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Sample records for drugs aspirin nimesulide

  1. Nimesulide in the treatment of patients intolerant of aspirin and other NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Senna, G E; Passalacqua, G; Andri, G; Dama, A R; Albano, M; Fregonese, L; Andri, L

    1996-02-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and other NSAIDs are responsible for many adverse effects. Among them, pseudo-allergic reactions (urticaria/angioedema, asthma, anaphylaxis) affect up to 9% of the population and up to 30% of asthmatic patients. The mechanisms provoking these reactions have not been fully elucidated, but it appears that inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) plays a central role. The anti-inflammatory action of nimesulide differs from that of other NSAIDs, possibly because of its chemical structure. In particular, nimesulide is selective for COX-2 and displays additional properties in terms of its effects on inflammatory mediator synthesis and release. For these reasons, nimesulide is generally well tolerated by NSAID-intolerant patients and patients with NSAID-induced asthma. The good tolerability of nimesulide as an alternative drug for use in patients with NSAID intolerance has been demonstrated in a large number of clinical studies.

  2. Liposomal Aloe vera trans-emulgel drug delivery of naproxen and nimesulide: A study

    PubMed Central

    Venkataharsha, Panuganti; Maheshwara, Ellutla; Raju, Y Prasanna; Reddy, Vayalpati Ashok; Rayadu, Bandugalla Sanjeev; Karisetty, Basappa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present aim of this study was to formulate naproxen and nimesulide liposomal formulation for incorporation in Aloe vera transemulgel and to carry out in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the formulation. Material and Methods: A. vera gel was prepared and used as a gel base for formulation. Carbopol 934 is used as a gelling agent and Methyl paraben was used as a preservative for the formulation of the gel. Liposomes was formulated by using hydration method. The formulated naproxen and nimesulide liposomal formulation using A. vera trans-emul gel were evaluated for in vitro studies such as drug release, permeation study, and drug content and entrapment efficiency. Paw edema method in Wistar rats induced by carrageenan is used to study in vivo anti-inflammatory action. Result: From the in vitro studies such permeability drug release naproxen 65% (69.6), Nimesulide 65% (61.1), and commercial Nimsulide gel (60.82) at 240 min. In vivo data shows that formulated liposomal transemulgel formulation are superior in their efficacy compared to commercial and A. vera gel. The results are compared with the commercial formulations. Conclusion: From our results, it is concluded that the A. vera trans emul gel using nimesulide and naproxen liposomal formulation is stable and prepared gel base is effective for formulation with high drug release and drug content compared with commercial formulation with significant anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:25599030

  3. A comparative clinical trial evaluating efficacy and safety of fixed dose combination of nimesulide (100 mg) and racemethionine (50 mg) (namsafe) versus reference drug (nimesulide) and other NSAIDs in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, V V

    2008-06-01

    Sixty consecutive patients of either sex, above the age of 18 years with symptoms of osteo-arthritis participated in this open, randomised, comparative clinical trial carried out over 3 months. Patients were randomised into 5 groups: Group A (paracetamol 500 mg), group B (ibuprofen 400 mg), group C (nimesulide 100 mg), group D (diclofenac 50 mg), and group E [fixed dose combination of nimesulide (100 mg) and racemethionine (50 mg) (namsafe)]. The efficacy parameters were pain intensity, pain on movement, tenderness and swelling. The liver function tests were carried out to estimate the effect of the drugs on the hepatic profile. The Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Kruskal Wallis (one way ANOVA) test were utilised to evaluate the significance of the change from baseline to the final visit. The treatment with combination of nimesulide and racemethionine gave the best relief from tenderness. With respect to pain intensity and pain movement, combination of nimesulide and racemethionine with nimesulide efficacy was comparable. Theliver function test data at the end of 6 months show that combination of nimesulide and racemethionine treated group showed the least rise in the serum asparatate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, whereas in the other treatment groups it was very pronounced. Thereby, combination of nimesulide and racemethionine is found to be better for the long-term treatment of osteo-arthritis in patients. The combination of the two agents, namely nimesulide and racemethionine is expected to augment the safety profile of nimesulide, without influencing the effectiveness of the analgesic agent, i.e., nimesulide.

  4. Drug delivery investigations of quaternised poly(propylene imine) dendrimer using nimesulide as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Murugan, E; Geetha Rani, D P; Yogaraj, V

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the demonstration of quaternized poly(propylene imine) dendrimer of generation-3, QPPI (G3) as a drug carrier for poorly soluble drug nimesulide (NMD, an anti-inflammatory drug). QPPI (G3) was prepared by treating the surface amine groups of poly(propylene imine) dendrimer with glycidyltrimethyl ammonium chloride and it was characterized with FTIR, (1)H and (13)C NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectral techniques. The drug carrying potential of QPPI (G3) was assessed by analyzing drug solubility, in vitro release and cytotoxicity studies. The observed results reveal that the aqueous solubility of NMD has been dramatically increased in the presence of QPPI (G3) and also can sustain the release of NMD. It is further noticed that the complexation of NMD with QPPI (G3) is responsible for increased solubility and sustained release. This complexation was evidenced through NMR ((1)H & 2D) and UV-vis spectral techniques, DSC and DLS studies. Cytotoxicity study through MTT assay on Vero and HBL-100 cell lines reveal that this dendrimer increase the biocompatibility and the tolerance concentration of NMD in drug-dendrimer formulations. The observed results prove that the QPPI (G3) is one of the new promising candidate for effective delivery of NMD.

  5. [Nimesulide: 25 years later].

    PubMed

    Mattia, C; Ciarcia, S; Muhindo, A; Coluzzi, F

    2010-08-01

    The first marketing authorization for nimesulide was approved in Italy in 1985. After one quarter of a century we evaluate its peculiar characteristics compared with other NSAIDs. Nimesulide is the only NSAID related to the arylsulfonamide class and is a "COX-2 preferential NSAIDs", because despite having a prevalent effect on COX-2, has a balanced action on both cyclooxygenase. The gastrointestinal absorption is rapid and complete and explains the short onset of action. Nimesulide is rapidly distributed in the synovial fluid, where it persists longer than in the blood, thus contributing to effectiveness of the drug in pain control. From the standpoint of safety, nimesulide arises NSAIDs with lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding thanks to its preferential activity on COX-2. In relation to the risk of severe hepatic reactions, the benefit/risk profile of nimesulide was considered by european regulatory authorities similar to other NSAIDs. Respecting international guidelines, the use of nimesulide in pain management, as that of other NSAIDs, must be considered as an alternative therapy when paracetamol is ineffective, or where the pain is caused or supported by an inflammatory process.

  6. Hyaluronic acid–nimesulide conjugates as anticancer drugs against CD44-overexpressing HT-29 colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jian, You-Sin; Chen, Ching-Wen; Lin, Chih-An; Yu, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Hua-Yang; Liao, Ming-Yuan; Wu, Shu-Huan; Lin, Yan-Fu; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Carrier-mediated drug delivery systems are promising therapeutics for targeted delivery and improved efficacy and safety of potent cytotoxic drugs. Nimesulide is a multifactorial cyclooxygenase 2 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic, antipyretic and potent anticancer properties; however, the low solubility of nimesulide limits its applications. Drugs conjugated with hyaluronic acid (HA) are innovative carrier-mediated drug delivery systems characterized by CD44-mediated endocytosis of HA and intracellular drug release. In this study, hydrophobic nimesulide was conjugated to HA of two different molecular weights (360 kDa as HA with high molecular weight [HAH] and 43kDa as HA with low molecular weight [HAL]) to improve its tumor-targeting ability and hydrophilicity. Our results showed that hydrogenated nimesulide (N-[4-amino-2-phenoxyphenyl]methanesulfonamide) was successfully conjugated with both HA types by carbodiimide coupling and the degree of substitution of nimesulide was 1%, which was characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance 400 MHz and total correlation spectroscopy. Both Alexa Fluor® 647 labeled HAH and HAL could selectively accumulate in CD44-overexpressing HT-29 colorectal tumor area in vivo, as observed by in vivo imaging system. In the in vitro cytotoxic test, HA–nimesulide conjugate displayed >46% cell killing ability at a nimesulide concentration of 400 µM in HT-29 cells, whereas exiguous cytotoxic effects were observed on HCT-15 cells, indicating that HA–nimesulide causes cell death in CD44-overexpressing HT-29 cells. Regarding in vivo antitumor study, both HAL–nimesulide and HAH–nimesulide caused rapid tumor shrinkage within 3 days and successfully inhibited tumor growth, which reached 82.3% and 76.4% at day 24 through apoptotic mechanism in HT-29 xenografted mice, without noticeable morphologic differences in the liver or kidney, respectively. These results indicated that HA–nimesulide with improved selectivity

  7. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... aches. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina (chest ... are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent ischemic ...

  8. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of developing blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) by ≈30% ( ... enoxaparin, fondaparinux, rivaroxaban) over aspirin for prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing ...

  9. Drug Resistance and Pseudoresistance: An Unintended Consequence of Enteric Coating Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Tilo; Fries, Susanne; Lawson, John A.; Kapoor, Shiv C.; Grant, Gregory R.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of “aspirin resistance” has emerged and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. We aimed to determine the commonality of a mechanistically consistent, stable and specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin – such as might be explained by genetic causes. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=400) were screened for their response to a single oral dose of 325 mg immediate release or enteric coated aspirin. Response parameters reflected the activity of aspirin's molecular target, cyclooxygenase-1. Individuals who appeared “aspirin resistant” on one occasion underwent repeat testing and if still “resistant” were exposed to low dose enteric coated aspirin (81 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) for one week each. Variable absorption caused a high frequency of apparent resistance to a single dose of 325 mg enteric coated aspirin (up to 49%) but not to immediate release aspirin (0%). All individuals responded to aspirin upon repeated exposure, extension of the post dosing interval or addition of aspirin to their platelets ex vivo. Conclusions Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is rare; this study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration. Clinical Trial Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00948987. PMID:23212718

  10. Differential impairment of aspirin-dependent platelet cyclooxygenase acetylation by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuanwen; Fries, Susanne; Li, Ruizhi; Lawson, John A.; Propert, Kathleen J.; Diamond, Scott L.; Blair, Ian A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Grosser, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be influenced by interactions with antiplatelet doses of aspirin. We sought to quantitate precisely the propensity of commonly consumed NSAIDs—ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib—to cause a drug–drug interaction with aspirin in vivo by measuring the target engagement of aspirin directly by MS. We developed a novel assay of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) acetylation in platelets isolated from volunteers who were administered aspirin and used conventional and microfluidic assays to evaluate platelet function. Although ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib all had the potential to compete with the access of aspirin to the substrate binding channel of COX-1 in vitro, exposure of volunteers to a single therapeutic dose of each NSAID followed by 325 mg aspirin revealed a potent drug–drug interaction between ibuprofen and aspirin and between naproxen and aspirin but not between celecoxib and aspirin. The imprecision of estimates of aspirin consumption and the differential impact on the ability of aspirin to inactivate platelet COX-1 will confound head-to-head comparisons of distinct NSAIDs in ongoing clinical studies designed to measure their cardiovascular risk. PMID:25385584

  11. Preparation and characterization of nimesulide containing nanocrystal formulations.

    PubMed

    Gülsün, Tuğba; Budak, Cisem; Vural, Imran; Sahin, Selma; Öner, Levent

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize nanocrystal formulation containing nimesulide. Physical mixture of drug and excipient (nimesulide:pluronic F127, 1:0.5) was also prepared to compare the efficiency of formulations. The physicochemical characteristics of the formulations were determined by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffractometry. Particle size, saturation solubilities as a function of pH, and permeability across Caco-2 monolayers were determined for nimesulide in powder, physical mixture, and nanocrystal formulations. In FT-IR analysis, the characteristic peaks that belong to nimesulide were seen in all formulations. X-ray diffractograms displayed that crystalline structure of nimesulide was conserved in the nanocrystal formulation. The interaction between nimesulide and pluronic F127 was demonstrated by DSC analysis. In all conditions, the average particle size of the nanocrystal formulations decreased significantly (p < 0.05) as compared with nimesulide and physical mixture. The solubility of nimesulide in nanocrystal formulation was higher than those of nimesulide in powder and physical mixture. Permeability studies revealed that nimesulide is a highly permeable compound whether in powder form or in physical mixture and nanocrystal formulation. All these results clearly demonstrate that aqueous solubility of poorly water-soluble compounds can be improved by preparing nanocrystal formulations.

  12. Stress modification of the toxicity of antimotion sickness drugs and Aspirin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, D.; Marra, C.; Goodwin, A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of environmental temperature on the toxicity of cyclizine, trimethobenzamide, and Aspirin were studied in mice. LD-50s were compared at 30 C, 22 C, and 15 C. At 30 C the toxicity of all three drugs increased, with that to Aspirin being affected most. Cooling decreased the toxicity of cyclizine and had no significant effect on that of trimethobenzamide or aspirin. These findings indicate that alterations in environmental temperature markedly affect drug toxicity. They emphasize that such alterations, and particularly increases in temperature, do not have to be particularly drastic, but that 'mild' variations in the environment are effective in altering an animal's sensitivity to a drug.

  13. Nimesulide: patients still exposed to a risk of severe hepatitis.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    Nimesulide, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been marketed in France since 1998, is neither more effective nor better tolerated than other NSAIDs. Many reports and reviews published by drug regulatory agencies in Spain, Ireland and Italy have warned of the hepatic adverse effects of nimesulide. In early 2008, 17 cases of nimesulide-induced liver damage requiring transplantation had been reported in Ireland, Italy, Spain, Finland and France. An Italian retrospective study conducted between 1997 and 2001, including about 400 000 patients exposed to NSAIDs, showed that the risk of severe liver damage was twice as high with nimesulide as with other NSAIDs. The European pharmacovigilance database shows that nimesulide is associated with more cases of severe liver damage than other NSAIDs, as well as more cases of liver damage than with cox-2 inhibitors. Young women are particularly at risk. In the vast majority of cases of liver damage, the dose of nimesulide used was that recommended in the summary of product characteristics (SPC). Liver damage occurred within 15 days after taking the first dose of nimesulide in one-third of cases. It is unacceptable that nimesulide still remains on the market in France and other countries: reports of severe liver damage continue to accumulate, and many other therapeutic options are available.

  14. Bioavailability of aspirin in rats comparing the drug's uptake into gastrointestinal tissue and vascular and lymphatic systems: implications on aspirin's chemopreventive action.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberger, L M; Phan, T; Fang, D; Edler, S; Philip, J; Li-Geng, T; Dial, E J

    2016-10-01

    Aspirin is an effective analgesic and antiplatelet drug that in addition to its ability to reduce pain, inflammation and fever, appears to have efficacy in the prevention/treatment of a range of diseases including heart disease, numerous cancers and Alzheimer's. It is important to understand the bioavailability of aspirin and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, since dosage and route of administration can vary for treating differing diseases, and the major side-effects of aspirin, upper gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, are dose-dependent. We examined the time course for gastroduodenal uptake of aspirin and the appearance of its major metabolite salicylic acid in blood and lymph after intragastric (to simulate oral) and intraduodenal (to simulate enteric-coating) dosing in rats. Results show that after intragastric dosing, intact aspirin is absorbed primarily by the gastric mucosa and to a lesser extent by the duodenal mucosa. When aspirin is dosed intragastrically or intraduodenally, a much greater concentration of aspirin enters the lymph than the blood. In contrast, the concentration of salicylic acid was higher in blood than in lymph. Lymph levels of both aspirin and salicylic acid were sufficiently high so as to perform a pharmacologic function there, possibly as a chemopreventive agent against colon cancer and potentially the metastatic spread of non-gastrointestinal cancers.

  15. Sodium N-(methylsulfonyl)-N-(4-nitro-2-phenoxyphenyl)sulfamate: a water-soluble nimesulide prodrug for parenteral use.

    PubMed

    Rapposelli, Simona; Digiacomo, Maria; Franchi, Silvia; Moretti, Sara; Pinza, Mario; Sacerdote, Paola; Balsamo, Aldo

    2010-10-04

    Several nimesulide preparations (i.e., tablet form, gels) have been marketed, but no parenteral solution has achieved the market because of their low wettability and unsatisfactory chemical-physical properties required for parenteral use. In this paper we describe the synthesis of the nimesulide prodrug 1 and its anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic properties. Pharmacological studies, carried out to evaluate the in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of compound 1 and nimesulide, showed that sodium sulfamate 1 is an effective nimesulide prodrug that can be administered by parenteral route, undergoing a satisfactory absorption and an extensive transformation into the active nimesulide compound. Moreover, the evaluation of the plasma concentrations of nimesulide after rat treatment with compound 1 showed an increased and dose-dependent release of nimesulide. In contrast, the plasma concentrations of nimesulide, after "native" drug administration, still remain substantially unchanged. These preliminary results prompt further investigations on this prodrug as a possible candidate for parenteral use.

  16. Repurposing of Aspirin and Ibuprofen as Candidate Anti-Cryptococcus Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ogundeji, Adepemi O.; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    The usage of fluconazole and amphotericin B in clinical settings is often limited by, among other things, drug resistance development and undesired side effects. Thus, there is a constant need to find new drugs to better manage fungal infections. Toward this end, the study described in this paper considered the repurposing of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and ibuprofen as alternative drugs to control the growth of cryptococcal cells. In vitro susceptibility tests, including a checkerboard assay, were performed to assess the response of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii to the above-mentioned anti-inflammatory drugs. Next, the capacity of these two drugs to induce stress as well as their mode of action in the killing of cryptococcal cells was determined. The studied fungal strains revealed a response to both aspirin and ibuprofen that was dose dependent, with ibuprofen exerting greater antimicrobial action. More importantly, the MICs of these drugs did not negatively (i) affect growth or (ii) impair the functioning of macrophages; rather, they enhanced the ability of these immune cells to phagocytose cryptococcal cells. Ibuprofen was also shown to act in synergy with fluconazole and amphotericin B. The treatment of cryptococcal cells with aspirin or ibuprofen led to stress induction via activation of the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, and cell death was eventually achieved through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated membrane damage. The presented data highlight the potential clinical application of aspirin and ibuprofen as candidate anti-Cryptococcus drugs. PMID:27246782

  17. Ab initio study of pristine and Si-doped capped carbon nanotubes interacting with nimesulide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, Ivana; Fagan, Solange B.; Mota, R.; Fazzio, A.

    2007-05-01

    The interaction of the nimesulide molecule with pristine and Si-doped capped carbon nanotubes is studied by first-principle calculations. The nimesulide molecules, which are basic components of an anti-inflammatory drug, combined with carbon nanostructures, could result in novel drug delivery systems. In this Letter, the nimesulide interaction with pristine capped nanotubes is shown as occuring in a physisorption regime and it is demonstrated that this interaction can be much more intense when the capped nanotube is substitutionaly doped with an Si atom. Then, the Si-doped capped nanotube can constitute a feasible novel nimesulide molecule delivery system.

  18. Genotoxicity of nimesulide in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Borkotoky, Debojyoti; Panda, Sushen K; Sahoo, Gyana R; Parija, Subas C

    2014-04-01

    It is mandatory for all new drugs to be tested for their potential genotoxicity in addition to general toxicity testing. Some old drugs have not been tested adequately for their genotoxic effects because these were in use before the local regulations were enforced. According to the material safety database, the toxicological effect of nimesulide is not yet fully understood. The present study therefore aimed to explore the genotoxic potential of nimesulide in Wistar albino rats. Nimesulide at the dose level of 50 (Gr-50), 100 (Gr-100) and 200 (Gr-200) mg/kg body weight (b.w.) was given orally. Each rat in treated groups (Gr-50 to Gr-200; n = 10) and negative control group (Gr-NC; n = 10) were administered orally (p.o.) with nimesulide and normal saline, respectively, for 14 days. Similarly, rats of positive control (Gr-PC; n = 10) were administered with cyclophosphamide (CPA; 20 mg/kg b.w.) intraperitoneally. CPA served as positive control, whereas normal saline served as as negative control. Approximately 1-2 mL of blood was collected from retro-orbital sinus for comet assay and subsequently rats were sacrificed to aspirate the femoral bone marrow for the micronucleus test. Structural chromosomal aberration, micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs), polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) and comet tail length were calculated using micronucleus assay and comet assay, respectively, which served as markers of genotoxicity. In the present study, it was observed that a significant increase in (1) different classified structural chromosomal aberrations with increase in nimesulide dose, such as gaps (50 mg/kg), gaps, breaks and pulverizations (100 mg/kg) and gaps, breaks, fragments, rings and pulverizations (200 mg/kg) and (2) % MnPCE and comet tail length was observed in animals treated with CPA (p < 0.001) or 200 mg of nimesulide (p < 0.05), as compared to negative control. In conclusion, nimesulide (200 mg/kg b.w.) produced a

  19. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach vs. a dose titration for the determination of a dosage regimen: the case of nimesulide, a Cox-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the dog.

    PubMed

    Toutain, P L; Cester, C C; Haak, T; Laroute, V

    2001-02-01

    The present experiment was designed to determine a dosage regimen (dose, interval of administration) in the dog for nimesulide, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with in vitro selectivity for the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (Cox-2), using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. The PK/PD results were compared with those obtained using a classical dose titration study. In the PK/PD experiment, 11 dogs were subjected to Freund's adjuvant arthritis characterized by permanent hyperthermia. Nimesulide (5 mg/kg, oral route) was tested during the secondary phase of the inflammatory response. In the dose titration study, nimesulide (0, 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg, oral route) was tested in eight other dogs using a reversible urate crystal arthritis in a 4-period crossover design. Different PD endpoints (including lameness assessed by force plate and hyperthermia) were regularly measured during the PK/PD experiment, and plasma samples were obtained to determine the plasma nimesulide concentration. The data were modeled using an indirect effect model. The IC50 of nimesulide for lameness was 6.26 +/- 3.01 microg/mL, which was significantly higher than the EC50 value obtained for antipyretic effect (2.72 +/- 1.29 microg/mL). The ED50 estimated from the classical dose titration study were 1.34 mg/kg (lameness) and 3.0 mg/kg (skin temperature). The PK/PD parameters were used to simulate different dosage regimens (dose, interval of administration). The antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects were calculated from the model for the recommended dosage regimen (5 mg/kg/24 h). It was apparent from this approach, that this dosage regimen enabled 76% of the theoretical maximal drug efficacy to be obtained for pyresis and 43% for lameness. It was concluded from the comparison of in vivo and in vitro IC50, that nimesulide is a potent NSAID for which some Cox-1 inhibition is required to obtain clinically relevant efficacy.

  20. Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and pancreatic cancer risk: a clinic-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Reid Lombardo, Kaye M; Bamlet, William R; Oberg, Ann L; Robinson, Dennis P; Anderson, Kristin E; Petersen, Gloria M

    2011-11-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) show indisputable promise as cancer chemoprevention agents. However, studies have been inconsistent as to whether aspirin has a protective effect in development of pancreatic cancer. To further evaluate the association between aspirin, NSAID, and acetaminophen use with pancreatic cancer risk, we used a clinic-based case-control study of 904 rapidly ascertained histologically or clinically documented pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases, and 1,224 age- and sex-matched healthy controls evaluated at Mayo Clinic from April 2004 to September 2010. Overall, there is no relationship between non-aspirin NSAID or acetaminophen use and risk of pancreatic cancer. Aspirin use for 1 d/mo or greater was associated with a significantly decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91, P = 0.005) compared with never or less than 1 d/mo. Analysis by frequency and frequency-dosage of use categories showed reduced risk (P = 0.007 and 0.022, respectively). This inverse association was also found for those who took low-dose aspirin for heart disease prevention (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.49-0.92, P = 0.013). In subgroup analyses, the association between aspirin use and pancreatic cancer was not significantly affected by pancreatic cancer stage, smoking status, or body mass index. Our data suggest that aspirin use, but not non-aspirin NSAID use, is associated with lowered risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

  1. An Overview Of The Physiology And Pharmacology Of Aspirin And Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, I present an overview of the actions and effects of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although athletic trainers cannot prescribe or dispense prescription medications, they should be as aware of their effects as they are of other methods of injury treatment. To set the discussion in proper perspective, the inflammatory process and its mediators are reviewed briefly. The eicosanoids are a family of very active chemicals, which include: the prostaglandins, thromboxane, and the leukotrienes. They affect inflammation as well as numerous other body processes. Ingesting aspirin and NSAIDs blocks the production of prostaglandins and thromboxane, resulting in desired and undesired effects. The NSAIDs were developed to have the same action as aspirin, but with fewer adverse side effects. Many NSAIDs are currently available, and the decision as to which agent to use depends upon various factors. Surprisingly, recent studies suggest that some NSAIDs may hinder the healing process. Although not a NSAID, acetaminophen has many important clinical uses. Armed with an understanding of how these drugs act, and their potentially harmful aspects, the athletic trainer can assist the team physician in designing an aspirin- or NSAID-therapy regimen. PMID:16558240

  2. Study of nimesulide release from solid pharmaceutical formulations in tween 80 solutions.

    PubMed

    Purcaru, Stefana-Oana; Ionescu, Mihaela; Raneti, Cristina; Anuta, Valentina; Mircioiu, I; Belu, Ionela

    2010-01-01

    Nimesulide is a weakly acidic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs). Like many non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Nimesulide is very sparingly soluble in water (≈ 0.01 mg/mL).The poor aqueous solubility and wettability of Nimesulide gives rise to difficulties in pharmaceutical formulations for oral or parenteral delivery, which may lead to variable bioavailability. Based on the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS), Nimesulide is considered a BCS 2 drug (poorly soluble and highly permeable). Solubilization in surfactant solutions above critical micelle concentration (CMC) offers one approach to the formulation of poorly soluble drugs. Weakly acidic and basic drugs may be brought into solution by the solubilizing action of surfactants. In this study, different concentrations of Tween 80 was used in combination with buffer (pH 7.4) to increase the solubility of Nimesulide. The results show that the dependence of the released amount on the Tween concentration is not linear, very low Tween concentration showing a decrease of "solubility", probably connected to a critical micelle concentration at the interface Nimesulide solution. An "analytical" artefact connected to a decreasing ultraviolet absorption of Nimesulide because of Nimesulide precipitation, the formation of a colloidal solution is possible, and the phenomenon remains to be searched further. It is hard to explain that for an almost complete solubilization a significant Tween quantity is necessary and this should be more than that of other slightly soluble drugs.

  3. Aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen and ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Christina M; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; DeFazio, Anna; Protani, Melinda M; Webb, Penelope M

    2015-04-01

    Aspirin and nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to decrease tumor progression in pre-clinical models of ovarian cancer, however the influence of these drugs on survival in women following a diagnosis of ovarian cancer is unknown. We included 1305 Australian women diagnosed with incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, recruited into a population-based case-control study. Use of aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs and acetaminophen in the 5 years preceding ovarian cancer diagnosis was assessed from self-reports. Deaths were ascertained up to October 2011 via linkage with the Australian National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During a mean follow-up time of 4.9 years (SD 2.8 years), there were 834 deaths, of which 779 (93% of deaths) were from ovarian cancer. We found uniformly inverse, but non-significant, HRs for ever use in the last five years of aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs and acetaminophen compared with no use (adjusted HRs 0.92 [95% CI 0.81-1.06], 0.91 [95% CI 0.80-1.05] and 0.91 [95% CI 0.69-1.20], respectively). There was no evidence of any dose response trends. The results remained unchanged when we limited the outcome to ovarian cancer mortality. Associations did not differ by histologic subtype, age at diagnosis or stage. Given current interest in the role of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs in cancer survival these results are noteworthy given they are the first to investigate these associations in women with ovarian cancer. Our results provide no strong evidence that pre-diagnostic use of aspirin or nonaspirin NSAIDs are associated with improved survival in women with ovarian cancer.

  4. Risk of upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding associated with selective cyclo‐oxygenase‐2 inhibitors, traditional non‐aspirin non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, aspirin and combinations

    PubMed Central

    Lanas, A; García‐Rodríguez, L A; Arroyo, M T; Gomollón, F; Feu, F; González‐Pérez, A; Zapata, E; Bástida, G; Rodrigo, L; Santolaria, S; Güell, M; de Argila, C M; Quintero, E; Borda, F; Piqué, J M

    2006-01-01

    Background The risks and benefits of coxibs, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and aspirin treatment are under intense debate. Objective To determine the risk of peptic ulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) associated with the use of coxibs, traditional NSAIDs, aspirin or combinations of these drugs in clinical practice. Methods A hospital‐based, case–control study in the general community of patients from the National Health System in Spain. The study included 2777 consecutive patients with endoscopy‐proved major UGIB because of the peptic lesions and 5532 controls matched by age, hospital and month of admission. Adjusted relative risk (adj RR) of UGIB determined by conditional logistic regression analysis is provided. Results Use of non‐aspirin‐NSAIDs increased the risk of UGIB (adj RR 5.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5 to 6.2). Among non‐aspirin‐NSAIDs, aceclofenac (adj RR 3.1; 95% CI 2.3 to 4.2) had the lowest RR, whereas ketorolac (adj RR 14.4; 95% CI 5.2 to 39.9) had the highest. Rofecoxib treatment increased the risk of UGIB (adj RR 2.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.0), whereas celecoxib, paracetamol or concomitant use of a proton pump inhibitor with an NSAID presented no increased risk. Non‐aspirin antiplatelet treatment (clopidogrel/ticlopidine) had a similar risk of UGIB (adj RR 2.8; 95% CI 1.9 to 4.2) to cardioprotective aspirin at a dose of 100 mg/day (adj RR 2.7; 95% CI 2.0 to 3.6) or anticoagulants (adj RR 2.8; 95% CI 2.1 to 3.7). An apparent interaction was found between low‐dose aspirin and use of non‐aspirin‐NSAIDs, coxibs or thienopyridines, which increased further the risk of UGIB in a similar way. Conclusions Coxib use presents a lower RR of UGIB than non‐selective NSAIDs. However, when combined with low‐dose aspirin, the differences between non‐selective NSAIDs and coxibs tend to disappear. Treatment with either non‐aspirin antiplatelet or cardioprotective aspirin has a similar risk of UGIB. PMID

  5. Nimesulide aggravates redox imbalance and calcium dependent mitochondrial permeability transition leading to dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Tripathi, Madhulika; Pandey, Pramod Kumar; Kakkar, Poonam

    2010-09-10

    Nimesulide (selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for the symptomatic treatment of painful conditions like osteoarthritis, spondilitis and primary dysmenorrhoea. Nimesulide induced liver damage is a serious side effect of this otherwise popular drug. The mechanism involved in nimesulide induced hepatotoxicity is still not fully elucidated. However, both mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been implicated in contributing to liver injury in susceptible patients. Mitochondria besides being the primary source of energy, act as a hub of signals responsible for initiating cell death, irrespective of the pathway, i.e. apoptosis or necrosis. The present study was aimed to explore the role of compounding stress, i.e. Ca(2+) overload and GSH depletion in nimesulide induced mitochondrial toxicity and dysfunction. Our study showed that, nimesulide (100 microM) treatment resulted into rapid depletion of GSH (60%) in isolated rat liver mitochondria and significant Ca(2+) dependent MPT changed. Enhanced ROS generation (DCF fluorescence) was also observed in mitochondria treated with nimesulide. An important finding was that the concentration at which nimesulide oxidized reduced pyridine nucleotides (autofluorescence of NAD(P)H), it affected mitochondrial electron flow (MTT activity decreased by 75%) and enhanced mitochondrial depolarization significantly as assessed by Rhodamine 123 fluorescent probe. Therefore, nimesulide was found to aggravate redox imbalance and affect Ca(2+) dependent mitochondrial membrane permeability transition leading to dysfunction and ultimately cell death.

  6. Aspirin in dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the oldest drugs in the field of medicine, with a wide range of applications. In dermatology, aspirin has shown benefit in a variety of disorders. Recently, reduction of melanoma risk with aspirin has been demonstrated. Although an analgesic to begin with, aspirin has come a long way; after cardiology, it is now found to be useful even in dermatology. PMID:26753146

  7. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M; Patel, Alpa V; Thun, Michael J; Diver, W Ryan; Zhai, Yusheng; Jacobs, Eric J

    2013-03-01

    Few large prospective studies have examined associations between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We examined the association between NSAID use and NHL incidence among 149,570 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition cohort. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use were reported at enrollment in 1992 and updated on periodic follow-up questionnaires. During follow-up through 2007, 1,709 incident NHLs were identified. Time-dependent hazard ratios were calculated using extended Cox regression. Compared to no use, current use of 60+ NSAID pills/month (aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs combined) was associated with slightly higher NHL incidence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.53), but no association with frequency of use was observed when NSAID exposure was lagged by approximately 2 years (HR = 1.08, 95% CI, 0.88-1.32). Long duration regular use (current use of 30+ pills/month for ≥5 years) was not associated with NHL incidence (HR = 1.09, 95% CI, 0.91-1.33). In subtype analyses, current use of 60+ NSAID pills/month was associated with follicular lymphoma incidence (HR = 1.87, 95% CI, 1.08-3.24). This association persisted when NSAID exposure was lagged (HR = 1.76, 95% CI, 1.04-2.98) and was similar for aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs. The association of current, but not lagged, NSAID use with risk of all NHL could be attributable to use of NSAIDs to relieve symptoms of undiagnosed NHL. However, the association with follicular lymphoma persisted in analyses where NSAID use was lagged and should be investigated further. These findings are particularly important for aspirin as the risks and benefits of prophylactic daily use are weighed.

  8. Nimesulide as a promising neuroprotectant in brain ischemia: new experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    Nimesulide is a preferential inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and it is one of the most prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) worldwide. Nimesulide was recently shown to have neuroprotective properties in animal models of acute neurologic injury. In particular, nimesulide is highly effective in reducing ischemic brain injury. This neuroprotective efficacy has been demonstrated in animal models of transient and permanent focal cerebral ischemia, global brain ischemia, embolic stroke, and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Nimesulide has been shown to reduce infarction, improve neurological function, attenuate blood-brain barrier disruption and edema, and reduce leukocyte infiltration into the ischemic brain. These beneficial effects have been observed even when the first treatment is given several hours after the onset of ischemia, demonstrating the wide therapeutic time window for nimesulide's neuroprotection. This is of great relevance since most stroke patients reach the emergency room several hours after the onset of symptoms, a time at which most medical interventions are not effective. In addition, nimesulide produces a long-lasting neuroprotection. This is of importance since some 'neuroprotective' compounds only produce a delay in cell death, and not a permanent protection. Its several mechanisms of action in neuroprotection make nimesulide a desirable and promising candidate as therapy for acute brain ischemia. This article reviews recent knowledge on the effects of nimesulide against brain injury, with particular emphasis in cerebral ischemia, and makes a critical appraisal of its therapeutic potential in the management of patients with brain ischemia.

  9. In-vitro assessment and pharmacodynamics of nimesulide incorporated Aloe vera transemulgel.

    PubMed

    Vandana, K R; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R; Sundaresan, C R; Sriramaneni, Raghava N; Vadlamudi, Harini C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to prepare nimesulide emulsion for incorporation in Aloe vera gel base to formulate 'nimesulide - Aloe vera transemulgel' (NAE) and to carryout in-vitro assessment and in-vivo anti-inflammatory studies of the product. Although the use of nimesulide is banned for oral administration, due to its potential for inducing hepatotoxicity and thrombocytopenia, the use of nimesulide for topical delivery is prominent in the treatment of many inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis. The drug loading capacity of transdermal gels is low for hydrophobic drugs such as nimesulide. Nimesulide can be effectively incorporated into emulgels (a combination of emulsion and gel). Aloe vera has a mild anti-inflammatory effect and in the present study Aloe vera gel was formulated and used as a gel base to prepare NAE. The emulgels thus prepared were evaluated for viscosity, pH, in-vitro permeation, stability and skin irritation test. In-vivo anti-inflammatory studies were performed using carrageenan induced hind paw edema method in Wistar rats. The results were compared with that of commercial nimesulide gel (CNG). From the in-vitro studies, effective permeation of nimesulide from NAE (53.04 %) was observed compared to CNG (44.72 %) at 30 min indicating better drug release from NAE. Topical application of the emulgel found no skin irritation. Stability studies proved the integrity of the formulation. The percentage of inhibition of edema was highest for the prepared NAE (67.4 % inhibition after 240 min) compared to CNG (59.6 %). From our results, it was concluded that the Aloe vera gel acts as an effective gel base to prepare nimesulide emulgel with high drug loading capacity (86.4 % drug content) compared to CNG (70.5 % drug content) with significant anti-inflammatory effect.

  10. Dissolution Profile of Nimesulide from Pharmaceutical Preparations for Oral Use.

    PubMed

    Tubić, Biljana; Uzunović, Alija; Pilipović, Saša; Gagić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nimesulide belongs to the group of semi-selective COX-2 inhibitors, widely used in solid oral formulations. In the present work the influence of surfactants among other drug excipients, as well as particle size of the active substance and the effects of medium pH on the dissolution rate of nimesulide from solid pharmaceutical forms. For that purpose, four different preparations containing 100 mg nimesulide per tablet and available in the market of Bosnia and Herzegovina (labeled here as A, B, C and D) were studied. The test for the assessment of dissolution profiles of the formulations was performed in surfactant-free dissolution medium pH 7.5. The dissolution profiles were compared by calculating difference (f1), and similarity (f2) factors. The increasing dissolution medium pH value from 7.5 to 7.75 resulted in a significant increase of nimesulide dissolution rate from the examined formulations. Also, the results showed that particle size affects to a great extent the dissolution rate and the best results were achieved with micronized nimesulide. The presence of the surfactants among the other excipients expressed a negligible effect on the dissolution profile.

  11. Combined dipyridamole and aspirin pellet formulation for improved oral drug delivery. Part 1: Development pharmaceutics.

    PubMed

    Deasy, P B; Murtagh, P W

    1996-01-01

    The dissolution profile of various weight fractions of dipyridamole: hydropropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS) and dipyridamole: hydroxypropylmethylcellulose phthalate co-precipitates lead to the choice of 1:2 dipyridamole: HPMC-AS as the controlled-release component. It was deposited to form two-third of the total dose as an inner layer on inert sucrose cores by air suspension coating for release mainly in the small intestine. Further examination of this material by IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction indicated some free drug, preferentially soluble under gastric pH conditions. One-third of the total dose was applied by pan coating as an outer layer of micronized dipyridamole around the inner enteric co-precipitate layer. Aspirin-loaded cores were prepared also by pan coating for use in the final product, which contained both anti-platelet drugs.

  12. Involvement of mitochondria mediated pathways in hepatoprotection conferred by Fumaria parviflora Lam. extract against nimesulide induced apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhulika; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Mishra, Chetna; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2010-03-01

    Nimesulide, a popular nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been associated with serious hepatotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial perturbations have been implicated in drug induced hepatotoxicity, although their role in the pathway needs exploration. Study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of Fumaria parviflora Lam. (Fp) on nimesulide induced cell death in primary rat hepatocyte cultures. Fp extract treated cells showed increased viability as compared to nimesulide stressed cells as assessed by MTT assay. LDH leakage increased significantly at 500microM nimesulide, and the data suggested that apoptosis was the predominant mechanism responsible for cell death. Nimesulide induced apoptosis was further confirmed by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. Nimesulide exposure increased intracellular ROS, translocation of Bax and Bcl2 followed by mitochondrial depolarization and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release along with caspase-9/-3 activity confirming involvement of mitochondria in nimesulide induced apoptosis. Events like membrane depolarization of mitochondria, expression of Bax, Bcl2, externalization of phosphatidyl serine are substantially reversed by the pre-treatment of Fp extract. Thus, the study indicates that Fp extract modulates critical events regulating pro and anti-apoptotic proteins in mitochondria dependent apoptosis induced by nimesulide.

  13. Nimesulide inhibits pathogenic fungi: PGE2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Rafaelle Fonseca; Mendonça, Lúcia Carla Vasconcelos; da Silva Souza, Kaira Geiliane; Fonseca, Adriana Aparecida Durães; Costa, Elaine Mirla Souza; de Lima, Marcus Vinicius Dias; Vieira, José Maria Dos Santos; de Brito, Mioni Thielli Figueiredo Magalhães; Monteiro, Marta Chagas

    2017-03-01

    Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit fungal growth, fungal prostaglandin E2 production, and enzyme activation. This study aims to investigate the antifungal effect of nimesulide against pathogenic filamentous fungi and yeast. The experiments detailed below were also designed to investigate whether the action is dependent on E2 fungal prostaglandins. Our data showed that nimesulide exhibited potent antifungal activity, mainly against Trichophyton mentagrophytes (ATCC 9533) and Cryptococcus neoformans with MIC values of 2 and 62 μg/mL, respectively. This drug was also able to inhibit the growth of clinic isolates of filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, and dermatophytes, such as T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, and M. gypseum, with MIC values ranging from 112 to 770 μg/mL. Our data also showed that the inhibition of fungal growth by nimesulide was mediated by a mechanism dependent on PGE2, which led to the inhibition of essential fungal enzymes. Thus, we concluded that nimesulide exerts a fungicidal effect against pathogenic filamentous fungi and yeast, involving the inhibition of fungal prostaglandins and fungal enzymes important to the fungal growth and colonization.

  14. Effects of nimesulide and its reduced metabolite on mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mingatto, Fábio Erminio; dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Pigoso, Acácio Antonio; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; Curti, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of nimesulide, a recently developed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and of a metabolite resulting from reduction of the nitro group to an amine derivative, on succinate-energized isolated rat liver mitochondria incubated in the absence or presence of 20 μM Ca2+, 1 μM cyclosporin A (CsA) or 5 μM ruthenium red.Nimesulide uncoupled mitochondria through a protonophoretic mechanism and oxidized mitochondrial NAD(P)H, both effects presenting an EC50 of approximately 5 μM.Within the same concentration range nimesulide induced mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux in a partly ruthenium red-sensitive manner, and induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) when ruthenium red was added after Ca2+ uptake by mitochondria. Nimesulide induced MPT even in de-energized mitochondria incubated with 0.5 mM Ca2+.Both Ca2+ efflux and MPT were prevented to a similar extent by CsA, Mg2+, ADP, ATP and butylhydroxytoluene, whereas dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide, which markedly prevented MPT, had only a partial or no effect on Ca2+ efflux, respectively.The reduction of the nitro group of nimesulide to an amine derivative completely suppressed the above mitochondrial responses, indicating that the nitro group determines both the protonophoretic and NAD(P)H oxidant properties of the drug.The nimesulide reduction product demonstrated a partial protective effect against accumulation of reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria under conditions of oxidative stress like those resulting from the presence of t-butyl hydroperoxide.The main conclusion is that nimesulide, on account of its nitro group, acts as a potent protonophoretic uncoupler and NAD(P)H oxidant on isolated rat liver mitochondria, inducing Ca2+ efflux or MPT within a concentration range which can be reached in vivo, thus presenting the potential ability to interfere with the energy and Ca2+ homeostasis in the liver cell. PMID:11082123

  15. Aspirin Desensitization

    MedlinePlus

    ... dust mites, cats, dogs, or pollen. Others believe sensitivity to aspirin results from a problem in certain ... examination is required to diagnose patients with aspirin sensitivity. Patients with severe asthma, chronic sinusitis, nasal polyps ...

  16. Determination of the adequate dosage of rebamipide, a gastric mucoprotective drug, to prevent low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Nouda, Sadaharu; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal mucosal injury caused by low-dose aspirin is a common cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to investigate the protective effects and optimal dose of rebamipide for low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this prospective randomized trial, 45 healthy volunteers (aged 20–65 years) were included and divided into three groups. The groups received enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg (low-dose aspirin) plus omeprazole 10 mg (Group A: proton pump inhibitor group), low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 300 mg (Group B: standard-dose group), or low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 900 mg (Group C: high-dose group). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and video capsule endoscopy were performed, and the fecal occult blood reaction and fecal calprotectin levels were measured before and two weeks after drug administration. Although the fecal calprotectin levels increased significantly in Group A, they did not increase in Groups B and C. The esophagogastroduodenoscopic and video capsule endoscopic findings and the fecal occult blood test findings did not differ significantly among the three groups. In conclusion, standard-dose rebamipide is sufficient for preventing mucosal injury of the small intestine induced by low-dose aspirin, indicating that high-dose rebamipide is not necessary. PMID:27895392

  17. Aspirin revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, D.; Hu, X. K.; Loboda, A. V.; Mosey, N. J.; Lipson, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments are described where the experimental conditions have been optimized to detect aspirin by MALDI mass spectrometry. Although protonated aspirin was not observed by MALDI, sodium and potassium aspirin adducts could be found. Significantly better signals could be obtained by using Rb and Cs salts as cationization sources. Quantum calculations were carried out to determine the structure and energetics of the Li, K, Rb, and Cs alkali--aspirin adducts.

  18. In vivo selectivity of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Laudanno, O M; Cesolari, J A; Esnarriaga, J; San Miguel, P; Bedini, O A

    2000-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study in vivo COX-2-COX-1 selectivity of 16 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in equipotent ulcerogenic doses in two in vivo experimental models. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, nimesulide, aceclofenac, aspirin, sodium diclofenac, meloxicam, naproxene, paracetamol, piroxicam, tenoxicam, nabumetone, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, etodolac, and ketorolac were administered to female Wistar rats (N = 10 each group). In experiment I, solid food plus subcutaneous NSAIDs were given. In experiment II, NSAIDs were given by oral gavage and in bolus. Macroscopic gastric antral ulcer area (30%) and intestinal erosiva area (295 mm2) in experiment I and necrotic gastric fundus area (65%) and erosive intestinal area (182 mm2), "in vivo" the NSAIDs COX-1 was showed. Neutrofilia assessed in gastric intestinal mucosa where also ibuprofen and paracetamol not given neotrophilic infiltration. In conclusion, COX-2-COX-1 selectivity was demonstrated in vivo with the drugs aceclofenac, nabumetone, meloxicam, nimesulide, and paracetamol.

  19. The Use of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Possible Carrier in Drug Delivery System for Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Alias Mohd.; Buang, Nor Aziah; Yean, Lee Sze; Ibrahim, Mohd. Lokman

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised great interest in a number of applications, including field emission, energy storage, molecular electronics, sensors, biochips and drug delivery systems. This is due to their remarkable mechanical properties, chemical stability and biofunctionalizability. This nanomaterial is low in weight, has high strength and a high aspect ratio (long length compared to a small diameter). This paper will present a brief overview of drugs adsorbed onto the surface of carbon nanotubes via sonication method. The surface area of carbon nanotubes was measured by methylene blue method, Carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method were purified and functionalized in a mixture of concentrated acids (H2SO4:HNO3 = 3:1) at room temperature (25° C) via sonication in water bath, yielding carboxylic acid group on the CNTs' surface. CNT was successfully loaded with 48 %(w/w) aspirin molecules by suspending CNTs in a solution of aspirin in alcohol. Analysis of loaded CNTs by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum (FITR) and UV-visible Spectroscopy confirmed the loading of the drug onto the CNTs. The work presented is a prelude to the direction of using carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system to desired sites in human body.

  20. Photoacoustic study of the penetration kinetics of nimesulid into human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barja, P. R.; Veloso, D. J. D. V.

    2010-03-01

    The photoacoustic (PA) effect is observed when modulated (or pulsed) light is absorbed by a sample inside a closed chamber and converted in heat, generating acoustic waves; PA measurements have been employed to evaluate transdermal penetration of topically applied drugs. Phonophoresis is the utilization of ultrasonic (US) energy to enhance absorption of drugs across the epidermal barrier, and its usefulness has been shown by PA measurements. The aim of the present work was to determine the characteristic absorption times of the anti-inflammatory Nimesulid (gel) in human skin, with and without help of therapeutic phonophoresis. After local cleaning, measurements were performed in the forearm of each volunteer before Nimesulid application and for different times after application through massage with the US equipment head; the protocol was repeated for the opposite forearm, but without US emission. Curves of the PA signal level as a function of time were adjusted by a Boltzmann equation, leading to the determination of the characteristic absorption time (about 12 minutes). No significant gain was observed in Nimesulid absorption with the utilization of US radiation, indicating that topic application of Nimesulid does not require the use of phonophoresis, due to the natural fast penetration of the Nimesulid gel.

  1. Nimesulide-induced electrophile stress activates Nrf2 in human hepatocytes and mice but is not sufficient to induce hepatotoxicity in Nrf2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kale, Vijay M; Hsiao, Chin-ju J; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2010-05-17

    Nimesulide is a widely prescribed nitroaromatic sulfoanilide-type nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that, despite its favorable safety profile, has been associated with rare cases of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Because reactive metabolites have been implicated in DILI, we aimed at investigating whether hepatic bioactivation of nimesulide produces a protein-reactive intermediate in hepatocytes. Also, we explored whether nimesulide can activate the transcription factor Nrf2 that would protect from drug-induced hepatocyte injury. We found that [(14)C]-nimesulide covalently bound to human liver microsomes (<50 pmol/mg under standard conditions) or immortalized human hepatocytes in a sulfaphenazole-sensitive, rifampicin-inducible manner; yet the overall extent of binding was modest. Although exposure of hepatocytes to nimesulide was not associated with increased net levels of superoxide anion, nimesulide (100 microM, 24 h) caused nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a sulfaphenazole-sensitive manner, indicating a role of electrophilic metabolites. However, knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA did not make the cells more sensitive to nimesulide-induced cell injury. Similarly, exposure of wild-type C57BL/6x129 Sv mice to nimesulide (100 mg/kg/day, po, for 5 days) was associated with nuclear translocation of immunoreactive Nrf2 in a small number of hepatocytes and induced >2-fold the expression levels of the Nrf2-target gene Nqo1 in wild-type but not Nrf2-null mice. Nimesulide administered to Nrf2(-/-) knockout mice did not cause increases in serum ALT activity or any apparent histopathological signs of liver injury. In conclusion, these data indicate that nimesulide is bioactivated by CYP2C to a protein-reactive electrophilic intermediate that activates the Nrf2 pathway even at nontoxic exposure levels.

  2. Nimesulide improves the disease modifying anti-rheumatic profile of methotrexate in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Inglis, Julia J; Nofal, Salwa M; Khalifa, Amani E; Williams, Richard O; El-Eraky, Wafaa I; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2010-10-10

    Methotrexate is a disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug that is widely used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Nimesulide is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is frequently used as adjuvant therapy for symptomatic alleviation of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we have evaluated the potential influence of nimesulide on the disease modifying anti-rheumatic properties of methotrexate using the collagen-induced arthritis model. Mice were immunized with collagen type II for the induction of arthritis and treated with methotrexate (2.5mg/kg) twice a week, nimesulide (20mg/kg) every other day or a combination of both drugs. Treatment started one week after the onset of arthritis until day 40. An arthritic index was used to compare the severity of arthritis between different treatments. In addition, articular hyperalgesia, joint stiffness, radiological deterioration and intra-articular leucocytic infiltration were evaluated. Methotrexate alone showed modest but significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, and the effects of nimesulide were comparable. On the other hand, nimesulide significantly improved the disease modifying anti-rheumatic profile of methotrexate in terms of arthritic index and joint mobility. Furthermore, although nimesulide failed to show any radiological evidence of articular protection, it significantly improved methotrexate-induced joint protection as judged by X-ray analysis.

  3. Aspirin, Nonaspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug, and Acetaminophen Use and Risk of Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Pooled Analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods We analyzed pooled data from 12 population-based case–control studies of ovarian cancer, including 7776 case patients and 11843 control subjects accrued between 1992 and 2007. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of medication use with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were estimated in individual studies using logistic regression and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Associations between frequency, dose, and duration of analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer were also assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84 to 0.99). Results were similar but not statistically significant for nonaspirin NSAIDs, and there was no association with acetaminophen. In seven studies with frequency data, the reduced risk was strongest among daily aspirin users (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.67 to 0.96). In three studies with dose information, the reduced risk was strongest among users of low dose (<100mg) aspirin (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.83), whereas for nonaspirin NSAIDs, the reduced risk was strongest for high dose (≥500mg) usage (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.64 to 0.91). Conclusions Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, especially among daily users of low-dose aspirin. These findings suggest that the same aspirin regimen proven to protect against cardiovascular events and several cancers could reduce the risk of ovarian cancer 20% to 34% depending on frequency and dose of use. PMID:24503200

  4. Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, paracetamol and risk of endometrial cancer: a case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Neill, Annette S; Nagle, Christina M; Protani, Melinda M; Obermair, Andreas; Spurdle, Amanda B; Webb, Penelope M

    2013-03-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with reduced risk of a number of cancer types, however, previous studies of endometrial cancer have yielded inconclusive results. We analyzed data from the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS), a population-based case-control study (1,398 cases, 740 controls). We systematically reviewed all the evidence linking aspirin/NSAIDs use with endometrial cancer and conducted a meta-analysis. For ANECS, unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) adjusting for potential confounders. For the systematic review, we searched Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and conducted a review of citations from retrieved articles. The meta-analysis risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. In our case-control study, women who had ever used aspirin in the last 5 years had a significantly lower risk of endometrial cancer OR = 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-0.97]. There was a significant inverse dose-response (p-trend <0.001) such that women who reported using ≥2 aspirin/week had almost half the risk OR = 0.54 (0.38-0.78). No significant associations were observed between use of half-aspirin/day, non-aspirin NSAIDs or paracetamol and endometrial cancer risk. The results were similar when examined by cancer subtype. Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall pooled risk estimate for any versus no use of aspirin was 0.87 (0.79-0.96) with no evidence of heterogeneity. The pooled risk estimate for obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ) was 0.72 (0.58-0.90) but there was no association for non-obese women. Overall these results suggest that aspirin may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer, particularly among obese women.

  5. Are COX-2 inhibitors preferable to non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with risk of cardiovascular events taking low-dose aspirin?

    PubMed

    Strand, Vibeke

    2007-12-22

    Cyclo-oxygenase-2 selective inhibitors and non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with increased risk of acute cardiovascular events. Only aspirin offers primary and secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis, but trials have not answered directly whether low-dose aspirin is cardioprotective with COX-2 inhibitors. A large inception cohort study showed that concomitant use of aspirin reduced risk of cardiovascular events when given with rofecoxib, celecoxib, sulindac, meloxicam, and indometacin but not when given with ibuprofen. In large trials assessing gastrointestinal safety, there were fewer gastrointestinal events in patients using both COX-2 inhibitors and aspirin than in those using non-selective NSAIDs and aspirin; significantly fewer uncomplicated upper gastrointestinal events took place in the MEDAL trial. Analysis of VIGOR and two capsule endoscopy studies showed significantly less distal gastrointestinal blood loss with COX-2 inhibitors than with non-selective NSAIDs. Endoscopy trials showed that low-dose aspirin does not diminish the gastrointestinal benefits of COX-2 inibitors over non-selective NSAIDs. In an elderly epidemiological cohort receiving aspirin, both celecoxib and rofecoxib reduced risk of admission for gastrointestinal events. Comparison of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal risks is difficult: likelihood and severity of cardiovascular events differ between individuals, agents, and exposure. Mortality associated with gastrointestinal events is less frequent than with cardiovascular events, but asymptomatic ulcers can result in severe complications. Data support the conclusion that COX-2 inhibitors are preferable to non-selective NSAIDs in patients with chronic pain and cardiovascular risk needing low-dose aspirin, but relative risks and benefits should be assessed individually for each patient.

  6. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

  7. Imidazolium ionic liquids as solvents of pharmaceuticals: influence on HSA binding and partition coefficient of nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana M O; Ribeiro, Diogo M G; Pinto, Paula C A G; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2013-02-25

    In this work, the influence of imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) on bio-chemical parameters that influence the in vivo behavior of nimesulide was evaluated. In this context, the binding of nimesulide to human serum albumin (HSA), in IL media, was studied. In parallel, the evaluation of the interaction of drug-IL systems, with micelles of hexadecylphosphocholine (HDPC), enabled the calculation of partition coefficients (K(p)). Both assays were performed in buffered media in the absence and in the presence of emim [BF(4)], emim [Ms] and emim [TfMs] 1%. Even though there was an increase of the dissociation constant (K(d)) in IL media, nimesulide still binds to HSA by means of strong interactions. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the interaction is spontaneous for all the tested systems. Moreover, the studied systems exhibited properties that are favorable to the interaction of the drug with biological membranes, with K(p) values 2.5-3.5 higher than in aqueous environment. The studied nimesulide-IL systems presented promising characteristics regarding the absorption and distribution of the drug in vivo, so that the studied solvents seem to be good options for drug delivery.

  8. An aspirin a day.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Philip W

    2014-01-01

    The title of this article is also its punch line. The thesis that I will prove is that every adult, with a few exceptions, should take one 325 mg aspirin tablet each day. The drug is extraordinary and is beneficial in myriad ways. In this dosage the toxicity of the treatment is minimal. Since the drug is sold "over the counter", not requiring prescription, it is cheap and its benefits are easily underestimated. I do not use extensive reference citations; but just tell the story of aspirin.

  9. Dipolar reorientations in amorphous nimesulide: a TSDC and DSC study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Joaquim J Moura; Diogo, Hermínio P

    2016-05-10

    The experimental techniques of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC) were used to study the thermal behavior of the pharmaceutical drug nimesulide and its slow molecular mobility in the amorphous solid state. The glass forming ability, the glass stability and the tendency for crystallization from the equilibrium melt were investigated by DSC. The general kinetic features of the main relaxation, including the dynamic fragility, were studied by both experimental techniques. The TSDC study of the secondary relaxations did not disclose fast modes. However slow modes were detected, that were ascribed to the Johari - Goldstein relaxation on the basis of an aging study.

  10. Effects of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate in rats.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aynur; Ozcicek, Adalet; Suleyman, Bahadir; Coban, Taha Abdulkadir; Cimen, Ferda Keskin; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Altuner, Durdu; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal mucositis is one of the major problems in the patients receiving cancer treatment. Nimesulide is a drug with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiulcer features. We aimed to investigate the effect of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate (MTX) in rats. Experimental animals were divided into the control group, MTX group (MTXG) and nimesulide+MTX administered group (NMTXG) with eight rats per group. The control and MTXG groups were given distilled water by gavage and the NMTXG was given nimesulide 100 mg/kg orally. After one hour, the NMTXG and MTXG rat groups were administered oral MTX 5 mg/kg. This procedure was repeated once a day for 15 days and the rats were sacrificed. The duodenum and jejunum of each rat was removed for the assessment of biochemical markers and histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the duodenal and jejunal tissues of the animals which received MTX, compared to the control and NMTXG (P<0.001). Also, the levels of total glutathione (tGSH), glutathione reductase (GSHRd), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly lower in the MTXG (P<0.001) compared to other groups. MTX led to villus and crypt epithelial damage and inflammation containing marked PMNL and eosinophils in the intestinal tissues histopathologically. Whereas, there was only mild irregularities in the villus structures of the NMTXG. Nimesulide protected the small intestines against damage by MTX. Intestinal mucositis caused by MTX may be preventable by co-administered nimesulide.

  11. 5-aminosalicylic acid in combination with nimesulide inhibits proliferation of colon carcinoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hai-Ming; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Ma, Wei-Juan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in combination with nimesulide on the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells and its potential mechanisms. METHODS: Inhibitory effects of drugs (5-ASA, nimesulide and their combination) on HT-29 colon carcinoma cells were investigated by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis and proliferation were detected by TUNEL assay and immunocytochemical staining, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment with 5-ASA or nimesulide at the concentration of 10-1000 μmol/L inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner in vitro (t = 5.122, P < 0.05; t = 3.086, P < 0.05, respectively). The inhibition rate of HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation was also increased when pretreated with 5-ASA (100 μmol/L) or nimesulide (100 μmol/L) for 12-96 h, which showed an obvious time-effect relationship (t = 6.149, P < 0.05; t = 4.159, P < 0.05, respectively). At the concentration of 10-500 μmol/L, the apoptotic rate of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells significantly increased (t = 18.156, P < 0.001; t = 19.983, P < 0.001, respectively), while expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was remarkably decreased (t = 6.828, P < 0.05; t = 14.024, P < 0.05, respectively). 5-ASA in combination with nimesulide suppressed the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells more than either of these agents in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner (t = 5.448, P < 0.05; t = 4.428, P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: 5-ASA and nimesulide may inhibit the proliferation of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells and coadministration of these agents may have additional chemopreventive potential. PMID:17569127

  12. Effects of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Aynur; Ozcicek, Adalet; Suleyman, Bahadir; Coban, Taha Abdulkadir; Cimen, Ferda Keskin; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Altuner, Durdu; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is one of the major problems in the patients receiving cancer treatment. Nimesulide is a drug with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiulcer features. We aimed to investigate the effect of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate (MTX) in rats. Experimental animals were divided into the control group, MTX group (MTXG) and nimesulide+MTX administered group (NMTXG) with eight rats per group. The control and MTXG groups were given distilled water by gavage and the NMTXG was given nimesulide 100 mg/kg orally. After one hour, the NMTXG and MTXG rat groups were administered oral MTX 5 mg/kg. This procedure was repeated once a day for 15 days and the rats were sacrificed. The duodenum and jejunum of each rat was removed for the assessment of biochemical markers and histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the duodenal and jejunal tissues of the animals which received MTX, compared to the control and NMTXG (P<0.001). Also, the levels of total glutathione (tGSH), glutathione reductase (GSHRd), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly lower in the MTXG (P<0.001) compared to other groups. MTX led to villus and crypt epithelial damage and inflammation containing marked PMNL and eosinophils in the intestinal tissues histopathologically. Whereas, there was only mild irregularities in the villus structures of the NMTXG. Nimesulide protected the small intestines against damage by MTX. Intestinal mucositis caused by MTX may be preventable by co-administered nimesulide. PMID:27333839

  13. Natural lipid nanoparticles containing nimesulide: synthesis, characterization and in vivo antiedematogenic and antinociceptive activities.

    PubMed

    Raffin, Renata P; Lima, Amanda; Lorenzoni, Ricardo; Antonow, Michelli B; Turra, Cláudia; Alves, Marta P; Fagan, Solange B

    2012-04-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are drug delivery systems able to increase bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. They can be prepared with different lipid materials, especially natural lipids. Shea butter is a natural lipid obtained from the Butyrospermum parkii seed and rich in oleic and stearic acids. Nimesulide is a COX 2 selective anti-inflammatory that is poorly soluble in water. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize shea butter lipid nanoparticles using a new technique and evaluate the in vivo activity of these nanoparticles. Lipid nanoparticles were prepared by melting shea butter and mixing with an aqueous phase using a high shear mixer. The nanoparticles presented pH of 6.9 +/- 0.1, mean particle size of 90 nm and a narrow polydispersity (0.21). Zeta potential was around -20 mV and the encapsulation efficiency was 97.5%. Drug release was evaluated using dialysis bags and presented monoexponential profile with t50% of 4.80 h (free drug t50% was only 2.86 h). Antinociceptive activity was performed by the acetic acid model. Both nimesulide and nimesulide-loaded nanoparticles presented significant activity compared to the control. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by paw edema and was statistically different for the nanoparticles containing nimesulide compared to free nimesulide, blank nanoparticles and saline. In conclusion, the use of shea butter as encapsulating lipid was very successful and allowed nanoparticles to be prepared with a very simple technique. The nanoparticles presented significant pharmacological effects that were not seen for free drug administration.

  14. Neutrophil- and myeloperoxidase-mediated metabolism of reduced nimesulide: evidence for bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Chordia, Mahendra D; Li, Fengping; Huang, Tao; Linden, Joel; Macdonald, Timothy L

    2010-11-15

    Nimesulide, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been associated with rare idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. The chemical mechanisms underlying the liver injury remain unknown. We have undertaken the detailed study of the metabolic pathways of nimesulide in an effort to identify potential reactive metabolites. A previous report from this laboratory has demonstrated that one of the known nimesulide metabolites, termed reduced nimesulide (M1), is further bioactivated by human liver microsomes (HLMs) to form a reactive diiminoquinone species M2. The formation of M2 was confirmed indirectly by trapping with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The aim of this study was to explore the fate of M1 in an inflammatory environment created by the recruitment of leukocytes. Leukocytes upon activation produce hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and other myeloperoxidase (MPO) products, such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl), that are capable of metabolite oxidation. We demonstrate here that the reduced nimesulide, M1, undergoes a facile oxidation with activated neutrophils or with MPO in the presence of H(2)O(2) or HOCl to produce a variety of reactive as well as stable metabolites. One major metabolite, M3, was also produced by HLM as determined by trapping with NAC. Other metabolites, for example, M6, M8, and M9, were unique to the myeloperoxidase, because of their mode of formation from activation of the amino group of reduced nimesulide. The structures of some of these reactive metabolites were proposed on the basis of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses and established by their comparison with synthetic standards. Metabolite M6 is interesting because it provides clear evidence of amine activation and indicates the potential of the reactive intermediate of M1 to conjugate with protein nucleophiles. In summary, our results demonstrate that a known nimesulide metabolite could be bioactivated by MPO through a pathway distinct from HLM-mediated pathways and that

  15. Aspirin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is only used as a very last resort. Outlook (Prognosis) A toxic dose of aspirin is ... evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management. Clinical Toxicology . 2007:Vol. 45; pp 95-131. ...

  16. Potential of prescription registries to capture individual-level use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Denmark: trends in utilization 1999–2012

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Morten; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to over-the-counter availability, no consensus exists on whether adequate information on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use can be obtained from prescription registries. Objectives To examine utilization of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs in Denmark between 1999 and 2012 and to quantify the proportion of total sales that was sold on prescription. Method Based on nationwide data from the Danish Serum Institute and the Danish National Prescription Registry, we retrieved sales statistics for the Danish primary health care sector to calculate 1-year prevalences of prescription users of aspirin or nonaspirin NSAIDs, and to estimate the corresponding proportions of total sales dispensed on prescription. Results Both low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were commonly used in the Danish population between 1999 and 2012, particularly among elderly individuals. The 1-year prevalence of prescribed low-dose aspirin increased throughout the study period, notably among men. Nonaspirin NSAID use was frequent in all age groups above 15 years and showed a female preponderance. Overall, the prevalence of prescribed nonaspirin NSAIDs decreased moderately after 2004, but substantial variation according to NSAID subtype was observed; ibuprofen use increased, use of all newer selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased after 2004, diclofenac use decreased by nearly 50% after 2008, and naproxen use remained stable. As of 2012, the prescribed proportion of individual-level NSAID sales was 92% for low-dose aspirin, 66% for ibuprofen, and 100% for all other NSAIDs. Conclusion The potential for identifying NSAID use from prescription registries in Denmark is high. Low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use varied substantially between 1999 and 2012. Notably, use of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased, use of diclofenac decreased markedly, and naproxen use remained unaltered. PMID:24872722

  17. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) strengthens warning that non-aspirin non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause myocardial infarctions or strokes: the dentist's perspective].

    PubMed

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I; Vered, M

    2015-10-01

    This short communication is aimed to update dental practitioners regarding the recently published warning of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the risk for severe cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction or stroke following the use of non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

  18. Noninvasive quantitation of drug concentration in prostate and seminal vesicles: improvement and validation with desipramine and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Jun; Caffo, Brian; Choi, Leena; Radebaugh, Christine L; Fuchs, Edward J; Hendrix, Craig W

    2008-02-01

    The accessory glands of the male genital tract are the sites of several major health problems, including benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. We aimed to validate and improve our noninvasive method for the quantitation of drug concentrations in these physiological subcompartments. Twenty-seven men were dosed with 100 mg desipramine (a weak base) and 975 mg aspirin (a weak acid) and ejaculated their semen in 1 pass across 5 compartments of a collection device 2.5 hours later. A Bayesian latent-variable model previously developed by our group was further advanced for the estimation of drug concentrations in prostate and seminal vesicles based on drug and biomarker concentrations in the split ejaculate. Under normality assumptions, desipramine concentration (with 95% credible intervals) in prostate and seminal vesicles were 27 (8.3-52) ng/mL and 7.6 (4.0-11) ng/mL, respectively; salicylate concentration in prostate and seminal vesicles were 2.0 (0.093-6.5) microg/mL, and 9.9 (8.2-12) microg/mL, respectively. The prostate-to-seminal vesicles concentration ratio was 0.20 (0.0087-0.75) for salicylate and 3.6 (0.91-9.9) for desipramine. We conclude that our quantitative analysis along with the split ejaculate method is sensitive, reproducible, and applicable for the assessment of pharmacokinetics of the accessory glands of the male genital tract.

  19. Natural terpenes prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and release of apoptotic proteins during nimesulide-hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Tripathi, Madhulika; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Pandey, Pramod K; Kakkar, Poonam

    2012-01-01

    Nimesulide, an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, is reported to cause severe hepatotoxicity. In this study, molecular mechanisms involved in deranged oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction during nimesulide-induced hepatotoxicity and its attenuation by plant derived terpenes, camphene and geraniol has been explored in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hepatotoxicity due to nimesulide (80 mg/kg BW) was evident from elevated SGPT, SGOT, bilirubin and histo-pathological changes. Antioxidants and key redox enzymes (iNOS, mtNOS, Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, GPx and GR) were altered significantly as assessed by their mRNA expression, Immunoblot analysis and enzyme activities. Redox imbalance along with oxidative stress was evident from decreased NAD(P)H and GSH (56% and 74% respectively; P<0.001), increased superoxide and secondary ROS/RNS generation along with oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules. Nimesulide reduced mitochondrial activity, depolarized mitochondria and caused membrane permeability transition (MPT) followed by release of apoptotic proteins (AIF; apoptosis inducing factor, EndoG; endonuclease G, and Cyto c; cytochrome c). It also significantly activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 and increased oxidative DNA damage (level of 8-Oxoguanine glycosylase; P<0.05). A combination of camphene and geraniol (CG; 1:1), when pre-administered in rats (10 mg/kg BW), accorded protection against nimesulide hepatotoxicity in vivo, as evident from normalized serum biomarkers and histopathology. mRNA expression and activity of key antioxidant and redox enzymes along with oxidative stress were also normalized due to CG pre-treatment. Downstream effects like decreased mitochondrial swelling, inhibition in release of apoptotic proteins, prevention of mitochondrial depolarization along with reduction in oxidized NAD(P)H and increased mitochondrial electron flow further supported protective action of selected terpenes against nimesulide toxicity. Therefore CG, a

  20. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods.

  1. Magnesium sulfate and nimesulide have synergistic effects on rescuing brain damage after transient focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Chao; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Wu, Ming-Hsiu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium sulfate and nimesulide are commonly used drugs with reported neuroprotective effects. Their combination as stroke treatment has the potential benefits of decreasing individual drug dosage and fewer adverse effects. This study evaluated their synergistic effects and compared a low-dose combination with individual drug alone and placebo. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 90 min of focal ischemia with intraluminal suture occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by reperfusion. The rats were randomly assigned to receive one of the following treatments: placebo, magnesium sulfate (MgSO₄; 45 mg/kg) intravenously immediately after the induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion, nimesulide (6 mg/kg) intraperitoneally before reperfusion, and combined therapy. Three days after the ischemia-reperfusion insult, therapeutic outcome was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and a 28-point neurological severity scoring system. Cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E₂, myeloperoxidase, and caspase-3 expression after treatment were evaluated using Western blot analyses and immunohistochemical staining, followed by immunoreactive cell analysis using tissue cytometry. Only the combination treatment group showed a significant decrease in infarction volume (10.93±6.54% versus 26.43±7.08%, p<0.01), and neurological severity score (p<0.05). Low-dose MgSO₄ or nimesulide showed no significant neuroprotection. There was also significant suppression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E₂, myeloperoxidase, and caspase-3 expression in the combination treatment group, suggesting that the combination of the two drugs improved the neuroprotective effects of each individual drug. MgSO₄ and nimesulide have synergistic effects on ischemia-reperfusion insults. Their combination helps decrease drug dosage and adverse effects. Combined treatment strategies may help to combat stroke-induced brain damage in the future.

  2. Rapeseed oil-rich diet alters in vitro menadione and nimesulide hepatic mitochondrial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, João P; Silva, Ana M; Jurado, Amália S; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2013-10-01

    Diet-induced changes in the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes have been shown to influence physiological processes. However, the modulation effect of diet on mitochondrially-active drugs has not yet received the deserved attention. Our hypothesis is that modulation of membrane dynamics by diet impacts drug-effects on liver mitochondrial functioning. In a previous work, we have shown that a diet rich in rapeseed oil altered mitochondrial membrane composition and bioenergetics in Wistar rats. In the present work, we investigated the influence of the modified diet on hepatic mitochondrial activity of two drugs, menadione and nimesulide, and FCCP, a classic protonophore, was used for comparison. The results showed that the effects of menadione and nimesulide were less severe on liver mitochondria for rats fed the modified diet than on rats fed the control diet. A specific effect on complex I seemed to be involved in drug-induced mitochondria dysfunction. Liver mitochondria from the modified diet group were more susceptible to nimesulide effects on MPT induction. The present work demonstrates that diet manipulation aimed at modifying mitochondrial membrane properties alters the toxicity of mitochondria active agents. This work highlights that diet may potentiate mitochondrial pharmacologic effects or increase drug-induced liabilities.

  3. Effect of pH and water-soluble polymers on the aqueous solubility of nimesulide in the absence and presence of beta-cyclodextrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Alexanian, Christina; Papademou, Helen; Vertzoni, Maria; Archontaki, Helen; Valsami, Georgia

    2008-11-01

    The aqueous solubility of nimesulide in the absence and presence of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and its alkyl derivatives hydroxypropyl-beta-CD and methyl-beta-CD was studied. We also investigated the effect of water-soluble polymers, hydroxypropylmethyl-cellulose, sodium-carboxymethyl-cellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyethyleneglycol on the solubilization efficacy and complexation ability of cyclodextrins with nimesulide. The solubility of nimesulide in the absence and presence of cyclodextrins and polymers was studied using a phase solubility technique combined with a spectrophotometric method. The study was carried out at 25 degrees C and pH values of 6.0 and 7.0. Conditions in terms of polymer concentration and polymer heating with and without sonication were optimized. Values of the solubility enhancement factor of nimesulide in the presence of each cyclodextrin and in the absence and presence of each polymer were determined and the formation constants, K, of the inclusion complexes formed calculated. beta-CDs increased the aqueous solubility of nimesulide in the following order: methyl-beta-CD > beta-CD > hydroxypropyl-beta-CD. Addition of hydroxypropylmethyl-cellulose at a concentration of 0.1% (w/v) had the greatest influence on complexation of all three beta-CDs with nimesulide, while preheating of the polymer at 70 degrees C under sonication resulted in an additional two-fold increase in the aqueous solubility of the drug. Sodium-carboxymethyl-cellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyethyleneglycol had minor effects on the aqueous solubility of nimesulide. Thus beta-CD, hydroxypropyl-beta-CD and methyl-beta-CD are proposed as good solubilizing agents for nimesulide in the presence and absence of hydroxypropylmethyl-cellulose in order to enhance its oral bioavailability.

  4. Design and content determination of nimesulide injectable formulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Tao, Wanfu; Bourkaib, Nadia; Luo, Yonghuang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate Nimesulide inject able solution, establish a method for content determination, and accumulate data for registration of a new Nimesulide formulation. The optimal Nimesulide inject able formulation was determined based on the results of single factor test and orthogonal test. Moreover, clarity, stability, pH, content and related substances of Nimesulide were used as the main study indicators. The content of Nimesulide in inject able solution was determined by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The mobile phase consisted of V (methanol): V (potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.2)=60:40 at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The detection was carried out with UV detector (λ(max) =254 nm) under a column temperature of 25°C and an injection volume of 20μL. The optimal inject able formulation was 4% Nimesulide, 4% ethanolamine, 0.1% L-cysteine, 0.01% EDTA-2Na, a suitable amount of lactic acid and water for injection. Nimesulide detection limits range from 20 to 80 μg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 and high average recovery 99.91% (RSD=0.06%). In conclusion, the formulation was suitable for Nimesulide inject able form, and the determination method was simple, sensitive and accurate. Therefore, the Nimesulide inject able formulation can be used for industrial production and effectively controlled.

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician’s understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  6. Thermosensitive and mucoadhesive in situ gel based on poloxamer as new carrier for rectal administration of nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Hui-Ping; Guo, Yi-Sha; Zhong, Bo; Hu, Xia; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Li

    2012-07-01

    Poloxamer 407 has excellent thermo-sensitive gelling properties. Nevertheless, these gels possess inadequate poor bioadhesiveness and high permeability to water, which limited its' application as a thermoresponsive matrix. The main aim of the present investigation was to develop thermosensitive and mucoadhesive rectal in situ gel of nimesulide (NM) by using mucoadhesive polymers such as sodium alginate (Alg-Na) and HPMC. These gels were prepared by addition of mucoadhesive polymers (0.5%) to the formulations of thermosensitive gelling solution containing poloxamer 407 (18%) and nimesulide (2.0%). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used to modify gelation temperature and drug release properties. The gelation temperature and drug release rate of the prepared in situ gels were evaluated. Gelation temperature was significantly increased with incorporation of nimesulide (2.0%) in the poloxamer solution, while the addition of the mucoadhesive polymers played a reverse role on gelation temperature. The addition of PEG polymers increased the gelation temperature and the drug release rate. Among the formulations examined, the poloxamer 407/nimesulide/sodium alginate/PEG 4000 (18/2.0/0.5/1.2%) exhibited the appropriate gelation temperature, acceptable drug release rate and rectal retention at the administration site. Furthermore, the micrographic results showed that in situ gel, given at the dose of 20mg/kg, was safe for no mucosa irritation. In addition, it resulted in significantly higher initial serum concentrations, C(max) and AUC of NM compared to the solid suppository.

  7. Drug-protein binding of Danhong injection and the potential influence of drug combination with aspirin: Insight by ultrafiltration LC-MS and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfeng; Yi, Xiaojiao; Huang, Peng; Chen, Shuqing; Wu, Yongjiang

    2017-02-05

    Danhong injection (DHI) is a widely used Chinese medicine injection (CMI) for the clinical treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. In this study, a simple and efficient in vitro method based on ultrafiltration LC-MS and molecular modeling has been developed to study the human serum albumin (HSA) binding of the compounds in DHI. Seven major components including protocatechuic aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, salvianolic acid D, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid E, lithospermic acid and salvianolic acid B were identified as HSA ligands and their binding degrees in the proposed non-saturated model were 26.17, 37.69, 99.77, 91.78, 96.91, 99.42 and 98.10%, respectively. Considering the drug-HSA binding property of the compounds in DHI may change during drug combination therapy, competitive binding assay was carried out to evaluate the influence of aspirin on the DHI-HSA binding. Experimental results revealed that the salvianolic acids in DHI had stronger binding ability to HSA than sodium salicylate. To further verify the results above, molecular modeling and probe displacement assay were conducted to investigate the optimum binding site and binding affinity of the ligands on HSA. Our findings suggested that the established method could be a powerful tool to study the drug-HSA binding property of CMIs.

  8. Selective inhibition of COX-2 in humans is associated with less gastrointestinal injury: a comparison of nimesulide and naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Shah, A; Thjodleifsson, B; Murray, F; Kay, E; Barry, M; Sigthorsson, G; Gudjonsson, H; Oddsson, E; Price, A; Fitzgerald, D; Bjarnason, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 may provoke less gastric damage and platelet inhibition than conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
AIMS—We compared the biochemical and gastrointestinal effects of nimesulide, a potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor, with naproxen which exhibits no selectivity.
SUBJECTS—Thirty six healthy volunteers were randomised to nimesulide 100 mg or naproxen 500 mg twice daily for two weeks in a double blind, crossover study with a washout between treatments.
METHODS—Gastrointestinal side effects were assessed by endoscopy, and by estimation of small intestinal absorption-permeability and inflammation. Comparisons were made between variables at the end of each treatment phase.
RESULTS—Nimesulide caused significantly less gastric injury using the modified Lanza score (p<0.001) as well as reduced duodenum injury (p=0.039). Nimesulide had lower visual analogue scores (VAS) for haemorrhage and erosive lesions in the stomach (p<0.001) and for mucosal injection in the duodenum (p=0.039). Naproxen increased excretion of calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation (5.5 (1.2) to 12.1 (2.1) mg/l) while nimesulide had no effect (treatment difference p=0.03). Naproxen abolished platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid and suppressed serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2) by 98%, indices of COX-1 activity. In contrast, nimesulide had no significant effect on platelet aggregation, although it reduced serum TXB2 by 29%. Production of prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin by gastric biopsies, also COX-1 dependent, was inhibited by naproxen, but not by nimesulide. COX-2 activity, determined as endotoxin induced prostaglandin E2 formation in plasma, was markedly suppressed by both treatments.
INTERPRETATION—Nimesulide has preferential selectivity for COX-2 over COX-1 in vivo at full therapeutic doses and induces less gastrointestinal damage than that seen with naproxen in the short term

  9. The influence of excipients on the stability of the moisture sensitive drugs aspirin and niacinamide: comparison of tablets containing lactose monohydrate with tablets containing anhydrous lactose.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Hoag, S W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that in tablet formulations, moisture-sensitive drugs formulated with lactose monohydrate have the same stability as formulations containing anhydrous lactose, and to characterize the kinetics of niacinamide degradation in the solid state. Aspirin and niacinamide decomposition were used as indicators of stability. Aspirin and niacinamide tablets containing either lactose monohydrate or anhydrous lactose were separately investigated at different temperatures and relative humidities; the stability tests were done at 25 degrees C--60% RH, 40 degrees C--80% RH, 60 degrees C--60% RH, 60 degrees C--80% RH, and 80 degrees C--80% RH. Official U.S. Pharmacopeia methods were used for the aspirin and niacinamide assays. Statistical analysis showed that tablets containing lactose monohydrate have the same stability as tablets containing anhydrous lactose, which means that even though water is present in the crystal structure, the bound water does not influence the reaction rate. In addition, niacinamide degradation in the solid-state can be described by a third order rate equation.

  10. Temporal variability in the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel and aspirin after elective drug-eluting stent implantation. An ADAPT-DES substudy.

    PubMed

    Nührenberg, Thomas G; Stratz, Christian; Leggewie, Stefan; Hochholzer, Willibald; Valina, Christian M; Gick, Michael; Kirtane, Ajay J; Stone, Gregg W; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Trenk, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    Given conflicting data on temporal variability in pharmacodynamic platelet responses to clopidogrel, we investigated platelet reactivity on clopidogrel and aspirin for up to six months after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents. Platelet reactivity was determined in 102 patients before loading with clopidogrel and aspirin, and on maintenance therapy after PCI on day 1, at one month and six months by VerifyNow™ P2Y12 and Aspirin assays and by residual platelet aggregation (RPA) on light transmission aggregometry using adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid. By VerifyNow testing, median (interquartile range) P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) on clopidogrel were 166 (90-234), 195 (124-257), and 198 (141-252) on day 1, one month and six months after PCI, respectively (p=0.005 day 1 to 1 month, and p=0.86 1 month to 6 months). Using a cut-off of > 208 PRU, 35 % of patients had high platelet reactivity (HPR) to clopidogrel on day 1, 43 % at one month, and 46 % at six months after PCI. Between day 1 and six months after PCI, 38.2 % of patients changed clopidogrel responder status at least once. Other cut-offs and RPA yielded similar results. Platelet inhibition by aspirin was consistent over time with only five patients being characterised as having HPR. Considerable variation in individual on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was present during both the subacute and the late phases of maintenance therapy after elective PCI. Hence, the utility of contemporary platelet function testing to guide antiplatelet therapy may be limited.

  11. Association of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin use and the risk of head and neck cancers: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huai; Jian, Chengzhu; Wang, Hui; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, have emerged as the potential chemopreventive agents for a number of cancer types, however, previous studies of head and neck cancers (HNC) have yielded inconclusive results. We performed a meta-analysis of observational studies to quantitatively assess the association between NSAIDs use and the risk for HNC. Methods We searched Pubmed, Embase, Google scholar, and Cochrane library for relevant studies that were published in any language, from January 1980 to April 2016. We pooled the odds ratio (OR) from individual studies and performed subgroup, heterogeneity, and publication bias analyses. Results A total of eleven studies (eight case-control studies and three cohort studies), involving 370,000 participants and 10,673 HNC cases contributed to this meta-analysis. The results of these studies suggested that neither use of overall NSAIDs (OR=0.95; 95% CI, 0.81-1.11), aspirin (OR=0.93; 95% CI, 0.79-1.10), nor nonsteroidal NSAIDs (OR=0.92; 95% CI, 0.76-1.10) were associated with HNC risk. Similar nonsteroidal results were observed when stratified by HNC sites, study design, sample size, and varied adjustment factors. However, we found significant protective effect of ibuprofen (OR=0.85; 95% CI, 0.72-0.99) and long-term aspirin use (≧5years) (OR=0.75; 95% CI, 0.65-0.85) on HNC risk, with low heterogeneity and publication bias. Conclusions Our meta-analysis results do not support the hypothesis that overall use of NSAIDs significant reduces the risk of HNC. Whereas, we cannot rule out a modest reduction in HNC risk associated with ibuprofen and long-term aspirin use. PMID:27533449

  12. Quantification of nimesulide in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector (HPLC-UV): application to pharmacokinetic studies in 28 healthy Korean subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Park, Yoo-Sin; Kim, Shin-Hee; Kim, Sang-Yeon; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Do-Wan; Yang, Seok-Chul; Kang, Ju-Seop

    2012-05-01

    Nimesulide is a selective COX-2 inhibitor that is as effective as the classical non-acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the relief of various pain and inflammatory conditions, but is better tolerated with lower incidences of adverse effects than other drugs. After oral dose of 100 mg nimesulide to western subjects, a mean maximal concentration (C(max)) of 2.86 ∼ 6.5 µg/mL was reached at 1.22 ∼ 2.75 h and mean t(1/2β) of 1.8 ∼ 4.74 h. This study developed a robust method for quantification of nimesulide for the pharmacokinetics and suitability of its dosage in Korea and compared its suitability with other racial populations. Nimesulide and internal standard were extracted from acidified samples with methyl tert-butyl ether and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). The 28 healthy volunteers took 2 tablets of 100 mg nimesulide and blood concentrations were analyzed during the 24 h post dose. Several pharmacokinetic parameters were represented: AUC(0-infinity) = 113.0 mg-h/mL, C(max) = 12.06 mg/mL, time for maximal concentrations (T(max)) = 3.19 h and t(1/2β) = 4.51 h. These were different from those of western populations as follows: AUC was 14.5% and C(max) was 28% that of of Korean subjects and T(max) and t(1/2β) were also different. The validated HPLC-UV method was successfully applied for the pharmacokinetic studies of nimesulide in Korean subjects. Because the pharmacokinetics of nimesulide were different from western populations, its dosage regimen needs to be adjusted for Koreans.

  13. Adenosine signalling mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Maione, Francesco; Morello, Silvana; Lapucci, Andrea; Paccosi, Sara; Steckel, Bodo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Parenti, Astrid; Iuvone, Teresa; Schrader, Jürgen; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine formation from ATP is controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e-5NT/CD73); the latter converts AMP to adenosine and inorganic phosphate, representing the rate limiting step controlling the ratio between extracellular ATP and adenosine. Evidence that cellular expression and activity of CD39 and CD73 may be subject to changes under pathophysiological conditions has identified this pathway as an endogenous modulator in several diseases and was shown to be involved in the molecular mechanism of drugs, such as methotrexate, salicylates , interferon-β. We evaluated whether CD73/adenosine/A2A signalling pathway is involved in nimesulide anti-inflammatory effect, in vivo and in vitro. We found that the adenosine A2A agonist, 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS21680, 2mg/kg ip.), inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and the effect was reversed by co-administration of the A2A antagonist -(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385; 3mg/kg i.p.). Nimesulide (5mg/kg i.p.) anti-inflammatory effect was inhibited by pre-treatment with ZM241385 (3mg/kg i.p.) and by local administration of the CD73 inhibitor, adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene)diphosphate (APCP; 400μg/paw). Furthermore, we found increased activity of 5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in paws and plasma of nimesulide treated rats, 4h following oedema induction. In vitro, the inhibitory effect of nimesulide on nitrite and prostaglandin E2 production by lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 cell line was reversed by ZM241385 and APCP. Furthermore, nimesulide increased CD73 activity in J774 macrophages while it did not inhibit nitrite accumulation by lipopolysaccharide-activated SiRNA CD73 silenced J774 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effect of nimesulide in part is mediated by CD73

  14. Applying response surface methodology to optimize nimesulide permeation from topical formulation.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Yasser; Afreen, Urooj; Nisar Hussain Shah, Syed; Hussain, Talib

    2013-01-01

    Nimesulide is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that acts through selective inhibition of COX-2 enzyme. Poor bioavailability of this drug may leads to local toxicity at the site of aggregation and hinders reaching desired therapeutic effects. This study aimed at formulating and optimizing topically applied lotions of nimesulide using an experimental design approach, namely response surface methodology. The formulated lotions were evaluated for pH, viscosity, spreadability, homogeneity and in vitro permeation studies through rabbit skin using Franz diffusion cells. Data were fitted to linear, quadratic and cubic models and best fit model was selected to investigate the influence of permeation enhancers, namely propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol on percutaneous absorption of nimesulide from lotion formulations. The best fit quadratic model explained that the enhancer combination at equal levels significantly increased the flux and permeability coefficient. The model was validated by comparing the permeation profile of optimized formulations' predicted and experimental response values, thus, endorsing the prognostic ability of response surface methodology.

  15. Chemical insights in the concept of hybrid drugs: the antitumor effect of nitric oxide-donating aspirin involves a quinone methide but not nitric oxide nor aspirin.

    PubMed

    Hulsman, Niels; Medema, Jan Paul; Bos, Carina; Jongejan, Aldo; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Richel, Dick; Wijtmans, Maikel

    2007-05-17

    Hybrid drug 1 (NO-ASA) continues to attract intense research from chemists and biologists alike. It consists of ASA and a -ONO2 group connected through a spacer and is in preclinical development as an antitumor drug. We report that, contrary to current beliefs, neither ASA nor NO contributes to this antitumor effect. Rather, an unsubstituted QM was identified as the sole cytotoxic agent. QM forms from 1 after carboxylic ester hydrolysis and, in accordance with the HSAB theory, selectively reacts with cellular GSH, which in turn triggers cell death. Remarkably, a derivative lacking ASA and the -ONO2 group is 10 times more effective than 1. Thus, our data provide a conclusive molecular mechanism for the antitumor activity of 1. Equally importantly, we show for the first time that a "presumed invisible" linker in a hybrid drug is not so invisible after all and is in fact solely responsible for the biological effect.

  16. Management of NSAID/aspirin-induced small intestinal damage by GI-sparing NSAIDs, anti-ulcer drugs and food constituents.

    PubMed

    Satoh, H; Takeuchi, K

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic techniques such as capsule endoscopy have revealed that aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause mucosal lesions not only in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but also in the small intestine in humans. Gastric and duodenal lesions caused by NSAIDs can be treated with anti-secretory agents such as proton pump inhibitors or histamine H2-receptor antagonists; however, these drugs are ineffective in treating NSAID-induced lesions in the small intestine. Furthermore, there are few effective agents for the treatment of small intestinal lesions. Therefore, identification of effective therapies for the treatment of NSAID/aspirin-induced small intestinal lesions remains an urgent priority. In the present review, we focus on novel pharmacological treatments to prevent or reduce NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, i.e., 1) GI-sparing NSAIDs (NO- or H2S-NSAIDs, NSAIDs mixed with phosphatidylcholine); 2) anti-ulcer drugs such as mucosal protective agents (misoprostol, rebamipide, teprenone, etc.) and anti-secretory agents (lansoprazole, etc.); 3) antibiotics (metronidazole) and probiotics (Lactobacillus sp.); and 4) food constituents (lactoferrin and soluble dietary fibers). We surveyed data from clinical trials evaluating these novel treatments. Also reviewed herein were the pros and cons of the novel protective methods from the standpoint of safety, efficacy, convenience, and cost.

  17. Different effects of cytoprotective drugs on ethanol- and aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in pylorus-ligated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, K.; Nishiwaki, H.; Niida, H.; Okabe, S. )

    1990-02-01

    In anesthetized rats oral administration (2 ml) of both ethanol (50% in 150 mM HCl) and aspirin (80 mM in 150 mM HCl) produced bandlike lesions in the stomach, while more generalized lesions occurred in the pylorus-ligated stomach when the irritant was given intragastrically through the fistula prepared in the rumen and the mucosal folds were removed by stomach distension. The bandlike lesions induced in the intact stomach by both irritants were significantly and dose-dependently prevented by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2: 3 and 10 micrograms/kg, subcutaneously), cysteamine (30 and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or timoprazole (10 and 30 mg/kg, per os) at the doses which significantly inhibited gastric motility. In the pylorus-ligated stomach, however, neither of these agents showed any protection against the generalized lesions induced by ethanol, but such lesions caused by aspirin were significantly prevented only by dmPGE2. These agents also showed similar effects against the reduction of transmucosal PD in the pylorus-ligated stomach exposed to ethanol and aspirin. These results suggest that (1) the formation of bandlike lesions caused by ethanol and aspirin depends on the presence of mucosal folds and may be prevented by the agents that inhibit gastric motility, (2) the pathogenesis of the lesions induced by aspirin and ethanol may be different in the pylorus-ligated stomach, and (3) dmPGE2 has a unique protective ability that is not shared by usual cytoprotective agents.

  18. Nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, acts synergistically with ionizing radiation against A549 human lung cancer cells through the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Won, Juyoon; Maeng, Kyung Ah; Han, Young Soo; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Hong, Sung Hee

    2009-05-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a radiosensitizing effect on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about the underlying cellular mechanism. In this study, we found that the treatment with the NSAID nimesulide significantly increased the sensitivity of A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells to radiotherapy. The combined nimesulide-radiation treatment increased apoptosis, induced the cleavage of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activated caspase-8, and induced cleavage of Bid. A pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, suppressed this increase in apoptosis and also suppressed the cleavage of caspase-8, caspase-3, and PARP, suggesting a caspase-dependent mechanism. In addition, z-IETD-fmk, a selective caspase-8 inhibitor, suppressed the nimesulide- and radiation-induced cleavage activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, caspase-8, and Bid, and suppressed the concomitant apoptosis, indicating that the nimesulide-induced increase in radiosensitivity was initiated by caspase-8. However, the caspase-3 inhibitor z-DEVD-fmk failed to suppress activation of the caspase-8/Bid pathway, indicating that caspase-3 activation occurred downstream of caspase-8 activation in our experiments. Marked antitumor effects, which were evaluated by measuring protracted tumor regression, were observed when nude mice were treated with a combination of nimesulide at a clinically achievable dose (0.5 mg/kg) and radiation therapy. Our results, demonstrating the radiosensitivity-increasing and tumor growth-inhibiting effects of nimesulide, suggest that nimesulide may be suitable as an adjuvant to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of radiotherapy.

  19. [Blood platelets and asthma caused by aspirin].

    PubMed

    Joseph, M; Capron, A; Ameisen, J C; Martinot, J B; Tonnel, A B

    1987-10-01

    Platelets isolated from patients with aspirin-induced asthma (ASA patients) react abnormally in vitro to aspirin and to non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), by generating cytocidal molecules, that can kill parasitic larvae and to oxygen-dependent free radicles, which may be detected by chemiluminescence, although these drugs do not have a similar effect on platelets from normal donors or allergic asthmatics. The abnormality appears to be associated with the inhibiting properties of NSAID and aspirin on the cyclo-oxygenase pathway, that leads to a defect of the binding of prostaglandin endoperoxide PGH2 to its receptors on the platelet membrane. In addition, another metabolite from the lipoxygenase pathway which is at present poorly defined seems to participate in the anomaly. Sodium salicylate, a naturally produced catabolite of aspirin, that is well-tolerated by ASA patients, inhibits the abnormal response of the platelets and this opens new perspectives in the management of aspirin-sensitive intolerance.

  20. Nimesulide-induced severe hemolytic anemia and acute liver failure leading to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, L; de Francisco, R; Pérez-Pariente, J M; Cadahia, V; Tojo, R; Rodriguez, M; Lucena, Ma I; Andrade, R J

    2002-11-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman who had undergone 7 months of treatment with Nimesulide (100 mg/b.i.d.) for symptomatic osteoarthritis. The patient was admitted to our unit with a clinical picture of progressive jaundice over 3 weeks. Clinical and analytical studies revealed acute liver failure, this being confirmed by liver biopsy, which showed submassive necrosis. Serological tests for different viral agents causing hepatitis were all negative. In addition, she presented a picture of severe haemolytic anaemia resistant to several treatments and needed multiple transfusions. Twenty-three days after admission, the patient presented hepatic encephalopathy and received an orthotopic liver transplant on day 25. The evolution after transplantation was good and the patient continues in good health with no evidence of haemolysis almost 2 years later. Liver toxicity due to Nimesulide is well known, but to our knowledge the occurrence of haemolytic anaemia has not been related to this drug previously. For these reasons, Nimesulide has been restricted or removed from the market in several countries in recent months.

  1. Comparative analysis of preemptive analgesic effect of tramadol chlorhydrate and nimesulide following third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    da Costa Araújo, Fábio Andrey; de Santana Santos, Thiago; de Morais, Hécio Henrique Araújo; Laureano Filho, José Rodrigues; de Oliveira E Silva, Emanuel Dias; Vasconcellos, Ricardo José Holanda

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled, paired trial was to perform a comparative analysis of the preemptive analgesic effect of nimesulide and tramadol chlorhydrate during third molar surgery. The study was carried out between March and November 2009, involving 94 operations in 47 male and female patients with bilateral impacted lower third molars in comparable positions. The sample was divided into two groups. Group A received an oral dose of 100 mg of nimesulide 1 h prior to surgery. Group B received an oral dose of 100 mg of tramadol chlorhydrate 1 h prior to surgery. The following aspects were evaluated in the postoperative period: adverse effects of the drugs; amount of rescue medication used (acetaminophen 750 mg); and pain 5, 6, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 84 h after surgery using a visual analog pain scale. Peak pain occurred 5 h after surgery in both groups, with a mean pain score of 2.3 in Group A and 3.0 in Group B; this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p > 0.141). Based on the sample studied, nimesulide and tramadol chlorhydrate demonstrate similar preemptive analgesic effects when used in lower third molar surgeries.

  2. Association of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Lin, Yi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; White, Emily; Baron, John A.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Lindor, Noralane M.; Lemire, Mathieu; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ogino, Shuji; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Qu, Conghui; Rosse, Stephanie A.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Gauderman, W. James; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Prior studies examining a potential differential relationship of aspirin and NSAIDs with colorectal cancer risk according to genetic factors have been limited to analyses of candidate genes or pathways. Objective To comprehensively identify common genetic markers that characterize individuals who may obtain differential benefit from aspirin and/or NSAID chemoprevention, we tested gene by environment (G X E) interactions between regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. Design Case-control study using the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) that enrolled cases of colorectal cancer ascertained between 1976 and 2011 and matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) of colorectal cancer and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using conventional logistic regression analysis and case-only interaction analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, center, the first three principal components to account for population structure, and known colorectal cancer risk factors. For all genome-wide analyses, a two-sided p-value<5.0×10-8, which yields a genome-wide significance level of 0.05, was considered statistically significant. Setting 10 observational studies (5 case-control and 5 cohort studies) that were initiated between 1976 and 2003 across the U.S., Canada, Australia and Germany. Participants 8,634 colorectal cancer cases and 8,553 controls of European descent. Exposures Genome-wide SNP data generated from genome-wide association scans and imputation to HapMap II, as well as information on regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and other colorectal cancer risk factors collected using in-person interviews and/or structured questionnaires. Main Outcomes and Measures

  3. Physicochemical impact studies of gamma rays on "aspirin" analgesics drug and its metal complexes in solid form: Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological assessment of Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) aspirinate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.; Heiba, Zein K.

    2013-09-01

    Metal aspirinate complexes, M2(Asp)4, where M is Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) or Ba(II) are formed by refluxed of aspirin (Asp) with divalent non-transition metal ions of group (II) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic measurements (infrared, electronic, 1H NMR, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Elemental analysis of the chelates suggests the stoichiometry is 1:2 (metal:ligand). Infrared spectra of the complexes agree with the coordination to the central metal atom through three donation sites of two oxygen atoms of bridge bidentate carboxylate group and oxygen atom of sbnd Cdbnd O of acetyl group. Infrared spectra coupled with the results of elemental analyzes suggested a distorted octahedral structure for the M(II) aspirinate complexes. Gamma irradiation was tested as a method for stabilization of aspirin as well as their complexes. The effect of gamma irradiation, with dose of 80 Gy, on the properties of aspirinate complexes was studied. The aspirinate chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial activity than the free aspirin chelate.

  4. Associations of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and paracetamol use with PSA-detected prostate cancer: findings from a large, population-based, case-control study (the ProtecT study).

    PubMed

    Murad, Ali S; Down, Liz; Davey Smith, George; Donovan, Jenny L; Athene Lane, Janet; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Martin, Richard M

    2011-03-15

    Evidence from laboratory studies suggests that chronic inflammation plays an important role in prostate cancer aetiology. This has resulted in speculation that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may protect against prostate cancer development. We analysed data from a cross-sectional case-control study (n(cases) = 1,016; n(controls) = 5,043), nested within a UK-wide population-based study that used prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing for identification of asymptomatic prostate cancers, to investigate the relationship of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and paracetamol use with prostate cancer. In conditional logistic regression models accounting for stratum matching on age (5-year age bands) and recruitment centre, use of non-aspirin NSAIDs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.67] or all NSAIDs (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.07-1.47) were positively associated with prostate cancer. There were weaker, not conventionally statistically significant, positive associations of aspirin (OR = 1.13; 95% CI = 0.94-1.36) and paracetamol (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.90-1.60) with prostate cancer. Mutual adjustment for aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs or paracetamol made little difference to these results. There was no evidence of confounding by age, family history of prostate cancer, body mass index or self-reported diabetes. Aspirin, NSAID and paracetamol use were associated with reduced serum PSA concentrations amongst controls. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that NSAIDs reduce the risk of PSA-detected prostate cancer. Our conclusions are unlikely to be influenced by PSA detection bias because the inverse associations of aspirin, NSAID and paracetamol use with serum PSA would have attenuated (not generated) the observed positive associations.

  5. Aspirin for the next generation

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Nick; Smith, Tom

    2013-01-01

    First used as an analgesic and antipyretic, investigations into aspirin’s anti-inflammatory effects led to its establishment in 1974 as a drug that altered the activity of platelets to influence the course and incidence of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular disease. It became the standard in treatment and prevention of vascular disorders. The 25th International Scientific Meeting on aspirin held at the Royal College of Physicians in London on 24th October 2012 took aspirin into fresh fields, among them cancer, diabetes, dementia and gynaecology. PMID:23589729

  6. Aspirin and some other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein gene expression in T-84 cells.

    PubMed

    Tondelier, D; Brouillard, F; Lipecka, J; Labarthe, R; Bali, M; Costa de Beauregard, M A; Torossi, T; Cougnon, M; Edelman, A; Baudouin-Legros, M

    1999-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF gene, which encodes CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a transmembrane protein that acts as a cAMP-regulated chloride channel The disease is characterized by inflammation but the relationship between inflammation, abnormal transepithelial ion transport, and the clinical manifestations of CF are uncertain. The present study was undertaken to determine whether three nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (aspirin, ibuprofen, and indomethacin) modulate CFTR gene expression in T-84 cells. Treatment with NSAIDs reduced CFTR transcripts, and decreased cAMP-stimulated anion fluxes, an index of CFTR function. However, the two phenomena occurred at different concentrations of both drugs. The results indicate that NSAIDs can regulate both CFTR gene expression and the function of CFTR-related chloride transport, and suggest that NSAIDs act via multiple transduction pathways.

  7. Effect of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on prostate cancer incidence and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been postulated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use leads to decreased prostate cancer (PCa) risk. In recent years, NSAIDs’ role in PCa development has been extensively studied; however, there is not yet a definitive answer. Moreover, the epidemiological results for NSAIDs’ effect on PCa-specific mortality have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to examine the controversy. Methods We performed a literature database search and included all published studies conducted in the general population exposed to any NSAID, extracting an odds ratio (OR) or a hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) that compared the incidence of PCa or PCa-specific mortality with non-exposure. We derived a pooled OR or HR using random or fixed effects models, as appropriate. Subgroup analyses were also performed. Results Thirty-nine studies (20 case–control and 19 cohort studies) were included in this analysis. Thirty-one studies were available concerning NSAID use and PCa incidence and eight studies on PCa-specific mortality. Compared to non-use, aspirin use was statistically significantly associated with PCa incidence risk, and the association was slightly stronger for advanced PCa than for total PCa (OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87 to 0.97 for total PCa; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.89 for advanced PCa). Aspirin use seems also to be associated with a modest reduction in PCa-specific mortality (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.96 for total PCa; OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71 to 0.92 for advanced PCa). Generally, the pooled effects for any NSAIDs, NA-NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors demonstrated no adverse or beneficial effects on PCa development or PCa-specific mortality, but the results were not consistent. The effect estimates did not vary markedly when stratified by study design and study quality but varied by geographic region. Furthermore, long-term aspirin use (≥4 years) was also significantly associated

  8. The effect of guggulipid and nimesulide on MPTP-induced mediators of neuroinflammation in rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Rajasekar, N; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2012-12-05

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its mechanism is still not properly explored. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition has also been known a major neuroprotective strategy in the various 1-methyl-4-phenyl 1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced models of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its role in astrocytes is still not properly understood. The present study demonstrated that, guggulipid and nimesulide (preferentially selective COX-2 inhibitor) treatment of rat astrocytoma cells, C6 for 24 h significantly decreased MPTP (400 μM) induced nitrative and oxidative stress and intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) level. Guggulipid and nimesulide also deactivated MPTP-induced P-p38 MAPK (Phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) and down regulated expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and CHOP (C/EBP, homologous protein 10). At transcriptional level of inflammatory cytokine genes, guggulipid and nimesulide down regulated MPTP-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expressions with up regulations in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) mRNA expressions. In addition to this, guggulipid and nimesulide inhibited translocation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) from cytosol to nucleus. In conclusion, our findings elucidated the potential antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory effect of guggulipid and nimesulide in rat astrocytoma cells C6, which may suggest the use of these drugs in the management of neuroinflammation associated pathophysiology of PD.

  9. Effect of caffeine, norfloxacin and nimesulide on heartbeat and VEGF expression of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Hsu, C H; Wen, Z H; Lin, C S; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2011-03-01

    The use of pharmaceuticals during pregnancy may causes abnormalities to the embryo. Sometime the drug also effect to the new born if the drug transferred through lactation. We have used zebrafish model to see the effect of some pharmaceuticals on embryos and larvae. Three drugs, caffeine, norfloxacin and nimesulide, were used for this study to see the effect mainly the hatching rate of eggs, heart beat rate and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of the larvae. VEGF is an important signaling protein that involved generating the new blood vessels during embryonic development. We have used 10, 20, 50, 100 microg ml(-1) concentrations of all the drugs to see the effect. No significant mortality or malformations were observed in zebrafish embryos. Hatching was stared from 60 hr. In control group, 91% hatching rate was observed. Lowest hatching rate was observed using highest concentration of norfloxacin (100 microg ml(-1)) and nimesulide (100 microg ml(-1)) i.e. 55 and 56% respectively. In control group, 110 to 115 heart beat rate was counted per minute. Significantly higher heart beat was observed in caffeine treated group which is 125 to 140 min(-1) Lower heart beat was noted in nimesulide treated group which is 100 min(-1). We have tried to observe the possible effect of VEGF of the larvae by these three drugs. Expression of VEGF was very low in caffeine treated group. Almost no VGF expression was observe in 100 microg ml(-1) caffeine treated group. These studies suggest that there is a possibility that high dosage of caffeine can harm the unborn baby or new born babies, if the mothers use caffeine.

  10. Experiments with Aspirin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa L.; Barry, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments that can be used to demonstrate how aspirin can be synthesized and characterized, how the hydrolysis of aspirin can be used as an introduction to kinetics, and how coordination chemistry (chelation) can be introduced by preparing and characterizing the copper complexes of aspirin and salicylic acid. (Contains over…

  11. A review of analytical techniques for determination of oxicams, nimesulide and nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Starek, Małgorzata; Krzek, Jan

    2009-01-15

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the group most often used in human health care, since they are available without prescription for treatment of fever and minor pain. The present review submitted the use of various analytical techniques for the determination of oxicams, nimesulide and nabumetone. This review covers the time period from 1990 to 2008 during which over 200 analytical methods including all types of chromatographic, spectrophotometric and voltammetric techniques were reported. Presented application concerns analysis of chosen NSAIDs from pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples.

  12. Ibuprofen or aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Blechman, W J; Schmid, F R; April, P A; Wilson, C H; Brooks, C D

    1975-07-28

    Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal drug with analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties that was recently introduced for use in antiarthritis therapy in the United States. In a year-long double-blind multiclinic trial in 885 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ibuprofen was at least as satisfactory as aspirin, considering both efficacy and tolerance. In the majority of patients, daily doses ranged from 800 to 1,600 mg of ibuprofen and 3 to 6 gm of aspirin. The drugs did not differ greatly in providing relief from arthritis symptoms, but ibuprofen was definitely better tolerated, especially in regard to gastrointestinal complaints. Seven percent of the ibuprofen group dropped out of the study because of adverse reactions, as compared with 16% of the aspirin group; 17% of the ibuprofen group and 31% of the aspirin group had gastrointestinal symptoms.

  13. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  14. Point-of-care platelet function assays demonstrate reduced responsiveness to clopidogrel, but not aspirin, in patients with Drug-Eluting Stent Thrombosis whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Alex R; Petley, Graham; Morton, Geraint; Dawkins, Keith D; Curzen, Nick P

    2008-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that point-of-care assays of platelet reactivity would demonstrate reduced response to antiplatelet therapy in patients who experienced Drug Eluting Stent (DES) ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy compared to matched DES controls. Whilst the aetiology of stent thrombosis (ST) is multifactorial there is increasing evidence from laboratory-based assays that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet therapy is a factor in some cases. Methods From 3004 PCI patients, seven survivors of DES ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy were identified and each matched with two patients without ST. Analysis was performed using (a) short Thrombelastogram PlateletMapping™ (TEG) and (b) VerifyNow Aspirin and P2Y12 assays. TEG analysis was performed using the Area Under the Curve at 15 minutes (AUC15) as previously described. Results There were no differences in responses to aspirin. There was significantly greater platelet reactivity on clopidogrel in the ST group using the Accumetrics P2Y12 assay (183 ± 51 vs. 108 ± 31, p = 0.02) and a trend towards greater reactivity using TEG AUC15 (910 ± 328 vs. 618 ± 129, p = 0.07). 57% of the ST group by TEG and 43% of the ST cases by Accumetrics PRU had results > two standard deviations above the expected mean in the control group. Conclusion This study demonstrates reduced platelet response to clopidogrel in some patients with DES ST compared to matched controls. The availability of point-of-care assays that can detect these responses raises the possibility of prospectively identifying DES patients at risk of ST and manipulating their subsequent risk. PMID:18312665

  15. Neuroprotective mechanism of losartan and its interaction with nimesulide against chronic fatigue stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Barinder; Mishra, Jitendriya; Sah, Sangeeta Pilkhwal; Pottabathini, Raghavender

    2015-12-01

    Potential role of angiotensin-II and cyclooxygenase have been suggested in the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue stress. The present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of losartan and its interaction with nimesulide against chronic fatigue stress and related complications in mice. In the present study, male Laca mice (20-30 g) were subjected to running wheel activity test session (RWATS) for 6 min daily for 21 days. Losartan, nimesulide and their combinations were administered daily for 21 days, 45 min before being subjected to RWATS. Various behavioral and biochemical and neuroinflammatory mediators were assessed subsequently. 21 days RWATS treatment significantly decreased number of wheel rotations/6 min indicating fatigue stress like behaviors as compared to naive group. 21 days treatment with losartan (10 and 20 mg/kg, ip), nimesulide (5 and 10 mg/kg, po) and their combinations significantly improved behavior [increased number of wheel rotations, reversal of post-exercise fatigue, locomotor activity, antianxiety-like behavior (number of entries, latency to enter and time spent in mirror chamber), and memory performance (transfer latency in plus-maze performance task)], biochemical parameters (reduced serum corticosterone, brain lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, restored reduced glutathione levels and catalase activity) as compared to RWATS control. Besides, TNF-α, CRP levels were significantly attenuated by these drugs and their combinations as compared to control. The present study highlights the role of cyclooxygenase modulation in the neuroprotective effect of losartan against chronic fatigue stress-induced behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations in mice.

  16. Nimesulide binding site in the B0AT1 (SLC6A19) amino acid transporter. Mechanism of inhibition revealed by proteoliposome transport assay and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Lorena; Seidita, Angela; Sensi, Cristina; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Eberini, Ivano; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-06-01

    The effect of pharmaceutical compounds on the rat kidney B0AT1 transporter in proteoliposomes has been screened. To this aim, inhibition of the transport activity by the different compounds was measured on Na(+)-[(3)H]glutamine co-transport in the presence of membrane potential positive outside. Most of the tested drugs had no effect on the transport activity. Some compounds exhibited inhibitory effects from 5 to 88% at concentration of 300μM. Among the tested compounds, only the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide exerted potent inhibition on B0AT1. From dose response analysis, an IC50 value of 23μM was found. Inhibition kinetic analysis was performed: noncompetitive inhibition of the glutamine transport was observed while competitive behaviour was found when the inhibition was analyzed with respect to the Na(+) concentration. Several molecules harbouring functional groups of nimesulide (analogues) were tested as inhibitors. None among the tested molecules has the capacity to inhibit the transport with the exception of the compound NS-398, whose chemical structure is very close to that of whole nimesulide. The IC50 for this compound was 131μM. Inhibition kinetics showed behaviour of NS-398 identical to that of nimesulide, i.e., noncompetitive inhibition respect to glutamine and competitive inhibition respect to Na(+). Molecular docking of nimesulide suggested that this drug is able to bind B0AT1 in an external dedicated binding site and that its binding produces a steric hindrance effect of the protein translocation path abolishing the transporter activity.

  17. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes.

  18. Isomeric iodinated analogs of nimesulide: Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity, and transport across Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Arai, Jun; Hisa, Takuya; Saito, Yohei; Mukai, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Maeda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Fumihiko

    2016-08-15

    Isomeric iodinated derivatives of nimesulide, with an iodine substituent on the phenoxy ring, were prepared with the aim of identifying potential candidate compounds for the development of imaging agents targeting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the brain. Both the experimental logP7.4 and pKa values for these iodinated analogs were in the acceptable range for passive brain penetration. The para-iodo-substituted analog was a more potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor than nimesulide, with a potency that was comparable to the reference drug, celecoxib. Iodination at the ortho- or meta-position of the phenoxy ring was associated with a substantial loss of COX-2 inhibitory activity. Transport studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers in the presence and absence of a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, verapamil, indicated that the para-iodo-substituted analog was not a P-gp transport substrate; this feature is a prerequisite for potential in vivo brain imaging compounds. The para-iodo-substituted analog of nimesulide appears to be an attractive candidate for the development of radioiodine-labeled tracers for in vivo brain imaging of COX-2 levels.

  19. Antiplatelet therapy: aspirin resistance and all that jazz!

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Zantek, Nicole D; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Rao, Gundu H R

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. Aspirin used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs has been shown to offer significant benefit to patients at high risk of vascular events. Resistance to the action of aspirin may decrease this benefit. Aspirin resistance has been defined by clinical and/or laboratory criteria; however, detection by laboratory methods prior to experiencing a clinical event will likely provide the greatest opportunity for intervention. Numerous laboratory methods with different cutoff points have been used to evaluate the resistance. Noncompliance with aspirin treatment has also confounded studies. A single assay is currently insufficient to establish resistance. Combinations of results to confirm compliance and platelet inhibition may identify "at-risk" individuals who truly have aspirin resistance. The most effective strategy for managing patients with aspirin resistance is unknown; however, studies are currently underway to address this issue.

  20. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug and Aspirin Use, and Mortality among Critically Ill Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Patients: an Exploratory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Holly; Vaughn, Frances L; Mosholder, Andrew D; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Rubinson, Lewis

    2016-05-20

    We explored nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and aspirin (ASA) use and mortality in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' registry of 683 adult and 838 pediatric critically ill pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) patients. Among adults, 88 (12.9%) and 101 (14.8%) reported pre-admission use of an NSAID and ASA, respectively; mortality was similar (23-24%) regardless of NSAID or ASA use. Mortality among 89 pediatric NSAID users and 749 nonusers did not differ significantly (10.1% and 8.8%, respectively). One of 16 pediatric ASA users died. Among pediatric patients, the adjusted relative risk estimate for NSAID use and 90-day mortality was higher when influenza vaccination was included in the model (risk ratio [RR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-3.2), although not statistically significant. Among adults, RR estimates did not change appreciably after adjusting for age, sex, health status, or vaccine status. We found no compelling evidence that NSAID or ASA use influenced mortality in severe pH1N1.

  1. In vitro-in vivo correlation study on nimesulide loaded hydroxypropylmethylcellulose microparticles.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shujaat Ali; Ahmad, Mahmood; Murtaza, Ghulam; Aamir, Muhammad Naeem; Kousar, Rozina; Rasool, Fatima; Shahiq-u-Zaman

    2010-06-01

    This study involves mathematical simulation model such as in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) development for various extended release formulations of nimesulide loaded hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) microparticles (M1, M2 and M3 containing 1, 2, and 3 g HPMC, respectively and 1 g drug in each) having variable release characteristics. In vitro dissolution data of these formulations were correlated to their relevant in vivo absorption profiles followed by predictability worth analysis of these Level A IVIVC. Nimaran was used as control formulation to validate developed formulations and their respective models. The regression coefficients of IVIVC plots for M1, M2, M3 and Nimaran were 0.834 9, 0.831 2, 0.927 2 and 0.898 1, respectively. The internal prediction error for all formulations was within limits, i.e., < 10%. A good IVIVC was found for controlled release nimesulide loaded HPMC floating M3 microparticles. In other words, this mathematical simulation model is best fit for biowaiver studies which involves study parameters as those adopted for M3 because the value of its IVIVC regression coefficient is the closest to 1 as compared to M1 and M2.

  2. Aspirin: History and Applications; Cross-Curricular Instructional Strategies, Ideas, and Applications for Teaching about Aspirin in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hademenos, George

    2005-01-01

    Of the thousands of drugs and medicines available for the prevention, treatment, and control of human disease and discomfort, the most widely used is aspirin. The primary reason for aspirin's popularity is its capabilities as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory agent. This article explores the historical development of aspirin…

  3. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-07-26

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk.

  4. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk. PMID:26225198

  5. Dissolution and pharmacokinetics of a novel micronized aspirin formulation.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Hammer, M

    2012-08-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) has been used as an analgesic, antipyretic and antiinflammatory drug for many years. A new 500 mg aspirin tablet formulation containing micronized active ingredient and an effervescent component has been developed for potential improvement in the onset of action for acute pain treatment. This paper describes the dissolution and the pharmacokinetics of the new formulation in comparison with regular aspirin tablets, aspirin granules and aspirin effervescent tablets. Micronized aspirin tablets dissolve significantly faster over a pH range from 1.2 to 6.8 compared to regular 500 mg aspirin tablets. Plasma concentration time curve comparison to regular 500 mg aspirin tablets showed a substantial improvement in the time to maximum plasma concentrations (T(max)) (ASA 17.5 min vs. 45 min) and an increase in maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) (ASA 13.8 μg/ml vs. 4.4 μg/ml) while the overall extent of exposure (AUC) remains almost unchanged. The data suggest a potential improvement for onset of action in treating acute pain with the new micronized aspirin formulation.

  6. Aspirin for vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Gianetta; Orrell, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is widely prescribed for patients with a diagnosis of vascular dementia. In a survey of UK geriatricians and psychiatrists 80% of patients with clinical diagnoses of vascular dementia were prescribed aspirin. However, a number of queries remain unanswered. Is there convincing evidence that aspirin benefits patients with vascular dementia? Does aspirin affect cognition and behaviour, or improve prognosis? Does the risk of cerebral or gastric haemorrhage outweigh any benefit? Objectives To assess the randomised trial evidence for efficacy and safety of aspirin in the treatment of vascular dementia. Search methods We searched ALOIS: the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group’s Specialized Register on 12 March 2012 using the terms: aspirin OR “acetylsalicylic acid”. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of a number of major healthcare databases, numerous trial registries and grey literature sources. In addition, relevant websites were searched and some journals were handsearched. Specialists in the field were approached for unpublished material and any publications found were searched for additional references. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of aspirin for vascular dementia were eligible for inclusion. Data collection and analysis Retrieved studies were analysed independently by both review authors. Methodology and results were critically appraised and outcomes scanned included cognition, behavioural change, mortality and institutionalisation. Main results No trials were eligible for inclusion in this review. Authors’ conclusions The most recent search for references to relevant research was carried out in March 2012. No trials were found for inclusion in this systematic review. Low-dose aspirin is frequently used as ‘treatment as normal’ in control groups and as a baseline treatment in pharmacological trials. There is still no good evidence that

  7. Prevention of dipyrone (metamizole) induced inhibition of aspirin antiplatelet effects.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Amin; Richter, Stefan; Schrör, Karsten; Rassaf, Tienush; Merx, Marc W; Kelm, Malte; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We have recently shown that dipyrone (metamizole), a non-opioid analgesic, can nullify aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) antiplatelet effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we analysed the aspirin and dipyrone drug-drug interaction in order to identify strategies to prevent the dipyrone induced inhibition of asprin antiplatelet effects. Platelet function was measured by arachidonic acid-induced light-transmission aggregometry, thromboxane (TX) B2- formation by immunoassay. Dipyrone metabolite plasma levels were determined by high-performance-liquid-chromatography (HPLC). In seven healthy individuals, in vitro ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM/ 300 µM/ 1,000 µM) and dipyrone (10 µM) coincubation revealed, that the aspirin and dipyrone interaction can be overcome by increasing doses of aspirin. In 36 aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients, addition of ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM) in vitro inhibited, but did not completely overcome the dipyrone induced reduction of aspirin antiplatelet effects. Notably, the inhibition of thromboxane formation in aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients coincided with dipyrone plasma levels. In a cross-over designed study in four healthy individuals, we were able to prove that inhibition of aspirin (100 mg/ day) effects by dipyrone (750 mg/ day) was reversible. Furthermore, aspirin (100 mg/ day) medication prior to dipyrone (750 mg/ day) intake prevented the inhibition of antiplatelet effects by dipyrone in 12 healthy individuals. In conclusion, aspirin medication prior to dipyrone intake preserves antiplatelet effects, circumventing the pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction at the level of cyclooxygenase-1.

  8. Aspirin and spinal haematoma after neuraxial anaesthesia: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Vela Vásquez, R S; Peláez Romero, R

    2015-11-01

    The safety of aspirin therapy in neuraxial anaesthesia has been historically questioned, and the current recommendations are still heterogeneous. A comprehensive review of clinical evidence and a comparative analysis of European and American guidelines were performed. Low-dose aspirin produces a selective, complete and irreversible cyclooxygenase-1 blockade, and higher doses do not increase the antiplatelet effect. Additional cyclooxygenase-2 blockade by high-dose aspirin might decrease the antithrombotic efficacy by inhibiting endothelial prostacyclin synthesis. Different doses of aspirin have been shown to be safe in a broad population subjected to neuraxial anaesthesia or analgesia. In the few case reports of spinal haematoma involving aspirin therapy, additional complicating factors were present. Considering the available evidence, the majority of national scientific societies agree that the isolated use of aspirin does not increase the risk of spinal haematoma and does not represent a contraindication to neuraxial blocks. The precautions regarding higher doses do not seem to be justified. Although aspirin alone is considered to be safe in neuraxial anaesthesia, the concurrent administration of other antithrombotic drugs significantly increases the risk of spinal haematoma and the recommended safety times for each of these other drugs must be strictly followed. An individualized assessment of the risks and benefits should be performed, before performing a neuraxial technique or catheter removal in a patient receiving aspirin.

  9. Controlled delivery of aspirin: effect of aspirin on polymer degradation and in vitro release from PLGA based phase sensitive systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu; Singh, Jagdish

    2008-06-05

    The objective of this study was to develop poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based injectable phase sensitive in situ gel forming delivery system for controlled delivery of aspirin, and to characterize the effect of drug/polymer interaction on the in vitro release of aspirin and polymer degradation. Aspirin was dissolved into PLGA solution in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Poly(ethylene glycol)400 was used as plasticizer to reduce initial burst release. The solution formulation was injected into aqueous release medium to form a gel depot. Released samples were withdrawn periodically and assayed for aspirin content by high performance liquid chromatography. The effect of aspirin on the degradation of PLGA matrix was evaluated using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Gel Permeation Chromatography. PLGA based in situ gel forming formulations controlled the in vitro release of aspirin for 7 days only. Analysis of PLGA matrix residuals revealed that PLGA in aspirin loaded formulations exhibited a significantly (p<0.05) faster degradation compared to blank formulations. These findings suggest that aspirin causes an unusually faster degradation of PLGA. Such faster degradation of PLGA has not been noticed for any other drugs reported in the literature.

  10. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need.

  11. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  12. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) effects on behavioral thermoregulation with microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; Laconsay, K L; Agnew, A C; Henderson, M E; Quinn, J M; Holland, B E; DePace, A N

    1993-08-01

    Aspirin is a widely used over-the-counter drug in our society which has wide therapeutic value, yet not all of the behavioral side effects have been studied. Different doses of aspirin solutions were administered (ip) prior to fixed-interval 2-min. schedules of microwave reinforcement in rats tested in a cold environment. Four Sprague-Dawley rats were conditioned to regulate their thermal environment with 5-sec. exposures of MW reinforcement. Friedman's nonparametric test showed significant differences among aspirin and saline-control doses. Post hoc sign tests showed that a moderate dose of aspirin increased operant behavior reinforced by MW radiation, yet lower and higher doses decreased and then increased the rate of responding which resulted in an inverted U-shaped trend. Possible multiple effects of aspirin in terms of its thermoregulatory as well as its pain-tolerance properties, and implications for hypothalamic "set point" are discussed.

  13. Effects of nimesulide, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen and nabumetone on cyclooxygenase-1- and cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostanoid production in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Markku; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Kosonen, Outi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Sarna, Seppo; Moilanen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    : The beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), whereas some of their adverse effects are associated mainly with inhibition of COX-1. Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, but increase the risk of thromboembolic events pointing to importance of optimal COX-1/COX-2 inhibition in drug safety. We compared the effects of acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, nabumetone and nimesulide on COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in healthy volunteers in an ex vivo set-up using single oral doses commonly used to treat acute pain. In a randomized, double-blind four-phase cross-over study, 15 healthy volunteers were given orally a single dose of either acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, nabumetone 1 g or nimesulide 100 mg. Blood samples were drawn before and 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr after the drug for the assessment of COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 activity was measured as thromboxane(2) production during blood clotting and COX-2 activity as endotoxin-induced prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in blood leucocytes. The data show that after a single oral dose these four NSAIDs have different profiles of action on COX-1 and COX-2. As expected, acetylsalicylic acid appeared to be COX-1-selective and ibuprofen effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2. Nabumetone showed only a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 and COX-2. Nimesulide caused almost complete suppression of COX-2 activity and a partial reduction of COX-1 activity. This confirms the relative COX-2 selectivity of nimesulide.

  14. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M.; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin. PMID:26491233

  15. Aspirin treatment reduces platelet resistance to deformation.

    PubMed

    Burris, S M; Smith, C M; Rao, G H; White, J G

    1987-01-01

    The present investigation has evaluated the influence of aspirin, its constituents, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the resistance of human platelets to aspiration into micropipettes. Aspirin increased the length of platelet extensions into the micropipette over the entire negative tension range of 0.04 to 0.40 dynes/cm after exposure to the drug in vitro or after ingestion of the agent. Other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, ibuprofen and indomethacin, did not increase platelet deformability. The influence of aspirin was mimicked to some degree by high concentrations of salicylic acid, but acetylation of platelets with acetic anhydride had little influence on platelet deformability. Incubation of platelets with both salicylic acid and acetic anhydride had no more effect than salicylic acid alone. Benzoic acid, chemically similar to salicylic acid, had a minimal effect. The studies demonstrate that aspirin makes platelets more deformable, while components of the drug or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and cyclooxygenase inhibitors do not have the same influence on resistance to deformation.

  16. Aspirin resistance and other aspirin-related concerns.

    PubMed

    Cai, Gaoyu; Zhou, Weijun; Lu, Ya; Chen, Peili; Lu, Zhongjiao; Fu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin is a widely used medication and has become a cornerstone for treating cardiovascular disease. Aspirin can significantly reduce the incidence of cardiovascular ischemic events, recurrence and mortality, thereby improving the long-term prognosis of patients. However, there has been a staggering increase in the volume of literature addressing the issue of so-called "aspirin resistance" in recent years, and for some patients, it is difficult to avoid adverse reactions to aspirin. In this review, we present both the historical aspects of aspirin use and contemporary developments in its clinical use.

  17. Nimesulide/methyl β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: physicochemical characterization, solubility, dissolution, and biological studies.

    PubMed

    Auda, Sayed H

    2014-03-01

    Nimesulide (NIM) is an insoluble nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Complexation of drug with methyl β-cyclodextrin was evaluated to improve solubility and dissolution rate of NIM. Complexation was achieved via a coevaporation technique to obtain different drug to polymer molar ratios (1:1, 1:2, and 1:3). The physicochemical characterization of the systems using powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy was carried out to understand the influence of this technological process on the physical status of single components and complex systems and to detect possible interactions between drug and carrier. Moreover, quantitative solubility and in vitro dissolution studies of NIM alone and NIM inclusion complexes were studied in the dissolution media of phosphate buffer pH 5.5 and 7.4. The analysis provided existence of a molecular interaction between drug and carrier together in the complex state. The study showed that the inclusion systems enhanced of drug solubility, dissolution rate, and anti-inflammatory activity.

  18. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  19. Detection of aspirin resistance by PFA-100: prevalence and aspirin compliance in patients with chronic stable angina.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Basil; Abbas, Syed; Meany, Brendan; de Haan, Jacob; Cahill, Mary R

    2005-01-01

    Most acute coronary syndromes result from a platelet-rich occlusion of the coronary arteries. Antiplatelet drugs are of proven efficacy in preventing myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and stroke. However, not all patients on aspirin (ASA) benefit. We studied the phenomenon of aspirin resistance with a simple and reliable platelet function analyzer--the PFA-100. Studying 31 patients with unstable angina and 105 controls, we found aspirin resistance in 42% of patients, most of whom were shown to be compliant utilizing concomitant salicylate levels.

  20. Antiplatelet therapies: aspirin at the heart of new directions.

    PubMed

    Bunimov, Natalia; Laneuville, Odette

    2013-12-01

    When introduced over 100 years ago, aspirin was prescribed as an analgesic drug to arthritic patients for pain relief. The prevalence of users grew quite rapidly and to this day, aspirin remains widely used in clinical practice. The popularity of aspirin resulted not only from its analgesic properties but also from a second benefit recognized later as an anti-platelet effect. It was this important activity of aspirin that made it one of the most recommended drugs for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The anti-platelet effect of aspirin emerged from the first few case reports published in the early 1900s and was described as a mild bleeding. The molecular mechanisms involved were described in 1971 and constituted the irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme and prevention of platelet aggregation. Today, the contribution of aspirin to our understanding of cardiovascular health persists and remains considerable. Observations from large cohorts of aspirin users generate massive amount of valuable information used in the identification of factors influencing the potential risk for cardiovascular diseases, including sex, age and genetic predisposition. Aspirin and the path of discovery leading to its anti-platelet activity has taken a hundred years was based on manifestations of effects observed in its users, and it remains a successful strategy for the identification of new avenues to treat cardiovascular diseases associated with hyper-platelet activity. The contribution of aspirin to the understanding of cardiovascular diseases and to the design of effective treatment and prevention strategies, remains of high importance in our society.

  1. 76 FR 53907 - Determination That TALWIN COMPOUND (Aspirin; Pentazocine Hydrochloride) Tablets, 325 Milligrams...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... hydrochloride (HCl)) tablets, 325 milligrams (mg); equivalent to (EQ) 12.5 mg base, were not withdrawn from sale... drug applications (ANDAs) for aspirin; pentazocine HCl tablets, 325 mg; EQ 12.5 mg base, if all other... ANDA that does not refer to a listed drug. TALWIN COMPOUND (aspirin; pentazocine HCl) tablets, 325...

  2. Van der Waals Interactions in Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The ability of molecules to yield multiple solid forms, or polymorphs, has significance for diverse applications ranging from drug design and food chemistry to nonlinear optics and hydrogen storage. In particular, aspirin has been used and studied for over a century, but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  3. [Risk and prevention of gastrointestinal complications due to low-dose aspirin and other antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François

    2008-09-15

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhages are the main complications associated with low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic drugs. In France, low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic agents use has been found in 30% of upper GI and 40% of lower GI bleeding episodes. Main causes of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and colonic diverticulosis. Recent cohort studies have shown that the relative risk of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was comprised between 2 and 4 and the absolute risk comprised between 1 per 100 and 1 per 1000 aspirin users per year. Main risk factors for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are concomitant antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids use, and recent history of complicated or non-complicated gastroduodenal ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin, but infection should be searched and treated only in patients with peptic ulcer. Despite eradication of H. pylori in the latter patients, gastroprotection with PPI is strongly recommended. In patients presenting with peptic ulcer bleeding with low-dose aspirin, aspirin should be continued in association with PPI rather than replaced with clopidogrel. Discontinuation of low-dose aspirin which exposes to increased cardiovascular complications and mortality should be avoided, even in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding.

  4. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  5. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.; Vallejo, G.; Horton, E.S.; Cotter, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than at baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss.

  6. The mechanism of the effect of aspirin on human platelets. I. Acetylation of a particulate fraction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits platelet prostaglandin synthesis and the ADP- and collagen-induced platelet release reaction. The mechanism of the inhibitory effect is unknown but may involve protein acetylation, since aspirin acetylates a variety of substrates, including platelet protein. We have examined the relationship between protein acetylation and aspirin's physiologic effect on platelets. Suspensions of washed human platelets were incubated at 37 degrees C with (3H)aspirin, and incorporation of radioactivity into protein was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Exposure to (acetyl-3H)aspirin but not (aromatic ring-3H)aspirin resulted in radioactive labeling of three platelet proteins, suggesting that the drug acetylates these three proteins. The acetylation of two of the proteins (located in the supernatant fraction) was not saturable, implying that these reactions may not be physiologically significant. Acetylation of the third protein, approximate mol wt 85,000 (located in the particulate fraction), saturated at an aspirin concentration of 30 muM and was complete within 20 min. Platelets prepared from aspirin-treated donors did not incorporate any (acetyl-3H)aspirin radioactivity into the particulate protein for 2 days after drug treatment and did not show full pretreatment uptake of radioactivity for 12 days thereafter. The course of increasing incorporation of (acetyl-3H)aspirin radioactivity parralleled that of platelet turnover. Therefore, in addition to its saturability, acetylation of the particulate fraction protein by aspirin was permanent. In two respects, the inhibition of platelet function by aspirin correlates well with the aspirin-mediated acetylation of the particulate fraction protein. Both persist for the life-span of the aspirin-treated platelet, and both occur at a similar saturating aspirin concentration. The evidence suggests that the physiologic effect of aspirin on human platelets is produced

  7. Risk of gastrointestinal complications associated to NSAIDs, low-dose aspirin and their combinations: Results of a pharmacovigilance reporting system.

    PubMed

    Rafaniello, Concetta; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Sessa, Maurizio; Sportiello, Liberata; Balzano, Antonio; Manguso, Francesco; Aiezza, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Francesco; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Capuano, Annalisa

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are one of the most limiting cause of use of NSAIDs. Beyond others well defined factors, history of peptic ulcer, older age, Helicobacter pylori infection and use of gastrotoxic drugs may affect their GI safety profile. In particular, the risk of GI complications associated to the use of antiplatelet drugs, especially low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (LDA) should deserve much attention. However, only few studies have focused on the effect of combination LDA/NSAIDs on the GI tract compared with the monotherapy and much less studies assessed this effect with multiple NSAIDs use. We aimed to characterize the GI safety profile of NSAIDs and LDA as monotherapy or their combinations in real-life conditions by analysing spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting system in a Southern Italy. We used the case/non-case method in the Italian Pharmacovigilance Network (RNF). Cases were reports of GI events in the RNF between January 2007 and December 2011. Non-cases were all other reports during the same period. The association between NSAID and suspected GI ADRs was calculated using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) with 95% confidence intervals as a measure of disproportionality while adjusting for age, and concomitant use of antineoplastic agents or drugs for cardiovascular diseases. Sub-analysis were performed within the NSAID class. Among the 2816 adverse drug reactions recorded, we identified 374 (13.3%) cases of GI complications. Upper GI complications were the most frequently reported type of events. The highest associations were found for the combined use of NSAIDs and/or LDA, whilst the lowest associations were for their respective monotherapy. Looking at individual NSAIDs the highest association with GI events was observed for ketorolac exposure followed by nimesulide, diclofenac, aspirin, ketoprofen, and ibuprofen. This study highlights the primary role of the national spontaneous reporting system to bring out potential signals

  8. Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some medication labels may use the words acetylsalicylate, acetylsalicylic acid, salicylic, salicylamide, phenyl salicylate, etc., instead of the word aspirin. There is not data as to other forms ...

  9. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Lin; Sun Jihong; Li Yuzhen

    2011-08-15

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation f{sub t}=kt{sup n} was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties. - Graphical abstract: Loading (A) and release profiles (B) of aspirin in N-BMMs and N-MCM-41 indicated that BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that MCM-41. Highlights: > Bimodal mesoporous silicas (BMMs) and MCM-41 modified with amino group via post-treatment procedure. > Loading and release profiles of aspirin in modified BMMs and MCM-41. > Modified BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that modified MCM-41.

  10. Aspirin Allergy: What Are the Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergy I think I may have an aspirin allergy. What are the symptoms and what can I do? Answers from James ... aspirin are common. If you have an aspirin allergy or sensitivity, you may also have a reaction ...

  11. Involvement of electron and hydrogen transfers through redox metabolism on activity and toxicity of the nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Borges, Rosivaldo S; Oliveira, Juliana P; Matos, Rafaelle F; Chaves Neto, Antonio M J; Carneiro, Agnaldo S; Monteiro, Marta C

    2015-07-01

    An electronic study of nimesulide was performed by using density functional theory calculations. The activities of the six different derivatives were related with electron donating or accepting capacities. All compounds which had nitro moiety had low electron donating and high electron accepting capacities. However, the reduced derivative of nimesulide have more electron donating capacity than other compounds. The highest spin density contribution in nitro and lowest spin density contribution on phenoxyl moieties can be related with preferential metabolism by reduction when compared with the oxidation. The redox behavior between nitro and amino groups can be related with anti-inflammatory mechanism of nimesulide. These results explain the redox influence of nitro moiety on biological metabolism and mechanism of nimesulide.

  12. Interaction of nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, with cisplatin in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Al Suleimani, Yousuf M; Abdelrahman, Aly M; AlMahruqi, Ahmed S; Alhseini, Ishaq S; Tageldin, Mohamed H; Mansour, Mohamed E; Ali, Badreldin H

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of administration of nimesulide, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, on cisplatin (CP)-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. WKY rats and SHRs were divided into four groups, each. The first and second groups received saline and oral nimesulide (20mg/kg/day for 6 days), respectively, whereas the third and fourth groups received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of CP (5mg/kg) and CP (5mg/kg) and nimesulide (20mg/kg/day for 5 days), respectively. At the end of the experiment, rats were anesthetized and blood pressure and renal blood flow (RBF) were monitored, followed by intravenous (i.v.) injection of norepinephrine (NE). Nephrotoxicity was evaluated histopathologically and biochemically. CP caused a reduction in baseline RBF in both WKY and SHRs. It increased the concentrations of urea and creatinine and kidney relative weight, and decreased body weight in both WKY and SHRs. Histopathologically, CP caused remarkable renal damage in both WKY rats and SHRs. Treatment with nimesulide alone did not produce any significant change in any of the above measurements. However, nimesulide aggravated CP-induced renal tissue damage in SHRs, but not in WKY rats. The results show that administration nimesulide augmented the histopathological indices of nephrotoxicity in SHRs, but not in WKY rats.

  13. Nondestructive and rapid concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form using Raman spectroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Gargi R; Sherikar, O D; Mehta, Priti J

    2013-03-01

    A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm(-1) and 1336 cm(-1), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control.

  14. Review of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling and safety of proton pump inhibitors and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Gesheff, Martin G; Franzese, Christopher J; Bliden, Kevin P; Contino, Chase J; Rafeedheen, Rahil; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of aspirin in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases has been convincingly demonstrated. Gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects with aspirin may lead to poor adherence and/or discontinuation of treatment. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been used for more than 20 years as the first choice for treating peptic ulcers and their bleeding complications, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced GI lesions and dyspepsia. Adherence becomes a major concern when aspirin is co-prescribed with PPIs to prevent GI adverse effects. Combining aspirin and PPIs into one tablet is an effective approach to address aspirin-related GI adverse effects and increase adherence to aspirin therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  16. Effect of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 on aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, S. M.; Bell, G. S.; Foster, S.; Spruce, K. E.; MacMillan, R.; Williams, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Arm, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The cysteinyl leukotrienes may play a central part in the mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma. Previous work has shown that individuals with aspirin-sensitive asthma have high basal urinary LTE4 levels which increase further upon aspirin ingestion, and that sulphidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonists attenuate aspirin-induced airflow obstruction. If the cysteinyl leukotrienes cause aspirin-induced asthmatic reactions, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway should prevent aspirin-induced bronchospasm. This hypothesis has been tested with ZD2138, a specific non-redox 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. METHODS--Seven subjects (four men) with aspirin-sensitive asthma with baseline FEV1 values > 67% were studied. ZD2138 (350 mg) or placebo was given on two separate occasions two weeks apart in a randomised double blind fashion. A single dose of aspirin was administered four hours after dosing and FEV1 was measured for six hours. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway by ZD2138 was assessed by measurements of urinary LTE4 levels and ex vivo calcium ionophore stimulated LTB4 generation in whole blood, before administration of drug or placebo and at regular time intervals after dosing and aspirin administration. RESULTS--ZD2138 protected against the aspirin-induced reduction in FEV1 with a 20.3 (4.9)% fall in FEV1 following placebo compared with 4.9 (2.9)% following ZD2138. This was associated with 72% inhibition of ex vivo LTB4 generation in whole blood at 12 hours and a 74% inhibition of the rise in urinary LTE4 excretion at six hours after aspirin ingestion. CONCLUSIONS--In aspirin-sensitive asthma the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 inhibits the fall in FEV1 induced by aspirin and this is associated with substantial inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. PMID:8091318

  17. Efficacy and Tolerability of Conventional Nimesulide Versus Beta-Cyclodextrin Nimesulide in Patients with Pain After Surgical Dental Extraction: A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Mildred; Seijas, Alberto; Yibirín, Maria González

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pain following extraction of an impacted third molar is widely used to assess analgesic efficacy, especially that of a single dose of a drug. The analgesic activity of conventional nimesulide (CN) has been documented in a variety of types of acute and chronic pain. Beta-cyclodextrin nimesulide (BN) is a new formulation in which nimesulide is included in a cyclodextrin molecule, which increases its solubility in water and its dilution rate, allowing extended, rapid absorption of the drug. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a single dose of BN compared with CN in patients with pain following extraction of an impacted third molar. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy study conducted at 3 dentistry centers in Venezuela. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups. One group received a single dose of BN (400-mg tablet, equivalent to 100 mg of nimesulide); the other group received a single dose of CN (100-mg tablet). Both groups also received a placebo. The efficacy variables were (1) pain intensity (PI), assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at the following times: 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after drug administration; (2) time to first measurable difference in PI from baseline (PID) (PID ≥1 cm on the VAS; ie, the beginning of analgesic action); (3) maximum PID (max PID); (4) sum of PIDs in the 12-hour observation period; (5) pain relief (PR), as rated on a 5-point scale; (6) maximum PR; and (7) sum of the PR scores in the 12-hour observation period (ie, total PR). For the tolerability analysis, all adverse events (AEs) were to be recorded, and the investigators were to assess whether each AE was drug related. Results: Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 62 patients (40 women, 22 men; mean [SD] age, 20.1 [5.9] years) were assessed; 35 were treated with BN and 27 with CN. PI reduction was more rapid and greater

  18. Affordability Calculations on a Health Education Campaign to Promote the Use of Aspirin in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2008-01-01

    Aspirin has far-reaching public health potential in reducing the risk of heart attacks, ischemic strokes and possibly cancer. Balanced against this potential are undesirable effects of the drug. It seems reasonable to allow every individual over the age of 50 years to make an informed choice about whether or not to take aspirin. A health education…

  19. Risk of acute and serious liver injury associated to nimesulide and other NSAIDs: data from drug‐induced liver injury case–control study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Monia; Conforti, Anita; Lenti, Maria Carmela; Capuano, Annalisa; Bortolami, Oscar; Motola, Domenico; Moretti, Ugo; Vannacci, Alfredo; Rafaniello, Concetta; Vaccheri, Alberto; Arzenton, Elena; Bonaiuti, Roberto; Sportiello, Liberata

    2016-01-01

    Aim Drug‐induced liver injury is one of the most serious adverse drug reactions and the most frequent reason for restriction of indications or withdrawal of drugs. Some nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were withdrawn from the market because of serious hepatotoxicity. We estimated the risk of acute and serious liver injury associated with the use of nimesulide and other NSAIDs, with a prevalence of use greater than or equal to 5%. Methods This is a multicentre case–control study carried out in nine Italian hospitals from October 2010 to January 2014. Cases were adults, with a diagnosis of acute liver injury. Controls presented acute clinical disorders not related to chronic conditions, not involving the liver. Adjusted odds ratio (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated initially with a bivariate and then multivariate analysis. Results We included 179 cases matched to 1770 controls. Adjusted OR for acute serious liver injury associated with all NSAIDs was 1.69, 95% CI 1.21–2.37. Thirty cases were exposed to nimesulide (adjusted OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.28–3.47); the risk increased according to the length of exposure (OR > 30 days: 12.55, 95% CI 1.73–90.88) and to higher doses (OR 10.69, 95% CI 4.02–28.44). Risk of hepatotoxicity was increased also for ibuprofen, used both at recommended dosages (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.13–3.26) and at higher doses (OR 3.73, 95% CI 1.11–12.46) and for ketoprofen ≥ 150 mg (OR 4.65, 95% CI 1.33–10.00). Conclusion Among all NSAIDs, nimesulide is associated with the higher risk, ibuprofen and high doses of ketoprofen are also associated with a modestly increased risk of hepatotoxicity. PMID:26991794

  20. Nimesulide-loaded nanoparticles for the potential coadjuvant treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Concepción; Aberturas, María del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús

    2015-09-30

    Nimesulide (NS)-loaded nanoparticles (NPNS) were prepared from polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and eventually coated with chitosan (NPNSCS). Nanoparticles (NP) were spherical with sizes 379 ± 59 nm for NPNS and 393 ± 66 nm for NPNSCS and zeta potentials of -15 ± 3 mV for NPNS to 10 ± 4 mV for NPNSCS, suggesting an efficient coating. Drug encapsulation rate was high (88 ± 5% and 83 ± 7% of added drug) for NPNS and NPNSCS, respectively. After NP washing and re-suspension, 98 ± 2% and 99 ± 1% of the drug initially entrapped remained associated to NP. NS was dispersed in amorphous state within the polymeric matrix. Two-fold dilution of NP with pH 7.4 PBS provoked no drug release. However, 30-40% NS was released after a 1/10 dilution. NPNSCS and NPNS diluted 1/100 reduced the encapsulated drug to around 30% and 70%, respectively. In contrast, 100% NS was released from NP under sink conditions in less than 2h. The permeability of free-NS (1-1.5 × 10(-5)cm/s) was compared with NPNS (NPNS = 6.4-8.1 × 10(-6)cm/s and NPNSCS = 5.5-7.0 × 10(-6)cm/s) using the PAMPA assay. The cytotoxicity of free-NS and NS in NP on model prostate cancer cells PC-3 and DU-145 showed the highest cytotoxic effect with NPNSCS on PC-3 cells (IC50 = 89 μM).

  1. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of aspirin with warfarin in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Ping; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Tingting; Pappoe, Faustina; Huang, Jihan; Tang, Haiqin

    2016-01-01

    1. Warfarin and aspirin are widely used in a wide spectrum of thromboembolic and atherothrombotic diseases. Despite the potential efficacy of warfarin-aspirin therapy, the safety and side effect of combined therapy remains unclear. 2. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between warfarin and aspirin in beagles after single and multiple doses. 3. Coadministration of aspirin had no significant effects on the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC(0-t)) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of R- and S-warfarin after a single dose of warfarin, but significantly increase the AUC(0-t) and Cmax and dramatically decrease the clearance (CL) of R- and S-warfarin after multiple dose of warfarin. Accordingly, there was a slight increase in the AUEC(0-t) and Emax of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT) and international normalized ratio (INR) after multiple dose of warfarin. 4. Coadministration of warfarin had no markedly effects on the AUC(0-t) and Cmax of aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid after single or multiple dose of aspirin. Meanwhile, the AUEC(0-t) and Emax of inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) were not significantly affected by warfarin. 5. Our animal study indicated that coadministration of aspirin with warfarin can cause significant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions in beagles. However, more studies are urgently needed to assess related information of warfarin-aspirin drug interactions in healthy volunteers or patients.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor nimesulide blocks ultraviolet B-induced photocarcinogenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiuwei; Kim, Arianna L; Kopelovich, Levy; Bickers, David R; Athar, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition can inhibit UVB-induced carcinogenesis in the skin. We have shown that COX-2 is overexpressed in UVB-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Celecoxib, a specific inhibitor of COX-2, blocks UVB-induced papillomas and carcinomas in murine skin. However, as COX-2 inhibitors of this type are associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, we decided to study nimesulide, a different class of COX-2 inhibitor, an N-arylmethanesulfonamide derivative not known to have these untoward effects. To assess the antitumor-promoting effects of nimesulide, 90 mice were equally divided into three groups. Group I animals received no test agent or UVB and served as age-matched controls; group II animals were irradiated with UVB (180 mJ cm(-2), twice weekly for 35 weeks) and group III animals received 300 p.p.m. nimesulide in drinking water and were irradiated with UVB as described for group-II. Nimesulide treatment reduced the growth of UVB-induced tumors both in terms of tumor number and tumor volume. By weeks 25, 30 and 35, the tumor numbers in the nimesulide-treated group were 79%, 49% and 53% less than the number occurring in UVB-treated animals whereas tumor volume was reduced 69%, 54% and 53%, respectively, compared to the UVB-irradiated control group. Nimesulide also inhibited the malignant progression of SCCs. The reduction in tumorigenesis was paralleled by a decrease in cell cycle regulatory proteins (cyclins A, B1, D1, E, CDK2/4/6) and the antiapoptotic protein (Bcl2); concomitantly there was an increase in proapoptotic markers, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3. Nimesulide also decreased ornithine decarboxylase expression and the nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor kappa B transcriptionally active protein complexes. These results show that alternative classes of COX-2 inhibitors may likely be efficacious as cancer chemopreventive agents and may have an improved therapeutic index.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Nimesulide-Loaded Nanoparticles for Anticancer Activity Against Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sengel-Turk, Ceyda Tuba; Hascicek, Canan; Bakar, Filiz; Simsek, Elif

    2017-02-01

    Recent clinical and epidemiological researches have declared that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents may display as antineoplastic agents and indicate pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. The major purpose of this research was to develop a novel poly(ethyleneglycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) nano-sized particles encapsulated with nimesulide (NMS), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and to evaluate its anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. NMS-encapsulated PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles were fabricated using three different production techniques: (i) by emulsion-solvent evaporation using a high shear homogenizer, (ii) by emulsion-solvent evaporation using an ultrasonicator, and (iii) by nanoprecipitation. Nanoparticles were evaluated with respect to the entrapment efficiency, size characteristics, drug release rates, thermal behavior, cell viability assays, and apoptosis. The resulting nanoparticles were found to be spherical shapes with negative surface charges. The average diameter of all nanoparticles ranged between 148.5 and 307.2 nm. In vitro release profiles showed that all nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic release pattern. NMS-loaded PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles demonstrated significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the effects of nanoparticles on cell proliferation were significantly affected by the preparation techniques. The nanoparticles developed in this work displayed higher potential for the NMS delivery against breast cancer treatment for the future.

  5. A Proteomic Approach to Analyze the Aspirin-mediated Lysine Acetylome*

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Michael H.; Cole, Christian; Scullion, Paul; Wilkie, Ross; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Stark, Lesley A.; Hay, Ronald T.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid is widely used to control pain, inflammation and fever. Important to this function is its ability to irreversibly acetylate cyclooxygenases at active site serines. Aspirin has the potential to acetylate other amino acid side-chains, leading to the possibility that aspirin-mediated lysine acetylation could explain some of its as-yet unexplained drug actions or side-effects. Using isotopically labeled aspirin-d3, in combination with acetylated lysine purification and LC-MS/MS, we identified over 12000 sites of lysine acetylation from cultured human cells. Although aspirin amplifies endogenous acetylation signals at the majority of detectable endogenous sites, cells tolerate aspirin mediated acetylation very well unless cellular deacetylases are inhibited. Although most endogenous acetylations are amplified by orders of magnitude, lysine acetylation site occupancies remain very low even after high doses of aspirin. This work shows that while aspirin has enormous potential to alter protein function, in the majority of cases aspirin-mediated acetylations do not accumulate to levels likely to elicit biological effects. These findings are consistent with an emerging model for cellular acetylation whereby stoichiometry correlates with biological relevance, and deacetylases act to minimize the biological consequences of nonspecific chemical acetylations. PMID:27913581

  6. A Proteomic Approach to Analyze the Aspirin-mediated Lysine Acetylome.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Michael H; Cole, Christian; Scullion, Paul; Wilkie, Ross; Westwood, Nicholas J; Stark, Lesley A; Hay, Ronald T

    2017-02-01

    Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid is widely used to control pain, inflammation and fever. Important to this function is its ability to irreversibly acetylate cyclooxygenases at active site serines. Aspirin has the potential to acetylate other amino acid side-chains, leading to the possibility that aspirin-mediated lysine acetylation could explain some of its as-yet unexplained drug actions or side-effects. Using isotopically labeled aspirin-d3, in combination with acetylated lysine purification and LC-MS/MS, we identified over 12000 sites of lysine acetylation from cultured human cells. Although aspirin amplifies endogenous acetylation signals at the majority of detectable endogenous sites, cells tolerate aspirin mediated acetylation very well unless cellular deacetylases are inhibited. Although most endogenous acetylations are amplified by orders of magnitude, lysine acetylation site occupancies remain very low even after high doses of aspirin. This work shows that while aspirin has enormous potential to alter protein function, in the majority of cases aspirin-mediated acetylations do not accumulate to levels likely to elicit biological effects. These findings are consistent with an emerging model for cellular acetylation whereby stoichiometry correlates with biological relevance, and deacetylases act to minimize the biological consequences of nonspecific chemical acetylations.

  7. [Epidemiology of digestive complications associated with use of low-dose aspirin].

    PubMed

    Czernichow, Pierre; Merle, Véronique

    2004-04-01

    Low-dose aspirin (< 330 mg/d) is recommended for the prevention of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Six to 12% of the general population is exposed to low-dose aspirin. The most frequently studied digestive complications are bleeding peptic ulcers, whose risk is increased twofold by low-dose aspirin treatment, and non-complicated peptic ulcers. History of bleeding or non-complicated peptic ulcer, alcohol intake, concomitant treatment with NSAID or calcic inhibitors are demonstrated risk factors of bleeding ulcer associated with low-dose aspirin. The role of enteric coating, of low-dose aspirin dose, of delay since low-dose aspirin treatment onset, and of Helicobacter pylori infection, remains controversial. Antisecretory drugs (H2 inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors), and nitroglycerin are associated with a decreased risk of bleeding ulcer. The protective effect of COX-2 inhibitors on the risk of bleeding ulcer is suppressed by concomitant treatment with low-dose aspirin. The risk of no- complicated peptic ulcer was increased by low-dose aspirin intake by a factor 2.9 in one study. Low-dose aspirin dose, infection by Helicobacter pylori, NSAID intake, and absence of enteric coating, are possible risk factors for non-complicated peptic ulcer. No association was retrieved with alcohol intake and peptic ulcer history.

  8. Higher rate of microscopic hematuria in elderly patients who take regular doses of aspirin: Result from AHAP Study

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Emadouddin; Hosseini, Seyed-Reza; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aspirin is the most widely used drug in medicine for cardiovascular and as recently for its role in cancer prevention. Although the risk of bleeding events increased following regular use of aspirin, little is known about the association of aspirin and hematuria. The present study aimed to evaluate the association of regular aspirin use and microscopic hematuria in elderly. Methods: In this study, we have extracted the data of elderly people who participated in Amirkola Health and Aging Project (AHAP) and taking regular doses of aspirin. The prevalence of microscopic hematuria was compared between the elderly who took aspirin regularly and those who did not take it. Results: A total of 1243 individuals (54.22% males, 45.78% females) were entered in to the study. Two hundred and eighty-four (23%) elderly took regular doses of aspirin. Microscopic hematuria was seen in 305 (24.54%) elderly. The prevalence of microscopic hematuria was 27.27% in regular users of aspirin and 23.72% in non-users of aspirin (P=0.126). The prevalence of microscopic hematuria was significantly higher among the regular users of aspirin compared to non-users in multiple logistic regression analysis (P=0.035, OR=1.40, 95%CI: 1.02-1.92). Conclusion: Taking regular doses of aspirin was accompanied with higher rate of microscopic hematuria in the elderly. PMID:27999646

  9. Aspirin activation of eosinophils and mast cells: implications in the pathogenesis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Negri, Julie; Liu, Lixia; Payne, Spencer C; Borish, Larry

    2014-07-01

    Reactions to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) are triggered when constraints upon activated eosinophils, normally supplied by PGE2, are removed secondary to cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. However, the mechanism driving the concomitant cellular activation is unknown. We investigated the capacity of aspirin itself to provide this activation signal. Eosinophils were enriched from peripheral blood samples and activated with lysine ASA (LysASA). Parallel samples were stimulated with related nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Activation was evaluated as Ca2+ flux, secretion of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLT), and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) release. CD34+ progenitor-derived mast cells were also used to test the influence of aspirin on human mast cells with measurements of Ca2+ flux and PGD2 release. LysASA induced Ca2+ fluxes and EDN release, but not CysLT secretion from circulating eosinophils. There was no difference in the sensitivity or extent of activation between AERD and control subjects, and sodium salicylate was without effect. Like eosinophils, aspirin was able to activate human mast cells directly through Ca2+ flux and PGD2 release. AERD is associated with eosinophils maturing locally in a high IFN-γ milieu. As such, in additional studies, eosinophil progenitors were differentiated in the presence of IFN-γ prior to activation with aspirin. Eosinophils matured in the presence of IFN-γ displayed robust secretion of both EDN and CysLTs. These studies identify aspirin as the trigger of eosinophil and mast cell activation in AERD, acting in synergy with its ability to release cells from the anti-inflammatory constraints of PGE2.

  10. Aspirin and acetaminophen: should they be available over the counter?

    PubMed

    Brune, Kay; Hinz, Burkhard; Otterness, Ivan

    2009-02-01

    Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs block cyclooxygenase (COX). They are the most widely used drugs for pain relief. They are indispensable for their effects but are condemned for their adverse drug reactions. Two COX inhibitors, acetaminophen and aspirin, are the most widely used over-the-counter drugs. They have low (but useful) therapeutic activity, but they are endowed with specific risks that are not seen with most other COX inhibitors. Both are lethal if taken in overdose. Each is stigmatized by severe adverse effects. Aspirin results in prolonged inhibition of blood coagulation, and acetaminophen can result in liver toxicity at normal dose and liver failure at higher dose. Both drugs cause many deaths every year. We recommend that the status of both drugs be changed to prescription only. Their continued availability over the counter poses an unacceptable risk to the general population.

  11. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaannet, E; Sampieri, K; Dekkers, O M; de Craen, A J M; van Herk-Sukel, M P P; Lemmens, V; van den Broek, C B M; Coebergh, J W; Herings, R M C; van de Velde, C J H; Fodde, R; Liefers, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based study was to assess the therapeutic effect on overall survival of aspirin/NSAIDs as adjuvant treatment used after the diagnosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Data concerning prescriptions were obtained from PHARMO record linkage systems and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (1998–2007) were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (population-based cancer registry). Aspirin/NSAID use was classified as none, prediagnosis and postdiagnosis and only postdiagnosis. Patients were defined as non-user of aspirin/NSAIDs from the date of diagnosis of the colorectal cancer to the date of first use of aspirin or NSAIDs and user from first use to the end of follow-up. Poisson regression was performed with user status as time-varying exposure. Results: In total, 1176 (26%) patients were non-users, 2086 (47%) were prediagnosis and postdiagnosis users and 1219 (27%) were only postdiagnosis users (total n=4481). Compared with non-users, a survival gain was observed for aspirin users; the adjusted rate ratio (RR) was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63–0.95; P=0.015). Stratified for colon and rectal, the survival gain was only present in colon cancer (adjusted RR 0.65 (95%CI 0.50–0.84; P=0.001)). For frequent users survival gain was larger (adjusted RR 0.61 (95%CI 0.46–0.81; P=0.001). In rectal cancer, aspirin use was not associated with survival (adjusted RR 1.10 (95%CI 0.79–1.54; P=0.6). The NSAIDs use was associated with decreased survival (adjusted RR 1.93 (95%CI 1.70–2.20; P<0.001). Conclusion: Aspirin use initiated or continued after diagnosis of colon cancer is associated with a lower risk of overall mortality. These findings strongly support initiation of

  12. Nimesulide improves the symptomatic and disease modifying effects of leflunomide in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Nofal, Salwa M; Khalifa, Amani E; Williams, Richard O; El-Eraky, Wafaa I; Nagy, Ayman A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness) and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity) in collagen induced arthritis animal model.

  13. Variability in the Responsiveness to Low-Dose Aspirin: Pharmacological and Disease-Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Bianca; Petrucci, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The main pharmacological aspects of pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of aspirin as antiplatelet agent were unravelled between the late sixties and the eighties, and low-dose aspirin given once daily has been shown to be a mainstay in the current treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disorders. Nevertheless, several PD and PK aspects of aspirin in selected clinical conditions have recently emerged and deserve future clinical attention. In 1994, the term “aspirin resistance” was used for the first time, but, until now, no consensus exists on definition, standardized assay, underlying mechanisms, clinical impact, and possible efficacy of alternative therapeutic interventions. At variance with an undefined aspirin-resistant status, in the last 5 years, the concept of variability in response to aspirin due to specific pathophysiological mechanisms and based on PK and/or PD of the drug has emerged. This growing evidence highlights the existence and possible clinical relevance of an interindividual variability of pharmacological aspirin response and calls for new, large studies to test new low-dose aspirin-based regimens which may ameliorate platelet acetylation, reduce variability in drug responsiveness, and improve clinical efficacy on selected populations. PMID:22288010

  14. Synergistic drug-cytokine induction of hepatocellular death as an in vitro approach for the study of inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; King, Bracken M.; Hasan, Maya A.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Farazi, Paraskevi A.; Hendriks, Bart S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Sorger, Peter K.; Tidor, Bruce; Xu, Jinghai J.

    2009-06-15

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration to induce an inflammatory background have successfully reproduced idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity signatures for certain drugs. However, the low-throughput nature of these models renders them problematic for employment as preclinical screening assays. Here, we present an analogous, but high-throughput, in vitro approach in which drugs are administered to a variety of cell types (primary human and rat hepatocytes and the human HepG2 cell line) across a landscape of inflammatory contexts containing LPS and cytokines TNF, IFN{gamma}, IL-1{alpha}, and IL-6. Using this assay, we observed drug-cytokine hepatotoxicity synergies for multiple idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (ranitidine, trovafloxacin, nefazodone, nimesulide, clarithromycin, and telithromycin) but not for their corresponding non-toxic control compounds (famotidine, levofloxacin, buspirone, and aspirin). A larger compendium of drug-cytokine mix hepatotoxicity data demonstrated that hepatotoxicity synergies were largely potentiated by TNF, IL-1{alpha}, and LPS within the context of multi-cytokine mixes. Then, we screened 90 drugs for cytokine synergy in human hepatocytes and found that a significantly larger fraction of the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (19%) synergized with a single cytokine mix than did the non-hepatotoxic drugs (3%). Finally, we used an information theoretic approach to ascertain especially informative subsets of cytokine treatments for most highly effective construction of regression models for drug- and cytokine mix-induced hepatotoxicities across these cell systems. Our results suggest that this drug-cytokine co-treatment approach could provide a useful preclinical tool for investigating inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity.

  15. Nimesulide inhibits the growth of human esophageal carcinoma cells by inactivating the JAK2/STAT3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Ru; Wu, Wen-Juan; Liu, Shu-Xia; Zuo, Lian-Fu; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Jian-Zhu; Nan, Yue-Min

    2015-06-01

    Although selective COX-2 inhibitors have cancer-preventive effects and induce apoptosis, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on apoptosis and on the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in Eca-109 human esophageal squamous carcinoma cells. The effects and mechanisms of nimesulide on Eca-109 cell growth were studied in culture and in nude mice with Eca-109 xenografts. Cells were cultured with or without nimesulide and/or the JAK2 inhibitor AG490. Cell proliferation was evaluated using the MTT assay, and apoptosis was investigated. COX-2 mRNA expression was measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression was detected by Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry. Nimesulide significantly inhibited Eca-109 cell viability in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Nimesulide also induced apoptosis, which was accompanied by a significant decrease in the expression of COX-2 and survivin and an increase in caspase-3 expression. Nimesulide downregulated the phosphorylation levels of JAK2 and STAT3, and JAK2 inhibition by AG490 significantly augmented both nimesulide-induced apoptosis and the downregulation of COX-2 and survivin (P<0.05). In vivo, nimesulide inhibited the growth of Eca-109 tumors and the expression of p-JAK2 and p-STAT3. Thus, nimesulide downregulates COX-2 and survivin expression and upregulates caspase-3 expression in Eca-109 cells, by inactivating the JAK2/STAT3 pathway. These effects may mediate nimesulide-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in Eca-109 cells in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Comparison of aspirin and indobufen in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Young; Sung, Ki-Chul; Choi, Hyo-In

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the extent and recovery of platelet inhibition after administration of indobufen and aspirin in healthy volunteers. Indobufen inhibits platelet aggregation by reversibly inhibiting the platelet cyclooxygenase enzyme, thereby suppressing thromboxane synthesis. Twenty healthy volunteers completed the study and received aspirin (200 mg/day for 2 weeks) followed by a 4-week washout period and then indobufen (200 mg twice a day for 2 weeks). The percent (%) inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed using arachidonic acid (0.5 mg/ml) and adenosine diphosphate (5 µM) at 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours after last dose of each drug. IPA assessed using arachidonic acid as the agonist was similar at 4 hours after the last dose of indobufen (81.07 ± 9.36%) and aspirin (96.99 ± 0.29%, p = 0.10), but significantly lower at 12 hours (74.04 ± 9.55% vs. 97.94 ± 0.28%, p = 0.02), 24 hours (33.39 ± 11.13% vs. 97.48 ± 0.32%, p < 0.001) and 48 hours (14.12 ± 9.74% vs. 98.22 ± 0.31%, p < 0.001) after indobufen, compared to the relative values for aspirin. IPA assessed using adenosine diphosphate as the agonist was similar in the two groups at 4, 12 and 24 hours after the last dose, but significantly lower 48 hours after the last dose of indobufen, compared to the relative value for aspirin (1.98 ± 3.57% vs. 12.61 ± 2.71%, p = 0.002). Indobufen (200 mg twice a day) caused equivalent initial inhibition of platelet aggregation to aspirin (200 mg daily), and the anti-aggregation effect diminished faster than after aspirin.

  17. Aspirin-induced peptic ulcer and genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Akiko; Sakakibara, Takashi; Nomura, Maki; Yamanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishi, Ryuji; Imamura, Hiroshi; Tarumi, Ken-ichi; Kamada, Tomoari; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2010-05-01

    There are a few studies of the association between genetic polymorphisms and the risks of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced ulcer or its complications. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), A-842G and C50T, exhibited increased sensitivity to aspirin and had lower prostaglandin synthesis capacity, lacking statistical significance in the association with bleeding peptic ulcer. A recent Japanese study indicated that the number of COX-1-1676T alleles was a significant risk factor for peptic ulcer in users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There are some genetic polymorphisms for aspirin resistance, such as platelet membrane glycoproteins, thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor, platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase and coagulation factor XIII; however, data on the frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) events in these variants are lacking. Carrying the CYP2C9 variants is reported a significantly increased risk of non-aspirin NSAID-related GI bleeding. The polymorphisms of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been associated with development of peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. In a recent investigation, carriage of the IL-1beta-511 T allele was significantly associated with peptic ulcer among low-dose aspirin users. Hypoacidity in corpus gastritis related to polymorphisms of pro-inflammatory cytokines seems to reduce NSAIDs or aspirin-related injury. Data on which polymorphisms are significant risk factors for GI events in aspirin users are still lacking and further large-scale clinical studies are required.

  18. Aspirin Intolerance: Experimental Models for Bed-to-Bench

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Masamichi

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the oldest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and it sometimes causes asthma-like symptoms known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which can be serious. Unwanted effects of aspirin (aspirin intolerance) are also observed in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, a type I allergy disease, and aspirin-induced urticaria (AIU). However the target and the mechanism of the aspirin intolerance are still unknown. There is no animal or cellular model of AERD, because its pathophysiological mechanism is still unknown, but it is thought that inhibition of cyclooxygenase by causative agents leads to an increase of free arachidonic acid, which is metabolized into cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) that provoke airway smooth muscle constriction and asthma symptoms. As the bed-to-bench approach, to confirm the clinical discussion in experimental cellular models, we have tried to develop a cellular model of AERD using activated RBL-2H3 cells, a rat mast cell like cell line. Indomethacin (another NSAID and also causes AERD), enhances in vitro cysLTs production by RBL-2H3 cells, while there is no induction of cysLTs production in the absence of inflammatory activation. Since this suggests that all inflammatory cells with activation of prostaglandin and cysLT metabolism should respond to NSAIDs, and then I have concluded that aspirin intolerance should be separated from subsequent bronchoconstriction. Evidence about the cellular mechanisms of NSAIDs may be employed for development of in vitro AERD models as the approach from bench-to-bed. PMID:27719658

  19. Oral anticoagulant treatment with and without aspirin.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Rouvier, J; Gurfinkel, E

    1995-07-01

    For preventing thromboembolic events, the concurrent use of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs has been proposed. In prosthetic heart valves the use of moderate intensity anticoagulants [International Normalized Ratio (INR) 2-3] plus aspirin (100 mg/day) decreases the amount and severity of embolic episodes. The possibility that the same regimen could provide benefit in the prevention of thrombotic events in other arterial diseases is also indicated by the ATACS trial in unstable angina. The ongoing studies in ischemic heart diseases will also give the answer to this possibility.

  20. Separation of the impairment of haemostasis by aspirin from mucosal injury in the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, C J; Hawthorne, A B; Hudson, N; Cole, A T; Mahida, Y R; Daneshmend, T K

    1991-10-01

    1. An increasing body of data suggests that the antihaemostatic as well as the ulcerogenic actions of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be operative when patients present with haematemesis and melaena. 2. We therefore developed methods to allow separate evaluation of the erosive and anti-haemostatic actions of aspirin in the human gastric mucosa. Volunteer subjects took 300 mg of aspirin daily in the morning or 600 mg of aspirin four times a day for 5 days under blinded randomized conditions. Changes in spontaneous gastric microbleeding, endoscopic signs of injury, spontaneous bleeding per gastric erosion, biopsy-induced bleeding and eicosanoids were studied. 3. Both doses of aspirin significantly inhibited gastric mucosal synthesis of prostaglandin E2 and reduced the serum thromboxane concentration. Erosions developed and regressed rapidly; compared with baseline 300 mg of aspirin daily in the morning caused substantial numbers of gastric erosions to develop (mean 5.3, 95% confidence limits 2.7-10.2) but this was significantly less than that caused by 600 mg of aspirin four times a day (10.9, 7.2-16.5, P less than 0.05). The presence of erosions was associated with enhanced spontaneous bleeding, but only during aspirin administration. 4. Aspirin significantly increased bleeding induced by mucosal biopsy and was associated with significant enhancements in the rate of bleeding per gastric erosion. Bleeding rate per erosion but not biopsy-induced bleeding showed a significant dose-related increase with 600 mg of aspirin four times a day. Enteric coating reduced endoscopic signs of injury, but did not affect the impaired haemostasis caused by aspirin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) and aspirin: a randomized, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic interaction study

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Michael; Krätzschmar, Jörn; Unger, Sigrun; Mück, Wolfgang; Wensing, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. PMID:27162625

  2. Guggulipid and nimesulide differentially regulated inflammatory genes mRNA expressions via inhibition of NF-kB and CHOP activation in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2011-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases. Lipo-polysacharide (LPS) induces reactive astrogliosis, the cellular manifestation of neuroinflammation, in various models of neurological diseases, but its mechanism of action is still not properly known. The effect of guggulipid and nimesulide on LPS-induced neuroinflammatory changes is also not properly understood. This work demonstrated the mechanism of actions of guggulipid and nimesulide on inflammatory genes expressions in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytoma cells, C6. We observed that LPS (10 μg/ml) treatment of rat astrocytoma cells, C6, for 24 h significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) ion and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB), C/EBP homologous protein 10 (CHOP), c-fos, and c-jun proteins. At transcriptional stage, LPS upregulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-6 with downregulation in IL-1α, IL-1β, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) through activating NF-kB translocation. Treatment with guggulipid reversed these LPS-induced changes in rat astrocytoma cells. Treatment with nimesulide also attenuated LPS-induced Ca(2+) ion, iNOS, NF-kB, and c-fos expressions, but does not significantly influence CHOP, c-jun protein expressions, and mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and mPGES-1 genes. In conclusion, our findings elucidated the molecular mechanism of neuroinflammation in response to LPS and its modulation by guggulipid and nimesulide in rat astrocytoma cells (C6), which suggest the use of these drugs in the treatment of neuroinflammation-associated disorders.

  3. Gastrointestinal ulcers, role of aspirin, and clinical outcomes: pathobiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cryer, Byron; Mahaffey, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the US with more than six million diagnoses annually. Ulcers are reported as the most common cause of hospitalization for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and are often a clinical concern due to the widespread use of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, both of which have been shown to induce ulcer formation. The finding that Helicobacter pylori infection (independent of aspirin use) is associated with the development of ulcers led to a more thorough understanding of the causes and pathogenesis of ulcers and an improvement in therapeutic options. However, many patients infected with H. pylori are asymptomatic and remain undiagnosed. Complicating matters is a current lack of understanding of the association between aspirin use and asymptomatic ulcer formation. Low-dose aspirin prescriptions have increased, particularly for cardioprotection. Unfortunately, the GI side effects associated with aspirin therapy continue to be a major complication in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. These safety concerns should be important considerations in the decision to use aspirin and warrant further education. The medical community needs to continue to improve awareness of aspirin-induced GI bleeding to better equip physicians and improve care for patients requiring aspirin therapy. PMID:24741318

  4. Aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: current knowledge and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Hennekens, Charles H; Dalen, James E

    2014-11-01

    In secondary prevention, among a very wide range of survivors of prior occlusive cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and those suffering acute myocardial infarction (MI) or occlusive stroke, aspirin decreases risks of MI, stroke, and CVD death. In these high risk patients, the absolute benefits are large and absolute risks are far smaller so aspirin should be more widely prescribed. In contrast, in primary prevention, aspirin reduces risks of first MI but the evidence on stroke and CVD death remain inconclusive. Based on the current totality of evidence from predominantly low risk subjects where the absolute benefits is low and side effects the same as in secondary prevention, any decision to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention should be an individual clinical judgment by the healthcare provider that weighs the absolute benefit in reducing the risk of a first MI against the absolute risk of major bleeding. If the ongoing trials of intermediate risks subjects show net benefits then general guidelines may be justified with several caveats. First, any decision to use aspirin should continue to be made by the healthcare provider. Second, therapeutic lifestyle changes and other drugs of life saving benefit such as statins should be considered with aspirin as an adjunct, not alternative. The more widespread and appropriate use of aspirin in primary prevention is particularly attractive, especially in developing countries where CVD is emerging as the leading cause of death. In addition, aspirin is generally widely available over the counter and is extremely inexpensive.

  5. Targeting KSHV/HHV-8 latency with COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide: a potential chemotherapeutic modality for primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arun George; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Chandran, Bala

    2011-01-01

    The significance of inflammation in KSHV biology and tumorigenesis prompted us to examine the role of COX-2 in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), an aggressive AIDS-linked KSHV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using nimesulide, a well-known COX-2 specific NSAID. We demonstrate that (1) nimesulide is efficacious in inducing proliferation arrest in PEL (KSHV+/EBV-; BCBL-1 and BC-3, KSHV+/EBV+; JSC-1), EBV-infected (KSHV-/EBV+; Raji) and non-infected (KSHV-/EBV-; Akata, Loukes, Ramos, BJAB) high malignancy human Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) as well as KSHV-/EBV+ lymphoblastoid (LCL) cell lines; (2) nimesulide is selectively toxic to KSHV infected endothelial cells (TIVE-LTC) compared to TIVE and primary endothelial cells (HMVEC-d); (3) nimesulide reduced KSHV latent gene expression, disrupted p53-LANA-1 protein complexes, and activated the p53/p21 tumor-suppressor pathway; (4) COX-2 inhibition down-regulated cell survival kinases (p-Akt and p-GSK-3β), an angiogenic factor (VEGF-C), PEL defining genes (syndecan-1, aquaporin-3, and vitamin-D3 receptor) and cell cycle proteins such as cyclins E/A and cdc25C; (5) nimesulide induced sustained cell death and G1 arrest in BCBL-1 cells; (6) nimesulide substantially reduced the colony forming capacity of BCBL-1 cells. Overall, our studies provide a comprehensive molecular framework linking COX-2 with PEL pathogenesis and identify the chemotherapeutic potential of nimesulide in treating PEL.

  6. The effect of nimesulide on oxidative damage inflicted by ischemia-reperfusion on the rat renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Suleyman, Zeynep; Sener, Ebru; Kurt, Nezahat; Comez, Mehmet; Yapanoglu, Turgut

    2015-03-01

    The objective of our study is to research biochemically and histopathologically the effect of nimesulide on oxidative damage inflicted by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) on the rat renal tissue. Twenty-four albino Wistar type of male rats were used for the experiment. The animals were divided into groups as: renal ischemia-reperfusion control (RIR), nimesulide+renal ischemia-reperfusion of 50 mg/kg (NRIR-50), nimesulide+renal ischemia-reperfusion of 100 mg/kg (NRIR-100), and sham groups (SG). In NRIR-50 and NRIR-100 groups were given nimesulide, and RIR and SG groups were given distilled water, an hour after anesthesia. Groups, except for the SG group, 1-h-ischemia and then 6-h-reperfusion were performed. In the renal tissue of the RIR group in which the malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHGua) levels were measured, the COX-1 and COX-2 activities were recorded. Nimesulide at 100 mg/kg doses reduced the oxidant parameters more significantly than 50 mg/kg doses; on the other hand, it raised the antioxidant parameters. It has been shown that 100 mg/kg doses of nimesulide prevented the renal I/R damage more significantly than a dose of 50 mg/kg, which shows that nimesulide, in clinics, could be used in the prevention of I/R damage.

  7. Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work By Emily Carlson Posted August 8, 2013 Most ...

  8. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin).

  9. Aspirin during Pregnancy: Is It Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take aspirin during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M. ... 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/aspirin-during-pregnancy/ ...

  10. Stress-responsive JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates aspirin-induced suppression of B16 melanoma cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ordan, Orly; Rotem, Ronit; Jaspers, Ilona; Flescher, Eliezer

    2003-01-01

    Available anticancer drugs do not seem to modify the prognosis of metastatic melanoma. Salicylate and acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) were found to suppress growth in a number of transformed cells, that is, prostate and colon. Therefore, we studied the direct effects of aspirin on metastatic B16 melanoma cells. Aspirin at a plasma-attainable and nontoxic level suppressed the proliferation of B16 cells. Aspirin induced the activation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Inhibition of JNK, but not p38, decreased the suppressive effect of aspirin upon the proliferation of B16 cells. The aspirin-induced reduction in B16 proliferation was cumulative over time. Aspirin and the chemotherapeutic drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) induced B16 cell death synergistically. In addition to the murine B16 cell line, the proliferation of SK-28 human melanoma cells was also suppressed by aspirin. In conclusion, aspirin suppresses the proliferation of metastatic B16 cells in a JNK-dependent mechanism. PMID:12684272

  11. A novel co-drug of aspirin and ursolic acid interrupts adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via regulating EMT and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways: multiple targets for cancer metastasis prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao; Liu, Yajun; Li, Tao; Yang, Xiang; Zheng, Guirong; Chen, Hongning; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis currently remains the predominant cause of breast carcinoma treatment failure. The effective targeting of metastasis-related-pathways in cancer holds promise for a new generation of therapeutics. In this study, we developed an novel Asp-UA conjugate, which was composed of classical “old drug” aspirin and low toxicity natural product ursolic acid for targeting breast cancer metastasis. Our results showed that Asp-UA could attenuate the adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a more safe and effective manner in vitro. Molecular and cellular study demonstrated that Asp-UA significantly down-regulated the expression of cell adhesion and invasion molecules including integrin α6β1, CD44, MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, EGFR and ERK proteins, and up-regulated the epithelial markers “E-cadherin” and “β-catenin”, and PTEN proteins. Furthermore, Asp-UA (80 mg/kg) reduced lung metastasis in a 4T1 murine breast cancer metastasis model more efficiently, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of CD44. More importantly, we did not detect side effects with Asp-UA in mice such as weight loss and main viscera tissues toxicity. Overall, our research suggested that co-drug Asp-UA possessed potential metastasis chemoprevention abilities via influencing EMT and EGFR-mediated pathways and could be a more promising drug candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27683033

  12. Multivariate control charts based on net analyte signal and near infrared spectroscopy for quality monitoring of Nimesulide in pharmaceutical formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato de Carvalho Rocha, Wérickson; Luis Rosa, André; Antônio Martins, José; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2010-10-01

    Multivariate control charts based on the net analytical signal, in conjunction with near infrared spectroscopy, were developed to monitor the quality of a pharmaceutical formulation containing Nimesulide. Three control charts were developed: the NAS chart that corresponds to the analyte of interest (Nimesulide in this case), the interference chart that corresponds to the contribution of other compounds in the sample and the residual chart that corresponds to nonsystematic variation. From the limits estimated for each chart using samples inside the quality specifications, it was possible to identify the samples that were outside the specifications concerning Nimesulide concentration and to identify the presence of different constituents in the standard formulation.

  13. Aspirin sensitivity: acetylsalicylate or excipients.

    PubMed

    Hebron, B S; Hebron, H J

    2009-08-01

    We present three patients who developed urticaria while taking an enteric formulation of aspirin, confirmed on a second exposure. Although hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin, especially in asthmatic patients or those with nasal polyps, are well reported, our patients did not exhibit any underlying history of atopy. Furthermore, two of the patients were able to tolerate a soluble formulation. We review the literature and discuss whether these symptoms might be caused by pharmaceutical excipients, present in very small amounts in the enteric coating, rather than the active ingredient acetylsalicylate. Adverse reactions to excipients are fortunately rare but are occasionally reported.

  14. Formulation development of intermediate release Nimesulide tablets by CCRD for IVIVC studies.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Sattar, Shahnila; Nadeem, Muhammad; Hussain, Liaqat; MZia, Muhammad Usman; Muhammad, Iyad Naeem; Uzair, Muhammad; Qadir, Imran

    2014-07-01

    Simple and cost effective study consisting of three steps, comparison of micromeritic properties of different blends i.e. placebo without API and Nimesulide containing, Use of central composite design (CCRD) for intermediate release Nimesulide tablets and stability results of three selected Nimesulide tablet formulations which were calculated by using R Gui. Different concentrations of Avicel, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and magnesium stearate were used as variables in central composite design and two types blend i.e., with or without Nimesulide were selected for bulk density, tap density, percentage compressibility; angle of repose and Hausner's ratio. Blending rate constant was performed after applying the different mixing times like 3, 6, 9 and 12 minutes. Twenty intermediate release formulations were designed and three formulations were chosen for compression by direct compression method on the basis of compressibility index. Physicochemical properties and best release pattern in four hours in different dissolution medium were successfully measured. Relative densities, porosity of tablets were compared with tensile strength of tablet and weight variation, hardness, friability and dissolution was performed by simple experiments. Presence of Nimesulide in the bulk increased all micromeratic tests while 9 minutes was best mixing time. The hardness of NM containing tablets increased with the increase of relative density. The release pattern was further analyzed by model dependent i.e. zero order, first order and Higuchi, Korse-meyer and Pappas, Hixson Crowell and model independent kinetic model i.e., f2 value respectively. R Gui explained the F16 formulation shows the best result in stability studies with shelf life 72 months.

  15. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A; Perkins, James R; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation.

  16. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A.; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs activate NADPH oxidase in adipocytes and raise the H2O2 pool to prevent cAMP-stimulated protein kinase a activation and inhibit lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) —aspirin, naproxen, nimesulide, and piroxicam— lowered activation of type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-II) in isolated rat adipocytes, decreasing adrenaline- and dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2cAMP)-stimulated lipolysis. The molecular bases of insulin-like actions of NSAID were studied. Results Based on the reported inhibition of lipolysis by H2O2, catalase was successfully used to block NSAID inhibitory action on Bt2cAMP-stimulated lipolysis. NSAID, at (sub)micromolar range, induced an H2O2 burst in rat adipocyte plasma membranes and in whole adipocytes. NSAID-mediated rise of H2O2 was abrogated in adipocyte plasma membranes by: diphenyleneiodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX); the NOX4 antibody; and cytochrome c, trapping the NOX-formed superoxide. These three compounds prevented the inhibition of Bt2cAMP-stimulated lipolysis by NSAIDs. Inhibition of aquaporin-mediated H2O2 transport with AgNO3 in adipocytes allowed NOX activation but prevented the lipolysis inhibition promoted by NSAID: i.e., once synthesized, H2O2 must reach the lipolytic machinery. Since insulin inhibits adrenaline-stimulated lipolysis, the effect of aspirin on isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis in rat adipocytes was studied. As expected, isoproterenol-mediated lipolysis was blunted by both insulin and aspirin. Conclusions NSAIDs activate NOX4 in adipocytes to produce H2O2, which impairs cAMP-dependent PKA-II activation, thus preventing isoproterenol-activated lipolysis. H2O2 signaling in adipocytes is a novel and important cyclooxygenase-independent effect of NSAID. PMID:23718778

  18. Comparison of effects of aspirin and indomethacin on human platelet prostaglandin synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Crook, D; Collins, A J

    1977-01-01

    Human platelets were incubated in vitro with either aspirin or indomethacin and the prostaglandin synthetase activity of the resultant microsomal fraction from each incubation measured using a radiometric technique. Whereas aspirin produced a dose-related inhibition of the enzyme, indomethacin produced little or no inhibition over the same concentration range (10(-6) mol/l--10(-3) mol/l). Furthermore, administration of aspirin (600 mg) to volunteers produced a highly significant, prolonged inhibition of platelet microsomal prostaglandin synthetase whereas no inhibition was found with indomethacin (50 mg). As indomethacin is considerably more potent than aspirin as an inhibitor of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase in vitro, the results suggest a fundamental difference in the nature of the inhibition produced by each drug, aspirin being an essentially irreversible inhibitor whereas the inhibition produced by indomethacin is reversible. Studies with [3H-acetyl] aspirin have confirmed previous findings (Roth and Majerus, 1975) that aspirin produces an irreversible acetylation of a particulate fraction protein from human platelets. PMID:411427

  19. Stability-indicating HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Aspirin and Prasugrel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shital M.; Patel, C. N.; Patel, V. B.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, specific, accurate, and stability-indicating reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of aspirin and prasugrel, using a Kromasil 100 C18 (150×4.6 mm, 5 μ) column and a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile:methanol:water (30:10:60, v/v), pH 3.0 adjusted with o-phosphoric acid. The retention times of aspirin and prasugrel were found to be 3.28 min and 6.61 min, respectively. Linearity was established for aspirin and prasugrel in the range of 15-150 and 2-20 μg/ml, respectively. The percentage recoveries of aspirin and prasugrel were found to be in the range of 99.34-100.32% and 98.92-102.09%, respectively. Both the drugs were subjected to acid, alkali and neutral hydrolysis, oxidation, dry heat, and UV degradation. The degradation studies indicated aspirin to be more susceptible to alkaline hydrolysis, while prasugrel to be more susceptible to neutral hydrolysis. The degradation products were well resolved from the pure drug with significant differences in their retention time values. This method can be successfully employed for simultaneous quantitative analysis of aspirin and prasugrel in bulk drugs and formulations. PMID:24302795

  20. Rapid Aspirin Challenge in Patients with Aspirin Allergy and Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin A; White, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin allergy in a patient with acute coronary syndrome represents one of the more urgent challenges an allergist may face. Adverse reactions to aspirin are reported in 1.5% of patients with coronary artery disease. A history of adverse reaction to aspirin often leads to unnecessary withholding of this medication or use of alternative antiplatelet therapy which may be inferior or more costly. Aspirin therapy has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Rapid aspirin challenge/desensitization in the aspirin allergic patient has been consistently shown to be both safe and successful in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  1. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  2. Impacts of metformin and aspirin on life history features and longevity of crickets: trade-offs versus cost-free life extension?

    PubMed

    Hans, Harvir; Lone, Asad; Aksenov, Vadim; Rollo, C David

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impacts of aspirin and metformin on the life history of the cricket Acheta domesticus (growth rate, maturation time, mature body size, survivorship, and maximal longevity). Both drugs significantly increased survivorship and maximal life span. Maximal longevity was 136 days for controls, 188 days (138 % of controls) for metformin, and 194 days (143 % of controls) for aspirin. Metformin and aspirin in combination extended longevity to a lesser degree (163 days, 120 % of controls). Increases in general survivorship were even more pronounced, with low-dose aspirin yielding mean longevity 234 % of controls (i.e., health span). Metformin strongly reduced growth rates of both genders (<60 % of controls), whereas aspirin only slightly reduced the growth rate of females and slightly increased that of males. Both drugs delayed maturation age relative to controls, but metformin had a much greater impact (>140 % of controls) than aspirin (~118 % of controls). Crickets maturing on low aspirin showed no evidence of a trade-off between maturation mass and life extension. Remarkably, by 100 days of age, aspirin-treated females were significantly larger than controls (largely reflecting egg complement). Unlike the reigning dietary restriction paradigm, low aspirin conformed to a paradigm of "eat more, live longer." In contrast, metformin-treated females were only ~67 % of the mass of controls. Our results suggest that hormetic agents like metformin may derive significant trade-offs with life extension, whereas health and longevity benefits may be obtained with less cost by agents like aspirin that regulate geroprotective pathways.

  3. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  4. Aspirin: The Mechanism of Action Revisited in the Context of Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid, Angela P.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is one of the most frequently used and cheapest drugs in medicine. It belongs to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with a wide range of pharmacological activities, including analgesic, antipyretic, and antiplatelet properties. Currently, it is accepted to prescribe a low dose of aspirin to pregnant women who are at high risk of preeclampsia (PE) because it reduces the onset of this complication. Another pregnancy alteration in which a low dose of aspirin is recommended is the obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The most recognized mechanism of action of aspirin is to inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins but this by itself does not explain the repertoire of anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. Later, another mechanism was described: the induction of the production of aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATLs) from arachidonic acid by acetylation of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2. The availability of a stable analog of ATL has stimulated investigations on the use of this analog and it has been found that, similar to endogenously produced lipoxins, ATL resolves inflammation and acts as antioxidant and immunomodulator. If we consider that in PE and in the obstetric APS, there is an underlying inflammatory process, aspirin might be used based on the induction of ATL. The objective of this review is to revisit the old and new mechanisms of action of aspirin. In particular, it intends to show other potential uses of this drug to prevent certain pregnancy complications in the light of its ability to induce anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid-derived mediators. PMID:28360907

  5. Spinal cholinergic involvement after treatment with aspirin and paracetamol in rats.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Klas S P; Kommalage, Mahinda; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-09-16

    Aspirin and paracetamol have been shown to suppress non-inflammatory pain conditions like thermal, visceral and mechanical pain in mice and rats. The non-inflammatory antinociception appears to be mediated by central receptor mechanisms, such as the cholinergic system. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the non-inflammatory antinociception of aspirin and paracetamol could be mediated by an increase of intraspinal acetylcholine release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in anesthetized rats for acetylcholine sampling. Subcutaneously administered aspirin 100 and 300 mg/kg increased, while paracetamol 300 mg/kg decreased intraspinal acetylcholine release. Intraspinal drug administration did not affect acetylcholine release. Our results suggest that an increased intraspinal acetylcholine release could be involved in part of the non-inflammatory pain suppression by aspirin, but not by paracetamol.

  6. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day Browse Sections The Basics Overview Benefits and Risks ... sure why this works. Can taking aspirin every day cause any side effects? Taking aspirin daily isn' ...

  7. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke Also known as aspirin primary prevention. ... if I’m taking aspirin to prevent another heart attack or stroke? The information discussed in Who may ...

  8. [Low-dose aspirin in patients with diabete melitus: risks and benefits regarding macro and microvascular complications].

    PubMed

    Camargo, Eduardo G; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Weinert, Letícia S; Lavinsky, Joel; Silveiro, Sandra P

    2007-04-01

    Aspirin is recommended as cardiovascular disease prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus. Due to the increased risk of bleeding and because of the hypothesis that there could be a worsening of microvascular complications related to aspirin, there has been observed an important underutilization of the drug. However, it is now known that aspirin is not associated with a deleterious effect on diabetic retinopathy and there is evidence indicating that it also does not affect renal function with usual doses (150 mg/d). On the other hand, higher doses may prove necessary, since recent data suggest that diabetic patients present the so called "aspirin resistance". The mechanisms of this resistance are not yet fully understood, being probably related to an abnormal intrinsic platelet activity. The employment of alternative antiplatelet strategies or the administration of higher aspirin doses (150-300 mg/d) should be better evaluated regarding effective cardiovascular disease prevention in diabetes as well as the possible effects on microvascular complications.

  9. EFFECTS OF ASPIRIN& SIMVASTATIN AND ASPIRIN, SIMVASTATIN & LIPOIC ACID ON HEME OXYGENASE-1 IN HEALTHY HUMAN SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Saw, Jessica; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Carlson, David; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) degrades heme and protects against oxidative stress. In vitro and animal models suggest that HO-1 is beneficial in several diseases (e.g., post-operative ileus, gastroparesis, acute pancreatitis, and colitis). However the only drugs (i.e., hemin and heme arginate) which pharmacologically up-regulate HO-1 in humans are expensive and can only be administered intravenously. Our aims were to compare the effects of placebo, aspirin and simvastatin alone, and with α-lipoic acid, on HO-1 protein concentration and activity in humans. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of 3 oral regimens administered for 7 days, ie, placebo; aspirin (325 mg twice daily) and simvastatin (40 mg twice daily); aspirin, simvastatin, and the sodium salt of R-α-lipoic acid (NaRLA, 600 mg three times daily) on markers of HO-1 activation (i.e., plasma HO-1 protein concentration and venous monocyte HO-1 protein activity) in 18 healthy subjects (14 females). Markers of HO-1 activation were evaluated at baseline, days 2 and 7. Key Results Baseline HO-1 protein concentrations and activity were similar amongst the three groups. Compared to placebo, aspirin and simvastatin combined, or together with NaRLA did not affect HO-1 protein concentration or activity at 2 or 7 days. HO-1 protein concentrations and activity were correlated on day 7 (r = 0.75, p = 0.0004) but not at baseline and on day 2. Conclusions At therapeutic doses, aspirin, simvastatin, and α-lipoic acid do not increase plasma HO-1 protein concentration or venous monocyte HO-1 activity in healthy humans. PMID:25093998

  10. Aspirin increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; Dudiak, Brianne; Beck, Megan E; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Stolz, Donna B; Goetzman, Eric S

    2017-01-08

    The metabolic effects of salicylates are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. Aspirin increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation, but inhibited peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, in two different cell lines. Aspirin increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and was found to be a stronger acetylating agent in vitro than acetyl-CoA. However, aspirin-induced acetylation did not alter the activity of fatty acid oxidation proteins, and knocking out the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 did not affect the induction of long-chain fatty acid oxidation by aspirin. Aspirin did not change oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids, which can freely traverse the mitochondrial membrane. Together, these data indicate that aspirin does not directly alter mitochondrial matrix fatty acid oxidation enzymes, but most likely exerts its effects at the level of long-chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. The drive on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may be a compensatory response to altered mitochondrial morphology and inhibited electron transport chain function, both of which were observed after 24 h incubation of cells with aspirin. These studies provide insight into the pathophysiology of Reye Syndrome, which is known to be triggered by aspirin ingestion in patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders.

  11. Aspirin inhibits hepatitis C virus entry by downregulating claudin-1.

    PubMed

    Yin, P; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin has previously been reported to inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The aim of this study was to investigate whether aspirin is involved in blocking HCV entry. We found that aspirin inhibits the entry of HCVpp and infectious HCV. The level of claudin-1, an HCV receptor, is reduced by aspirin. Our results extend the anti-HCV effect of aspirin to the HCV entry step and further reinforce the anti-HCV role of aspirin.

  12. Induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) by aspirin in Caco-2 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Naveen; Gerner, Eugene W; Casero, Robert A

    2006-02-15

    Epidemiological, experimental and clinical results suggest that aspirin and other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) inhibit the development of colon cancer. It has been shown that the NSAID sulindac induces apoptosis and suppresses carcinogenesis, in part, by a mechanism leading to the transcriptional activation of the gene encoding SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase), a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism. In the present study, we show that a variety of NSAIDs, including aspirin, sulindac, ibuprofen and indomethacin, can induce SSAT gene expression in Caco-2 cells. Aspirin, at physiological concentrations, can induce SSAT mRNA via transcriptional initiation mechanisms. This induction leads to increased SSAT protein levels and enzyme activity. Promoter deletion analysis of the 5' SSAT promoter-flanking region led to the identification of two NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) response elements. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed binding of NF-kappaB complexes at these sequences after aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment led to the activation of NF-kappaB signalling and increased binding at these NF-kappaB sites in the SSAT promoter, hence providing a potential mechanism for the induction of SSAT by aspirin in these cells. Aspirin-induced SSAT ultimately leads to a decrease in cellular polyamine content, which has been associated with decreased carcinogenesis. These results suggest that activation of SSAT by aspirin and different NSAIDs may be a common property of NSAIDs that plays an important role in their chemopreventive actions in colorectal cancer.

  13. Effects of nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on cardiovascular function in 2 rat models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joanne Y T; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2014-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been found to be activated in diabetes. We investigated whether nimesulide (selective COX-2 inhibitor) alters cardiovascular responses to adrenaline in 2 rat models of diabetes. Wistar rats (5-week old) were continuously fed a normal or high-fructose diet (60% of caloric intake). At week 2, half of the rats in each diet regimen were given streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg, intravenously). At week 6, cardiovascular effects of adrenaline (6 and 16 × 10 mol·kg·min, intravenously) were measured in 4 groups of thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats (control, fructose, STZ, and fructose-streptozotocin [F-STZ]) before and after the injection of nimesulide (3 mg/kg, intravenously). Both the STZ and F-STZ groups exhibited hyperglycemia and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced left ventricular contractility, mean arterial pressure, arterial and venous resistance, and mean circulatory filling pressure (index of venous tone) responses to adrenaline, relative to the control and fructose groups. Nimesulide did not affect responses in the control and fructose groups but increased the venous and, to a less extent, arterial constriction to adrenaline in both the groups of diabetic rats. The cardiac contractile responses, however, were not altered after nimesulide treatment. The results show that nimesulide partially restored arterial and venous constriction to adrenaline in rats with STZ- and F-STZ-induced diabetes.

  14. Immunological mechanisms in aspirin hypersensitivity. Studies on the immunogenicity of free aspirin.

    PubMed

    Cîrstea, M; Suhaciu, G; Cîrje, M; Ciontescu, L

    1976-10-01

    Anti-aspiryl antibodies were produced in rabbits and guinea pigs by inoculation of aspirin incorporated in complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant. These antibodies were readily detected by passive haemagglutination using rabbit erythrocytes incubated with aspirin at alkaline pH. Aspiryl conjugates with ovalbumin, human gamma-globulin, bovine gamma-globulin and rabbit serum were also prepared by incubating the proteins with aspirin at alkaline pH. Aspiryl conjugates prepared by this technique behaved, immunologically, identically with the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. By contrast, the molar absorbance at 305 nm of the conjugates prepared from aspirin was about 25 times lower than the molar absorbance of the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. Since the absorbance of salicylic acid is about eight times greater than that of aspirin, the conclusion is drawn that the aspiryl/salicylyl ratio is significantly higher in the conjugates prepared by incubating proteins with aspirin at alkaline pH than in the conjugates prepared from aspirin chloride. In parallel experiments, salicylic acid did not induce formation of specific antibodies capable of reacting with aspirin- or salicylic acid-treated red cells. Sera giving positive passive haemagglutination with aspirin-treated erythrocytes did not react with erythrocytes treated with salicylic acid or acetic anhydride.

  15. Gastroduodenal mucosal damage with salsalate versus aspirin: results of experimental models and endoscopic studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Scheiman, J M; Elta, G H

    1990-10-01

    Animal models have identified multiple mechanisms of aspirin toxicity. Aspirin inhibits cyclooxygenase in the gastroduodenal mucosa leading to a decrease in endogenous prostaglandins. Prostaglandin mediated mucus and bicarbonate secretion, epithelial hydrophobicity, blood flow, and cellular proliferation are all decreased. Salicylates may cause direct cellular toxicity via inhibition of energy metabolism and membrane transport properties. Salicylate preparations have been designed to decrease gastroduodenal absorption. Endoscopic studies in humans have confirmed that buffering of aspirin does not ameliorate damage, but enteric coating does. Salicylsalicylic acid (salsalate) is an effective antirheumatic drug that bypasses gastric absorption and also avoids cyclooxygenase inhibition. In a randomized, single-blind, endoscopic comparison of salsalate versus enteric-coated aspirin, significantly less gastroduodenal damage was observed in volunteers after salsalate administration compared to enteric-coated aspirin. An endoscopic study in rheumatoid arthritics also confirmed the ability of salsalate to spare gastroduodenal mucosa when compared to naproxen administration. Salsalate may cause less gastroduodenal damage than enteric-coated aspirin based on the results of animal models and endoscopic studies in humans.

  16. Effect of allopurinol, sulphasalazine, and vitamin C on aspirin induced gastroduodenal injury in human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    McAlindon, M E; Muller, A F; Filipowicz, B; Hawkey, C J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The mechanisms of aspirin induced gastroduodenal injury are not fully understood. Aspirin induces the release of reactive oxygen metabolites in animal models, which may contribute to mucosal injury. AIMS--To investigate the effects of aspirin administered with placebo or antioxidants on gastric mucosal reactive oxygen metabolite release and gastroduodenal injury in human volunteers. SUBJECTS--Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in the study (seven male; mean age 27 years, range 20-40). METHODS--In a double blind, randomised, crossover study, volunteers received aspirin 900 mg twice daily and either placebo, allopurinol 100 mg twice daily, sulphasalazine 1 g twice daily or vitamin C 1 g twice daily for three days. Injury was assessed endoscopically and by quantifying mucosal reactive oxygen metabolite release by measuring chemiluminescence before and after each treatment. The effect on prostanoids was determined by measuring ex vivo antral prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2). RESULTS--No drug reduced any parameter of gastric injury but vitamin C reduced duodenal injury assessed by Lanza score (p < 0.005). Chemiluminescence increased after aspirin both with placebo (p < 0.05) and vitamin C (p < 0.05). Post-treatment chemiluminescence was lower in subjects taking allopurinol (p < 0.05) or sulphasalazine (p < 0.005) than in those taking placebo with aspirin. CONCLUSIONS--In this study, aspirin induced gastric injury was associated with reactive oxygen metabolite release. This was reduced by sulphasalazine and allopurinol, although macroscopic injury was not affected. Vitamin C, however, was shown to have a previously unrecognised protective effect against aspirin induced duodenal injury. PMID:8707080

  17. Aspirin and proton pump inhibitor combination therapy for prevention of cardiovascular disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Peura, David A; Wilcox, C Mel

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin, used at low doses (75-325 mg daily), prevents aggregation of platelets and is prescribed for patients as pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease. Despite the well-documented beneficial effects of aspirin, prolonged use is associated with damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa in the upper and lower GI tract. Patient risk of hemorrhage and peptic ulcer formation is increased with older age, previous ulcer history, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, or antithrombotic agents. As termination of aspirin therapy can precipitate a cardiovascular event, patients at risk need co-therapy with gastroprotective agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), to reduce the GI side effects of aspirin treatment. Fixed-dose combinations of low-dose aspirin and gastroprotective agents have been designed to increase medication compliance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce the overall cost of therapy. Prolonged use of PPIs may, however, lead to serious adverse effects or, in some cases, reduce the cardioprotective effects of aspirin. Hence, physicians need to carefully consider the benefits and risks associated with the condition of each patient to optimize clinical outcomes of combination therapy. A growing body of clinical evidence indicates that aspirin may decrease the risk of colorectal and other GI cancers, as well as reduce progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, PPIs have recently been shown to reduce neoplastic transformation in patients with BE. Thus, the use of a fixed-dose aspirin/PPI combination could potentially provide chemopreventive benefit to patients with BE, and, at the same time, treat the underlying gastroesophageal reflux responsible for the condition.

  18. 1,2,3-Triazole-nimesulide hybrid: Their design, synthesis and evaluation as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mareddy, Jyoti; Suresh, N; Kumar, C Ganesh; Kapavarapu, Ravikumar; Jayasree, A; Pal, Sarbani

    2017-02-01

    A new hybrid template has been designed by integrating the structural features of nimesulide and the 1,2,3-triazole moiety in a single molecular entity at the same time eliminating the problematic nitro group of nimesulide. The template has been used for the generation of a library of molecules as potential anticancer agents. A mild and greener CuAAC approach has been used to synthesize these compounds via the reaction of 4-azido derivative of nimesulide and terminal alkynes in water. Three of these compounds showed promising growth inhibition (IC50 ∼6-10μM) of A549, HepG2, HeLa and DU145 cancer cell lines but no significant effects on HEK293 cell line. They also inhibited PDE4B in vitro (60-70% at 10μM) that was supported by the docking studies (PLP score 87-94) in silico.

  19. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid has enhanced chemo-preventive properties compared to aspirin, is gastrointestinal safe with all the classic therapeutic indications.

    PubMed

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-15

    Aspirin is chemopreventive; however, side effects preclude its long-term use. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel hybrid that releases nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide, was designed to be a safer alternative. Here we compare the gastrointestinal safety, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, anti-platelet, and chemopreventive properties of aspirin and NBS-1120 administered orally to rats at equimolar doses. Gastrointestinal safety: 6h post-administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs were counted; tissue samples were frozen for PGE2, SOD, and MDA determination. Anti-inflammatory: 1h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 5h. Anti-pyretic: fever was induced by LPS (ip) an hour before administration of the test drugs, core body temperature was measured hourly for 5h. Analgesic: time-dependent analgesic effects were evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Antiplatelet: anti-aggregatory effects were studied on collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma. Chemoprevention: nude mice were gavaged daily for 25 days with vehicle, aspirin or NBS-1120. After one week, each mouse was inoculated subcutaneously in the right flank with HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both agents reduced PGE2 levels in stomach tissue; however, NBS-1120 did not cause any stomach ulcers, whereas aspirin caused significant bleeding. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that exerted by NBS-1120. SOD activity was significantly inhibited by aspirin but increased by NBS-1120. Both agents showed similar anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, and anti-platelet activities. Aspirin increased plasma TNFα more than NBS-1120-treated animals. NBS-1120 was better than aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; it dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and tumor mass.

  20. Biochemical pathogenesis of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    PubMed

    Narayanankutty, Arun; Reséndiz-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Teran, Luis M

    2013-05-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a distinct clinical entity characterized by eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, asthma and often nasal polyposis. Exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exacerbates bronchospasms with asthma and rhinitis. Disease progression suggests a skewing towards TH2 type cellular response along with moderate to severe eosinophil and mast cell infiltration. Alterations in upper and lower airway cellular milieu with abnormalities in eicosanoid metabolism and altered eicosanoid receptor expression are the key features underlying AERD pathogenesis. Dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, notably reduced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis compared to their aspirin tolerant counterpart and relatively increased PGD2 production, a TH2/eosinophil chemoattractant are reported in AERD. Underproduced PGE2 is metabolized by overexpression of 15 prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) to inactive products further reducing PGE2 at real time. This relives the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) resulting in overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). Diminished formation of CysLT antagonists called lipoxins (LXs) also augments CysLTs responsiveness. Occasional intake of NSAIDs favors even more 5-LOX product formation, further narrowing the bronchoconstrictive bottle neck, resulting in acute asthmatic exacerbations along with increased mucus production. This review focuses on abnormalities in biochemical and molecular mechanisms in eicosanoid biosynthesis, eicosanoid receptor dysregulation and associated polymorphisms with special reference to arachidonic acid metabolism in AERD.

  1. Acid-NSAID/aspirin interaction in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Richard H; Yuan, Yuhong

    2011-01-01

    The presence of gastric acid plays a critical role in the mechanisms of NSAIDs/aspirin-associated gastric and duodenal mucosal injury and ulceration. The role of gastric acid and its relationship to NSAIDs/aspirin in mucosal damage, ulcer and ulcer complications continues to be an important concern because of the increasing worldwide use of NSAIDs and aspirin. Acid suppression continues to be an important prevention strategy for NSAID-associated gastric and duodenal ulcer and ulcer complications. While a coxib or an NSAID and PPI in combination are considered to have comparable safety profiles, the evidence from direct comparisons in high-risk patients is limited, and the cardiovascular safety of coxibs and NSAIDs remains a concern especially in patients with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. An evaluation of individual gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks and benefits, selection of the most appropriate NSAID and dose for each particular patient should always be emphasized. Twice daily PPI is more appropriate to protect a patient who is taking NSAIDs twice daily. PPI co-therapy is still recommended in patients receiving dual antiplatelet treatment, although conflicting results have been reported about adverse drug interactions between PPIs and clopidogrel.

  2. Evaluation of antioxidant activity and electronic structure of aspirin and paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motozaki, W.; Nagatani, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Endo, K.; Takemura, T.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and antioxidant activity of phenolic antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol). X-ray photoelectron and emission spectra of the antioxidants have been simulated by deMon density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the molecules. The chemical bonding of aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen 'lone-pair' π-orbitals which can neutralize free radicals and thus be related to antioxidant properties of the drug. In the case of paracetamol the additional nitrogen 'lone pair' is formed which can explain toxicity of the drug. We propose an evaluation method of antioxidant activity based on the relationship between experimental half-wave oxidation potential ( Ep/2 ) and calculated ionization potentials ( IP) by the DFT calculations, and can conclude that paracetamol has the higher antioxidant activity than aspirin.

  3. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route.

  4. Amelioration of Aspirin Induced Oxidative Impairment and Apoptotic Cell Death by a Novel Antioxidant Protein Molecule Isolated from the Herb Phyllanthus niruri

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Ghosh, Shatadal; Sil, Parames C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has been used for a long time as an analgesic and anti-pyretic drug. Limitations of its use, however, remain for the gastro-intestinal side effects and erosions. Although the role of aspirin on gastro-intestinal injury has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying aspirin-induced liver and spleen pathophysiology are poorly defined. The present study has been conducted to investigate whether phyllanthus niruri protein (PNP) possesses any protective role against aspirin mediated liver and spleen tissue toxicity, and if so, what signaling pathways it utilizes to convey its protective action. Aspirin administration in mice enhanced serum marker (ALP) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced antioxidant power and altered oxidative stress related biochemical parameters in liver and spleen tissues. Moreover, we observed that aspirin intoxication activated both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, as well as down regulated NF-κB activation and the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK MAPKs. Histological assessments and TUNEL assay also supported that aspirin induced tissue damages are apoptotic in nature. PNP treatment after aspirin exposure effectively neutralizes all these abnormalities via the activation of survival PI3k/Akt pathways. Combining all results suggest that PNP could be a potential protective agent to protect liver and spleen from the detrimental effects of aspirin. PMID:24586486

  5. (Nitrooxyacyloxy)methyl esters of aspirin as novel nitric oxide releasing aspirins.

    PubMed

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Donnola, Monica; Rolando, Barbara; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Cena, Clara; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Biondi, Stefano; Ongini, Ennio; Gasco, Alberto

    2009-08-27

    A series of (nitrooxyacyloxy)methyl esters of aspirin were synthesized and evaluated as new NO-donor aspirins. Different amounts of aspirin were released in serum from these products according to the nature of nitrooxyacyloxy moiety present. In the aromatic series, there is a rather good linear correlation between the amount of aspirin released and the potencies of the products in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by collagen. Both the native compounds and the related nitrooxy-substituted acid metabolites were able to relax rat aorta strips precontracted with phenylephrine, in keeping with a NO-induced activation of the sGC as a mechanism that underlies the vasodilator effect. The products here described are new improved examples of NO-donor aspirins containing nitrooxy groups. They could represent an alternative to the use of aspirin in a variety of clinical applications.

  6. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  7. Aspirin resistance: truth or dare.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Pharand, Chantal; Palisaitis, Donald A; Diodati, Jean G

    2006-12-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin (ASA), is widely used in patients with cardiovascular disease to prevent acute ischemic events. However, platelet response to ASA is not equal in all individuals, and a high variability in the prevalence of ASA resistance is reported in the literature (0.4-83%). Actually, ASA resistance is poorly understood; this stems from the fact that its definition is unclear, its presence can be evaluated by a number of assays that are not equivalent, and its prevalence may vary widely based on the population studied. This article (1) exposes the difficulties in defining ASA resistance; (2) discusses the mechanisms by which ASA resistance may occur; (3) presents the characteristics that may put patients at greater risk of exhibiting ASA resistance; and (4) discusses the clinical impact of ASA resistance in patients requiring chronic therapy.

  8. Aspirin for primary prevention in diabetes mellitus: from the calculation of cardiovascular risk and risk/benefit profile to personalised treatment.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by persistent thromboxane (TX)-dependent platelet activation, regardless of disease duration. Low-dose aspirin, that induces a permanent inactivation of platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, thus inhibiting TXA2 biosynthesis, should be theoretically considered the drug of choice. The most up-to-date meta-analysis of aspirin prophylaxis in this setting, which includes three trials conducted in patients with diabetes and six other trials in which such patients represent a subgroup within a broader population, reported that aspirin is associated with a non-significant decrease in the risk of vascular events, although the limited amount of available data precludes a precise estimate of the effect size. An increasing body of evidence supports the concept that less-than-expected response to aspirin may underlie mechanisms related to residual platelet hyper-reactivity despite anti-platelet treatment, at least in a fraction of patients. Among the proposed mechanisms, the variable turnover rate of the drug target (platelet COX-1) appears to represent the most convincing determinant of the inter-individual variability in aspirin response. This review intends to develop the idea that the understanding of the determinants of less-than-adequate response to aspirin in certain individuals, although not changing the paradigm of the indication to low-dose aspirin prescription in primary prevention, may help identifying, in terms of easily detectable clinical or biochemical characteristics, individuals who would attain inadequate protection from aspirin, and for whom different strategies should be challenged.

  9. How to test the effect of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy?

    PubMed

    Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Homoródi, Nóra; Kovács, Emese Gyöngyvér; Sarkady, Ferenc; Csiba, László; Édes, István; Muszbek, László

    2016-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin is frequently used for the prevention of recurrent ischemic events. Various laboratory methods are used to detect the effect of these drugs administered in monotherapy, however their value in dual therapy has not been explored. Here, we determined which methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel or aspirin are influenced by the other antiplatelet agent. One arm of the study included 53 ischemic stroke patients being on clopidogrel monotherapy showing effective inhibition of the P2Y12 ADP receptor. Laboratory tests routinely used for the detection of aspirin resistance (arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation/secretion, AA-induced thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production in platelet-rich plasma and VerifyNow Aspirin assay) were carried out on samples obtained from these patients. The other arm of the study involved 52 patients with coronary artery disease being on aspirin monotherapy. Methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel (ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, flow cytometric analysis of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and a newly developed P2Y12-specific platelet aggregation (ADP[PGE1] test)) were performed on samples obtained from these patients. Clopidogrel monotherapy significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, moreover, AA-induced TXB2 production was also significantly decreased. VASP phosphorylation and AA-induced platelet aggregation showed fair correlation in patients taking clopidogrel only. Clopidogrel did not inhibit the VerifyNow Aspirin test significantly. Aspirin monotherapy influenced ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, but did not have an effect on VASP phosphorylation and on the ADP[PGE1] platelet aggregation test.

  10. Lipid Mediators in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew R; Ayars, Andrew G; Altman, Matthew C; Henderson, William R

    2016-11-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a syndrome of severe asthma and rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis with exacerbations of baseline eosinophil-driven and mast cell-driven inflammation after nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug ingestion. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, dysregulation of the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism is thought to be key. Central features of AERD pathogenesis are overproduction of proinflammatory and bronchoconstrictor cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin (PG) D2 and inhibition of bronchoprotective and antiinflammatory PGE2. Imbalance in the ratio of these lipid mediators likely leads to the increased eosinophilic and mast cell inflammatory responses in the respiratory tract.

  11. Method Development for Analysis of Aspirin Tablets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Develops a lab experiment for introductory instrumental analysis that requires interference studies and optimizing of conditions. Notes the analysis of the aspirin is by visible spectrophotometric assay. Gives experimental details and discussion. (MVL)

  12. Analysis of the mechanism for the development of allergic skin inflammation and the application for its treatment: aspirin modulation of IgE-dependent mast cell activation: role of aspirin-induced exacerbation of immediate allergy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Ra, Chisei

    2009-07-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that can potentiate some acute allergies and causes adverse immunological reactions collectively referred to as aspirin intolerance, a disorder that induces urticaria, asthma, and anaphylaxis in response to oral administration of the drug. Aspirin also potentiates some acute allergies such as food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), a food allergy induced by physical exercise. The anti-inflammatory actions as well as the adverse immunological effects have been thought to be primarily due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that mechanisms unrelated to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis are involved. One key feature of aspirin intolerance is the overproductions of cysteinyl leukotrienes (LTs), in which mast cells have been implicated to play a role. In this review, we provide an overview of our current knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms of LTC(4) secretion in mast cells and its modulation by aspirin, with a special emphasis on the role of Ca(2+) signals. We also introduced our recent findings that mast cells express dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) and that Ca(2+) channels of this kind mediate aspirin modulation of LTC(4) secretion in mast cells.

  13. Arachidonic acid metabolism and inhibition of cyclooxygenase in platelets from asthmatic subjects with aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bonne, C; Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Wayoff, M; Descharmes, A; Gazel, P; Legrand, A; Kalt, C

    1985-02-01

    Exaggerated inhibition of cyclooxygenase has been proposed as a mechanism of drug-induced bronchospasm in aspirin-intolerant patients. This study, using platelets, shows that inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis by aspirin is unmodified in patients when compared with healthy subjects. The ratio of cyclooxygenase:lipoxygenase products is similar in platelets from patients and control subjects. We conclude that the cyclooxygenase alteration observed in cells from the respiratory tract is not generalised to other cells such as platelets. We also propose that the major abnormality in NSAID-intolerant patients would affect receptivity to lipoxygenase products more than their biosynthesis.

  14. Hypersensitivity to aspirin and urgent percutaneous coronary intervention: A therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tatiana; Gonçalves, Sara; Sá, Catarina; Marinheiro, Rita; Rodrigues, Rita; Seixo, Filipe; Tomas, Elza; Caria, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common and five types of reactions have been defined. The prevalence of such reactions in patients with myocardial infarction is unclear, and so antiplatelet therapy in this population is a challenge. Various desensitization protocols have been developed but there are no specific guidelines for their use. The authors present the case of a patient with acute coronary syndrome and aspirin hypersensitivity referred for urgent coronary angiography. Aspirin desensitization therapy is safe and successful in many patients, but more randomized trials are needed to confirm its benefits in coronary artery disease patients.

  15. Aspirin and clopidogrel: a sweeping combination in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S; Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Koulouris, Spyros; Melita, Helen

    2005-07-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis, believed to be integrally involved in both the development and progression of atherosclerotic heart disease, as well as in its acute thrombotic complications. Antiplatelet therapy constitutes the cornerstone in the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes and generally high-risk patients with atherothrombosis. Until recently, long-term antiplatelet therapy for the treatment and prevention of the complications of atherothrombotic disease was traditionally limited to aspirin. The availability of the thienopyridines, in particular clopidogrel, represents an important addition to the physician's armamentarium. Clopidogrel is currently one of the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of symptomatic coronary artery disease. Aspirin and clopidogrel interfere with platelet activation in complementary, but separate pathways. Aspirin irreversibly inhibits cyclooxygenase, thus preventing the production of thromboxane A(2), which is a prothrombotic and vasoconstrictive substance. Clopidogrel, a newer thienopyridine which has largely supplanted ticlopidine due to a more favorable safety profile, irreversibly prevents platelet activation by blocking one of the three known adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) receptors (the P2Y(12) receptor) on the platelet surface, thus interfering with platelet activation, degranulation and aggregation. Both these antiplatelet agents have a potent protective effect against adverse vascular events, but the combination of these two agents has an even stronger antiplatelet effect translating into superior antithrombotic protection in coronary, cerebral or peripheral arterial disease, without an inordinate increase in bleeding complications. A number of seminal clinical trials have demonstrated and confirmed the incremental benefit and efficacy of the combination of clopidogrel and aspirin therapy above and beyond that of aspirin alone, with multiple other

  16. Development and validation of RP-HPLC method for simultaneous estimation of nimesulide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate and caffeine anhydrous in pharmaceutical dosage form.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Rishbha; Nair, Anroop; Saini, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a simple, specific and accurate reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nimesulide (NS), phenylephrine hydrochloride (PE), chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) and caffeine anhydrous (CF) in pharmaceutical dosage forms. A reversed phase Hypersil phenyl column (4.6 mm x 25 cm) with mobile phase having pH 5.5 consisting of methanol and buffer (55:45, v/v) was used. The flow rate was 1.0 mL per minute and the effluents were monitored at 214 nm. The retention times of all the drugs were found to be 7.47 min (NS), 3.944 min (PE), 4.55 min (CF) and 17.15 min (CPM), respectively. The linearity for all the drugs was obtained in the range of 300-800 microg/mL (NS), 15-32 microg/mL (PE), 16-32 microg/mL (CPM) and 30-180 microg/mL (CF), respectively. The results of analysis have been well validated according to guidelines of International Conference of Harmonisation of technical requirements for registration of pharmaceuticals for human use. The method was found to be simple, precise, economical, less time consuming and reproducible. Hence, the suggested procedure could be used for the determination of all the four drugs in commercial preparations.

  17. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  18. Significant Modules and Biological Processes between Active Components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Depside Salt and Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Lianxin; Zhang, Yingying; Gu, Hao; Chai, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine and compare the similarities and differences between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin using perspective of pharmacological molecular networks. Active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin's related genes were identified via the STITCH4.0 and GeneCards Database. A text search engine (Agilent Literature Search 2.71) and MCODE software were applied to construct network and divide modules, respectively. Finally, 32, 2, and 28 overlapping genes, modules, and pathways were identified between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin. A multidimensional framework of drug network showed that two networks reflected commonly in human aortic endothelial cells and atherosclerosis process. Aspirin plays a more important role in metabolism, such as the well-known AA metabolism pathway and other lipid or carbohydrate metabolism pathways. S. miltiorrhiza depside salt still plays a regulatory role in type II diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and adipocytokine signaling pathway. Therefore, this study suggests that aspirin combined with S. miltiorrhiza depside salt may be more efficient in treatment of CHD patients, especially those with diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidemia. Further clinical trials to confirm this hypothesis are still needed.

  19. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  20. Activation of elements in HERV-W family by caffeine and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlan; Chen, Yatang; Li, Shan; Yu, Honglian; Zeng, Jie; Wang, Xiuling; Zhu, Fan

    2013-10-01

    Caffeine and aspirin have been suggested to be involved in neurologic diseases, such as schizophrenia, and previous data have revealed that abnormal expression of HERV-W elements may be an important factor in the etiopathogenesis of those diseases. In this article, we reported that caffeine and aspirin contributed to the expression of HERV-W env and gag in Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative Real-time PCR were used to detect the mRNA of HERV-W env and gag in cells exposed to caffeine or aspirin. Western blotting was used to detect the protein of HERV-W env. Luciferase activity assay was employed to detect the activity of HERV-W env promoter. It was found that both caffeine and aspirin could increase the expression of HERV-W env and gag in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Caffeine could activate the HERV-W env promoter, while aspirin could not. With previous studies we can conjecture that HERVs might play a bridging role between environmental factors, such as drugs and neurologic diseases.

  1. Significant Modules and Biological Processes between Active Components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Depside Salt and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yanming; Wang, Lianxin; Zhang, Yingying; Gu, Hao; Chai, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine and compare the similarities and differences between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin using perspective of pharmacological molecular networks. Active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin's related genes were identified via the STITCH4.0 and GeneCards Database. A text search engine (Agilent Literature Search 2.71) and MCODE software were applied to construct network and divide modules, respectively. Finally, 32, 2, and 28 overlapping genes, modules, and pathways were identified between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin. A multidimensional framework of drug network showed that two networks reflected commonly in human aortic endothelial cells and atherosclerosis process. Aspirin plays a more important role in metabolism, such as the well-known AA metabolism pathway and other lipid or carbohydrate metabolism pathways. S. miltiorrhiza depside salt still plays a regulatory role in type II diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and adipocytokine signaling pathway. Therefore, this study suggests that aspirin combined with S. miltiorrhiza depside salt may be more efficient in treatment of CHD patients, especially those with diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidemia. Further clinical trials to confirm this hypothesis are still needed. PMID:27069488

  2. Potential therapeutic applications of aspirin and other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Farah, A. E.; Rosenberg, F.

    1980-01-01

    1 The ubiquitous actions of the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors are described. 2 These include the inhibitory effect on prostaglandin synthesis and the direct effect of aspirin on lymphocytes and their ability to produce lymphokines. 3 Aspirin reduces some types of platelet aggregation possibly involving inhibition of the precursors of thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin. 4 The therapeutic implications in relation to transient ischaemic attacks, coronary artery disease and reno-allograft rejection are discussed. 5 The beneficial and adverse effects on the gastro-intestinal tract are described. 6 The effects of aspirin-like drugs on the genito-urinary tract are described with particular reference to their adverse effects on labour and their therapeutic effect on dysmenorrhoea. PMID:6776977

  3. Aspirin-induced asthma: a tribute to John Vane as a source of inspiration.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma is a distinct clinical syndrome consisting of inflammation, characterized by chronic eosinophilic rhinosinusitis with asthma and often nasal polyposis. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exacerbate asthma, resulting in violent attacks. This is the hallmark of the clinical syndrome as explained by the cyclooxygenase theory. This theory, which is now generally accepted, states that asthma attacks precipitated by aspirin and other NSAIDs have no allergic background; instead, they occur due to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 in sensitive patients. This paper describes how the discoveries of John Vane inspired the authors of the cyclooxygenase theory and led to further insight into the biology of eicosanoid metabolism in this relatively common type of asthma.

  4. Aspirin degradation in surface-charged TEMPO-oxidized mesoporous crystalline nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Daniel O; Hua, Kai; Forsgren, Johan; Mihranyan, Albert

    2014-01-30

    TEMPO-mediated surface oxidation of mesoporous highly crystalline Cladophora cellulose was used to introduce negative surface charges onto cellulose nanofibrils without significantly altering other structural characteristics. This enabled the investigation of the influence of mesoporous nanocellulose surface charges on aspirin chemical stability to be conducted. The negative surface charges (carboxylate content 0.44±0.01 mmol/g) introduced on the mesoporous crystalline nanocellulose significantly accelerated aspirin degradation, compared to the starting material which had significantly less surface charge (0.06±0.01 mmol/g). This effect followed from an increased aspirin amorphisation ability in mesopores of the oxidized nanocellulose. These results highlight the importance of surface charges in formulating nanocellulose for drug delivery.

  5. Formulation design and optimization of mouth dissolve tablets of nimesulide using vacuum drying technique.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Mukesh; Patel, Madhabhai; Amin, Avani; Agrawal, Ruchi; Dave, Rikita; Bariya, Nehal

    2004-04-26

    The purpose of this research was to develop mouth dissolve tablets of nimesulide. Granules containing nimesulide, camphor, crospovidone, and lactose were prepared by wet granulation technique. Camphor was sublimed from the dried granules by exposure to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability, wetting time, and disintegration time. In the investigation, a 32 full factorial design was used to investigate the joint influence of 2 formulation variables: amount of camphor and crospovidone. The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that for obtaining a rapidly disintegrating dosage form, tablets should be prepared using an optimum concentration of camphor and a higher percentage of crospovidone. A contour plot is also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the disintegration time and percentage friability. A checkpoint batch was also prepared to prove the validity of the evolved mathematical model. Sublimation of camphor from tablets resulted in superior tablets as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The systematic formulation approach helped in understanding the effect of formulation processing variables.

  6. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  7. The Aspirin Foundation Scientific Conference: the history, the present state and the future of aspirin prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tom; Elwood, Peter; Keating, Conrad; Rothwell, Peter; Detering, Elmar; Freedman, Andrew; Langley, Ruth; Logan, Richard; Phillips, Ceri; DeCensi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Aspirin Foundation Conference covered a range of topics from clinical and medical history, epidemiology, health economics, and the current uses of aspirin in general practice and in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The use of aspirin as primary prevention in people at risk of atherosclerotic events is now well known, but its use as a preventative agent in some cancer types is still under discussion, and data on colorectal and lung cancer were presented at this meeting. The potential use of aspirin in preventing vascular disease in HIV patients was also discussed. The cost effectiveness of aspirin as a primary prevention strategy was discussed for the first time in this series of meetings. PMID:24678343

  8. Modified tamarind kernel polysaccharide: a novel matrix for control release of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sandipta; Pal, Sagar

    2013-07-01

    pH dependent hydrogels of modified tamarind kernel polysaccharide (TKP) were synthesized by grafting with polyacrylamide chains on TKP backbone in presence of microwave irradiation and initiator. The present study is carried out to design oral controlled drug delivery systems for aspirin using synthesized hydrogels as carrier in form of tablets. TKP-g-PAM based hydrogels show significant enhancement for control release of aspirin. Release behavior of aspirin has been evaluated using USP type I apparatus in 900 mL of buffer solutions (pH 1.2, 6.8, 7.4), maintained at 37°C at 100 rpm. It is observed that with increase in percentage of grafting (% G), swelling of matrices increases whereas erosion and rate of drug release decrease. The effect of % G onto t50 value (time taken for release of 50% drug) has also been discussed. The release characteristics from the matrices under study show non-Fickian diffusion mechanism, suggesting the controlled release of aspirin.

  9. [Progress of research on aspirin resistance and its related course of integrative medical research].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Hao; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2010-06-01

    Aspirin is the most classic anti-platelet drug, plays its important role in preventing and treating cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases for its excellent potency ratio; however, there exists individual difference in its anti-platelet effect, aspirin resistance (AR) presented in about 25%-40% of patients, which seriously influences the intervention effect of aspirin. So AR has become a clinical problem that attached more attention. In this paper, the authors put forward a new thinking for clinical studying and inventing new effective Chinese drugs on AR by means of screen out AR suffered from cardio/cerebro-vascular patients long-term received aspirin; find their gene difference sites from MtSNP to establish a foundation for AR predication and reasonable strategy formation; meantime, through platelet intervention in vitro adopting uniform design optimization method to explore the best compatibility and matching relationship of anti-platelet Chinese medicine for AR prevention and treatment, so as to fully display the multi-target intervening effects of Chinese drug-therapy.

  10. Simultaneous determination of nimesulide and its four possible metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application in a study of pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Xue, Kai-Lu; Jiao, Xin-Yue; Chen, Qian; Xu, Li; Zheng, Heng; Ding, Yu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this study, it was the first time that we simultaneously quantified nimesulide and its possible metabolites M1, M2, M3 and M4 by employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Nimesulide-d5 was used as internal standard (IS) for validation. Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Prepared plasma samples were analyzed under the same LC-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was realized by using an Ultimate C18 column, with run time being 5min for each sample. Our results showed that various analytes within their concentration ranges could be quantified accurately by using the method. Mean intra- and inter-day accuracies ranged from -4.8% to 4.8% (RE), and intra- and inter-assay precision ≤6.2% (RSD). The following parameters were validated: specificity, recovery, matrix effects, dilution integrity, carry-over, sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw and post-preparative) and stock solution stability. Pharmacokinetics of nimesulide and its metabolites were calculated based on the analysis of samples collected from twelve Chinese healthy volunteers after single oral dose of 100mg nimesulide tablets. By applying the pharmacokinetic determination into human samples, we preliminarily detected a new metabolite of nimesulide (M4*), and the concentration of M4* was relatively higher in plasma. Furthermore, we predicted part of conceivable metabolism pathway in plasma of after oral administration of 100mg nimesulide tablets. This research provided an experimental basis for further studies on metabolic activation and biotransformation of nimesulide, and for more comprehensive conjecture of its metabolic pathways.

  11. A comparison of the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity of nitroaspirin and aspirin

    PubMed Central

    al-Swayeh, O A; Clifford, R H; del Soldato, P; Moore, P K

    2000-01-01

    Nitroaspirin (2.5–50 mg kg−1, i.p. or 2.5–100 mg kg−1, p.o.) and aspirin (2.5–100 mg kg−1, i.p. or p.o.) exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced hindpaw oedema model in the rat. When administered i.p., nitroaspirin was a more effective anti-oedema agent than aspirin particularly in the ‘early' phase (i.e. up to 60 min) of the response. The ED50 values for nitroaspirin and aspirin as inhibitors of the ‘late' phase response (measured at 180 min) were 64.3 μmol kg−1 and >555 μmol kg−1, respectively. When administered p.o., neither nitroaspirin nor aspirin exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in the ‘early' phase and were of similar potency in the ‘late' phase. Thus, at the highest dose used (100 mg kg−1, 360 min) orally administered nitroaspirin (aspirin in parenthesis) inhibited oedema formation by 46.9±1.6% (47.2±3.8%, both n=6, P<0.05). Nitroaspirin and aspirin (25–200 mg kg−1, p.o.) caused dose-related inhibition of the hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation following intraplantar injection of carrageenan in the rat. ED50 values were 365 μmol kg−1 and 784 μmol kg−1, respectively. Neither drug influenced the threshold for mechanical stimulation in the contralateral (i.e. untreated) hindpaw. Nitroaspirin and aspirin (2.5–100 mg kg−1, p.o.) caused dose-related inhibition of acetic acid induced abdominal constrictions in the mouse (ED50 values of 154.7 μmol kg−1 and 242.8 μmol kg−1, respectively). Nitroaspirin and aspirin (>200 mg kg−1, p.o.) reduced the ‘late' phase (but not the ‘early' phase) of the formalin-induced hindpaw licking assay in the mouse. Similarly, nitroaspirin and aspirin (>50 mg kg−1, p.o.) prolonged tail withdrawal latency following application of a noxious heat stimulus in the mouse. PMID:10694241

  12. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage.

  13. Topical diclofenac does not affect the antiplatelet properties of aspirin as compared to the intermediate effects of oral diclofenac: A prospective, randomized, complete crossover study.

    PubMed

    Rowcliffe, M; Nezami, B; Westphal, E S; Rainka, M; Janda, M; Bates, V; Gengo, F

    2016-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) adversely interact with aspirin, diminishing its antiplatelet effect and potentially placing patients at an increased risk for recurrent thrombotic events. This crossover study aimed to determine whether the topical NSAID diclofenac epolamine 1.3% patch or oral diclofenac 50 mg interfered with the antiplatelet effects of aspirin 325 mg. Twelve healthy men and women aged 18-50 were included. Participants were randomized into 5 treatment arms: aspirin, diclofenac potassium 50 mg, diclofenac patch, diclofenac potassium plus ASA 325 mg, and diclofenac patch plus aspirin. Platelet responsiveness was determined using whole-blood impedance aggregation (WBA) to collagen 1 μg/mL and arachidonic acid (AA) 0.5 mM and was sampled every 2 hours. No significant difference in platelet function was observed following the diclofenac patch and aspirin vs aspirin alone. Oral diclofenac produced a mixed effect with significant reduction in platelet inhibition at hour 2 and hour 8 following aspirin administration. Topical diclofenac does not significantly interfere with the antiplatelet effects of aspirin and may be a safer alternative to the oral formulation.

  14. Are the current recommendations for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease applicable in low-income countries?

    PubMed Central

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence has accumulated that long-term aspirin therapy is beneficial in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a lot of controversies persist regarding the benefit of aspirin use in primary prevention of CVD. In low-income countries (LIC) specifically, the decision to prescribe aspirin for primary CVD prevention is more problematic, as there is a dearth of evidence in this regard. Aspirin has been shown to have relative beneficial effects in preventing a first myocardial infarction, but not stroke. However, as stroke is the prevailing CVD in many LIC, especially in Africa, the benefit of aspirin in these settings is therefore questionable. Indeed, there is no published trial that has evaluated the benefits and risks of continuous aspirin therapy in populations of LIC. Furthermore, though cardiovascular risk assessment is crucial in decision-making for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD, there are no risk assessment tools that have been validated in African populations. Studies are urgently warranted, to determine the usefulness of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD in low-income settings where the drug is highly available and affordable, as CVD is becoming the leading cause of deaths in LIC. PMID:26345154

  15. Comparison of the pharmacokinetic profiles of soluble aspirin and solid paracetamol tablets in fed and fasted volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stillings, M; Havlik, I; Chetty, M; Clinton, C; Schall, R; Moodley, I; Muir, N; Little, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the absorption of popular preparations of two common analgesics--soluble aspirin and solid paracetamol tablets. An open, randomised, crossover study design was used to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of soluble aspirin and solid paracetamol tablets in 16 healthy, male volunteers from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa, in both fed and fasted states. Plasma concentrations of paracetamol, aspirin and salicylic acid were measured. It was found that the rate of absorption was significantly faster for soluble aspirin than for solid paracetamol, regardless of fed or fasting state, considering time to maximum concentration (p < 0.01), time to first quantifiable concentrations (p < 0.05) and absorption rate (p < 0.01). Absorption rate was significantly affected by food for both soluble aspirin (p = 0.028) and for solid paracetamol (p = 0.0003). Time to maximum concentration was not significantly affected by food for soluble aspirin (p = 0.17) but significantly lengthened for solid paracetamol (p = 0.0003). The extent of absorption was affected by food in terms of maximum concentration for both drugs (p = 0.0001), with a reduction of 49% in the fed state for solid paracetamol compared to 18% for soluble aspirin, the difference between the drugs being statistically significant (p = 0.0024). The overall bioavailability of soluble aspirin was unaffected by food and the bioavailability of salicylic acid was increased in the fed state, whereas that of solid paracetamol was lowered in the fed state. Greater inter-individual variation was seen in paracetamol concentrations compared with aspirin or salicylic acid levels. In conclusion, these results show that the absorption of soluble aspirin is largely unaffected by food, whereas, in the same volunteers, the absorption of solid paracetamol tablets is greatly affected. In some volunteers, maximum plasma concentrations of paracetamol following food did not reach levels

  16. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs modulate cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis by affecting EGFR and PI3K signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mozolewski, Paweł; Moskot, Marta; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Bocheńska, Katarzyna; Banecki, Bogdan; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    In this report, selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin and nimesulide, and analgesics acetaminophen, alone, as well as in combination with isoflavone genistein as potential glycosaminoglycan (GAG) metabolism modulators were considered for the treatment of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) with neurological symptoms due to the effective blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration properties of these compounds. We found that indomethacin and nimesulide, but not acetaminophen, inhibited GAG synthesis in fibroblasts significantly, while the most pronounced impairment of glycosaminoglycan production was observed after exposure to the mixture of nimesulide and genistein. Phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) was inhibited even more effective in the presence of indomethacin and nimesulide than in the presence of genistein. When examined the activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) production, we observed its most significant decrease in the case of fibroblast exposition to nimesulide, and afterwards to indomethacin and genistein mix, rather than indomethacin used alone. Some effects on expression of individual GAG metabolism-related and lysosomal function genes, and significant activity modulation of a number of genes involved in intracellular signal transduction pathways and metabolism of DNA and proteins were detected. This study documents that NSAIDs, and their mixtures with genistein modulate cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis by affecting EGFR and PI3K signaling pathways. PMID:28240227

  17. Daily Aspirin May Help Prevent Some Recurrent Miscarriages

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163515.html Daily Aspirin May Help Prevent Some Recurrent Miscarriages Approach seemed ... as simple as taking a daily low-dose aspirin could help prevent a recurrence. The intervention appears ...

  18. Daily Aspirin Therapy: Understand the Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... made for or against aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer for these age groups. Although ... of aspirin in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 3, ...

  19. Synthesis of Aspirin: A General Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, John A., III

    1998-10-01

    An experiment is described that is suitable for the early portion of the laboratory in a general chemistry course and integrates organic examples. It is the two-step synthesis of aspirin starting from oil of wintergreen. The mechanism for this synthesis provides examples of three major classes of chemical reactions: hydrolysis, condensation, and proton transfer. To understand the chemistry, the student must be able to recognize the common molecular framework shared by oil of wintergreen, salicylic acid, and aspirin and to identify the -OH and -CO2 sites where chemical changes occur. The experiment differs in three ways from traditional aspirin synthesis experiments for general chemistry. It is designed to be performed early rather than late; it starts from a naturally occurring material and requires two steps rather than one; and it utilizes FTIR spectroscopy to distinguish among oil of wintergreen starting material, salicylic acid intermediate, and aspirin product. The use of FTIR spectroscopy introduces students to a modern analytical technique that is currently used in research involving aspirin.

  20. Aspirin-induced post-gingivectomy haemorrhage: a timely reminder.

    PubMed

    Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A; Murphy, P; Brigham, K M; Jones, P

    1997-02-01

    A case report is described of significant aspirin-induced haemorrhage following a gingivectory procedure in an organ transplant patient. Aspirin-induced platelet impairment secondary to low-dose aspirin was implicated as the cause of the haemorrhage. Haemostasis was eventually achieved after platelet transfusion. The case illustrates the problems that can arise when carrying out gingival surgery on patients medicated with low-dose aspirin.

  1. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues.

  2. Aspirin-sensitive asthma due to diffuse neuroendocrine system pathology.

    PubMed

    Evsyukova, Helen V

    2002-08-01

    Available clinical data on aspirin-sensitive asthma (ASA) indicate that ASA patients have certain disturbances in the nervous, endocrine, immune and other body systems. It has been found that such patients have a lower melatonin (MT) production in daytime, a pathology of the platelet membrane-receptor complex, and a pathological response to exogenic MT and acetylsalicylic acid. A hypothesis has been suggested in which ASA is considered as apudopathy caused by dysfunction of MT-producing cells. The decreased MT production and the disturbed cell sensitivity to MT lead to pathological changes in individual organs and functional systems. As a result, there is an enhanced lipid peroxidation, an excessive production of reactive oxygen radicals, and a reduced inhibitory action of MT on the 5-lipoxygenase and NO-synthase activities. The lower MT content also results in an intense aggregation of platelets, activating these cells and increasing the production of leukotrienes and nitric oxide. These changes disturb the pulmonary microcirculation, causing the bronchial obturation syndrome even in patient who do not take aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The lower basic production of MT is also responsible for a lower content of its metabolite-endogenic acetylsalicylic acid, thereby increasing the sensitivity of melatonin-producing cells, in particular of platelets, to this acid. So, even minimal aspirin doses inhibit the activity of COX-1, which shunts the already abnormal metabolism of arachidonic acid. This, in turn, leads to a greater production of leukotrienes and, hence, to a severe course of the disease. This hypothesis has become the basis for a new pathogenetic approach to the treatment of ASA patients by correcting the melatonin content with peptide bioregulators--the epiphysis extracts--Epithalamin and Epiphamin.

  3. Protective effects of essential oil of Citrus limon against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Hfaiedh, Najla; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Talarmin, Hélène

    2016-12-15

    Aspirin, one of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, is the most highly consumed pharmaceutical product in the world. However, it has several side effects in cells. This study was designed to investigate the antioxidative activity and cytoprotective effects of essential oil of Citrus limon (EOC) extracted from leaves against aspirin-induced damages in the rat small intestine epithelial cells (IEC-6). Biochemical indicators were used to assess cytotoxicity and oxidative damages caused by aspirin treatment on IEC-6. Our results showed that the chemical characterization of EOC identified 25 compounds representing 98.19% of the total oil. The major compounds from this oil were z-citral (53.21%), neryl acetate (13.06%), geranyl acetate (10.33%), and limonene (4.23%). Aspirin induced a decrease in cell viability as well as an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Contrariwise, the co-exposure of cells to aspirin and EOC alleviated every above syndrome by an increase in cell survival and decrease in SOD and CAT activities. In conclusion, the essential oil of C. limon has a potent cytoprotective effect against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells.

  4. Comparative efficacy of in vitro and in vivo metabolized aspirin in the DeBakey ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Girdhar, Gaurav; Chiu, Wei-Che; Jesty, Jolyon; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are implanted in patients with end-stage heart failure to provide both short- and long-term hemodynamic support. Unfortunately, bleeding and thromboembolic complications due to the severely disturbed, dynamic flow conditions generated within these devices require complex, long-term antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy. While several studies have examined the effectiveness of one such agent, aspirin, under flow conditions, data comparing the efficacy of in vitro and in vivo metabolized aspirin is lacking. Two sets of studies were conducted in vitro with purified human platelets circulating for 30 min in a flow loop containing the DeBakey VAD (MicroMed Cardiovascular, Houston, TX, USA): (a) 20 μM aspirin was added exogenously in vitro to platelets isolated from aspirin-free subjects, and (b) platelets were obtained from donors 2 h (n = 14) and 20 h (n = 13) after ingestion of 1,000 mg aspirin. Near real-time platelet activation state (PAS) was measured with a modified prothrombinase-based assay. Platelets exposed to aspirin in vitro and in vivo (metabolized) showed 28.2 and 25.3 % reduction in platelet activation rate, respectively, compared to untreated controls. Our results demonstrate that in vitro treatment with antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin is as effective as in vivo metabolized aspirin in testing the effect of reducing shear-induced platelet activation in the VAD. Using the PAS assay provides a practical in vitro alternative to in vivo testing of antiplatelet efficacy, as well as for testing the thrombogenic performance of devices during their research and development.

  5. The effect of simvastatin, aspirin, and their combination in reduction of atheroma plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniati, Neng Fisheri; Permatasari, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by high level of cholesterol especially low density lipoprotein (LDL) and accumulation of neutrophil and macrophage in the artery wall. Thickness of aortic wall is an early stage of atherosclerosis plaque formation. Identification of atherosclerosis plaque formation was done by measuring level of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, interleukin-18 (IL-18), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and measuring the thickness of aortic wall. Atherosclerosis's model induced by high fat diet and CCT (cholesterol, cholic acid, and propyltiouracil) oral administration. Rats induced cholesterol divided into positive control, simvastatin 25 mg/kg bw, aspirin 20 mg/kg bw, and combination simvastatin 25 mg/kg and aspirin 20 mg/kg bw group for 3 weeks. In the third week, therapy was given to atherosclerosis's model. Then, in the fourth and fifth week, therapy was given but induction of high cholesterol was stopped due to the massive loss of body weight. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, MPO, and IL-18 measured by uv-vis spectrophotometry and ELISA. In the end of therapy, aorta's rats was isolated to identify the thickness of aorta wall. In the fourth week, after 1 week of treatment, only combination group showed significantly higher total cholesterol, LDL and MPO compared to positive control group. Level of triglycerides and HDL in all groups did not significantly differ compared to positive control group. After 2 weeks continuing drug treatment, the level of total cholesterol, MPO, and IL-18 were decreased in all groups, and aspirin group showed the lowest level. The level of triglycerides was decreased in simvastatin and aspirin group, and aspirin group showed the lowest. Only combination group showed the lowest level of LDL. Based on histopathology result, the thickness of aortic wall was reduced in all groups and aspirin group showed the lowest.

  6. Prostate Cancer and Aspirin Use: Synopsis of the Proposed Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bilani, Nadeem; Bahmad, Hisham; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PCa) is a critical health burden, impacting the morbidity and mortality of millions of men around the world. Most of the patients with PCa have their disease at first sensitive to androgen deprivation treatments, but later they develop resistance to therapy and eventually die of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Although the newly developed anti-androgen therapies are effectively alleviating symptoms and prolonging lives of patients, there are still no curable treatments for CRPC. Recently, statistical studies have shown that the chronic use of aspirin might be significantly associated with better outcomes in PCa patients. Through this review, we aim to identify the different proposed molecular mechanisms relating aspirin to the pathobiology of PCa neoplasms, with a major focus on basic research done in this context. Methods: Articles were retrieved via online database searching of PubMed and MEDLINE between 1946 and September 2016. Keywords and combinations related to PCa and aspirin were used to perform the search. Abstracts of the articles were studied by two independent reviewers and then data extraction was performed on the relevant articles that met our review objectives. Results: Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), affects the proliferation, apoptosis, resistance and metastasis of PCa cell lines, through both COX-dependent and COX-independent mechanisms. It also lowers levels of the PCa diagnostic marker prostate specific antigen (PSA), suggesting that clinicians need to at least be aware if their patients are using Aspirin chronically. Conclusion: This review strongly warrants further consideration of the signaling cascades activated by aspirin, which may lead to new knowledge that might be applied to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of PCa. PMID:28377721

  7. Effectiveness of Aspirin on Double Lumen Permanent Catheter Efficacy in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Mozafar, Mohammad; Samsami, Majid; Sobhiyeh, Mohammad Reza; Jabbehdari, Sayena; Fallah Zavareh, Mahtab

    2013-01-01

    Background The complications of vascular access are the most imperative etiology for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis. The most prevalent complication of central catheter is dysfunction due to thrombosis. Aspirin is an anti-aggregative platelet drug that may increase the patency of permanent catheters (perm-cath). Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Aspirin in perm-cath survival. Patients and Methods This study included a total of 185 ESRD cases according to the inclusion criteria for perm-cath insertion in hemodialysis. One hundred and eighty patients following perm-cath insertion had proper blood flow through perm-cath during hemodialysis. Patients were randomly divided between intervention (80 mg/day Aspirin initiated a day following catheter insertion) and control (placebo) groups. The average time that the perm-cath was functional was noted. Demographic characteristics included comorbidities and past history were also used to address probable influence on perm-cath function and patency. Results The mean survival time of the catheter in Aspirin group was significantly higher than the control group (5.3 ± 4.7 month versus 3.9 ± 2.7 month, P = 0.012). No significant difference in major complications of Aspirin use (such as GI bleeding) was noted between two groups (P = 0.52). In terms of the patient’s demographic characteristics, those of the female gender and a history of diabetes mellitus were found to have significant influence on median survival rate of the catheters (P = 0.021, 0.043 respectively). Conclusions These results suggest that Aspirin use following perm-cath insertion might be beneficial for catheter survival. This increased survival time might enable patient’s use of AVF maturation for long term dialysis access. PMID:23841041

  8. Evaluation of an enteric coated aspirin preparation.

    PubMed

    Day, R O; Paull, P D; Champion, G D; Graham, G G

    1976-02-01

    The bioavailability and gastrointestinal site of release of enteric coated aspirin tablets ("Rhusal", G.P. Laboratories) were investigated following dosage with single tablets. A delay of one to more than eight hours was observed between dosage and the appearance of salicylate in plasma or saliva. This delay was decreased by pretreatment with metoclopramide. No aspirin or salicylate was detected in gastric aspirates. The mean urinary recovery of salicylate was equivalent to 92% of the administered dose. All these tests were consistent with the designed function of the enteric coating. The time course of concentrations of salicylate in saliva rather than in plasma was confirmed as a useful technique for the evaluation of different formulations of aspirin. The acceleration of gastric emptying by metoclopramide is a useful technique for the evaluation of enteric coated tablets.

  9. Feasibility of clinoptilolite application as a microporous carrier for pH-controlled oral delivery of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Tondar, Mahdi; Parsa, Mohammad Javad; Yousefpour, Yaser; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite which due to high surface area/volume ratio has found many applications in industries and medicine. Aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is currently used as an anticoagulant, antinociceptive, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory drug. It is an acidic drug which induces gastric irritation due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase I located in gastric mucosa. In the present work, adsorption and desorption of aspirin on Iranian clinoptilolite micronized particles were studied in acidic and relatively alkaline pHs. Effect of particle size of clinoptilolite was also investigated on adsorption and desorption of aspirin. Specific surfaces, particle sizes, and zeta potentials of clinoptilolite particles were also determined. Scanning electron micrograph was used to study the morphology and crystallinity of clinoptilolite particles. The results showed that adsorption and desorption of aspirin on clinoptilolite are particle size- and pH-dependent. The present work proposes clinoptilolite as an inexpensive, efficient, and non-toxic natural available microporous material for aspirin oral delivery.

  10. Detoxifying emulsion for overdosed aspirin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Stambouli, Moncef; Pareau, Dominique

    2013-01-30

    Aspirin overdose could lead to intoxication, with the clinical manifestations of vomit, pulmonary edema and severe dyspnea. Stomach washing, emetics and activated charcoal are the common treatments with a limited efficiency for the intoxication. In this study, an active emulsion for aspirin intoxication was prepared with the detoxifying efficiency of 100% in less than 15 min, with the conditions of dodecane used as the oil phase, 8% Abil EM90 as the surfactant and 0.1 mol/L sodium hydroxide as the inner aqueous phase in a volume ratio of 2 between internal aqueous phase and the oil phase.

  11. Locust bean gum as superdisintegrant--formulation and evaluation of nimesulide orodispersible tablets.

    PubMed

    Malik, Karan; Arora, Gurpreet; Singh, Inderbir

    2011-01-01

    Orodispersible tablets disperse instantaneously in the mouth so that they can be swallowed without the aid of water. The aim of the present study was to formulate nimesulide orodispersible tablets using locust bean gum as a natural superdisintegrant. The gum was evaluated for powder flow properties, swelling index and loss on drying. Excellent powder flow properties were observed, swelling index was found to be 20 which indicated appreciable capability of locust bean gum to be used as superdisintegrant. The prepared tablets were evaluated against standard superdisintegrant i.e. cross-carmellose sodium. Disintegration time of tablets containing 10 % locust bean gum was found to be 13 seconds. The prepared batches were also evaluated for wetting time, water absorption ratio, effective pore radius, porosity, in vitro and in vivo disintegration time, in vitro release and stability studies. Wetting time was found to reduce from 19 +/- 2 to 11 +/- 3 sec (A1-A4) and 51 +/- 2 to 36 +/- 3 sec (B1-B4). Effective pore radius and porosity were found to be increase with increase in polymer concentration. The superdisintegrant property of locust bean gum may be due to concentration dependent wicking action leading to formation of porous structure which disintegrates the tablet within seconds. In-vivo results were complementary to in-vitro disintegration time results. The in-vitro release studies were compared against marketed nimesulide fast dissolving tablets (Nimulid MD). Stability studies showed that there was no significant change in hardness, friability, tensile strength and assay of the prepared formulations. The f2 values (in comparison with Nimulid MD) of 92.27 and 98.19 were obtained with A3 and A4 batches respectively.

  12. Synthesis of aspirin-loaded polymer-silica composites and their release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kierys, Agnieszka

    2014-08-27

    This study describes a novel approach to the synthesis of polymer-drug-silica nanocomposites via encapsulation/isolation of drug molecules, introduced into the polymer matrix by the silica gel. For the first time, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) gelation in the vapor phase of the acidic catalyst is presented as an efficient method to enter the silica gel nanoparticles into the polymer-aspirin conjugate. The conducted studies reveal that the internal structure of the polymer carrier is significantly reorganized after the embedding of aspirin molecules and the silica gel. The total porosity of the polymer-drug-silica nanocomposites and the molecular structure of the silica gel embedded in the system strongly depend on the conditions of the silica source transformation. Additionally, the release of the drug was fine-tuned by adapting the conditions of hydrolysis and condensation of the silica gel precursor. Finally, to prove the usefulness of the proposed synthesis, the controlled release of aspirin from the polymer-drug-silica nanocomposites is demonstrated.

  13. Synthesis of monodisperse nimesulide nanoparticles in microemulsions E170/isopropyl myristate/water/n-butanol (or isopropanol).

    PubMed

    Debuigne, F; Cuisenaire, J; Jeunieau, L; Masereel, B; Nagy, J B

    2000-01-01

    Nanoparticles of nimesulide have been synthesized in two systems of microemulsion: E170/isopropyl myristate/water/n-butanol (or isopropanol). Nanoparticles are monodisperse. In the two microemulsions, the size of the nanoparticles is comprised between 45 and 60 A and also seems to be independent of the factor R ([water]/[E170]) and of the concentration of the nimesulide solubilized in chloroform. The constancy of the size suggests that the size is controlled by thermodynamic stabilization of the nanoparticles with the surfactant. The nature of the cosurfactant does not have an obvious influence on the nanoparticle size. The nanoparticles are instantaneously formed and stay stable during a long period of time (several months).

  14. A randomized, controlled study on the influence of acetaminophen, diclofenac, or naproxen on aspirin-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Galliard-Grigioni, Katja S; Reinhart, Walter H

    2009-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) may interfere with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and increase the risk for cardiovascular events. The clinical relevance is uncertain. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a co-administration of aspirin and NSAID on platelet aggregation. In a randomized, placebo controlled trial, eleven healthy volunteers were studied during 4 separate study periods of 4 days each. Individuals were treated on each occasion with 100 mg aspirin daily in combination with either 3 x 1 g acetaminophen, 3 x 50 mg diclofenac, 3 x 250 mg naproxen, or 3 x 1 placebo. Primary hemostasis was assessed with a platelet function analyser (PFA-100), which measures the closure time (CT) of a collagen- and epinephrine-coated pore by aggregating platelets in flowing blood. Naproxen enhanced the anti-aggregatory action of aspirin after 24 h (CT rising from 104+/-16 s at baseline to 212+/-69 s at 24 h, P<0.001), which was not seen with any other drug combination. Diclofenac reduced the anti-aggregatory action of aspirin in the first two days, since the CT did not rise significantly (109+/-19 s, 148+/-56 s, and 168+/-66 s at 0 h, 24 h, 48 h, respectively, P>0.05). Acetaminophen had no effect compared with placebo. After 4 days of treatment platelet aggregation was similarly inhibited by all combinations. We conclude that a co-administration of NSAID and aspirin may interfere with platelet inhibition at the beginning of a treatment with an increase of naproxen and a decrease of diclofenac. This effect is lost after 4 days, suggesting that a regular daily co-administration of NSAID does not have an influence on platelet inhibition by aspirin.

  15. Gastroprotective [6]-Gingerol Aspirinate as a Novel Chemopreventive Prodrug of Aspirin for Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingdong; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Yantao; Wang, Pei; Sang, Shengmin

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests daily low-dose aspirin (ASA) reduces heart diseases and colorectal cancers. However, the major limitation to the use of aspirin is its side effect to cause ulceration and bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Preclinical studies have shown that ginger constituents ameliorate ASA-induced gastric ulceration. We here report the design and synthesis of a novel prodrug of aspirin, [6]-gingerol aspirinate (GAS). Our data show that GAS exerts enhanced anti-cancer properties in vitro and superior gastroprotective effects in mice. GAS was also able to survive stomach acid and decomposed in intestinal linings or after absorption to simultaneously release ASA and [6]-gingerol. We further present that GAS inactivates both COX-1 and COX-2 equally. Our results demonstrate the enhanced anticancer properties along with gastroprotective effects of GAS, suggesting that GAS can be a therapeutic equivalent for ASA in inflammatory and proliferative diseases without the deleterious effects on stomach mucosa. PMID:28067282

  16. Comparative evaluation of the pain-relieving properties of a lecithinized formulation of curcumin (Meriva(®)), nimesulide, and acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Di Maio, Eleonora Adriana; Appendino, Giovanni; Franceschi, Federico; Togni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its anti-inflammatory activity, Meriva(®), a proprietary lecithin formulation of curcumin, has been anecdotally reported to decrease acute pain in patients with various chronic diseases. Given that curcumin can desensitize transient receptor potential A1, a nociceptor seemingly also mediating the analgesic effect of acetaminophen, as well as inhibiting and downregulating the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, the selective target of nimesulide, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, we carried out a pilot comparative study of the acute pain-relieving properties of these three agents. At a dose of 2 g (corresponding to 400 mg of curcumin), Meriva showed clear analgesic activity, comparable with that of a standard dose (1 g) of acetaminophen, but lower than that of a therapeutic (100 mg) dose of nimesulide. The analgesic activity of lower (1.5 g) doses of Meriva was less satisfactory, and the onset of activity was longer than that of nimesulide for both doses. On the other hand, gastric tolerability was significantly better than that of nimesulide and comparable with that of acetaminophen. Taken together, our results show that the preclinical analgesic properties of curcumin have clinical relevance, at least at a dose of 2 g as the Meriva formulation. While this dose is significantly higher than that used to relieve chronic inflammatory conditions (1-1.2 g/day), its pain-relieving activity could benefit from the general downregulation of the inflammatory response induced by curcumin, considering that the transient receptor potential channel-mediated mechanisms of analgesia are magnified by attenuation of inflammation. In patients on treatment with Meriva, this would also translate into better control of acute pain, providing a rationale for the analgesic properties associated with this curcumin formulation.

  17. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  18. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  19. Aspirin- and Indomethacin-Induced Ulcers and their Antagonism by Anthihistamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Patricia A.; Sawrey, James M.; Vernikos, Joan

    1978-01-01

    Gastric ulceration produced by aspirin and indomethacin was compared in acutely stressed and non-stressed rats. We found a synergism between these anti-inflammatory agents and acute stress in the production of gastric ulcers. Even at relatively high doses, neither agent caused appreciable gastric damage in non-stressed rats, whereas moderate doses of both agents produced massive ulceration in stressed rats. The synergism appears unrelated to the effect of these agents on the pituitary-adrenal response. The size and regional distribution of ulcers produced by aspirin and indomethacin in stressed rats were comparable. However, the dose--response curves of the two drugs were markedly dissimilar. Furthermore, the ulceration produced by indomethacin was attenuated by both H(sub 1) and H(sub 2) histamine receptor antagonists, whereas ulceration produced by aspirin was attenuated only by an H(sub 2) antagonist. The results suggest that the ulcerogenic mechanism of indomethacin may differ from that of aspirin and add to the growing evidence on the importance of endogenous histamine in various forms of gastric ulceration.

  20. A case of chlorpheniramine maleate-induced hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, So-Hee; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic disease, such as allergic rhinitis, urticaria, and angioedema. Although several previous reports describe hypersensitivity to antihistamines such as cetirizine and hydroxyzine, documented cases of chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old Korean woman who presented with urticaria after ingesting a cold medication. Over the previous 5 years, she had also experienced a food allergy to crab and shrimp, allergic rhinitis, and repeated urticaria after ingesting cold medication. Provocation with aspirin elicited generalized urticaria. Intravenous chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone was injected for symptom control, but in fact appeared to aggravate urticaria. A second round of skin and provocation tests for chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone showed positive results only for chlorpheniramine. She was diagnosed with aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity, and was instructed to avoid these drugs. To date, this is the second of only two cases of chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance. Although the relationship between aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity is unclear, physicians should be aware of the possibility of urticaria or other allergic reactions in response to antihistamines.

  1. Comparative efficacy of nimesulide and ketoprofen on inflammatory events in third molar surgery: a split-mouth, prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Pouchain, E C; Costa, F W G; Bezerra, T P; Soares, E C S

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of nimesulide and ketoprofen on inflammatory parameters related to the surgical removal of third molars. A split-mouth, prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted in patients undergoing removal of four third molars. Eighteen eligible patients were allocated to one of two groups to receive treatment two times a day with either ketoprofen 100 mg or nimesulide 100 mg for a period of 3 days. The rescue medication intake (number) and pain intensity were evaluated at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days postoperatively. Swelling and maximum mouth opening were evaluated at 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days postoperatively. The peak pain score occurred at 6h after surgery in the nimesulide group and at 12h in the ketoprofen group. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups, although pain relief was observed after 48 h in the nimesulide group and after 7 days in the ketoprofen group. For each group, there was a statically significant difference in pain scores among the studied periods (P<0.0001). None of the patients required rescue medication. There was a statistically significant difference in maximum mouth opening between the preoperative and postoperative periods (P<0.0001). Ketoprofen and nimesulide were effective at controlling pain, swelling, and trismus after the surgical removal of third molars.

  2. Hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction for the determination of nimesulide in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Yang, W W; Zhang, H F; Jia, Y R; Zhao, T; Zhao, Y L; Tong, L J; Sun, L X

    2011-08-01

    A hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) method in combination with HPLC-UV for the determination of nimesulide in human plasma was developed and validated. A small volume of dihexyl ether contained within a polypropylene hollow fiber was used for the extraction of nimesulide from acidified plasma solutions. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency were optimized and discussed. With HPLC-UV as the end analysis technique, the procedure was validated for nimesulide in the concentration range of 50-5000 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay precisions were less than 9.1%, and accuracy was within 3.2%. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 50 ng/mL. Enrichment factor from 144-fold to 156-fold was achieved at three quality control (QC) concentrations. The mean extraction recovery was greater than 41.2%. This method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of nimesulide after single oral doses of 100 mg nimesulide to six healthy Chinese volunteers.

  3. Variation in thromboxane B2 concentrations in serum and plasma in patients taking regular aspirin before and after clopidogrel therapy.

    PubMed

    Good, Richard I S; McGarrity, Anne; Sheehan, Rory; James, Tina E; Miller, Helen; Stephens, Jonathan; Watkins, Stuart; McConnachie, Alex; Goodall, Alison H; Oldroyd, Keith G

    2015-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 antagonist is widely prescribed for the prevention of thrombotic events in patients with an acute coronary syndrome or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). It is recognised that there is inter-individual variation in the antiplatelet effects of both drugs. Recent data also suggest that P2Y12 antagonists can affect the response to aspirin. A direct indicator of the effect of aspirin on platelets is their ability to generate thromboxane, which if measured as the difference between the level of thromboxane B2 in serum and plasma ([TxB2]S-P) avoids the confounding effect of endogenous TxB2 production from other cells. We therefore analysed [TxB2]S-P as a measure of aspirin response in a group of 123 patients undergoing elective PCI before and after the introduction of clopidogrel. In a subgroup of 40 patients taking aspirin alone, we compared [TxB2]S-P and VerifyNow Aspirin for the assessment of aspirin response. There was a wide variation in plasma and serum TxB2 concentrations both before and after clopidogrel therapy but only 3.5% of patients had residual serum concentration of TxB2 > 10 ng/ml. There was a strong correlation between the pre and post clopidogrel levels of TxB2 (r ≥ 0.78; p = 0.001) and no significant difference in [TxB2]S-P. There was no correlation between the magnitude of response to clopidogrel response and the generation of thromboxane B2. Correlation between [TxB2]S-P and VerifyNow Aspirin was poor. We conclude that the use of a P2Y12 antagonist does not influence the effect of aspirin on the ability of platelets to generate thromboxane. Therefore, measurement of TxB2 levels in serum, after subtracting the contribution from plasma, provides a measure of the response to aspirin in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy.

  4. [Obstetrical APS: Is there a place for additional treatment to aspirin-heparin combination?

    PubMed

    Mekinian, A; Kayem, G; Cohen, J; Carbillon, L; Abisror, N; Josselin-Mahr, L; Bornes, M; Fain, O

    2017-01-01

    Obstetrical APS is defined by thrombosis and/or obstetrical morbidity associated with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies. The aspirin and low molecular weighted heparin combination dramatically improved obstetrical outcome in APS patients. Several factors could be associated with obstetrical prognosis, as previous history of thrombosis, associated SLE, the presence of lupus anticoagulant and triple positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies. Obstetrical APS with isolated recurrent miscarriages is mostly associated with isolated anticardiolipids antibodies and have better obstetrical outcome. The pregnancy loss despite aspirin and heparin combination define the refractory obstetrical APS, and the prevalence could be estimated to 20-39%. Several other treatments have been used in small and open labeled studies, as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, plasma exchanges and hydroxychloroquine to improve the obstetrical outcome. Some other drugs as eculizumab and statins could also have physiopathological rational, but studies are necessary to define the place of these various drugs.

  5. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  6. Evaluation of compressibility of pentaestergum coated aspirin microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Y V; Dorle, A K

    1989-01-01

    We have earlier reported the usefulness of the pentaerythritol rosin ester (pentaestergum) as a coating material, its dissolution kinetics and in vivo release studies in dogs. The present communication deals with the compressibility of the pentaestergum-coated aspirin microcapsules. The microcapsules were prepared by the pan-coating method described earlier. These were compressed into the tablets using a single punch machine. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability loss, disintegration time and dissolution studies. The results showed that there were significant differences in the release characteristics from the microcapsules and the compressed tablets. The effect of 5 per cent starch as a disintegrating agent in the tablet formulation was also studied. The results showed that the tablets can be a suitable dosage form for pentaestergum-coated microcapsules to give a delayed drug release.

  7. A Review on the Relationship between Aspirin and Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor commonly used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Its users are elderly population susceptible to osteoporosis. It also inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 essential in bone remodeling. This prompts the question whether it can influence bone health among users. This review aimed to summarize the current literature on the use of aspirin on bone health. A literature search on experimental and clinical evidence on the effects of aspirin on bone health was performed using major scientific databases. In vitro studies showed that aspirin could enhance the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the progenitors of osteoblasts, and stimulate the differentiation of preosteoblasts. Aspirin also inhibited the nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) pathway and decreased the expression of receptor activator of NFκB ligand, thus suppressing the formation of osteoclast. Aspirin could prevent bone loss in animal models of osteoporosis. Despite a positive effect on bone mineral density, the limited human epidemiological studies revealed that aspirin could not reduce fracture risk. A study even suggested that the use of aspirin increased fracture risk. As a conclusion, aspirin may increase bone mineral density but its effect on fracture prevention is inconclusive. More data are needed to determine the effects of aspirin and bone health in human. PMID:28163951

  8. A novel water-soluble vitamin E derivative protects against aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Yutaka; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Masaaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Naito, Yuji; Okanoue, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen radical-mediated lipid peroxidation and neutrophil activation may be involved in the development of gastric mucosal injury induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Vitamin E is one of the lipid-soluble antioxidants and is generally considered to protect against lipid peroxidation of the cell membrane and to scavenge singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals. Our object was to investigate the antioxidative effects of water-soluble vitamin E derivative, 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)methyl-2,5,7,8-tetra-methylchroman-6-ol (TMG), on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Gastric injury was induced by intragastric administration of aspirin and 0.15 N HCl in male Sprague-Dawley rats. TMG dissolved in physiological saline was injected intraperitoneally 0.5 h before the aspirin administration. The intragastric administration of acidified aspirin induced hyperemia and hemorragic erosions in rat stomach. The increase in total area of gastric erosions was reduced by pretreatment with TMG in a dose-dependent manner. The increases of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity 3 h after aspirin administration were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with TMG. The gastric concentration of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractants-1 (CINC-1) increased after aspirin administration, and the increase was also inhibited by pretreatment with TMG. These results suggest that TMG is effective for the treatment of aspirin-induced gastric injury. This anti-inflammatory effect of TMG seems to be related to impairment of lipid peroxidation, neutrophil function and cytokine production in gastric mucosa.

  9. Analysis of a Suspected Drug Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schurter, Eric J.; Zook-Gerdau, Lois Anne; Szalay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This general chemistry laboratory uses differences in solubility to separate a mixture of caffeine and aspirin while introducing the instrumental analysis methods of GCMS and FTIR. The drug mixture is separated by partitioning aspirin and caffeine between dichloromethane and aqueous base. TLC and reference standards are used to identify aspirin…

  10. Neuroprotection by Aspirin and Sodium Salicylate Through Blockade of NF-kappaB Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Mariagrazia; Pizzi, Marina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, Pierfranco

    1996-11-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a commonly prescribed drug with a wide pharmacological spectrum. At concentrations compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy, acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolite sodium salicylate were found to be protective against neurotoxicity elicited by the excitatory amino acid glutamate in rat primary neuronal cultures and hippocampal slices. The site of action of the drugs appeared to be downstream of glutamate receptors and to involve specific inhibition of glutamate-mediated induction of nuclear factor kappa B. These results may contribute to the emerging theme of anti-inflammatory drugs and neurodegeneration.

  11. Coxibs interfere with the action of aspirin by binding tightly to one monomer of cyclooxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Gilad; Sidhu, Ranjinder S.; Lauver, D. Adam; Lee, Jullia Y.; Sharma, Narayan P.; Yuan, Chong; Frieler, Ryan A.; Trievel, Raymond C.; Lucchesi, Benedict R.; Smith, William L.

    2010-02-11

    Pain associated with inflammation involves prostaglandins synthesized from arachidonic acid (AA) through cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways while thromboxane A{sub 2} formed by platelets from AA via cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) mediates thrombosis. COX-1 and COX-2 are both targets of nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) including aspirin whereas COX-2 activity is preferentially blocked by COX-2 inhibitors called coxibs. COXs are homodimers composed of identical subunits, but we have shown that only one subunit is active at a time during catalysis; moreover, many nsNSAIDS bind to a single subunit of a COX dimer to inhibit the COX activity of the entire dimer. Here, we report the surprising observation that celecoxib and other coxibs bind tightly to a subunit of COX-1. Although celecoxib binding to one monomer of COX-1 does not affect the normal catalytic processing of AA by the second, partner subunit, celecoxib does interfere with the inhibition of COX-1 by aspirin in vitro. X-ray crystallographic results obtained with a celecoxib/COX-1 complex show how celecoxib can bind to one of the two available COX sites of the COX-1 dimer. Finally, we find that administration of celecoxib to dogs interferes with the ability of a low dose of aspirin to inhibit AA-induced ex vivo platelet aggregation. COX-2 inhibitors such as celecoxib are widely used for pain relief. Because coxibs exhibit cardiovascular side effects, they are often prescribed in combination with low-dose aspirin to prevent thrombosis. Our studies predict that the cardioprotective effect of low-dose aspirin on COX-1 may be blunted when taken with coxibs.

  12. Multi-parameter assessment of platelet inhibition and its stability during aspirin and clopidogrel therapy

    PubMed Central

    Timur, A. Anil; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Zhang, Li; Barnard, John; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Poor response to antiplatelet drugs is associated with adverse outcomes. We assessed platelet inhibition and its stability and tested correlation and agreement between platelet function assays. Methods Peripheral blood from 58 patients on both aspirin and clopidogrel who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was collected at hospital discharge (visit-1) and at 30–90 days (visit-2). Platelet function was measured using light transmission aggregometry (LTA-AA and LTA-ADP), VerifyNow (Aspirin; ARU and P2Y12; PRU), ex vivo TxB2, urinary 11dhTxB2, and VASP (PRI) assays. Data were analyzed as continuous, quartiles and binary. Patients were defined as aspirin poor responder (PR) with ARU ≥550, LTA-AA maximum ≥20%, TxB2 ≥1 ng/mL or 11dhTxB2 ≥1,500 pg/mg of creatinine and as clopidogrel PR with PRU ≥240, PRU ≥208, LTA-ADP maximum ≥40%, PRI ≥50%, or PRI ≥66%. Results Aspirin PR was 3–33% and clopidogrel PR was 10–35% in visit-1. LTA-AA, 11dhTxB2, and all clopidogrel-response measures showed correlation and agreement between visit-1 and visit-2. The highest agreement between two visits was revealed by PRU ≥240 and PRI ≥66% (PRU-κ=0.7, 95% CI=0.47, 0.93; PRI-κ=0.69, 95% CI=0.42, 0.95, p-values<0.001). Comparison of platelet function assays in a single visit (Visit-1) revealed a poor correlation between LTA-AA and 11dhTxB2 assays and no agreement among aspirin-response assays. The highest correlation and agreement were obtained between VerifyNow P2Y12 and VASP assays (rho=0.7, p-value<0.001 and PRU ≥208-PRI-κ=0.41–0.42, 95% CI=0.13, 0.69, p-values<0.001). Conclusions Platelet inhibition is stable during aspirin and clopidogrel treatment. Clopidogrel-response assays correlate and agree with each other better than aspirin-response assays. PMID:24852729

  13. Cell-kinetic alterations induced by aspirin in human gastric mucosa and their prevention by a cytoprotective agent.

    PubMed

    Biasco, G; Paganelli, G M; Di Febo, G; Siringo, S; Barbara, L

    1992-01-01

    The effect on gastric epithelial cell proliferation of a short-term, low-dose treatment with aspirin was evaluated in 9 healthy volunteers. Nine days before and during aspirin administration, the subjects assumed sulglycotide, a sulfated glycopeptide with cytoprotective properties. Endoscopic biopsies were collected in each subject from the gastric body and antrum before and after treatment. The specimens were incubated in a culture medium containing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). The proliferative activity was evaluated by immunohistochemical detection of BrdU uptake. A decrease in BrdU-labelled cells together with a shortening of the length of gastric columns were observed after treatment with aspirin and placebo in biopsies of both body and antrum (p less than 0.05). On the contrary, no modifications were observed after treatment with aspirin and sulglycotide. We conclude that a decrease in the proliferative activity of the epithelial cells could be one of the mechanisms by which aspirin affects the defensive properties of gastric mucosa. The treatment with a cytoprotective drug seems to be effective in preventing this alteration.

  14. Pilot study of the safety of starting administration of low-dose aspirin and cilostazol in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Keishi; Komatsu, Yoji; Sato, Naoaki; Higuchi, Osamu; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Kamezaki, Takao; Suzuki, Kensuke; Matsumura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Progressive stroke is a serious problem due to the associated morbidity and mortality. Aspirin is recommended for acute ischemic stroke, but does not reduce the frequency of stroke progression. No standard treatment has been approved for the prevention of stroke progression. Cilostazol, which reduces platelet aggregation about 3 hours after single administration, does not increase the frequency of bleeding events when compared with aspirin or a placebo. Moreover, the combination of 100 mg aspirin and 200 mg cilostazol does not increase the frequency of bleeding events compared with only 100 mg aspirin, and thus is expected to prevent stroke progression with a high degree of safety. The present study investigated the safety of this combination of two drugs administered at the above concentrations in 54 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of stroke onset. Modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) measurements were performed at baseline and again on day 4 to 7. Progressive stroke was defined as an increase greater than or equal to 1 point on NIHSS. Patient scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after enrollment. Stroke progression occurred in 11.1% of the patients. The percentages of patients with mRS score from 0 to 2 were 42.6% and 75% at baseline and 3 months, respectively. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or major extracranial hemorrhage occurred. These results suggest that administration of aspirin and cilostazol is safe for acute ischemic stroke.

  15. Rhinosinusitis and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia Cruz, Maria L; Jimenez-Chobillon, M Alejandro; Teran, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a feature of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which in the initial phase is manifested as nasal congestion, mostly affecting females at the age of around 30 years on average. Subsequently, nasal inflammation progresses to chronic eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, asthma, nasal polyposis, and intolerance to aspirin and to other NSAIDs. While it has been long established that NSAIDs cause inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), leading to excessive metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) to cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs), there is now evidence that both cytokines and staphylococcus superantigens amplify the inflammatory process exacerbating the disease. This paper gives a brief overview of the development of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in sensitive patients, and we share our experience in the diagnosis and management of CRS in AERD.

  16. Radial basis function neural networks in non-destructive determination of compound aspirin tablets on NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ying; Mi, Hong; Zhao, Lingzhi; Ren, Yuqiu; Ren, Yulin

    2006-09-01

    The application of the second most popular artificial neural networks (ANNs), namely, the radial basis function (RBF) networks, has been developed for quantitative analysis of drugs during the last decade. In this paper, the two components (aspirin and phenacetin) were simultaneously determined in compound aspirin tablets by using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and RBF networks. The total database was randomly divided into a training set (50) and a testing set (17). Different preprocessing methods (standard normal variate (SNV), multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), first-derivative and second-derivative) were applied to two sets of NIR spectra of compound aspirin tablets with different concentrations of two active components and compared each other. After that, the performance of RBF learning algorithm adopted the nearest neighbor clustering algorithm (NNCA) and the criterion for selection used a cross-validation technique. Results show that using RBF networks to quantificationally analyze tablets is reliable, and the best RBF model was obtained by first-derivative spectra.

  17. PA32540 for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients at risk for aspirin-associated gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Danielle; Rooney, Bridget; Adams, Suzanne; Whellan, David J

    2014-01-01

    Prescribed in patients with a history of myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, coronary intervention or bypass surgery, aspirin is one of the medications most commonly used in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It has become a mainstay of therapy after years of solid evidence supporting its efficacy in clinical trials. However, a number of risks and side effects accompany its benefits, including the notable risk of bleeding and gastrointestinal side effects. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to attenuate these effects to promote adherence and to expand the population for which aspirin is a reasonable treatment option. A polypill or combination formulation that includes a proton pump inhibitor, a drug commonly prescribed alongside aspirin, is one potential avenue of therapy. One such combination pill, PA32540, has undergone Phase I and Phase III trials and shows promising safety and efficacy results in these preliminary trials. PMID:25300316

  18. Aspirin dosing frequency in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonseok; Becker, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    Aspirin has been a cornerstone of cardiovascular disease prevention since the late 1980s. Despite the popularity of aspirin and its wide use, the proper dosing and frequency of aspirin has yet to be determined. Early aspirin trials focused on its utility in broad target populations, but this strategy did not magnify the benefit of aspirin, and rather increased the complication rate. We have learned from previous studies that laboratory and clinical response to aspirin therapy in patients with different conditions and settings are diverse. This difference in aspirin response necessitates a personalized, tailored aspirin therapy. We aim to perform a comprehensive review of the current evidence surrounding aspirin responsiveness in several distinct patient populations and the rationale of different aspirin frequency and dosing strategies. Our conclusions call for future studies to determine individualized aspirin strategies to maximize the benefit and minimize the risk of aspirin.

  19. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts Share Tweet Linkedin ... example, using aspirin to lower the risk of heart attack and clot-related strokes. In these cases, the ...

  20. [Nasosinusal polyposis and aspirin intolerance. Fernand Widal-Lermoyez syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Moneret-Vautrin, D; Gazel, P

    1979-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical picture of the aspirin idiosyncrasy and propose to call this peculiar entity: syndrom of Widal and Lermoyez. They compare 25 cases of aspirin nasal polyposis with 26 other cases of various etiologies. Other substances than aspirin seem to be charged. The complications are regular with severe asthma and infection. The pathogenesis is discussed, excluding an allergic mechanism; it remain not quite clear. Essentially prophylactic, the treatment is poor and difficult.

  1. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain;numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  2. A Copper (II) Aspirinate Project for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudek, Emily

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the synthesis of copper (II) aspirinate and the analysis of copper content in the product using electrogravimetric, spectrophotometric, and titrimetric methods. (MLH)

  3. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of nimesulide in the mouse bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rina; Tripathi, Pankaj; Pancholi, Shyam S; Patel, Chhagan N

    2014-07-01

    Genotoxicity of nimesulide (NM) was evaluated by employing bone marrow (BM) chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus assays in Swiss albino mice. For BM CA assay, mice of either sex were treated orally with 1.5, 2.5 and 5 mg body weight solution of NM in 0.2 mL of 0.05% CMC (carboxy methyl cellulose) daily for 4, 13, 28 and 40 weeks. Treatment induced dose-dependent and significantly depressed mitotic activity and increase in CAs per cell in the BM cells after 13 weeks of treatment at all dose levels. In micronucleus assay, male mice were treated orally with the same dose levels and sampling durations as for CA assay. Treatment increased the percentage of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes frequency and showed a statistically significant reduction in polychromatic erythrocyte/normochromatic erythrocyte ratio, as compared to control groups. Cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg) was used as clastogen (positive control) and yielded the expected positive results. Cytotoxicity was observed in the 8-week recovery period after 40 weeks of dosing, but it was not significant. On the basis of these findings, it may be concluded that in the long term, NM, or its biotransformed product, is genotoxic and cytotoxic for BM cells of mice in vivo.

  4. Lallemantia reylenne seeds as superdisintegrant: Formulation and evaluation of nimesulide orodispersible tablets

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Karan; Arora, Gurpreet; Singh, Inderbir; Arora, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Orodispersible tablets also known as fast dissolving tablets disintegrate instantaneously within the mouth and thus can be consumed without water. The present study was aimed to formulate orodispersible tablets of nimesulide by using Lallemantia reylenne seeds as natural superdisintegrant. Materials and Methods: Powdered lallemantia seeds were characterized for powder flow properties (bulk density, tapped density, carr's consolidation index, hausner ratio, angle of repose), swelling index, viscosity, pH, and loss on drying. The prepared tablets were evaluated for different tablet parametric tests, wetting time, water absorption ratio, effective pore radius, porosity, packing fraction, in vitro and in vivo disintegration time, in vitro dissolution and stability studies. Results and Discussion: Increase in Lallementia reylenne concentration had an appreciable effect on tablet hardness and friability which clearly indicated binding potential of the seeds. Water absorption ratio increased with increase in Lallemantia reylenne concentration from batch A1 to A4. Water uptake coupled natural polymer swelling could be the most probable mechanism for concentration dependent reduction in disintegration time by the Lallemantia reylenne seeds. Porosity of the formulated tablets was found to increase from batch A1-A4. The in vitro disintegration results were in line with in vivo disintegration results. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Lallemantia reylenne seeds could be used as natural superdisintegrant in the formulation of orodispersible tablets. PMID:23071942

  5. Radiochromium (chromium-51) evaluation of gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; LeBel, E.

    1987-10-30

    Gastrointestinal blood loss is one of the most serious clinical events induced by drugs. To date, almost no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been shown to be devoid of that side effect in a strictly controlled study. The objective of this study was to assess quantitatively, by use of radioactive chromium (chromium-51)-labeled red blood cells, gastrointestinal blood loss associated with nabumetone (1000 mg daily), aspirin (3.6 g daily), and placebo. A total of 37 normal subjects, divided among the three treatment groups and a fourth group that received no treatment, were assessed clinically and quantitatively for gastrointestinal blood loss over a period of 28 days of active treatment. The results with chromium-51, analyzed on a logarithmic scale, revealed no statistically significant differences between the nabumetone, placebo, and control groups. Gastrointestinal blood loss in the aspirin group, however, was elevated when compared with all other groups at a high level of statistical significance (p less than 0.001). It is concluded that, under conditions in which aspirin causes substantial gastrointestinal microbleeding, nabumetone is not significantly different from placebo.

  6. Evaluation of the pharmaceutical characteristics of various enteric-coated aspirin tablets under different storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshihide; Yanagihara, Yoshitsugu; Uchino, Tomonobu; Oriyama, Toyohito; Komatsu, Mamoru; Nakajima, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The formulation characteristics of 6 brands of enteric-coated aspirin tablets under unpackaged conditions at 40°C and 60°C for 4 weeks were analyzed. Appearance, salicylic acid content, dissolution rates, and surface properties (by Raman microscopy) were evaluated to determine stability data, taking into account the clinical use of generic drugs. No change in appearance, decomposition, or dissolution rates was observed in unpackaged aspirin tablets stored at 40°C for 4 weeks. However, when stored at 60°C, tablets of 5 of the 6 brands showed whiskers on their surfaces along with an increase in salicylic acid content and a decrease in dissolution rate. Results of Raman mapping on the surface and cross sectional surface of the tablets with whiskers showed a salicylic acid peak associated with storage at 60°C for 4 weeks. However, for tablets from 1 of the 6 brands, no salicylic acid peaks were observed. For this tablet, Raman microscopy revealed 2 layers of film coating, and talc, which greatly affected the stability of the acetylsalicylic acid, was found only in the outer layer film. These results indicated that the protection of compatibility with talc is one of the important factors in enhancement of aspirin tablet stability in this tablet. We concluded that certification of the characteristics associated with stability and formulation is essential for generic drugs, which are not required to undergo stability testing under extreme storage conditions.

  7. Reduction of indium-111 platelet deposition on Dacron vascular grafts in humans by aspirin plus dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    Aspirin plus dipyridamole reduces platelet accumulation on short-term Dacron vascular grafts in man. To determine whether drug inhibition of platelet deposition is sustained on older grafts, we studied 18 men aged 41 to 87 years who had Dacron aortic bifurcation grafts in place a mean of 43.4 months (range 9.8 to 121.0) before and during short-term therapy with aspirin (325 mg tid) plus dipyridamole (75 mg tid). During both the baseline and drug studies, indium-111 (/sup 111/In) platelet deposition was quantitated by two techniques, standard planar imaging performed at 24, 48, and 72 hr after injection of platelets and single photon emission computed tomographic imaging performed at 24 and 72 hr after injection. All analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. On both the planar and tomographic images, platelet accumulation on the graft was quantitated by a graft/blood ratio that compared activity in the graft to simultaneously collected whole blood /sup 111/In platelet activity. Aspirin plus dipyridamole reduced the tomographic graft/blood ratio at 24 hr (20.6 +/- 3.5 vs 17.3 +/- 2.5) (+/-SEM) and at 72 hr (29.0 +/- 4.8 vs 25.0 +/- 4.1) after injection of platelets (p = .02). Dacron vascular grafts. Similarly, the planar graft/blood ratio was reduced at 24 hr (2.7 +/- 0.5 vs 2.4 +/- 0.5), 48 hr (3.7 +/- 0.9 vs 3.1 +/- 0.7), and 72 hr (4.0 +/- 0.9 vs 3.6 +/- 0.8) (p = .04). We conclude that aspirin (325 mg tid) plus dipyridamole (75 mg tid) reduces platelet accumulation on long-term Dacron vascular grafts.

  8. Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Saff, Rebecca R; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Because of widespread use, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second most common cause of all adverse drug reactions, with hypersensitivity reported in ∼1% of the population. NSAID hypersensitivity can be categorized into five types by the underlying disease, symptoms of reaction, and timing of reaction. These include rhinitis and asthma induced by NSAIDs (also known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (NECD), urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, single NSAID-induced reactions, and delayed NSAID reactions. NECD occurs in one-third of patients with chronic urticaria who develop an exacerbation of their urticaria, sometimes with angioedema, typically beginning 30-90 minutes after ingestion of NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. In urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, patients without underlying disease develop urticaria or angioedema 30-90 minutes after ingestion of COX-1-inhibiting NSAIDs including aspirin. Single NSAID-induced reactions are immediate and specific to a single NSAID and are thought to occur because of an IgE-mediated reaction against a specific epitope of the NSAID. Delayed NSAID reactions occur days to weeks after initiating an NSAID. These are T-cell mediated and not amenable to desensitization or rechallenge. Classifying the type of NSAID hypersensitivity is important because many patients with a prior history of urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs will often tolerate aspirin test dose. This would allow the use of an aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease despite a presumed history of NSAID hypersensitivity.

  9. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  10. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future.

  11. COX-2, aspirin and metabolism of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids and their physiological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Poorani, R; Bhatt, Anant N; Dwarakanath, B S; Das, Undurti N

    2016-08-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are vital for normal growth and development and physiological function of various tissues in humans. PUFAs have immunomodulatory actions in addition to their ability to modulate inflammation, vascular reactivity, neurotransmission and stem cell biology. PUFAs and their metabolites possess both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties that underlie their actions and involvement in several diseases. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), possesses both cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory action and enhances the production of anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 {(called as epi-lipoxin A4, aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATLs))}. In addition, at low doses aspirin may not interfere with the production of prostacyclin (PGI2). Both lipoxin A4 and PGI2 have vasodilator, platelet anti-aggregator and anti-inflammatory actions that may underlie the beneficial actions of aspirin. Paradoxically, other NSAIDs may not have the same actions as that of aspirin on PUFA metabolism. Similar anti-inflammatory compounds are formed from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) by the action of aspirin termed as resolvins (from EPA and DHA) and protectins and maresins from DHA. PUFAs: arachidonic acid (AA), EPA and DHA and their various products modulate not only inflammation and immune response but also possess actions on various genes, nuclear factors, cyclic AMP and GMP, G-protein coupled receptors (GPRs), hypothalamic neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines and enzymes, and interact with nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide to regulate their formation and action and to form new compounds that have several biological actions. These pleiotropic actions of PUFAs and their metabolites may explain their ability to play a role in several physiological actions and diseases. The big challenge is to harness these actions to prevent and manage clinical conditions.

  12. Effects of 3-methylcholanthrene and aspirin co-administration on ALDH3A1 in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulou, M; Pappas, P; Marselos, M

    2001-01-30

    The effects of two different protocols of 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) and aspirin co-administration were studied in a well-established human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). During this work, we have performed toxicity tests for cell viability/cell proliferation as well as studies on the expression of ALDH3A1 after exposure of HepG2 cells to 3MC or/and aspirin. For the evaluation of toxic concentrations of 3MC and aspirin, the WST-1 test was used. WST-1 is a reliable cytotoxicity test which is based on the cleavage of the tetrazolium salt WST-1 to formazan by mitochondrial enzymes of living cells. A broad range of drug concentrations for either 3MC (0.25-50.0 microM) or aspirin (0.05-10.0 mM) were used for cell exposure, in several periods of time. The expression of ALDH3A1 in HepG2 cells showed typical time- and dose-response curves of induction after application of 3MC (1-5 days, 1.5-5.0 microM, respectively). When cells were firstly exposed to 3MC (2.5 and 5.0 microM) and then to aspirin (0.25 mM), the induced ALDH3A1 activity was further enhanced in a statistically significant way (P<0.05). On the contrary, when aspirin application was preceded 3MC exposuring a statistically significant decrease in ALDH3A1 inducibility was observed, as compared with the application of 3MC alone.

  13. Isomeric methoxy analogs of nimesulide for development of brain cyclooxygense-2 (COX-2)-targeted imaging agents: Synthesis, in vitro COX-2-inhibitory potency, and cellular transport properties.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Hisa, Takuya; Arai, Jun; Saito, Yohei; Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Mukai, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Maeda, Minoru; Ohkubo, Yasuhito

    2015-11-01

    Nimesulide analogs bearing a methoxy substituent either at the ortho-, meta- or para-position on the phenyl ring, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for potential as radioligands for brain cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) imaging. The synthesis of nimesulide and regioisomeric methoxy analogs was based on the copper-mediated arylation of phenolic derivatives for the construction of diaryl ethers. These isomeric methoxy analogs displayed lipophilicity similar to that of nimesulide itself, as evidenced by their HPLC logP7.4 values. In vitro inhibition studies using a colorimetric COX (ovine) inhibitor-screening assay demonstrated that the para-methoxy substituted analog retains the inhibition ability and selectivity observed for parent nimesulide toward COX-2 enzyme, whereas the meta- and ortho-methoxy substituents detrimentally affected COX-2-inhibition activity, which was further supported by molecular docking studies. Bidirectional transport cellular studies using Caco-2 cell culture model in the presence of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, verapamil, showed that P-gp did not have a significant effect on the efflux of the para-methoxy substituted analog. Further investigations using the radiolabeled form of the para-methoxy substituted analog is warranted for in vivo characterization.

  14. Effects of co-administered dexamethasone and nimesulide on pain, swelling, and trismus following third molar surgery: a randomized, triple-blind, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Barbalho, J C; Vasconcellos, R J H; de Morais, H H; Santos, L A M; Almeida, R de A C; Rêbelo, H L; Lucena, E E; de Araújo, S Q

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of the co-administration of dexamethasone 8mg and nimesulide 100mg given 1h before mandibular third molar surgery. A prospective, randomized, triple-blind, split-mouth clinical trial was developed at the study institution in Pernambuco, Brazil. A pilot study was first performed (95% confidence interval, 80% test power, and 5% error), and a sample of 40 patients aged between 18 and 40 years was selected. The patients were randomized and divided into two groups: dexamethasone+placebo and dexamethasone+nimesulide. The following parameters were evaluated: pain (visual analogue scale), total number of rescue analgesics taken, time taken to first rescue analgesic consumption, oedema, trismus, and patient satisfaction. The paired t-test and the Wilcoxon test were used to compare means. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups in pain values at 2, 4, and 12h postoperative, and in the total number of rescue analgesics and time taken to first rescue analgesic ingestion (P<0.05), with results in favour of dexamethasone+nimesulide administration. Oedema and trismus were similar in the two treatment groups and decreased over time postoperatively. The co-administration of dexamethasone and nimesulide reduces pain intensity and the need for rescue medication after third molar surgery.

  15. Aspirin use and post-operative bleeding from dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M T; Valerin, M A; Noll, J L; Napeñas, J J; Kent, M L; Fox, P C; Sasser, H C; Lockhart, P B

    2008-08-01

    Aspirin is a common, chronically administered preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, but is often discontinued prior to invasive dental procedures because of concern for bleeding complications. We hypothesized that aspirin does not cause increased bleeding following a single tooth extraction. Thirty-six healthy persons requiring a tooth extraction were randomized to receive 325 mg/day aspirin or placebo for 4 days. Cutaneous bleeding time (BT) and platelet aggregation tests were obtained prior to extraction. The primary outcome measure, oral BT, and secondary bleeding outcomes were evaluated during and following extraction. No significant baseline differences, except for diastolic blood pressure, were found between groups. There were no differences in oral BT, cutaneous BT, secondary outcome measures, or compliance. Whole-blood aggregation results were significantly different between the aspirin and placebo groups. These findings suggest that there is no indication to discontinue aspirin for persons requiring single-tooth extraction.

  16. Inhibition of aspirin-induced bronchoconstriction by sodium cromoglycate inhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, N A; Usandivaras, G

    1977-01-01

    Five patients with asthma and severe aspirin hypersensitivity were challenged on separate days with increasing doses of aspirin given by mouth, starting with 5 mg, until a reduction in FEV1 greater than 15% was obtained. Sodium cromoglycate in doses of 20-40 mg inhibited the bronchoconstrictive reaction not only when inhaled before the challenge but also after it, at a time when progressive reduction in FEV1 values was taking place. According to these results, it seems reasonable to postulate sequential mast cell degranulation and liberation of mediators of anaphylaxis as the mechanism through which aspirin induces bronchoconstriction in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics. The differences between bronchial provocation tests and oral challenge with aspirin are stressed. PMID:414371

  17. Aspirin decreases platelet uptake on Dacron vascular grafts in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, W.C.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.; Keough, E.M.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; McCullough, J.L.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Melaragno, A.; Valeri, C.R.; Weiblen, B.

    1984-07-01

    The influence of a single dose of aspirin (5.4-7.4 mg/kg) on platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron interposition grafts was studied in a baboon model using gamma camera scanning for 111-Indium labeled platelets. In vitro assessment of platelet function after aspirin administration revealed that in the baboon, as in the human, aspirin abolished arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation, prolonged the lag time between exposure to collagen and aggregation, and decreased plasma thromboxane B2 levels. Aspirin also prolonged the template bleeding time. Scans for 111-Indium labeled platelets revealed that pretreatment with a single dose of aspirin decreased platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron carotid interposition grafts. This decrease in platelet uptake was associated with a significant improvement in 2-hour graft patency and with a trend toward improved 2-week patency.

  18. Aspirin dosing in cardiovascular disease prevention and management: an update.

    PubMed

    Ganjehei, Leila; Becker, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin has been in use for prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases for several decades. Clinical and epidemiological literature suggests that while net benefits of aspirin in primary prevention of CVDs are less clear, the benefits of aspirin in acute scenarios and secondary prevention settings are well established. However, its optimum dosing requirements have been up for debate especially in various settings of acute coronary syndrome and stable ischemic heart disease. The role of clinician in stratifying individual risk score to achieve net clinical benefit is an important determinant of initiating aspirin therapy. The purpose of this article is to review association of aspirin and CVD in general, and to review its dosing regimens in acute settings as well as primary and secondary prevention as suggested by various established guidelines. We also aim to provide the readers an update on recent changes and current evidence based practice trends.

  19. The mechanism of aspirin reactions in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Alan; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Sohlberg, Karl; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2001-03-01

    We report first-principles (density functional theory) calculations of possible reaction pathways for the break-up of aspirin that leads to pain relief in the human body. An aspirin molecule consists of an acetyl group attached to a salicylate. Upon entering a membrane protein known as COX, the aspirin molecule is pulled apart. The acetyl group of the aspirin molecule attaches to SER-530, a serine residue that is located near the entrance of the COX protein channel. The resulting acetyl-serine residue effectively forms a gate within the COX channel blocking certain fatty acids from reaching the protein active site where they are converted into prostaglandins, the molecules that are responsible for the sensation of pain. An important new finding is that the aspirin molecule undergoes a transformation prior to breaking up.

  20. Aspirin in the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Arber, Nadir; Burn, John; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Elwood, Peter; Hull, Mark A.; Logan, Richard F.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Schrör, Karsten; Baron, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in addition to its well-established benefits in the prevention of vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have consistently observed an inverse association between aspirin use and risk of CRC. A recent pooled analysis of a long-term post-trial follow-up of nearly 14,000 patients from 4 randomized, cardiovascular disease prevention trials showed that daily aspirin treatment for about 5 years was associated with a 34% reduction in 20-year CRC mortality. A separate meta-analysis of nearly 3,000 patients with a history of colorectal adenoma or cancer in 4 randomized adenoma prevention trials demonstrated that aspirin reduced the occurrence of advanced adenomas by 28% and any adenoma by 17%. Aspirin has also been shown to be beneficial in a clinical trial of patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary CRC syndrome; in those treated with aspirin for at least 2 years, there was a ≥ 50% reduction in the risk of CRC commencing 5 years after randomization and after aspirin had been discontinued. A few observational studies have shown an increase in survival among patients with CRC who use aspirin. Taken together, these findings strengthen the case for consideration of long-term aspirin use in CRC prevention. Despite these compelling data, there is a lack of consensus about the balance of risks and benefits associated with long-term aspirin use, particularly in low-risk populations. The optimal dose to use for cancer prevention and the precise mechanism underlying aspirin’s anticancer effect require further investigation. PMID:22084361

  1. New nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirins.

    PubMed

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Borretto, Emily; Guglielmo, Stefano; Joseph, Sony; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2011-08-11

    A new series of (((R-oxy)carbonyl)oxy)methyl esters of aspirin (ASA), bearing nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) releasing groups, was synthesized, and the compounds were evaluated as new ASA co-drugs. All the products were quite stable in buffered solution at pH 1 and 7.4. Conversely, they were all rapidly metabolized, producing ASA and the NO/H(2)S releasing moiety used for their preparation. Consequent on ASA release, the compounds were capable of inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The simple NO/H(2)S donor substructures were able to relax contracted rat aorta strips, with a NO- and H(2)S-dependent mechanism, respectively, but they either did not trigger antiaggregatory activity or displayed antiplatelet potency markedly below that of the related co-drug. The new products might provide a safer and improved alternative to the use of ASA principally in its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic applications.

  2. Aspirin prevents colorectal cancer metastasis in mice by splitting the crosstalk between platelets and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ricciotti, Emanuela; Cufino, Valerio; Sacco, Angela; Grande, Rosalia; Alberti, Sara; Arena, Vincenzo; Cirillo, Mariangela; Patrono, Carlo; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Steinhilber, Dieter; Sgambato, Alessandro; Patrignani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether platelets prime colon cancer cells for metastasis and whether pharmacological inhibition of platelet function may prevent it. Coculturing HT29 human colon carcinoma cells with human platelets led to the induction of mesenchymal-like cancer cells characterized by downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of Twist1, enhanced cell mobility and a proaggregatory action on platelets. These changes were prevented by different antiplatelet agents, aspirin[an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase(COX)-1], DG-041[an antagonist of prostaglandin(PG)E2 EP3 receptor] and ticagrelor (a P2Y12 receptor antagonist). The injection of HT29 cells, exposed to platelets in vitro, into the tail vein of humanized immunodeficient mice led to higher incidence of lung metastasis compared to the injection of untreated HT29 cells. This effect was associated with enhanced systemic biosynthesis of thromboxane(TX)A2 and PGE2 in vivo. Platelet COX-1 inhibition by aspirin administration to mice prevented the increased rate of metastasis as well as the enhanced production of TXA2 and PGE2 induced by the in vitro priming of HT29 cells by platelets. In conclusion, targeting platelet COX-1 with low-dose aspirin exerts an antimetastatic action by averting the stem cell mimicry of cancer cells associated with enhanced proaggregatory effects induced by platelet-tumor cell interactions. These effects may be shared by other antiplatelet drugs. PMID:27074574

  3. Opposing effects of aspirin and acetaminophen use on risk of adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joli R; Baker, Julie A; Baer, Maria R; Menezes, Ravi J; Nowell, Susan; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2006-02-01

    Regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been hypothesized to be associated with reduced risk of hematologic cancer, although previous results have been inconsistent. The current study investigated the effects of aspirin or acetaminophen use on adult acute leukemia risk among 169 individuals with leukemia and 676 age and sex matched hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions who completed a comprehensive epidemiologic questionnaire. Results indicate that regular aspirin use may be associated with a modest decrease in leukemia risk [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.21]. In contrast, ever using acetaminophen was associated with elevated leukemia risk (aOR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.26). Results did not differ between men and women. Other studies have demonstrated that acetaminophen is associated with transient decreases in DNA repair, and lymphocytes may be particularly susceptible to DNA damage, suggesting a mechanism for the elevated acute leukemia risk observed among acetaminophen users.

  4. Regular use of aspirin or acetaminophen and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Baker, Julie A; Weiss, Joli R; Czuczman, Myron S; Menezes, Ravi J; Ambrosone, Christine B; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2005-04-01

    Regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been hypothesized to be associated with reduced risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), although previous results have been inconsistent. The current study investigated the effects of regular aspirin or acetaminophen use on non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk among 625 individuals with primary, incident NHL and 2512 age and sex matched hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions who completed a comprehensive epidemiologic questionnaire. Results indicate that regular aspirin use may be associated with decreased NHL risk among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.65--1.04], but not among women (aOR 0.93, 95% CI, 0.71--1.23). In contrast, regular acetaminophen use was associated with elevated NHL risk among women (aOR 1.71, 95% CI, 1.18--2.50) but not among men (aOR 0.75, 95% CI, 0.48--1.17). Other studies have demonstrated that acetaminophen is associated with transient decreases in DNA repair, and lymphocytes may be particularly susceptible to DNA damage, suggesting a mechanism for the elevated NHL risk observed.

  5. Probing Vitamine C, Aspirin and Paracetamol in the Gas Phase: High Resolution Rotational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, S.; Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Pena, I.; Nino, A.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2011-06-01

    A solid sample of Vitamin C (m.p. 190°C) vaporized by laser ablation has been investigated in gas phase and characterized through their rotational spectra. Two spectroscopy techniques has been used to obtain the spectra: a new design of broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with in-phase/quadrature-phase-modulation passage-acquired-coherence technique (IMPACT) and conventional laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW). Up to now, two low-energy conformer have been observed and their rotational constants determined. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory predicted rotational constants which helped us to identify these conformers unequivocally. Among the molecules to benefit from the LA-MB-FTMW technique there are common important drugs never observed in the gas phase through rotational spectroscopy. We present here the results on acetyl salicylic acid and acetaminophen (m.p. 136°C), commonly known as aspirin and paracetamol respectively. We have observed two stable conformers of aspirin and two for paracetamol. The internal rotation barrier of the methyl group in aspirin has been determined for both conformers from the analysis of the A-E splittings due to the coupling of internal and overall rotation. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  6. Combination of Praziquantel and Aspirin Minimizes Liver Pathology of Hamster Opisthorchis viverrini Infection Associated Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sudsarn, Pakkayanee; Boonmars, Thidarut; Ruangjirachuporn, Wipaporn; Namwat, Nisana; Loilome, Watcharin; Sriraj, Pranee; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Nadchanan, Wonkchalee; Jiraporn, Songsri

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis is one of the major risk factors for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in northeastern Thailand. An effective drug for killing this parasite is praziquantel. Recently, several reports have shown that with frequent use, praziquantel may itself be a CCA risk and can cause liver cell damage from an immunopathological response after parasite death. Aspirin has many properties including anti-inflammation and anti-cancer. Therefore, we use of aspirin (As) and praziquantel (Pz) to improve hepatobiliary system function in hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) and or administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (ND). Livers of OVNDAsPz, appeared healthy macroscopically, suggesting slow progression of cholangiocarcinoma evident by extent of fibrosis and bile duct cell proliferation was less than OVND although aggregations of inflammatory cells remained. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), and cancer antigen (CA19-9) staining were strongly positive in OVND, but were only slight in OVNDAs. Moreover, OVNDAsPz, appeared a few inflammatory infiltrations, bile duct proliferation, fibrosis and CCA area than the OVNDAs group. Thirty seven point five percent of hamster in this group could not develop CCA. These findings suggest that using aspirin combination with praziquantel treatment can improve the hepatobiliary system after O. viverrini infection and reduce the risk of CCA.

  7. Effect of Quaternary Ammonium Carboxymethylchitosan on Release Rate In-vitro of Aspirin Sustained-release Matrix Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Teng, Zhongqiu; Zheng, Nannan; Meng, Weiwei; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a derivative of chitosan as pharmaceutical excipient used in sustained-release matrix tablets of poorly soluble drugs. A water-soluble quaternary ammonium carboxymethylchitosan was synthesized by a two-step reaction with carboxymethylchitosan (CMCTS), decylalkyl dimethyl ammonium and epichlorohydrin. The elemental analysis showed that the target product with 10.27% of the maximum grafting degree was obtained. To assess the preliminary safety of this biopolymer, cell toxicity assay was employed. In order to further investigate quaternary ammonium carboxymethylchitosan application as pharmaceutical excipient, aspirin was chosen as model drug. The effect of quaternary ammonium CMCTS on aspirin release rate from sustained-release matrix tablets was examined by in-vitro dissolution experiments. The results showed that this biopolymer had a great potential in increasing the dissolution of poorly soluble drug. With the addition of CMCTS-CEDA, the final cumulative release rate of drug rose up to 90%. After 12 h, at the grade of 10, 20 and 50 cps, the drug release rate increased from 58.1 to 90.7%, from 64.1 to 93.9%, from 69.3 to 96.1%, respectively. At the same time, aspirin release rate from sustainedrelease model was found to be related to the amount of quaternary ammonium CMCTS employed. With the increase of CMCTS-CEDA content, the accumulated release rate increased from 69.1% to 86.7%. The mechanism of aspirin release from sustained-release matrix tablets was also preliminary studied to be Fick diffusion. These data demonstrated that the chitosan derivative has positive effect on drug release from sustained-release matrix tablets. PMID:24250627

  8. Recovery Time of Platelet Function After Aspirin Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeonghun; Kim, Jeong Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hee; Dunuu, Tsagaan; Park, Sang-Ho; Park, Sang Joon; Kang, Ji Yeon; Choi, Rak Kyeong; Hyon, Min Su

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate antiplatelet therapy discontinuation increases the risk of thrombotic complications and bleeding after dental procedures. To determine the platelet reactivity recovery time after aspirin withdrawal in vivo, our study was conducted in patients with low-risk cardiovascular disease who can stop aspirin administration following the guidelines stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. The time it takes for platelet activity to normalize and the diagnostic accuracy of testing methods were assessed for a residual antiplatelet activity with multiple electrode aggregometry. Our study included patients with clinically indicated hypertension preparing for a dental extraction procedure. Materials and methods A total of 212 patients not taking aspirin (control group) and 248 patients with hypertension receiving long-time aspirin treatment at a 100-mg daily dose were prospectively included in the study, which involved stopping aspirin intake before dental extraction. The residual platelet activity and dental bleeding in patients who stopped aspirin intake were analyzed and compared with those of the control group. In addition, platelet reactivity recovery time and bleeding risk in patients who stopped taking aspirin every 24 hours for 0 to 5 days (0–143 hours) before dental extraction was also assessed. Results Platelet reactivity normalized 96 hours after aspirin withdrawal. The cut-off value of 49 arbitrary units in the arachidonic acid platelet aggregation test excluded the effect of aspirin with 91% sensitivity and 66% specificity. AUC showed 0.86 (P < 0.001) diagnostic accuracy. The immediate bleeding complications in all treatment groups were similar to those seen in the control group and were successfully managed with local hemostatic measures. Conclusions The antiplatelet effects of aspirin disappeared 96 hours after aspirin withdrawal in our study, and dental extractions may be safely performed in this period when appropriate

  9. The postulated mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer: Histological and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Salah Khalil, Mahmoud

    2015-07-01

    There are many available drugs for treating gastric ulcer, but they have various side effects. Ginger is a folk, herbal medicine, which is used for treatment of various diseases including gastric ulcer. This study investigates the possible mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on aspirin induced gastric ulcer. Forty adult male albino rats were randomized into four groups (10 animal per each group) and orally received the followings once daily for 5 days: Group I: 3 ml of 1% carboxymethyl cellulose; Group II: ginger powder (200 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 mL of 1% carboxymethylcellulose; Group III: aspirin (400 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 ml of 1% carboxymethylcellulose in water. Group IV: ginger and 30 minutes later, received aspirin suspended in 1% carboxymethylcellulose, in similar doses as received in groups II and III. On day 6, rats were sacrificed. The animals were anesthetized and the stomach was removed for the macroscopic, histological (Haematoxylin & Eosin and Periodic Acid Shiff) and immunohistochemical investigations (Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase and heat shock protein 70). Aspirin induced a significant increase of the macroscopic ulcer score, shed and disrupted epithelium, mucosal hemorrhage, submucosal edema and leukocyte infiltration, loss of the mucus of the mucosal surface significantly increased expression of apoptosis regulator Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Ginger ameliorated the histological changes by reducing Bax and iNOS and increasing HSP70 expressions.

  10. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  11. Calculations of aspirin reaction mechanisms in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Alan; Sohlberg, Karl; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    1999-11-01

    We report quantum mechanical calculations of possible reaction pathways for the breakup of aspirin that lead to pain relief in the human body. Animations of the reactions will be shown. An aspirin molecule consists of an acetyl group attached to a salicylate. Upon entering a membrane protein known as COX, the aspirin molecule is pulled apart. The acetyl group of the aspirin molecule attaches to SER-530, a serine residue that is located near the entrance of the COX protein channel. The resulting acetyl-serine residue effectively forms a gate within the COX channel blocking certain fatty acids from reaching the protein active site where the fatty acids are converted into prostaglandins, the molecules that are responsible for inflammation and the sensation of pain.

  12. An Efficient Microscale Procedure for the Synthesis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandita, Sangeeta; Goyal, Samta

    1998-06-01

    The synthesis of aspirin is a part of many undergraduate organic synthesis labs and is frequently used in qualitative organic analysis laboratory for the identification of salicylic acid. We have found that aspirin can be synthesized on microscale by a simple and efficient procedure that eliminates the heating step employed in literature procedures and gives a pure, ferric-negative product (no purple color with alcoholic ferric chloride solution).

  13. Functional testing methods for the antiplatelet effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Huber, Kurt; Hohlfeld, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    At antiplatelet doses of 75-325 mg/day, aspirin irreversibly inhibits the platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1-dependent thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) formation. This is the pharmacological mode of action of aspirin, and it can be predicted that if aspirin does not inhibit COX-1 sufficiently, patients will not benefit from its antiplatelet effects. A pharmacodynamic failure of aspirin occurs in 1-2% of patients. The vast majority of atherothrombotic events in patients treated with aspirin result from mechanisms that are dependent on residual (non-COX-1-dependent) platelet reactivity. Global tests of platelet activation in vitro may identify patients with high residual platelet reactivity but are not sufficiently specific to test the pharmacological effect of aspirin. A further problem is the absence of standardized normal ranges for many assays and the fact that different equipment measures different signals, which are also influenced by the agonist and the anticoagulant used. Similar considerations apply for the determination of platelet-derived biomarkers such as circulating P-selectin, soluble CD40 ligand and others. The direct measurement of inhibition of thromboxane-forming capacity is the most specific pharmacological assay for aspirin. However, there is no linear correlation between inhibition of TXA(2) formation and inhibition of platelet function. Measurement of urinary levels of the TXB(2) metabolite, 11-dehydro-thromboxane B(2), represents an index of TXA(2) biosynthesis in vivo, but is also sensitive to other cellular sources of TXA(2). One general problem of all assays is the relationship with clinical outcome, which is still unclear. Monitoring aspirin treatment by testing platelet function or measuring biomarkers in clinical practice should not be recommended until a clear relationship for the predictive value of these assays for clinical outcome has been established.

  14. Effect of aspirin dosage and enteric coating on platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Feng, D; McKenna, C; Murillo, J; Mittleman, M A; Gebara, O C; Lipinska, I; Muller, J E; Tofler, G H

    1997-07-15

    Although aspirin is effective in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the optimal dose remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to compare the platelet inhibitory and prostacyclin-sparing effects of 2 doses (81 and 325 mg) and forms (enteric-coated and regular) of aspirin. Since platelet reactivity has been reported to increase after strenuous exercise, a known trigger of myocardial infarction, subjects were studied following maximal treadmill exercise as well as at rest. Forty male healthy subjects were evaluated using a randomized, double-blind, parallel study design. Blood samples were obtained before and after maximal treadmill exercise at baseline and after 7 days on aspirin therapy. Both enteric and regular aspirin in 81- and 325-mg dosages markedly inhibited adenosine diphosphate and epinephrine-induced aggregation at rest and after exercise. Aspirin also inhibited the platelet response to collagen as assessed by a longer lag time to aggregation. The prolongation of lag time was greater for 325 mg than for 81 mg (100 +/- 7 vs 91 +/- 7; p = 0.04, after exercise). There were no significant dose-related differences in plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha level; however, enteric-coated aspirin inhibited the exercise-induced increase in 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha to a lesser extent than regular aspirin. Although both doses (81 and 325 mg) and types (regular and enteric-coated) of aspirin inhibited adenosine diphosphate and epinephrine-induced aggregation equally, the 325-mg dose inhibited collagen-induced aggregation to a greater extent than 81 mg. The greater platelet inhibition observed with 325 mg may be clinically relevant in acute coronary syndromes characterized by plaque rupture with extensive collagen exposure and platelet activation.

  15. Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy on Thermoregulation in Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    McEntire, Serina J.; Reis, Steven E.; Suman, Oscar E.; Hostler, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart attack is the most common cause of line-of-duty death in the fire service. Daily aspirin therapy is a preventative measure used to reduce the morbidity of heart attacks but may decrease the ability to dissipate heat by reducing skin blood flow. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, firefighters were randomized to receive 14 days of therapy (81-mg aspirin or placebo) before performing treadmill exercise in thermal-protective clothing in a hot room [38.8 ± 2.1°C, 24.9 ± 9.1% relative humidity (RH)]. Three weeks without therapy was provided before crossing to the other arm. Firefighters completed a baseline skin blood-flow assessment via laser Doppler flowmetry; skin was heated to 44°C to achieve maximal cutaneous vasodilation. Skin blood flow was measured before and after exercise in a hot room, and at 0 minutes, 10 minutes, 20 minutes, and 30 minutes of recovery under temperature conditions (25.3 ± 1.2°C, 40.3 ± 13.7% RH). Platelet clotting time was assessed before drug administration, and before and after exercise. Results Fifteen firefighters completed the study. Aspirin increased clotting time before and after exercise compared with placebo (p = 0.003). There were no differences in absolute skin blood flow between groups (p = 0.35). Following exercise, cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was 85 ± 42% of maximum in the aspirin and 76 ± 37% in the placebo groups. The percentage of maximal CVC did not differ by treatment before or after recovery. Neither maximal core body temperature nor heart rate responses to exercise differed between trials. Conclusion There were no differences in skin blood flow during uncompensable heat stress following exercise after aspirin or placebo therapy. PMID:26929836

  16. Crystal structure and electronic properties of two nimesulide derivatives: A combined X-ray powder diffraction and quantum mechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Abir; Ghosh, Soumen; Kankanala, Kavitha; Reddy, Vangala Ranga; Mukkanti, Khagga; Pal, Sarbani; Mukherjee, Alok K.

    2010-06-01

    Crystal structures of two nimesulide derivatives, C 13H 14O 3N 2S ( 2) and C 21H 16O 5N 2S ( 3), have been determined from X-ray powder diffraction data and their electronic structures were calculated at the DFT level. The optimized molecular geometries of 2 and 3 correspond closely to that obtained from the crystallographic analysis. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds and π… π stacking interactions form supramolecular assembly in both compounds. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap (>2.2 eV) indicates a high kinetic stability of both compounds. Although the compound 2 does not exhibit any anti-inflammatory activity, 3 can induce 34% edema inhibition in rat paws.

  17. Interactions of m-xylene and aspirin metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, L; Wilson, H K; Samuel, A M; Gompertz, D

    1988-01-01

    In a series of experiments to investigate interactions between industrial solvents and common medications the interaction between m-xylene and aspirin was studied. As both these substances are metabolised and excreted as glycine conjugates there would possibly be competition for this conjugation pathway. Five male volunteers were exposed on separate occasions to m-xylene by inhalation (100 ppm), aspirin (1500 mg) by mouth, and m-xylene and aspirin together under controlled conditions in an exposure chamber. Urine and blood samples were collected and analysed for m-xylene, aspirin, and their metabolites. The amounts of the major glycine conjugates produced from m-xylene (m-methylhippuric acid) and aspirin (salicyluric acid) were significantly reduced by about 50% when m-xylene and aspirin were coadministered. There appears to be a mutual inhibition on the formation of the respective glycine conjugates. It is suggested that the inhibition is due to competition for either the enzymes, acyl-CoA synthetase, or glycine N-acylase. These findings have implications in the biological monitoring of workers exposed to m-xylene. Images PMID:3342195

  18. Diltiazem potentiates the inhibitory effect of aspirin on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Scazziota, A; Dujovne, C

    1988-09-01

    Platelet aggregation in vivo occurs through the combined effects of many agonists. Aspirin inhibits platelet aggregation but its antiaggregate effects can be overcome by the synergistic action of sodium arachidonate (AA) plus platelet activating factor (PAF). We tested the effect of a calcium entry-blocking agent, diltiazem, on AA-PAF-induced platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma from seven healthy volunteers. The studies were done before and after aspirin (100 mg/day) administration for 7 to 10 days. Stimulation of platelet was done in vitro by AA, PAF, or both. Before aspirin treatment, diltiazem (2 micrograms/ml) added in vitro to the platelet-rich plasma inhibited platelet aggregation induced by AA (0.75 mmol/L) by 50%. When PAF was used the inhibition of aggregation was obtained at a lower concentration of diltiazem (0.4 to 1 microgram/ml). After aspirin treatment, AA-induced aggregation was inhibited, and PAF alone (30 nmol/L) produced a first-wave aggregation followed by complete disaggregation. When AA and PAF were added together a full aggregation of postaspirin treatment platelets was obtained. Diltiazem added in vitro at the clinically attainable concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml produced a complete inhibition of this AA-PAF synergism on platelet aggregation. These results suggest that administration of a combination of low-dose aspirin and diltiazem may be of greater benefit than aspirin alone for prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases where platelets are involved in the pathogenesis.

  19. Mechanistic and Pharmacological Issues of Aspirin as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dovizio, Melania; Tacconelli, Stefania; Sostres, Carlos; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Patrignani, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have shown that aspirin, taken for several years, reduces the long-term risk of some cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. The result that aspirin benefit is detectable at daily low-doses (at least 75mg), the same used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, positions the antiplatelet action of aspirin at the center of its antitumor efficacy. At low-doses given every 24 h, aspirin is acting by a complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in the pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (approximately 20 min); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize the acetylated COX-isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin, such as the inhibition of Wnt/ β-catenin and NF-kB signaling and the acetylation of extra-COX proteins, have been suggested to play a role in its chemo-preventive effects, but their relevance remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses. In conclusion, the results of clinical pharmacology and the analysis of randomized and epidemiological studies suggest that colorectal cancer and atherothrombosis share a common mechanism of disease, i.e. enhanced platelet activation in response to injury at distinct sites. PMID:24281340

  20. Pronounced reduction in adenoma recurrence associated with aspirin use and a polymorphism in the ornithine decarboxylase gene

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, María Elena; O'Brien, Thomas G.; Fultz, Kimberly E.; Babbar, Naveen; Yerushalmi, Hagit; Qu, Ning; Guo, Yongjun; Boorman, David; Einspahr, Janine; Alberts, David S.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2003-01-01

    Most sporadic colon adenomas acquire mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) and show defects in APC-dependent signaling. APC influences the expression of several genes, including the c-myc oncogene and its antagonist Mad1. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first enzyme in polyamine synthesis, is a transcriptional target of c-myc and a modifier of APC-dependent tumorigenesis. A single-nucleotide polymorphism exists in intron 1 of the human ODC gene, which lies between two myc-binding domains. This region is known to affect ODC transcription, but no data exist on the relationship of this polymorphism to risk of colorectal neoplasia in humans. We show that individuals homozygous for the minor ODC A-allele who reported using aspirin are ≈0.10 times as likely to have an adenoma recurrence as non-aspirin users homozygous for the major G-allele. Mad1 selectively suppressed the activity of the ODC promoter containing the A-allele, but not the G-allele, in a human colon cancer-derived cell line (HT29). Aspirin (≥10 μM) did not affect ODC allele-specific promoter activity but did activate polyamine catabolism and lower polyamine content in HT29 cells. We propose that the ODC polymorphism and aspirin act independently to reduce the risk of adenoma recurrence by suppressing synthesis and activating catabolism, respectively, of colonic mucosal polyamines. These findings confirm the hypothesis that the ODC polymorphism is a genetic marker for colon cancer risk, and support the use of ODC inhibitors and aspirin, or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in combination as a strategy for colon cancer prevention. PMID:12810952

  1. Rationale and design of a Phase II clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: ASA-STAT

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Bagiella, Emilia; Shimbo, Daichi; Lederer, David J.; Al-Naamani, Nadine; Roberts, Kari E.; Barr, R. Graham; Post, Wendy; Horn, Evelyn; Tracy, Russell; Hassoun, Paul; Girgis, Reda

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease which causes exercise limitation, heart failure, and death. Aspirin and simvastatin are highly effective and safe therapies for other cardiovascular diseases characterized by platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction, but have not been formally studied in PAH. Methods ASA-STAT is a Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin in patients with PAH. A total of 92 subjects were to be randomized to aspirin or aspirin placebo and simvastatin or simvastatin placebo. The primary outcome is the distance walked in six minutes at six months after randomization. Secondary measures include brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, circulating biomarkers of platelet and endothelial function, functional class, quality-of-life, and time to clinical end points. The incidence of adverse events will be compared between treatment groups. Screening and Enrollment We screened a total of 712 individuals with PAH. Sixty-five subjects were enrolled when the trial was terminated for futility in reaching the primary end point for simvastatin. Conclusions This study aims to determine whether aspirin or simvastatin have beneficial biologic or clinical effects in patients with PAH. The safety and side effects of these commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs will also be assessed. PMID:21146637

  2. Automated docking and molecular dynamics simulations of nimesulide in the cyclooxygenase active site of human prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Nieto, Raquel; Pérez, Carlos; Gago, Federico

    2000-02-01

    Molecular models of the complex between the selective COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide and the cyclooxygenase active site of human prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 have been built using a combination of homology modelling, conformational searching and automated docking techniques. The stability of the resulting complexes has been assessed by molecular dynamics simulations and interaction energy decomposition. It is found that nimesulide exploits the extra space made available by the replacement at position 523 of an isoleucine residue in COX-1 by a valine in COX-2 and establishes electrostatic interactions with both Arg-106 and Arg-499 (Arg-120 and Arg-513 in PGHS-1 numbering). Two alternate binding modes are proposed which are compatible with the pharmacological profile of this agent as a COX-2 selective inhibitor.

  3. Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, Here Is What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, What You Should Know Share Tweet ... use of aspirin will help to prevent a heart attack or stroke in your particular case. Aspirin can ...

  4. Platelet response to increased aspirin dose in patients with persistent platelet aggregation while treated with aspirin 81 mg.

    PubMed

    Gengo, Fran; Westphal, Erica S; Rainka, Michelle M; Janda, Maria; Robson, Matthew J; Hourihane, J Maurice; Bates, Vernice

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates that patients who are taking 81 mg of aspirin and are nonresponsive benefit from a dose of 162 mg or greater vs a different antiplatelet therapy. We identified 100 patients who were nonresponsive to aspirin 81 mg via whole blood aggregometry and observed how many patients became responsive at a dose of 162 mg or greater. Platelet nonresponsiveness was defined as >10 Ω of resistance to collagen 1 µg/mL and/or an ohms ratio of collagen 1 µg/mL to collagen 5 µg/mL >0.5 and/or >6 Ω to arachidonate. Borderline response was defined as an improvement in 1 but not both of the above criteria. Of the initial 100 patients who were nonresponsive to an aspirin dose of 81 mg, 79% became responsive at a dose of 162 mg or >162 mg. Only 6% did not respond to any increase in dose. We believe that patients treated with low-dose aspirin who have significant risk for secondary vascular events should be individually assessed to determine their antiplatelet response. Those found to have persistent platelet aggregation despite treatment with 81 mg of aspirin have a higher likelihood of obtaining an adequate antiplatelet response at a higher aspirin dose.

  5. Does enteric-coated aspirin result in a lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications compared to normal aspirin?

    PubMed

    Walker, Jay; Robinson, James; Stewart, Jamie; Jacob, Samuel

    2007-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether enteric-coated aspirin results in a lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications compared to normal aspirin in CABG surgery. Using the reported search, 340 papers were identified. Nine papers represented the best evidence on the subject. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, weaknesses, results and study comments were tabulated. Five randomised controlled trials of healthy volunteers undergoing endoscopy after a period of either enteric-coated aspirin or plain aspirin administration all demonstrated a clear reduction of gastric mucosal injury. However, these trials on healthy volunteers taking short-term aspirin have not been supported by clinical studies in older age-group adults taking lower doses of aspirin for long periods. No clinical benefits in terms of reduction of gastrointestinal bleeding or ulceration with enteric coating have, therefore, been successfully demonstrated, although the endoscopic studies show that potentially these benefits could exist.

  6. The abnormal in vitro response to aspirin of platelets from aspirin-sensitive asthmatics is inhibited after inhalation of nedocromil sodium but not of sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Marquette, C H; Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B; Vorng, H; Lassalle, P; Tsicopoulos, A; Capron, A

    1990-01-01

    1. Blood platelets from patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma (ASA) generated cytotoxic mediators in the presence of aspirin. This abnormal in vitro response to aspirin was abolished within 1 h after nedocromil sodium inhalation but not after sodium cromoglycate inhalation. 2. Platelets recovered this reactivity to aspirin by 12 hours after nedocromil sodium treatment of ASA-patients. 3. The in vitro reactivity to aspirin of ASA platelets isolated before inhalation was inhibited in the presence of serum isolated 15 and 60 min after nedocromil sodium inhalation. PMID:2161678

  7. Effects of ticlopidine or ticlopidine plus aspirin on platelet aggregation and ATP release in normal volunteers: why aspirin improves ticlopidine antiplatelet activity.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Scazziota, A; Rouvier, J; Gonzalez, C

    1999-10-01

    Aspirin and ticlopidine are used to prevent arterial thrombosis. In some clinical settings ticlopidine is administered with aspirin for improving antithrombotic effect. We administered aspirin (100 mg/day), ticlopidine (500 mg/day), or ticlopidine and aspirin for 7 days to healthy volunteers. Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by sodium arachidonate, ADP, or a combination of both were measured. Sodium arachidonate (0.25 mmol/L), which produces no platelet aggregation, combined with adenosine diphosphate (1 mumol/L), which produced a reversible platelet aggregation of 20% after ticlopidine, resulted in a synergistic platelet aggregation response in normal (74.6 +/- 9.2%) and in ticlopidine platelet-rich plasma (59.1% +/- 14.9%, p < 0.0001). Synergism after sodium arachidonate (0.75 mmol/L) plus adenosine diphosphate (4 mumol/L) fell from 75.8% +/- 11.0% and 59.1% +/- 15.6% after ticlopidine or aspirin, respectively, to 14.8% +/- 18.0% (p < 0.0001) after ticlopidine plus aspirin. Aspirin and ticlopidine alone did not inhibit adenosine triphosphate release as thoroughly as did aspirin plus ticlopidine. Aspirin or ticlopidine does not adequately prevent platelet activity as ticlopidine plus aspirin do. Addition of aspirin to treatment with ticlopidine improves their antiplatelet activity and better results could be obtained in arterial thrombotic prevention strategies.

  8. Graphene quantum dots decorated CdS doped graphene oxide sheets in dual action mode: As initiator and platform for designing of nimesulide imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Choudhary, Raksha; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2017-03-15

    The present work describes the preparation of a nanohybrid by a combination of the 2D graphene sheet and 0D graphene quantum dots (GQDs). The GQDs were prepared from natural green precursors i.e. carrot juice by the one-step hydrothermal process. To get the maximum fluorescence property from nanohybrid, the graphene sheets were chemically doped with cadmium sulphide (CdS). The as prepared nanohybrid was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. The nanohybrid was further modified to design a nano-iniferter, which shows dual property i.e. works as polymerization initiator as well as provides platform for synthesis of the nimesulide-imprinted polymer. For designing of imprinted polymer two biocompatible monomers (cystine monomer and N-vinyl caprolactam) were used, which provides biodegradability to the polymer matrix. The imprinted polymer shows a very good selectivity towards the detection of nimesulide with a limit of detection as low as 6.65ngL(-1) (S/N=3). The sensor was also applied for the detection of nimesulide in real samples like human blood serum, plasma and urine samples as well as some pharmaceutical tablets.

  9. The effect of aspirin nanoemulsion on TNFα and iNOS in gastric tissue in comparison with conventional aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fatma Abd Elhalim; Hashem, Khalid S; Hussein Elkelawy, Asmaa Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Background No dose of aspirin is free of bleeding risk. Even at a dose as low as 75 mg/day, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is twice as high as among nonusers. Nanoemulsions (NEs) are emulsion systems with droplet size in nanometer scale in which oil or water droplets are finely dispersed in the opposite phase with the help of a suitable surfactant to stabilize the system. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin NE in comparison to conventional aspirin. Materials and methods A total of 24 male rats were used in the study and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given saline. Group 2 was given blank NE 1.5 mL/kg orally. Group 3 was given aspirin 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Group 4 was given aspirin NE 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Rats were killed, and gastric tissue was quickly excised after dissection of the animals. The tissues were divided into three pieces. The first one was kept in formalin 10% for pathological investigation. The second piece was kept in liquid nitrogen for molecular investigation. The third piece was homogenized in ten volumes of ice-cold phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7) using a Teflon homogenizer until a uniform suspension was obtained. The homogenate was centrifuged at 4,000 rpm for 30 minutes at 4°C to separate the supernatant from cellular debris. The supernatant was then used for the estimation of biochemical assays. Results The present study shows that aspirin has a toxic effect on the stomach as a result of inducing marked oxidative damage and the release of reactive oxygen species. This was shown by the significant increase in TNFα, iNOS, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels, and also a significant decrease in glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. In the aspirin-treated group compared to the control group, the NE had a protective effect on the stomach and caused less injury than

  10. Pityriasis rosea like drug rash - a need to identify the disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Panda, Maitreyee; Patro, Nibedita; Jena, Monalisa; Dash, Mrutunjay; Mishra, Swati

    2014-08-01

    Pityriasis rosea is a common dermatosis named by Gibert in 1860. It is an acute self limiting papulosquamous disease, probably infective in origin affecting healthy adolescents and young adults. It is characterized by distinctive skin eruptions and minimal constitutional symptoms. Drug induced pityriasis rosea tend to occur in older generation and resolution seen only after withdrawal of the offending drug. We report a case of 12-year-old boy with erythematous papules distributed over trunk and proximal arms after nimesulide therapy consistent with a clinical diagnosis of atypical pityriasis rosea. The relation of drug and development of pityriasis rosea is confirmed by dechallenge test of the suspected drug.

  11. In vivo and in vitro metabolism of aspirin eugenol ester in dog by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Youming; Liu, Xiwang; Yang, Yajun; Li, Jianyong; Ma, Ning; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) is a promising drug candidate for treatment of inflammation, pain and fever and prevention of cardiovascular diseases with fewer side effects than its precursor, aspirin. Investigation into its metabolic process in target animal species will help to illustrate its mechanism of action and to establish its residual mark compound to formulate its dosage. Six beagle dogs were orally given a dose of 20 mg kg(-1) of AEE and one dog was used to prepare blank liver microsomes. Their liver microsomes were prepared for in vitro study and their plasma and urine were collected for in vivo metabolic analysis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. In this study we identified 10 metabolites, M1, M2, M3, M4, M5 in phase I and M6, M7, M8, M9, M10 in phase II. Based on the metabolites of AEE, the pathways of AEE metabolism in dog were demonstrated.

  12. Aspirin induces cell death by directly modulating mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Debanjan; Majumdar, Dhriti; Vallabhaneni, Sirisha; Bera, Amal Kanti

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin induces apoptotic cell death in various cancer cell lines. Here we showed that silencing of VDAC1 protected HeLa cells from aspirin-induced cell death. Compared to the wild type cells, VDAC1 knocked down cells showed lesser change of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), upon aspirin treatment. Aspirin augmented ATP and ionomycin-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake which was abolished in VDAC1 knocked down cells. Aspirin dissociated bound hexokinase II (HK-II) from mitochondria. Further, aspirin promoted the closure of recombinant human VDAC1, reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer. Taken together, these results imply that VDAC1 serves as a novel target for aspirin. Modulation of VDAC1 is possibly associated with the cell death and anticancer effects of aspirin. PMID:28327594

  13. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  14. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C.; Voelker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:26247959

  15. Aspirin can stimulate luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oksana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Vasilieva, Elena

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted into the influence of aspirin on the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelets stimulated with platelet-activating factor (PAF). Ten coronary artery disease patients and six volunteers without coronary artery disease were included in the study. All the patients received aspirin (daily dose, 100 mg) for at least 10 days before in vitro experiments. Luminol-enhanced luminescence of platelet-rich plasma samples mixed with a PAF solution was measured. After stimulation of platelets with PAF, we did not find a luminol-enhanced chemiluminescent response either in the non-coronary artery disease volunteers or in eight out of the 10 coronary artery disease patients examined. However, in samples from two patients where platelets were stimulated with PAF reactive oxygen species were formed. This ability was expressed as an intensive luminol-enhanced luminescence of activated platelets. Such a reaction was observed against the background of the administration of aspirin. The addition of aspirin to a test tube considerably enhanced the intensity of chemiluminescence. In one case, the cancellation of aspirin was accompanied by diminution of the intensity of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelets. The clinical significance of this phenomenon is unknown.

  16. The effect of concurrent aspirin upon plasma concentrations of tenoxicam.

    PubMed Central

    Day, R O; Paull, P D; Lam, S; Swanson, B R; Williams, K M; Wade, D N

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of chronic, high-dose aspirin therapy upon the disposition of a single dose and multiple doses of tenoxicam was examined in normal volunteers. 2. Aspirin caused a 24% drop in the t1/2 (P less than 0.005), a 49% rise in the volume of distribution (P less than 0.0003) and a 98% increase in the clearance (P less than 0.0001) of tenoxicam after a single dose of the tenoxicam. 3. Steady-state concentrations of tenoxicam decreased significantly from 10.4 +/- 1.5 to 4.5 +/- 1.6 micrograms ml-1 in the presence of chronic, high-dose aspirin treatment. 4. Tenoxicam percentage free measured in plasma from a normal volunteer was 0.56 +/- 0.05% over the tenoxicam concentration range 1-20 micrograms ml-1 and rose to 1.24 +/- 0.07% in the presence of aspirin 150 micrograms ml-1. 5. The effect of aspirin upon the disposition of tenoxicam was consistent with a competitive protein binding interaction. PMID:3190995

  17. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C; Voelker, Michael

    2015-08-03

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer's clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  18. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Yang, Ya-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Mohamed, Isam; Liu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na). AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg), eugenol (18 mg/kg) and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg) were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1) was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT). The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values.

  19. Non-compliance is the predominant cause of aspirin resistance in chronic coronary arterial disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Kenneth A; Schwartz, Dianne E; Barber, Kimberly; Reeves, Mathew; De Franco, Anthony C

    2008-01-01

    Background Our previous publication showed that 9% of patients with a history of myocardial infarction MI. could be labeled as aspirin resistant; all of these patients were aspirin resistant because of non-compliance. This report compares the relative frequency of aspirin resistance between known compliant and non-compliance subjects to demonstrate that non-compliance is the predominant cause of aspirin resistance. Methods The difference in the slopes of the platelet prostaglandin agonist (PPA) light aggregation curves off aspirin and 2 hours after observed aspirin ingestion was defined as net aspirin inhibition. Results After supposedly refraining from aspirin for 7 days, 46 subjects were judged non-compliant with the protocol. Of the remaining 184 compliant subjects 39 were normals and 145 had a past history of MI. In known compliant subjects there was no difference in net aspirin inhibition between normal and MI subjects. Net aspirin inhibition in known compliant patients was statistically normally distributed. Only 3% of compliant subjects (2 normals and 5 MI) had a net aspirin inhibitory response of less than one standard deviation which could qualify as a conservative designation of aspirin resistance. A maximum of 35% of the 191 post MI subjects could be classified as aspirin resistant and/or non-compliant: 9% aspirin resistant because of non-compliance, 23% non-compliant with the protocol and possibly 3% because of a decreased net aspirin inhibitory response in known compliant patients. Conclusion Our data supports the thesis that the predominant cause of aspirin resistance is noncompliance. PMID:18759978

  20. The Effects of EPA+DHA and Aspirin on Inflammatory Cytokines and Angiogenesis Factors.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Dier, Usawadee; Calderonartero, Pedro; Shearer, Gregory C; Kakinami, Lisa; Larson, Mark K; Harris, William S; Georas, Steve; Mousa, Shaker A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a recent study, we showed that the combination of aspirin plus the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) synergistically inhibited platelet function. As aspirin, EPA, and DHA have demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties, we hypothesized that the ingestion of EPA and DHA, with and without aspirin, would reduce plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenesis factors more than aspirin alone and before aspirin was ingested. METHODS: Using multiplex technology, we investigated the effects of aspirin (single-dose 650 mg on day 1), EPA+DHA (3.4 g/d for days 2-29), and aspirin with EPA+DHA (day 30) on plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenesis factors in healthy adults. RESULTS: Aspirin alone had no effect on any factor versus baseline, but EPA+DHA, with and without aspirin, significantly reduced concentrations of 8 of 9 factors. Although EPA+DHA plus aspirin reduced concentrations of a subset of the factors compared to baseline, neither aspirin alone nor the combination significantly reduced the level of any analyte more robustly than EPA+DHA alone. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that EPA+DHA has more pronounced down-regulatory effects on inflammation and angiogenesis than aspirin. The implications of these findings for the use of combined therapy for cardiovascular disease remain to be clarified.

  1. Complexity in estimation of esomeprazole and its related impurities' stability in various stress conditions in low-dose aspirin and esomeprazole magnesium capsules.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Palavai Sripal; Hotha, Kishore Kumar; Sait, Shakil

    2013-01-01

    A complex, sensitive, and precise high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the profiling of impurities of esomeprazole in low-dose aspirin and esomeprazole capsules has been developed, validated, and used for the determination of impurities in pharmaceutical products. Esomeprazole and its related impurities' development in the presence of aspirin was traditionally difficult due to aspirin's sensitivity to basic conditions and esomeprazole's sensitivity to acidic conditions. When aspirin is under basic, humid, and extreme temperature conditions, it produces salicylic acid and acetic acid moieties. These two byproducts create an acidic environment for the esomeprazole. Due to the volatility and migration phenomenon of the produced acetic acid and salicylic acid from aspirin in the capsule dosage form, esomeprazole's purity, stability, and quantification are affected. The objective of the present research work was to develop a gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method to separate all the degradation products and process-related impurities from the main peak. The impurities were well-separated on a RP8 column (150 mm × 4.6mm, X-terra, RP8, 3.5μm) by the gradient program using a glycine buffer (0.08 M, pH adjusted to 9.0 with 50% NaOH), acetonitrile, and methanol at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) with detection wavelength at 305 nm and column temperature at 30°C. The developed method was found to be specific, precise, linear, accurate, rugged, and robust. LOQ values for all of the known impurities were below reporting thresholds. The drug was subjected to stress conditions of hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis, and thermal degradation in the presence of aspirin. The developed RP-HPLC method was validated according to the present ICH guidelines for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification, ruggedness, and robustness.

  2. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  3. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  4. Salicylic acid retention impairs aspirin reactivity in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowen; Xie, Hao; Zheng, Xiao; Chai, Yingying; Tang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hanyu; Li, Feiyan; Christoph, Heier; Chen, Jiandong; Sun, Weixin; Ye, Hui; Wang, Shiguang; Hao, Haiping; Chen, Xiaohu

    2017-01-05

    High on-aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) has been associated with compromised aspirin efficacy in patients with diabetes suffering from acute cardiovascular events, but the key mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of this study was to uncover the potential link between pathogenic accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), the major metabolite of aspirin, and HAPR in diabetic state. Aspirin failed to inhibit platelet CD62P expression and thromboxane (TX) B2/6-keto-prostaglandin(PG)F1α ratio in a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mice model, particularly in the female, which were unanimously accompanied by significantly higher plasma SA concentrations. Pre-administration with SA increased both platelet CD62P expression and TXB2/6-keto-PGF1α ratio in female T2DM mice, while pretreatment with NaHCO3 caused the opposite effect. On the in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs)-platelet interaction assay, SA suppressed inflammation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 upregulation on HUVECs and attenuated their inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. The prolonged retention of SA in diabetes may be partially explained by the downregulation of various SA efflux transporters in the kidney and the decreased urine pH. Importantly, in female aspirin non-responsive patients, the trough plasma concentration of SA are markedly increased with T2DM treated with long-term aspirin, and TXB2/6-keto-PGF1α ratio and uric acid level in plasma are positively correlated with SA concentration. Our findings support that the accumulation of SA represents an important factor in causing HAPR in diabetes, and that targeting impaired SA excretion may become a novel intervention strategy to diabetes-associated HAPR.

  5. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  6. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  7. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  8. [Melatonin production in thrombocytes and their functional activity in patients with aspirin asthma].

    PubMed

    Evsiukova, E V; Muraia, E V; Zubzhitskaia, L B; Kveshnoĭ, I M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study melatonin production in thrombocytes and their functional activity in correlation with 6-sulfatoximelatonin (6-SOM) urinary excretion in patients with aspirin-induced bronchial asthma (AIBA). Forty-three patients with bronchial asthma (BA) were examined. The main group consisted of 26 AIBA patients; the comparison group consisted of 17 BA patients with no intolerance to aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; 30 practically healthy individuals constituted the control group. The study found no melatonin production in thrombocytes of AIBA patients: only 13.0 +/- 1.3% of platelets expressed melatonin, while in healthy people 97.7 +/- 0.6% of the cells did. Besides, daytime urinary excretion of 6-SOM, the main melatonin metabolite, was lower in AIBA patients. Lower daytime and higher nighttime melatonin production in AIBA patients correlated with the acceleration of the 1st phase and increased intensity of thrombocyte aggregation, which evidences high thrombocyte reactivity to the inducing agent. The presence of a pathologic reaction of thrombocytes to exogenous melatonin, manifesting by changes in the 1st stage of aggregation, suggests the presence of pathology in thrombocyte membrane-receptor complex and the calcium homeostasis of the cell, which determines constant activation and the participation of thrombocytes in the development of asthmatic syndrome.

  9. [Enteric-coated aspirin does not reduce the risk of gastrointestinal side effects].

    PubMed

    Haastrup, Peter; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2014-04-28

    Enteric-coated aspirin has been developed in order to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. When reviewing the existing literature on the effects of the coating on the incidence of gastrointestinal side effects we find that enteric-coated aspirin causes significantly less minor gastrointestinal lesions compared to plain aspirin evaluated by endoscopy after short-term treatment, but there seems to be no effect of enteric-coating on the incidence of dyspepsia or gastrointestinal bleeding of clinical relevance. In conclusion enteric-coated aspirin is not superior to plain aspirin.

  10. Validated stability-indicating reversed-phase-HPLC method for simultaneous determination of orphenadrine citrate, caffeine and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Khaled; Salama, Ismail; Mostafa, Samia; El-Sadek, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    New, simple, rapid and precise reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of orphenadrine citrate, caffeine and aspirin in presence of aspirin degradation products, orphenadrine citrate and caffeine process related impurities, and excipients. Good resolution and quantization were achieved on reversed-phase column [Phenomenex™ Luna ODS C(18) (25 cm×4.6 mm, 5 µm particles)]. Gradient elution based on; eluant [A]: 0.1% triethylamine in aqueous potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (50 mM; pH 3.0), while as, eluant [B]: acetonitrile, at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min(-1). UV quantitation was set at 215 nm. Linearity was exhibited for orphenadrine citrate, caffeine and aspirin within 0.5-150, 0.5-360 or 0.7-301 µg mL(-1) ranges, respectively. Satisfactory validation results were ascertained in terms of low limits of quantiation (6.33×10(-2)-7.94×10(-2)), mean percentage recovery (98.9-101.4%), precision (<2%) and robustness. The proposed method was proved to be specific, robust and accurate for the determination of cited drugs in pharmaceutical preparations in presence of their degradation products.

  11. The Role of Aspirin, Vitamin D, Exercise, Diet, Statins, and Metformin in the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Amikar; O'Neil, Bert H

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a worldwide health problem leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Several strategies based on either lifestyle modifications or pharmacological interventions have been developed in an attempt to reduce the risk of CRC. In this review article, we discuss these interventions including aspirin (and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), vitamin D, exercise, diet, statins, and metformin. Depending upon the risk of developing CRC, the current evidence supports the beneficial role of aspirin, vitamin D, diet, and exercise especially in high-risk individuals (advanced adenoma or CRC). However, even with these established interventions, there are significant knowledge gaps such as doses of aspirin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D are not well established. Similarly, there is no convincing data from randomized controlled trials that a high fiber diet or a low animal fat diet reduces the risk of CRC. Some potential interventions, such as statins and metformin, do not have convincing data for clinical use even in high-risk individuals. However, these may have emerging roles in the prevention and treatment of CRC. Greater understanding of molecular mechanisms and the application of genomic tools to risk stratify an individual and tailor the interventions based on that individual's risk will help further advance the field. Some of this work is already underway and is a focus of this article.

  12. Effect of aspirin, paracetamol and their nitric oxide donating derivatives on exudate cytokine and PGE2 production in zymosan-induced air pouch inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Mamuk, Soner; Melli, Mehmet

    2007-04-30

    Effects of different doses of aspirin, compared to equimolar doses of nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin (NCX 4016), and of a single dose of paracetamol, compared to an equimolar dose of NO-donating paracetamol (NCX 701) were investigated in acute zymosan-induced air pouch inflammation in rats. Treatments were administered by orogastric route, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels in the exudates were analysed 4 h after zymosan injection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Aspirin, at 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg doses, increased IL-1beta levels in exudates, however, only the highest dose lead to a significant increase when compared to control, whereas a significant increase in TNF-alpha level was observed at all doses tested. NCX 4016, at equimolar doses for aspirin, i.e., 18.6, 55.8 and 186 mg/kg, respectively, did not cause any changes in exudate IL-1beta or TNF-alpha levels. These effects were significantly different, when aspirin was compared with the corresponding NCX 4016 group. Nevertheless, the ability of aspirin and NCX 4016 to inhibit PGE(2) synthesis in the exudate where comparable. Although paracetamol significantly increased exudate TNF-alpha level compared to the control group and NCX 701 group, neither paracetamol, nor NCX701 treatments changed the levels of exudate IL-1beta significantly. As expected, paracetamol and NCX 701 showed poor PGE(2) inhibition. At high doses, aspirin and NCX 4016 decreased the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the exudate. However, this inhibition was not significantly different from the control group. Paracetamol and NO-paracetamol did not cause any change in the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in exudate. These results indicated that aspirin and NCX 4016 possessed different effects on cytokine production or release, despite the fact that both drugs inhibited the synthesis of PGE(2) in a similar way. Unlike paracetamol, which increased exudate

  13. Validation of low‐dose aspirin prescription data in The Health Improvement Network: how much misclassification due to over‐the‐counter use?

    PubMed Central

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Soriano‐Gabarró, Montse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose We aimed to quantify the extent of over‐the‐counter (OTC) low‐dose aspirin use among patients in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) in the UK. Methods In September 2013, a random sample of low‐dose aspirin users (75 past users and 75 never users) was identified based on prescriptions recorded in THIN. Primary care practitioners (PCPs) were sent questionnaires to provide information on patients' use of OTC low‐dose aspirin. Results One hundred and forty valid questionnaires were received (93.30% [95%CI: 88.16–96.34] response rate). Current use of low‐dose aspirin was reported by PCPs in 4.23% (95%CI: 1.45–11.70) (n = 3) of past users (OTC use in one patient) and in 2.9% (95%CI: 0.78–9.70) (n = 2) of never users (OTC use in one patient). In addition, PCPs reported past use of low‐dose aspirin in 88.70% (95%CI: 79.31–94.18) (n = 63) of past users (all prescribed; none as OTC) and in 2.82% (95%CI: 0.78–9.70) (n = 2) of never users (as OTC). Among past users, PCPs reported the indication for low‐dose aspirin as primary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in 63.16% (95%CI: 50.18–74.48) of patients and secondary CVD prevention in 31.58% (95%CI: 21.00–44.48) of patients. Corresponding percentages based on THIN were 78.95% (95%CI: 66.71–87.53) and 21.1% (95%CI: 12.47–33.29), respectively. Conclusion Our findings show the small impact of potential misclassification of low‐dose aspirin use in THIN due to unrecorded OTC use. The small proportion of false negatives confirms the utility of THIN for utilization and outcome studies of low‐dose aspirin. © 2015 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26660710

  14. Crystal Structure of Aspirin-Acetylated Human Cyclooxygenase-2: Insight into the Formation of Products with Reversed Stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lucido, Michael J; Orlando, Benjamin J; Vecchio, Alex J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs target the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) to block the formation of prostaglandins. Aspirin is unique in that it covalently modifies each enzyme by acetylating Ser-530 within the cyclooxygenase active site. Acetylation of COX-1 leads to complete loss of activity, while acetylation of COX-2 results in the generation of the monooxygenated product 15(R)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15R-HETE). Ser-530 has also been shown to influence the stereochemistry for the addition of oxygen to the prostaglandin product. We determined the crystal structures of S530T murine (mu) COX-2, aspirin-acetylated human (hu) COX-2, and huCOX-2 in complex with salicylate to 1.9, 2.0, and 2.4 Å, respectively. The structures reveal that (1) the acetylated Ser-530 completely blocks access to the hydrophobic groove, (2) the observed binding pose of salicylate is reflective of the enzyme-inhibitor complex prior to acetylation, and (3) the observed Thr-530 rotamer in the S530T muCOX-2 crystal structure does not impede access to the hydrophobic groove. On the basis of these structural observations, along with functional analysis of the S530T/G533V double mutant, we propose a working hypothesis for the generation of 15R-HETE by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. We also observe differential acetylation of COX-2 purified in various detergent systems and nanodiscs, indicating that detergent and lipid binding within the membrane-binding domain of the enzyme alters the rate of the acetylation reaction in vitro.

  15. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ASPIRIN ACETYLATED HUMAN CYCLOOXYGENASE-2: INSIGHT INTO THE FORMATION OF PRODUCTS WITH REVERSED STEREOCHEMISTRY

    PubMed Central

    Lucido, Michael J.; Orlando, Benjamin J.; Vecchio, Alex J.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin and other nonsterroidal anti-inflammatory drugs target the Cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) to block the formation of prostaglandins. Aspirin is unique in that it covalently modifies each enzyme by acetylating Ser-530 within the cyclooxygenase active site. Acetylation of COX-1 leads to complete loss of activity, while acetylation of COX-2 results in the generation of the mono-oxygenated product 15(R)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15R-HETE). Ser-530 has also been shown to influence the stereochemistry for oxygen addition into the prostaglandin product. We determined the crystal structures of S530T murine (mu) COX-2, aspirin-acetylated human (hu) COX-2, and huCOX-2 in complex with salicylate to 1.9Å, 2.0Å, and 2.4Å, respectively. The structures reveal that: 1) the acetylated Ser-530 completely blocks access to the hydrophobic groove; 2) the observed binding pose of salicylate is reflective of the enzyme-inhibitor complex prior to acetylation; and 3) the observed Thr-530 rotamer in the S530T muCOX-2 crystal structure does not impede access to the hydrophobic groove. Based on these structural observations, along with functional analysis of the S530T/G533V double mutant, we propose a working hypothesis for the generation of 15R-HETE by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. We also observe differential acetylation of COX-2 purified in various detergent systems and nanodiscs, indicating that detergent and lipid binding within the membrane-binding domain of the enzyme alters the rate of the acetylation reaction in vitro. PMID:26859324

  16. Preparation and analysis of deuterium-labeled aspirin: application to pharmacokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, A.K.; FitzGerald, G.A.

    1985-02-01

    Inhibition of endogenous prostacyclin and thromboxane biosynthesis by aspirin is critically dose-dependent in humans. Gastrointestinal and hepatic hydrolysis may limit systemic availability of aspirin, especially in low doses, perhaps contributing to the biochemical selectivity of aspirin. Existing analytical methods do not permit determination of systemic bioavailability when low (less than 100 mg) doses of aspirin are administered. Deuterium-labeled aspirin (2-acetoxy(3,4,5,6-/sup 2/H4)benzoic acid) was synthesized from salicylic acid by catalytic exchange and subsequent acetylation. Analysis of the compounds as benzyl esters by GC-MS followed extractive alkylation from plasma. Heptadeuterated compounds were used as internal standards. Simultaneous administration of tetradeuterated aspirin intravenously with native aspirin orally to anesthetized dogs permitted kinetic studies of both aspirin and salicylic acid. The sensitivity of the method is superior to published methods using HPLC and, thus, more applicable to studies of low dose aspirin. Pulse administration of stable isotope-labeled aspirin permits detailed and repeated studies of dose-related aspirin pharmacokinetics in humans.

  17. Aspirin acetylates wild type and mutant p53 in colon cancer cells: identification of aspirin acetylated sites on recombinant p53.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-05-01

    Aspirin's ability to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines is considered to be an important mechanism for its anti-cancer effects. We previously demonstrated that aspirin acetylated the tumor suppressor protein p53 at lysine 382 in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we extended these observations to human colon cancer cells, HCT 116 harboring wild type p53, and HT-29 containing mutant p53. We demonstrate that aspirin induced acetylation of p53 in both cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Aspirin-acetylated p53 was localized to the nucleus. In both cell lines, aspirin induced p21(CIP1). Aspirin also acetylated recombinant p53 (rp53) in vitro suggesting that it occurs through a non-enzymatic chemical reaction. Mass spectrometry analysis and immunoblotting identified 10 acetylated lysines on rp53, and molecular modeling showed that all lysines targeted by aspirin are surface exposed. Five of these lysines are localized to the DNA-binding domain, four to the nuclear localization signal domain, and one to the C-terminal regulatory domain. Our results suggest that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may involve acetylation and activation of wild type and mutant p53 and induction of target gene expression. This is the first report attempting to characterize p53 acetylation sites targeted by aspirin.

  18. A nimesulide derivative with potential anti-inflammatory activity: Synthesis, X-ray powder structure analysis and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Abir; Kankanala, Kavitha; Pal, Sarbani; Mukherjee, Alok K.

    2010-06-01

    A nimesulide derivative, N-[4-(2,5-dioxo-2,5-dihydropyrrol-1-yl)-2-phenoxyphenyl]methanesulfonamide ( 2), was synthesized and its crystal structure has been determined from X-ray powder diffraction data following direct-space global optimization technique and refined by the Rietveld method. The molecular geometry and electronic structure of the title compound were calculated at the DFT level using the hybrid exchange-correlation functional, BLYP. The optimized molecular geometry of 2 corresponds closely to that obtained from the X-ray structure analysis. Intermolecular N-H···O and C-H···O hydrogen bonds in 2 form one-dimensional polymeric chains of R22(8) rings propagating along the [1 0 0] direction. Further linking between parallel chains via C-H···π (arene) hydrogen bonds generates a two-dimensional supramolecular assembly in the (1 1 0) plane. The title compound exhibits potential anti-inflammatory activity and can induce 64% edema inhibition in rat paws.

  19. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents.

    PubMed

    Saucier, Caroline; Adebayo, Matthew A; Lima, Eder C; Cataluña, Renato; Thue, Pascal S; Prola, Lizie D T; Puchana-Rosero, M J; Machado, Fernando M; Pavan, Flavio A; Dotto, G L

    2015-05-30

    Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L(-1) HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N2 adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pHpzc). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations.

  20. Healing of aspirin-associated peptic ulcer disease despite continued salicylate ingestion.

    PubMed

    O'Laughlin, J C; Silvoso, G R; Ivey, K J

    1981-05-01

    Patients who have rheumatic disease and who are undergoing long-term aspirin therapy have a high incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Whether it is possible to heal long-term aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease if aspirin intake is continued is unknown. Nine patients with rheumatic disease who were receiving long-term aspirin therapy and who had 15 endoscopically verified gastric and/or duodenal ulcers were studied. Patients were treated daily with 1,200 mg of cimetidine plus at least 120 mL of antacid (Mylanta II), while continuing aspirin therapy at the same dose and type. By eight weeks, 14 ulcers had healed. This study shows that some aspirin-associated peptic ulcers can be healed, despite continued aspirin intake, by intensive medical therapy aimed at lowering intragastric acidity.

  1. Aspirin and clopidogrel response variability: review of the published literature.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Angela D; Dokainish, Hisham; Lakkis, Nasser

    2008-01-01

    Antiplatelet resistance has been proposed as a possible mechanism to explain recurrent cardiovascular events in patients who have coronary artery disease and who are undergoing dual antiplatelet therapy. A comprehensive search on PubMed was conducted for literature that was printed in the English language between January 1996 and November 2007 on aspirin and clopidogrel resistance. Significant traits for aspirin hyporesponsiveness were female sex, older age, and lower levels of hemoglobin. Diabetes mellitus and elevated body mass index showed trends toward a higher incidence of resistance in some aspirin trials but did not reach statistical significance. Clopidogrel studies suggested that patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are more likely to manifest inadequate response to the medication. Although 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors were initially suspected to decrease response to clopidogrel, later studies refuted this possibility. Patients with a suboptimal response to aspirin or clopidogrel seem to be at increased risk of recurrent cardiovascular events. Large clinical trials with standardized laboratory methods and well-defined protocols are needed to determine whether common features exist in patients with suspected hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet therapy, and to validate the clinical relevance of response variability. A concise nonarbitrary definition of physiologic "resistance" is needed, and investigators should identify patients as having a variable response to antiplatelet therapy.

  2. The role of aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2016-08-01

    Considerable interest has emerged over the last decade regarding the role of aspirin in prevention of colorectal cancer. This disease is one of the commonest cancers in the Western World, therefore, the existence of a simple "everyday" agent, which could have the ability to prevent the disease, represents an invaluable opportunity clinicians may be able to exploit. Evidence from case-control and cohort studies, and recent updates of randomised controlled trials have been very encouraging-indicating benefit from long term use of aspirin at low dose. Possible mechanisms of chemoprevention include inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, or COX-independent mechanisms, for example, the PIK3CA pathway, or therapy-induced senescence of cancer cells. The most serious side effect of prolonged aspirin treatment is haemorrhage, especially from the GI tract. This is likely to be less of a problem with chemoprevention at lower doses. One also needs to consider the impact if aspirin resistance, an increasingly recognised clinical entity.

  3. Class Projects in Physical Organic Chemistry: The Hydrolysis of Aspirin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise that provides a hands-on demonstration of the hydrolysis of aspirin is presented. The key to understanding the hydrolysis is recognizing that all six process may occur simultaneously and that the observed rate constant is the sum of the rate constants that one rate constant dominates the overall process.

  4. Quinone Induced Activation of Keap1/Nrf2 Signaling by Aspirin Prodrugs Masquerading as Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Tareisha; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C.; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Vanni, Michael; Litosh, Vladislav; Luo, Jia; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The promising therapeutic potential of the NO-donating hybrid aspirin prodrugs (NO-ASA), includes induction of chemopreventive mechanisms, and has been reported in almost 100 publications. One example, NCX-4040 (pNO-ASA), is bioactivated by esterase to a quinone methide (QM) electrophile. In cell cultures, pNO-ASA and QM-donating X-ASA prodrugs that cannot release NO rapidly depleted intracellular GSH and caused DNA damage; however, induction of Nrf2 signaling elicited cellular defense mechanisms including upregulation of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL). In HepG2 cells, the “NO-specific” 4,5-diaminofluorescein reporter, DAF-DA, responded to NO-ASA and X-ASA, with QM-induced oxidative stress masquerading as NO. LC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated efficient alkylation of Cys residues of proteins including glutathione-S-transferase-P1 (GST-P1) and Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1). Evidence was obtained for alkylation of Keap1 Cys residues associated with Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus, nuclear translocation of Nrf2, activation of antioxidant response element (ARE), and upregulation of cytoprotective target genes. At least in cell culture, pNO-ASA acts as a QM-donor, bioactivated by cellular esterase activity to release salicylates, NO3−, and an electrophilic QM. Finally, two novel aspirin prodrugs were synthesized, both potent activators of ARE, designed to release only the QM and salicylates on bioactivation. Current interest in electrophilic drugs acting via Nrf2 signaling suggests that QM-donating hybrid drugs can be designed as informative chemical probes in drug discovery. PMID:23035985

  5. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  6. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  7. Aspirin in the 21st century-common mechanisms of disease and their modulation by aspirin: a report from the 2015 scientific conference of the international aspirin foundation, 28 August, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tom; Hutchison, Pippa; Schrör, Karsten; Clària, Joan; Lanas, Angel; Patrignani, Paola; Chan, Andrew T; Din, Farhat; Langley, Ruth; Elwood, Peter; Freedman, Andrew; Eccles, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Professor Peter Rothwell of Oxford University chaired the annual Scientific Conference of the International Aspirin Foundation in London on 28 August 2015. It took the form of four sessions. Aspirin has more than one action in its effects on disease. Its acetylation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in platelets leads to the blockade of pro-inflammatory chemicals and generation of anti-inflammatory mediators and increase in nitrous oxide (NO) production, which helps to preserve arterial endothelium. But platelets are not its only target. There is now evidence that aspirin has a direct antitumour effect on intestinal mucosal cells that block their potential transformation into cancer cells. Randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) in people with histories of colorectal neoplasia have shown that aspirin reduces the risk of recurrent adenomas and reduces long-term cancer incidence in patients with Lynch syndrome. Among women given aspirin for cardiovascular disease, there were fewer cancers than in those given placebo. Epidemiological evidence has suggested that aspirin treatment after cancer is diagnosed reduces the incidence of metastases and prolongs survival, and long-term studies of anticancer treatment with aspirin are under way to confirm this. Apart from cancer studies, aspirin use is now firmly established as treatment for antiphospholipid syndrome (Hughes syndrome) and is being used to prevent and treat the heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus and in patients with HIV.

  8. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole

    MedlinePlus

    ... dipyridamole is in a class of drugs called antiplatelet agents. It works by preventing excessive blood clotting. It ... Univasc), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin) and heparin; ...

  9. Combined aspirin and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    So, Charlotte H; Eckman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    The combined use of aspirin and oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) has been questioned due to an increased risk of major bleeding with little to no benefit in preventing ischemic events. (1) To better understand patterns and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and identify patients who might reasonably be treated with oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy alone. (2) To perform an updated literature review regarding the use of combined antiplatelet and OAC therapy in patients with AF and stable CAD. Retrospective review. Patients within the University of Cincinnati Health System with a diagnosis of non-valvular AF, excluding those with acute coronary syndrome or revascularization within the last 12 months. Numbers and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and sequence of events leading to the initiation of each. Of 948 patients receiving OAC, 430 (45 %) were receiving concomitant OAC and aspirin. Among patients receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, 49 and 42 % of patients respectively, had CAD or DM. In a more detailed analysis including chart review of 219 patients receiving combined OAC and aspirin, 27 % had a diagnosis of CAD and 14 % had a diagnosis of DM prior to the development of AF. These patients were initially treated with aspirin. Warfarin was added when they subsequently developed AF but aspirin wasn't discontinued. A surprisingly large proportion of patients (22.8 %) had no obvious indication for dual therapy. Prior myocardial infarction, CAD, vascular disease and DM (among others) increase the likelihood of receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy among patients with AF. A literature review suggests this may lead to increased major bleeding with little benefit in decreasing either AF-related stroke or cardiovascular events.

  10. Metabolism of aspirin and procaine in mice pretreated with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate or O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, J.M.; Brown, T.M.

    1986-07-01

    Concentrations of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine in blood of mice were increased threefold for 27 min by exposure to O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate 2 hr prior to (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine injection ip, while there was no effect of O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate pretreatment. There was no effect of either organophosphinate on the primary hydrolysis of (acetyl-l-/sup 14/C)aspirin when assessed by the expiration of (/sup 14/C)carbon dioxide; however, O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreatment produced transient increases in blood concentrations of both (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin and (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)salicylic acid following administration of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin. Liver carboxylesterase activity in O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreated mice was 11% of control activity. These results indicate the potential for drug interaction with O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate but not with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate. It appears that liver carboxylesterase activity has a minor role in hydrolysis of aspirin in vivo, but may be more important in procaine metabolism.

  11. Acetaminophen and aspirin inhibit superoxide anion generation and lipid peroxidation, and protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, D S; Saravanan, K S; Maharaj, H; Mohanakumar, K P; Daya, S

    2004-04-01

    We assessed the antioxidant activity of non-narcotic analgesics, acetaminophen and aspirin in rat brain homogenates and neuroprotective effects in vivo in rats intranigrally treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP+). Both drugs inhibited cyanide-induced superoxide anion generation, as well as lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates, the combination of the agents resulting in a potentiation of this effect. Acetaminophen or aspirin when administered alone or in combination, did not alter dopamine (DA) levels in the forebrain or in the striatum. Intranigral infusion of MPP+ in rats caused severe depletion of striatal DA levels in the ipsilateral striatum in rats by the third day. Systemic post-treatment of acetaminophen afforded partial protection, whereas similar treatment of aspirin resulted in complete blockade of MPP+-induced striatal DA depletion. While these findings suggest usefulness of non-narcotic analgesics in neuroprotective therapy in neurodegenerative diseases, aspirin appears to be a potential candidate in prophylactic as well as in adjuvant therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Development and Validation of a Reversed-phase HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Aspirin, Atorvastatin Calcium and Clopidogrel Bisulphate in Capsules.

    PubMed

    Londhe, S V; Deshmukh, R S; Mulgund, S V; Jain, K S

    2011-01-01

    A simple, accurate, rapid and precise isocratic reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of aspirin, atorvastatin calcium and clopidogrel bisulphate in capsules. The chromatographic separation was carried out on an Inertsil ODS analytical column (150×4.6 mm; 5 μm) with a mixture of acetonitrile:phosphate buffer pH 3.0 adjusted with o-phosphoric acid (50:50, v/v) as mobile phase; at a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. UV detection was performed at 235 nm. The retention times were 1.89, 6.6 and 19.8 min. for aspirin, atorvastatin calcium and clopidogrel bisulphate, respectively. Calibration plots were linear (r(2)>0.998) over the concentration range 5-30 μg/ml for atorvastatin calcium and 30-105 μg/ml for aspirin and clopidogrel bisulphate. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, specificity, linearity, and sensitivity. The proposed method was successfully used for quantitative analysis of capsules. No interference from any component of pharmaceutical dosage form was observed. Validation studies revealed that method is specific, rapid, reliable, and reproducible. The high recovery and low relative standard deviation confirm the suitability of the method for routine determination of aspirin, atorvastatin calcium and clopidogrel bisulphate in bulk drug and capsule dosage form.

  13. Aspirin desensitization for patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hossein; Nabavi, Mohammad; Aryan, Zahra; Arshi, Saba; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Fallahpour, Morteza; Mortazavi, Negar

    2015-10-01

    The effect of aspirin desensitization (AD) on immunologic profile of patients with AERD has been poorly understood. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of AD on clinical and immunological markers of patients with AERD. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial comprised 34 adult patients (67.6% female) with chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and aspirin-intolerant asthma. The active group underwent AD over a 2-day period with increasing doses of aspirin (60, 125, 325, and 625 mg), followed by receiving aspirin 625 mg twice daily for 6 months. Symptom scores and medication needs of patients with AERD who have undergone AD were significantly lower compared to the placebo group after 6 months (7.5 ± 3.5 vs. 10.6 ± 3.8 and 9.3 ± 2.0 vs. 11.0 ± 3.1, respectively, all p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in serum concentration of IL-10, IFN-γ, and TGF-β between two groups neither at baseline nor at the end of study.

  14. [Prostaglandin E1 (misoprostol) and S-adenosylmethionine in the prevention of hemorrhagic gastritis induced by aspirin in the human. Endoscopic, histologic and histochemical study].

    PubMed

    Laudanno, O M; Finkelstein, D; Capdepon, E

    1984-01-01

    On 58 healthy subjects, it was evaluated in endoscopic and histopathologic form, the cytoprotective effect on the gastroduodenal mucosa, such of T.G.E 1 (misoprostol) as of SAMe, in the present of acute bleeding gastritis induced by 1300 mg aspirin in a single dose and during 2 hours. SAMe was given in progressive doses up to 500 mg, which were ingested simultaneously with aspirin, and so with Misoprostol in doses of 50 mg, showed an endoscopic score of 0 without microscopic lesion of the gastroduodenal mucosa, this was confirmed by the histopathology, where both drugs give a cytoprotection of the gastroduodenal mucosa by about 95% of total biopsies gastrointestinal mucosa. It is suggest that T.G.E.1 (misoprostol) and SAMe are choice drugs in the treatment of hemorrhagic gastritis.

  15. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alex; Rahmanian, Sorena; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by disease processes in multiple organ systems. The effect of aspirin (ASA) resistance on platelet metabolism was evaluated using constraint-based modeling, which revealed a redirection of glycolytic, fatty acid, and nucleotide metabolism reaction fluxes in order to accommodate eicosanoid synthesis and reactive oxygen species stress. These results were confirmed with independent proteomic data. The construction and availability of iAT-PLT-636 should stimulate further data-driven, systems analysis of platelet metabolism towards the understanding of pathophysiological conditions including, but not strictly limited to, coagulopathies.

  16. Aspirin in combination with TACE in treatment of unresectable HCC: a matched-pairs analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Huan; Wang, Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Yin, Xin; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Rong-Xin; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the principal therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its efficacy is currently limited owing to tumor progression or treatment failure. It has been shown that aspirin reduces the incidence of multiple malignant tumors including HCC and plays a synergistic role with chemotherapy in the treatment of colon cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the adjuvant effect of aspirin on patients with unresectable HCC who underwent TACE therapy. A retrospective matched-pairs analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin in combination with TACE therapy. A total of 120 patients with HCC, including 60 patients treated with aspirin for treatment of cardiovascular disease, transient ischemic attack, and arthritis, and 60 paired matching HCC patients without aspirin treatment in the same period, were enrolled. Compared with non-aspirin users, patients treated with aspirin showed improved OS (P = 0.050). Specifically, patients treated with a full dose of aspirin showed prolonged OS (P = 0.027), which was an independent factor associated with OS in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 0.498, 95% confidence interval 0.280-0.888, P = 0.018). Aspirin in combination with TACE might improve OS in patients with unresectable HCC. Thus, the impact of aspirin on patients with HCC warrants further investigation prospectively. PMID:27725915

  17. Aspirin Protects against Acinar Cells Necrosis in Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guotao; Tong, Zhihui; Ding, Yanbing; Liu, Jinjiao; Pan, Yiyuan; Gao, Lin; Tu, Jianfeng; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin has a clear anti-inflammatory effect and is used as an anti-inflammatory agent for both acute and long-term inflammation. Previous study has indicated that aspirin alleviated acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein in rat. However, the role of aspirin on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the necrosis of pancreatic acinar cell are not yet clear. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of aspirin treatment on a SAP model induced by caerulein combined with Lipopolysaccharide. We found that aspirin reduced serum amylase and lipase levels, decreased the MPO activity, and alleviated the histopathological manifestations of pancreas and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Proinflammatory cytokines were decreased and the expression of NF-κB p65 in acinar cell nuclei was suppressed after aspirin treatment. Furthermore, aspirin induced the apoptosis of acinar cells by TUNEL assay, and the expression of Bax and caspase 3 was increased and the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Intriguingly, the downregulation of critical necrosis associated proteins RIP1, RIP3, and p-MLKL was observed; what is more, we additionally found that aspirin reduced the COX level of pancreatic tissue. In conclusion, our data showed that aspirin could protect pancreatic acinar cell against necrosis and reduce the severity of SAP. Clinically, aspirin may potentially be a therapeutic intervention for SAP. PMID:28119929

  18. A preliminary study: aspirin discontinuation before elective operations; when is the optimal timing?

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Suleyman; Ozis, Erpulat; Sahli, Zafer; Demirtas, Selda; Korkmaz, Atilla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the optimum timing of aspirin cessation before noncardiac surgeries. We have conducted a pilot study to minimize the aspirin cessation time before various surgeries. Methods Eighty patients who were taking regular aspirin for secondary prevention undergoing elective surgical operations were enrolled in the study. We separated the patients into two groups. The control group had 35 patients who stopped aspirin intake 10 days before surgery. The study group had 45 patients who stopped their aspirin intake and underwent surgery one day after arachidonic acid aggregation tests were within normal limits. Bleeding, blood loss, and transfusion requirements were assessed perioperatively. Results The mean time between aspirin cessation and aspirin nonresponsiveness were found to be 4.2 days with a median value of 4 days. In addition, the mean time between aspirin cessation and operation day were found to be 5.5 days with a median value of 5 days. No perioperative bleeding, thromboembolic or cardiovascular complications were encountered. Conclusion Reducing time of aspirin cessation from 7-10 days to 4-5 days is a possibility for patients using aspirin for secondary prevention without increased perioperative complications. PMID:24106686

  19. Effect of aspirin dose, preparation, and withdrawal on platelet response in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacqueline L; Alberts, Mark J

    2006-09-15

    A significant difference in individual response to aspirin therapy has been described, and studies have shown that a minimal response to aspirin may be associated with increased risk for some cardiovascular events. However, it remains unclear if aspirin dose, coating, or termination alters the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Normal volunteers were randomly assigned to enteric-coated or uncoated aspirin 81 or 325 mg and monitored over 12 days with a point-of-care aspirin assay that incorporates the platelet agonist arachidonic acid. The antiplatelet response was greater with a 325-mg dose than with an 81-mg dose. A coating slowed the antiplatelet response to the 81-mg dose only. There were no differences among the groups after maximum response was achieved between days 4 and 7. There was significant recovery of platelet aggregation <48 hours after the cessation of aspirin, with a return to baseline values by the fifth day. A significant interpatient variation in response to the 4 dosing regimes was observed. In conclusion, the antiplatelet response was more rapid to a 325-mg/day dose of aspirin compared with an 81-mg/day dose. An enteric-coated preparation delayed the time of response to an 81-mg/day dose. These results suggest that aspirin dose and preparation may be important mediators of the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in some patients.

  20. Aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage: prevention by enteric-coating and relation to prostaglandin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, A B; Mahida, Y R; Cole, A T; Hawkey, C J

    1991-07-01

    1. Gastric damage induced by low-dose aspirin and the protective effect of enteric-coating was assessed in healthy volunteers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial using Latin square design. Each was administered placebo, plain aspirin 300 mg daily, plain aspirin 600 mg four times daily, enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg daily, or enteric-coated aspirin 600 mg four times daily for 5 days. Gastric damage was assessed endoscopically, and gastric mucosal bleeding measured. 2. Aspirin 300 mg daily and 600 mg four times daily caused significant increases in gastric injury compared with placebo. Gastric mucosal bleeding was significantly more with the high dose, with a trend towards increased gastric erosions, compared with the low dose. 3. Enteric-coating of aspirin eliminated the injury caused by low dose aspirin and substantially reduced that caused by the higher dose. 4. All dosages and formulations caused similar inhibition of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 synthesis. 5. Serum thromboxane levels were suppressed equally with plain and enteric-coated aspirin. 6. In this short-term study in healthy volunteers, gastric toxicity from aspirin was largely topical, independent of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, and could be virtually eliminated by the use of an enteric-coated preparation.

  1. Perioperative aspirin management after POISE-2: some answers, but questions remain.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Neal Stuart; Carey, Michael Christopher; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Schulman, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin constitutes important uninterrupted lifelong therapy for many patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease or significant (CV) risk factors. However, whether aspirin should be continued or withheld in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery is a common clinical conundrum that balances the potential of aspirin for decreasing thrombotic risk with its possibility for increasing perioperative blood loss. In this focused review, we describe the role of aspirin in treating and preventing cardiovascular disease, summarize the most important literature on the perioperative use of aspirin (including the recently published PeriOperative ISchemic Evaluation [POISE]-2 trial), and offer current recommendations for managing aspirin during the perioperative period. POISE-2 suggests that aspirin administration during the perioperative period does not change the risk of a cardiovascular event and may result in increased bleeding. However, these findings are tempered by a number of methodological issues related to the study. On the basis of currently available literature, including POISE-2, aspirin should not be administered to patients undergoing surgery unless there is a definitive guideline-based primary or secondary prevention indication. Aside from closed-space procedures, intramedullary spine surgery, or possibly prostate surgery, moderate-risk patients taking lifelong aspirin for a guideline-based primary or secondary indication may warrant continuation of their aspirin throughout the perioperative period.

  2. Prevalence of Aspirin Resistance in Diabetic Patients and its Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    HABIZAL, Nor Halwani; ABDUL HALIM, Sanihah; BHASKAR, Shalini; WAN BEBAKAR, Wan Mohamed; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aspirin resistance has posed a major dilemma in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke. There have been many factors that have been associated with aspirin resistance. Among these factors, the inflammatory processes of diabetes and glycaemic control have been significantly associated with aspirin resistance. Our study evaluated the prevalence of aspirin resistance and its associated factors. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, interventional study, which was implemented from October to November 2012 at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). Sixty-nine patients with diabetes who were taking aspirin were enrolled. The glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in these patients. The thromboelastography (TEG) level was measured using a TEG machine by a trained technician employing standard methods. The variables obtained were analysed for prevalence of aspirin resistance, HbA1c, CRP, and TEG level. The Chi-square test (and Fisher exact test where applicable) were used to evaluate the associations between aspirin resistance with glycaemic control (HbA1c) and inflammatory markers (CRP). Results: The prevalence of aspirin resistance was 17.4% (95%; CI 9.3, 28.4). Glycaemic control (HbA1c) and inflammatory markers (CRP) were not associated with aspirin resistance. Aspirin resistance was prevalent in our study population and was comparable to other studies. The mean HbA1c in the aspirin-resistant group was 8.9%, whereas the mean HbA1c in the aspirin-sensitive group was 8.6%. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in HbA1c between the two groups. There was no significant association between CRP levels and aspirin resistance. PMID:25892950

  3. Aspirin and paracetamol removal using a commercial micro-sized TiO2 catalyst in deionized and tap water.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Claudia L; Sacchi, Benedetta; Pirola, Carlo; Demartin, Francesco; Cerrato, Giuseppina; Morandi, Sara; Capucci, Valentino

    2016-10-21

    Micro-sized TiO2 catalyst was employed to degrade pharmaceutical compounds, i.e. aspirin and paracetamol, two of the most widely used drugs, purchasable without prescription. Their active agents, acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen, are characterized by different substituent groups, linked to the aromatic ring, which affect both the photodegradation and mineralization processes. The experimental conditions highlight the relationship between the nature of the pristine molecules, their degradation mechanisms, their mutual interference and the water's role. The research started from model systems with a single pollutant to the mixture of them and finally by moving from deionized water to tap water.

  4. Narrow-line waveguide terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of aspirin and aspirin precursors.

    PubMed

    Laman, N; Harsha, S Sree; Grischkowsky, D

    2008-03-01

    Low frequency vibrational modes of pharmaceutical molecules are dependent on the molecule as a whole and can be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform far-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper spectral features. Waveguide THz-TDS consists of forming an ordered polycrystalline film on a metal plate and incorporating that plate in a parallel-plate waveguide, where the film is probed by THz radiation. The planar order of the film on the metal surface strongly reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, while cooling the waveguide to 77 K reduces the homogeneous broadening. This combination results in sharper absorption lines associated with the vibrational modes of the molecule. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with aspirin and its precursors, benzoic acid and salicylic acid, as well as the salicylic acid isomers 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Linewidths as narrow as 20 GHz have been observed, rivaling single crystal measurements.

  5. Dissimilar effects of chronic treatment with aspirin, flubiprofen and indomethacin on renal prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Quilley, C.P.; McGiff, J.C.; Quilley, J.

    1986-03-01

    Inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) excretion is not sustained during long-term aspirin administration. The authors compared the effects of 9d treatment of SHR rats with aspirin (A), 200 mg/kg/d s.c., flubiprofen (F), 2.5 mg/kg/12h s.c., and indomethacin (I), 2.5 mg/kg/12 s.c. on excretion of radioimmunoassayable PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C) arachidonic acid (AA) by renal papillae was also examined. In vehicle-treated control rats (C) PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ excretion varied from 32.2 +/- 6.2 (mean +/- SEM) to 41.6 +.- 7.3 ng/6h, 3-fold higher than that of PGE/sub 2/. Within 6h of administration all 3 drugs reduced excretion of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ to less than 20% and 35% of C rats. Although urinary concentrations of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ in A-treated rats remained depressed, a 2-fold increase in urine volume resulted in excretion rates similar to C rats. In contrast, urine volume in I- and F-treated rats was unaffected while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ excretion rates in I-treated rats were 50''% of C rats and were also lower than control in F-treated rats. Paradoxically, metabolism of AA to PGs by by renal papillae dissected on day 10, 2-4h after the last drug dose, was markedly inhibited by A (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ by 62% and PGE/sub 2/ by 82%), but unaffected by I and F. As the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors differ on in vivo and indices of PG production, their intended action should be verified by measuring PG levels in biological fluids.

  6. Effects of food on pharmacokinetics of immediate release oral formulations of aspirin, dipyrone, paracetamol and NSAIDs – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Robert Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Straube, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Aims It is common to advise that analgesics, and especially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), be taken with food to reduce unwanted gastrointestinal adverse effects. The efficacy of single dose analgesics depends on producing high, early, plasma concentrations; food may interfere with this. This review sought evidence from single dose pharmacokinetic studies on the extent and timing of peak plasma concentrations of analgesic drugs in the fed and fasting states. Methods A systematic review of comparisons of oral analgesics in fed and fasting states published to October 2014 reporting kinetic parameters of bioavailability, time to maximum plasma concentration (tmax), and its extent (Cmax) was conducted. Delayed-release formulations were not included. Results Bioavailability was not different between fasted and fed states. Food typically delayed absorption for all drugs where the fasting tmax was less than 4 h. For the common analgesics (aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, paracetamol) fed tmax was 1.30 to 2.80 times longer than fasted tmax. Cmax was typically reduced, with greater reduction seen with more rapid absorption (fed Cmax only 44–85% of the fasted Cmax for aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen and paracetamol). Conclusion There is evidence that high, early plasma concentrations produces better early pain relief, better overall pain relief, longer lasting pain relief and lower rates of remedication. Taking analgesics with food may make them less effective, resulting in greater population exposure. It may be time to rethink research priorities and advice to professionals, patients and the public. PMID:25784216

  7. Swelling and aspirin release study: cross-linked pH-sensitive vinyl acetate-co-acrylic acid (VAC-co-AA) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ranjha, Nazar Mohammad; Mudassir, Jahanzeb

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop new pH-sensitive hydrogels to deliver gastric mucosal irritating drugs to the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract. For this purpose, cross-linked vinyl acetate-co-acrylic acid (VAC-co-AA) hydrogels were synthesized by using N, N, methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAm) as a cross-linking agent. Different ratios of 90:10, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70, and 10:90 of VAC-co-AA were synthesized. All of the compositions were cross-linked using 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, and 0.60 mol percent MBAAm. Swelling and aspirin release were studied for 8 hour period. The drug release data were fitted into various kinetic models like the zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, and Peppas. Hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition to the above, these hydrogels were loaded with 2%, 8% and 14% w/v aspirin solutions, keeping the monomeric composition and degree of cross-linking constant. In conclusion, it can be said that aspirin can be successfully incorporated into cross-linked VAC/AA hydrogels and its swelling and drug release can be modulated by changing the mole fraction of the acid component in the gels.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, crystallographic studies and antibacterial assays of new copper(II) complexes with sulfathiazole and nimesulide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Julia Helena Bormio; de Paiva, Raphael Enoque Ferraz; Cuin, Alexandre; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria; Lustri, Wilton Rogério; Corbi, Pedro Paulo

    2016-05-01

    New ternary copper(II) complexes of sulfathiazole (SFT, C9H8N3O2S2) or nimesulide (NMS, C13H11N2O5S) and 2,2‧-bipyridine (bipy) were synthesized, and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic techniques. Elemental analyses indicated a 2:1:1 sulfonamide/copper/bipy composition for both complexes. Mass spectrometric measurements permitted identifying the molecular ions [Cu(SFT)2(bipy)+H]+ and [Cu(NMS)2(bipy)+H]+ at m/z 728 and 835, respectively, confirming the proposed compositions. Crystal structure of the [Cu(SFT)2(bipy)] complex was solved by powder X-ray diffraction analysis (PXRD), attesting that the Cu(II) ion is hexacoordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry. Each SFT molecule coordinates to the metal ion by the nitrogen atoms of the SO2-N group and of the heterocyclic ring. The coordination sphere is completed by a bipyridine. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out for the [Cu(NMS)2(bipy)] complex, indicating a tetragonal environment around the metal ion. It was suggested that NMS coordinates to Cu(II) by the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the SO2-N group, which was confirmed by infrared spectroscopic studies. Biological studies showed the antibacterial activity of both Cu-SFT and Cu-NMS complexes, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.10 to 0.84 mmol L-1 against Gram-negative bacteria for [Cu(SFT)2(bipy)], and from 1.50 to 3.00 mmol L-1 against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria for [Cu(NMS)2(bipy)].

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of nimesulide based new class of triazole derivatives as potential PDE4B inhibitors against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mareddy, Jyoti; Nallapati, Suresh Babu; Anireddy, Jayasree; Devi, Yumnam Priyadarshini; Mangamoori, Lakshmi Narasu; Kapavarapu, Ravikumar; Pal, Sarbani

    2013-12-15

    A new class of 1,2,3-triazol derivatives derived from nimesulide was designed as potential inhibitors of PDE4B. Synthesis of these compounds was carried out via a multi-step sequence consisting of copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) as a key step in aqueous media. The required azide was prepared via the reaction of aryl amine (obtained from nimesulide) with α-chloroacetyl chloride followed by displacing the α-chloro group by an azide. Some of the synthesized compounds showed encouraging PDE4B inhibitory properties in vitro that is >50% inhibition at 30 μM that were supported by the docking studies of these compounds at the active site of PDE4B enzyme (dock scores ~ -28.6 for a representative compound). Two of these PDE4 inhibitors showed promising cytotoxic properties against HCT-15 human colon cancer cells in vitro with IC50 ~ 21-22 μg/mL.

  10. N-(3-Arylaminopyridin-4-yl)alkanesulfonamides as pyridine analogs of nimesulide: cyclooxygenases inhibition, anti-inflammatory studies and insight on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-François; Lecomte, Frédéric; Hubert, Philippe; de Leval, Xavier; Pirotte, Bernard

    2014-03-03

    Nimesulide, a COX-2 preferential inhibitor with a favorable gastric and cardiovascular safety profile, was responsible for some cases of acute liver failure attributed to the nitrobenzene ring. A series of analogs of nimesulide resulting from isosteric replacement of the nitrobenzene ring by the pyridine nucleus, was synthesized and their ability to inhibit both cyclooxygenases (COXs) isoforms was evaluated in vitro using a human whole blood model. Compounds 19c, 23b and 23c displayed an important inhibitory activity associated to a COX-2/COX-1 selectivity ratio similar to or higher than that of celecoxib. The anti-inflammatory activity and the ability of several compounds to decrease leukocyte infiltration were further evaluated in vivo in a model of a λ carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Plasma assays were performed on blood samples collected from rats and allowed us to identify the 4-position of the phenyl ring as a major metabolism site explaining the occasionally observed lack of correlation between in vitro and in vivo results.

  11. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins. PMID:27441638

  12. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  13. Aspirin therapy and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Younis, Naveed; Williams, Steve; Soran, Handrean

    2009-11-01

    The benefits of aspirin therapy in reducing the subsequent risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death is well documented in individuals with cardiovascular disease including those with diabetes mellitus (DM). The evidence for aspirin use in primary prevention of cardiovascular events in DM is debatable and meta-analyses do not suggest a proven benefit. Despite the lack of evidence, low-dose aspirin therapy has been recommended by many current diabetes guidelines. This article reviews the results of two recently published large randomized clinical trials that have looked at primary prevention of cardiovascular events using aspirin in patients with DM.

  14. Aspirin-induced recurrent urticaria and recurrent angioedema in non-atopic children.

    PubMed

    Botey, J; Ibero, M; Malet, A; Marin, A; Eseverri, J L

    1984-09-01

    Recurrent urticaria and recurrent angioedema are frequent adverse reactions in non-atopic patients who do not tolerate aspirin. Of 1,632 infants and children who visited our allergy department for the first time, nine children (0.55%), five males and four females, presented recurrent urticaria or recurrent angioedema after taking aspirin. No evidence of atopy was disclosed either by clinical history (personal and family), skin testing, eosinophil levels or total IgE. Aspirin intolerance was established by oral challenge. Only three of the nine patients reported aspirin intolerance in their histories.

  15. Dental Extraction Can Be Performed Safely in Patients on Aspirin Therapy: A Timely Reminder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac patients on aspirin therapy may require extractions for their diseased teeth. It is a common practice among physicians and treating surgeons to stop aspirin prior to tooth extraction because of fear of bleeding complications. This practice often predisposes the patient to adverse thromboembolic events. This practice is based on theoretical risk of bleeding and on isolated case reports of excessive bleeding with aspirin therapy. The current consensus and recommendations are in favor of continuing aspirin therapy during simple tooth extraction as the bleeding complication incidence is very less and if it occurs can be controlled efficiently with local hemostasis measures. PMID:25093121

  16. Report: frequency of aspirin resistance in patients with coronory artery disease in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Naveed; Junaid, Ayesha; Khalid, Ayesha; Ahmed, Waqas; Shah, Mumtaz Ali; Rahman, Habibur

    2009-04-01

    Aspirin resistance is an emerging clinical entity. However the data available on aspirin resistance in Asian population is scarce. This study was initiated to prospectively evaluate the frequency of aspirin resistance in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) in Pakistan. A cross sectional prospective study was conducted in cardiology and hematology departments at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad from January to December 2007. Two hundred and fifty patients were enrolled from cardiology out patient department having met the specific inclusion criteria. Details were entered on a pre-designed questionnaire and aspirin response assay was performed on IMPACT-R (Dia Med AG 1785 Cressier Morat, Switzerland). Data was analyzed using SPSS V12. Aspirin resistance was observed in 12% of patients. 73.2% of study population were male and 26.8% were female, with a mean age of 57.2 years. There was no significant correlation of aspirin resistance with traditional risk factors like diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension or dyslipidemia. 84% of aspirin non responders were taking 75 mg per day and 16% were on 150 mg per day. A positive trend was noted between aspirin resistance and cigarette smoking. Aspirin resistance is a real phenomenon in Pakistani population with an estimated frequency of 12%. Large scale prospective randomized trials with long term follow up are needed to assess the impact of different doses and the clinical significance of this biochemical entity.

  17. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior heart attack: ticagrelor plus aspirin versus aspirin monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amico, Frank; Schlesinger, Alex; Mazzoni, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Bonaca MP, Bhatt DL, Cohen M, et al. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:1791-1800. This Practice Pearl reviews the recent study Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared With Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54 (PEGASUS-TIMI 54). It challenges the current standard of care of 12 months of dual antiplatelet followed by aspirin indefinitely. The study demonstrated that patients who received ticagrelor, either the 60 mg or 90 mg twice daily plus aspirin, showed a decreased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial also proved that the benefit of ticagrelor was seen early and continued to accrue over time, with a median of 33 months of follow-up, meaning that the benefit persists over time. It is important to note that both doses of the ticagrelor were associated with higher incidence of bleeding, but the rates of fatal bleeding did not show any difference between the ticagrelor or placebo.

  18. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Celecoxib, Mefenamic Acid, Aspirin and Indometacin on Several Cells Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda; Falsafi, Farideh; Tahmasebi Arashlo, Mehrnaz; Rajabalian, Saied; Gandjalikhan Nassab, Sayed Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors as chemotherapy agents has attracted the attention of a large number of investigators in recent years. Given the importance of cancer therapy, only a limited number of studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on specific cell lines. Purpose This research aimed to determine the in vitro cytotoxic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors) on KB, Saos-2, 1321N, U-87MG, SFBF-PI 39 cell lines. Materials and Method Powders of celecoxib, mefenamic acid, aspirin and indometacin were dissolved in the appropriate solvent. The viability of cell lines was carried out by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay technique. Data gathered from four separate experiments were expressed as mean±SD. Statistical significance was defined at p< 0.05 by using analysis of variance. Significant treatment mean values were subjected to post-hoc Tukey’s test. Results Celecoxib showed marked cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Celecoxib was not effective in killing U-87MG cell line. Mefenamic acid exerted cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, where the viability was approximately 75%. U-87MG cells were resistant to mefenamic acid. Indometacin had the highest rate of activity on U-87MG cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Aspirin did not exhibit any activity on these cell lines and was not effective in killing U-87MG, KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells. Conclusion This research showed that celecoxib, indometacin, and mefenamic acid have the cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, 1321N and U-87MG cell lines. Therefore, it appears that these drugs can be considered as anti-neoplastic agents in the experimental phase. PMID:27602398

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of a New Synthetic Aspirin-decursinol Adduct in Experimental Animal Models of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bich Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae-Chul; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hwang, In Koo; Choi, Jung Hoon; Park, Jeong Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul; Suh, Hong-Won; Jun, Jong-Gab; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Her, Song; Kim, Jin Su; Hyun, Byung-Hwa; Kim, Chul-Kyu; Cho, Jun Hwi; Lee, Choong Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death. Experimental animal models of cerebral ischemia are widely used for researching mechanisms of ischemic damage and developing new drugs for the prevention and treatment of stroke. The present study aimed to comparatively investigate neuroprotective effects of aspirin (ASA), decursinol (DA) and new synthetic aspirin-decursinol adduct (ASA-DA) against transient focal and global cerebral ischemic damage. We found that treatment with 20 mg/kg, not 10 mg/kg, ASA-DA protected against ischemia-induced neuronal death after transient focal and global ischemic damage, and its neuroprotective effect was much better than that of ASA or DA alone. In addition, 20 mg/kg ASA-DA treatment reduced the ischemia-induced gliosis and maintained antioxidants levels in the corresponding injury regions. In brief, ASA-DA, a new synthetic drug, dramatically protected neurons from ischemic damage, and neuroprotective effects of ASA-DA may be closely related to the attenuation of ischemia-induced gliosis and maintenance of antioxidants. PMID:24073226

  20. Aspirin Resistance Predicts Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasala, Tilak; Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Waheed, Rehan; Sengodan, Prasanna; Alexander, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular death in patients who have symptomatic peripheral artery disease. However, a subset of patients who take aspirin continues to have recurrent cardiovascular events. There are few data on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease who manifest aspirin resistance. Patients with peripheral artery disease on long-term aspirin therapy (≥4 wk) were tested for aspirin responsiveness by means of the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. The mean follow-up duration was 22.6 ± 8.3 months. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Secondary endpoints were the incidence of vascular interventions (surgical or percutaneous), or of amputation or gangrene caused by vascular disease. Of the 120 patients enrolled in the study, 31 (25.8%) were aspirin-resistant and 89 (74.2%) were aspirin-responsive. The primary endpoint occurred in 10 (32.3%) patients in the aspirin-resistant group and in 13 (14.6%) patients in the aspirin-responsive group (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–5.66; P=0.03). There was no significant difference in the secondary outcome of revascularization or tissue loss. By multivariate analysis, aspirin resistance and history of chronic kidney disease were the only independent predictors of long-term adverse cardiovascular events. Aspirin resistance is highly prevalent in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease and is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular risk. Whether intervening in these patients with additional antiplatelet therapies would improve outcomes needs to be explored. PMID:28100965

  1. Case-control Study of Aspirin Use and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, Samantha A.; Yu, Herbert; Lu, Lingeng; Kidd, Mark S.; Risch, Harvey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreas-cancer prognosis is dismal, with 5-year survival less than 5%. Significant relationships between aspirin use and decreased pancreas-cancer incidence and mortality have been shown in four of 13 studies. Methods To evaluate further a possible association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer, we used data from a population-based Connecticut study conducted from January 2005-August 2009, of 362 pancreas-cancer cases frequency matched to 690 randomly sampled controls. Results Overall, regular use of aspirin was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.52; 95% CI, 0.39–0.69). Increments of decreasing risk of pancreatic cancer were observed for each year of low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91–0.98 and OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96–1.01, respectively) and for increasing years in the past that low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use had started (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92–0.99 and OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96–1.00, respectively). Reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was seen in most categories of calendar time period of aspirin use, for both low-dose aspirin and regular-dose aspirin use. Relative to continuing use at the time of interview, termination of aspirin use within 2 years of interview was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR, 3.24; 95% CI, 1.58–6.65). Conclusions Our results provide some support that a daily aspirin regimen may reduce risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Impact Long-term aspirin use has benefits for both cardiovascular disease and cancer, but appreciable bleeding complications that necessitate risk-benefit analysis for individual applications. PMID:24969230

  2. Effect of Panax notoginseng saponins on the pharmacokinetics of aspirin in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhihao; Pang, Huanhuan; Du, Shouying; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Lin; Wu, Huichao; Guo, Shuang; Wang, Min; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is widely used to treat fever, pain, inflammation and cerebral infarction in clinic. Panax Notoginseng Saponins (PNS) is the extracts of Panax Notoginseng (PN)-a traditional Chinese medicine extensively used in cardiovascular diseases. Panax notoginseng saponins and ASA are both widely used to treat cerebral infarction in China. Good results in clinical practice have been achieved when the two drugs were taken together. To investigate the effect of PNS on ASA in vivo, the concentrations of salicylic acid (SA) in blood were measured after oral administration of ASA or ASA combined with PNS by UPLC-MS/MS. Sample preparation was carried out by the protein precipitation technique with an internal Saikosaponin A standard. The separation of two components was achieved by using an ACQUITY UPLC (®)BEH C18 Column (1.7μm 2.1×100mm) by gradient elution using water (containing 0.2% formic acid) and acetonitrile (containing 0.2% formic acid) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by using non-compartmental analysis. The results suggested that drug-drug interaction in vivo existed between PNS and ASA. The concentration of the SA was increasing when the two drugs were administered together. The transport of ASA and SA in MDCK -MDR1 cell monolayer was used to verify this conclusion. The values of apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) were significantly increased when the two drugs were used together. This result suggested PNS could increase the gastrointestinal tract absorption of ASA and SA. These findings provide more insight for wise use of two drugs to treat or prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Studies on Aspirin Crystals Generated by a Modified Vapor Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit; Malhotra, Deepak; Jain, Preeti; Kalia, Anupama; Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the current investigation were (1) to study the influence of selected two different non-solvents (diethylether and dichloromethane) on the drug crystal formation of a model drug, aspirin (ASP-I) by the modified vapor diffusion method and (2) to characterize and compare the generated crystals (ASP-II and ASP-III) using different analytical techniques with that of unprocessed ASP-I. When compared to the classical vapor diffusion method which consumes about 15 days to generate drug crystals, the modified method needs only 12 h to get the same. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that the internal structures of ASP-II and ASP-III crystals were identical when compared with ASP-I. Although the drug crystals showed a close similarity in X-ray diffraction patterns, the difference in the relative intensities of some of the diffraction peaks (especially at 2θ values of around 7.7 and 15.5) could be attributed to the crystal habit or crystal size modification. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study speculates that only the crystal habit modifications might occur but without involving any change in internal structure of the generated drug polymorphic form I. This is further substantiated from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures that indicated the formation of platy shape for the ASP-II crystals and needle shape for the ASP-III crystals. In addition, the observed slow dissolution of ASP crystals should indicate polymorph form I formation. Thus, the modified vapor diffusion method could routinely be used to screen and legally secure all possible forms of other drug entities too.

  4. Aspirin induces cell death and caspase-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, E; Dalmau, M; Barragán, M; Pueyo, G; Bartrons, R; Gil, J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of cell death by aspirin was analysed in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. Aspirin induced two hallmarks of apoptosis: nuclear chromatin condensation and increase in phosphatidylserine externalization. However, aspirin did not induce either oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA, decrease in DNA content or nuclear fragmentation. The effect of aspirin on Annexin V binding was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases in the apoptotic action of aspirin. However, aspirin did not induce proteolysis of PARP, suggesting that aspirin does not increase nuclear caspase 3-like activity in HT-29 cells. This finding may be related with the ‘atypical’ features of aspirin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496355

  5. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    PubMed Central

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC in vitro and in vivo. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, dexamethasone, meclofenamic acid, flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid were tested in UCC HeLa, VIPA, INBL and SiHa cell lines. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was evaluated in vitro. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid presented with slight to moderate toxicity (10–40% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM) in certain cell lines, while meclofenamic acid exhibited significant cytotoxicity in all essayed cell lines (50–90% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM). The meclofenamic acid was tested in murine models (immunodeficient and immunocompetent) of UCC, which manifested a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased mouse survival. It was demonstrated that of the evaluated anti-inflammatory drugs, meclofenamic acid was the most cytotoxic, with a significant antitumor effect in murine models. Subsequent studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of this drug. PMID:26622892

  6. Evaluation of the stability of aspirin in solid state by the programmed humidifying and non-isothermal experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Li; Zhan, Xian-Cheng; Tao, Jian-Lin

    2008-03-01

    The influence of both moisture and heat on the stability of aspirin was investigated by a single pair of experiments, one with programmed humidity control and the other non-isothermal, rather than many standard isothermal studies, each at constant relative humidity. In experiments, we adopted the acid-base back titration method to measure the content of aspirin in the presence of its degradation products. It was found that the degradation of aspirin could be expressed as ln[(c0-c)/c]=kt+D, where D was a lag time item not related to humidity and temperature. The relationship between the degradation rate constant k and humidity Hr) and temperature T could be described as Arrhenius equation multiplied by an exponential item of relative humidity: k = A . exp(mHr) . exp(-(Ea/RT)), where A, Ea and m were the pre-exponential factor, observed activation energy, and a parameter related to humidity, respectively. The results obtained from the programmed humidifying and non-isothermal experiments, A=(1.09+/-2.04)x10(12) h(-1), Ea=(93.5+/-2.2) kJ . mol(-1) and m=1.18+/-0.19, were comparable to those from isothermal studies at constant humidity, A=(1.71+/-0.35)x10(12) h(-1), Ea=(94.9+/-0.7) kJ . mol(-1) and m=1.20+/-0.02. Since the programmed humidifying and non-isothermal experiments save time, labor and materials, it is suggested that the new experimental method can be used to investigate the stability of drugs unstable to both moisture and heat, instead of many classical isothermal experiments at constant humidity.

  7. Selective inhibition by aspirin and naproxen of mainstream cigarette smoke-induced genotoxicity and lung tumors in female mice.

    PubMed

    Balansky, Roumen; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; D'Oria, Chiara; Steele, Vernon E; De Flora, Silvio

    2016-05-01

    The role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in smoke-related lung carcinogenesis is still controversial. We have developed and validated a murine model for evaluating the tumorigenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) and its modulation by chemopreventive agents. In the present study, the protective effects of the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and naproxen were investigated by using a total of 277 Swiss H neonatal mice of both genders. Groups of mice were exposed whole-body to MCS during the first 4 months of life, followed by an additional 3.5 months in filtered air in order to allow a better growth of tumors. Aspirin (1600 mg/kg diet) and naproxen (320 mg/kg diet) were given after weanling until the end of the experiment. After 4 months of exposure, MCS significantly enhanced the frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of mice, and naproxen prevented such systemic genotoxic damage in female mice. After 7.5 months, exposure of mice to MCS resulted in the formation of lung tumors, both benign and malignant, and in several other histopathological lesions detectable both in the respiratory tract and in the urinary tract. Aspirin and, even more sharply, naproxen significantly inhibited the formation of lung tumors in MCS-exposed mice, but this protective effect selectively occurred in female mice only. These results lend support to the views that estrogens are involved in smoke-related pulmonary carcinogenesis and that NSAIDs have antiestrogenic properties. The two NSAIDs proved to be safe and efficacious in the experimental model used.

  8. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  9. Activation of activator protein 2 alpha by aspirin alleviates atherosclerotic plaque growth and instability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Jing; Li, Peng; Wang, Fu; Liang, Wen-Jing; Ma, Hui; Chen, Yuan; Ma, Zhi-Min; Li, Quan-Zhong; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Aims Aspirin has been used for the secondary prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease for several decades. We investigated the roles of transcriptional factor activator protein 2α (AP-2α) in the beneficial effects of aspirin in the growth and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque. Methods and Results In mice deficient of apolipoprotein E (Apoe-/-), aspirin (20, 50 mg/kg/day) suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis in aortic roots and increased the plaque stability in carotid atherosclerotic plaques induced by collar-placement. In vivo lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of AP-2α reversed the inhibitory effects of aspirin on atherosclerosis in Apoe-/- mice. Mechanically, aspirin increased AP-2α phosphorylation and its activity, upregulated IkBα mRNA and protein levels, and reduced oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, deficiency of AP-2α completely abolished aspirin-induced upregulation of IkBα levels and inhibition of oxidative stress in Apoe-/- mice. Clinically, conventional doses of aspirin increased AP-2α phosphorylation and IkBα protein expression in humans subjects. Conclusion Aspirin activates AP-2α to upregulate IkBα gene expression, resulting in attenuations of plaque development and instability in atherosclerosis. PMID:27391154

  10. A study into the genetic basis of aspirin resistance in Pakistani patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Mukarram, Osama; Akhtar, Naveed; Junaid, Ayesha; Mohyuddin, Aisha

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin is a key player in the management and prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction in patients with atherothrombosis. About 12% of Pakistanis suffering from coronary artery disease are resistant to aspirin's effects. Clinical, biochemical and genetic factors are known to be responsible for this phenomenon. We conducted this study to investigate whether previously studied polymorphisms in COX-1, GPIIIa, GPIa and P2RYI genes could be the cause of aspirin resistance in our population. Blood samples were collected from 29 aspirin non-responders and 60 ethnically matched responders. Aspirin response assay was performed on IMPACT-R and DNA prepared from blood using the phenol: chloroform method. Genotyping was carried out for four SNPS including COX-1 C50T (rs3842787), GPIIIA PIA1/A2 polymorphism (rs5918), GPIA C807T (rs1126643) and p2RY1 C893T (rs1065776). No statistically significant differences were observed in the allele or genotype frequencies between the aspirin non responders and responders indicating the possible involvement of different genetic determinants of aspirin resistance in our population. This study paves the way for further research into the field of aspirin resistance in Pakistan.

  11. Aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bell, David S H

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes imparts a substantial increased risk for cardiovascular disease-related mortality and morbidity. Because of this, current medical guidelines recommend prophylactic treatment with once-daily, low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular (CV) events in high-risk patients. However, only modest reductions in CV events and mortality have been observed with once-daily aspirin treatment in patients with diabetes, including patients with a previous CV event, perhaps because of disparity between aspirin pharmacokinetics and diabetes-related platelet abnormalities. Once-daily aspirin irreversibly inactivates platelets for only a short duration (acetylsalicylic acid half-life, approximately 15-20 minutes), after which time newly generated, active platelets enter the circulation and weaken aspirin's effect. Platelets from patients with diabetes are more reactive and are turned over more rapidly than platelets from normal individuals; the short inhibitory window provided by once-daily aspirin may therefore be insufficient to provide 24-h protection against CV events. Alternative conventional aspirin regimens (e.g. higher daily dose, twice-daily dosing, combination with clopidogrel) and newer formulations (e.g. 24-h, extended-release) have been proposed to overcome the apparent limited efficacy of conventional aspirin in patients with diabetes; however, tolerability concerns and limited clinical efficacy data need to be taken into account when considering the use of such regimens.

  12. Aspirin-intolerant asthma: a comprehensive review of biomarkers and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan R; Teran, Luis M

    2013-08-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is a tetrad of nasal polyps, chronic hypertrophic eosinophilic sinusitis, asthma, and sensitivity to aspirin. Unawareness of this clinical condition by patients and physicians may have grave consequences because of its association with near-fatal asthma. The pathogenesis of aspirin-intolerant asthma is not related with an immunoglobin E mechanism, but with an abnormal metabolism of the lipoxygenase (LO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways. At present, a diagnosis of aspirin sensitivity can be established only by provocative aspirin challenge, which represents a health risk for the patient. This circumstance has encouraged the search for aspirin intolerance-specific biomarkers. Major attempts have focused on mediators related with inflammation and eicosanoid regulation. The use of modern laboratory techniques including high-throughput methods has facilitated the detection of dozens of biological metabolites associated with aspirin-intolerant asthma disease. Not surprisingly, the majority of these is implicated in the LO and COX pathways. However, substantial amounts of data reveal the participation of many genes deriving from different ontologies. Biomarkers may represent a powerful, noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of aspirin sensitivity; moreover, they could provide a new way to classify asthma phenotypes.

  13. Aspirin and Zileuton and Biomarker Expression in Nasal Tissue of Current Smokers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies the effects of aspirin and zileuton on genes related to tobacco use in current smokers. Aspirin and zileuton may interfere with genes related to tobacco use and may be useful in preventing lung cancer in current smokers. |

  14. Aspirin use and risk of type 2 diabetes in apparently healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Hayashino, Yasuaki; Hennekens, Charles H.; Kurth, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data on aspirin use and the risk of diabetes are limited. The Physician’s Health Study has accumulated 22 years of follow-up data, including 5 years of randomized data, from 22,071 apparently healthy men. Methods and results At baseline and in yearly follow-up questionnaires, participants self-reported a history of diabetes, aspirin use and various lifestyle factors. To evaluate the association between aspirin use and risk of subsequent diabetes, we used a Cox-proportional hazards model with time-varying regression coefficients. During the 22 follow-up years, 1719 cases of diabetes were reported. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of developing diabetes was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77–0.97) for those who self-selected any aspirin. During the 5 years of randomized treatment, 318 cases of diabetes were observed, with an HR of 0.91 (95%CI, 0.73–1.14) for those randomized to aspirin. Conclusions Our data suggest a small but not significant decrease in the risk of diabetes during 5 years of randomized comparison of 325 mg of aspirin every other day. This trend was continued during 22 years of follow-up, indicating that self-selection of any use of aspirin is associated with a significant, approximately 14% decrease in the risk of diabetes. Decreased risk of type 2 diabetes may be added to the list of the clinical benefits of aspirin. PMID:19233341

  15. Reduction of bacterial titers by low-dose aspirin in experimental aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, D P; Freeman, C D; Nightingale, C H; Quintiliani, R; Coe, C J; Maderazo, E G; Cooper, B W

    1993-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis, we studied the effects of aspirin on the natural progression of this infection. Compared with untreated animals, the aspirin-treated animals showed a 30% (P = 0.11) reduction in the weight of the vegetations and an 84% (P = 0.03) reduction in the bacterial titer of the vegetations. PMID:8454370

  16. The effects of enteric coating of aspirin tablets on occult gastrointestinal blood loss.

    PubMed

    Howe, G B; Champion, G D; Corrigan, A B; Hewson, J; Haski, A; Day, R O; Paull, P D; Graham, G G

    1977-12-01

    The effect of enteric coating of aspirin tablets on the gastrointestinal blood loss associated with high dose aspirin therapy was investigated in 12 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Occult blood loss was measured after labelling the patients' red blood cells with Cr51. Three salicylate preparations were used: enteric coated tablets of aspirin ("Rhusal", G.P. Laboratories, 7 x 650 mg per day), uncoated tablet cores of aspirin from the same batch (7 x 650 mg per day) and enteric coated tablets of sodium salicylate (7 x 600 mg and 1 x 300 mg per day). Daily blood loss during a salicylate-free period was (0.7 +/- 0.15 ml, mean +/- SE). Blood loss was significantly increased during dosage with all three salicylate preparations. Daily blood loss during dosage with the uncoated tablets of aspirin (5.3 +/- 0.3 ml) was significantly greater than during dosage with the enteric coated tablets of aspirin (2.3 +/- 0.3 ml) and enteric coated tablets of sodium salicylate (2.1 +/- 0.4 ml). The bioavailability of the salicylate preparations was studied in seven of the 12 patients. Mean plasma salicylate concentration two hours after the second daily dose during dosage with the enteric coated tablets of aspirin was 118 +/- 15 microgram/ml compared to 131 +/- 16 microgram/ml during dosage with the uncoated tablets. Urinary recoveries of the daily dosage of aspirin in the two formulations were also similar.

  17. Molecular Pathways: Aspirin and Wnt Signaling—A Molecularly Targeted Approach to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish K.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin have resulted in its widespread use as an analgesic, anti-pyretic, and cardioprotective agent. Beyond these applications, multiple observational studies and randomized controlled trials have demonstrated a chemopreventative role for aspirin, particularly in the development of colorectal neoplasia. Given the critical importance of Wnt dysregulation in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interplay between aspirin and canonical Wnt signaling has become a focus of investigation. These studies have illuminated our understanding of the anti-cancer mechanisms of aspirin, yielding the identification of potential biomarkers for which aspirin's chemopreventative efficacy can be safely optimized into routine clinical practice and providing leads into the discovery of novel preventive and therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize key experimental and clinical studies of this interaction, as well as highlight future strategies to advance their clinical translation. PMID:25501125

  18. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible.

  19. Use of aspirin for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients in an ambulatory care setting in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Rejas-Gutiérrez, Javier; Fernández-de-Bobadilla, Jaime; Frías-Garrido, Xavier; Ruiz-Riera, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Background This study was conducted in order to determine the use of aspirin and to assess the achievement of therapeutic targets in diabetic patients according to primary (PP) or secondary prevention (SP). Methods This is a retrospective, observational study including patients ≥18 years with diabetes mellitus followed in four primary care centers. Measurements included demographics, use of aspirin and/or anticoagulant drugs, co-morbidities, clinical parameters and proportion of patient at therapeutic target (TT). Descriptive statistics, chi-square test and logistic regression model were used for significance. Results A total of 4,140 patients were analyzed, 79.1% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 77.7–80.5%) in PP and 20.9% (95% CI: 18.2–23.7%) in SP. Mean age was 64.1 (13.8) years, and 49.3% of patient were men (PP: 46.3, SP: 60.7, p = 0.001). Aspirin was prescribed routinely in 20.8% (95% CI: 19.4–22.2%) in PP and 60.8% (95% CI: 57.6–64.0%) in SP. Proportion of patient at TT was 48.0% for blood pressure and 59.8% for cholesterol. Use of aspirin was associated to increased age [OR = 1.01 (95% CI: 1.00–1.02); p = 0.011], cardiovascular-risk factors [OR = 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03–1.27); p = 0.013], LDL-C [OR = 1.42 (95% CI: 1.06–1.88); p = 0.017] and higher glycated hemoglobin [OR = 1.51 (95% CI: 1.22–1.89); p = 0.000] were covariates associated to the use of aspirin in PP. Conclusion Treatment with aspirin is underused for PP in patients with diabetes mellitus in Primary Care. Achievement of TT should be improved. PMID:17941978

  20. The Use of Drugs in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Steven

    Indications, precautions, contraindications, and side effects of drugs most frequently used by athletic trainers in treating injuries are discussed: (1) aspirin; (2) arylalkanoic derivatives; (3) butazolidin and tandearil; (4) corticosteroids; (5) oral corticosteroids; (6) muscle relaxants; (7) analgesics; (8) cold medications; (9) antidiarrheal…

  1. Effect of dietary aspirin on ascites in broilers raised in a hypobaric chamber.

    PubMed

    Balog, J M; Huff, G R; Rath, N C; Huff, W E

    2000-08-01

    During the course of ascites development in broilers, many factors can interact to cause hypoxia. To counteract hypoxia, birds with ascites develop greatly increased hematocrit and red cell counts. Increasing hematocrits result in more viscous blood. Prostaglandins are involved in the regulation of constriction and dilation of pulmonary blood vessels and in the formation of blood clots. Dietary aspirin, a prostaglandin inhibitor, was used in an attempt to promote vasodilation and inhibit blood clotting in broilers, with the objective of determining the effect of aspirin on ascites progression. The experimental design consisted of two trials with a total of 1,360, 1-d-old male broiler chicks, which were placed at either local altitude (390 m above sea level) or in a hypobaric chamber that simulated an altitude of 2,900 m above sea level. At each elevation, five dietary treatments were employed: [control, 0.025% crystalline acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), 0.05% aspirin, 0.10% aspirin, and 0.20% aspirin]. Bird and feed weights were recorded weekly. At the end of 5 wk, blood samples and organ weights were collected, and all birds were examined for signs of ascites. In both trials, birds raised at high altitudes were significantly lighter, had a higher incidence of ascites, and had differences in hematology, compared with birds raised at local elevation. Only in Trial 2, however, did dietary aspirin appear to have any effect on ascites incidence. At the 0.20% aspirin level, a reduction in ascites incidence approached significance compared with controls (34% vs. 56%, P < or = 0.06). Unfortunately, birds fed 0.20% aspirin also were significantly (P < or = 0.01) lighter than controls. Because slowing growth rate is known to reduce ascites, this decrease in BW may have been partially responsible for any beneficial effect on ascites development and progression obtained through feeding aspirin.

  2. Prediagnosis aspirin use and outcomes in a prospective cohort of esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, James L.; Altorki, Nasser K.; Sonett, Joshua R.; Rodriguez, Adriana; Sungur-Stasik, Kivilcim; Spinelli, Cathy F.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Esophageal cancer remains associated with poor outcomes, yet little is known regarding factors that influence survival. Aspirin use prior to cancer diagnosis may influence outcomes. We aimed to assess the effects of prediagnosis aspirin use in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of newly-diagnosed esophageal cancer patients at two tertiary care centers. We assessed history of prediagnosis aspirin use, and prospectively followed patients and assessed mortality, cause of death, and development of metastases. Results: We enrolled 130 patients, the majority of whom were male (81.5%) and had adenocarcinoma (80.8%). Overall, 57 patients (43.9%) were regular aspirin users. In unadjusted analyses, we found no difference in all-cause mortality between aspirin users and nonusers. In multivariate analyses, prediagnosis aspirin use was not associated with all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48–1.57] or esophageal cancer-specific mortality (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.52–2.21). Prediagnosis aspirin use was associated with a significantly increased risk of interval metastasis (HR 3.59, 95% CI 1.08–11.96). Conclusions: In our cohort of esophageal cancer patients, prediagnosis aspirin use was not associated with all-cause or cancer-specific mortality. However, risk of interval metastatic disease was increased among those who took aspirin regularly prediagnosis. Future studies are warranted to assess whether aspirin influences the molecular characteristics of esophageal tumors, with potential prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27803735

  3. β-Cyclodextrin inclusion complex: preparation, characterization, and its aspirin release in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui-Yun; Jiang, Ling-Juan; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Jun-Bo

    2012-09-01

    In this work, the optimal clathration condition was investigated for the preparation of aspirin-β-cyclodextrin (Asp-β-CD) inclusion complex using design of experiment (DOE) methodology. A 3-level, 3-factor Box-Behnken design with a total of 17 experimental runs was used. The Asp-β-CD inclusion complex was prepared by saturated solution method. The influence on the embedding rate was investigated, including molar ratio of β-CD to Asp, clathration temperature and clathration time, and the optimum values of such three test variables were found to be 0.82, 49°C and 2.0 h, respectively. The embedding rate could be up to 61.19%. The formation of the bonding between -COOH group of Asp and O-H group of β-CD might play an important role in the process of clathration according to FT-IR spectra. Release kinetics of Asp from inclusion complex was studied for the evaluation of drug release mechanism and diffusion coefficients. The results showed that the drug release from matrix occurred through Fickian diffusion mechanism. The cumulative release of Asp reached only 40% over 24 h, so the inclusion complex could potentially be applied as a long-acting delivery system.

  4. Antiplatelet Agents in Cardiology: A Report on Aspirin, Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, and Ticagrelor.

    PubMed

    Dobesh, Paul P; Varnado, Sara; Doyle, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstone of therapy in many cardiovascular conditions. With the current success and increased use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the use of antiplatelet therapy is considered part of the medical therapy for these patients. Clinicians caring for these patients need to have a thorough understanding of the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic, and clinical efficacy and safety of commonly used antiplatelet therapy. While aspirin therapy is widely used, dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel has become part of standard of care. Despite the extensive experience with clopidogrel, there are limitations such as drug interactions, metabolism genetic polymorphisms, and variability in the antiplatelet response. More predictable and more potent antiplatelet agents, prasugrel and ticagrelor, have demonstrated superior reductions in ischemic endpoints as part of dual antiplatelet therapy compared to clopidogrel, but at the cost of more major bleeding in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Significant research needs to be conducted in the setting of TAVI to help define the optimal antiplatelet regimen.

  5. Thumbnail Sketches: Consumer Application of Chemical Principles: Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John W.; Jones, Susan M.

    1985-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry can be made more meaningful to beginning students by using familiar drugs as examples. They include: (1) drugs (nicotine, cocaine, and aspirin); (2) general anesthesia (nitrous oxide, enflurane, isoflurane, and halothane); (3) local anesthetics (procaine, lidocaine, and cocaine); and (4) intravenous anesthetics (thiopental,…

  6. Resveratrol and aspirin eliminate tetraploid cells for anticancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Lissa, Delphine; Senovilla, Laura; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Vitale, Ilio; Michaud, Mickaël; Pietrocola, Federico; Boilève, Alice; Obrist, Florine; Bordenave, Chloé; Garcia, Pauline; Michels, Judith; Jemaà, Mohamed; Kepp, Oliver; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-02-25

    Tetraploidy constitutes a genomically metastable state that can lead to aneuploidy and genomic instability. Tetraploid cells are frequently found in preneoplastic lesions, including intestinal cancers arising due to the inactivation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Using a phenotypic screen, we identified resveratrol as an agent that selectively reduces the fitness of tetraploid cells by slowing down their cell cycle progression and by stimulating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Selective killing of tetraploid cells was observed for a series of additional agents that indirectly or directly stimulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) including salicylate, whose chemopreventive action has been established by epidemiological studies and clinical trials. Both resveratrol and salicylate reduced the formation of tetraploid or higher-order polyploid cells resulting from the culture of human colon carcinoma cell lines or primary mouse epithelial cells lacking tumor protein p53 (TP53, best known as p53) in the presence of antimitotic agents, as determined by cytofluorometric and videomicroscopic assays. Moreover, oral treatment with either resveratrol or aspirin, the prodrug of salicylate, repressed the accumulation of tetraploid intestinal epithelial cells in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model of colon cancer. Collectively, our results suggest that the chemopreventive action of resveratrol and aspirin involves the elimination of tetraploid cancer cell precursors.

  7. Total organic carbon method for aspirin cleaning validation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A J; Vanderwielen, A J

    1997-01-01

    Cleaning validation is the process of assuring that cleaning procedures effectively remove the residue from manufacturing equipment/facilities below a predetermined level. This is necessary to assure the quality of future products using the equipment, to prevent cross-contamination, and as a World Health Organization Good Manufacturing Practices requirement. We have applied the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analysis method to a number of pharmaceutical products. In this article we discuss the TOC method that we developed for measuring residual aspirin on aluminum, stainless steel, painted carbon steel, and plexiglass. These are all surfaces that are commonly found as part of pharmaceutical production equipment. The method offers low detection capability (parts per million levels) and rapid sample analysis time. The recovery values ranged from 25% for aluminum to about 75% for plexiglass with a precision of 13% or less. The results for the plexiglass tended to vary with the age of the surface making the determination of an accurate recovery value difficult for this type of surface. We found that the TOC method is applicable for determining residual aspirin on pharmaceutical surfaces and will be useful for cleaning validation.

  8. Can Aspirin and Cancer Prevention be Ageless Companions?

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the rate of cancer diagnosis has increased worldwide due to the increase in population and average life expectancy, and also, due to the advances in diagnostic medical technology that facilitate early cancer detection and recognition. Nonetheless, the treatment options have not been developed proportional to this increase, with a huge number of patients frequently being diagnosed with different types of fatal cancer. This has prompted different health organizations to search for novel strategies to prevent cancer, or even halt its progression. Having failed to provide optimum vascular protection benefits, especially with the introduction of relatively superior antiplatelets, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors; clopidogrel and ticagrelor, regular aspirin use was proposed to reduce the risk of common cancers like colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer and haematological malignancies, as suggested by epidemiological studies. However, it is difficult to draw any firm conclusions on such weak data, as this could raise false hopes among patients and physicians and could potentially mislead scientific research. Clearly, current evidence highlights a gap in medical research and emphasizes the need to carry out interventional studies in high risk for cancer patients using specific aspirin doses in order to validate the data. This should also shed some light on the risk-benefit profile in view of the potential for bleeding complications, especially with the higher doses.

  9. Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kirthi, Varo; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 10 March 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using aspirin to treat a discrete migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Thirteen studies (4222 participants) compared aspirin 900 mg or 1000 mg, alone or in combination with metoclopramide 10 mg, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 50 mg or 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes, all active treatments were superior to placebo, with NNTs of 8.1, 4.9 and 6.6 for 2-hour pain-free, 2-hour headache relief, and 24-hour headache relief with aspirin alone versus placebo, and 8.8, 3.3 and 6.2 with aspirin plus metoclopramide versus placebo. Sumatriptan 50 mg did not differ from aspirin alone for 2-hour pain-free and headache relief, while sumatriptan 100 mg was better than the combination of aspirin plus metoclopramide for 2-hour pain-free, but not headache relief; there were no data for 24-hour headache relief. Associated symptoms of nausea, vomiting

  10. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  11. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine.

  12. [Case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis diagnosed by the provocation test with cuttlefish after the pretreatment with 1.5 g of aspirin].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuko; Inomata, Naoko; Okawa, Tomoko; Maeda, Nobuko; Kirino, Mio; Shiomi, Kazuo; Ikezawa, Zenro

    2010-12-01

    A 29-year-old woman had an episode of urticaria at the age of 17 while exercising after eating fried cuttlefish. For years thereafter, she experienced several episodes of urticaria after eating seafood. At the age of 29, she ate grilled seafood, including cuttlefish for supper after taking loxoprofen for lumbago. One hour later, she developed generalized urticaria accompanied by nausea, abdominal pain, swelling of the lips, and dyspnea while walking; she was taken to a hospital. She was then referred to us for further examination of the etiology of her anaphylactic reactions. The level of specific IgE measured using Immuno CAP was negative for all kinds of foods, including cuttlefish. However, a skin prick test was positive for raw and cooked cuttlefish. Provocation tests were performed on admission by combining the intake of cuttlefish and aspirin under the suspicion of cuttlefish allergy enhanced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and exercise. As a result, she developed no symptoms except for slight itching of the oral mucosa after eating 20 g or 100 g of cuttlefish with or without concomitant administration of 0.5 g of aspirin. Finally, generalized urticaria appeared after challenge with cuttlefish and 1.5 g of aspirin. She was diagnosed with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) caused by cuttlefish. She has not developed urticaria since she started to avoid eating cuttlefish. Our results indicated that in provocation tests for the diagnosis of FDEIA, allergic reactions could not only be induced by food intake but could also be enhanced by aspirin in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. Aspirin resistance is more common in lacunar strokes than embolic strokes and is related to stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Englyst, Nicola A; Horsfield, Gill; Kwan, Joseph; Byrne, Christopher D

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between aspirin resistance, ischaemic stroke subtype, stroke severity, and inflammatory cytokines. Aspirin resistance was assessed by thrombelastography in 45 people with ischaemic stroke and 25 controls. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 was measured. Stroke severity was assessed using the modified Rankin scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Score within 72 h of stroke. Aspirin resistance was more common in the stroke than the control group (67% versus 40%, P=0.028), and within the stroke group the aspirin-resistant group had a higher Rankin score (4.0 versus 2.0, P=0.013). Aspirin resistance was greater in lacunar than embolic strokes (platelet activation 79% versus 59%, P=0.020). The stroke aspirin-resistant group had higher levels of IL-6 than the stroke aspirin-sensitive group (2.4+/-1 versus 1.8+/-0.9 ng/mL, P=0.037). Using multivariate analysis, we examined the interrelationships between aspirin resistance, IL-6, and stroke severity. These analyses showed that IL-6 was independently associated with stroke severity as the outcome (B=3.738, P=0.036), and aspirin resistance was independently associated with IL-6 (B=0.765, P=0.005) as the outcome. In conclusion, aspirin resistance is related to stroke severity and aspirin resistance is more common in lacunar strokes than embolic strokes.

  14. Mutations in PIK3CA sensitize breast cancer cells to physiologic levels of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Sanja B; Najor, Matthew S; Ruby, Carl E; Cobleigh, Melody A; Abukhdeir, Abde M

    2016-02-01

    A review of the literature finds that women diagnosed with breast cancer, who were on an aspirin regimen, experienced a decreased risk of distant metastases and death. Several recent studies have reported an improvement in overall survival in colorectal cancer patients who harbored mutations in the oncogene PIK3CA and received a daily aspirin regimen. Breast cancer patients on a daily aspirin regimen experienced decreased risk of distant metastases and death. PIK3CA is the most frequently mutated oncogene in breast cancer, occurring in up to 45 % of all breast cancers. In order to determine if mutations in PIK3CA sensitized breast cancers to aspirin treatment, we employed the use of isogenic cellular clones of the non-tumorigenic, breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A that harbored mutations in either PIK3CA or KRAS or both. We report that mutations in both PIK3CA and KRAS are required for the greatest aspirin sensitivity in breast cancer, and that the GSK3β protein was hyperphosphorylated in aspirin-treated double knockin cells, but not in other clones/treatments. A more modest effect was observed with single mutant PIK3CA, but not KRAS alone. These observations were further confirmed in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Our findings provide the first evidence that mutations in PIK3CA sensitize breast cancer cells to aspirin.

  15. Luteolin supplementation adjacent to aspirin treatment reduced dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Osman, Neamt H A; Said, Usama Z; El-Waseef, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Esraa S A

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that aspirin is used in colon cancer treatment. However, long-term of Aspirin usage is limited to gastric and renal toxicity. Luteolin (LUT) has cancer prevention and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of LUT supplementation and Aspirin treatment in dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced carcinogenesis in rats. DMH (20 mg/kg BW/week) treated rats received gavages with Aspirin (50 mg/kg BW/week) and LUT (0.2 mg/kg BW/day) for 15 weeks. DMH injections induce colon polyps and renal bleeding, significantly increasing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxidative stress, and kidney function tests and reducing antioxidant markers. Either Aspirin or LUT gavages alone or combined produce a significant decrease in colon polyp number and size, significantly decreasing CEA, COX-2, and oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant markers. In conclusion, the supplementations of LUT adjacent to Aspirin in the treatment of DMH-induced carcinogenesis in rats reflect a better effect than the use of Aspirin alone.

  16. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in the elderly: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stephanie A; Demos, Lisa; Workman, Barbara; McNeil, John J

    2012-04-01

    The role of aspirin in the secondary prevention of occlusive cardiovascular events has now been well established. Given this, aspirin in primary prevention has been the focus of several large trials and subsequent meta-analyses over the past 3 decades, and yet the issue remains controversial. Recent studies in populations with high baseline risk - such as diabetics and those with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease - have not found the expected benefits of aspirin on cardiovascular endpoints, which contrasts with earlier studies that reported a reduced relative risk for outcomes such as myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke, but not for mortality. Furthermore, in healthy populations, the absolute risk reduction conferred by aspirin is small and needs to be balanced against the risk of a major haemorrhage. Older adults have a higher risk for cardiovascular events and therefore might represent the group in which aspirin for primary prevention could deliver the greatest absolute benefit, yet at the same time, the elderly bear an increased vulnerability to major haemorrhage, including haemorrhagic stroke. It is also not known whether older adults experience the same risk reduction from aspirin as middle-aged individuals. The current evidence base does not sufficiently clarify whether aspirin for primary prevention confers a meaningful net benefit in the elderly.

  17. Antiplatelet Drugs: Mechanisms and Risks of Bleeding Following Cardiac Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Saha, Sibu P.

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative antiplatelet drug use is common in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The impact of these drugs on bleeding and blood transfusion varies. We hypothesize that review of available evidence regarding drug-related bleeding risk, underlying mechanisms of platelet dysfunction, and variations in patient response to antiplatelet drugs will aid surgeons as they assess preoperative risk and attempt to limit perioperative bleeding. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine the role that antiplatelet drugs play in excessive postoperative blood transfusion, (2) identify possible mechanisms to explain patient response to antiplatelet drugs, and (3) formulate a strategy to limit excessive blood product usage in these patients. We reviewed available published evidence regarding bleeding risk in patients taking preoperative antiplatelet drugs. In addition, we summarized our previous research into mechanisms of antiplatelet drug-related platelet dysfunction. Aspirin users have a slight but significant increase in blood product usage after CABG (0.5 U of nonautologous blood per treated patient). Platelet adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors are more potent antiplatelet drugs than aspirin but have a half-life similar to aspirin, around 5 to 10 days. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons guidelines recommend discontinuation, if possible, of ADP inhibitors 5 to 7 days before operation because of excessive bleeding risk, whereas aspirin should be continued during the entire perioperative period in most patients. Individual variability in response to aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs is common with both hyper- and hyporesponsiveness seen in 5 to 25% of patients. Use of preoperative antiplatelet drugs is a risk factor for increased perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion. Point-of-care tests can identify patients at high risk for perioperative bleeding and blood

  18. Quinone-induced activation of Keap1/Nrf2 signaling by aspirin prodrugs masquerading as nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Tareisha; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C; Wijewickrama, Gihani T; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Vanni, Michael; Litosh, Vladislav; Luo, Jia; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2012-12-17

    The promising therapeutic potential of the NO-donating hybrid aspirin prodrugs (NO-ASA) includes induction of chemopreventive mechanisms and has been reported in almost 100 publications. One example, NCX-4040 (pNO-ASA), is bioactivated by esterase to a quinone methide (QM) electrophile. In cell cultures, pNO-ASA and QM-donating X-ASA prodrugs that cannot release NO rapidly depleted intracellular GSH and caused DNA damage; however, induction of Nrf2 signaling elicited cellular defense mechanisms including upregulation of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL). In HepG2 cells, the "NO-specific" 4,5-diaminofluorescein reporter, DAF-DA, responded to NO-ASA and X-ASA, with QM-induced oxidative stress masquerading as NO. LC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated efficient alkylation of Cys residues of proteins including glutathione-S-transferase-P1 (GST-P1) and Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1). Evidence was obtained for alkylation of Keap1 Cys residues associated with Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus, nuclear translocation of Nrf2, activation of antioxidant response element (ARE), and upregulation of cytoprotective target genes. At least in cell culture, pNO-ASA acts as a QM donor, bioactivated by cellular esterase activity to release salicylates, NO(3)(-), and an electrophilic QM. Finally, two novel aspirin prodrugs were synthesized, both potent activators of ARE, designed to release only the QM and salicylates on bioactivation. Current interest in electrophilic drugs acting via Nrf2 signaling suggests that QM-donating hybrid drugs can be designed as informative chemical probes in drug discovery.

  19. No Effect of Aspirin on Mammographic Density in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, Anne; Wang, CY; Sorensen, Bess; Xiao, Liren; Buist, Diana S. M.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; White, Emily; Rossing, Mary Anne; Potter, John; Urban, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer among women who regularly use aspirin; a plausible mechanism is through aspirin effect on mammographic breast density, a breast cancer risk factor, possibly mediated through aspirin interference with estrogen synthesis. Methods: In a 2-arm randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of 6-months administration of 325 mg/day aspirin on total mammographic breast dense area and percent of the mammographic breast image occupied by dense areas (% density) in 143 postmenopausal women. Eligible women, recruited 2005-7, were healthy, not taking hormone therapy, with elevated mammographic breast density (American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS®) density category 2, 3 or 4) within 6 months prior to enrollment. Results: Women were a mean (s.d.) 59.5 (5.5) years. Geometric mean baseline percent density was 17.6% (95% CI 14.8, 20.9) in women randomized to aspirin and 19.2% (95% CI 16.3, 22.7) in women randomized to placebo. Percent density decreased in women randomized to aspirin by an absolute 0.8% vs. an absolute decrease of 1.2% in controls (p = 0.84). Total breast area and dense area decreased to a similar degree in women assigned to aspirin and in those assigned to placebo, with no differences statistically significantly different between trial arms. Conclusions: A single daily administration of adult-dose aspirin for 6 months had no effect on mammographic density in postmenopausal women. If aspirin affects breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, it may do so through alternative pathways than mammographic breast density. PMID:19423529

  20. Aspirin Use and Lung Cancer Risk: A Possible Relationship? Evidence from an Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Yu, Jing; Wu, Yan; Geng, Jiang; Yao, Xu-dong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Growing evidence has emerged and controversial results reported on possible relationship between aspirin use and lung cancer risk. We, therefore, conducted this updated and comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate this issue, with focus on dose-risk and duration-risk relationships. Methods We searched electronic databases including PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane library to identify eligible studies. Relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for cohort studies, while odds ratio (OR) were employed for case-control studies. The random effects and fixed effects models were used for analyses. Results 18 studies were identified including 19835 lung cancer cases, which were eligible for inclusion in the present meta-analysis. Pooled data from case-control studies showed a significant inverse association between regular aspirin use and lung cancer risk. But for cohort studies, insignificant association was detected with little evidence of heterogeneity (RR: 1.05, 95%CI: 0.95 – 1.16; I2: 10.3%, p value: 0.351). In case-control studies, standard aspirin use (>325mg) was related to lower lung cancer incidence, compared with low-dose aspirin use (75–100mg). A similar trend was observed in cohort studies. Besides, when analysis was restricted to long time regular aspirin use (>5 years), insignificant results were reported in both cohort and case-control studies. Finally, regular aspirin use might result in higher reduction of non-small cell lung cancer incidence among men. Conclusions Our findings do not support the protective effect of regular aspirin use on lung cancer risk. Long time aspirin use, sex, dose and type of lung cancer might alter the effect of aspirin use on lung cancer risk. More well-designed studies are needed to further clarify these associations. PMID:25849465

  1. AspiriN To Inhibit SEPSIS (ANTISEPSIS) randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Damon P; Moore, Elizabeth M; Leder, Karin; Lockery, Jessica; McBryde, Emma S; McNeil, John J; Pilcher, David; Wolfe, Rory; Woods, Robyn L

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a leading global cause of morbidity and mortality, and is more common at the extremes of age. Moreover, the cost of in-hospital care for elderly patients with sepsis is significant. There are indications from experimental and observational studies that aspirin may reduce inflammation associated with infection. This paper describes the rationale and design of the AspiriN To Inhibit SEPSIS (ANTISEPSIS) trial, a substudy of ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE). ANTISEPSIS primarily aims to determine whether low-dose aspirin reduces sepsis-related deaths in older people. Additionally, it will assess whether low-dose aspirin reduces sepsis-related hospitalisations and sepsis-related Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admissions. Methods and analysis ASPREE is a double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled primary prevention trial that will determine whether daily low-dose aspirin extends disability-free longevity in 19 000 healthy older people recruited in Australia and the USA. The ANTISEPSIS substudy involves additional ASPREE trial data collection to assess the impact of daily low-dose aspirin on sepsis-related events in the 16 703 ASPREE participants aged 70 years and over, recruited in Australia. The intervention is a daily 100 mg dose of enteric-coated aspirin versus matching placebo, with 1:1 randomisation. The primary outcome for the ANTISEPSIS substudy is the incidence of sepsis-related death in eligible patients. The incidence of sepsis-related hospital and ICU admissions are secondary outcomes. ANTISEPSIS is to be conducted between 2012 and 2018. Discussion This substudy will determine whether aspirin, an inexpensive and accessible therapy, safely reduces sepsis-related deaths and hospitalisations in older Australians. If shown to be the case, this would have profound effects on the health of older Australians. Trial registration number Pre-results, ACTRN12613000349741. PMID:28110287

  2. Aspirin in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia: current facts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Landolfi, R; Patrono, C

    1996-09-01

    The role of aspirin in the antithrombotic strategy of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) is highly controversial. Long considered unsafe on the basis of a single clinical trial testing very high doses in PV patients, aspirin is being increasingly used at lower dosage. The rationale for the use of aspirin in patients with PV and ET is provided by the efficacy of this agent in the treatment of microcirculatory disturbances of thrombocythemic states associated with myeloproliferative disorders and by recent evidence that asymptomatic PV and ET patients have persistently increased thromboxane (TX) A2-biosynthesis. This increase, which most likely reflects enhanced platelet activation in vivo, is independent of the platelet mass and blood viscosity and largely supressed by a short term low-dose aspirin regimen (50 mg/day for 7 days). Since enhanced TXA2 biosynthesis may play a role in transducing the increased thrombotic risk associated with PV and ET, long-term low-dose aspirin administration has been proposed as a possible antithombotic strategy in these subjects. The safety of this treatment in PV patients has been recently reassessed by the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Policitemia Vera (GISP) which has followed for over one year 112 patients randomized to receive 40 mg/day aspirin or placebo. In the same study, serum TXB2 measurements provided evidence that the low-dose aspirin regimen tested was fully effective in inhibiting platelet cyclooxygenase activity. On this basis, a large scale trial aimed at assessing the antithrombotic efficacy of this approach is currently being organized. In patients with ET both the minimal aspirin dose required for complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase and the safety of long-term aspirin administration need to be established prior to extensive clinical evaluation of this strategy.

  3. Long Term Use of Aspirin and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Edward S.; Strate, Lisa L.; Ho, Wendy W.; Lee, Salina S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    Background In short-term trials, aspirin is associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the effect of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk remains unclear. Methods We conducted a prospective study of 87,680 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study in 1990 who provided biennial data on aspirin use. We examined the relative risk (RR) of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or blood transfusion. Results Over a 24-year follow-up, 1537 women reported a major gastrointestinal bleeding. Among women who used aspirin regularly (≥2 standard [325-mg] tablets/week), the multivariate RR of gastrointestinal bleeding was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29-1.59) compared with non-regular users. Compared with women who denied any aspirin use, the multivariate RRs of gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.85-1.24) for women who used 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin tablets/week, 1.30 (95% CI, 1.07-1.58) for 2 to 5 tablets/week, 1.77 (95% CI, 1.44-2.18) for 6-14 tablets/week, and 2.24 (95% CI, 1.66-3.03) for >14 tablets/week (Ptrend<.001). Similar dose-response relationships were observed among short-terms users (≤ 5 years; Ptrend<.001) and long-term users (>5 years; Ptrend<.001). In contrast, after adjustments were made for dose, increasing duration of use did not confer greater risk of bleeding (Ptrend=0.28). Conclusions Regular aspirin use is associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. Risk appears more strongly related to dose than duration of aspirin use. Efforts to minimize adverse effects of aspirin therapy should emphasize using the lowest effective dose among both short-term and long-term users. PMID:21531232

  4. Assessment of aspirin resistance varies on a temporal basis in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Muir, A R; McMullin, M F; Patterson, C; McKeown, P P

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Laboratory tests including optical platelet aggregometry (OPA), platelet function analyser (PFA-100), and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) metabolite levels have been used to define aspirin resistance. This study characterised the prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and investigated the concordance and repeatability of these tests. Design, setting and patients: Consecutive outpatients with stable IHD were enrolled. They were commenced on 150 mg aspirin daily (day 0) and had platelet function assessment (OPA and PFA-100) and quantitative analysis of serum/urine TXB2 at day ⩾7 and then at a second visit approximately 2 weeks later. Main outcome measures: We assessed the prevalence of aspirin resistance by each method, concordance between methods of measuring response to aspirin and association between time points to assess the predictability of response over time. Results: 172 patients (62.7 (SD 8.7) years, 83.1% male) were recruited. At visits 1 and 2, respectively, 1.7% and 4.7% were aspirin resistant by OPA, whereas 22.1% and 20.3% were aspirin resistant by PFA-100. There were poor associations between PFA-100 and OPA, and between TXB2 metabolites and platelet function tests. OPA and PFA-100 results were poorly associated between visits (κ = 0.16 and κ = 0.42, respectively) as were TXB2 metabolites, suggesting that aspirin resistance is not predictable over time. Conclusions: The prevalence of aspirin resistance is dependent on the method of testing. Response varies on a temporal basis, indicating that testing on a single occasion is inadequate to diagnose resistance or guide therapy in a clinical setting. PMID:18697805

  5. The Population Impact of Long-term Use of Aspirin and Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Nishihara, Reiko; Wu, Kana; Wang, Molin; Ogino, Shuji; Willett, Walter C.; Spiegelman, Donna; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended the use of aspirin to prevent colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease among many U.S adults. However, the association of aspirin on risk of other cancer types, and aspirin’s potential population-wide impact on cancer, particularly within the context of screening, remain uncertain. Objective To examine potential benefits of aspirin use for overall and subtype-specific cancer prevention, at a range of doses and duration of use, and estimate the absolute benefit of aspirin in the context of screening. Design Two large prospective cohort studies: the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, 1980–2010) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, 1986–2012). Setting Health professionals in the United States Participants 88,084 women and 47,881 men participating in the NHS and HPFS who reported aspirin use biennially. Main Outcome Measures Relative risks (RRs) for incident cancers and population attributable risk (PAR). Results During up to 32 years of follow-up, we documented 20,414 cancers among women and 7,571 among men. Compared with nonregular use, regular aspirin use was associated with lower risk of overall cancer (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94, 0.99), which was primarily due to a lower incidence of gastrointestinal cancers (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.80, 0.91), especially colorectal cancers (RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.75, 0.88). The benefit of aspirin on gastrointestinal cancers appeared evident with use of at least 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin tablets per week; the minimum duration of regular use associated with lower risk was 6 years. Among individuals aged over 50, regular aspirin use could prevent 33 colorectal cancers (PAR 17.0%) among those who have not undergone a lower endoscopy and 18 colorectal cancers per 100,000 person-years (PAR 8.5%) among those who have. Regular aspirin use was not associated with risk of breast, advanced prostate, or lung cancer. Conclusions and Relevance Long-term aspirin use was

  6. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  7. Elastic properties of aspirin in its crystalline and glassy phases studied by micro-Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Ike, Yuji; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-11-01

    The acoustic waves propagating along the direction perpendicular to the (1 0 0) cleavage plane of aspirin crystal were investigated using micro-Brillouin spectroscopy from which C11, C55 and C66 were obtained. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic waves could be explained by normal anharmonic lattice models, while the transverse acoustic waves showed an abnormal increase in the hypersonic attenuation at low temperatures indicating their coupling to local remnant dynamics. The sound velocity as well as the attenuation of the longitudinal acoustic waves of glassy aspirin showed a substantial change at ˜235 K confirming a transition from glassy to supercooled liquid state in vitreous aspirin.

  8. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  9. A spectroscopic study of phenylbutazone and aspirin bound to serum albumin in rheumatoid diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2011-11-01

    Interaction of phenylbutazone (PBZ) and aspirin (ASA), two drugs recommended in rheumatoid diseases (RDs), when binding to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, has been studied by quenching of fluorescence and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1HNMR) techniques. On the basis of spectrofluorescence measurements high affinity binding sites of PBZ and ASA on albumin as well as their interaction within the binding sites were described. A low affinity binding site has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using fluorescence spectroscopy the location of binding site in serum albumin (SA) for PBZ and ASA was found. Association constants Ka were determined for binary (i.e. PBZ-SA and ASA-SA) and ternary complexes (i.e. PBZ-[ASA]-SA and ASA-[PBZ]-SA). PBZ and ASA change the affinity of each other to the binding site in serum albumin (SA). The presence of ASA causes the increase of association constants KaI of PBZ-SA complex. Similarly, PBZ influences KaI of ASA-SA complex. This phenomenon shows that the strength of binding and the stability of the complexes increase in the presence of the second drug. The decrease of KaII values suggests that the competition between PBZ and ASA in binding to serum albumin in the second class of binding sites occurs. The analysis of 1HNMR spectral parameters i.e. changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicate that the presence of ASA weakens the interaction of PBZ with albumin. Similarly PBZ weakens the interaction of ASA with albumin. This conclusion points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic effects.

  10. Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  11. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death.

  12. Evaluation the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Baktash, Forouz; Heshmat-Ghahdarijani, Kiyan; Zarean, Elahe; Bahrani, Saeide

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia complicates up to 3% of pregnancies in developing countries. Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients. Materials and Methods: in this triple-blind randomized clinical trial, enrolled patients were divided randomly into two groups. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 80 mg or placebo will be taken daily by oral administration from the initiation of diagnosis until 2 months after delivery. Every patient's flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were evaluated at the beginning of study and 2 months after delivery with the same experienced operator at a same period of the time (3–5 pm) by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonographic. T-test or Mann–Whitney test was used in the comparison of means between the intervention and placebo groups. To compare FMD in each group, before and after the intervention, paired t-test was used. Results: Mean value of FMD in intervention (9.61 ± 5.58) and control group (9.40 ± 4.33) have no significant differences before drug consumption (P = 0.089). FMD in intervention group significantly increased after ASA consumption ([9.61 ± 5.58 vs. 13.65 ± 7.91] [P = 0.044]). Conclusion: Increase mean of FMD in intervention group shows that this supplement can improve endothelial function. PMID:28331517

  13. Structure, molecular simulation, and release of aspirin from intercalated Zn-Al-layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zilin; Li, Xiaowei; Lv, Fengzhu; Zhang, Qian; Chu, Paul K; Zhang, Yihe

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid (AA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is intercalated into Zn-Al-layered double hydroxides (ZnAl-LDHs) by co-precipitation and reconstruction methods. The composition, structure, and morphology of the intercalated products as well as their release behavior are determined experimentally and theoretically by Material Studio 5.5. Experimental results disclose the strong interaction between the LDHs sheets and AA in the intercalated ZnAl-LDHs produced by co-precipitation and slow release of AA from the intercalated ZnAl-LDHs in both phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and borate buffered saline (BBS) solutions. The percentage of AA released from the ZnAl-LDHs prepared by both methods in PBS (96.87% and 98.12%) are much more than those in BBS (68.59% and 81.22%) implying that both H4BO4(-) and H2PO4(-) can exchange with AA in the ZnAl-LDHs. After AA is released to PBS, ZnAl-LDHs break into small pieces. The experimental results are explained theoretically based on the calculation of the bonding energy between the anions and LDHs sheets as well as the AlO bond length change in the LDHs sheets.

  14. Management of type-2 diabetes with anti-platelet therapies: special reference to aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gundu H R

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset diabetes currently affects 380 million individuals worldwide and is expected to affect 380 million by 2025. Major defects contributing to this complex disease are insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. More than 80% of patients professing to type-2 diabetes are insulin resistant. Recent studies have shown that the Indian subcontinent ranks very high in the occurrence of Diabetes and Coronary artery disease (1, 2, 3). Patients with Type 2 diabetes carry an equivalent cardiovascular risk to that of a non-diabetic individual who has already experienced a coronary event. The risk of coronary artery disease in any given population seems to be 2-3 times higher in diabetics than non-diabetics. Inflammation, platelet activation, endothelial dysfunction and coagulation are the four processes, whose interplay determines the development of cardiovascular disease. In this article, we provide a brief overview on platelet physiology, vascular dysfunction, platelet hyper-function, and the role of platelet related clinical complications in diabetes mellitus and what is know about the management of this complex disease with anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin and Clopidogrel.

  15. Comparative gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone as assessed by radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; Davis, A.; Lussier, Y.; Lebel, E.

    1989-03-01

    Nabumetone differs from most other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is presented to the gut as a nonacidic prodrug, and is metabolized to its active form after absorption. Studies in animals and humans suggest it is less irritating to the gastrointestinal mucosa. This study compared the gastrointestinal microbleeding induced by nabumetone to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), and placebo in a double blind parallel study using chromium /sup 51/Cr labelled red cells to quantitate fecal blood loss (FBL) in healthy volunteers. Thirty subjects were randomized to treatment with nabumetone (2000 mg), ASA (3.6 g) or placebo for 21 days following a 7 day placebo period. Six subjects served as untreated controls. FBL in nabumetone treated subjects was not significantly different to placebo or untreated subjects. In contrast, ASA-treated subjects exhibited significantly increased FBL than the other 3 groups (P less than .0001).

  16. Mobile compression devices and aspirin for VTE prophylaxis following simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Levy et al questioned the effectiveness of mobile compression devices (MCDs) as the sole method of thromboprophylaxis following simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study's purpose was to assess if the addition of aspirin to MCDs improves venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention following simultaneous bilateral TKA. Ninety-six patients (192 TKAs) were retrospectively reviewed: 47 patients received MCDs for 10 days and aspirin for 6 weeks postoperatively based on a risk stratification protocol, while 49 patients received warfarin for 4 weeks postoperatively. One symptomatic VTE was noted in the warfarin cohort, while one patient in the MCD/aspirin cohort and three patients in the warfarin cohort were readmitted within 3 months of surgery. In appropriately selected patients, MCDs with aspirin shows promise in VTE prevention following simultaneous bilateral TKA.

  17. Role of Dispersion Interactions in the Polymorphism and Entropic Stabilization of the Aspirin Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin has been used and studied for over a century but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  18. Effect of sulglycotide treatment on cell kinetics alterations induced by aspirin in humans.

    PubMed

    Biasco, G; Paganelli, G M; Psilogenis, M; Nazzari, M; Di Febo, G; Siringo, S

    1992-01-01

    The effect on gastric epithelial cell proliferation of small doses of aspirin was evaluated in 9 healthy volunteers, with or without administration of sulglycotide, a sulfated glycopeptide with cytoprotective properties. Cell kinetics study was performed by incubation of gastric biopsies with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and immunohistochemistry. A decrease of BrdU-labeling index and a shortening of the height of gastric columns were observed after treatment with aspirin and placebo. No variations were observed after treatment with aspirin and sulglycotide. A decrease of the epithelial cell renewal could be one of the damaging effects of aspirin on the gastric mucosa. The treatment with sulglycotide seems to be effective to prevent this alteration.

  19. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  20. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  1. Aspirin and serum estrogens in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Catherine; Wang, Ching-Yun; Xiao, Liren; McTiernan, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer among women who use aspirin. A plausible mechanism is through aspirin's effect on estrogens, possibly mediated through interference with estrogen synthesis via reduction in inflammation, which is increased in adipose tissues, including breast. In a randomized placebo-controlled trial, we evaluated the effects of six-month administration of 325 mg/day aspirin on serum estrogens (estradiol, estrone, free estradiol, and bioavailable estradiol) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in 144 healthy postmenopausal women. Eligible participants, recruited 2005-2007, were not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, including aspirin >2 times/week or menopausal hormone therapy, and had a Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) mammographic density classification of 2, 3, or 4. The intervention effects (intent-to-treat) were evaluated by differences in the geometric mean outcome changes at six months between aspirin and placebo groups using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Participants were a mean 59.4 (SD, 5.4) years of age, with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.4 (SD, 5.4) kg/m(2). Between baseline and six months, none of the serum estrogens or SHBG changed substantially and there were no differences between groups. Stratifying by BMI did not change results. In conclusion, a single daily administration of 325 mg of aspirin for six months had no effect on serum estrogens or SHBG in postmenopausal women. Larger doses or longer duration of aspirin administration may be needed to affect circulating estrogens. Alternately, if aspirin influences breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, it may do so through direct breast tissue effects, or through pathways other than estrogens.

  2. Association between aspirin and upper gastrointestinal complications: Systematic review of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis A García; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; de Abajo, Francisco J

    2001-01-01

    Aims Because of the widespread use of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular diseases, side-effects associated with thromboprophylactic doses are of interest. This study summarizes the relative risk (RR) for serious upper gastrointestinal complications (UGIC) associated with aspirin exposure in general and with specific aspirin doses and formulations in particular. Methods After a systematic review, 17 original epidemiologic studies published between 1990 and 2001 were selected according to predefined criteria. Heterogeneity of effects was explored. Pooled estimates were calculated according to different study characteristics and patterns of aspirin use. Results The overall relative risk of UGIC associated with aspirin use was 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1, 2.4) for cohort studies and nested case-control studies and 3.1 (95% CI: 2.8, 3.3) for non-nested case-control studies. Original studies found a dose–response relationship between UGIC and aspirin, although the risk was still elevated for doses lower or up to 300 mg day−1. The summary RR was 2.6 (95% CI: 2.3, 2.9) for plain, 5.3 (95% CI: 3.0, 9.2) for buffered, and 2.4 (95% CI: 1.9, 2.9) for enteric-coated aspirin formulations. Conclusions Aspirin was associated with UGIC even when used at low doses or in buffered or enteric-coated formulations. The latter findings may be partially explained by channeling of susceptible patients to these formulations. PMID:11736865

  3. Esomeprazole and aspirin fixed combination for the prevention of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Katelyn W; Cheng, Judy WM; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2013-01-01

    Low dose aspirin therapy plays a fundamental role in both the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Although the evidence using low dose aspirin for secondary prevention is well-established, the decision to use aspirin for primary prevention is based on an evaluation of the patient’s risk of cardiovascular events compared to their risk of adverse events, such as bleeding. In addition to the risk of bleeding associated with long term aspirin administration, upper gastrointestinal side effects, such as dyspepsia often lead to discontinuation of therapy, which places patients at an increased risk for cardiovascular events. One option to mitigate adverse events and increase adherence is the addition of esomeprazole to the medication regimen. This review article provides an evaluation of the literature on the concomitant use of aspirin and esomeprazole available through February 2013. The efficacy, safety, tolerability, cost effectiveness, and patient quality of life of this regimen is discussed. A summary of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between aspirin and esomeprazole, as well as other commonly used cardiovascular medications are also reviewed. The addition of esomeprazole to low dose aspirin therapy in patients at high risk of developing gastric ulcers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, significantly reduced their risk of ulcer development. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies suggested that esomeprazole did not affect the pharmacokinetic parameters or the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Therefore, for those patients who are at a high risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, the benefit of adding esomeprazole likely outweighs the risks of longer term proton pump inhibitor use, and the combination can be recommended. Administering the two agents separately may also be more economical. On the other hand, for those patients at lower risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, both the additional risk

  4. Oxidative stress-related mechanisms affecting response to aspirin in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Lapenna, Domenico; La Barba, Sara; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Persistent platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in T2DM. However, current antiplatelet treatments appear less effective in T2DM patients vs nondiabetics at similar risk. A large body of evidence supports the contention that oxidative stress, which characterizes DM, may be responsible, at least in part, for less-than-expected response to aspirin, with multiple mechanisms acting at several levels. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms related to oxidative stress and contributing to suboptimal aspirin action or responsiveness. These include: (1) mechanisms counteracting the antiplatelet effect of aspirin, such as reduced platelet sensitivity to the antiaggregating effects of NO, due to high-glucose-mediated oxidative stress; (2) mechanisms interfering with COX acetylation especially at the platelet level, e.g., lipid hydroperoxide-dependent impaired acetylating effects of aspirin; (3) mechanisms favoring platelet priming (lipid hydroperoxides) or activation (F2-isoprostanes, acting as partial agonists of thromboxane receptor), or aldose-reductase pathway-mediated oxidative stress, leading to enhanced platelet thromboxane A2 generation or thromboxane receptor activation; (4) mechanisms favoring platelet recruitment, such as aspirin-induced platelet isoprostane formation; (5) modulation of megakaryocyte generation and thrombopoiesis by oxidative HO-1 inhibition; and (6) aspirin-iron interactions, eventually resulting in impaired pharmacological activity of aspirin, lipoperoxide burden, and enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals capable of promoting protein kinase C activation and platelet aggregation. Acknowledgment of oxidative stress as a major contributor, not only of vascular complications, but also of suboptimal response to antiplatelet agents in T2DM, may open the way to designing and testing novel antithrombotic strategies, specifically targeting

  5. The association between regular use of aspirin and the prevalence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wan-Ting; Erickson, Steven R.; Hansen, Richard A.; Wu, Chung-Hsuen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is prevalent with significant morbidity in the United States. Aspirin previously has been found to be associated with reduced carcinogenesis of prostate cells. However, it remains unclear whether regularly taking aspirin could lower the risk of prostate cancer. Therefore, our aim was to examine the association between self-reported regular use of aspirin and the prevalence of prostate cancer in a national sample of the US adult population. The National Health Interview Survey is an annual survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics to investigate health and healthcare use of the US population. The current study is a population-based cross-sectional study using the 2010 National Health Interview Survey data. Adult male respondents who self-reported regularly taking aspirin at least 3 times per week were grouped as regular users. The prostate cancer prevalence was measured by respondents’ self-report of prostate cancer. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between these 2 factors by adjusting for covariates selected based on Andersen Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. An estimated 23 million (23.7%) males in the United States reported that they took aspirin regularly. Of them, 5.0% had prostate cancer. Regular aspirin use was significantly associated with a lower self-reported prevalence of prostate cancer after adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need factors (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.38–0.94). Regular aspirin use was found to be significantly associated with a lower self-reported prevalence of prostate cancer in the United States in 2010. Further clinical trials and longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the causality between regular aspirin use and prostate cancer. PMID:27336878