. To achieve overall good data coverage and quality, a series of statistical methods have been developed to overcome high levels of data noise in biological networks and literature mining results. Further development of computational molecular connectivity maps to cover major disease areas will likely set up a new model for

  6. Point Process Modeling for Directed Interaction Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911NF-11-1-0036 611103 Form... works literature; see, e.g., McPherson et al. (2001); Butts (2008); Aral et al. (2009); Snijders et al. (2010), and references contained therein...the individual using a hidden Markov model, and of Heard et al. (2010), who work at the level of the dyad, assum- ing a piecewise-constant interaction

  7. Exploring the interactions of the RAS family in the human protein network and their potential implications in RAS-directed therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Anibal; Morilla, Ian; Diez, Diego; Moya-Garcia, Aurelio A.; Lozano, José; Ranea, Juan A.G.

    2016-01-01

    RAS proteins are the founding members of the RAS superfamily of GTPases. They are involved in key signaling pathways regulating essential cellular functions such as cell growth and differentiation. As a result, their deregulation by inactivating mutations often results in aberrant cell proliferation and cancer. With the exception of the relatively well-known KRAS, HRAS and NRAS proteins, little is known about how the interactions of the other RAS human paralogs affect cancer evolution and response to treatment. In this study we performed a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between the phylogeny of RAS proteins and their location in the protein interaction network. This analysis was integrated with the structural analysis of conserved positions in available 3D structures of RAS complexes. Our results show that many RAS proteins with divergent sequences are found close together in the human interactome. We found specific conserved amino acid positions in this group that map to the binding sites of RAS with many of their signaling effectors, suggesting that these pairs could share interacting partners. These results underscore the potential relevance of cross-talking in the RAS signaling network, which should be taken into account when considering the inhibitory activity of drugs targeting specific RAS oncoproteins. This study broadens our understanding of the human RAS signaling network and stresses the importance of considering its potential cross-talk in future therapies. PMID:27713118

  8. Interface-Resolved Network of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret E.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    We define an interface-interaction network (IIN) to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI). This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked in the coarser

  9. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-01

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers. PMID:27880943

  10. Integrated multimedia information system on interactive CATV network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Meng-Huang; Chang, Shin-Hung

    1998-10-01

    In the current CATV system architectures, they provide one- way delivery of a common menu of entertainment to all the homes through the cable network. Through the technologies evolution, the interactive services (or two-way services) can be provided in the cable TV systems. They can supply customers with individualized programming and support real- time two-way communications. With a view to the service type changed from the one-way delivery systems to the two-way interactive systems, `on demand services' is a distinct feature of multimedia systems. In this paper, we present our work of building up an integrated multimedia system on interactive CATV network in Shih Chien University. Besides providing the traditional analog TV programming from the cable operator, we filter some channels to reserve them as our campus information channels. In addition to the analog broadcasting channel, the system also provides the interactive digital multimedia services, e.g. Video-On- Demand (VOD), Virtual Reality, BBS, World-Wide-Web, and Internet Radio Station. These two kinds of services are integrated in a CATV network by the separation of frequency allocation for the analog broadcasting service and the digital interactive services. Our ongoing work is to port our previous work of building up a VOD system conformed to DAVIC standard (for inter-operability concern) on Ethernet network into the current system.

  11. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-03

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers.

  12. EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to Combat Pain and Addiction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0220 Project Title: EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to Combat Pain and Addiction Principal Investigator Name: Mark...REPORT DATE September 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1Sep2015 - 31Aug2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to Combat...Pain and Addiction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EphB1 as a Novel Drug Target to Combat Pain and Addiction 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0220 5c. PROGRAM

  13. Hazard interactions and interaction networks (cascades) within multi-hazard methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Joel C.; Malamud, Bruce D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper combines research and commentary to reinforce the importance of integrating hazard interactions and interaction networks (cascades) into multi-hazard methodologies. We present a synthesis of the differences between multi-layer single-hazard approaches and multi-hazard approaches that integrate such interactions. This synthesis suggests that ignoring interactions between important environmental and anthropogenic processes could distort management priorities, increase vulnerability to other spatially relevant hazards or underestimate disaster risk. In this paper we proceed to present an enhanced multi-hazard framework through the following steps: (i) description and definition of three groups (natural hazards, anthropogenic processes and technological hazards/disasters) as relevant components of a multi-hazard environment, (ii) outlining of three types of interaction relationship (triggering, increased probability, and catalysis/impedance), and (iii) assessment of the importance of networks of interactions (cascades) through case study examples (based on the literature, field observations and semi-structured interviews). We further propose two visualisation frameworks to represent these networks of interactions: hazard interaction matrices and hazard/process flow diagrams. Our approach reinforces the importance of integrating interactions between different aspects of the Earth system, together with human activity, into enhanced multi-hazard methodologies. Multi-hazard approaches support the holistic assessment of hazard potential and consequently disaster risk. We conclude by describing three ways by which understanding networks of interactions contributes to the theoretical and practical understanding of hazards, disaster risk reduction and Earth system management. Understanding interactions and interaction networks helps us to better (i) model the observed reality of disaster events, (ii) constrain potential changes in physical and social vulnerability

  14. Ecological Networks: Structure, Interaction Strength, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Sinha, Somdatta

    The fundamental building blocks of any ecosystem, the food webs, which are assemblages of species through various interconnections, provide a central concept in ecology. The study of a food web allows abstractions of the complexity and interconnectedness of natural communities that transcend the specific details of the underlying systems. For example, Fig. 1 shows a typical food web, where the species are connected through their feeding relationships. The top predator, Heliaster (starfish) feeds on many gastropods like Hexaplex, Morula, Cantharus, etc., some of whom predate on each other [129]. Interactions between species in a food web can be of many types, such as predation, competition, mutualism, commensalism, and ammensalism (see Section 1.1, Fig. 2).

  15. Multiplicative interaction in network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Piepho, Hans-Peter; Madden, Laurence V; Williams, Emlyn R

    2015-02-20

    Meta-analysis of a set of clinical trials is usually conducted using a linear predictor with additive effects representing treatments and trials. Additivity is a strong assumption. In this paper, we consider models for two or more treatments that involve multiplicative terms for interaction between treatment and trial. Multiplicative models provide information on the sensitivity of each treatment effect relative to the trial effect. In developing these models, we make use of a two-way analysis-of-variance approach to meta-analysis and consider fixed or random trial effects. It is shown using two examples that models with multiplicative terms may fit better than purely additive models and provide insight into the nature of the trial effect. We also show how to model inconsistency using multiplicative terms. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Evolutionary interaction networks of insect pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Jacobus J; Jensen, Annette B; Meyling, Nicolai V; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Lineages of insect pathogenic fungi are concentrated in three major clades: Hypocreales (several genera), Entomophthoromycota (orders Entomophthorales and Neozygitales), and Onygenales (genus Ascosphaera). Our review focuses on aspects of the evolutionary biology of these fungi that have remained underemphasized in previous reviews. To ensure integration with the better-known domains of insect pathology research, we followed a conceptual framework formulated by Tinbergen, asking complementary questions on mechanism, ontogeny, phylogeny, and adaptation. We aim to provide an introduction to the merits of evolutionary approaches for readers with a background in invertebrate pathology research and to make the insect pathogenic fungi more accessible as model systems for evolutionary biologists. We identify a number of questions in which fundamental research can offer novel insights into the evolutionary forces that have shaped host specialization and life-history traits such as spore number and size, somatic growth rate, toxin production, and interactions with host immune systems.

  17. A Perspective on Monoamine Oxidase Enzyme as Drug Target: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhupinder; Gupta, Vivek Prakash; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme is responsible for the deamination of monoamine neurotransmitters and regulates their concentration in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Imbalance in the concentration of neurotransmitters in the brain and central nervous system is linked with the biochemical pathology of various neurogenic disorders. Irreversible MAO inhibitors were the first line drugs developed for the management of severe depression but most of these were withdrawn from the clinical practice due to their fatal side effects including food-drug interactions. New generations of MAO inhibitors were developed which were reversible and selective for one of the enzyme isoform and showed improved pharmacological profile. The discovery of crystal structure of MAO-A & MAO-B isoforms helped in understanding the drug-receptor interactions at the molecular level and designing of ligands with selectivity for either of the isoforms. The current article provides an overview on the MAO enzyme as potential drug target for different disease states. The article describes catalytic mechanism of MAO enzyme, crystal structures of the two MAO isoforms, traditional MAO inhibitors and various problems associated with their use, new developments in the MAO inhibitors and their potential as therapeutic agents especially in neurological disorders.

  18. GINI: From ISH Images to Gene Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Puniyani, Kriti; Xing, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization)-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node) in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, where GINI makes novel and

  19. Changes in gene expression variability reveal a stable synthetic lethal interaction network in BRCA2- ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Raymund; Mar, Jessica C

    2017-07-25

    Synthetic lethal interactions (SLIs) are robust mechanisms that provide cells with the ability to remain viable despite having mutations in genes critical to the DNA damage response, a core cellular process. Studies in model organisms such as S. cerevisiae showed that thousands of genes important in maintaining DNA integrity cooperated in a SLI network. Two genes participate in a SLI when a mutation in one gene has no effect on the cell, but mutations in both interacting genes are lethal. Furthermore in C. elegans, a mutation in a critical gene that is important for development induced a change in expression variability in the synthetic lethal interactor. In cancer, targeting SLIs shows promise in selectively killing cancer cells. For example, targeting PARP1 is an effective treatment for BRCA1/2- breast and ovarian cancers. Although PARP1 is already identified as having a SLI with BRCA1/2-, computationally searching for other genes that cooperate in the SLI network could highlight genes that may have promise for being a cancer-specific drug target. Using RNA sequencing data for ovarian cancer patients with BRCA2 mutations and the R Bioconductor package pathVar, we showed that genes whose expression changes to an invariant, stable expression state are likely candidates for SLIs with BRCA2. Our results highlight the interactions between the genes with predicted SLIs and protein-coding genes that are functionally important in the DNA damage response. The method of analyzing expression variability to computationally identify genes with SLIs can be applied to query SLIs in other tumor types. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In silico exploration of novel phytoligands against probable drug target of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Prakash, Nisha; Bharadwaj, Navya

    2012-12-01

    Though tetanus is an old disease with well known medicines, its complications are still a serious issue worldwide. Tetanus is mainly due to a powerful neurotoxin, tetanolysin-O, produced by a Gram positive anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium tetani. The toxin has a thiol-activated cytolysin which causes lysis of human platelets, lysosomes and a variety of subcellular membranes. The existing therapy seems to have challenged as available vaccines are not so effective and the bacteria developed resistance to many drugs. Computer aided approach is a novel platform to screen drug targets and design potential inhibitors. The three dimensional structure of the toxin is essential for structure based drug design. But the structure of tetanolysin-O is not available in its native form. Moreover, the interaction and pharmacological activities of current drugs against tetanolysin-O is not clear. Hence, there is need for three dimensional model of the toxin. The model was generated by homology modeling using crystal structure of perfringolysin-O, chain-A (PDB ID: 1PFO) as the template. The modeled structure has 22.7% α helices, 27.51% β sheets and 41.75% random coils. A thiol-activated cytolysin was predicted in the region of 105 to 1579, which acts as a functional domain of the toxin. The hypothetical model showed the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) value of 0.6 Å and the model was validated by ProCheck. The Ramachandran plot of the model accounts for 92.3% residues in the most allowed region. The model was further refined by various tools and deposited to Protein Model Database (PMDB ID: PM0077550). The model was used as the drug target and the interaction of various lead molecules with protein was studied by molecular docking. We have selected phytoligands based on literatures and pharmacophoric studies. The efficiency of herbal compounds and chemical leads was compared. Our study concluded that herbal derivatives such as berberine (7, 8, 13, 13a-tetradehydro-9

  1. Stabilization of perturbed Boolean network attractors through compensatory interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding and ameliorating the effects of network damage are of significant interest, due in part to the variety of applications in which network damage is relevant. For example, the effects of genetic mutations can cascade through within-cell signaling and regulatory networks and alter the behavior of cells, possibly leading to a wide variety of diseases. The typical approach to mitigating network perturbations is to consider the compensatory activation or deactivation of system components. Here, we propose a complementary approach wherein interactions are instead modified to alter key regulatory functions and prevent the network damage from triggering a deregulatory cascade. Results We implement this approach in a Boolean dynamic framework, which has been shown to effectively model the behavior of biological regulatory and signaling networks. We show that the method can stabilize any single state (e.g., fixed point attractors or time-averaged representations of multi-state attractors) to be an attractor of the repaired network. We show that the approach is minimalistic in that few modifications are required to provide stability to a chosen attractor and specific in that interventions do not have undesired effects on the attractor. We apply the approach to random Boolean networks, and further show that the method can in some cases successfully repair synchronous limit cycles. We also apply the methodology to case studies from drought-induced signaling in plants and T-LGL leukemia and find that it is successful in both stabilizing desired behavior and in eliminating undesired outcomes. Code is made freely available through the software package BooleanNet. Conclusions The methodology introduced in this report offers a complementary way to manipulating node expression levels. A comprehensive approach to evaluating network manipulation should take an "all of the above" perspective; we anticipate that theoretical studies of interaction modification

  2. Mining the modular structure of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, Ariel José; Piñero, Janet; Furlong, Laura Inés; Chernomoretz, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Cluster-based descriptions of biological networks have received much attention in recent years fostered by accumulated evidence of the existence of meaningful correlations between topological network clusters and biological functional modules. Several well-performing clustering algorithms exist to infer topological network partitions. However, due to respective technical idiosyncrasies they might produce dissimilar modular decompositions of a given network. In this contribution, we aimed to analyze how alternative modular descriptions could condition the outcome of follow-up network biology analysis. We considered a human protein interaction network and two paradigmatic cluster recognition algorithms, namely: the Clauset-Newman-Moore and the infomap procedures. We analyzed to what extent both methodologies yielded different results in terms of granularity and biological congruency. In addition, taking into account Guimera's cartographic role characterization of network nodes, we explored how the adoption of a given clustering methodology impinged on the ability to highlight relevant network meso-scale connectivity patterns. As a case study we considered a set of aging related proteins and showed that only the high-resolution modular description provided by infomap, could unveil statistically significant associations between them and inter/intra modular cartographic features. Besides reporting novel biological insights that could be gained from the discovered associations, our contribution warns against possible technical concerns that might affect the tools used to mine for interaction patterns in network biology studies. In particular our results suggested that sub-optimal partitions from the strict point of view of their modularity levels might still be worth being analyzed when meso-scale features were to be explored in connection with external source of biological knowledge.

  3. Mining the Modular Structure of Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, Laura Inés; Chernomoretz, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Cluster-based descriptions of biological networks have received much attention in recent years fostered by accumulated evidence of the existence of meaningful correlations between topological network clusters and biological functional modules. Several well-performing clustering algorithms exist to infer topological network partitions. However, due to respective technical idiosyncrasies they might produce dissimilar modular decompositions of a given network. In this contribution, we aimed to analyze how alternative modular descriptions could condition the outcome of follow-up network biology analysis. Methodology We considered a human protein interaction network and two paradigmatic cluster recognition algorithms, namely: the Clauset-Newman-Moore and the infomap procedures. We analyzed to what extent both methodologies yielded different results in terms of granularity and biological congruency. In addition, taking into account Guimera’s cartographic role characterization of network nodes, we explored how the adoption of a given clustering methodology impinged on the ability to highlight relevant network meso-scale connectivity patterns. Results As a case study we considered a set of aging related proteins and showed that only the high-resolution modular description provided by infomap, could unveil statistically significant associations between them and inter/intra modular cartographic features. Besides reporting novel biological insights that could be gained from the discovered associations, our contribution warns against possible technical concerns that might affect the tools used to mine for interaction patterns in network biology studies. In particular our results suggested that sub-optimal partitions from the strict point of view of their modularity levels might still be worth being analyzed when meso-scale features were to be explored in connection with external source of biological knowledge. PMID:25856434

  4. Interlog protein network: an evolutionary benchmark of protein interaction networks for the evaluation of clustering algorithms.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohieddin; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2015-10-05

    In the field of network science, exploring principal and crucial modules or communities is critical in the deduction of relationships and organization of complex networks. This approach expands an arena, and thus allows further study of biological functions in the field of network biology. As the clustering algorithms that are currently employed in finding modules have innate uncertainties, external and internal validations are necessary. Sequence and network structure alignment, has been used to define the Interlog Protein Network (IPN). This network is an evolutionarily conserved network with communal nodes and less false-positive links. In the current study, the IPN is employed as an evolution-based benchmark in the validation of the module finding methods. The clustering results of five algorithms; Markov Clustering (MCL), Restricted Neighborhood Search Clustering (RNSC), Cartographic Representation (CR), Laplacian Dynamics (LD) and Genetic Algorithm; to find communities in Protein-Protein Interaction networks (GAPPI) are assessed by IPN in four distinct Protein-Protein Interaction Networks (PPINs). The MCL shows a more accurate algorithm based on this evolutionary benchmarking approach. Also, the biological relevance of proteins in the IPN modules generated by MCL is compatible with biological standard databases such as Gene Ontology, KEGG and Reactome. In this study, the IPN shows its potential for validation of clustering algorithms due to its biological logic and straightforward implementation.

  5. Antagonistic interaction networks among bacteria from a cold soil environment.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathish; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2011-11-01

    Microbial antagonism in an Arctic soil habitat was demonstrated by assessing the inhibitory interactions between bacterial isolates from the same location. Of 139 isolates obtained from five soil samples, 20 antagonists belonging to the genera, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium were identified. Inter-genus, inter-species and inter-strain antagonism was observed between the interacting members. The extent of antagonism was temperature dependent. In some cases, antagonism was enhanced at 4 °C but suppressed at 18 °C while in some the reverse phenomenon was observed. To interpret antagonism from an ecological perspective, the interacting members were delineated according to their positional roles in a theoretical antagonistic network. When only one antimicrobial producer (P) was present, all the other members permitted grouping into either sensitive (S) or resistant (R). Composite interactive types such as PSR, PS, PR or SR could be designated only when at least two producers were present. Mapping of all possible antagonistic interaction networks based on the individual positional roles of the interactive types illustrates the existence of complex and interconnected networks among microbial communities.

  6. Hazard Interactions and Interaction Networks (Cascades) within Multi-Hazard Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Joel; Malamud, Bruce D.

    2016-04-01

    Here we combine research and commentary to reinforce the importance of integrating hazard interactions and interaction networks (cascades) into multi-hazard methodologies. We present a synthesis of the differences between 'multi-layer single hazard' approaches and 'multi-haza