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Sample records for drugs mutually inhibit

  1. Sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-[3H] SKF 10,047 and [3H]haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, S W; Cook, L

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D2 sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 bound to a single class of sites with a Kd of 4 X 10(-8) M and a Bmax of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from mu, kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol greater than perphenazine greater than fluphenazine greater than acetophenazine greater than trifluoperazine greater than molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for [3H]spiperone (dopamine D2) sites. [3H]-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable [3H]haloperidol binding was to [3H]spiperone (D2) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. PMID:6147851

  2. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 and (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; Cook, L.

    1984-09-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D/sub 2/ sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10/sup -8/ M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from ..mu.., kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for (/sup 3/H)spiperone (dopamine D/sub 2/) sites. (/sup 3/H)-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding was to (/sup 3/H)spiperone (D/sub 2/) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  3. Reward value comparison via mutual inhibition in ventromedial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Caleb E.; Blanchard, Tommy C.; Hayden, Benjamin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories suggest that reward-based choice reflects competition between value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We tested this idea by recording vmPFC neurons while macaques performed a gambling task with asynchronous offer presentation. We found that neuronal activity shows four patterns consistent with selection via mutual inhibition. (1) Correlated tuning for probability and reward size, suggesting that vmPFC carries an integrated value signal, (2) anti-correlated tuning curves for the two options, suggesting mutual inhibition, (3) neurons rapidly come to signal the value of the chosen offer, suggesting the circuit serves to produce a choice, (4) after regressing out the effects of option values, firing rates still could predict choice – a choice probability signal. In addition, neurons signaled gamble outcomes, suggesting that vmPFC contributes to both monitoring and choice processes. These data suggest a possible mechanism for reward-based choice and endorse the centrality of vmPFC in that process. PMID:24881835

  4. Reward value comparison via mutual inhibition in ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Strait, Caleb E; Blanchard, Tommy C; Hayden, Benjamin Y

    2014-06-18

    Recent theories suggest that reward-based choice reflects competition between value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We tested this idea by recording vmPFC neurons while macaques performed a gambling task with asynchronous offer presentation. We found that neuronal activity shows four patterns consistent with selection via mutual inhibition: (1) correlated tuning for probability and reward size, suggesting that vmPFC carries an integrated value signal; (2) anti-correlated tuning curves for the two options, suggesting mutual inhibition; (3) neurons rapidly come to signal the value of the chosen offer, suggesting the circuit serves to produce a choice; and (4) after regressing out the effects of option values, firing rates still could predict choice-a choice probability signal. In addition, neurons signaled gamble outcomes, suggesting that vmPFC contributes to both monitoring and choice processes. These data suggest a possible mechanism for reward-based choice and endorse the centrality of vmPFC in that process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mutual inhibition of RecQ molecules in DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing-Yi; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Yang, Ye; Xu, Ya-Nan; Bugnard, Elisabeth; Ding, Xiu-Yan; Zhang, Lingyun; Wang, Peng-Ye; Li, Ming; Xi, Xu Guang

    2010-05-21

    Helicases make conformational changes and mechanical movements through hydrolysis of NTP to unwind duplex DNA (or RNA). Most helicases require a single-stranded overhang for loading onto the duplex DNA substrates. Some helicases have been observed to exhibit an enhanced unwinding efficiency with increasing length of the single-stranded DNA tail both by preventing reannealing of the unwound DNA and by compensating for premature dissociation of the leading monomers. Here we report a previously unknown mutual inhibition of neighboring monomers in DNA unwinding by the monomeric Escherichia coli RecQ helicase. With single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, we observed that the unwinding initiation of RecQ at saturating concentrations was more delayed for a long rather than a short tailed DNA. In stopped-flow kinetic studies under both single and multiple turnover conditions, the unwinding efficiency decreased with increasing enzyme concentration for long tailed substrates. In addition, preincubation of RecQ and DNA in the presence of 5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate was observed to alleviate the inhibition. We propose that the mutual inhibition effect results from a forced closure of cleft between the two RecA-like domains of a leading monomer by a trailing one, hence the forward movements of both monomers are stalled by prohibition of ATP binding to the leading one. This effect represents direct evidence for the relative movements of the two RecA-like domains of RecQ in DNA unwinding. It may occur for all superfamily I and II helicases possessing two RecA-like domains.

  6. Ungulate saliva inhibits a grass-endophyte mutualism.

    PubMed

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Vicari, Mark; Bazely, Dawn R

    2014-07-01

    Fungal endophytes modify plant-herbivore interactions by producing toxic alkaloids that deter herbivory. However, studies have neglected the direct effects herbivores may have on endophytes. Antifungal properties and signalling effectors in herbivore saliva suggest that evolutionary pressures may select for animals that mitigate the effects of endophyte-produced alkaloids. Here, we tested whether saliva of moose (Alces alces) and European reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) reduced hyphal elongation and production of ergot alkaloids by the foliar endophyte Epichloë festucae associated with the globally distributed red fescue Festuca rubra. Both moose and reindeer saliva reduced the growth of isolated endophyte hyphae when compared with a treatment of distilled water. Induction of the highly toxic alkaloid ergovaline was also inhibited in plants from the core of F. rubra's distribution when treated with moose saliva following simulated grazing. In genotypes from the southern limit of the species' distribution, ergovaline was constitutively expressed, as predicted where growth is environmentally limited. Our results now present the first evidence, to our knowledge, that ungulate saliva can combat plant defences produced by a grass-endophyte mutualism.

  7. An obligatory bacterial mutualism in a multi-drug environment exhibits strong oscillatory population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conwill, Arolyn; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    A common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria involves the production of an enzyme that inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can protect other cells in the population that would otherwise be sensitive to the drug. In a multidrug environment, an obligatory mutualism arises because populations of different strains rely on each other to breakdown antibiotics in the environment. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics: ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either one of the strains alone. Although mutualisms are often thought to stabilize population dynamics, we observe strong oscillatory dynamics even when there is long-term coexistence between the two strains. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and, more generally, the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity, cooperation, and ecological stability.

  8. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  9. Mutual Regioselective Inhibition of Human UGT1A1-Mediated Glucuronidation of Four Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guo; Wu, Baojian; Gao, Song; Yang, Zhen; Ma, Yong; Hu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1-catalyzed glucuronidation is an important elimination pathway of flavonoids, and mutually inhibitory interactions may occur when two or more flavonoids are co-administered. Our recent research suggested that glucuronidation of flavonoids displayed distinct positional preferences, but whether this will lead to the mutually regioselective inhibition of UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation of flavonoids is unknown. Therefore, we chose three monohydroxyflavone isomers 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF), 7-hydroxyflavone (7HF), 4′-hydroxyflavone (4′HF) and one trihydroxyflavone 3,7,4′-trihydroxyflavone (3,7,4′THF) as the model compounds to characterize the possible mutually regioselective inhibition of glucuronidation using expressed human UGT1A1. Apparent kinetic parameters [e.g., reaction velocity (V), Michaelis-Menten constant (Km), maximum rate of metabolism (Vmax), concentration at which inhibitor achieve 50% inhibition or IC50] and the Lineweaver-Burk plots were used to evaluate the apparent kinetic mechanisms of inhibition of glucuronidation. The results showed that UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation of three monohydroxyflavones (i.e., 3HF, 7HF and 4′HF) and 3,7,4′THF was mutually inhibitory, and the mechanisms of inhibition appeared to be the mixed-typed inhibition. Specifically, the inhibitory effects displayed certain positional preference. Glucuronidation of 3HF was more easily inhibited by 3,7,4′THF than that of 7HF or 4′HF. Compared to 7-O-glucuronidation of 3,7,4′THF, 3-O-glucuronidation of 3,7,4′THF was more inhibited by 3HF and 4′HF, whereas glucuronidation at both 3-OH and 7-OH positions of 3,7,4′THF was more easily inhibited by 7HF than by 3HF and 4′HF. In conclusion, 3HF, 7HF, 4′HF and 3,7,4′THF were both substrates and inhibitors of UGT1A1, and they exhibited mutually regioselective inhibition of UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation via a mixed-type inhibitory mechanism. PMID:23786524

  10. Excess positional mutual information predicts both local and allosteric mutations affecting beta lactamase drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cortina, George A; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-11-15

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, particularly plasmid-encoded resistance to beta lactam drugs, poses an increasing threat to human health. Point mutations to beta-lactamase enzymes can greatly alter the level of resistance conferred, but predicting the effects of such mutations has been challenging due to the large combinatorial space involved and the subtle relationships of distant residues to catalytic function. Therefore we desire an information-theoretic metric to sensitively and robustly detect both local and distant residues that affect substrate conformation and catalytic activity. Here, we report the use of positional mutual information in multiple microsecond-length molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict residues linked to catalytic activity of the CTX-M9 beta lactamase. We find that motions of the bound drug are relatively isolated from motions of the protein as a whole, which we interpret in the context of prior theories of catalysis. In order to robustly identify residues that are weakly coupled to drug motions but nonetheless affect catalysis, we utilize an excess mutual information metric. We predict 31 such residues for the cephalosporin antibiotic cefotaxime. Nine of these have previously been tested experimentally, and all decrease both enzyme rate constants and empirical drug resistance. We prospectively validate our method by testing eight high-scoring mutations and eight low-scoring controls in bacteria. Six of eight predicted mutations decrease cefotaxime resistance greater than 2-fold, while only one control shows such an effect. The ability to prospectively predict new variants affecting bacterial drug resistance is of great interest to clinical and epidemiological surveillance. Excess mutual information code is available at https://github.com/kassonlab/positionalmi CONTACT: kasson@virginia.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Mutual inhibition of insulin signaling and PHLPP-1 determines cardioprotective efficiency of Akt in aged heart

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yuan; Sun, Wanqing; Wang, Yishi; Gao, Feng; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Insulin protects cardiomyocytes from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury through activating Akt. However, phosphatase PHLPP-1 (PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase-1) dephosphorylates and inactivates Akt. The balanced competitive interaction of insulin and PHLPP-1 has not been directly examined. In this study, we have identified the effect of mutual inhibition of insulin signaling and PHLPP-1 on the cardioprotective efficiency of Akt in aged heart. Young (3 mon) and aged (20 mon) Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to MI/R in vivo. The PHLPP-1 level was higher in aged vs. young hearts at base. But, insulin treatment failed to decrease PHLPP-1 level during reperfusion in the aged hearts. Consequently, the cardioprotection of insulin-induced Akt activation was impaired in aged hearts, resulting in more susceptible to MI/R injury. In cultured rat ventricular myocytes, PHLPP-1 knockdown significantly enhanced insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and reduced simulated hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis. Contrary, PHLPP-1 overexpression terminated Akt phosphorylation and deteriorated myocytes apoptosis. Using in vivo aged animal models, we confirmed that cardiac PHLPP-1 knockdown or enhanced insulin sensitivity by exercise training dramatically increased insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. Specifically, MI/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and infarct size were decreased and cardiac function was increased. More importantly, we found that insulin regulated the degradation of PHLPP-1 and insulin treatment could enhance the binding between PHLPP-1 and β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP) to target for ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Altogether, we have identified a new mechanism by which insulin suppresses PHLPP-1 to enhance Akt activation. But, aged heart possesses lower insulin effectiveness and fails to decrease PHLPP-1 during MI/R, which subsequently limited Akt activity and cardioprotection. PHLPP-1 could be a promising

  12. Mathematical Models for Sleep-Wake Dynamics: Comparison of the Two-Process Model and a Mutual Inhibition Neuronal Model

    PubMed Central

    Skeldon, Anne C.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Derks, Gianne

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is essential for the maintenance of the brain and the body, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the mutual inhibition of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the mutual inhibition model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is valuable because not only does it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena such as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model. PMID:25084361

  13. Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Anne C; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Derks, Gianne

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is essential for the maintenance of the brain and the body, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the mutual inhibition of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the mutual inhibition model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is valuable because not only does it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena such as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model.

  14. Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (–COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic –OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities

  15. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

    2016-02-01

    The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions.

  16. Reliable Attention Network Scores and Mutually Inhibited Inter-network Relationships Revealed by Mixed Design and Non-orthogonal Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Liu, Feng; Li, Mei-Ling; Long, Zhi-Liang; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2015-05-21

    The attention system can be divided into alerting, orienting, and executive control networks. The efficiency and independence of attention networks have been widely tested with the attention network test (ANT) and its revised versions. However, many studies have failed to find effects of attention network scores (ANSs) and inter-network relationships (INRs). Moreover, the low reliability of ANSs can not meet the demands of theoretical and empirical investigations. Two methodological factors (the inter-trial influence in the event-related design and the inter-network interference in orthogonal contrast) may be responsible for the unreliability of ANT. In this study, we combined the mixed design and non-orthogonal method to explore ANSs and directional INRs. With a small number of trials, we obtained reliable and independent ANSs (split-half reliability of alerting: 0.684; orienting: 0.588; and executive control: 0.616), suggesting an individual and specific attention system. Furthermore, mutual inhibition was observed when two networks were operated simultaneously, indicating a differentiated but integrated attention system. Overall, the reliable and individual specific ANSs and mutually inhibited INRs provide novel insight into the understanding of the developmental, physiological and pathological mechanisms of attention networks, and can benefit future experimental and clinical investigations of attention using ANT.

  17. Rational drug design applied to myeloperoxidase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Van Antwerpen, P; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, K

    2015-06-01

    Rational drug design is a general approach using protein-structure technique in which the discovery of a ligand can be driven either by chance, screening, or rational theory. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was rapidly identified as a therapeutical target because of its involvement in chronic inflammatory syndromes. In this context, the research of MPO inhibitors was intensified and development of new chemical entities was rationally driven by the research of ligands that enter into the MPO catalytic pocket. Actually, as soon as crystallography data of MPO have become available and its structure was virtually designed, the rational drug design has been applied to this peroxidase. Pharmaceutical industries and academic laboratories apply rational drug design on MPO by either optimizing known inhibitors or searching new molecules by high-throughput virtual screening. By these ways, they were able to find efficient MPO inhibitors and understand their interactions with the enzyme. During this quest of MPO inhibition, it appears that Glu268 is a crucial residue in order to optimize ligand-target interaction. This amino acid should be carefully considered by medicinal chemist when they design inhibitors interfering with MPO activity.

  18. Evaluation of Mutual Drug-Drug Interaction within Geneva Cocktail for Cytochrome P450 Phenotyping using Innovative Dried Blood Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Bosilkovska, Marija; Samer, Caroline; Déglon, Julien; Thomas, Aurélien; Walder, Bernhard; Desmeules, Jules; Daali, Youssef

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity can be assessed using a 'cocktail' phenotyping approach. Recently, we have developed a cocktail (Geneva cocktail) which combines the use of low-dose probes with a low-invasiveness dried blood spots (DBS) sampling technique and a single analytical method for the phenotyping of six major CYP isoforms. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of CYP activity after pre-treatment with CYP inhibitors/inducer could be reliably predicted using Geneva cocktail. To further validate this cocktail, in this study, we have verified whether probe drugs contained in the latter cause mutual drug-drug interactions. In a randomized, four-way, Latin-square crossover study, 30 healthy volunteers received low-dose caffeine, flurbiprofen, omeprazole, dextromethorphan and midazolam (a previously validated combination with no mutual drug-drug interactions); fexofenadine alone; bupropion alone; or all seven drugs simultaneously (Geneva cocktail). Pharmacokinetic profiles of the probe drugs and their metabolites were determined in DBS samples using both conventional micropipette sampling and new microfluidic device allowing for self-sampling. The 90% confidence intervals for the geometric mean ratios of AUC metabolite/AUC probe for CYP probes administered alone or within Geneva cocktail fell within the 0.8-1.25 bioequivalence range indicating the absence of pharmacokinetic interaction. The same result was observed for the chosen phenotyping indices, that is metabolic ratios at 2 hr (CYP1A2, CYP3A) or 3 hr (CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6) post-cocktail administration. DBS sampling could successfully be performed using a new microfluidic device. In conclusion, Geneva cocktail combined with an innovative DBS sampling device can be used routinely as a test for simultaneous CYP phenotyping. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  19. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1

    SciTech Connect

    Szymańska, Paulina; Martin, Katie R.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Hlavacek, William S.; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-03-11

    We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macro)autophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation). The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1), namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputs of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy), a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.

  20. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1

    DOE PAGES

    Szymańska, Paulina; Martin, Katie R.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; ...

    2015-03-11

    We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macro)autophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation). The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1), namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputsmore » of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy), a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.« less

  1. San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang Constituents Exert Drug-Drug Interaction of Mutual Reinforcement at Both Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetic Level: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiasi; Hu, Yingfan; Xiang, Li; Li, Sheng; Yuan, Yi; Chen, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Wenge; Meng, Xianli; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory disorders underlie varieties of human diseases. San-Huang-Xie-xin-Tang (SHXXT), composed with Rhizoma Rhei (Rheum palmatum L.), Rhizoma Coptidis (Coptis chinensis Franch), and Radix Scutellaria (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), is a famous formula which has been widely used in the fight against inflammatory abnormalities. Mutual reinforcement is one of the basic theories of traditional Chinese medicine. Here this article reviewed and analyzed the recent research on (1) How the main constituents of SHXXT impact on inflammation-associated signaling pathway molecules. (2) The interaction between the main constituents and efflux pumps or intestinal transporters. The goal of this work was to, (1) Provide evidence to support the theory of mutual reinforcement. (2) Clarify the key targets of SHXXT and suggest which targets need further investigation. (3) Give advice for the clinical use of SHXXT to elevated the absorption of main constituents and eventually promote oral bioavailability. We search literatures in scientific databases with key words of “each main SHXXT constituent,” in combination with “each main inflammatory pathway target molecule” or each main intestinal transporter, respectively. We report the effect of five main constituents on target molecules which lies in three main inflammatory signaling pathways, we as well investigate the interaction between constituents and intestinal transporter. We conclude, (1) The synergistic effect of constituents at both levels confirm the mutual reinforcement theory of TCM as it is proven in this work. (2) The effect of main constituents on downstream targets in nuclear need more further investigation. (3) Drug elevating the absorption of rhein, berberine and baicalein can be employed to promote oral bioavailability of SHXXT. PMID:27965575

  2. San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang Constituents Exert Drug-Drug Interaction of Mutual Reinforcement at Both Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetic Level: A Review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiasi; Hu, Yingfan; Xiang, Li; Li, Sheng; Yuan, Yi; Chen, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Wenge; Meng, Xianli; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory disorders underlie varieties of human diseases. San-Huang-Xie-xin-Tang (SHXXT), composed with Rhizoma Rhei (Rheum palmatum L.), Rhizoma Coptidis (Coptis chinensis Franch), and Radix Scutellaria (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), is a famous formula which has been widely used in the fight against inflammatory abnormalities. Mutual reinforcement is one of the basic theories of traditional Chinese medicine. Here this article reviewed and analyzed the recent research on (1) How the main constituents of SHXXT impact on inflammation-associated signaling pathway molecules. (2) The interaction between the main constituents and efflux pumps or intestinal transporters. The goal of this work was to, (1) Provide evidence to support the theory of mutual reinforcement. (2) Clarify the key targets of SHXXT and suggest which targets need further investigation. (3) Give advice for the clinical use of SHXXT to elevated the absorption of main constituents and eventually promote oral bioavailability. We search literatures in scientific databases with key words of "each main SHXXT constituent," in combination with "each main inflammatory pathway target molecule" or each main intestinal transporter, respectively. We report the effect of five main constituents on target molecules which lies in three main inflammatory signaling pathways, we as well investigate the interaction between constituents and intestinal transporter. We conclude, (1) The synergistic effect of constituents at both levels confirm the mutual reinforcement theory of TCM as it is proven in this work. (2) The effect of main constituents on downstream targets in nuclear need more further investigation. (3) Drug elevating the absorption of rhein, berberine and baicalein can be employed to promote oral bioavailability of SHXXT.

  3. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-08-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia.

  4. Comparative QSAR analysis of cyclo-oxygenase2 inhibiting drugs.

    PubMed

    Mohanapriya, Arumugam; Achuthan, Dayalan

    2012-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) inhibiting drugs were subjected to comparative quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) analysis with an attempt to derive and to understand the relationship between the biological activity and molecular descriptors by multiple regression analysis. The different drugs that inhibit cyclo-oxygenase 2 enzyme were compared instead of subjecting one drug and its derivatives to QSAR analysis. The study was conducted to look for the common structural features between the drugs which confer to a good biological activity. Based on the regression analysis the following descriptors were finalized as the components fitting best in the regression equations: Ss, SCBO, RBN, nN, SIC0, IC1, and H-055. These descriptors belong to constitution (Ss, SCBO, RBN, nN), information indices (SIC0, IC1) and atom centered fragments (H-055) category. Based on these descriptors QSAR models were generated and evaluated for best structure-activity correlation. The model generated from constitution and information indices descriptors corresponds to the essential structural features of the drugs and are found to have significant correlation with COX2 inhibiting activity. This study shall help in rational drug design and synthesis of new selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors with predetermined affinity and activity.

  5. The clinically approved antiviral drug sofosbuvir inhibits Zika virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Sacramento, Carolina Q.; de Melo, Gabrielle R.; de Freitas, Caroline S.; Rocha, Natasha; Hoelz, Lucas Villas Bôas; Miranda, Milene; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Marttorelli, Andressa; Ferreira, André C.; Barbosa-Lima, Giselle; Abrantes, Juliana L.; Vieira, Yasmine Rangel; Bastos, Mônica M.; de Mello Volotão, Eduardo; Nunes, Estevão Portela; Tschoeke, Diogo A.; Leomil, Luciana; Loiola, Erick Correia; Trindade, Pablo; Rehen, Stevens K.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Boechat, Nubia; Thompson, Fabiano L.; de Filippis, Ana M. B.; Brüning, Karin; Souza, Thiago Moreno L.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family, along with other agents of clinical significance such as dengue (DENV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses. Since ZIKV causes neurological disorders during fetal development and in adulthood, antiviral drugs are necessary. Sofosbuvir is clinically approved for use against HCV and targets the protein that is most conserved among the members of the Flaviviridae family, the viral RNA polymerase. Indeed, we found that sofosbuvir inhibits ZIKV RNA polymerase, targeting conserved amino acid residues. Sofosbuvir inhibited ZIKV replication in different cellular systems, such as hepatoma (Huh-7) cells, neuroblastoma (SH-Sy5y) cells, neural stem cells (NSC) and brain organoids. In addition to the direct inhibition of the viral RNA polymerase, we observed that sofosbuvir also induced an increase in A-to-G mutations in the viral genome. Together, our data highlight a potential secondary use of sofosbuvir, an anti-HCV drug, against ZIKV. PMID:28098253

  6. The clinically approved antiviral drug sofosbuvir inhibits Zika virus replication.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, Carolina Q; de Melo, Gabrielle R; de Freitas, Caroline S; Rocha, Natasha; Hoelz, Lucas Villas Bôas; Miranda, Milene; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Marttorelli, Andressa; Ferreira, André C; Barbosa-Lima, Giselle; Abrantes, Juliana L; Vieira, Yasmine Rangel; Bastos, Mônica M; de Mello Volotão, Eduardo; Nunes, Estevão Portela; Tschoeke, Diogo A; Leomil, Luciana; Loiola, Erick Correia; Trindade, Pablo; Rehen, Stevens K; Bozza, Fernando A; Bozza, Patrícia T; Boechat, Nubia; Thompson, Fabiano L; de Filippis, Ana M B; Brüning, Karin; Souza, Thiago Moreno L

    2017-01-18

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family, along with other agents of clinical significance such as dengue (DENV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses. Since ZIKV causes neurological disorders during fetal development and in adulthood, antiviral drugs are necessary. Sofosbuvir is clinically approved for use against HCV and targets the protein that is most conserved among the members of the Flaviviridae family, the viral RNA polymerase. Indeed, we found that sofosbuvir inhibits ZIKV RNA polymerase, targeting conserved amino acid residues. Sofosbuvir inhibited ZIKV replication in different cellular systems, such as hepatoma (Huh-7) cells, neuroblastoma (SH-Sy5y) cells, neural stem cells (NSC) and brain organoids. In addition to the direct inhibition of the viral RNA polymerase, we observed that sofosbuvir also induced an increase in A-to-G mutations in the viral genome. Together, our data highlight a potential secondary use of sofosbuvir, an anti-HCV drug, against ZIKV.

  7. Drug-Eluting Fibers for HIV-1 Inhibition and Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract. PMID:23209601

  8. Microglia-inhibiting activity of Parkinson's disease drug amantadine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Lee, Ho-Won; Hwang, Jaegyu; Kim, Jaehong; Lee, Min-Jeong; Han, Hyung-Soo; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2012-09-01

    Amantadine is currently used as an antiviral and an antiparkinsonian drug. Although the drug is known to bind a viral proton channel protein, the mechanism of action in Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be determined. This study investigated whether the drug has an inhibitory effect on microglial activation and neuroinflammation, which have been implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative processes. Using cultured microglial cells, it was demonstrated that the drug inhibited inflammatory activation of microglia and a signaling pathway that governs the microglial activation. The drug reduced the expression and production of proinflammatory mediators in bacterial lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglia cells. The microglia-inhibiting activity of amantadine was also demonstrated in a microglia/neuron coculture and animal models of neuroinflammation and Parkinson's disease. Collectively, our results suggest that amantadine may act on microglia in the central nervous system to inhibit their inflammatory activation, thereby attenuating neuroinflammation. These results provide a molecular basis of the glia-targeted mechanism of action for amantadine.

  9. Drug-eluting fibers for HIV-1 inhibition and contraception.

    PubMed

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract.

  10. Flagging Drugs That Inhibit the Bile Salt Export Pump.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Floriane; Pinto, Marta; Khunweeraphong, Narakorn; Wlcek, Katrin; Sohail, M Imran; Noeske, Tobias; Boyer, Scott; Chiba, Peter; Stieger, Bruno; Kuchler, Karl; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-01-04

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) is an ABC-transporter expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Its physiological role is to expel bile salts into the canaliculi from where they drain into the bile duct. Inhibition of this transporter may lead to intrahepatic cholestasis. Predictive computational models of BSEP inhibition may allow for fast identification of potentially harmful compounds in large databases. This article presents a predictive in silico model based on physicochemical descriptors that is able to flag compounds as potential BSEP inhibitors. This model was built using a training set of 670 compounds with available BSEP inhibition potencies. It successfully predicted BSEP inhibition for two independent test sets and was in a further step used for a virtual screening experiment. After in vitro testing of selected candidates, a marketed drug, bromocriptin, was identified for the first time as BSEP inhibitor. This demonstrates the usefulness of the model to identify new BSEP inhibitors and therefore potential cholestasis perpetrators.

  11. Intraguild mutualism.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Philip H; Cox, John J

    2011-12-01

    Although studies of species linked by a common resource (i.e. ecological guilds) have so far mainly focused on competition and predation, guilds are also good places to find mutualism. In this review we consider some three- and four-species community modules to illustrate examples of wide relevance. Mutualism arises from various direct and indirect trophic and non-trophic interactions between species--and within modules both with and without intraguild predation. Species removal and augmentation experiments, other manipulations, direct measurements, and path-analytic methods can determine the presence and intensity of mutualism within guilds. Such studies, particularly when associated with existing theory and new theoretical development, can help advance an interaction-based approach to community analysis that recognizes linkages among mutualism, predation and competition in natural systems.

  12. Prediction and evaluation of protein farnesyltransferase inhibition by commercial drugs.

    PubMed

    DeGraw, Amanda J; Keiser, Michael J; Ochocki, Joshua D; Shoichet, Brian K; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-03-25

    The similarity ensemble approach (SEA) relates proteins based on the set-wise chemical similarity among their ligands. It can be used to rapidly search large compound databases and to build cross-target similarity maps. The emerging maps relate targets in ways that reveal relationships one might not recognize based on sequence or structural similarities alone. SEA has previously revealed cross talk between drugs acting primarily on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we used SEA to look for potential off-target inhibition of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) by commercially available drugs. The inhibition of PFTase has profound consequences for oncogenesis, as well as a number of other diseases. In the present study, two commercial drugs, Loratadine and Miconazole, were identified as potential ligands for PFTase and subsequently confirmed as such experimentally. These results point toward the applicability of SEA for the prediction of not only GPCR-GPCR drug cross talk but also GPCR-enzyme and enzyme-enzyme drug cross talk.

  13. Prediction and evaluation of protein farnesyltransferase inhibition by commercial drugs

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Keiser, Michael J.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The Similarity Ensemble Approach (SEAa) relates proteins based on the set-wise chemical similarity among their ligands. It can be used to rapidly search large compound databases and to build cross-target similarity maps. The emerging maps relate targets in ways that reveal relationships one might not recognize based on sequence or structural similarities alone. SEA has previously revealed cross talk between drugs acting primarily on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we used SEA to look for potential off-target inhibition of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) by commercially available drugs. The inhibition of PFTase has profound consequences for oncogenesis, as well as a number of other diseases. In the present study, two commercial drugs, Loratadine and Miconazole, were identified as potential ligands for PFTase and subsequently confirmed as such experimentally. These results point towards the applicability of SEA for the prediction of not only GPCR-GPCR drug cross talk, but also GPCR-enzyme and enzyme-enzyme drug cross talk. PMID:20180535

  14. Antipsychotic Drugs Inhibit the Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Markowitz, John S.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Hong-Jie; DeVane, C. Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The ABCG2 transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) has been identified in several physiological sites. It has been suggested to play an important role in disposition of many drugs and environmental toxins. We investigated the effects of several antipsychotic drugs, including risperidone, 9-hydroxy-risperidone (paliperidone), olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, haloperidol and chlorpromazine, and a positive control inhibitor Ko143 on functions of BCRP in MCF7 and BCRP over-expressing MCF7/MX100 cell lines using a BCRP prototypical substrate mitoxantrone. Our findings indicated that the tested antipsychotics rank order of potency of inhibition of BCRP according to concentrations required to reach 50% of maximum inhibition (IC50) was as follows: Ko143 (0.07 μM) > risperidone (38.1 μM) > clozapine (42.0 μM) > paliperidone (51 μM) > chlorpromazine (52.2 μM) > quetiapine (66.1 μM) > olanzapine = haloperidol (>100.0 μM). We further tested the effects of various concentrations of risperidone on the BCRP-mediated transport of oestrone-3-sulfate in a colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2, a widely used model to study drug absorption. Our findings show that risperidone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 μM significantly inhibited intracellular accumulation of oestrone-3-sulfate in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present results suggest that a potential source of pharmacokinetic interactions exists between BCRP substrates and several antipsychotics. PMID:18834354

  15. Vasoactive drugs inhibit oxygen radical production of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M; Schneider, E M; Liebert, S; Mettler, S; Lemoine, H

    1997-05-01

    A concentration response study was performed to clarify whether vasoactive drugs, routinely used in intensive care patients, inhibit oxygen radical production of neutrophils. Moreover, in a cell-free system, it was investigated whether these drugs exert free radical scavenging properties. Vasoactive agents were incubated with neutrophils from healthy human volunteers, which were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and by opsonized zymosan to produce oxygen radicals, detected by chemiluminescence measurements. Sympathomimetics (epinephrine greater than norepinephrine, dopamine and dobutamine) as well as phosphodiesterase-inhibitors (amrinone and enoximone) inhibited FMLP-induced and zymosan-induced oxygen radical production of neutrophils in a concentration-dependent and drug-specific fashion. With the exception of amrinone, FMLP-induced chemiluminescence of neutrophils was impaired nearly 10-fold more markedly than zymosan-induced chemiluminescence. Glyceryl trinitrate, nifedipine and prostacyclin had no effect on oxygen radical production of neutrophils. In the cell-free system, epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, amrinone and enoximone demonstrated oxygen free radical scavenging properties. This study shows that vasoactive drugs, frequently used in the clinical setting, may suppress oxidative burst after FMLP-receptor stimulation. As demonstrated in the cell-free system, this suppression was, at least in part, due to oxygen radical scavenging.

  16. Selective inhibition of bitter taste of various drugs by lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Y; Sugiura, Y; Lee, C; Otsuji, K; Kurihara, K

    1995-05-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that lipoprotein composed of phosphatidic acid (PA) and beta-lactoglobulin (LG) selectively and reversibly suppress the frog taste nerve response to bitter substances. In the present study, we examined the effects of various lipoproteins on the taste sensation to various stimuli in humans by a psychophysical method. Among various lipoproteins composed of different of lipids and proteins, the lipoproteins composed of PA and proteins were most effective in suppressing bitter taste. The lipoproteins composed of PA and LG, bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, alpha-lactoalbumin or casein similarly suppressed effects on sensation of bitter taste. Using PA-LG, the effects on taste sensation to various stimuli were examined. The bitter taste of all twelve substances examined was inhibited, while saltiness of NaCl and sweetness of sucrose were not inhibited. The inhibition of bitter taste was completely reversible. Masking of the target sites for bitter substances on the taste receptor membranes with PA-LG seems to contribute to the inhibition of bitter taste. Direct binding of the bitter substances to PA-LG in the medium also contributes to the inhibition of bitter taste of certain substances. Among various drugs, basic and hydrophobic substances such as quinine, denatortium and propranolol have low taste thresholds and are said to be the most bitter. PA-LG most effectively suppressed the bitter taste of such substances. PA originates from soybeans and the proteins used except for bovine serum albumin originate from milk or eggs, and hence the lipoproteins can be safely used to mask the bitter taste of drugs.

  17. High-Throughput Cytochrome P450 Cocktail Inhibition Assay for Assessing Drug-Drug and Drug-Botanical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Detection of drug-drug interactions is essential during the early stages of drug discovery and development, and the understanding of drug-botanical interactions is important for the safe use of botanical dietary supplements. Among the different forms of drug interactions that are known, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is the most common cause of drug-drug or drug-botanical interactions. Therefore, a rapid and comprehensive mass spectrometry–based in vitro high-throughput P450 cocktail inhibition assay was developed that uses 10 substrates simultaneously against nine CYP isoforms. Including probe substrates for CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and two probes targeting different binding sites of CYP3A4/5, this cocktail simultaneously assesses at least as many P450 enzymes as previous assays while remaining among the fastest due to short incubation times and rapid analysis using ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated using known inhibitors of each P450 enzyme and then shown to be useful not only for single-compound testing but also for the evaluation of potential drug-botanical interactions using the botanical dietary supplement licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) as an example. PMID:26285764

  18. High-Throughput Cytochrome P450 Cocktail Inhibition Assay for Assessing Drug-Drug and Drug-Botanical Interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    Detection of drug-drug interactions is essential during the early stages of drug discovery and development, and the understanding of drug-botanical interactions is important for the safe use of botanical dietary supplements. Among the different forms of drug interactions that are known, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is the most common cause of drug-drug or drug-botanical interactions. Therefore, a rapid and comprehensive mass spectrometry-based in vitro high-throughput P450 cocktail inhibition assay was developed that uses 10 substrates simultaneously against nine CYP isoforms. Including probe substrates for CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and two probes targeting different binding sites of CYP3A4/5, this cocktail simultaneously assesses at least as many P450 enzymes as previous assays while remaining among the fastest due to short incubation times and rapid analysis using ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated using known inhibitors of each P450 enzyme and then shown to be useful not only for single-compound testing but also for the evaluation of potential drug-botanical interactions using the botanical dietary supplement licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) as an example. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. GABAergic drugs inhibit amphetamine-induced distractibility in the rat.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A; Medrano, A; Garrido, N; Alonso, P

    1997-09-01

    Drugs facilitating GABAergic neurotransmission have been reported to block some behavioral actions of dopaminergic stimulation but not others. The present experiments were performed with the purpose to extend the range of behaviors in which the interaction between GABA and dopamine have been studied. The ability of the GABAB agonist baclofen and the GABA transaminase inhibitor sodium valproate to block the enhanced distractibility produced by amphetamine was evaluated in a procedure especially designed for analyzing drugs' effects on distractibility. Briefly, rats were trained to traverse a straight runway with a sucrose solution as reinforcement. Once the response had been acquired, an additional runway ending in an empty box was connected. The time spent investigating this additional runway is the measure of distractibility. Male rats treated with amphetamine, 1 mg/kg, displayed an increase of the time spent in the additional runway. Baclofen, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, and sodium valproate, 100 and 200 mg/kg, had no effect on distraction behavior when administered alone. However, when these drugs were administered together with amphetamine, 1 mg/kg, they completely inhibited the effects of the stimulant on distractibility. These data show that distractibility is similar to discrimination learning with regard to the capacity of GABAergic drugs to block the effects of dopaminergic stimulation. It is different from locomotor activity, however, where GABAergic drugs are ineffective in this respect.

  20. Histamine N-methyl transferase: inhibition by drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, G M; Donatelli, P; Giuliani, L

    1992-01-01

    1. Histamine N-methyl transferase activity was measured in samples of human liver, brain, kidney, lung and intestinal mucosa. The mean (+/- s.d.) rate (nmol min-1 mg-1 protein) of histamine N-methylation was 1.78 +/- 0.59 (liver, n = 60), 1.15 +/- 0.38 (renal cortex, n = 8), 0.79 +/- 0.14 (renal medulla, n = 8), 0.35 +/- 0.08 (lung, n = 20), 0.47 +/- 0.18 (human intestine, n = 30) and 0.29 +/- 0.14 (brain, n = 13). 2. Inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase by 15 drugs was investigated in human liver. The IC50 for the various drugs ranged over three orders of magnitude; chloroquine was the most potent inhibitor. 3. The average IC50 values for chloroquine were 12.6, 22.0, 19.0, 21.6 microM in liver, renal cortex, brain and colon, respectively. These values are lower than the Michaelis-Menten constant for histamine N-methyltransferase in liver (43.8 microM) and kidney (45.5 microM). Chloroquine carried a mixed non-competitive inhibition of hepatic histamine N-methyl transferase. Some side-effects of chloroquine may be explained by inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase. PMID:1457266

  1. Drug-Drug Interaction Potentials of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors via Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Liu, Yong; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are anticancer drugs that may be co-administered with other drugs. The aims of this study are to investigate the inhibitory effects of TKIs on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities, and to quantitatively evaluate their potential to cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Inhibition kinetic profiles of a panel of UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17) by four TKIs (axitinib, imatinib, lapatinib and vandetanib) were characterized by using hepatic microsomes and recombinant proteins. Lapatinib exhibited potent competitive inhibition against UGT1A1 activity with a Ki of 0.5 μM. Imatinib was found to exhibit broad inhibition on several UGTs, particularly potent competitive inhibition against UGT2B17 with a Ki of 0.4 μM. The TKIs also exerted intermediate inhibition against several UGTs (i.e., UGT1A7 by lapatinib; UGT1A1 by imatinib; UGT1A4, 1A7 and 1A9 by axitinib; and UGT1A9 by vandetanib). Results from modeling for the quantitative prediction of DDI risk indicated that the coadministration of lapatinib or imatinib at clinical doses could result in a significant increase in AUC of drugs primarily cleared by UGT1A1 or 2B17. Lapatinib and imatinib may cause clinically significant DDIs when co-administered UGT1A1 or 2B17 substrates. PMID:26642944

  2. Pharmacological diversity among drugs that inhibit bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Russell, R Graham G

    2015-06-01

    Drugs that inhibit bone resorption ('anti-resorptives') continue to dominate the therapy of bone diseases characterized by enhanced bone destruction, including Paget's disease, osteoporosis and cancers. The historic use of oestrogens for osteoporosis led on to SERMs (Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators, e.g. raloxifene and bazedoxifene). Currently the mainstay of treatment worldwide is still with bisphosphonates, as used clinically for over 40 years. The more recently introduced anti-RANK-ligand antibody, denosumab, is also very effective in reducing vertebral, non-vertebral and hip fractures. Odanacatib is the only cathepsin K inhibitor likely to be registered for clinical use. The pharmacological basis for the action of each of these drug classes is different, enabling choices to be made to ensure their optimal use in clinical practice.

  3. Alleviating Cancer Drug Toxicity by Inhibiting a Bacterial Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Bret D.; Wang, Hongwei; Lane, Kimberly T.; Scott, John E.; Orans, Jillian; Koo, Ja Seol; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Jobin, Christian; Yeh, Li-An; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2011-08-12

    The dose-limiting side effect of the common colon cancer chemotherapeutic CPT-11 is severe diarrhea caused by symbiotic bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases that reactivate the drug in the gut. We sought to target these enzymes without killing the commensal bacteria essential for human health. Potent bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase inhibitors were identified by high-throughput screening and shown to have no effect on the orthologous mammalian enzyme. Crystal structures established that selectivity was based on a loop unique to bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases. Inhibitors were highly effective against the enzyme target in living aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but did not kill the bacteria or harm mammalian cells. Finally, oral administration of an inhibitor protected mice from CPT-11-induced toxicity. Thus, drugs may be designed to inhibit undesirable enzyme activities in essential microbial symbiotes to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  4. The Synthetic Antiviral Drug Arbidol Inhibits Globally Prevalent Pathogenic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Halfmann, Peter; Morrey, John D.; Smee, Donald F.; Prichard, Mark; Mire, Chad E.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arbidol (ARB) is a synthetic antiviral originally developed to combat influenza viruses. ARB is currently used clinically in several countries but not in North America. We have previously shown that ARB inhibits in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) by blocking HCV entry and replication. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are inhibited by ARB and demonstrate that ARB suppresses in vitro infection of mammalian cells with Ebola virus (EBOV), Tacaribe arenavirus, and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We also confirm suppression of hepatitis B virus and poliovirus by ARB. ARB inhibited EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection when added before or at the same time as virus infection and was less effective when added 24 h after EBOV infection. Experiments with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the EBOV Zaire glycoprotein showed that infection was inhibited by ARB at early stages, most likely at the level of viral entry into host cells. ARB inhibited HHV-8 replication to a similar degree as cidofovir. Our data broaden the spectrum of antiviral efficacy of ARB to include globally prevalent viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality. IMPORTANCE There are many globally prevalent viruses for which there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral medicines. Some of these viruses, such as Ebola virus or members of the arenavirus family, rapidly cause severe hemorrhagic diseases that can be fatal. Other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), establish persistent infections that cause chronic illnesses, including cancer. Thus, finding an affordable, effective, and safe drug that blocks many viruses remains an unmet medical need. The antiviral drug arbidol (ARB), already in clinical use in several countries as an anti-influenza treatment, has been previously shown to suppress the growth of many viruses. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are blocked by ARB in a laboratory setting to include Ebola virus

  5. The Synthetic Antiviral Drug Arbidol Inhibits Globally Prevalent Pathogenic Viruses.

    PubMed

    Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Halfmann, Peter; Morrey, John D; Smee, Donald F; Prichard, Mark; Mire, Chad E; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Geisbert, Thomas W; Polyak, Stephen J

    2016-01-06

    Arbidol (ARB) is a synthetic antiviral originally developed to combat influenza viruses. ARB is currently used clinically in several countries but not in North America. We have previously shown that ARB inhibits in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) by blocking HCV entry and replication. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are inhibited by ARB and demonstrate that ARB suppresses in vitro infection of mammalian cells with Ebola virus (EBOV), Tacaribe arenavirus, and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We also confirm suppression of hepatitis B virus and poliovirus by ARB. ARB inhibited EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection when added before or at the same time as virus infection and was less effective when added 24 h after EBOV infection. Experiments with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the EBOV Zaire glycoprotein showed that infection was inhibited by ARB at early stages, most likely at the level of viral entry into host cells. ARB inhibited HHV-8 replication to a similar degree as cidofovir. Our data broaden the spectrum of antiviral efficacy of ARB to include globally prevalent viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality. There are many globally prevalent viruses for which there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral medicines. Some of these viruses, such as Ebola virus or members of the arenavirus family, rapidly cause severe hemorrhagic diseases that can be fatal. Other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), establish persistent infections that cause chronic illnesses, including cancer. Thus, finding an affordable, effective, and safe drug that blocks many viruses remains an unmet medical need. The antiviral drug arbidol (ARB), already in clinical use in several countries as an anti-influenza treatment, has been previously shown to suppress the growth of many viruses. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are blocked by ARB in a laboratory setting to include Ebola virus, Tacaribe arenavirus

  6. Inhibition of human liver aldehyde oxidase: implications for potential drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Barr, John T; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2011-12-01

    During the course of our research efforts to understand the kinetics of human aldehyde oxidase as a xenobiotic-clearing enzyme, we investigated the effect of eight different inhibitors on the oxidation of the probe substrate phthalazine. Saturation kinetic parameters for phthalazine oxidation in human liver cytosol were found to be the following: K(m) = 8.0 ± 0.4 μM and V(max) = 4.3 ± 0.1 nmol · min(-1) · mg protein(-1). Inhibitory potency of the inhibitors tested ranged from 0.1 to 5 μM. Of the eight different inhibitor compounds tested, seven were observed to inhibit through a mixed mode and one through a strictly competitive mode. A ratio of the K(ii) and K(is) values was used to assess the relative competitiveness of each inhibitor. For the mixed inhibitors, the mode of inhibition varied from mostly uncompetitive to predominantly competitive (K(ii)/K(is) values ranging from 0.1 to 15). The implications for potential drug-drug interactions and inhibition mechanism are discussed. We found two inhibitors, clozapine and chlorpromazine, that have a moderate predicted risk of drug-drug interactions based on the K(i) value relative to the inhibitor concentration in human plasma, having a calculated [I]/K(i) value of 0.4 and 0.8, respectively.

  7. Trans-Channel Interactions in Batrachotoxin-Modified Rat Skeletal Muscle Sodium Channels: Kinetic Analysis of Mutual Inhibition between μ-Conotoxin GIIIA Derivatives and Amine Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Quanli; Pavlov, Evgeny; Britvina, Tatiana; Zamponi, Gerald W.; French, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    R13X derivatives of μ-conotoxin GIIIA bind externally to single sodium channels and block current incompletely with mean “blocked” durations of several seconds. We studied interactions between two classes of blockers (μ-conotoxins and amines) by steady state, kinetic analysis of block of BTX-modified Na channels in planar bilayers. The amines cause all-or-none block at a site internal to the selectivity filter. TPrA and DEA block single Na channels with very different kinetics. TPrA induces discrete, all-or-none, blocked events (mean blocked durations, ∼100 ms), whereas DEA produces a concentration-dependent reduction of the apparent single channel amplitude (“fast” block). These distinct modes of action allow simultaneous evaluation of block by TPrA and DEA, showing a classical, competitive interaction between them. The apparent affinity of TPrA decreases with increasing [DEA], based on a decrease in the association rate for TPrA. When an R13X μ-conotoxin derivative and one of the amines are applied simultaneously on opposite sides of the membrane, a mutually inhibitory interaction is observed. Dissociation constants, at +50 mV, for TPrA (∼4 mM) and DEA (∼30 mM) increase by ∼20%–50% when R13E (nominal net charge, +4) or R13Q (+5) is bound. Analysis of the slow blocking kinetics for the two toxin derivatives showed comparable decreases in affinity of the μ-conotoxins in the presence of an amine. Although this mutual inhibition seems to be qualitatively consistent with an electrostatic interaction across the selectivity filter, quantitative considerations raise questions about the mechanistic details of the interaction. PMID:18658223

  8. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Ganesan, V.; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle-RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml-1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml-1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle-RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs-RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates.

  9. A mutual inhibition between APC/C and its substrate Mes1 required for meiotic progression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yuu; Trickey, Michelle; Izawa, Daisuke; Gannon, Julian; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yamano, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a cell-cycle-regulated essential E3 ubiquitin ligase; however, very little is known about its meiotic regulation. Here we show that fission yeast Mes1 is a substrate of the APC/C as well as an inhibitor, allowing autoregulation of the APC/C in meiosis. Both traits require a functional destruction box (D box) and KEN box. We show that Mes1 directly binds the WD40 domain of the Fizzy family of APC/C activators. Intriguingly, expression of nonubiquitylatable Mes1 blocks cells in metaphase I with high levels of APC/C substrates, suggesting that ubiquitylation of Mes1 is required for partial degradation of cyclin B in meiosis I by alleviating Mes1 inhibitory function. Consistently, a ternary complex, APC/C-Fizzy/Cdc20-Mes1, is stabilized by inhibiting Mes1 ubiquitylation. These results demonstrate that the fine-tuning of the APC/C activity, by a substrate that is also an inhibitor, is required for the precise coordination and transition through meiosis.

  10. Mutual inhibition between YAP and SRSF1 maintains long non-coding RNA, Malat1-induced tumourigenesis in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayi; Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yue; Zhen, Ni; Zhang, Li; Qiao, Yongxia; Weng, Wenhao; Liu, Xiangfan; Ma, Lifang; Xiao, Weifan; Yu, Wenjun; Chu, Qinghua; Pan, Qiuhui; Sun, Fenyong

    2014-05-01

    Emerging studies have revealed that Malat1 is overexpressed in many malignant diseases, including liver cancer, and contributes to enhancing cell migration or facilitating proliferation. However, the mechanism underlying its regulation has largely remained elusive. Here, we characterised the oncoprotein Yes-associated protein (YAP), which up-regulated metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1) expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, whereas serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) played an opposing role. SRSF1 inhibited YAP activity by preventing its co-occupation with TCF/β-catenin on the Malat1 promoter. In contrast, overexpression of YAP impaired the nuclear retention of both SRSF1 and itself via an interaction with Angiomotin (AMOT). This effect removed the inhibitory role of SRSF1 on Malat1 in the nucleus. Furthermore, higher expression of YAP was consistent with a lower SRSF1 nuclear accumulation in human liver cancer tissues. We also revealed that overexpression of YAP combined with a knockdown of SRSF1 resulted in conspicuously enhanced transwell cell mobility, accelerated tumour growth rate, and loss of body weight in a tail vein-injected mouse models. Taken together, these data provided a novel mechanism underlying the balance between SRSF1, YAP and Malat1 and uncovered a new role of YAP in regulating long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). Thus, disrupting the interaction between YAP and SRSF1 may serve as a crucial therapeutic method in liver cancer.

  11. The "Flavor" of the Social Ecology Paradigm in Use: Building on Mutual Social Support in Preventing Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsheim, Howard I.; Roberts, Bruce B.

    The "Bottled Pain" project, a drug abuse prevention program in 24 Lutheran congregations in southern Minnesota, is based on a social ecology paradigm designed to prevent drug abuse through the development of socially supportive relationshps and through using the environment as a natural strength within the community. According to the…

  12. Characterizing Septum Inhibition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis for Novel Drug Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Respicio,L.; Nair, P.; Huang, Q.; Anil, B.; Tracz, S.; Truglio, J.; Kisker, C.; Raleigh, D.; Ojima, I.; et al

    2008-01-01

    A temperature sensitive mutation in the cell division protein FtsZ was used in combination with transcriptional analysis to identify biomarkers for inhibition of septum formation. Crystallography and modeling revealed that the glycine for aspartate substitution at amino acid 210 was located in helix 8 of the protein, adjacent to the T7 synergy loop. To verify the molecular behavior of FtsZD210G, the in vitro activity and structural stability were evaluated as a function of temperature. These analyses confirmed that the FtsZD210G mutant had reduced GTPase and polymerization activity compared to wild-type FtsZ, and CD spectroscopy demonstrated that both FtsZD210G and wild-type FtsZ had similar structure and stability. Significantly, the FtsZD210G merodiploid strain of M. tuberculosis had compromised growth at 37 C, substantiating the suitability of FtsZD210G as a molecular tool for global analysis in response to improper FtsZ polymerization and septum inhibition. Advanced model-based bioinformatics and transcriptional mapping were used to identify high-content multiple features that provide biomarkers for the development of a rational drug screening platform for discovering novel chemotherapeutics that target cell division.

  13. The antipsychotic drug chlorpromazine inhibits HERG potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dierk; Wu, Kezhong; Kathöfer, Sven; Katus, Hugo A; Schoels, Wolfgang; Kiehn, Johann; Karle, Christoph A

    2003-01-01

    Acquired long QT syndrome (aLQTS) is caused by prolongation of the cardiac action potential because of blockade of cardiac ion channels and delayed repolarization of the heart. Patients with aLQTS carry an increased risk for torsade de pointes arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Several antipsychotic drugs may cause aLQTS. Recently, cases of QTc prolongation and torsade de pointes associated with chlorpromazine treatment have been reported. Blockade of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels, which plays a central role in arrhythmogenesis, has previously been reported to occur with chlorpromazine, but information on the mechanism of block is currently not available. We investigated the effects of chlorpromazine on cloned HERG potassium channels to determine the biophysical mechanism of block. HERG channels were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and ion currents were measured using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. Chlorpromazine blocked HERG potassium channels with an IC50 value of 21.6 μM and a Hill coefficient of 1.11. Analysis of the voltage dependence of block revealed a reduction of inhibition at positive membrane potentials. Inhibition of HERG channels by chlorpromazine displayed reverse frequency dependence, that is, the amount of block was lower at higher stimulation rates. No marked changes in electrophysiological parameters such as voltage dependence of activation or inactivation, or changes of the inactivation time constant were observed. In conclusion, HERG channels were blocked in the closed and activated states, and unblocking occurred very slowly. PMID:12788816

  14. Plaque inhibition assay for drug susceptibility testing of influenza viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, F G; Cote, K M; Douglas, R G

    1980-01-01

    The relative antiviral activities of four drugs against contemporary strains of influenza A and B viruses were determined in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayers with a plaque inhibition assay. This assay proved to be a reliable, rapid method of determining 50% inhibitory concentrations that correlated well with clinically achievable drug levels and the results of clinical trials. Contemporary strains of influenza A viruses (subtypes H1N1, H3N2, HSW1N1) required amantadine hydrochloride and rimantadine hydrochloride 50% inhibitory concentrations in the range of 0.2 to 0.4 microgram/ml, whereas 50% inhibitory concentrations ranged from approximately 50 to 100 micrograms/ml against influenza B viruses. Ribavirin was approximately 10-fold less active than amantadine hydrochloride against influenza A viruses, and the ribavirin 50% inhibitory concentrations against both influenza A and B viruses ranged from 2.6 to 6.8 micrograms/ml. Inosiplex had no antiviral activity in this test system. PMID:7396473

  15. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    PubMed

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C; Sudano, Isabella; Lüscher, Thomas F; Camici, Giovanni G

    2010-01-22

    DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54+/-0.9427%, n=5, P<0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0%+/-4.031, n=9, P=0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388+/-2.212%, n=6, P=0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  17. Raltegravir Has a Low Propensity To Cause Clinical Drug Interactions through Inhibition of Major Drug Transporters: an In Vitro Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Robert; Chan, Grace Hoyee; Hafey, Mike; Rhee, Elizabeth G.; Chu, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Raltegravir (RAL) is a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase inhibitor approved to treat HIV infection in adults in combination with other antiretrovirals. The potential of RAL to cause transporter-related drug-drug interactions (DDIs) as an inhibitor has not been well described to date. In this study, a series of in vitro experiments were conducted to assess the inhibitory effects of RAL on major human drug transporters known to be involved in clinically relevant drug interactions, including hepatic and renal uptake transporters and efflux transporters. For hepatic uptake transporters, RAL showed no inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), weak inhibition of OATP1B3 (40% inhibition at 100 μM), and no inhibition of organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1). Studies of renal uptake transporters showed that RAL inhibited organic anion transporters 1 and 3 (OAT1 and OAT3) with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) (108 μM and 18.8 μM, respectively) well above the maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) at the clinical 400-mg dose and did not inhibit organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2). As for efflux transporters, RAL did not inhibit breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and showed weak inhibition of multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) (52% inhibition at 100 μM) and MATE2-K (29% inhibition at 100 μM). These studies indicate that at clinically relevant exposures, RAL does not inhibit or only weakly inhibits hepatic uptake transporters OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OCT1, renal uptake transporters OCT2, OAT1, and OAT3, as well as efflux transporters BCRP, MATE1, and MATE2-K. The propensity for RAL to cause DDIs via inhibition of these transporters is therefore considered low. PMID:24295974

  18. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  19. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  20. Mebendazole, an antiparasitic drug, inhibits drug transporters expression in preclinical model of gastric peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Celestino Pinto, Laine; de Fátima Aquino Moreira-Nunes, Caroline; Soares, Bruno Moreira; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether MBZ down-regulates drug transporter expression (ABCB1, ABCC1, SLC47A1). mRNA expression level of ABCB1, ABCC1 and SLC47A1 was evaluated by qPCR and protein expression levels MDR-1 was performed by western blotting in malignant ascites cells (AGP-01) treated with MBZ for 24h. The mRNA expression level of ABCB1 and ABCC1 significantly decreased at a 1.0μM of MBZ compared to negative control, while SLC47A1 extremely decreased at all tested concentrations of MBZ. Protein expression levels MDR-1 significantly decreased at a 1.0μM of MBZ compared to negative control. Therefore, our results showed MBZ may play an important role in inhibiting MDR gene expression in malignant ascites cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hsf-1 and POB1 induce drug sensitivity and apoptosis by inhibiting Ralbp1.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sharad S; Yadav, Sushma; Drake, Kenneth; Singhal, Jyotsana; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2008-07-11

    Hsf-1 (heat shock factor-1) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate cellular heat shock response through its binding with the multispecific transporter protein, Ralbp1. Results of present studies demonstrate that Hsf-1 causes specific and saturable inhibition of the transport activity of Ralbp1 and that the combination of Hsf-1 and POB1 causes nearly complete inhibition through specific bindings with Ralbp1. Augmentation of cellular levels of Hsf-1 and POB1 caused dramatic apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cell line H358 through Ralbp1 inhibition. These findings indicate a novel model for mutual regulation of Hsf-1 and Ralbp1 through Ralbp1-mediated sequestration of Hsf-1 in the cellular cytoskeleton and Hsf-1-mediated inhibition of the transport activity of membrane-bound Ralbp1.

  2. Metabolism profiling, and cytochrome P450 inhibition & induction in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Z; Caldwell, G W

    2001-11-01

    To reduce the high attrition rates of NCEs in preclinical and clinical development uncovering pharmacokinetics, toxicokinetics, drug metabolism, and drug-drug interactions early in drug discovery would be highly valuable. There have been many in vitro screens developed for these areas that have higher sample throughput, which is consistent with the iterative cycle of a typical drug discovery research project. We have presented the present status and given detailed descriptions of biotransformation, metabolic stability assays, identification of drug metabolizing P450 enzymes, prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters from in vitro metabolism data, structure elucidation of metabolites, CYP450 inhibition assays and CYP450 induction assays from a drug discovery perspective. Strategies for the proper sequencing of primary and secondary assays employedfor drug metabolism and CYP450 inhibition & induction is discussed.

  3. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended.

  4. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Cubeddu, Luigi X.

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended. PMID:26926294

  5. Comparison of the Drug-Drug Interactions Potential of Erlotinib and Gefitinib via Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Ramírez, Jacqueline; House, Larry

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to investigate and compare the effects of erlotinib and gefitinib on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities and to quantitatively evaluate their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential due to UGT inhibition. The inhibitory effects of erlotinib and gefitinib on UGTs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography by measuring the formation rates for 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronide, imipramine N-glucuronide, and bilirubin glucuronides using recombinant human UGT isoforms and human liver microsomes (HLMs) in the absence or presence of erlotinib and gefitinib. Inhibition kinetic studies were conducted. Area under the curve (AUC) ratios were used to predict the risk of potential DDI in vivo. Erlotinib exhibited selective potent competitive inhibition against 4-MU glucuronidation by UGT1A1, and gefitinib demonstrated a wide range of inhibition against UGT-mediated 4-MU glucuronidation, particularly against UGT1A1, UGT1A7, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7. Erlotinib also exerted potent mixed inhibition against bilirubin glucuronidation in HLMs. We estimated that coadministration of erlotinib at 100 mg/day or higher doses may result in at least a 30% increase in the AUC of drugs predominantly cleared by UGT1A1. Thus, the coadministration of erlotinib with drugs primarily cleared by UGT1A1 may result in potential DDI. In contrast, gefitinib is unlikely to cause a clinically significant DDI through inhibition of glucuronidation. PMID:19850672

  6. Conjugation to polymeric chains of influenza drugs targeting M2 ion channels partially restores inhibition of drug-resistant mutants

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alyssa M.; Chen, Jianzhu; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    By attaching multiple copies of the influenza M2 ion channel inhibitors amantadine (1) and rimantadine (2) to polymeric chains we endeavored to recover their potency in inhibiting drug-resistant influenza viruses. Depending on loading densities, as well as the nature of the drug, the polymer, and the spacer arm, polymer-conjugated drugs were up to 30-fold more potent inhibitors of drug-resistant strains than their monomeric parents. In particular, a 20% loading density and a short linker group on the negatively charged poly-L-glutamate resulted in some of the most potent inhibitors for 2′s conjugates against drug-resistant influenza strains. Although full recovery of the inhibitory action against drug-resistant strains was not achieved, this study may be a step toward salvaging anti-influenza drugs that are no longer effective. PMID:23832466

  7. Assessment of cytochrome p450 enzyme inhibition and inactivation in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, David O; Einolf, Heidi J

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential of a drug candidate to inhibit or inactivate cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes remains an important part of pharmaceutical drug Discovery and Development programs. CYP enzymes are considered to be one of the most important enzyme families involved in the metabolic clearance of the vast majority of prescribed drugs. Clinical drug-drug interactions (DDI) involving inhibition or time-dependent inactivation of these enzymes can result in dangerous side effects resulting from reduced clearance/increased exposure of the drug being affected (the 'victim' drug). In this regard, pharmaceutical companies have become quite vigilant in mitigating CYP inhibition/inactivation liabilities of drug candidates early in Discovery including continued risk assessment throughout Development. In this review, common strategies and decision making processes for the assessment of DDI risk in the different stages of pharmaceutical development are discussed. In addition, in vitro study designs, analysis, and interpretation of CYP inhibition and inactivation data are described in stage appropriate context. The in vitro tools and knowledge available now enable the Discovery Chemist to place the potential CYP DDI liability of a drug candidate into perspective and to aid in the optimization of chemical drug design to further mitigate this risk.

  8. P-glycoprotein Inhibition for Optimal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Md. Lutful

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux membrane transporter, is widely distributed throughout the body and is responsible for limiting cellular uptake and the distribution of xenobiotics and toxic substances. Hundreds of structurally diverse therapeutic agents are substrates to it and it impedes the absorption, permeability, and retention of the drugs, extruding them out of the cells. It is overexpressed in cancer cells and accountable for obstructing cell internalization of chemotherapeutic agents and for developing transporter mediated resistance by cancer cells during anti-tumor treatments. As it jeopardizes the success of drug delivery and cancer targeting, strategies are being developed to overcome P-gp mediated drug transport. This concise review represents a brief discussion on P-gp mediated drug transport and how it hinders the success of various therapies. Its main focus is on various strategies used to tackle this curb in the field of drug delivery and targeting. PMID:24023511

  9. P-glycoprotein Inhibition for Optimal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Lutful

    2013-08-19

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux membrane transporter, is widely distributed throughout the body and is responsible for limiting cellular uptake and the distribution of xenobiotics and toxic substances. Hundreds of structurally diverse therapeutic agents are substrates to it and it impedes the absorption, permeability, and retention of the drugs, extruding them out of the cells. It is overexpressed in cancer cells and accountable for obstructing cell internalization of chemotherapeutic agents and for developing transporter mediated resistance by cancer cells during anti-tumor treatments. As it jeopardizes the success of drug delivery and cancer targeting, strategies are being developed to overcome P-gp mediated drug transport. This concise review represents a brief discussion on P-gp mediated drug transport and how it hinders the success of various therapies. Its main focus is on various strategies used to tackle this curb in the field of drug delivery and targeting.

  10. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Use of Human Plasma Samples to Identify Circulating Drug Metabolites that Inhibit Cytochrome P450 Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Obach, R Scott

    2016-08-01

    Drug interactions elicited through inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes are important in pharmacotherapy. Recently, greater attention has been focused on not only parent drugs inhibiting P450 enzymes but also on possible inhibition of these enzymes by circulating metabolites. In this report, an ex vivo method whereby the potential for circulating metabolites to be inhibitors of P450 enzymes is described. To test this method, seven drugs and their known plasma metabolites were added to control human plasma at concentrations previously reported to occur in humans after administration of the parent drug. A volume of plasma for each drug based on the known inhibitory potency and time-averaged concentration of the parent drug was extracted and fractionated by high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the fractions were tested for inhibition of six human P450 enzyme activities (CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4). Observation of inhibition in fractions that correspond to the retention times of metabolites indicates that the metabolite has the potential to contribute to P450 inhibition in vivo. Using this approach, norfluoxetine, hydroxyitraconazole, desmethyldiltiazem, desacetyldiltiazem, desethylamiodarone, hydroxybupropion, erythro-dihydrobupropion, and threo-dihydrobupropion were identified as circulating metabolites that inhibit P450 activities at a similar or greater extent as the parent drug. A decision tree is presented outlining how this method can be used to determine when a deeper investigation of the P450 inhibition properties of a drug metabolite is warranted. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid inhibits Candida albicans growth.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Northrop, Frederick D; Miedema, Hendrik; Devine, Gary R; Davies, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid was found to inhibit growth of the yeast form of Candida albicans. Niflumic acid inhibited respiratory oxygen uptake and it is hypothesised that this was achieved by cytosolic acidification and block of glycolysis. Inhibitory concentrations are compatible with current practice of topical application.

  13. Target mRNA inhibition by oligonucleotide drugs in man

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide delivery in vivo is commonly seen as the principal hurdle to the successful development of oligonucleotide drugs. In an analysis of 26 oligonucleotide drugs recently evaluated in late-stage clinical trials we found that to date at least half have demonstrated suppression of the target mRNA and/or protein levels in the relevant cell types in man, including those present in liver, muscle, bone marrow, lung, blood and solid tumors. Overall, this strongly implies that the drugs are being delivered to the appropriate disease tissues. Strikingly we also found that the majority of the drug targets of the oligonucleotides lie outside of the drugable genome and represent new mechanisms of action not previously investigated in a clinical setting. Despite the high risk of failure of novel mechanisms of action in the clinic, a subset of the targets has been validated by the drugs. While not wishing to downplay the technical challenges of oligonucleotide delivery in vivo, here we demonstrate that target selection and validation are of equal importance for the success of this field. PMID:22989709

  14. Organ Impairment—Drug–Drug Interaction Database: A Tool for Evaluating the Impact of Renal or Hepatic Impairment and Pharmacologic Inhibition on the Systemic Exposure of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, CK; Yoshida, K; Kusama, M; Zhang, H; Ragueneau-Majlessi, I; Argon, S; Li, L; Chang, P; Le, CD; Zhao, P; Zhang, L; Sugiyama, Y; Huang, S-M

    2015-01-01

    The organ impairment and drug–drug interaction (OI-DDI) database is the first rigorously assembled database of pharmacokinetic drug exposure data from publicly available renal and hepatic impairment studies presented together with the maximum change in drug exposure from drug interaction inhibition studies. The database was used to conduct a systematic comparison of the effect of renal/hepatic impairment and pharmacologic inhibition on drug exposure. Additional applications are feasible with the public availability of this database. PMID:26380158

  15. The anti-hypertensive drug prazosin inhibits glioblastoma growth via the PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Assad Kahn, Suzana; Costa, Silvia Lima; Gholamin, Sharareh; Nitta, Ryan T; Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Coelho, Paulo Lucas Cerqueira; El-Habr, Elias; Cadusseau, Josette; Varlet, Pascale; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Devaux, Bertrand; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Cheshier, Samuel H; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Haiech, Jacques; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2016-05-01

    A variety of drugs targeting monoamine receptors are routinely used in human pharmacology. We assessed the effect of these drugs on the viability of tumor-initiating cells isolated from patients with glioblastoma. Among the drugs targeting monoamine receptors, we identified prazosin, an α1- and α2B-adrenergic receptor antagonist, as the most potent inducer of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cell death. Prazosin triggered apoptosis of glioblastoma-initiating cells and of their differentiated progeny, inhibited glioblastoma growth in orthotopic xenografts of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cells, and increased survival of glioblastoma-bearing mice. We found that prazosin acted in glioblastoma-initiating cells independently from adrenergic receptors. Its off-target activity occurred via a PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway, which resulted in caspase-3 activation. Blockade of PKCδ activation prevented all molecular changes observed in prazosin-treated glioblastoma-initiating cells, as well as prazosin-induced apoptosis. Based on these data, we conclude that prazosin, an FDA-approved drug for the control of hypertension, inhibits glioblastoma growth through a PKCδ-dependent mechanism. These findings open up promising prospects for the use of prazosin as an adjuvant therapy for glioblastoma patients.

  16. Drug Inhibition Profile Prediction for NFκB Pathway in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huiming; Wen, Jianguo; Li, Hongwei; Chang, Jeff; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation plays a crucial role in anti-apoptotic responses in response to the apoptotic signaling during tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) stimulation in Multiple Myeloma (MM). Although several drugs have been found effective for the treatment of MM by mainly inhibiting NFκB pathway, there are not any quantitative or qualitative results of comparison assessment on inhibition effect between different drugs either used alone or in combinations. Computational modeling is becoming increasingly indispensable for applied biological research mainly because it can provide strong quantitative predicting power. In this study, a novel computational pathway modeling approach is employed to comparably assess the inhibition effects of specific drugs used alone or in combinations on the NFκB pathway in MM and to predict the potential synergistic drug combinations. PMID:21408099

  17. MTOR inhibition reversed drug resistance after combination radiation with erlotinib in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hongqing; Bai, Jing; Chang, Joe Y; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-12-20

    To investigate the effects of mTOR inhibition on drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after combined radiation and erlotinib therapy. Combined radiation and erlotinib therapy produced clear radiosensitization effects both in vitro and in vivo; however, tumor cells remained drug resistant. Additionally, combined radiation and erlotinib therapy significantly increased p-AKT and p-P70 levels. After mTOR inhibition, the number of surviving cells significantly decreased compared with that before inhibition, and the in vivo growth curve was significantly reduced. The effects of combined radiation and erlotinib therapy on tumor inhibition and drug resistance were evaluated by in vitro survival curves in PC9 lung adenocarcinoma cell line and in vivo growth curves in nude mouse xenograft tumor model respectively. The association between tumor drug resistance and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mechanistic target of rapamycin (PI3K-AKT-mTOR) pathway was measured by western blot, assessing the changes in protein kinase B (AKT), phosphor-AKT (p-AKT), P70, and p-P70 protein levels. MTOR was inhibited using everolimus, and changes in AKT, p-AKT, P70, and p-P70 levels were observed. Furthermore, changes in in vitro survival curves, and in vivo growth curves before and after mTOR inhibition were evaluated to confirm its effects on drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after combined radiation and TKI therapy. mTOR was associated with drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after radiation combined with TKI, and MTOR inhibition reversed drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after combined radiation and TKI therapy.

  18. Inhibition of STAT3 by Anticancer Drug Bendamustine

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazunori; Uehara, Yutaka; Inoue, Yukie; Taguchi, Kyoko; Muraoka, Daisuke; Ogo, Naohisa; Matsuno, Kenji; Asai, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Bendamustine (BENDA), which bears the bis(2-chloroethyl)amino moiety, is an alkylating agent that stops the growth of cancer cells by binding to DNA and interfering with its replication. However, the mechanism of action underlying its excellent clinical efficacy remains unclear. In this work, we report that BENDA inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). In an AlphaScreen-based biochemical assay using recombinant human STAT3, binding of STAT3–Src homology 2 (SH2) to the phosphotyrosine (pTyr, pY) peptide was inhibited by BENDA but not by the inactive metabolite dihydroxy bendamustine (HP2). When a single point mutation of C550A or C712A was introduced into recombinant human STAT3, its sensitivity to BENDA was substantially reduced, suggesting that these cysteine residues are important for BENDA to inhibit STAT3. Furthermore, BENDA suppressed the function of cellular STAT3 as a transcriptional activator in a human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-468, with constitutively activated STAT3. A competitive pull-down assay using biotinylated BENDA (Bio-BENDA) revealed that BENDA bound tightly to cellular STAT3, presumably through covalent bonds. Therefore, our results suggest that the anticancer effects of BENDA may be associated, at least in part, with its inhibitory effect on the SH2 domain of STAT3. PMID:28125678

  19. In silico evaluation of TERT inhibition by anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Mahendar, Porika; Sirisha, Kalam; Kulandaivelu, Umasankar; Shankar, Prakhya Laxmi Jaya; Radhika, Tippani; Sadanandam, Abbagani

    2012-10-01

    The activation of telomerase represents an early step in carcinogenesis. Increased telomerase expression in malignant tumors suggests that telomerase inactivation may represent a potential chemotherapeutic target. In this work, existing anticancer drugs were docked against telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) using a Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Autodock's scoring function was applied to each of the molecules in order to identify the inhibitor with the strongest pharmacological action. The structural insights provided by this study regarding binding poses and possible interactions, free energies of binding, and drug scores aided in the identification of potential inhibitory compounds. The ranks of the various ligands investigated were based on the final docked energy values. Among nine selected compounds, vindesine, temsirolimus, and cyclosporine were found to be more potent TERT inhibitors than the standard inhibitor, curcumin.

  20. Development of an in vitro cytochrome P450 cocktail inhibition assay for assessing the inhibition risk of drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Dinger, Julia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2014-10-01

    Drugs of abuse are not tested for cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition potential before distribution. Therefore, a cocktail assay should be developed for testing the inhibition potential for all relevant CYPs. The following CYP test substrates and selective inhibitors were incubated in pooled human liver microsomes: phenacetin (alpha-naphthoflavone for CYP1A2), coumarin (tranylcypromine, CYP2A6), bupropion (sertraline, CYP2B6), amodiaquine (trimethoprim, CYP2C8), diclofenac (sulfaphenazole, CYP2C9), omeprazole (fluconazole, CYP2C19), dextromethorphan (quinidine, CYP2D6), chlorzoxazone (clomethiazole, CYP2E1), testosterone (verapamil, CYP3A). Samples were analyzed after protein precipitation using a Thermo Fisher Q-Exactive LC-high-resolution-MS/MS. The IC50 values were calculated by plotting the concentration of the formed metabolite, relative to the control sample, over the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration. They were determined either for single substrate or the cocktail incubation. Unfortunately, the cocktail assay had to be split because of interferences during incubation caused by substrates or metabolites, but the mixture of both incubates could be analyzed in one analytical run. The IC50 values determined in the single substrate or both cocktail incubations were comparable among themselves and with published data. In conclusion, the new inhibition cocktail assay was reproducible and applicable for testing the inhibition potential of drugs of abuse as exemplified for 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amfetamine (DOI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  2. Cognitive control of drug craving inhibits brain reward regions in cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Wang, G.J.; Telang, F.; Logan, J.; Jayne, M.; Ma, Y.; Pradhan, K.; Wong, C.T.; Swanson, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control over drug taking is considered a hallmark of addiction and is critical in relapse. Dysfunction of frontal brain regions involved with inhibitory control may underlie this behavior. We evaluated whether addicted subjects when instructed to purposefully control their craving responses to drug-conditioned stimuli can inhibit limbic brain regions implicated in drug craving. We used PET and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (marker of brain function) in 24 cocaine abusers who watched a cocaine-cue video and compared brain activation with and without instructions to cognitively inhibit craving. A third scan was obtained at baseline (without video). Statistical parametric mapping was used for analysis and corroborated with regions of interest. The cocaine-cue video increased craving during the no-inhibition condition (pre 3 {+-} 3, post 6 {+-} 3; p < 0.001) but not when subjects were instructed to inhibit craving (pre 3 {+-} 2, post 3 {+-} 3). Comparisons with baseline showed visual activation for both cocaine-cue conditions and limbic inhibition (accumbens, orbitofrontal, insula, cingulate) when subjects purposefully inhibited craving (p < 0.001). Comparison between cocaine-cue conditions showed lower metabolism with cognitive inhibition in right orbitofrontal cortex and right accumbens (p < 0.005), which was associated with right inferior frontal activation (r = -0.62, p < 0.005). Decreases in metabolism in brain regions that process the predictive (nucleus accumbens) and motivational value (orbitofrontal cortex) of drug-conditioned stimuli were elicited by instruction to inhibit cue-induced craving. This suggests that cocaine abusers may retain some ability to inhibit craving and that strengthening fronto-accumbal regulation may be therapeutically beneficial in addiction.

  3. Sorivudine and 5-fluorouracil; a clinically significant drug-drug interaction due to inhibition of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Diasio, Robert B

    1998-01-01

    Sorivudine (1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-E-5-[2-bromovinyl] uracil; BV-araU; SQ32,756) is an antimetabolite which is a synthetic analogue of thymidine. This drug has demonstrated antiviral activity against varicella zoster virus, herpes simplex type 1 virus, and Epstein-Barr virus. Clinical studies in Japan and subsequently worldwide showed this drug to be a potent agent for treating varicella zoster infections. Although in general well tolerated, a fatal drug interaction with fluoropyrimidine drugs was subsequently observed. While three deaths resulting from this interaction were recognized to have occurred during the initial clinical evaluation in Japan, the full impact of the interaction was not recognized in Japan until post-marketing when an additional 23 cases of severe toxicity were reported including 16 patients who subsequently died from fluoro-pyrimidine toxicity. Worldwide recognition of this potentially fatal drug-drug interaction led to subsequent disapproval in the US and elsewhere. The interaction has been shown to be due to suppression of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) catabolism, resulting in higher levels of 5-FU than would normally be observed. The mechanism of this interaction is mediated through inhibition of the 5-FU rate-limiting catabolizing enzyme dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) by the BV-araU metabolite BVU. This drug-drug interaction of sorivudine and 5-FU further emphasizes the critical importance of DPD on the clinical pharmacology of 5-FU. PMID:9690942

  4. Microencapsulated drug delivery: a new approach to pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Oettinger, Carl W.; D'Souza, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: This article reviews the use of albumin microcapsules 3–4 mm in size containing cytokine inhibiting drugs which include neutralizing antibodies to TNF and IL1, CNI-1493, antisense oligonucleotides to TNF and NF-kappaB, and the antioxidant catalase. Objective: Describe the effects, cellular uptake and distribution of microencapsulated drugs and the effect in both a peritonitis model of infection and a model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Methods: The studies performed by our group are reviewed, the only such studies available. Results: Microencapsulation of these compounds produced high intracellular drug concentrations due to rapid uptake by phagocytic cells, including endothelial cells, without toxicity. All compounds produced excellent inhibition of TNF and IL1 resulting in improved animal survival in a peritonitis model of septic shock and inflammation in an arthritis model. Conclusion: Albumin microencapsulated pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibiting compounds are superior to equivalent concentration of these compounds administered in solution form. PMID:22348221

  5. Inhibition of bacterial ribosome assembly: a suitable drug target?

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2009-03-01

    The assembly of bacterial ribosomes is viewed with increasing interest as a potential target for new antibiotics. The in vivo synthesis and assembly of ribosomes are briefly reviewed here, highlighting the many ways in which assembly can be perturbed. The process is compared with the model in vitro process from which much of our knowledge is derived. The coordinate synthesis of the ribosomal components is essential for their ordered and efficient assembly; antibiotics interfere with this coordination and therefore affect assembly. It has also been claimed that the binding of antibiotics to nascent ribosomes prevents their assembly. These two contrasting models of antibiotic action are compared and evaluated. Finally, the suitability and tractability of assembly as a drug target are assessed.

  6. Inhibition mechanism of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate on drug crystallization in gastrointestinal fluid and drug permeability from a supersaturated solution.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Kataoka, Makoto; Yamashita, Shinji; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2014-10-01

    The effects of drug-crystallization inhibitor in bile acid/lipid micelles solution on drug permeation was evaluated during the drug crystallization process. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS) was used as a drug-crystallization inhibitor, which efficiently suppressed dexamethasone (DEX) crystallization in a gastrointestinal fluid model containing sodium taurocholate (NaTC) and egg-phosphatidylcholine (egg-PC). Changes of molecular state of supersaturated DEX during the DEX crystallization process was monitored in real time using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). It revealed that DEX distribution to bulk water and micellar phases formed by NaTC and egg-PC was not changed during the DEX crystallization process even in the presence of HPMC-AS. DEX permeation during DEX crystallization was evaluated using dissolution/permeability system. The combination of crystallization inhibition by HPMC-AS and micellar encapsulation by NaTC and egg-PC led to considerably higher DEX concentrations and improvement of DEX permeation at the beginning of the DEX crystallization process. Crystallization inhibition by HPMC-AS can efficiently work even in the micellar solution, where NaTC/egg-PC micelles encapsulates some DEX. It was concluded that a crystallization inhibitor contributed to improvement of permeation of a poorly water-soluble drug in gastrointestinal fluid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo evaluation of drug-drug interaction via mechanism-based inhibition by macrolide antibiotics in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Akihito; Negishi, Isao; Kozakai, Kazumasa; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2009-11-01

    Irreversible inhibition, characterized as mechanism-based inhibition (MBI), of cytochrome P450 in drugs has to be avoided for their safe use. A comprehensive assessment of drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential is important during the drug discovery process. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of macrolide antibiotics, erythromycin (ERM), clarithromycin (CAM), and azithromycin (AZM), which are mechanism-based inhibitors of CYP3A, on biotransformation of midazolam (MDZ) in monkeys. These macrolides inhibited the formation of 1'-hydroxymidazolam in monkey microsomes as functions of incubation time and macrolide concentration. Furthermore, the inactivation potentials of macrolides (k(inact)/K(I): CAM congruent with ERM > AZM) were as effective as that observed in human samples. In in vivo studies, MDZ was administered orally (1 mg/kg) without or with multiple oral dosing of macrolides (15 mg/kg, twice a day on days 1-3). On day 3, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of MDZ increased 7.0-, 9.9-, and 2.0-fold with ERM, CAM, and AZM, respectively, compared with MDZ alone. Furthermore, the effects of ERM and CAM on the pharmacokinetics of MDZ were also observed on the day (day 4) after completion of macrolide treatments (AUC changes: 7.3- and 7.3-fold, respectively). Because the plasma concentrations of macrolides immediately before MDZ administration on day 4 were much lower than the IC(50) values for reversible CYP3A inhibition, the persistent effects may be predominantly caused by CYP3A inactivation. These results suggest that the monkey might be a suitable animal model to predict DDIs caused by MBI of CYP3A.

  8. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of heme oxygenases by azole-based antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinobe, Robert T; Dercho, Ryan A; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Brien, James F; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2006-10-01

    Ketoconazole (KTZ) and other azole antifungal agents are known to have a variety of actions beyond the inhibition of sterol synthesis in fungi. These drugs share structural features with a series of novel heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors designed in our laboratory. Accordingly, we hypothesized that therapeutically used azole-based antifungal drugs are effective HO inhibitors. Using gas chromatography to quantify carbon monoxide formation in vitro and in vivo, we have shown that azole-containing antifungal drugs are potent HO inhibitors. Terconazole, sulconazole, and KTZ were the most potent drugs with IC(50) values of 0.41 +/- 0.01, 1.1 +/- 0.4, and 0.3 +/- 0.1 microM for rat spleen microsomal HO activity, respectively. Kinetic characterization revealed that KTZ was a noncompetitive HO inhibitor. In the presence of KTZ (2.5 and 10 microM), K(m) values for both rat spleen and brain microsomal HO were not altered; however, a significant decrease in the catalytic capacity (V(max)) was observed (P < 0.005). KTZ was also found to weakly inhibit nitric-oxide synthase with an IC(50) of 177 +/- 2 microM but had no effect on the enzymatic activity of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase. Because these drugs were effective within the concentration range observed in humans, it is possible that inhibition of HO may play a role in some of the pharmacological actions of these antimycotic drugs.

  9. The evolution of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Leigh, E G

    2010-12-01

    Like altruism, mutualism, cooperation between species, evolves only by enhancing all participants' inclusive fitness. Mutualism evolves most readily between members of different kingdoms, which pool complementary abilities for mutual benefit: some of these mutualisms represent major evolutionary innovations. Mutualism cannot persist if cheating annihilates its benefits. In long-term mutualisms, symbioses, at least one party associates with the other nearly all its life. Usually, a larger host harbours smaller symbionts. Cheating is restrained by vertical transmission, as in Buchnera; partner fidelity, as among bull-thorn acacias and protective ants; test-based choice of symbionts, as bobtail squid choose bioluminescent bacteria; or sanctioning nonperforming symbionts, as legumes punish nonperforming nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Mutualisms involving brief exchanges, as among plants and seed-dispersers, however, persist despite abundant cheating. Both symbioses and brief-exchange mutualisms have transformed whole ecosystems. These mutualisms may be steps towards ecosystems which, like Adam Smith's ideal economy, serve their members' common good. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Inhibition of Nanobacteria by Antimicrobial Drugs as Measured by a Modified Microdilution Method

    PubMed Central

    Çíftçíoglu, N.; Miller-Hjelle, M. A.; Hjelle, J. T.; Kajander, E. O.

    2002-01-01

    Compounds from 16 classes of antimicrobial drugs were tested for their abilities to inhibit the in vitro multiplication of nanobacteria (NB), a newly discovered infectious agent found in human kidney stones and kidney cyst fluids from patients with polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Because NB form surface calcifications at physiologic levels of calcium and phosphate, they have been hypothesized to mediate the formation of tissue calcifications. We describe a modified microdilution inhibitory test that accommodates the unique growth conditions and long multiplication times of NB. This modified microdilution method included inoculation of 96-well plates and determination of inhibition by periodic measurement of the absorbance for 14 days in cell culture medium under cell culture conditions. Bactericidal or bacteriostatic drug effects were distinguished by subsequent subculture in drug-free media and monitoring for increasing absorbance. NB isolated from fetal bovine serum (FBS) were inhibited by tetracycline HCl, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and ampicillin at levels achievable in serum and urine; all drugs except ampicillin were cidal. Tetracycline also inhibited multiplication of isolates of NB from human kidney stones and kidney cyst fluids from patients with PKD. The other antibiotics tested against FBS-derived NB either had no effect or exhibited an inhibitory concentration above clinically achievable levels; the aminoglycosides and vancomycin were bacteriostatic. Antibiotic-induced morphological changes to NB were observed by electron microscopy. Bisphosphonates, aminocaproic acid, potassium citrate-citric acid solutions, and 5-fluorouracil also inhibited the multiplication of NB in a cidal manner. Insights into the nature of NB, the action(s) of these drugs, and the role of NB in calcifying diseases may be gained by exploiting this in vitro inhibition test system. PMID:12069958

  11. The inhibition of human multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 is involved in the drug-drug interaction caused by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Soichiro; Maeda, Kazuya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Ohta, Kin-ya; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Nakayama, Hideki; Horita, Shigeru; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2009-03-01

    Cimetidine is known to cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with organic cations in the kidney, and a previous clinical study showed that coadministration of cimetidine or probenecid with fexofenadine (FEX) decreased its renal clearance. FEX was taken up into human kidney by human organic anion transporter (hOAT) 3 (SLC22A8), but the mechanism of its luminal efflux has not been clarified. The present study examined the molecular mechanism of these DDIs. Saturable uptake of FEX was observed in human kidney slices, with K(m) and V(max) values of 157+/-7 microM and 418+/-16 nmol/15 min/g kidney, respectively. Cimetidine only slightly inhibited its uptake even at 100 microM, far greater than its clinically relevant concentration, whereas 10 microM probenecid markedly inhibited its uptake. As candidate transporters for the luminal efflux of FEX, we focused on human multidrug and toxin extrusions MATE1 (SLC47A1) and MATE2-K (SLC47A2). Saturable uptake of FEX could be observed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing human MATE1 (hMATE1), whereas hMATE2-K-specific uptake of FEX was too small to conduct its further kinetic analysis. The hMATE1-mediated uptake clearance of FEX was inhibited by cimetidine in a concentration-dependent manner, and it was decreased to 60% of the control value in the presence of 3 microM cimetidine. Taken together, our results suggest that the DDI of FEX with probenecid can be explained by the inhibition of renal uptake mediated by hOAT3, whereas the DDI with cimetidine is mainly caused by the inhibition of hMATE1-mediated efflux of FEX rather than the inhibition of its renal uptake process.

  12. Inhibition of Aβ42 oligomerization in yeast by a PICALM ortholog and certain FDA approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sei-Kyoung; Ratia, Kiira; Ba, Mariam; Valencik, Maria; Liebman, Susan W.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of small Aβ42 oligomers has been implicated as a toxic species in Alzheimer disease (AD). In strong support of this hypothesis we found that overexpression of Yap1802, the yeast ortholog of the human AD risk factor, phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM), reduced oligomerization of Aβ42 fused to a reporter in yeast. Thus we used the Aβ42-reporter system to identify drugs that could be developed into therapies that prevent or arrest AD. From a screen of 1,200 FDA approved drugs and drug-like small compounds we identified 7 drugs that reduce Aβ42 oligomerization in yeast: 3 antipsychotics (bromperidol, haloperidol and azaperone), 2 anesthetics (pramoxine HCl and dyclonine HCl), tamoxifen citrate, and minocycline HCl. Also, all 7 drugs caused Aβ42 to be less toxic to PC12 cells and to relieve toxicity of another yeast AD model in which Aβ42 aggregates targeted to the secretory pathway are toxic. Our results identify drugs that inhibit Aβ42 oligomers from forming in yeast. It remains to be determined if these drugs inhibit Aβ42 oligomerization in mammals and could be developed as a therapeutic treatment for AD. PMID:28357335

  13. Enhancing chemotherapeutic drug inhibition on tumor growth by ultrasound: an in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhou, Zhi-Cai; Jin, Zhuo; Zhang, Lu; Sun, Chang-Zheng; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Hui-Sheng; Tian, Ji-Lai; Gao, Feng-Hou; Tang, Qin-Qin; Li, Wei; Xiang, Qi; Li, Xiao-Kun; Li, Wen-Feng

    2011-02-01

    An in vivo study on enhancing epirubicin hydrochloride (EPI) inhibition on tumor growth by ultrasound (US) was reported. Five-week-old male nude mice were used and HL-60 cells were s.c. (subcutaneous injection) inoculated in axilla of these mice. Six groups were designed and five consecutive treatments were applied to investigate the inhibition on tumor growth and body weight growth. US applied locally to the tumor resulted in a substantially increased drug uptake in tumor cells. The inhibition on tumor growth depended on the position of drug injection and phospholipid-based microbubble (PMB) application. Tumor growth rate under group 1 (PMB+US) was similar to that of blank control. The order of the inhibition on tumor volume growth was: group 4 (s.c. EPI+PMB+US) > group 5 intraperitoneal (i.p. EPI+PMB+US) > group 2 (i.p. EPI) > group 3 (s.c. EPI+US) > group 1 (PMB+US). Similar conclusion was obtained from experimental measurements of tumor weight change. The order of animal survival status for EPI administration groups was: group 4 > group 5 > group 2 > group 3. Chemotherapeutic drug inhibition on tumor growth could be enhanced by local US combined with PMB, which might provide a potential application for US-mediated chemotherapy.

  14. Childhood Sleep Problems, Response Inhibition, and Alcohol and Drug Outcomes in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Maria M.; Brower, Kirk J.; Nigg, Joel T.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no prospective studies examine the relationships among childhood sleep problems, adolescent executive functioning, and substance outcomes (i.e., substance use and substance-related problems). In this study, we examined whether childhood sleep problems predicted adolescent sleep problems and response inhibition. We also tested whether adolescent sleep problems and poor response inhibition mediated the relationship between childhood sleep problems and substance (alcohol and drug) outcomes in young adulthood. Methods Study participants were 292 boys and 94 girls (M = 4.85, SD = 1.47) from a community sample of high-risk families and controls. Results When compared to their counterparts, those with trouble sleeping in childhood were twice as likely to have the same problem in adolescence. Childhood overtiredness predicted poor response inhibition in adolescence. Persistent trouble sleeping from childhood to adolescence and response inhibition in adolescence mediated the relationship between childhood sleep problems and drug outcomes in young adulthood, whereas overtiredness in childhood directly predicted alcohol use outcomes and alcohol-related problems in young adulthood. Conclusions This is the first study showing a long-term relationship between childhood sleep measures and subsequent alcohol and drug outcomes. The developmental and clinical implications of these findings were discussed. Prevention and intervention programs may want to consider the role of sleep problems and response inhibition on substance use and abuse. PMID:20374209

  15. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin

    PubMed Central

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  16. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin.

    PubMed

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  17. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10−6 cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10−6 cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10−6 cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10−6 cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  18. Role of Molecular Interactions for Synergistic Precipitation Inhibition of Poorly Soluble Drug in Supersaturated Drug-Polymer-Polymer Ternary Solution.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Dev; Chauhan, Harsh; Atef, Eman

    2016-03-07

    We are reporting a synergistic effect of combined Eudragit E100 and PVP K90 in precipitation inhibition of indomethacin (IND) in solutions at low polymer concentration, a phenomenon that has significant implications on the usefulness of developing novel ternary solid dispersion of poorly soluble drugs. The IND supersaturation was created by cosolvent technique, and the precipitation studies were performed in the absence and the presence of individual and combined PVP K90 and Eudragit E100. The studies were also done with PEG 8000 as a noninteracting control polymer. A continuous UV recording of the IND absorption was used to observe changes in the drug concentration over time. The polymorphic form and morphology of precipitated IND were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The change in the chemical shift in solution (1)H NMR was used as novel approach to probe IND-polymer interactions. Molecular modeling was used for calculating binding energy between IND-polymer as another indication of IND-polymer interaction. Spontaneous IND precipitation was observed in the absence of polymers. Eudragit E100 showed significant inhibitory effect on nuclei formation due to stronger interaction as reflected in higher binding energy and greater change in chemical shift by NMR. PVP K90 led to significant crystal growth inhibition due to adsorption on growing IND crystals as confirmed by modified crystal habit of precipitate in the presence of PVP K90. Combination of polymers resulted in a synergistic precipitation inhibition and extended supersaturation. The NMR confirmed interaction between IND-Eudragit E100 and IND-PVP K90 in solution. The combination of polymers showed similar peak shift albeit using lower polymer concentration indicating stronger interactions. The results established the significant synergistic precipitation inhibition effect upon combining Eudragit E100 and PVP K90 due to drug-polymer interaction.

  19. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors.

  20. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  1. Biomarker- versus drug-driven tumor growth inhibition models: an equivalence analysis.

    PubMed

    Sardu, Maria Luisa; Poggesi, Italo; De Nicolao, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The mathematical modeling of tumor xenograft experiments following the dosing of antitumor drugs has received much attention in the last decade. Biomarker data can further provide useful insights on the pathological processes and be used for translational purposes in the early clinical development. Therefore, it is of particular interest the development of integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models encompassing drug, biomarker and tumor-size data. This paper investigates the reciprocal consistency of three types of models: drug-to-tumor, such as established drug-driven tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models, drug-to-biomarker, e.g. indirect response models, and biomarker-to-tumor, e.g. the more recent biomarker-driven TGI models. In particular, this paper derives a mathematical relationship that guarantees the steady-state equivalence of the cascade of drug-to-biomarker and biomarker-to-tumor models with a drug-to-tumor TGI model. Using the Simeoni TGI model as a reference, conditions for steady-state equivalence are worked out and used to derive a new biomarker-driven model. Simulated and real data are used to show that in realistic cases the steady-state equivalence extends also to transient responses. The possibility of predicting the drug-to-tumor potency of a new candidate drug based only on biomarker response is discussed.

  2. Sulfa drugs inhibit sepiapterin reduction and chemical redox cycling by sepiapterin reductase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R; Hossain, Muhammad M; Heindel, Ned D; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the reduction of sepiapterin to dihydrobiopterin (BH2), the precursor for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor critical for nitric oxide biosynthesis and alkylglycerol and aromatic amino acid metabolism. SPR also mediates chemical redox cycling, catalyzing one-electron reduction of redox-active chemicals, including quinones and bipyridinium herbicides (e.g., menadione, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and diquat); rapid reaction of the reduced radicals with molecular oxygen generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using recombinant human SPR, sulfonamide- and sulfonylurea-based sulfa drugs were found to be potent noncompetitive inhibitors of both sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. The most potent inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction (IC50s = 31-180 nM) were sulfasalazine, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, and chlorpropamide. Higher concentrations of the sulfa drugs (IC50s = 0.37-19.4 μM) were required to inhibit redox cycling, presumably because of distinct mechanisms of sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. In PC12 cells, which generate catecholamine and monoamine neurotransmitters via BH4-dependent amino acid hydroxylases, sulfa drugs inhibited both BH2/BH4 biosynthesis and redox cycling mediated by SPR. Inhibition of BH2/BH4 resulted in decreased production of dopamine and dopamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. Sulfathiazole (200 μM) markedly suppressed neurotransmitter production, an effect reversed by BH4. These data suggest that SPR and BH4-dependent enzymes, are "off-targets" of sulfa drugs, which may underlie their untoward effects. The ability of the sulfa drugs to inhibit redox cycling may ameliorate ROS-mediated toxicity generated by redox active drugs and chemicals, contributing to their anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. In vivo inhibition of trans-plasma membrane electron transport by antiviral drugs in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Panattoni, A; Rinaldelli, E; Triolo, E; Luvisi, A

    2013-07-01

    Electrophysiological techniques were applied to investigate the action of antiviral drugs during trans-plasma events in in vivo grapevine cells infected by GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3. Carbon fiber microelectrodes and redox-sensitive dyes were used to measure trans-plasma membrane electron transport (t-PMET) activity in healthy and infected samples treated with ribavirin, tiazofurin and oseltamivir. Each drug caused a reduction in oxidation current (expressed as Δ[Fe(2+)]) in healthy samples, indicating t-PMET inhibition. In almost all infected samples, the effect of drugs on t-PMET activity was significantly lower, suggesting that higher content of NADH in infected plants can interfere with t-PMET inhibition caused by drugs. Moreover, virus-infected samples exhibited elevated t-PMET activity compared to healthy samples. Analogous effects were observed by dye tests. Considering the effects of drugs on trans-plasma membrane potential, tests showed the activity of a proton pump during drug treatments with no significant difference with regard to health status.

  4. Trifluoperazine, an antipsychotic agent, inhibits cancer stem cell growth and overcomes drug resistance of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Wu, Alexander T H; Chang, Peter M-H; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Chia-Ning; Yang, Shuenn-Chen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kuo, Yu-Lun; Lee, Pei-Ying; Liu, Yu-Wen; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Hsiao, Michael; Lu, Pei-Jung; Lai, Jin-Mei; Wang, Liang-Shun; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2012-12-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has drawn much attention, with evidence supporting the contribution of stem cells to tumor initiation, relapse, and therapy resistance. To screen drugs that target CSCs to improve the current treatment outcome and overcome drug resistance in patients with lung cancer. We used publicly available embryonic stem cell and CSC-associated gene signatures to query the Connectivity Map for potential drugs that can, at least in part, reverse the gene expression profile of CSCs. High scores were noted for several phenothiazine-like antipsychotic drugs, including trifluoperazine. We then treated lung CSCs with different EGFR mutation status with trifluoperazine to examine its anti-CSC properties. Lung CSCs resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor or cisplatin were treated with trifluoperazine plus gefitinib or trifluoperazine plus cisplatin. Animal models were used for in vivo validation of the anti-CSC effect and synergistic effect of trifluoperazine with gefitinib. We demonstrated that trifluoperazine inhibited CSC tumor spheroid formation and down-regulated the expression of CSC markers (CD44/CD133). Trifluoperazine inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in gefitinib-resistant lung cancer spheroids. The combination of trifluoperazine with either gefitinib or cisplatin overcame drug resistance in lung CSCs. Trifluoperazine inhibited the tumor growth and enhanced the inhibitory activity of gefitinib in lung cancer metastatic and orthotopic CSC animal models. Using in silico drug screening by Connectivity Map followed by empirical validations, we repurposed an existing phenothiazine-like antipsychotic drug, trifluoperazine, as a potential anti-CSC agent that could overcome epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor and chemotherapy resistance.

  5. Drug-mediated inhibition of Fli-1 for the treatment of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Y-J; Zhao, X; Vecchiarelli-Federico, L M; Li, Y; Datti, A; Cheng, Y; Ben-David, Y

    2012-01-01

    The Ets transcription factor, Fli-1 is activated in murine erythroleukemia and overexpressed in various human malignancies including Ewing's sarcoma, induced by the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/Fli-1. Recent studies by our group and others have demonstrated that Fli-1 plays a key role in tumorigenesis, and disrupting its oncogenic function may serve as a potential treatment option for malignancies associated with its overexpression. Herein, we describe the discovery of 30 anti-Fli-1 compounds, characterized into six functional groups. Treatment of murine and human leukemic cell lines with select compounds inhibits Fli-1 protein or mRNA expression, resulting in proliferation arrest and apoptosis. This anti-cancer effect was mediated, at least in part through direct inhibition of Fli-1 function, as anti-Fli-1 drug treatment inhibited Fli-1 DNA binding to target genes, such as SHIP-1 and gata-1, governing hematopoietic differentiation and proliferation. Furthermore, treatment with select Fli-1 inhibitors revealed a positive relationship between the loss of DNA-binding activity and Fli-1 phosphorylation. Accordingly, anti-Fli-1 drug treatment significantly inhibited leukemogenesis in a murine erythroleukemia model overexpressing Fli-1. This study demonstrates the ability of this drug-screening strategy to isolate effective anti-Fli-1 inhibitors and highlights their potential use for the treatment of malignancies overexpressing this oncogene.

  6. Fruit juice inhibition of uptake transport: a new type of food–drug interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, David G

    2010-01-01

    A new type of interaction in which fruit juices diminish oral drug bioavailability through inhibition of uptake transport is the focus of this review. The discovery was based on an opposite to anticipated finding when assessing the possibility of grapefruit juice increasing oral fexofenadine bioavailability in humans through inhibition of intestinal MDR1-mediated efflux transport. In follow-up investigations, grapefruit or orange juice at low concentrations potentially and selectively inhibited in vitro OATP1A2-mediated uptake compared with MDR1-caused efflux substrate transport. These juices at high volume dramatically depressed oral fexofenadine bioavailability. Grapefruit was the representative juice to characterize the interaction subsequently. A volume–effect relationship study using a normal juice amount halved average fexofenadine absorption. Individual variability and reproducibility data indicated the clinical interaction involved direct inhibition of intestinal OATP1A2. Naringin was a major causal component suggesting that other flavonoids in fruits and vegetables might also produce the effect. Duration of juice clinical inhibition of fexofenadine absorption lasted more than 2 h but less than 4 h indicating the interaction was avoidable with appropriate interval of time between juice and drug consumption. Grapefruit juice lowered the oral bioavailability of several medications transported by OATP1A2 (acebutolol, celiprolol, fexofenadine, talinolol, L-thyroxine) while orange juice did the same for others (atenolol, celiprolol, ciprofloxacin, fexofenadine). Juice clinical inhibition of OATP2B1 was unresolved while that of OATP1B1 seemed unlikely. The interaction between grapefruit juice and etoposide also seemed relevant. Knowledge of both affected uptake transporter and drug hydrophilicity assisted prediction of the clinical interaction with grapefruit or orange juice. PMID:21039758

  7. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. PMID:25625582

  8. Esterase inhibition attribute of grapefruit juice leading to a new drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Callery, Patrick S; Gan, Liang-Shang; Balani, Suresh K

    2007-07-01

    This report describes a newly identified potential of grapefruit juice (GFJ) in mediating pharmacokinetic drug interactions due to its capability to inhibit esterase. The study demonstrates that GFJ inhibits purified porcine esterase activity toward p-nitrophenyl acetate and the prodrugs lovastatin and enalapril. In rat and human hepatic or gut S9 fractions and rat gut lumen, GFJ inhibited the hydrolysis of enalapril and lovastatin, which are known to be metabolized principally by esterases, lovastatin being metabolized also by CYP3A. In Caco-2 cells, with minimal CYP3A activity, permeability of these prodrugs was increased in the presence of GFJ. In rats, oral coadministration of GFJ or an esterase inhibitor, bis-(p-nitrophenylphosphate), with the prodrugs led to respective increases in plasma area under the curve by 70% or 57% for enalaprilat and 279% or 141% for lovastatin acid. In addition, portal vein-cannulated rats pretreated with GFJ at -15 and -2 h before lovastatin administration (10 mg/kg p.o.) as a solution, 1) in water and 2) in GFJ, showed, respectively, a 49% increase (CYP3A-inhibited) and a 116% increase (both CYP3A and gut esterase-inhibited) in the portal plasma exposure to the active acid, compared with a non-GFJ pretreatment group. Overall, along with the CYP3A inactivation by GFJ, the decreased esterase activity also played a significant role in increasing the metabolic stability and permeability of esters leading to enhancement of exposure to the active drugs in rats. These new esterase inhibition findings indicate that the potential of drug interaction between ester prodrugs and GFJ should also be considered in the clinic.

  9. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds. PMID:27824161

  10. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-08

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  11. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying Food-Drug Interactions: Inhibition of Intestinal Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively. PMID:22884524

  13. Mechanisms underlying food-drug interactions: inhibition of intestinal metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Won, Christina S; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2012-11-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively.

  14. Development of a New Class of Drugs To Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0518 TITLE: Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration- Resistant...DATES COVERED 30Sep2015 - 29Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0518 Development of a New Class of Drugs To Inhibit All...endocrine targeting therapies designed to block AR activity that re- emerges during castration. However, despite a growing armamentarium of drugs

  15. Development of a New Class of Drugs To Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0519 TITLE: Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration- Resistant...DATES COVERED 30Sep2015 - 29Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0519 Development of a New Class of Drugs To Inhibit...of drugs targeting the androgen/AR signaling axis, progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a major clinical challenge

  16. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A: relevant drug interactions in gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Sagir, A; Schmitt, M; Dilger, K; Häussinger, D

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) is involved in biotransformation of more than half of all drugs currently available. Drug interactions by inhibition of CYP3A are of major interest in patients receiving combinations of drugs. Some interactions with CYP3A inhibitors also involve inhibition of the multidrug export pump, P-glycoprotein. An increasing number of adverse drug reactions might be avoided on the basis of knowledge about CYP3A substrates and inhibitors. This article summarizes some examples of such interactions relevant to gastroenterologists. Serious cases by coadministration of CYP3A inhibitors resulting in acute hepatitis, hypotension, rhabdomyolyis, torsade de pointes, sedation, or ergotism are presented: interactions with azole antifungals (ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole), HIV protease inhibitors (ritonavir, indinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir), macrolide antibiotics (clarithromycin, erythromycin), and grapefruit juice. In addition, 1 case is reported who presented the highest trough levels of the CYP3A substrate budesonide in serum ever measured. Practitioners have to be aware of the high potential of metabolic drug interactions when they prescribe a CYP3A inhibitor. It is wise to check carefully comedication in patients complaining of side effects with substrates of CYP3A.

  17. Evolution of mutualism between species

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  18. Weak mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, M.; Vourdas, A.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum systems with variables in { Z}(d) are considered. The properties of lines in the { Z}(d)\\times { Z}(d) phase space of these systems are studied. Weak mutually unbiased bases in these systems are defined as bases for which the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is equal to d-1/2 or alternatively to one of the d-1/2i, 0 (where di is a divisor of d apart from d, 1). They are designed for the geometry of the { Z}(d)\\times { Z}(d) phase space, in the sense that there is a duality between the weak mutually unbiased bases and the maximal lines through the origin. In the special case of prime d, there are no divisors of d apart from 1, d and the weak mutually unbiased bases are mutually unbiased bases.

  19. Behavioral Ecology: Manipulative Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David P

    2015-09-21

    A new study reveals that an apparent mutualism between lycaenid caterpillars and their attendant ants may not be all it seems, as the caterpillars produce secretions that modify the brains and behavior of their attendant ants.

  20. Inhibition of MDR3 Activity in Human Hepatocytes by Drugs Associated with Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Shi, Qin; Liu, Hao; Woolf, Thomas F

    2015-10-19

    MDR3 dysfunction is associated with liver diseases. We report here a novel MDR3 activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis in primary hepatocytes of deuterium (d9)-labeled PC and LC-MS/MS determination of transported extracellular PC-d9. Several drugs associated with DILI such as chlorpromazine, imipramine, itraconazole, haloperidol, ketoconazole, sequinavir, clotrimazole, ritonavir, and troglitazone inhibit MDR3 activity. MDR3 inhibition may play an important role in drug-induced cholestasis and vanishing bile duct syndrome. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that the reported assay is physiologically relevant and can be used to assess the potential of chemical entities and their metabolites to modulate MDR3 activity and/or PC biosynthesis in hepatocytes.

  1. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Olafson, Katy N.; Ketchum, Megan A.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼104× less than hematin’s physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials. PMID:25831526

  2. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Olafson, Katy N; Ketchum, Megan A; Rimer, Jeffrey D; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-04-21

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼10(4)× less than hematin's physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials.

  3. Structure and Inhibition of Microbiome β-Glucuronidases Essential to the Alleviation of Cancer Drug Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Bret D.; Roberts, Adam B.; Pollet, Rebecca M.; Ingle, James D.; Biernat, Kristen A.; Pellock, Samuel J.; Venkatesh, Madhu Kumar; Guthrie, Leah; O’Neal, Sara K.; Robinson, Sara J.; Dollinger, Makani; Figueroa, Esteban; McShane, Sarah R.; Cohen, Rachel D.; Jin, Jian; Frye, Stephen V.; Zamboni, William C.; Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Mani, Sridhar; Kelly, Libusha; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2015-09-01

    The selective inhibition of bacterial β-glucuronidases was recently shown to alleviate drug-induced gastrointestinal toxicity in mice, including the damage caused by the widely used anticancer drug irinotecan. Here, we report crystal structures of representative β-glucuronidases from the Firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium perfringens and the Proteobacterium Escherichia coli, and the characterization of a β-glucuronidase from the Bacteroidetes Bacteroides fragilis. While largely similar in structure, these enzymes exhibit marked differences in catalytic properties and propensities for inhibition, indicating that the microbiome maintains functional diversity in orthologous enzymes. Small changes in the structure of designed inhibitors can induce significant conformational changes in the β-glucuronidase active site. Finally, we establish that β-glucuronidase inhibition does not alter the serum pharmacokinetics of irinotecan or its metabolites in mice. Together, the data presented advance our in vitro and in vivo understanding of the microbial β-glucuronidases, a promising new set of targets for controlling drug-induced gastrointestinal toxicity.

  4. Glycolysis Inhibition Inactivates ABC Transporters to Restore Drug Sensitivity in Malignant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ayako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Miki, Hirokazu; Cui, Qu; Sayed, Salah Mohamed El; Ikegame, Akishige; Oda, Asuka; Amou, Hiroe; Nakamura, Shingen; Harada, Takeshi; Fujii, Shiro; Kagawa, Kumiko; Takeuchi, Kyoko; Sakai, Akira; Ozaki, Shuji; Okano, Kazuma; Nakamura, Takahiro; Itoh, Kohji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA) suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABC transporter-expressing, RPMI8226 (ABCG2), KG-1 (ABCB1) and HepG2 cells (ABCB1 and ABCG2). Interestingly, although side population (SP) cells isolated from RPMI8226 cells exhibited higher levels of glycolysis with an increased expression of genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, 3BrPA abolished Hoechst 33342 exclusion in SP cells. 3BrPA also disrupted clonogenic capacity in malignant cell lines including RPMI8226, KG-1, and HepG2. Furthermore, 3BrPA restored cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin and doxorubicin on KG-1 and RPMI8226 cells, and markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with doxorubicin in RPMI8226-implanted mice. These results collectively suggest that the inhibition of glycolysis is able to overcome drug resistance in ABC transporter-expressing malignant cells through the inactivation of ABC transporters and impairment of SP cells with enhanced glycolysis as well as clonogenic cells. PMID:22073292

  5. Interplay between the ribosomal tunnel, nascent chain, and macrolides influences drug inhibition.

    PubMed

    Starosta, Agata L; Karpenko, Viktoriya V; Shishkina, Anna V; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Sumbatyan, Natalia V; Schluenzen, Frank; Korshunova, Galina A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Wilson, Daniel N

    2010-05-28

    Accumulating evidence suggests that, during translation, nascent chains can form specific interactions with ribosomal exit tunnel to regulate translation and promote initial folding events. The clinically important macrolide antibiotics bind within the exit tunnel and inhibit translation by preventing progression of the nascent chain and inducing peptidyl-tRNA drop-off. Here, we have synthesized amino acid- and peptide-containing macrolides, which are used to demonstrate that distinct amino acids and peptides can establish interaction with components of the ribosomal tunnel and enhance the ribosome-binding and inhibitory properties of the macrolide drugs, consistent with the concept that the exit tunnel is not simply a Teflon-like channel. Surprisingly, we find that macrolide antibiotics do not inhibit translation of all nascent chains similarly, but rather exhibit polypeptide-specific inhibitory effects, providing a change to our general mechanistic understanding of macrolide inhibition.

  6. Drug packaging and delivery using perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for targeted inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhao-xiong; Zhang, Bai-gen; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Xiao-zhong; Hu, Ya-li; Sun, Li; Wang, Xiao-min; Zhang, Ji-wei

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the in vitro release profile of drugs encapsulated within perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles (NPs) and their ability to inhibit the activity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods: Dexamethasone phosphate (DxP) or dexamethasone acetate (DxA) was encapsulated into PFC nanoparticles using a high-pressure homogenous method. The morphology and size of the NPs were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a laser particle size analyzer. Drug loading and in vitro release were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The impact of NP capsules on SMC proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro was assessed using cell counting kit-8, transwell cell migration and flow cytometry assays. Results: The sizes of DxP-NPs and DxA-NPs were 224±6 nm and 236±9 nm, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of DxP-NPs was 66.4%±1.0%, with an initial release rate of 77.2%, whereas the EE of DxA-NPs was 95.3%±1.3%, with an initial release rate of 23.6%. Both of the NP-coated drugs could be released over 7 d. Human umbilical artery SMCs were harvested and cultured for four to six passages. Compared to free DxP, SMCs treated with tissue factor (TF)-directed DxP-NPs showed significant differences in the inhibition of proliferation, migration and apoptosis (P<0.05). Conclusion: The results collectively suggest that PFC nanoparticles will be beneficial for targeted drug delivery because of the sustained drug release and effective inhibition of SMC proliferation and migration. PMID:19890365

  7. Evidence of a drug-drug interaction linked to inhibition of ester hydrolysis by orlistat.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Darren; Young, Anne-Marie; Rowell, Lucy; Gross, Günter; Tardio, Joseph; Carlile, David

    2012-10-01

    : Orlistat, a lipase inhibitor taken with meals at doses of 60 mg (available over-the-counter) or 120 mg (prescription only) for treatment of obesity, is known to impair the absorption of fat-soluble molecules. Dalcetrapib, a modulator of cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity, is a lipophilic thioester prodrug. Lipase-induced and pancreatin-induced hydrolysis of dalcetrapib in biorelevant media in vitro was very efficiently inhibited by orlistat. Thus, the potential for orlistat to affect the bioavailability of concomitantly administered dalcetrapib was studied in an open-label 2-cohort study in 24 healthy volunteers as follows: single 600-mg doses of dalcetrapib were administered with increasing doses of orlistat (cohort A: 10, 40, 120 mg; cohort B: 20, 60, 120 mg). Exposure to the active form of dalcetrapib was more than 50% lower when taken with orlistat 60 mg or 120 mg than when taken alone. Similar trends were observed with lower orlistat doses (20 mg and 40 mg). Concomitant administration of orlistat also reduced the pharmacodynamic effects of dalcetrapib treatment on cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity. The interaction exceeds that predicted on the basis of dalcetrapib lipophilicity. These findings demonstrate the potential for large interactions between orlistat and esters that undergo de-esterification in the gastrointestinal tract, independent of lipophilicity.

  8. Cardiotoxicity of copper-based antineoplastic drugs casiopeinas is related to inhibition of energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Esquivel, Luz; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Pavon, Natalia; Carvajal, Karla; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael . E-mail: rafael.moreno@cardiologia.org.mx

    2006-04-01

    Isolated rat hearts were perfused with glucose, octanoate or glucose + octanoate and different concentrations of the copper-based antineoplastic drugs casiopeina II-gly (CSII) or casiopeina III-i-a (CSIII). In isolated perfused hearts with glucose + octanoate, both casiopeinas induced diminution in cardiac work and O{sub 2} consumption with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 5}) of 4 (CSII) and 4.6 (CSIII) {mu}M, after 1 h of perfusion. Strong inhibition of the pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases as well as total creatine kinase by casiopeinas suggested that ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation and its transfer towards myofibrils were targets for these drugs. In consequence, the cellular contents of ATP and phosphocreatine were also lowered by casiopeinas. Remarkably, casiopeinas were less toxic than adriamycin (IC{sub 5} = 2.6 {mu}M), a well-known potent cardiotoxic and antineoplastic drug, which has a wide clinical use. In an open-chest animal, which is a more physiological model than the isolated heart, femoral administration of 1 {mu}M drug revealed that CSII was innocuous very likely due to strong binding to serum albumin, whereas adriamycin induced again a potent cardiotoxic effect (diminution in heart rate and severe depression of systolic blood pressure). Thus, it seems that casiopeinas are a group of new antineoplastic drugs with milder secondary toxic effects than proven drugs such as adriamycin.

  9. Zika viral polymerase inhibition using anti-HCV drugs both in market and under clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Elfiky, Abdo A

    2016-12-01

    In the last few months, a new Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak evolved in America. In accordance, World Health Organization (WHO) in February 2016 declared it as Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). ZIKV infection was reported in more than 60 countries and the disease was spreading since 2007 but with little momentum. Many antiviral drugs are available in market or in laboratories under clinical trials, could affect ZIKV infection. In silico docking study were performed on the ZIKV polymerase to test some of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) drugs (approved and in clinical trials). The results show potency of almost all of the studied compounds on ZIKV polymerase and hence inhibiting the propagation of the disease. In addition, the study suggested two nucleotide inhibitors (IDX-184 and MK0608) that may be tested as drugs against ZIKV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:2044-2051, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Inhibiting Drivers of Non-mutational Drug Tolerance Is a Salvage Strategy for Targeted Melanoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael P.; Brunton, Holly; Rowling, Emily J.; Ferguson, Jennifer; Arozarena, Imanol; Miskolczi, Zsofia; Lee, Jessica L.; Girotti, Maria R.; Marais, Richard; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Dummer, Reinhard; Frederick, Dennie T.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Once melanomas have progressed with acquired resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-targeted therapy, mutational heterogeneity presents a major challenge. We therefore examined the therapy phase before acquired resistance had developed and discovered the melanoma survival oncogene MITF as a driver of an early non-mutational and reversible drug-tolerance state, which is induced by PAX3-mediated upregulation of MITF. A drug-repositioning screen identified the HIV1-protease inhibitor nelfinavir as potent suppressor of PAX3 and MITF expression. Nelfinavir profoundly sensitizes BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells to MAPK-pathway inhibitors. Moreover, nelfinavir is effective in BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells isolated from patients progressed on MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapy and in BRAF/NRAS/PTEN mutant tumors. We demonstrate that inhibiting a driver of MAPKi-induced drug tolerance could improve current approaches of targeted melanoma therapy. PMID:26977879

  11. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  12. Time-dependent inhibition of human drug metabolizing cytochromes P450 by tricyclic antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M; Miners, John O

    2008-01-01

    AIMS To investigate time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of human drug metabolizing CYP enzymes by tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). METHODS CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A/CYP3A4 activities were investigated following co- and preincubation with TCAs using human liver microsomes (HLM) and human recombinant CYP proteins (expressed in Escherichia coli) as the enzyme sources. A two-step incubation method was employed to examine the in vitro mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) criteria. Potential metabolite–intermediate complex (MIC) formation was studied by spectral analysis. RESULTS TCAs generally exhibited significant TDI of recombinant CYP1A2, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 (>10% positive inhibition differences between co- and preincubation conditions). TDI of recombinant CYP2C9 was minor (<10%), and was minor or absent in experiments utilizing recombinant CYP3A4 or HLM as the enzyme sources. Where observed, TDI of recombinant CYP occurred via alkylamine MIC formation, but evidence to support similar behaviour in HLM was limited. Indeed, only secondary amine TCAs reduced the apparent P450 content of HLM (3–6%) consistent with complexation. As a representative TCA, nortriptyline fulfilled the in vitro MBI criteria using recombinant CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 (KI and kinact values of 4 µm and 0.19 min−1, and 70 µm and 0.06 min−1), but not with the human liver microsomal enzymes. CONCLUSIONS TCAs appear to have minimal potential for MBI of human liver microsomal CYP enzymes involved in drug metabolism. HLM and recombinant CYP (expressed in E. coli) are not equivalent enzyme sources for evaluating the TDI associated with some drugs. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Much of the literature evidence for mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of CYP by tricyclic antidepressants is limited to studies in rat liver microsomes. One report from this laboratory characterized MBI of human recombinant CYP2C8 by nortriptyline. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Tricyclic antidepressants form

  13. Exposure time independent summary statistics for assessment of drug dependent cell line growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Falgreen, Steffen; Laursen, Maria Bach; Bødker, Julie Støve; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Schmitz, Alexander; Nyegaard, Mette; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin

    2014-06-05

    In vitro generated dose-response curves of human cancer cell lines are widely used to develop new therapeutics. The curves are summarised by simplified statistics that ignore the conventionally used dose-response curves' dependency on drug exposure time and growth kinetics. This may lead to suboptimal exploitation of data and biased conclusions on the potential of the drug in question. Therefore we set out to improve the dose-response assessments by eliminating the impact of time dependency. First, a mathematical model for drug induced cell growth inhibition was formulated and used to derive novel dose-response curves and improved summary statistics that are independent of time under the proposed model. Next, a statistical analysis workflow for estimating the improved statistics was suggested consisting of 1) nonlinear regression models for estimation of cell counts and doubling times, 2) isotonic regression for modelling the suggested dose-response curves, and 3) resampling based method for assessing variation of the novel summary statistics. We document that conventionally used summary statistics for dose-response experiments depend on time so that fast growing cell lines compared to slowly growing ones are considered overly sensitive. The adequacy of the mathematical model is tested for doxorubicin and found to fit real data to an acceptable degree. Dose-response data from the NCI60 drug screen were used to illustrate the time dependency and demonstrate an adjustment correcting for it. The applicability of the workflow was illustrated by simulation and application on a doxorubicin growth inhibition screen. The simulations show that under the proposed mathematical model the suggested statistical workflow results in unbiased estimates of the time independent summary statistics. Variance estimates of the novel summary statistics are used to conclude that the doxorubicin screen covers a significant diverse range of responses ensuring it is useful for biological

  14. Endotoxin administration to humans inhibits hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shedlofsky, S I; Israel, B C; McClain, C J; Hill, D B; Blouin, R A

    1994-01-01

    In experimental animals, injection of gram-negative endotoxin (LPS) decreases hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism. To evaluate this phenomenon in a human model of gram-negative sepsis, LPS was administered on two consecutive days to healthy male volunteers during which time a cocktail of antipyrine (AP-250 mg), hexobarbital (HB-500 mg), and theophylline (TH-150 mg) was ingested and the apparent oral clearance of each drug determined. Each subject had a control drug clearance study with saline injections. In the first experiment, six subjects received the drug cocktail 0.5 h after the first dose of LPS. In the second experiment, another six subjects received the drug cocktail 0.5 h after the second dose of LPS. In both experiments, LPS caused the expected physiologic responses of inflammation including fever with increases in serum concentrations of TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and acute phase reactants. In the first experiment, only minor decreases in clearances of the probe drugs were observed (7-12%). However in the second experiment, marked decreases in the clearances of AP (35, 95% CI 18-48%), HB (27, 95% CI 14-34%), and TH (22, 95% CI 12-32%) were seen. The decreases in AP clearance correlated with initial peak values of TNF alpha (r = 0.82) and IL-6 (r = 0.86). These data show that in humans the inflammatory response to even a very low dose of LPS significantly decreases hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and this effect evolves over a 24-h period. It is likely that septic patients with much higher exposures to LPS have more profound inhibition of drug metabolism. PMID:7989576

  15. The drug ornidazole inhibits photosynthesis in a different mechanism described for protozoa and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Yehouda; Tal, Noam; Ronen, Mordechai; Carmieli, Raanan; Gurevitz, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Ornidazole of the 5-nitroimidazole drug family is used to treat protozoan and anaerobic bacterial infections via a mechanism that involves preactivation by reduction of the nitro group, and production of toxic derivatives and radicals. Metronidazole, another drug family member, has been suggested to affect photosynthesis by draining electrons from the electron carrier ferredoxin, thus inhibiting NADP(+) reduction and stimulating radical and peroxide production. Here we show, however, that ornidazole inhibits photosynthesis via a different mechanism. While having a minute effect on the photosynthetic electron transport and oxygen photoreduction, ornidazole hinders the activity of two Calvin cycle enzymes, triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Modeling of ornidazole's interaction with ferredoxin of the protozoan Trichomonas suggests efficient electron tunneling from the iron-sulfur cluster to the nitro group of the drug. A similar docking site of ornidazole at the plant-type ferredoxin does not exist, and the best simulated alternative does not support such efficient tunneling. Notably, TPI was inhibited by ornidazole in the dark or when electron transport was blocked by dichloromethyl diphenylurea, indicating that this inhibition was unrelated to the electron transport machinery. Although TPI and GAPDH isoenzymes are involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, ornidazole's effect on respiration of photoautotrophs is moderate, thus raising its value as an efficient inhibitor of photosynthesis. The scarcity of Calvin cycle inhibitors capable of penetrating cell membranes emphasizes on the value of ornidazole for studying the regulation of this cycle. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Establishment of in vitro P-glycoprotein inhibition assay and its exclusion criteria to assess the risk of drug-drug interaction at the drug discovery stage.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Tachibana, Miho; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Hirabayashi, Hideki; Amano, Nobuyuki; Moriwaki, Toshiya

    2011-09-01

    The decision tree to determine whether the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1)-mediated drug-drug interaction (DDI) study is recommended has been proposed by the International Transporter Consortium. We, therefore, designed an in vitro P-gp inhibition assay and determined the appropriate risk criteria for P-gp-mediated DDI at the drug discovery stage. Effects of P-gp inhibitors on digoxin transport across a monolayer of MDR1-expressing cells were examined. The IC(50) (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) values generated from the efflux ratio (ER) were smaller than those generated from basolateral-to-apical directional apparent permeability. The difference in IC(50) values was kinetically described in a compartment model analysis. This analysis indicated that ER is a highly sensitive parameter that can be used for the degree of P-gp inhibition. Considering IC(50) values and the increase in digoxin exposure in clinical DDI studies, the risk criteria of [I(2)]/IC(50) = 30 ([I(2)], theoretically maximal gastrointestinal concentration) was the optimal cutoff value to predict a clinically relevant DDI. We also investigated whether the IC(50) value itself is applicable to assess the DDI risk. In conclusion, compounds with IC(50) values less than 2 μM exhibit high risk for P-gp-mediated DDIs. However, compounds with IC(50) values greater than or equal to 2 μM are inconclusive because clinical doses should be considered for the precise DDI risk assessment.

  17. [Modified tests basophil degranulation and leukocyte migration inhibition factor in drug allergy. Study 2009-2014].

    PubMed

    Irigoyen-Coria, María Lourdes; Rojo-Gutiérrez, María Isabel; Meyer-Gómez, Rubén Humberto; Leyva-Carmona, Isabel; Zendejas-Buitrón, Víctor Manuel; García-Ruiz, Angélica Dinorah; Mellado-Ábrego, Jaime; García-Ortega, Ilayalid; Castillo-Narváez, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions to drugs are increasing and there are few studies for the diagnosis. To determine the utility of modified basophil degranulation (MBD) test and modified leukocyte migration inhibition factor (MLMIF) test to prove drug hypersensitivity. 177 patients of both sexes were studied with the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity, determining MBD, MLMIF, or both, between 2009 and 2014. They were matched with positive and negative controls and the non-allergic population. Applications are issued according to the type of hypersensitivity, considering type I MBD and type IV MLMIF. 170 patients (96.04%) were positive to at least one drug (RR = 4.71). 561 MBD (73.62%) and 201 MLMIF (26.37%) were performed. Female sex was more frequent (64.41%); the average age was 38.5. MBD was positive in 70.23% and MLMIF in 67.16%. The test sensitivity was increased complementarily and with two dilutions. The correlation of MBD and MLMIF was positive and highly significant. Women have more drug reactions. Modified MBD test is useful at any age. Since medications can activate one or other hypersensitivity mechanism, it is important to request the tests simultaneously.

  18. New use of an old drug: inhibition of breast cancer stem cells by benztropine mesylate

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jihong; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Lina; Chen, Yong; Proulx, Steven T.; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Gisbert; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play major roles in cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence and therapeutic resistance. Targeting CSCs represents a promising strategy for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify selective inhibitors of breast CSCs (BCSCs). We carried out a cell-based phenotypic screening with cell viability as a primary endpoint, using a collection of 2,546 FDA-approved drugs and drug-like molecules in spheres formed by malignant human breast gland-derived cells (HMLER-shEcad cells, representing BCSCs) and control immortalized non-tumorigenic human mammary cells (HMLE cells, representing normal stem cells). 19 compounds were identified from screening. The chemically related molecules benztropine mesylate and deptropine citrate were selected for further validation and both potently inhibited sphere formation and self-renewal of BCSCs in vitro. Benztropine mesylate treatment decreased cell subpopulations with high ALDH activity and with a CD44+/CD24− phenotype. In vivo, benztropine mesylate inhibited tumor-initiating potential in a 4T1 mouse model. Functional studies indicated that benztropine mesylate inhibits functions of CSCs via the acetylcholine receptors, dopamine transporters/receptors, and/or histamine receptors. In summary, our findings identify benztropine mesylate as an inhibitor of BCSCs in vitro and in vivo. This study also provides a screening platform for identification of additional anti-CSC agents. PMID:27894093

  19. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel-loaded microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu; Guo, Jun; He, Cancan; Geng, Huaxiao; Yu, Gengsheng; Li, Jinqing; Zheng, Hairong; Ji, Xiaojuan; Yan, Fei

    2016-02-22

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has been recognized as a promising drug for intervention of vascular reconstructions. However, it is still difficult to achieve local drug delivery in a spatio-temporally controllable manner under real-time image guidance. Here, we introduce an ultrasound (US) triggered image-guided drug delivery approach to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microbubbles (PLM) in a rabbit iliac balloon injury model. PLM was prepared through encapsulating PTX in the shell of lipid microbubbles via film hydration and mechanical vibration technique. Our results showed PLM could effectively deliver PTX when exposed to US irradiation and result in significantly lower viability of vascular smooth muscle cells. Ultrasonographic examinations revealed the US signals from PLM in the iliac artery were greatly increased after intravenous administration of PLM, making it possible to identify the restenosis regions of iliac artery. The in vivo anti-restenosis experiments with PLM and US greatly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia at the injured site, showing an increased lumen area and reduced the ratio of intima area and the media area (I/M ratio). No obvious functional damages to liver and kidney were observed for those animals. Our study provided a promising approach to realize US triggered image-guided PTX delivery for therapeutic applications against iliac restenosis.

  20. Old drug, new target: ellipticines selectively inhibit RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Andrews, William J; Panova, Tatiana; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier; Tikhonova, Irina G; Panov, Konstantin I

    2013-02-15

    Transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I) is the main driving force behind ribosome biogenesis, a fundamental cellular process that requires the coordinated transcription of all three nuclear polymerases. Increased Pol-I transcription and the concurrent increase in ribosome biogenesis has been linked to the high rates of proliferation in cancers. The ellipticine family contains a number of potent anticancer therapeutic agents, some having progressed to stage I and II clinical trials; however, the mechanism by which many of the compounds work remains unclear. It has long been thought that inhibition of Top2 is the main reason behind the drugs antiproliferative effects. Here we report that a number of the ellipticines, including 9-hydroxyellipticine, are potent and specific inhibitors of Pol-I transcription, with IC(50) in vitro and in cells in the nanomolar range. Essentially, the drugs did not affect Pol-II and Pol-III transcription, demonstrating a high selectivity. We have shown that Pol-I inhibition occurs by a p53-, ATM/ATR-, and Top2-independent mechanism. We discovered that the drug influences the assembly and stability of preinitiation complexes by targeting the interaction between promoter recognition factor SL1 and the rRNA promoter. Our findings will have an impact on the design and development of novel therapeutic agents specifically targeting ribosome biogenesis.

  1. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel-loaded microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu; Guo, Jun; He, Cancan; Geng, Huaxiao; Yu, Gengsheng; Li, Jinqing; Zheng, Hairong; Ji, Xiaojuan; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has been recognized as a promising drug for intervention of vascular reconstructions. However, it is still difficult to achieve local drug delivery in a spatio-temporally controllable manner under real-time image guidance. Here, we introduce an ultrasound (US) triggered image-guided drug delivery approach to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microbubbles (PLM) in a rabbit iliac balloon injury model. PLM was prepared through encapsulating PTX in the shell of lipid microbubbles via film hydration and mechanical vibration technique. Our results showed PLM could effectively deliver PTX when exposed to US irradiation and result in significantly lower viability of vascular smooth muscle cells. Ultrasonographic examinations revealed the US signals from PLM in the iliac artery were greatly increased after intravenous administration of PLM, making it possible to identify the restenosis regions of iliac artery. The in vivo anti-restenosis experiments with PLM and US greatly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia at the injured site, showing an increased lumen area and reduced the ratio of intima area and the media area (I/M ratio). No obvious functional damages to liver and kidney were observed for those animals. Our study provided a promising approach to realize US triggered image-guided PTX delivery for therapeutic applications against iliac restenosis. PMID:26899550

  2. Proliferation inhibition of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells using drugs screened by integrating a metabolic model and transcriptomic data.

    PubMed

    Motamedian, E; Taheri, E; Bagheri, F

    2017-09-03

    If screening to find effective drugs is possible, the inhibition of proliferation using existing drugs can be a practical strategy to control the drug resistance of cancer. Development of a system-oriented strategy to find effective drugs was the main aim of this research. An algorithm (transcriptional regulated flux balance analysis [TRFBA]) integrating a generic human metabolic model with transcriptomic data was used to identify genes affecting the growth of drug-resistant cancer cells. Drugs that inhibit activation of the target genes were found and their effect on the proliferation was experimentally evaluated. Experimental assessments demonstrated that TRFBA improves the prediction of cancer cell growth in comparison with previous algorithms. The algorithm was then used to propose the system-oriented strategy to search drugs effective in limiting the growth rate of the cisplatin-resistant A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cell. Experimental evaluations resulted in the selection of azathioprine, terbinafine, hydralazine and sodium valproate that appropriately inhibit the proliferation of resistant cancer cells while minimally affecting normal cells. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that the selected drugs are synergistic and can be used in combination therapies. The proposed strategy was successful to identify drugs effective on the viability of resistant cancer cells. This strategy can enhance the potency of treatments for drug-resistant cancer cells and provides the possibility of using existing drugs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Using in situ Raman spectroscopy to study the drug precipitation inhibition and supersaturation mechanism of Vitamin E TPGS from self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS).

    PubMed

    Raut, Shilpa; Karzuon, Basel; Atef, Eman

    2015-05-10

    We are reporting a new methodology of using Raman spectroscopy for studying the drug surfactant interactions in self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS). The physicochemical properties of surfactants could affect the performance of drugs from lipid delivery systems. Thus the purpose of our research was to study the drug surfactant interactions on a molecular level to understand the mechanism of supersaturation and precipitation inhibition. Two surfactants, Labrasol® and Vitamin E TPGS, were used to formulate several SEDDS. The optimized SEDDS were further evaluated by a kinetic solubility study and in situ Raman spectroscopy for two model drugs. It was found that both drugs precipitated from Labrasol® SEDDS whereas TPGS was able to inhibit precipitation and achieve high drug supersaturation levels. In situ Raman spectroscopy indicated that hydrogen bonding with TPGS was the main factor responsible for inhibiting precipitation. This study was able to correlate the structure and physicochemical properties of the drugs and surfactants to their ability to prevent drug precipitation. Our study brings up a possible new systematic approach by using Raman spectroscopy in the development and optimization of lipid based delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition broadly sensitizes glioblastoma cells to death receptor- and drug-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Opel, Daniela; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Bender, Ariane; Braun, Veit; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fulda, Simone

    2008-08-01

    The aberrant activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been reported to correlate with adverse clinical outcome in human glioblastoma in vivo. However, the question of how this survival network can be successfully targeted to restore the sensitivity of glioblastoma to apoptosis induction has not yet been answered. Here, we report that inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 broadly sensitizes wild-type and mutant PTEN glioblastoma cells to both death receptor- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, whereas mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition is not sufficient to restore apoptosis sensitivity. LY294002 significantly enhances apoptosis triggered by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), agonistic anti-CD95 antibodies, or several anticancer drugs (i.e., doxorubicin, etoposide, and vincristine) in a highly synergistic manner. In addition, LY294002 cooperates with TRAIL or doxorubicin to suppress colony formation, thus also showing a strong effect on long-term survival. Similarly, genetic knockdown of PI3K subunits p110alpha and/or p110beta by RNA interference (RNAi) primes glioblastoma cells for TRAIL- or doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis. In contrast to PI3K inhibition, pharmacologic or genetic blockade of mTOR by RAD001 (everolimus), rapamycin, or RNAi fails to enhance TRAIL- or doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Analysis of apoptosis pathways reveals that PI3K inhibition acts in concert with TRAIL or doxorubicin to trigger mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, caspase activation, and caspase-dependent apoptosis, which are abolished by the caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Most importantly, PI3K inhibition by LY294002 sensitizes primary cultured glioblastoma cells obtained from surgical specimens to TRAIL- or chemotherapy-induced cell death. By showing that PI3K inhibition broadly primes glioblastoma cells for apoptosis, our findings provide the rationale for using PI3K inhibitors in

  5. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  6. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  7. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  8. Antipsychotic drugs inhibit prolactin release from rat anterior pituitary cells in culture by a mechanism not involving the dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    West, B; Dannies, P S

    1979-04-01

    Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, inhibited secretion of PRL and did not affect GH release from rat anterior pituitary cells in culture. The reversal of this inhibition of PRL release by butaclamol, a dopamine antagonist, was stereospecific; 10 nM d-butaclamol completely reversed the inhibition caused by 10 nM bromocriptine, while l-butaclamol had no effect at concentrations up to 10 microM. However, both enantiomers at 10 microM inhibited PRL release to 30% and GH release to 91% of control values. Two other dopamine antagonists also inhibited hormone release. Haloperidol (10 microM) inhibited PRL release to 23% of control values and did not affect GH release; 3.3 microM pimozide inhibited PRL and GH release to 18% and 38% of control values, respectively. These data indicate that, the inhibition of PRL by antipsychotic drugs is not mediated through the dopamine receptor.

  9. A simple construction of electrochemical liver microsomal bioreactor for rapid drug metabolism and inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Walgama, Charuksha; Nerimetla, Rajasekhara; Materer, Nicholas F; Schildkraut, Deniz; Elman, James F; Krishnan, Sadagopan

    2015-01-01

    In order to design a green microsomal bioreactor on suitably identified carbon electrodes, it is important to understand the direct electrochemical properties at the interfaces between various carbon electrode materials and human liver microsomes (HLM). The novelty of this work is on the investigation of directly adsorbed HLM on different carbon electrodes with the goal to develop a simple, rapid, and new bioanalytical platform of HLM useful for drug metabolism and inhibition assays. These novel biointerfaces are designed in this study by a one step adsorption of HLM directly onto polished basal plane pyrolytic graphite (BPG), edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPG), glassy carbon (GC), or high-purity graphite (HPG) electrodes. The estimated direct electron transfer (ET) rate constant of HLM on the smooth GC surface was significantly greater than that of the other electrodes. On the other hand, the electroactive surface coverage and stability of microsomal films were greater on highly surface defective, rough EPG and HPG electrodes compared to the smooth GC and less defective hydrophobic BPG surfaces. The presence of significantly higher oxygen functionalities and flatness of the GC surface is attributed to favoring faster ET rates of the coated layer of thin HLM film compared to other electrodes. The cytochrome P450 (CYP)-specific bioactivity of the liver microsomal film on the catalytically superior, stable HPG surface was confirmed by monitoring the electrocatalytic conversion of testosterone to 6β-hydroxytestosterone and its inhibition by the CYP-specific ketoconazole inhibitor. The identification of optimal HPG and EPG electrodes to design biologically active interfaces with liver microsomes is suggested to have immense significance in the design of one-step, green bioreactors for stereoselective drug metabolite synthesis and drug metabolism and inhibition assays.

  10. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  11. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  12. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  13. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  14. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and survival of breast, colon and prostate cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Watt, Ian; Martin, Fabiola; Bland, Martin; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-11-18

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) regulate invasion and metastasis. Several VGSC-inhibiting drugs reduce metastasis in murine cancer models. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs who developed cancer live longer than those not taking these drugs. A cohort study was performed on primary care data from the QResearch database, including patients with breast, bowel or prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the survival from cancer diagnosis of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs with those not exposed to these drugs. Median time to death was 9.7 years in the exposed group and 18.4 years in the unexposed group, and exposure to these medications significantly increased mortality. Thus, exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs associates with reduced survival in breast, bowel and prostate cancer patients. This finding is not consistent with the preclinical data. Despite the strengths of this study including the large sample size, the study is limited by missing information on potentially important confounders such as cancer stage, co-morbidities and cause of death. Further research, which is able to account for these confounding issues, is needed to investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival.

  15. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and survival of breast, colon and prostate cancer: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Watt, Ian; Martin, Fabiola; Bland, Martin; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) regulate invasion and metastasis. Several VGSC-inhibiting drugs reduce metastasis in murine cancer models. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs who developed cancer live longer than those not taking these drugs. A cohort study was performed on primary care data from the QResearch database, including patients with breast, bowel or prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the survival from cancer diagnosis of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs with those not exposed to these drugs. Median time to death was 9.7 years in the exposed group and 18.4 years in the unexposed group, and exposure to these medications significantly increased mortality. Thus, exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs associates with reduced survival in breast, bowel and prostate cancer patients. This finding is not consistent with the preclinical data. Despite the strengths of this study including the large sample size, the study is limited by missing information on potentially important confounders such as cancer stage, co-morbidities and cause of death. Further research, which is able to account for these confounding issues, is needed to investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival. PMID:26577038

  16. Mutual information algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ai-Hua; Huang, Xiu-Chang; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Li, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Yi; Hua, Hong-Xin

    2010-11-01

    Three new mutual information algorithms are raised for time delay in the phase space reconstruction process. Firstly, Cellucci's mutual information algorithm is analyzed based on partitioning plane, which is constructed by a pair of Lorenz series with the same size, into four and sixteen grids with equal distribution probability in elements on each axis. Then three new mutual information algorithms are promoted based on the original probability matrix that shows the distribution of points corresponding to the data pairs of Lorenz series on the plane, the matrix excluding the last column and the last row of the original one as well as the proportionally revised matrix from the original one. Synchronously, an algorithm to compute the probability matrix is also advanced by sorting two series and replacing each numerical value with its order number in its own series so as to judge the element in which data sets are located. The optimal time delay of the three new mutual information algorithms as well as the computing time is also compared when series sizes are different. Finally, after reconstructing phase space with the optimal time delay, comparison between the maximal Lyapunov exponent calculated by Rosenstein's algorithm from time series and that gained by Jacobi matrix from Lorenz equation is used to confirm the validity of the new mutual information algorithms. The results show that Cellucci's mutual information algorithm will lead to wrong optimal time delay when series size is not a multiple of elements. The three new algorithms, whose results are more steady when a large number of data pairs are used, can not only eliminate the default of Cellucci's algorithm but also is very speedy, and the time spent on calculations by three algorithms nearly enhances linearly with the increase in series size. Moreover, the algorithm using original probability distribution matrix is more accurate than the others when small size series are used, and is also faster than the

  17. Drug CRL 40 028-induced inhibition of pancreatic secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Rozé, C; Chariot, J; Vaille, C

    1983-09-01

    The drug CRL 40 028 increases spontaneous motility through an action on central adrenergic receptors. The effects of this drug have been tested in rats on the external pancreatic secretion induced by secretin, CCK, acetylcholine, vagal electrical stimulation or 2 deoxy-D-glucose. CRL 40 028 had no effect on basal secretion nor on secretion stimulated by agents acting directly on pancreatic secretory cells (secretin, CCK, acetylcholine), but decreased significantly secretion induced by central or peripheral stimulation of the vagus nerves. CRL 40 028-induced inhibition of 2 DG effect was reduced by yohimbine, suggesting a participation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the action of CRL 40 028 on the exocrine pancreas secretion of rats.

  18. Inhibition of epithelial ovarian cancer by Minnelide, a water-soluble pro-drug.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Colleen; Geller, Melissa; Schnettler, Erica; Saluja, Manju; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Saluja, Ashok; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2014-11-01

    Minnelide is a water-soluble pro-drug of triptolide, a natural product. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Minnelide on ovarian cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Minnelide on ovarian cancer cell proliferation was determined by real time electrical impedance measurements. Multiple mouse models with C200 and A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines were used to assess the efficacy of Minnelide in inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. Minnelide decreased cell viability of both platinum sensitive and resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Minnelide with carboplatin showed additive effects in vitro. Minnelide monotherapy increased the survival of mice bearing established ovarian tumors. Minnelide, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, improved overall survival of mice. Minnelide is a promising pro-drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer, especially when combined with standard chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural basis for non-competitive product inhibition in human thymidine phosphorylase: implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    El Omari, Kamel; Bronckaers, Annelies; Liekens, Sandra; Pérez-Pérez, Maria-Jésus; Balzarini, Jan; Stammers, David K

    2006-10-15

    HTP (human thymidine phosphorylase), also known as PD-ECGF (platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor) or gliostatin, has an important role in nucleoside metabolism. HTP is implicated in angiogenesis and apoptosis and therefore is a prime target for drug design, including antitumour therapies. An HTP structure in a closed conformation complexed with an inhibitor has previously been solved. Earlier kinetic studies revealed an ordered release of thymine followed by ribose phosphate and product inhibition by both ligands. We have determined the structure of HTP from crystals grown in the presence of thymidine, which, surprisingly, resulted in bound thymine with HTP in a closed dead-end complex. Thus thymine appears to be able to reassociate with HTP after its initial ordered release before ribose phosphate and induces the closed conformation, hence explaining the mechanism of non-competitive product inhibition. In the active site in one of the four HTP molecules within the crystal asymmetric unit, additional electron density is present. This density has not been previously seen in any pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase and it defines a subsite that may be exploitable in drug design. Finally, because our crystals did not require proteolysed HTP to grow, the structure reveals a loop (residues 406-415), disordered in the previous HTP structure. This loop extends across the active-site cleft and appears to stabilize the dimer interface and the closed conformation by hydrogen-bonding. The present study will assist in the design of HTP inhibitors that could lead to drugs for anti-angiogenesis as well as for the potentiation of other nucleoside drugs.

  20. Structural Basis for Inhibition of Histamine N-Methyltransferase by Diverse Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Horton,J.; Sawada, K.; Nishibori, M.; Cheng, X.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, histamine action is terminated through metabolic inactivation by histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) and diamine oxidase. In addition to three well-studied pharmacological functions, smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, and stimulation of gastric acid secretion, histamine plays important roles in neurotransmission, immunomodulation, and regulation of cell proliferation. The histamine receptor H1 antagonist diphenhydramine, the antimalarial drug amodiaquine, the antifolate drug metoprine, and the anticholinesterase drug tacrine (an early drug for Alzheimer's disease) are surprisingly all potent HNMT inhibitors, having inhibition constants in the range of 10-100 nM. We have determined the structural mode of interaction of these four inhibitors with HNMT. Despite their structural diversity, they all occupy the histamine-binding site, thus blocking access to the enzyme's active site. Near the N terminus of HNMT, several aromatic residues (Phe9, Tyr15, and Phe19) adopt different rotamer conformations or become disordered in the enzyme-inhibitor complexes, accommodating the diverse, rigid hydrophobic groups of the inhibitors. The maximized shape complementarity between the protein aromatic side-chains and aromatic ring(s) of the inhibitors are responsible for the tight binding of these varied inhibitors.

  1. Aurora kinase A inhibition-induced autophagy triggers drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhengzhi; Yuan, Zhongyu; Zhang, Qiongxia; Long, Zijie; Chen, Jinna; Tang, Zhiping; Zhu, Yuliang; Chen, Shupeng; Xu, Jie; Yan, Min; Wang, Jing; Liu, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    We have previously shown that elevated expression of mitotic kinase aurora kinase A (AURKA) in cancer cells promotes the development of metastatic phenotypes and is associated clinically with adverse prognosis. Here, we first revealed a clinically positive correlation between AURKA and autophagy-associated protein SQSTM1 in breast cancer and further demonstrated that AURKA regulated SQSTM1 through autophagy. Indeed, depletion by siRNA or chemical inhibition of AURKA by the small molecule VX-680 increased both the level of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and the number of autophagosomes, along with decreased SQSTM1. Conversely, overexpression of AURKA inhibited autophagy, as assessed by decreased LC3-II and increased SQSTM1 either upon nutrient deprivation or normal conditions. In addition, phosphorylated forms of both RPS6KB1 and mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) were elevated by overexpression of AURKA whereas they were suppressed by depletion or inhibition of AURKA. Moreover, inhibition of MTOR by PP242, an inhibitor of MTOR complex1/2, abrogated the changes in both LC3-II and SQSTM1 in AURKA-overexpressing BT-549 cells, suggesting that AURKA-suppressed autophagy might be associated with MTOR activation. Lastly, repression of autophagy by depletion of either LC3 or ATG5, sensitized breast cancer cells to VX-680-induced apoptosis. Similar findings were observed in cells treated with the autophagy inhibitors chloroquine (CQ) and bafilomycin A 1 (BAF). Our data thus revealed a novel role of AURKA as a negative regulator of autophagy, showing that AURKA inhibition induced autophagy, which may represent a novel mechanism of drug resistance in apoptosis-aimed therapy for breast cancer.

  2. Inhibition of Bacterial Carbonic Anhydrases as a Novel Approach to Escape Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-01-01

    Clinically used antibiotics act through one of these four mechanisms: cell wall biosynthesis inhibition, inhibition of protein biosynthesis, interference with DNA and RNA synthesis and the folate pathway. The metalloenzymes carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) widespread in microorganisms and present as three genetically distinct families may be considered for the design of antiinfective agents with a different mechanism of action compared to the clinically used antibiotics. CAs are crucial for the life cycle of the pathogen, interfering with pH regulation and biosynthetic processes in which CO2 or bicarbonate are substrates. CA inhibition was shown to lead to debilitation or growth defects of several pathogenic bacteria. CAs catalyzes the interconversion between carbon dioxide to bicarbonate, leading to the formation of protons, and thus affecting pH homeostasis. Several classes of CA inhibitors (CAIs) are known to date, among which the metal complexing anions, the unsubstituted sulfonamides, the dithiocarbamates, etc., which bind to the Zn(II) ion of the enzyme either by substituting the non-protein zinc ligand or add to the metal coordination sphere. Effective inhibitors for many bacterial CAs belonging to the α-, β-, and γ-CA classes were detected, some of which inhibited bacterial growth in vivo. Few of the inhibitors investigated so far were also selective for the bacterial over the human CA isoforms, which may pose problems for their wide clinical applications. Structure-based drug design campaigns might lead to the achievement of the desired selectivity/ potency for preferentially inhibiting bacterial but not the host CAs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Ashley J.; Drozda, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <5 µM. A significant number of these compounds are established inhibitors of dopamine or estrogen signaling. Follow-up experiments with the dopamine receptor inhibitor pimozide revealed that the drug impacted both parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several

  4. Quinidine-induced neutropenia: report of a case with drug-dependent inhibition of granulocyte colony generation.

    PubMed

    Ascensao, J L; Flynn, P J; Slungaard, A; Wachsman, W; Zanjani, E D; Jacob, H S

    1984-01-01

    We describe a case of quinidine-induced agranulocytosis in which in vitro marrow culture studies suggested immune inhibition of committed human granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM). Autologous, but not allogeneic, inhibition of CFU-GM was seen with 'acute' serum from the patient in the presence of quinidine but not other drugs. Cytotoxic antibodies to mature granulocytes were not found. These studies provide a novel mechanism for drug-induced neutropenia and suggest that a battery of in vitro assays of progenitor and of mature granulocyte cytotoxicity might identify offending agents in suspected drug-induced neutropenias.

  5. Selective inhibition of anthrax edema factor by adefovir, a drug for chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuequan; Zhukovskaya, Natalia L; Zimmer, Michael I; Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Bergson, Pamela; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Gibbs, Craig S; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2004-03-02

    Edema factor (EF), a key virulence factor in anthrax pathogenesis, has calmodulin (CaM)-activated adenylyl cyclase activity. We have found that adefovir dipivoxil, a drug approved to treat chronic infection of hepatitis B virus, effectively inhibits EF-induced cAMP accumulation and changes in cytokine production in mouse primary macrophages. Adefovir diphosphate (PMEApp), the active cellular metabolite of adefovir dipivoxil, inhibits the adenylyl cyclase activity of EF in vitro with high affinity (K(i) = 27 nM). A crystal structure of EF-CaM-PMEApp reveals that the catalytic site of EF forms better van der Waals contacts and more hydrogen bonds with PMEApp than with its endogenous substrate, ATP, providing an explanation for the approximately 10,000-fold higher affinity EF-CaM has for PMEApp versus ATP. Adefovir dipivoxil is a clinically approved drug that can block the action of an anthrax toxin. It can be used to address the role of EF in anthrax pathogenesis.

  6. Autophagy inhibits cell death induced by the anti-cancer drug morusin

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang Woo; Na, Wooju; Choi, Minji; Kang, Shin Jung; Lee, Seok-Geun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process by which damaged organelles and dysfunctional proteins are degraded. Morusin is an anti-cancer drug isolated from the root bark of Morus alba. Morusin induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by reducing STAT3 activity. In this study, we examined whether morusin induces autophagy and also examined the effects of autophagy on the morusin-induced apoptosis. Morusin induces LC3-II accumulation and ULK1 activation in HeLa cells. In addition, we found that induction of ULK1 Ser317 phosphorylation and reduction of ULK1 Ser757 phosphorylation occurred simultaneously during morusin-induced autophagy. Consistently, morusin induces autophagy by activation of AMPK and inhibition of mTOR activity. Next, we investigated the role of autophagy in morusin-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy by treating cells with the 3-methyladenine (3-MA) autophagic inhibitor induces high levels of morusin-mediated apoptosis, while treatment of cells with morusin alone induces moderate levels of apoptosis. Cell survival was greatly reduced when cells were treated with morusin and 3-MA. Taken together, morusin induces autophagy, which is an impediment for morusin-induced apoptosis, suggesting combined treatment of morusin with an autophagic inhibitor would increase the efficacy of morusin as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:28401008

  7. Induction and inhibition of cytochrome P450 and drug-metabolizing enzymes by climbazole.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuna; Suzuki, Michiya; Ohshiro, Naomi; Sunagawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Tadanori; Oguro, Takiko; Tokuyama, Shogo; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Yoshida, Takemi

    2002-01-01

    To determine the effect of climbazole on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) and drug-metabolizing enzymes, four different P450 isoforms (CYP2B1, 3A2, 2E1, and 2C12) were examined in female Long-Evans rats. Treatment of rats with climbazole resulted in the induction of P450 content. Climbazole both induced and inhibited aminopyrine N-demethylase activity, but not erythromycin N-demethylase activity. Uridine 5'-phosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyl transferase and glutathione S-transferase activities were also increased with climbazole treatment. Immunoblot analyses revealed that climbazole induces CYP2B1 and CYP3A2 at the lower dose examined, but it failed to increase CYP2B1 at the higher dose. Northern blot analysis revealed that climbazole markedly increases P450 2B1 mRNA. These results indicate that climbazole induces and inhibits P450-dependent drug-metabolizing enzymes in vivo and may have the dose-differential effect on CYP2B1 in rat liver.

  8. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen*

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-α-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2. PMID:20810665

  9. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-11-15

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-{alpha}-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2.

  10. Inhibition of Lipolysis by Mercaptoacetate and Etomoxir Specifically Sensitize Drug-Resistant Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell to Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Teng; Zhao, Li; Miao, Ping; Song, Shaoli; Sun, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianjun; Zhao, Xiaoping; Huang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a major cause of treatment failure in patients with lung cancer. Although the extensive efforts have been made in overcoming chemoresistance, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Cancer cells reprogram cellular metabolism to satisfy the demands of malignant phenotype. To reveal roles of cancer metabolism in regulating chemoresistance, we profiled the metabolic characteristics in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cells by flux assay. Glucose and oleate metabolism were significantly different between resistant and non-resistant cells. In addition, targeting metabolism as a strategy to overcome drug resistance was investigated using specific metabolic inhibitors. Inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation by 2-deoxyglucose and malonate, respectively, potentiated the effects of paclitaxel on nonresistant lung adenocarcinoma cells but not paclitaxel-resistant cells. By contrast, inhibition of lipolysis by mercaptoacetate or etomoxir synergistically inhibited drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation. We conclude that lipolysis inhibition potentially be a therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in lung cancer. PMID:24040298

  11. Polymer-drug conjugates for intracellar molecule-targeted photoinduced inactivation of protein and growth inhibition of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Huanxiang; Zhu, Chunlei; Yang, Qiong; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2012-10-01

    For most molecule-targeted anticancer systems, intracellular protein targets are very difficult to be accessed by antibodies, and also most efforts are made to inhibit protein activity temporarily rather than inactivate them permanently. In this work we firstly designed and synthesized multifunctional polymer-drug conjugates (polythiophene-tamoxifen) for intracellular molecule-targeted binding and inactivation of protein (estrogen receptor α, ERα) for growth inhibition of MCF-7 cancer cells. Small molecule drug was conjugated to polymer side chain for intracellular signal protein targeting, and simultaneously the fluorescent characteristic of polymer for tracing the cellular uptake and localization of polythiophene-drug conjugates by cell imaging. Under light irradiation, the conjugated polymer can sensitize oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that specifically inactivate the targeted protein, and thus inhibit the growth of tumor cells. The conjugates showed selective growth inhibition of ERα positive cancer cells, which exhibits low side effect for our intracellular molecule-targeted therapy system.

  12. Reversal of efflux of an anticancer drug in human drug-resistant breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Woo; Asai, Daisuke; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a 170-kDa transmembrane protein that mediates the efflux of anticancer drugs from cells. Pgp overexpression has a distinct role in cells exhibiting multidrug resistance (MDR). We examined reversal of drug resistance in human MDR breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity, which is associated with Pgp-mediated efflux of anticancer drugs. PKCα activity was confirmed by measurement of phosphorylation levels of a PKCα-specific peptide substrate (FKKQGSFAKKK-NH2), showing relatively higher basal activity in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells (84 %) than that in drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells (63 %). PKCα activity was effectively suppressed by the PKC inhibitor, Ro-31-7549, and reversal of intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin was observed by inhibition of PKCα activity in MCF-7/ADR cells compared with their intrinsic drug resistance. Importantly, increased accumulation of doxorubicin could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in MDR cells significantly. These results suggest a potential for overcoming MDR via inhibition of PKCα activity with conventional anticancer drugs.

  13. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  14. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  15. Phospho-sulindac inhibits pancreatic cancer growth: NFATc1 as a drug resistance candidate.

    PubMed

    Murray, Onika T; Wong, Chi C; Vrankova, Kvetoslava; Rigas, Basil

    2014-02-01

    Phospho-sulindac (P-S), a promising anticancer agent, is efficacious in pre-clinical models of human cancer and is apparently safe. Here, we studied the effect of P-S on pancreatic cancer growth. We found that P-S strongly inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, is efficacious in inhibiting the growth of pancreatic xenografts in nude mice, and has an excellent safety profile. Microarray analysis revealed that P-S induced the expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, isoform c1 (NFATc1) gene. NFATc1, a calcineurin-responsive transcription factor associated with aggressive pancreatic cancer. The role of increased NFATc1 expression on the growth inhibitory effect of P-S on cancer growth was evaluated by silencing or by overexpressing it both in vitro and in vivo. We found that when the expression of NFATc1 was abrogated by RNAi, pancreatic cancer cells were more responsive to treatment with P-S. Conversely, overexpressing the NFATc1 gene made the pancreatic cancer cells less responsive to treatment with P-S. NFATc1 likely mediates drug resistance to P-S and is an unfavorable prognostic factor that predicts poor tumor response. We also demonstrated that NFATc1-mediated resistance can be overcome by cyclosporin A (CsA), an NFAT inhibitor, and that the combination of P-S and CsA synergistically inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth. In conclusion, our preclinical data establish P-S as an efficacious drug for pancreatic cancer in preclinical models, which merits further evaluation.

  16. Drugs Which Inhibit Osteoclast Function Suppress Tumor Growth through Calcium Reduction in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liao, Jinhui; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Sadler, William D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rosol, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma frequently metastasizes to bone where the microenvironment facilitates its growth. Inhibition of bone resorption is effective in reducing tumor burden and bone destruction in prostate cancer. However, whether drugs that inhibit osteoclast function inhibit tumor growth independent of inhibition of bone resorption is unclear. Calcium is released during bone resorption and the calcium sensing receptor is an important regulator of cancer cell proliferation. The goal of this investigation was to elucidate the role of calcium released during bone resorption and to determine the impact of drugs which suppress bone resorption on tumor growth in bone. To compare tumor growth in a skeletal versus non-skeletal site, equal numbers of canine prostate cancer cells expressing luciferase (ACE-1luc) prostate cancer cells were inoculated into a simple collagen matrix, neonatal mouse vertebrae (vossicles), human de-proteinized bone, or a mineralized collagen matrix. Implants were placed subcutaneously into athymic mice. Luciferase activity was used to track tumor growth weekly and at one month tumors were dissected for histologic analysis. Luciferase activity and tumor size were greater in vossicles, de-proteinized bone and mineralized collagen matrix versus non-mineralized collagen implants. The human osteoblastic prostate carcinoma cell line C4-2b also grew better in a mineral rich environment with a greater proliferation of C4-2b cells reflected by Ki-67 staining. Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate, and recombinant OPG-Fc, a RANKL inhibitor, were administered to mice bearing vertebral implants (vossicles) containing ACE-1 osteoblastic prostate cancer cells. Vossicles or collagen matrices were seeded with ACE-1luc cells subcutaneously in athymic mice (2 vossicles, 2 collagen implants/mouse). Mice received ZA (5μg/mouse, twice/week), (OPG-Fc at 10mg/kg, 3 times/week) or vehicle, and luciferase activity was measured weekly. Histologic analysis of the tumors

  17. Inhibition mechanism exploration of investigational drug TAK-441 as inhibitor against Vismodegib-resistant Smoothened mutant.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Yuji; Nakashima, Kosuke; Kondo, Shigeru; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Satoshi; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-01-15

    Hedgehog signaling is a driving force in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), making it an attractive therapeutic target. Vismodegib recently received FDA approval for the treatment of inoperable BCC, but a drug-resistant Smoothened (Smo) mutant (D473H) was identified in a clinical study. TAK-441 is a pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridine-4-one derivative that potently inhibits Hh signal transduction and is currently under investigation in clinical trials. We demonstrated that TAK-441 inhibits reporter activity in D473H-transfected cells with an IC50 of 79nM, while Vismodegib showed an IC50=7100nM. In order to investigate the mode of inhibition, we evaluated the Smo inhibitors with three different binding assays, such as [(3)H]-TAK-441 membrane binding assay, affinity selection-MS detection assay, and bodipy-cylopamine whole cell assay. In three different assays, Vismodegib and cyclopamine showed lower affinity for the D473H mutant in comparison with wild-type Smo. On the other hand, TAK-441 showed almost equal binding affinity for the D473H mutant compared with wild-type Smo in the binding assays, although TAK-441 binds to the same binding site as two other well-known inhibitors. These in vitro findings suggest that TAK-441 has the potential for clinical use in cancers that are dependent on Hedgehog signaling, including wild-type tumors and Vismodegib-resistant D473H mutants.

  18. Mechanism of Inhibition of Enveloped Virus Membrane Fusion by the Antiviral Drug Arbidol

    PubMed Central

    Teissier, Elodie; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Loquet, Antoine; Lavillette, Dimitri; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Montserret, Roland; Cosset, François-Loïc; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Penin, François; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The broad-spectrum antiviral arbidol (Arb) inhibits cell entry of enveloped viruses by blocking viral fusion with host cell membrane. To better understand Arb mechanism of action, we investigated its interactions with phospholipids and membrane peptides. We demonstrate that Arb associates with phospholipids in the micromolar range. NMR reveals that Arb interacts with the polar head-group of phospholipid at the membrane interface. Fluorescence studies of interactions between Arb and either tryptophan derivatives or membrane peptides reconstituted into liposomes show that Arb interacts with tryptophan in the micromolar range. Interestingly, apparent binding affinities between lipids and tryptophan residues are comparable with those of Arb IC50 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) membrane fusion. Since tryptophan residues of membrane proteins are known to bind preferentially at the membrane interface, these data suggest that Arb could increase the strength of virus glycoprotein's interactions with the membrane, due to a dual binding mode involving aromatic residues and phospholipids. The resulting complexation would inhibit the expected viral glycoprotein conformational changes required during the fusion process. Our findings pave the way towards the design of new drugs exhibiting Arb-like interfacial membrane binding properties to inhibit early steps of virus entry, i.e., attractive targets to combat viral infection. PMID:21283579

  19. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival: protocol for a cohort study using the CPRD primary care database

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Martin, Fabiola; Watt, Ian; Doran, Tim; Bland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-inhibiting drugs are commonly used to treat epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. VGSCs are also widely expressed in various cancers, including those of the breast, bowel and prostate. A number of VGSC-inhibiting drugs have been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, invasion, tumour growth and metastasis in preclinical models, suggesting that VGSCs may be novel molecular targets for cancer treatment. Surprisingly, we previously found that prior exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs may be associated with reduced overall survival in patients with cancer, but we were unable to control for the cause of death or indication for prescription. The purpose of the present study is to interrogate a different database to further investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer-specific survival. Methods and analysis A cohort study using primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database will include patients with diagnosis of breast, bowel and prostate cancer (13 000). The primary outcome will be cancer-specific survival from the date of cancer diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards regression will be used to compare survival of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs (including antiepileptic drugs and class I antiarrhythmic agents) with patients with cancer not taking these drugs, adjusting for cancer type, age and sex. Drug exposure will be treated as a time-varying covariate to account for potential immortal time bias. Various sensitivity and secondary analyses will be performed. Ethics and dissemination The project has been reviewed and approved by the University of York Ethical Review Process. Results will be presented at an international conference and published in open access peer-reviewed journals according to the STROBE and RECORD guidelines. PMID:27601493

  20. Identification of synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibition and microtubule-destabilizing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hugle, M; Belz, K; Fulda, S

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is frequently overexpressed in cancer, which correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, we investigated PLK1 as therapeutic target using rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) as a model. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs in preclinical RMS models and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this synergism. PLK1 inhibitors (i.e., BI 2536 and BI 6727) synergistically induce apoptosis together with microtubule-destabilizing drugs (i.e., vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VNR)) in several RMS cell lines (combination index <0.9) including a patient-derived primary RMS culture. Importantly, PLK1 inhibitors and VCR cooperate to significantly suppress RMS growth in two in vivo models, including a mouse xenograft model, without causing additive toxicity. In addition, no toxicity was observed in non-malignant fibroblast or myoblast cultures. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers mitotic arrest, which initiates mitochondrial apoptosis by inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, followed by BAX/BAK activation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent effector pathways. This conclusion is supported by data showing that BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis is significantly inhibited by preventing cells to enter mitosis, by overexpression of BCL-2 or a non-degradable MCL-1 mutant, by BAK knockdown, ROS scavengers, caspase inhibition or endonuclease G silencing. This identification of a novel synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs has important implications for developing PLK1 inhibitor-based combination treatments. PMID:26024389

  1. Identification of approved and investigational drugs that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Wen; Huang, Ruili; Khuc, Thai; Shou, David; Bullock, Joshua; Grooby, Suzanne; Griffin, Sue; Zou, Chaozhong; Little, Annette; Astley, Holly; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    One of the requirements for tumor development is blood supply, most often driven by hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Hypoxia induces the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), which induces expression of an angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The purpose of this study is to validate a new screening platform combined with orthogonal assays to rapidly identify HIF-1 inhibitors and to evaluate the effectiveness of approved drugs on modulating HIF-1 signaling. We generated an endogenous HIF-1α–NanoLuc luciferase reporter allele in the human HCT116 colon cancer cell line using genome editing and screened a panel of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to 960 druggable targets and approximately 2,500 drugs on a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) platform. Selected compounds were further investigated with secondary assays to confirm their anti-HIF activity and to study their mode of action. The qHTS assay identified over 300 drugs that inhibited HIF-1α-NanoLuc expression. The siRNA screening results supported the effectiveness of several target-specific inhibitors. Moreover, the identified HIF-1 inhibitors, such as mycophenolate mofetil, niclosamide, and trametinib, were able to suppress cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Our study indicates that blocking the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways effectively inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1α transactivation and that proteasome inhibitors induce accumulation and decrease transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These findings underline the importance of developing a battery of robust assay platforms and confirmation studies that focus on endogenous protein targets so that only relevant and reliable data will be taken into pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26882567

  2. Inhibition of the enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase in human platelets by vigabatrin, a potential antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, E; Kongola, G; Richens, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of the new antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl GABA), on the platelet enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) was investigated in volunteers and patients. Platelets GABA-T activity was assayed using a radioenzymic method. 2. Three single oral doses of vigabatrin (1 g, 2 g and 4 g) were given to six healthy male volunteers in an open randomised cross over study and compared with a baseline period preceding the three treatments. 3. Significant inhibition of the platelet GABA-T was produced by treatment with all three doses and a dose-response relationship was demonstrated. The minimum enzyme activities after 1 g, 2 g and 4 g doses were 43%, 30% and 21% respectively compared with the control values. 4. A significant depression of enzyme activity occurred at 30 min after drug administration and the values remained below control values for 72 h post-dose, outlasting the presence of the drug itself in the plasma. 5. Eight patients with chronic refractory epilepsy were treated with vigabatrin for 6 weeks. After taking the 2 g daily dose for 1 week there was a marked reduction in platelet enzyme activity in all subjects but the enzyme inhibition produced by the 3 g dose was not significantly different from that produced by the 2 g dose, even after 4 weeks treatment with the larger dose. The mean enzyme activity was approximately 30% throughout the active treatment period. One week after stopping vigabatrin, the enzyme levels were not significantly different from the baseline values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358887

  3. Identification of synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibition and microtubule-destabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Hugle, M; Belz, K; Fulda, S

    2015-12-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is frequently overexpressed in cancer, which correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, we investigated PLK1 as therapeutic target using rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) as a model. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs in preclinical RMS models and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this synergism. PLK1 inhibitors (i.e., BI 2536 and BI 6727) synergistically induce apoptosis together with microtubule-destabilizing drugs (i.e., vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VNR)) in several RMS cell lines (combination index <0.9) including a patient-derived primary RMS culture. Importantly, PLK1 inhibitors and VCR cooperate to significantly suppress RMS growth in two in vivo models, including a mouse xenograft model, without causing additive toxicity. In addition, no toxicity was observed in non-malignant fibroblast or myoblast cultures. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers mitotic arrest, which initiates mitochondrial apoptosis by inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, followed by BAX/BAK activation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent effector pathways. This conclusion is supported by data showing that BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis is significantly inhibited by preventing cells to enter mitosis, by overexpression of BCL-2 or a non-degradable MCL-1 mutant, by BAK knockdown, ROS scavengers, caspase inhibition or endonuclease G silencing. This identification of a novel synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs has important implications for developing PLK1 inhibitor-based combination treatments.

  4. Structural Insights into Drug Processing by Human Carboxylesterase 1: Tamoxifen, Mevastatin, and Inhibition by Benzil

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Christopher D.; Bencharit, Sompop; Edwards, Carol C.; Hyatt, Janice L.; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Bai, Feng; Fraga, Charles; Morton, Christopher L.; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Potter, Philip M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-07-19

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) exhibits broad substrate specificity and is involved in xenobiotic processing and endobiotic metabolism. We present and analyze crystal structures of hCE1 in complexes with the cholesterol-lowering drug mevastatin, the breast cancer drug tamoxifen, the fatty acyl ethyl ester (FAEE) analogue ethyl acetate, and the novel hCE1 inhibitor benzil. We find that mevastatin does not appear to be a substrate for hCE1, and instead acts as a partially non-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. Similarly, we show that tamoxifen is a low micromolar, partially non-competitive inhibitor of hCE1. Further, we describe the structural basis for the inhibition of hCE1 by the nanomolar-affinity dione benzil, which acts by forming both covalent and non-covalent complexes with the enzyme. Our results provide detailed insights into the catalytic and non-catalytic processing of small molecules by hCE1, and suggest that the efficacy of clinical drugs may be modulated by targeted hCE1 inhibitors.

  5. Evaluation of human D-amino acid oxidase inhibition by anti-psychotic drugs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, Miho; Hakariya, Hitomi; Iwasa, Sumiko; Yoshio, Takashi; Ichiba, Hideaki; Yorita, Kazuko; Fukui, Kiyoshi; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    It is of importance to determine whether antipsychotic drugs currently prescribed for schizophrenia exert D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)-inhibitory effects. We first investigated whether human (h)DAO can metabolize D-kynurenine (D-KYN) to produce the fluorescent compound kynurenic acid (KYNA) by using high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectrometry. After confirmation of KYNA production from D-KYN by hDAO, 8 first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs, and 6 drugs often prescribed concomitantly, were assayed for hDAO-inhibitory effects by using in vitro fluorometric methods with D-KYN as the substrate. DAO inhibitors 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid and 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-5-carboxylic acid inhibited KYNA production in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the second-generation antipsychotics blonanserin and risperidone were found to possess relatively strong hDAO-inhibitory effects in vitro (5.29 ± 0.47 μM and 4.70 ± 0.17 μM, respectively). With regard to blonanserin and risperidone, DAO-inhibitory effects should be taken into consideration in the context of their in vivo pharmacotherapeutic efficacy.

  6. A combined model for predicting CYP3A4 clinical net drug-drug interaction based on CYP3A4 inhibition, inactivation, and induction determined in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Odette A; Maurer, Tristan S; Kish, Mary; Cardenas, Edwin; Boldt, Sherri; Nettleton, David

    2008-08-01

    Although approaches to the prediction of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) arising via time-dependent inactivation have recently been developed, such approaches do not account for simple competitive inhibition or induction. Accordingly, these approaches do not provide accurate predictions of DDIs arising from simple competitive inhibition (e.g., ketoconazole) or induction of cytochromes P450 (e.g., phenytoin). In addition, methods that focus upon a single interaction mechanism are likely to yield misleading predictions in the face of mixed mechanisms (e.g., ritonavir). As such, we have developed a more comprehensive mathematical model that accounts for the simultaneous influences of competitive inhibition, time-dependent inactivation, and induction of CYP3A in both the liver and intestine to provide a net drug-drug interaction prediction in terms of area under the concentration-time curve ratio. This model provides a framework by which readily obtained in vitro values for competitive inhibition, time-dependent inactivation and induction for the precipitant compound as well as literature values for f(m) and F(G) for the object drug can be used to provide quantitative predictions of DDIs. Using this model, DDIs arising via inactivation (e.g., erythromycin) continue to be well predicted, whereas those arising via competitive inhibition (e.g., ketoconazole), induction (e.g., phenytoin), and mixed mechanisms (e.g., ritonavir) are also predicted within the ranges reported in the clinic. This comprehensive model quantitatively predicts clinical observations with reasonable accuracy and can be a valuable tool to evaluate candidate drugs and rationalize clinical DDIs.

  7. IFN-λ Inhibits Drug-Resistant HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, He; Liu, Man-Qing; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Run-Hong; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated to inhibit a number of viruses, including HIV. Here, we further examined the anti-HIV effect of IFN-λs in macrophages. We found that IFN-λs synergistically enhanced anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals [azidothymidine (AZT), efavirenz, indinavir, and enfuvirtide] in infected macrophages. Importantly, IFN-λs could suppress HIV infection of macrophages with the drug-resistant strains, including AZT-resistant virus (A012) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant virus (TC49). Mechanistically, IFN-λs were able to induce the expression of several important anti-HIV cellular factors, including myxovirus resistance 2 (Mx2), a newly identified HIV post-entry inhibitor and tetherin, a restriction factor that blocks HIV release from infected cells. These observations provide additional evidence to support the potential use of IFN-λs as therapeutics agents for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:28321215

  8. Common drugs inhibit human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1)-mediated neurotransmitter uptake.

    PubMed

    Boxberger, Kelli H; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-06-01

    The human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a polyspecific transporter involved in the uptake of positively charged and neutral small molecules in the liver. To date, few endogenous compounds have been identified as OCT1 substrates; more importantly, the effect of drugs on endogenous substrate transport has not been examined. In this study, we established monoamine neurotransmitters as substrates for OCT1, specifically characterizing serotonin transport in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinetic analysis yielded a Km of 197 micomolar and a Vmax of 561 pmol/mg protein/minute for serotonin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that serotonin uptake was inhibited by diphenhydramine, fluoxetine, imatinib, and verapamil, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. These results were recapitulated in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that OCT1 plays a significant role in hepatic elimination of serotonin and that xenobiotics may alter the elimination of endogenous compounds as a result of interactions at the transporter level.

  9. Common Drugs Inhibit Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1)-Mediated Neurotransmitter Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Boxberger, Kelli H.; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a polyspecific transporter involved in the uptake of positively charged and neutral small molecules in the liver. To date, few endogenous compounds have been identified as OCT1 substrates; more importantly, the effect of drugs on endogenous substrate transport has not been examined. In this study, we established monoamine neurotransmitters as substrates for OCT1, specifically characterizing serotonin transport in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinetic analysis yielded a Km of 197 micomolar and a Vmax of 561 pmol/mg protein/minute for serotonin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that serotonin uptake was inhibited by diphenhydramine, fluoxetine, imatinib, and verapamil, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. These results were recapitulated in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that OCT1 plays a significant role in hepatic elimination of serotonin and that xenobiotics may alter the elimination of endogenous compounds as a result of interactions at the transporter level. PMID:24688079

  10. Mutual help in SETIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, F.; Frisch, D. H.

    1985-06-01

    Techniques to establish communication between earth and extraterrestrial intelligent beings are examined analytically, emphasizing that the success of searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETIs) depends on the selection by both sender and receiver of one of a few mutually helpful SETI strategies. An equation for estimating the probability that an SETI will result in the recognition of an ETI signal is developed, and numerical results for various SETI strategies are presented in tables. A minimum approach employing 10 40-m 20-kW dish antennas for a 30-yr SETI in a 2500-light-year disk is proposed.

  11. New insights into human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibition by second-generation bisphosphonate drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, D.; Ramis, R.; Ortega-Castro, J.; Casasnovas, R.; Vilanova, B.; Frau, J.

    2017-07-01

    Pamidronate, alendronate, APHBP and neridronate are a group of drugs, known as second-generation bisphosphonates (2G-BPs), commonly used in the treatment of bone-resorption disorders, and recently their use has been related to some collateral side effects. The therapeutic activity of 2G-BPs is related to the inhibition of the human Farnesyl Pyrophosphate Synthase (hFPPS). Available inhibitory activity values show that 2G-BPs act time-dependently, showing big differences in their initial inhibitory activities but similar final IC50 values. However, there is a lack of information explaining this similar final inhibitory potency. Although different residues have been identified in the stabilization of the R2 side chain of 2G-BPs into the active site, similar free binding energies were obtained that highlighted a similar stability of the ternary complexes, which in turns justified the similar IC50 values reported. Free binding energy calculations also demonstrated that the union of 2G-BPs to the active site were 38 to 54 kcal mol-1 energetically more favourable than the union of the natural substrate, which is the basis of the inhibition potency of the hFPPS activity.

  12. Inhibition of human LDL oxidation by the neuroprotective drug l-deprenyl.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tom; Bhavnani, Bhagu R; Thomas, Prem

    2002-03-01

    L-deprenyl (Selegiline) used in the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease also enhances longevity. Oxidized low density lipoprotein promotes atherosclerosis and is toxic to both vascular and neural tissue. The reported association between vascular dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases prompted us to investigate the effect of l-deprenyl, a MAO-B inhibitor, on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. LDL was isolated from freshly collected blood and the kinetics of copper induced oxidation of LDL was monitored continuously by spectrophotometry. Oral administration (10 mg) or in vitro (2.8 to 84 microM) addition of l-deprenyl inhibited oxidation of LDL isolated from healthy men and post-menopausal women. This is the first report demonstrating that the antioxidant action of l-deprenyl may be antiatherogenic and cardioprotective. Such an action could contribute to reported extension of life span associated with long-term administration of the drug. In conjunction with inhibition of LDL oxidation, l-deprenyl is unique in that it demonstrates protective effects on both vascular and neuronal tissue. Prophylactic use of low doses of l-deprenyl may accord protection against vascular and neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging.

  13. Sorafenib overcomes irinotecan resistance in colorectal cancer by inhibiting the ABCG2 drug-efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Mazard, Thibault; Causse, Annick; Simony, Joelle; Leconet, Wilhem; Vezzio-Vie, Nadia; Torro, Adeline; Jarlier, Marta; Evrard, Alexandre; Del Rio, Maguy; Assenat, Eric; Martineau, Pierre; Ychou, Marc; Robert, Bruno; Gongora, Celine

    2013-10-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), tumor resistance is a frequent cause of chemotherapy failure. Therefore, new treatment options are needed to improve survival of patients with irinotecan-refractory CRCs, particularly those bearing KRAS mutations that preclude the use of anti-EGFR therapies. In this study, we investigated whether sorafenib could reverse irinotecan resistance, thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of routinely used irinotecan-based chemotherapy. We used both in vitro (the HCT116, SW48, SW620, and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines and four SN-38-resistant HCT-116 and SW48 clones) and in vivo models (nude mice xenografted with SN-38-resistant HCT116 cells) to test the efficacy of sorafenib alone or in combination with irinotecan or its active metabolite, SN-38. We have shown that sorafenib improved the antitumoral activity of irinotecan in vitro, in both parental and SN-38-resistant colon adenocarcinoma cell lines independently of their KRAS status, as well as in vivo, in xenografted mice. By inhibiting the drug-efflux pump ABCG2, sorafenib favors irinotecan intracellular accumulation and enhances its toxicity. Moreover, we found that sorafenib improved the efficacy of irinotecan by inhibiting the irinotecan-mediated p38 and ERK activation. In conclusion, our results show that sorafenib can suppress resistance to irinotecan and suggest that sorafenib could be used to overcome resistance to irinotecan-based chemotherapies in CRC, particularly in KRAS-mutated tumors.

  14. Anti-inflammatory drug (BW755C) inhibits airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, L.M.; Aizawa, H.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Bethel, R.A.; Walters, E.H.; Holtzman, M.J.; Nadel, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    To follow up a previous observation that airway hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone is linked to airway inflammation, the authors investigated the effect of BW755C, an anti-inflammatory drug, on ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness in dogs. Airway responsiveness was assessed with dose-response curves of acetylcholine aerosol versus pulmonary resistance in two sets of experiments. In one set (placebo treatment), five dogs were given only saline solution treatment and were studied before treatment or ozone exposure and then after treatment both before and after ozone (3.0 ppm, 2 hours); in another set (BW755C treatment), the same dogs were studied before BW755C treatment or ozone and then after treatment (10 mg/kg intravenously) both before and after ozone. When the dogs were given no BW755C treatment, ozone induced a marked increase in airway responsiveness to acetylcholine. When the dogs were given BW755C, responsiveness was no different during treatment than before treatment but, more importantly, responsiveness did not increase significantly after ozone. The authors conclude that BW755C markedly inhibits ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in dogs, probably by inhibiting the formation of oxygenation products of arachidonic acid.

  15. Structural basis of influenza virus fusion inhibition by the antiviral drug Arbidol

    SciTech Connect

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2016-12-21

    The broad-spectrum antiviral drug Arbidol shows efficacy against influenza viruses by targeting the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion machinery. However, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying fusion inhibition by Arbidol has remained obscure, thereby hindering its further development as a specific and optimized influenza therapeutic. We determined crystal structures of Arbidol in complex with influenza virus HA from pandemic 1968 H3N2 and recent 2013 H7N9 viruses. Arbidol binds in a hydrophobic cavity in the HA trimer stem at the interface between two protomers. This cavity is distal to the conserved epitope targeted by broadly neutralizing stem antibodies and is ~16 Å from the fusion peptide. Arbidol primarily makes hydrophobic interactions with the binding site but also induces some conformational rearrangements to form a network of inter- and intraprotomer salt bridges. By functioning as molecular glue, Arbidol stabilizes the prefusion conformation of HA that inhibits the large conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion in the low pH of the endosome. This unique binding mode compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of other class I fusion proteins enhances our understanding of how small molecules can function as fusion inhibitors and guides the development of broad-spectrum therapeutics against influenza virus.

  16. Classification of Drugs Based on Properties of Sodium Channel Inhibition: A Comparative Automated Patch-Clamp Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenkey, Nora; Karoly, Robert; Lukacs, Peter; Vizi, E. Sylvester; Sunesen, Morten; Fodor, Laszlo; Mike, Arpad

    2010-01-01

    Background There is only one established drug binding site on sodium channels. However, drug binding of sodium channels shows extreme promiscuity: ∼25% of investigated drugs have been found to potently inhibit sodium channels. The structural diversity of these molecules suggests that they may not share the binding site, and/or the mode of action. Our goal was to attempt classification of sodium channel inhibitors by measuring multiple properties of inhibition in electrophysiology experiments. We also aimed to investigate if different properties of inhibition correlate with specific chemical properties of the compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings A comparative electrophysiological study of 35 compounds, including classic sodium channel inhibitors (anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics and local anesthetics), as well as antidepressants, antipsychotics and neuroprotective agents, was carried out using rNav1.2 expressing HEK-293 cells and the QPatch automatic patch-clamp instrument. In the multi-dimensional space defined by the eight properties of inhibition (resting and inactivated affinity, potency, reversibility, time constants of onset and offset, use-dependence and state-dependence), at least three distinct types of inhibition could be identified; these probably reflect distinct modes of action. The compounds were clustered similarly in the multi-dimensional space defined by relevant chemical properties, including measures of lipophilicity, aromaticity, molecular size, polarity and electric charge. Drugs of the same therapeutic indication typically belonged to the same type. We identified chemical properties, which were important in determining specific properties of inhibition. State-dependence correlated with lipophilicity, the ratio of the neutral form of molecules, and aromaticity: We noticed that the highly state dependent inhibitors had at least two aromatic rings, logP>4.0, and pKa<8.0. Conclusions/Significance The correlations of inhibition properties

  17. In vitro cytochrome P450 inhibition potential of methylenedioxy-derived designer drugs studied with a two-cocktail approach.

    PubMed

    Dinger, Julia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2016-02-01

    In vitro cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assays are common approaches for testing the inhibition potential of drugs for predicting potential interactions. In contrast to marketed medicaments, drugs of abuse, particularly the so-called novel psychoactive substances, were not tested before distribution and consumption. Therefore, the inhibition potential of methylenedioxy-derived designer drugs (MDD) of different drug classes such as aminoindanes, amphetamines, benzofurans, cathinones, piperazines, pyrrolidinophenones, and tryptamines should be elucidated. The FDA-preferred test substrates, split in two cocktails, were incubated with pooled human liver microsomes and analysed after protein precipitation using LC-high-resolution-MS/MS. IC50 values were determined of MDD showing more than 50 % inhibition in the prescreening. Values were calculated by plotting the relative metabolite concentration formed over the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration. All MDD showed inhibition against CYP2D6 activity and most of them in the range of the clinically relevant CYP2D6 inhibitors quinidine and fluoxetine. In addition, the beta-keto compounds showed inhibition of the activity of CYP2B6, 5,6-MD-DALT of CYP1A2 and CYP3A, and MDAI of CYP2A6, all in the range of clinically relevant inhibitors. In summary, all MDD showed inhibition of the activity of CYP2D6, six of CYP1A2, three of CYP2A6, 13 of CYP2B6, two of CYP2C9, six of CYP2C19, one of CYP2E1, and six of CYP3A. These results showed that the CYP inhibition by MDD might be clinically relevant, but further studies are needed for final conclusions.

  18. PREPARATION, DRUG RELEASE, AND CELL GROWTH INHIBITION OF A GELATIN – DOXORUBICIN CONJUGATE

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Darren C.; Cammarata, Christopher R.; Park, Hyun Joo; Rhodes, Brian T.; Ofner, Clyde M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel macromolecular delivery system for doxorubicin (DOX) which combines pH dependent DOX release with a high molecular weight and biodegradable gelatin carrier. Methods DOX was conjugated to gelatin using an acid labile hydrazone bond and a glycylglycine linker. The gelatin-doxorubicin conjugate (G-DOX) was evaluated for hydrazide and DOX content by spectrophotometry, molecular weight by HPLC-SEC, in vitro DOX release at various pH, and cell growth inhibition using EL4 mouse lymphoma and PC3 human prostate cells. Results G-DOX hydrazide and DOX content was 47% and 5-7%, respectively of theoretical gelatin carboxylic acid sites. During preparation of G-DOX, the molecular weight decreased to 22 kDa. DOX release was 48% in pH 4.8 phosphate buffer, 22% at pH 6.5, but 10% at pH 7.4. The G-DOX IC50 values in EL4 and PC3 cells were 0.26 μM and 0.77 μM, respectively; the latter value 3 times greater than that of free DOX. Conclusions A 22 kDa macromolecular DOX conjugate containing 3.4-5.0% w/w DOX has been prepared. The pH dependent drug release in combination with a biodegradable gelatin carrier offer potential therapeutic advantages of enhanced tumor cell localization and reduced systemic toxicities of the drug. PMID:23686374

  19. Inhibition of brain [(3)H]cimetidine binding by improgan-like antinociceptive drugs.

    PubMed

    Stadel, Rebecca; Carpenter, Amanda B; Nalwalk, Julia W; de Esch, Iwan J P; Janssen, Elwin; Hough, Lindsay B

    2010-04-25

    [(3)H]cimetidine, a radiolabeled histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, binds with high affinity to an unknown hemoprotein in the brain which is not the histamine H(2) receptor. Improgan, a close chemical congener of cimetidine, is a highly effective pain-relieving drug following CNS administration, yet its mechanism of action remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that the [(3)H]cimetidine-binding site is the improgan antinociceptive target, improgan, cimetidine, and 8 other chemical congeners were studied as potential inhibitors of [(3)H]cimetidine binding in membrane fractions from the rat brain. All compounds produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of [(3)H]cimetidine binding over a 500-fold range of potencies (K(i) values were 14.5 to >8000nM). However, antinociceptive potencies in rats did not significantly correlate with [(3)H]cimetidine-binding affinities (r=0.018, p=0.97, n=10). These results suggest that the [(3)H]cimetidine-binding site is not the analgesic target for improgan-like drugs.

  20. F901318 represents a novel class of antifungal drug that inhibits dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jason D; Sibley, Graham E M; Beckmann, Nicola; Dobb, Katharine S; Slater, Martin J; McEntee, Laura; du Pré, Saskia; Livermore, Joanne; Bromley, Michael J; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Hope, William W; Kennedy, Anthony J; Law, Derek; Birch, Mike

    2016-10-25

    There is an important medical need for new antifungal agents with novel mechanisms of action to treat the increasing number of patients with life-threatening systemic fungal disease and to overcome the growing problem of resistance to current therapies. F901318, the leading representative of a novel class of drug, the orotomides, is an antifungal drug in clinical development that demonstrates excellent potency against a broad range of dimorphic and filamentous fungi. In vitro susceptibility testing of F901318 against more than 100 strains from the four main pathogenic Aspergillus spp. revealed minimal inhibitory concentrations of ≤0.06 µg/mL-greater potency than the leading antifungal classes. An investigation into the mechanism of action of F901318 found that it acts via inhibition of the pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) in a fungal-specific manner. Homology modeling of Aspergillus fumigatus DHODH has identified a predicted binding mode of the inhibitor and important interacting amino acid residues. In a murine pulmonary model of aspergillosis, F901318 displays in vivo efficacy against a strain of A. fumigatus sensitive to the azole class of antifungals and a strain displaying an azole-resistant phenotype. F901318 is currently in late Phase 1 clinical trials, offering hope that the antifungal armamentarium can be expanded to include a class of agent with a mechanism of action distinct from currently marketed antifungals.

  1. Cheaters in mutualism networks.

    PubMed

    Genini, Julieta; Morellato, L Patrícia C; Guimarães, Paulo R; Olesen, Jens M

    2010-08-23

    Mutualism-network studies assume that all interacting species are mutualistic partners and consider that all links are of one kind. However, the influence of different types of links, such as cheating links, on network organization remains unexplored. We studied two flower-visitation networks (Malpighiaceae and Bignoniaceae and their flower visitors), and divide the types of link into cheaters (i.e. robbers and thieves of flower rewards) and effective pollinators. We investigated if there were topological differences among networks with and without cheaters, especially with respect to nestedness and modularity. The Malpighiaceae network was nested, but not modular, and it was dominated by pollinators and had much fewer cheater species than Bignoniaceae network (28% versus 75%). The Bignoniaceae network was mainly a plant-cheater network, being modular because of the presence of pollen robbers and showing no nestedness. In the Malpighiaceae network, removal of cheaters had no major consequences for topology. In contrast, removal of cheaters broke down the modularity of the Bignoniaceae network. As cheaters are ubiquitous in all mutualisms, the results presented here show that they have a strong impact upon network topology.

  2. Cheaters in mutualism networks

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Julieta; Morellato, L. Patrícia C.; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Olesen, Jens M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualism-network studies assume that all interacting species are mutualistic partners and consider that all links are of one kind. However, the influence of different types of links, such as cheating links, on network organization remains unexplored. We studied two flower-visitation networks (Malpighiaceae and Bignoniaceae and their flower visitors), and divide the types of link into cheaters (i.e. robbers and thieves of flower rewards) and effective pollinators. We investigated if there were topological differences among networks with and without cheaters, especially with respect to nestedness and modularity. The Malpighiaceae network was nested, but not modular, and it was dominated by pollinators and had much fewer cheater species than Bignoniaceae network (28% versus 75%). The Bignoniaceae network was mainly a plant–cheater network, being modular because of the presence of pollen robbers and showing no nestedness. In the Malpighiaceae network, removal of cheaters had no major consequences for topology. In contrast, removal of cheaters broke down the modularity of the Bignoniaceae network. As cheaters are ubiquitous in all mutualisms, the results presented here show that they have a strong impact upon network topology. PMID:20089538

  3. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs.

  4. Metabolic drug-drug interaction potential of macrolactin A and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A assessed by evaluating cytochrome P450 inhibition and induction and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase inhibition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Doyun; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Jae-Seon; Kim, Chun-Gyu; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Macrolactin A (MA) and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A (SMA), polyene macrolides containing a 24-membered lactone ring, show antibiotic effects superior to those of teicoplanin against vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. MA and SMA are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents in preclinical studies in Korea. We evaluated the potential of MA and SMA for the inhibition or induction of human liver cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in vitro to assess their safety as new molecular entities. We demonstrated that MA and SMA are potent competitive inhibitors of CYP2C9, with Ki values of 4.06 μM and 10.6 μM, respectively. MA and SMA also weakly inhibited UGT1A1 activity, with Ki values of 40.1 μM and 65.3 μM, respectively. However, these macrolactins showed no time-dependent inactivation of the nine CYPs studied. In addition, MA and SMA did not induce CYP1A2, CYP2B6, or CYP3A4/5. On the basis of an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, our data strongly suggested that MA and SMA are unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition or induction of most of the CYPs involved in drug metabolism in vivo, except for the inhibition of CYP2C9 by MA. Similarly, MA and SMA are unlikely to inhibit the activity of UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 enzymes in vivo. Although further investigations will be required to clarify the in vivo interactions of MA with CYP2C9-targeted drugs, our findings offer a clearer understanding and prediction of drug-drug interactions for the safe use of MA and SMA in clinical practice.

  5. Metabolic Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Macrolactin A and 7-O-Succinyl Macrolactin A Assessed by Evaluating Cytochrome P450 Inhibition and Induction and UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Inhibition In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Doyun; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Jae-Seon; Kim, Chun-Gyu; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    Macrolactin A (MA) and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A (SMA), polyene macrolides containing a 24-membered lactone ring, show antibiotic effects superior to those of teicoplanin against vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. MA and SMA are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents in preclinical studies in Korea. We evaluated the potential of MA and SMA for the inhibition or induction of human liver cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in vitro to assess their safety as new molecular entities. We demonstrated that MA and SMA are potent competitive inhibitors of CYP2C9, with Ki values of 4.06 μM and 10.6 μM, respectively. MA and SMA also weakly inhibited UGT1A1 activity, with Ki values of 40.1 μM and 65.3 μM, respectively. However, these macrolactins showed no time-dependent inactivation of the nine CYPs studied. In addition, MA and SMA did not induce CYP1A2, CYP2B6, or CYP3A4/5. On the basis of an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, our data strongly suggested that MA and SMA are unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition or induction of most of the CYPs involved in drug metabolism in vivo, except for the inhibition of CYP2C9 by MA. Similarly, MA and SMA are unlikely to inhibit the activity of UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 enzymes in vivo. Although further investigations will be required to clarify the in vivo interactions of MA with CYP2C9-targeted drugs, our findings offer a clearer understanding and prediction of drug-drug interactions for the safe use of MA and SMA in clinical practice. PMID:24890600

  6. Melanin Protects Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from the Effects of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inhibition and Antifungal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Werneck, Silvia Maria Cordeiro; Soares, Betânia Maria; Ferreira, Marcus Vinicius L.; Souza, Danielle G.; Pinotti, Marcos; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a public health concern in Latin America and South America that when not correctly treated can lead to patient death. In this study, the influence of melanin produced by Paracoccidioides spp. on the effects of treatment with antimicrobial photodynamic inhibition (aPI) and antifungal drugs was evaluated. aPI was performed using toluidine blue (TBO) as a photosensitizer and a 630-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light. The antifungals tested were itraconazole and amphotericin B. We evaluated the effects of each approach, aPI or antifungals, against nonmelanized and melanized yeast cells by performing susceptibility tests and by quantifying oxidative and nitrosative bursts during the experiments. aPI reduced nonmelanized cells by 3.0 log units and melanized cells by 1.3 log units. The results showed that melanization protects the fungal cell, probably by acting as a scavenger of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, but not of peroxynitrite. Melanin also increased the MICs of itraconazole and amphotericin B, and the drugs were fungicidal for nonmelanized and fungistatic for melanized yeast cells. Our study shows that melanin production by Paracoccidioides yeast cells serves a protective function during aPI and treatment with itraconazole and amphotericin B. The results suggest that melanin binds to the drugs, changing their antifungal activities, and also acts as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, but not of peroxynitrite, indicating that peroxynitrite is the main radical that is responsible for fungal death after aPI. PMID:25896704

  7. Therapeutic effects of antibiotic drug tigecycline against cervical squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Jiao, Shun; Li, Xin; Banu, Hasina; Hamal, Shreejana; Wang, Xianrong

    2015-11-06

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is common in human cervical cancers and has great potential therapeutic value. We show that tigecycline, a FDA-approved antibiotic drug, targets cervical squamous cell carcinoma through inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Tigecycline is effective in inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation of Hela cells. The inhibitory effects of tigecycline are further enhanced upon combination with paclitaxel, a most commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for cervical cancer. In a cervical xenograft model, tigecycline inhibits tumor growth as a single agent and its combination with paclitaxel significantly inhibits more tumor growth throughout the duration of treatment. We further show that tigecycline decreases level of both cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through increasing levels of Axin 1 in Hela cells. In addition, stabilization or overexpression of β-catenin using pharmacological and genetic approaches abolished the effects of tigecycline in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of Hela cells. Our study suggests that tigecycline is a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for cervical cancer and targeting Wnt/β-catenin represents a potential therapeutic strategy in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • We repurposed the antibiotic drug tigecycline for cervical cancer treatment. • Tigecycline is effectively against cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • Combination of tigecycline and paclitaxel is synergistic in targeting Hela cells. • Tigecycline acts on Hela cells through inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  8. Antimalarial Drug Artemether Inhibits Neuroinflammation in BV2 Microglia Through Nrf2-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Okorji, Uchechukwu P; Velagapudi, Ravikanth; El-Bakoush, Abdelmeneim; Fiebich, Bernd L; Olajide, Olumayokun A

    2016-11-01

    Artemether, a lipid-soluble derivative of artemisinin has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we have investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of neuroinflammation by the drug. The effects of artemether on neuroinflammation-mediated HT22 neuronal toxicity were also investigated in a BV2 microglia/HT22 neuron co-culture. To investigate effects on neuroinflammation, we used LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia treated with artemether (5-40 μM) for 24 h. ELISAs and western blotting were used to detect pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1). Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE-1) activity and Aβ levels were measured with ELISA kits. Protein levels of targets in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NQO1 and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were also measured with western blot. NF-κB binding to the DNA was investigated using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), DNA fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays in BV2-HT22 neuronal co-culture were used to evaluate the effects of artemether on neuroinflammation-induced neuronal death. The role of Nrf2 in the anti-inflammatory activity of artemether was investigated in BV2 cells transfected with Nrf2 siRNA. Artemether significantly suppressed pro-inflammatory mediators (NO/iNOS, PGE2/COX-2/mPGES-1, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-6); Aβ and BACE-1 in BV2 cells following LPS stimulation. These effects of artemether were shown to be mediated through inhibition of NF-κB and p38 MAPK signalling. Artemether produced increased levels of HO-1, NQO1 and GSH in BV2 microglia. The drug activated

  9. Increase in E-selectin expression in umbilical vein endothelial cells by anticancer drugs and inhibition by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Jin; Ozawa, Soji; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Imaeda, Yoshihiro; Umemoto, Shunji; Matsumoto, Sumio; Ueda, Masakazu

    2009-12-01

    E-selectin is expressed on the surfaces of stimulated vascular endothelial cells and is sometimes involved in cancer cell metastasis. The H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine inhibits the increase in E-selectin expression on vascular endothelial cells that is induced by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and cimetidine. It also inhibits the adhesion of sialyl-Lewis-antigen-positive cancer cells to vascular endothelial cells, ultimately inhibiting hematogenous metastasis. Anticancer drugs are essential to cancer therapy, but whether they can alter the expression of E-selectin in vascular endothelial cells remains unclear. Whether cimetidine inhibits the expression of E-selectin in the same manner in the presence or absence of anticancer drugs also remains unknown. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin (DXR), cisplatin (CDDP), or IL-1beta and with or without cimetidine. The expression of E-selectin at the mRNA and protein levels was then determined using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The E-selectin mRNA level increased in cells exposed to 5-FU, DXR, or CDDP, but the addition of cimetidine had no effect on the E-selectin mRNA level. The expression of E-selectin protein was also significantly higher after the addition of 5-FU, DXR, or CDDP, compared with that of a negative control. However, when cimetidine was added prior to the addition of 5-FU, DXR, or CDDP, the expression of E-selectin was significantly suppressed. Thus, cimetidine significantly inhibited the expression of E-selectin at the protein level without affecting its expression at the mRNA level in cells treated with anticancer drugs. In conclusion, anticancer drugs increased the expression of E-selectin and this increase was inhibited by cimetidine. These findings suggest that the administration of cimetidine during treatment with anticancer drugs might be useful for preventing

  10. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  11. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0520 TITLE: Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration- Resistant...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30Sep2015 - 29Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0520 Development of a New Class of Drugs To...armamentarium of drugs targeting the androgen/AR signaling axis, progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a major clinical

  12. Time-dependent drug-drug interaction alerts in care provider order entry: software may inhibit medication error reductions.

    PubMed

    van der Sijs, Heleen; Lammers, Laureen; van den Tweel, Annemieke; Aarts, Jos; Berg, Marc; Vulto, Arnold; van Gelder, Teun

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent drug-drug interactions (TDDIs) are drug combinations that result in a decreased drug effect due to coadministration of a second drug. Such interactions can be prevented by separately administering the drugs. This study attempted to reduce drug administration errors due to overridden TDDIs in a care provider order entry (CPOE) system. In four periods divided over two studies, logged TDDIs were investigated by reviewing the time intervals prescribed in the CPOE and recorded on the patient chart. The first study showed significant drug administration error reduction from 56.4 to 36.2% (p<0.05), whereas the second study was not successful (46.7 and 45.2%; p>0.05). Despite interventions, drug administration errors still occurred in more than one third of cases and prescribing errors in 79-87%. Probably the low alert specificity, the unclear alert information content, and the inability of the software to support safe and efficient TDDI alert handling all diminished correct prescribing, and consequently, insufficiently reduced drug administration errors.

  13. Targeting BMK1 Impairs the Drug Resistance to Combined Inhibition of BRAF and MEK1/2 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chengli; Wang, Lina; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Kai; Xie, Dan; Yu, Zhe; Jiang, Kui; Liao, Lujian; Yates, John R.; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Yang, Qingkai

    2017-01-01

    Combined inhibition of BRAF and MEK1/2 (CIBM) improves therapeutic efficacy of BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, drug resistance to CIBM is inevitable and the drug resistance mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that BMK1 pathway contributes to the drug resistance to CIBM. Considering that ERK1/2 pathway regulates cellular processes by phosphorylating, we first performed a SILAC phosphoproteomic profiling of CIBM. Phosphorylation of 239 proteins was identified to be downregulated, while phosphorylation of 47 proteins was upregulated. Following siRNA screening of 47 upregulated proteins indicated that the knockdown of BMK1 showed the most significant ability to inhibit the proliferation of CIBM resistant cells. It was found that phosphorylation of BMK1 was enhanced in resistant cells, which suggested an association of BMK1 with drug resistance. Further study indicated that phospho-activation of BMK1 by MEK5D enhanced the resistance to CIBM. Conversely, inhibition of BMK1 by shRNAi or BMK1 inhibitor (XMD8-92) impaired not only the acquirement of resistance to CIBM, but also the proliferation of CIBM resistant cells. Further kinome-scale siRNA screening demonstrated that SRC\\MEK5 cascade promotes the phospho-activation of BMK1 in response to CIBM. Our study not only provides a global phosphoproteomic view of CIBM in melanoma, but also demonstrates that inhibition of BMK1 has therapeutic potential for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:28387310

  14. STAT3 Inhibition by Microtubule-Targeted Drugs: Dual Molecular Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Chaudhury, Mousumi; Frank, David A.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapies, it is necessary to identify molecular targets that are essential to a tumor cell but dispensable in a normal cell. Increasing evidence indicates that the transcription factor STAT3, which regulates the expression of genes controlling proliferation, survival, and self-renewal, constitutes such a target. Recently it has been found that STAT3 can associate with the cytoskeleton. Since many of the tumors in which STAT3 is activated, such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, are responsive to drugs that target microtubules, we examined the effect of these compounds on STAT3. We found that microtubule stabilizers, such as paclitaxel, or microtubule inhibitors, such as vinorelbine, decrease the activating tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in tumor cells and inhibit the expression of STAT3 target genes. Paclitaxel decreases the association between STAT3 and microtubules, and appears to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation through induction of a negative feedback regulator. The cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel in breast cancer cell lines correlates with its ability to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation. However, consistent with the necessity for expression of a negative regulator, treatment of resistant MDA-MB-231 cells with the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine restores the ability of paclitaxel to block STAT3-dependent gene expression. Finally, the combination of paclitaxel and agents that directly target STAT3 has beneficial effects in killing STAT3-dependent cell lines. Thus, microtubule-targeted agents may exert some of their effects by inhibiting STAT3, and understanding this interaction may be important for optimizing rational targeted cancer therapies. PMID:21949561

  15. Autophagy inhibition uncovers the neurotoxic action of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Vucicevic, Ljubica; Misirkic-Marjanovic, Maja; Paunovic, Verica; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Martinovic, Tamara; Ciric, Darko; Maric, Nadja; Petricevic, Sasa; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of autophagy, a controlled cellular self-digestion process, in regulating survival of neurons exposed to atypical antipsychotic olanzapine. Olanzapine induced autophagy in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cell line, as confirmed by the increase in autophagic flux and presence of autophagic vesicles, fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, and increase in the expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes ATG4B, ATG5, and ATG7. The production of reactive oxygen species, but not modulation of the main autophagy repressor MTOR or its upstream regulators AMP-activated protein kinase and AKT1, was responsible for olanzapine-triggered autophagy. Olanzapine-mediated oxidative stress also induced mitochondrial depolarization and damage, and the autophagic clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria was confirmed by electron microscopy, colocalization of autophagosome-associated MAP1LC3B (LC3B henceforth) and mitochondria, and mitochondrial association with the autophagic cargo receptor SQSTM1/p62. While olanzapine-triggered mitochondrial damage was not overtly toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, their death was readily initiated upon the inhibition of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors, RNA interference knockdown of BECN1 and LC3B, or biological free radical nitric oxide. The treatment of mice with olanzapine for 14 d increased the brain levels of autophagosome-associated LC3B-II and mRNA encoding Atg4b, Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, Gabarap, and Becn1. The administration of the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine significantly increased the expression of proapoptotic genes (Trp53, Bax, Bak1, Pmaip1, Bcl2l11, Cdkn1a, and Cdkn1b) and DNA fragmentation in the frontal brain region of olanzapine-exposed animals. These data indicate that olanzapine-triggered autophagy protects neurons from otherwise fatal mitochondrial damage, and that inhibition of autophagy might unmask the neurotoxic action of the drug. PMID:25551567

  16. Inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastric hemorrhages in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Nomura, Daniel K; O'Neal, Scott T; Long, Jonathan Z; Mahadevan, Anu; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Grider, John R; Lichtman, Aron H

    2011-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used analgesics, but can cause gastric and esophageal hemorrhages, erosion, and ulceration. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid; eCB) system possesses several potential targets to reduce gastric inflammatory states, including cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1)), cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2)), and enzymes that regulate the eCB ligands 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA). In the presented study, we tested whether 4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184), a selective inhibitor of the primary catabolic enzyme of 2-AG, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), would protect against NSAID-induced gastric damage. Food-deprived mice administered the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac sodium displayed gastric hemorrhages and increases in proinflammatory cytokines. JZL184, the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (positive control), or the primary constituent of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), significantly prevented diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhages. JZL184 also increased stomach levels of 2-AG, but had no effect on AEA, arachidonic acid, or the prostaglandins E(2) and D(2). MAGL inhibition fully blocked diclofenac-induced increases in gastric levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as IL-10. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of CB(1) or CB(2) revealed that the gastroprotective effects of JZL184 and THC were mediated via CB(1). The antihemorrhagic effects of JZL184 persisted with repeated administration, indicating a lack of tolerance. These data indicate that increasing 2-AG protects against gastric damage induced by NSAIDs, and its primary catabolic enzyme MAGL offers a promising target for the development of analgesic therapeutics possessing gastroprotective properties.

  17. Autophagy inhibition uncovers the neurotoxic action of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Ljubica; Misirkic-Marjanovic, Maja; Paunovic, Verica; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Martinovic, Tamara; Ciric, Darko; Maric, Nadja; Petricevic, Sasa; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of autophagy, a controlled cellular self-digestion process, in regulating survival of neurons exposed to atypical antipsychotic olanzapine. Olanzapine induced autophagy in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cell line, as confirmed by the increase in autophagic flux and presence of autophagic vesicles, fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, and increase in the expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes ATG4B, ATG5, and ATG7. The production of reactive oxygen species, but not modulation of the main autophagy repressor MTOR or its upstream regulators AMP-activated protein kinase and AKT1, was responsible for olanzapine-triggered autophagy. Olanzapine-mediated oxidative stress also induced mitochondrial depolarization and damage, and the autophagic clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria was confirmed by electron microscopy, colocalization of autophagosome-associated MAP1LC3B (LC3B henceforth) and mitochondria, and mitochondrial association with the autophagic cargo receptor SQSTM1/p62. While olanzapine-triggered mitochondrial damage was not overtly toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, their death was readily initiated upon the inhibition of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors, RNA interference knockdown of BECN1 and LC3B, or biological free radical nitric oxide. The treatment of mice with olanzapine for 14 d increased the brain levels of autophagosome-associated LC3B-II and mRNA encoding Atg4b, Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, Gabarap, and Becn1. The administration of the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine significantly increased the expression of proapoptotic genes (Trp53, Bax, Bak1, Pmaip1, Bcl2l11, Cdkn1a, and Cdkn1b) and DNA fragmentation in the frontal brain region of olanzapine-exposed animals. These data indicate that olanzapine-triggered autophagy protects neurons from otherwise fatal mitochondrial damage, and that inhibition of autophagy might unmask the neurotoxic action of the drug.

  18. Inhibition of bacterial carbonic anhydrases and zinc proteases: from orphan targets to innovative new antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Supuran, C T

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-containing enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrases (CAs) and metalloproteases (MPs) play critical functions in bacteria, being involved in various steps of their life cycle, which are important for survival, colonization, acquisition of nutrients for growth and proliferation, facilitation of dissemination, invasion and pathogenicity. The development of resistance to many classes of clinically used antibiotics emphasizes the need of new antibacterial drug targets to be explored. There is a wealth of data regarding bacterial CAs and zinc MPs present in many pathogenic species, such as Neisseria spp., Helycobacter pylori Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria spp, Vibrio spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Streptomyces spp., Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., etc. Some of these enzymes have been cloned, purified and characterized by crystallographic techniques. However, for the moment, few potent and specific inhibitors for bacterial MPs have been reported except for Clostridium histolyticum collagenase, botulinum and tetanus neurotoxin and anthrax lethal factor, which will be reviewed in this article. Bacteria encode α-,β-, and/or γ-CA families, but up to now only the first two classes have been investigated in some detail in different species. The α-CAs from Neisseria spp. and H. pylori as well as the β-class enzymes from E. coli, H. pylori, M. tuberculosis, Brucella spp., S. pneumoniae, S. enterica and H. influenzae have been cloned and characterized. The catalytic/inhibition mechanisms of these CAs are well understood as X-ray crystal structures are available for some of them, but no adducts of these enzymes with inhibitors have been characterized so far. In vitro and in vivo studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates have been reported. Only for Neisseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S

  19. Efficient inhibition of colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis by drug loaded micelles in thermosensitive hydrogel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changyang; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yujun; Wu, Qinjie; Zhang, Doudou; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we aim to develop a dual drug delivery system (DDDS) of self-assembled micelles in thermosensitive hydrogel composite to deliver hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs simultaneously for colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC) therapy. In our previous studies, we found that poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCEC) copolymers with different molecular weight and PEG/PCL ratio could be administered to form micelles or thermosensitive hydrogels, respectively. Therefore, the DDDS was constructed from paclitaxel (PTX) encapsulated PCEC micelles (PTX-micelles) and a fluorouracil (Fu) loaded thermosensitive PCEC hydrogel (Fu-hydrogel). PTX-micelles were prepared by self-assembly of biodegradable PCEC copolymer (Mn = 3700) and PTX without using any surfactants or excipients. Meanwhile, biodegradable and injectable thermosensitive Fu-hydrogel (Mn = 3000) with a lower sol-gel transition temperature at around physiological temperature was also prepared. The obtained PTX-micelles in thermosensitive Fu-hydrogel (PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel) composite is a free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and rapidly turned into a non-flowing gel at physiological temperature. In addition, the results of cytotoxicity, hemolytic study, and acute toxicity evaluation suggested that the PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel was non-toxic and biocompatible. In vitro release behaviors of PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel indicated that both PTX and Fu have a sustained release behavior. Furthermore, intraperitoneal application of PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel effectively inhibited growth and metastasis of CT26 peritoneal carcinomatosis in vivo (p < 0.001), and induced a stronger antitumor effect than that of Taxol® plus Fu (p < 0.001). The pharmacokinetic study indicated that PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel significantly increased PTX and Fu concentration and residence time in peritoneal fluids compared with Taxol® plus Fu group. Thus, the results suggested the micelles-hydrogel DDDS may

  20. Cyclosporine-inhibitable Cerebral Drug Transport Does not Influence Clinical Methadone Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Konrad; Blood, Jane; Francis, Amber M.; Yermolenka, Viktar; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Interindividual variability and drug interaction studies suggest that blood-brain barrier drug transporters mediate human methadone brain biodistribution. In vitro and animal studies suggest that methadone is a substrate for the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein, and that P-glycoprotein-mediated transport influences brain access and pharmacologic effect. This investigation tested whether methadone is a transporter substrate in humans. Methods Healthy volunteers received oral (N=16) or IV (N=12) methadone in different crossover protocols after nothing (control) or the validated P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine (4.5 mg/kg orally twice daily for 4 days, or 5 mg/kg IV over 2 hr). Plasma and urine methadone and metabolite concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. Methadone effects were measured by miosis and thermal analgesia (maximally tolerated temperature and verbal analog scale rating of discreet temperatures). Results Cyclosporine marginally but significantly decreased methadone plasma concentrations and apparent oral clearance, but had no effect on methadone renal clearance or on hepatic N-demethylation. Cyclosporine had no effect on miosis, or on R-methadone concentration-miosis relationships after either oral or IV methadone. Peak miosis was similar in controls and cyclosporine-treated subjects after oral methadone (1.4 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 0.5 mm/mg, respectively) and IV methadone (3.1 ± 1.0 and 3.2 ± 0.8 mm respectively). Methadone increased maximally tolerated temperature, but analgesia testing was confounded by cyclosporine-related pain. Conclusions Cyclosporine did not affect methadone pharmacodynamics. This result does not support a role for cyclosporine-inhibitable transporters mediating methadone brain access and biodistribution. PMID:25072223

  1. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire... marine insurance companies and mutual fire insurance companies exclusively issuing either...

  2. Synergistic inhibition of human cancer cell growth by cytotoxic drugs and mixed backbone antisense oligonucleotide targeting protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Tortora, Giampaolo; Caputo, Rosa; Damiano, Vincenzo; Bianco, Roberto; Pepe, Stefano; Bianco, A. Raffaele; Jiang, Zhiwei; Agrawal, Sudhir; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase A type I plays a key role in neoplastic transformation, conveying mitogenic signals of different growth factors and oncogenes. Inhibition of protein kinase A type I by antisense oligonucleotides targeting its RIα regulatory subunit results in cancer cell growth inhibition in vitro and in vivo. A novel mixed backbone oligonucleotide HYB 190 and its mismatched control HYB 239 were tested on soft agar growth of several human cancer cell types. HYB 190 demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of colony formation in all cell lines whereas the HYB 239 at the same doses caused a modest or no growth inhibition. A noninhibitory dose of each mixed backbone oligonucleotide was used in OVCAR-3 ovarian and GEO colon cancer cells to study whether any cooperative effect may occur between the antisense and a series of cytotoxic drugs acting by different mechanisms. Treatment with HYB 190 resulted in an additive growth inhibitory effect with several cytotoxic drugs when measured by soft agar colony formation. A synergistic growth inhibition, which correlated with increased apoptosis, was observed when HYB 190 was added to cancer cells treated with taxanes, platinum-based compounds, and topoisomerase II selective drugs. This synergistic effect was also observed in breast cancer cells and was obtained with other related drugs such as docetaxel and carboplatin. Combination of HYB 190 and paclitaxel resulted in an accumulation of cells in late S-G2 phases of cell cycle and marked induction of apoptosis. A cooperative effect of HYB 190 and paclitaxel was also obtained in vivo in nude mice bearing human GEO colon cancer xenografts. These results are the first report of a cooperative growth inhibitory effect obtained in a variety of human cancer cell lines by antisense mixed backbone oligonucleotide targeting protein kinase A type I-mediated mitogenic signals and specific cytotoxic drugs. PMID:9356493

  3. In vitro inhibition of UGT1A3, UGT1A4 by ursolic acid and oleanolic acid and drug-drug interaction risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongbo; Wu, Jie; Liu, Dan; Liu, Mingyi; Zhang, Hong; Huang, Shibo; Xiong, Yuqing; Xia, Chunhua

    2017-09-01

    1. Ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) may have important activity relevant to health and disease prevention. Thus, we studied the activity of UA and OA on UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and used trifluoperazine as a probe substrate to test UGT1A4 activity. Recombinant UGT-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation was used as a probe reaction for other UGT isoforms. 2. UA and OA inhibited UGT1A3 and UGT1A4 activity but did not inhibit other tested UGT isoforms. 3. UA-mediated inhibition of UGT1A3 catalyzed 4-MU-β-d-glucuronidation was via competitive inhibition (IC50 0.391 ± 0.013 μM; Ki 0.185 ± 0.015 μM). UA also competitively inhibited UGT1A4-mediated trifluoperazine-N-glucuronidation (IC50 2.651 ± 0.201 μM; Ki 1.334 ± 0.146 μM). 4. OA offered mixed inhibition of UGT1A3-mediated 4-MU-β-d-glucuronidation (IC50 0.336 ± 0.013 μM; Ki 0.176 ± 0.007 μM) and competitively inhibited UGT1A4-mediated trifluoperazine-N-glucuronidation (IC50 5.468 ± 0.697 μM; Ki 6.298 ± 0.891 μM). 5. Co-administering OA or UA with drugs or products that are substrates of UGT1A3 or UGT1A4 may produce drug-mediated side effects.

  4. Efficacy and selectivity of phosphodiesterase-targeted drugs to inhibit photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6) in retinal photoreceptors*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Feng, Qing; Cote, Rick H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are important therapeutic agents, but their effects on photoreceptor PDE (PDE6) and photoreceptor cells are poorly understood. We characterized the potency and selectivity of various classes of PDE inhibitors on purified rod and cone PDE6 and on intact rod outer segments (ROS). Methods: The inhibition constant (KI) of isozyme-selective PDE inhibitors was determined for purified rod and cone PDE6. Perturbations of cGMP levels in isolated ROS suspensions by PDE inhibitors were quantitated by a cGMP enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results: Most PDE5-selective inhibitors are excellent PDE6 inhibitors. Vardenafil, a potent PDE5 inhibitor (KI = 0.2 nM), is the most potent PDE6 inhibitor tested (KI = 0.7 nM). Zaprinast is the only drug that inhibits PDE6 more potently than PDE5. PDE1-selective inhibitors were equally effective in inhibiting PDE6. In intact ROS, PDE inhibitors elevated cGMP levels but none fully inhibited PDE6. Their potency to elevate cGMP levels in ROS was much lower than their ability to inhibit the purified enzyme. Competition between PDE5/6-selective drugs and the inhibitory γ subunit for the active site of PDE6 is proposed to reduce the effectiveness of drugs at the enzyme active site. Conclusions: Several classes of PDE inhibitors equally well inhibit PDE6 as the PDE family to which they are targeted. In intact ROS, high PDE6 concentrations, binding of the γ subunit to the active site, and calcium feedback mechanisms attenuate the effectiveness of PDE inhibitors to inhibit PDE6 and disrupt the cGMP signaling pathway during visual transduction. PMID:16123402

  5. Application of linear discriminant analysis in the virtual screening of antichagasic drugs through trypanothione reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Julián J; Talevi, Alan; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E

    2006-08-01

    We have performed virtual screening to identify new lead trypanothione reductase inhibitor (TRI) compounds, enzyme present in Tripanozoma cruzi, the agent responsible of Chagas disease. From a training set of 58 compounds, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed using 2D and 3D descriptors as discriminating variables in order to find out which function of descriptors characterizes the active TRI. The values of the statistical parameters F--Snedecor and Wilk's lambda for the discriminant function (DF) showed good statistical significance, as long as the rate of success in the prediction for both the training and the test set: 91.38% and 88.63%, in that order. Internal validation through the Leave--Group--Out methodology was performed with good results, assuring the stability of the DF. Afterwards, the DF was applied in virtual screening of 422,367 compounds. The optimum range of values of octanol--water partition coefficient for a compound to develop trypanothione reductase inhibition was applied as a second filtering criteria. 739 structurally heterogeneous drugs of the virtual library were selected as promissory TRI.

  6. Phosphorus-32, a Clinically Available Drug, Inhibits Cancer Growth by Inducing DNA Double-Strand Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yulan; Kiess, Ana P.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pomper, Martin G.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Abraham, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Radioisotopes that emit electrons (beta particles), such as radioiodine, can effectively kill target cells, including cancer cells. Aqueous 32P[PO4] is a pure beta-emitter that has been used for several decades to treat non-malignant human myeloproliferative diseases. 32P[PO4] was directly compared to a more powerful pure beta-emitter, the clinically important 90Y isotope. In vitro, 32P[PO4] was more effective at killing cells than was the more powerful isotope 90Y (P ≤ 0.001) and also caused substantially more double-stranded DNA breaks than did 90Y. In vivo, a single low-dose intravenous dose of aqueous elemental 32P significantly inhibited tumor growth in the syngeneic murine cancer model (P ≤ 0.001). This effect is exerted by direct incorporation into nascent DNA chains, resulting in double-stranded breakage, a unique mechanism not duplicatable by other, more powerful electron-emitting radioisotopes. 32P[PO4] should be considered for human clinical trials as a potential novel anti-cancer drug. PMID:26030880

  7. Structural basis of DNA gyrase inhibition by antibacterial QPT-1, anticancer drug etoposide and moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pan F; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Huang, Jianzhong; Cui, Haifeng; Fosberry, Andrew P; Gu, Minghua; Hann, Michael M; Hibbs, Martin; Homes, Paul; Ingraham, Karen; Pizzollo, Jason; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony J; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Tanner, Robert; Theobald, Andrew J; Stavenger, Robert A; Bax, Benjamin D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2015-12-07

    New antibacterials are needed to tackle antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Type IIA topoisomerases (topo2As), the targets of fluoroquinolones, regulate DNA topology by creating transient double-strand DNA breaks. Here we report the first co-crystal structures of the antibacterial QPT-1 and the anticancer drug etoposide with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase, showing binding at the same sites in the cleaved DNA as the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Unlike moxifloxacin, QPT-1 and etoposide interact with conserved GyrB TOPRIM residues rationalizing why QPT-1 can overcome fluoroquinolone resistance. Our data show etoposide's antibacterial activity is due to DNA gyrase inhibition and suggests other anticancer agents act similarly. Analysis of multiple DNA gyrase co-crystal structures, including asymmetric cleavage complexes, led to a 'pair of swing-doors' hypothesis in which the movement of one DNA segment regulates cleavage and religation of the second DNA duplex. This mechanism can explain QPT-1's bacterial specificity. Structure-based strategies for developing topo2A antibacterials are suggested.

  8. Sigma 1 receptor agonists act as neuroprotective drugs through inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Vagnerova, Kamila; Hurn, Patricia D; Bhardwaj, Anish; Kirsch, Jeffrey R

    2006-08-01

    Postischemic administration of the sigma-1 agonists reduces ischemic brain injury; however, the mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that the sigma-1 agonist (+)isoform of pentazocine (P(+)) reduces damage in part by ameliorating cell death mediated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and that the (-)isoform (P(-)) lacks this effect. We compared treatment with P(+) with or without the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) and also the effects of P(+) in iNOS deficient (iNOSKO) mice. A possible mechanism of neuroprotection is inhibition of iNOS expression. Male C57/Bl6 mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (90 min) and drugs were administered with reperfusion: 1) P(+) with AG (P+/AG), 2) P(+), 3) P(-), 4) AG, or 5) placebo. iNOSKOs were treated with either P(+) or placebo. Infarction (triphenyltetrazolium chloride histology, 72 h) was reduced by P(+) treatment in striatum by 44% and in neocortex by 23% versus placebo (P < 0.05), a reduction comparable to AG effect. P(-) did not attenuate brain injury. There was no difference in P(+)/AG treatment compared with showed the same level of neuroprotection as P(+) alone. P(+) also did not provide further neuroprotection for iNOSKOs. We conclude that postischemic administration of P(+) reduces infarct volume in mice. Because AG provides no additional benefit to P(+) treatment and iNOSKOs do not benefit from P(+), we speculate that P(+) acts by suppressing cell death resulting from iNOS toxicity.

  9. Structural basis of DNA gyrase inhibition by antibacterial QPT-1, anticancer drug etoposide and moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pan F.; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Huang, Jianzhong; Cui, Haifeng; Fosberry, Andrew P.; Gu, Minghua; Hann, Michael M.; Hibbs, Martin; Homes, Paul; Ingraham, Karen; Pizzollo, Jason; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony J.; Spitzfaden, Claus E.; Tanner, Robert; Theobald, Andrew J.; Stavenger, Robert A.; Bax, Benjamin D.; Gwynn, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    New antibacterials are needed to tackle antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Type IIA topoisomerases (topo2As), the targets of fluoroquinolones, regulate DNA topology by creating transient double-strand DNA breaks. Here we report the first co-crystal structures of the antibacterial QPT-1 and the anticancer drug etoposide with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase, showing binding at the same sites in the cleaved DNA as the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Unlike moxifloxacin, QPT-1 and etoposide interact with conserved GyrB TOPRIM residues rationalizing why QPT-1 can overcome fluoroquinolone resistance. Our data show etoposide's antibacterial activity is due to DNA gyrase inhibition and suggests other anticancer agents act similarly. Analysis of multiple DNA gyrase co-crystal structures, including asymmetric cleavage complexes, led to a ‘pair of swing-doors' hypothesis in which the movement of one DNA segment regulates cleavage and religation of the second DNA duplex. This mechanism can explain QPT-1's bacterial specificity. Structure-based strategies for developing topo2A antibacterials are suggested. PMID:26640131

  10. A high-throughput chemical screen with FDA approved drugs reveals that the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone impairs cancer cell survival by inhibiting homology directed repair

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Or David; Kalousi, Alkmini; Eini, Lital; Fisher, Benoit; Weiss, Amelie; Darr, Jonatan; Mazina, Olga; Bramson, Shay; Kupiec, Martin; Eden, Amir; Meshorer, Eran; Mazin, Alexander V.; Brino, Laurent; Goldberg, Michal; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining or homology directed repair (HDR). Identifying novel small molecules that affect HDR is of great importance both for research use and therapy. Molecules that elevate HDR may improve gene targeting whereas inhibiting molecules can be used for chemotherapy, since some of the cancers are more sensitive to repair impairment. Here, we performed a high-throughput chemical screen for FDA approved drugs, which affect HDR in cancer cells. We found that HDR frequencies are increased by retinoic acid and Idoxuridine and reduced by the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone. We further revealed that Spironolactone impairs Rad51 foci formation, sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damaging agents, to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and cross-linking agents and inhibits tumor growth in xenografts, in mice. This study suggests Spironolactone as a new candidate for chemotherapy. PMID:24682826

  11. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile☆

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23707769

  12. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: a study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licensed as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation between the short-term measurements of drug accumulation in living cells and the long-term growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E; Garnier-Suillerot, A

    1994-05-18

    The basic distinguishing feature of all cells expressing functional P-glycoprotein-multidrug resistance (P-gp-MDR) is a decrease of steady state drug levels as compared to drug-sensitive controls. Recently it has been pointed out that there appears to be a discrepancy between the amount of drug accumulated at steady state by drug-sensitive and highly resistant cells and their degree of resistance. These observations could suggest two things: (1) that factors other than drug accumulation may be important in MDR, (2) that they reflect a discrepancy between the short-term measurements of drug accumulation at 60 min versus long-term (72 hr) growth inhibition. Due to the different experimental conditions and the different type of cells used it is very difficult to compare the literature data. For this reason we have investigated the effect of 12 compounds in overcoming resistance in relation to drug accumulation. We have used a spectrofluorometric method which allows the determination of the nuclear drug accumulation directly on living cells. Our data clearly establish that, at least for the compounds used in that study, there is a very good correlation between their ability to increase drug accumulation, measured at short-term, and their ability to reverse MDR accumulation, measured at short-term, and their ability to reverse MDR, but no correlation with their ability to inhibit protein kinase C activity. In addition, their efficiency to reverse MDR correlates with their pKa values, the efficiency being the highest when the pKa is the lowest.

  14. In vitro selective inhibition of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A4 by finasteride, and prediction of in vivo drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Doyun; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Chin, Young-Won; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2015-01-22

    In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory potentials of finasteride for the major human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and UGT2B15) in vitro using LC-MS/MS by specific marker reactions in human liver microsomes (except for UGT2B15) or recombinant supersomes (UGT2B15). Of the seven tested UGTs, finasteride potently, selectively, and competitively inhibited UGT1A4-mediated trifluoperazine-N-glucuronidation in human liver microsomes with an IC₅₀ value of 11.5 ± 1.78 μM and Ki value of 6.03 ± 0.291 μM. This inhibitory potency was similar to that of hecogenin, a well-known inhibitor of UGT1A4. However, finasteride did not seem to inhibit any of the other six UGTs: UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, or UGT2B15. Similarly, finasteride markedly inhibited UGT1A4 activity in recombinant human UGT1A4 supersomes, with a Ki value of 6.05 ± 0.410 μM. In addition, finasteride strongly inhibited UGT1A4-catalyzed imipramine-N-β-D-glucuronidation. However, on the basis of an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, our data strongly suggested that finasteride is unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition of the hepatic UGT enzymes involved in drug metabolism in vivo.

  15. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis sensitizes lung adenocarcinoma to chemotherapeutic drugs by inhibiting mitochondrial DNA repair and suppressing cellular bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Bartosz; Marcatti, Michela; Zatarain, John R.; Druzhyna, Nadiya; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Nagy, Péter; Hellmich, Mark R.; Szabo, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic manipulation of the gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has recently been proposed as a novel targeted anticancer approach. Here we show that human lung adenocarcinoma tissue expresses high levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) producing enzymes, namely, cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), in comparison to adjacent lung tissue. In cultured lung adenocarcinoma but not in normal lung epithelial cells elevated H2S stimulates mitochondrial DNA repair through sulfhydration of EXOG, which, in turn, promotes mitochondrial DNA repair complex assembly, thereby enhancing mitochondrial DNA repair capacity. In addition, inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes suppresses critical bioenergetics parameters in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Together, inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes sensitize lung adenocarcinoma cells to chemotherapeutic agents via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as shown in in vitro and in vivo models, suggesting a novel mechanism to overcome tumor chemoresistance. PMID:27808278

  16. Estimating mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y) , from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density μ(x,y) . In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M̂ (X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if μ(x,y)=μ(x)μ(y) . This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y . In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation.

  17. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    PubMed

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market.

  18. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  19. Most drugs that reverse multidrug resistance also inhibit photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein by a vinblastine analog

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, S.; Cornwell, M.M.; Kuwano, M.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells express a 170,000-dalton membrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) that can be photoaffinity labeled with the vinblastine analog N-(p-azido-(3-/sup 125/I)salicyl)-N'-(beta-aminoethyl)vindesine. Several agents that suppress the multidrug-resistant phenotype, including N-solanesyl-N,N'-bis(3,4-dimethylbenzyl)ethylenediamine, cepharanthine, quinidine, and reserpine, were found to inhibit photolabeling of P-glycoprotein at doses comparable to those that reverse multidrug resistance. However, the phenothiazines chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine, which also effectively reverse multidrug resistance, were poor inhibitors of the photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein. Chloroquine, propranolol, or atropine, which only partially reversed the drug resistance, also did not inhibit photolabeling. Naphthalene sulfonamide calmodulin inhibitors, W7 and W5, as well as many other drugs that did not circumvent multidrug resistance, did not inhibit photolabeling. These studies suggest that most, but not all, agents that phenotypically suppress multidrug resistance also inhibit drug binding to a site on P-glycoprotein with which a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine interacts.

  20. Zoledronic acid inhibits aromatase activity and phosphorylation: potential mechanism for additive zoledronic acid and letrozole drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Schech, Amanda J; Nemieboka, Brandon E; Brodie, Angela H

    2012-11-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate originally indicated for use in osteoporosis, has been reported to exert a direct effect on breast cancer cells, although the mechanism of this effect is currently unknown. Data from the ABCSG-12 and ZO-FAST clinical trials suggest that treatment with the combination of ZA and aromatase inhibitors (AI) result in increased disease free survival in breast cancer patients over AI alone. To determine whether the mechanism of this combination involved inhibition of aromatase, AC-1 cells (MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with an aromatase construct) were treated simultaneously with combinations of ZA and AI letrozole. This combination significantly increased inhibition of aromatase activity of AC-1 cells when compared to letrozole alone. Treatment of 1 nM letrozole in combination with 1 μM or 10 μM ZA resulted in an additive drug interaction on inhibition of cell viability, as measured by MTT assay. Treatment with ZA was found to inhibit phosphorylation of aromatase on serine residues. Zoledronic acid was also shown to be more effective in inhibiting cell viability in aromatase transfected AC-1 cells when compared to inhibition of cell viability observed in non-transfected MCF-7. Estradiol was able to partially rescue the effect of 1 μM and 10 μM ZA on cell viability following treatment for 72 h, as shown by a shift to the right in the estradiol dose-response curve. In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of ZA and letrozole results in an additive inhibition of cell viability. Furthermore, ZA alone can inhibit aromatase activity through inhibition of serine phosphorylation events important for aromatase enzymatic activity and contributes to inhibition of cell viability.

  1. γ-Secretase inhibitor inhibits bladder cancer cell drug resistance and invasion by reducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Wang, Gongxian; Zhang, Xiali; Zhou, Xiaocheng; Liu, Zhihuan; Huang, Liang; Liu, Rensheng; Lang, Bin; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Weipeng; Fu, Longlong; Fu, Bin

    2015-08-01

    A previous study by our group demonstrated that the expression levels of Notch 1 and Jagged 1 in bladder cancer cells was significantly lower compared with those in normal bladder mucosa, while the expression levels of Notch 1 and Jagged 1 in invasive bladder cancer were higher compared with those in superficial bladder cancer. The present study investigated the effect of the Notch signaling pathway on the drug resistance and invasiveness of bladder cancer cells. It was demonstrated that complete inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway induced significant morphological changes and inhibited cell proliferation and migration (P<0.05). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses revealed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of E-cadherin were upregulated (P<0.05) and the mRNA and protein expression levels of N-cadherin, vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin were downregulated (P<0.05). The present study concluded that complete inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, and reduced drug resistance in bladder cancer cells, a phenomenon which may be associated with the inhibition of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  2. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a

  3. MicroRNA-199a-5p inhibits cisplatin-induced drug resistance via inhibition of autophagy in osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yusheng; Jiang, Wei; Hu, Yuling; Da, Zixun; Zeng, Chao; Tu, Min; Deng, Zhenhan; Xiao, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common cancer of the bone. Chemotherapy is commonly used for the clinical treatment of OS. However, chemoresistance to cisplatin [also known as diamminedichloridoplatinum (II) (DDP)] is a major obstacle for OS therapy, the underlying mechanism of which is not fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-199a-5p in the regulation of chemoresistance to DDP in OS cells. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the expression level of miR-199a-5p was significantly reduced in human OS MG63 cells. In addition, DDP treatment also upregulated the protein levels of light chain 3 (LC3)-II and Beclin1 as well as the ratio of LC3-II vs. LC3-I in MG63 cells, indicating that autophagy was activated. Restoration of miR-199a-5p expression promoted DDP-induced inhibition of MG63 cell proliferation and inhibited DDP-induced autophagy, as indicated by the reduced protein levels of LC3-II and Beclin1 and the ratio of LC3-II vs. LC3-I. Finally, luciferase reporter assay data revealed that miR-199a-5p directly targeted Beclin1 and negatively mediated Beclin1 expression at a post-transcriptional level in MG63 cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-199a-5p promotes the cytotoxicity of DDP in OS cells via inhibition of autophagy. Therefore, miR-199a-5p/autophagy signaling is involved in chemoresistance and may become a potential target for the treatment of DDP-resistant OS. PMID:27895792

  4. Altiratinib Inhibits Tumor Growth, Invasion, Angiogenesis, and Microenvironment-Mediated Drug Resistance via Balanced Inhibition of MET, TIE2, and VEGFR2.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bryan D; Kaufman, Michael D; Leary, Cynthia B; Turner, Benjamin A; Wise, Scott C; Ahn, Yu Mi; Booth, R John; Caldwell, Timothy M; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lu, Wei-Ping; Patt, Tristan W; Patt, William C; Rutkoski, Thomas J; Samarakoon, Thiwanka; Telikepalli, Hanumaiah; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Vogeti, Subha; Yates, Karen M; Chun, Lawrence; Stewart, Lance J; Clare, Michael; Flynn, Daniel L

    2015-09-01

    Altiratinib (DCC-2701) was designed based on the rationale of engineering a single therapeutic agent able to address multiple hallmarks of cancer (1). Specifically, altiratinib inhibits not only mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression, but also drug resistance mechanisms in the tumor and microenvironment through balanced inhibition of MET, TIE2 (TEK), and VEGFR2 (KDR) kinases. This profile was achieved by optimizing binding into the switch control pocket of all three kinases, inducing type II inactive conformations. Altiratinib durably inhibits MET, both wild-type and mutated forms, in vitro and in vivo. Through its balanced inhibitory potency versus MET, TIE2, and VEGFR2, altiratinib provides an agent that inhibits three major evasive (re)vascularization and resistance pathways (HGF, ANG, and VEGF) and blocks tumor invasion and metastasis. Altiratinib exhibits properties amenable to oral administration and exhibits substantial blood-brain barrier penetration, an attribute of significance for eventual treatment of brain cancers and brain metastases. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Azvudine, A Novel Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Showed Good Drug Combination Features and Better Inhibition on Drug-Resistant Strains than Lamivudine In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Qing-Hua; Luo, Rong-Hua; Peng, You-Mei; Dai, Shao-Xing; Zhang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Huan; Cui, Xue-Qing; Liu, Ya-Juan; Huang, Jing-Fei; Chang, Jun-Biao; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Azvudine is a novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with antiviral activity on human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Here we reported the in vitro activity of azvudine against HIV-1 and HIV-2 when used alone or in combination with other antiretroviral drugs and its drug resistance features. Azvudine exerted highly potent inhibition on HIV-1 (EC50s ranging from 0.03 to 6.92 nM) and HIV-2 (EC50s ranging from 0.018 to 0.025 nM). It also showed synergism in combination with six approved anti-HIV drugs on both C8166 and PBMC. In combination assay, the concentrations of azvudine used were 1000 or 500 fold lower than other drugs. Azvudine also showed potent inhibition on NRTI-resistant strains (L74V and T69N). Although M184V caused 250 fold reduction in susceptibility, azvudine remained active at nanomolar range. In in vitro induced resistant assay, the frequency of M184I mutation increased with induction time which suggests M184I as the key mutation in azvudine treatment. As control, lamivudine treatment resulted in a higher frequency of M184I/V given the same induction time and higher occurrence of M184V was found. Molecular modeling analysis suggests that steric hindrance is more pronounced in mutant M184I than M184V due to the azido group of azvudine. The present data demonstrates the potential of azvudine as a complementary drug to current anti-HIV drugs. M184I should be the key mutation, however, azvudine still remains active on HIV-1LAI-M184V at nanomolar range. PMID:25144636

  6. Toxicity of xanthene food dyes by inhibition of human drug-metabolizing enzymes in a noncompetitive manner.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC(50) values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC(50) values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of (1)O(2) originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by (1)O(2) quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin.

  7. Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex: reversal by antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Frau, Roberto; Orrù, Marco; Puligheddu, Monica; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Mereu, Giampaolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Bortolato, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is known to induce perceptual impairments, ranging from perceptual distortion to hallucinatory states. Although this phenomenon has been extensively described in the literature, its neurobiological underpinnings remain elusive. In rodents, SD induces a series of behavioural patterns that might be reflective of psychosis and mania, such as hyperlocomotion and sensitization to psychotogenic drugs. Notably, such changes are accompanied by transitory alterations of dopaminergic signalling. Based on the hypothesis that both psychotic and manic disorders reflect gating impairments, the present study was aimed at the assessment of the impact of SD on the behavioural model of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex, a reliable paradigm for the study of informational filtering. Rats subjected to SD (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) exhibited a time-dependent increase in startle reflex and a dramatic deficit in PPI. Both alterations were reversed 24 h after termination of the SD period. Interestingly, PPI disruption was efficiently prevented by haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) clozapine (5 mg/kg i.p.) and risperidone (1 mg/kg i.p.). Conversely, neither the anxiolytic diazepam (5 mg/kg i.p.) nor the antidepressant citalopram (5 mg/kg i.p) affected the PPI disruption mediated by SD, although diazepam reversed the enhancement in startle reflex magnitude induced by this manipulation. Our data suggest that SD induces gating deficits that might be relevant to the hallucinatory phenomena observed in humans, and provide a novel reliable animal model where such relationship can be studied.

  8. Electrospinning of artemisinin-loaded core-shell fibers for inhibiting drug re-crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongli; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Shuxin; Dong, Anjie

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to inhibit the re-crystallization of a potent antimalarial drug, artemisinin (ART), by encapsulating it in core-shell fibers via a coaxially electrospun method. The ART-infiltrated cellulose acetate (CA) solution as the core material and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) solution as the shell material were used to prepared ART-loaded core-shell fibers ([ART/CA]/PVP). Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed the core-shell structures of the coaxially electrospun fibers. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to characterize the physical states of ART in the fibers. It was observed that ART crystals were formed in the ART-loaded CA/PVP composite fibers (ART/CA/PVP) during the electrospinning process and increased during storage duration. While ART crystals hardly were observed in the fresh core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fibers with high ART entrapped amount (20 wt.%) and a little was detected after 6-month storage. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results illustrated the hydrogen bonding interaction between ART and CA in the core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fibers mainly contributed to the amorphous state of ART. Importantly, combination of the hydrophilic PVP shell and the amorphous ART in CA core, the core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fibers provided a continued and stable ART release manner. Ex vivo permeation studies suggested the amorphous ART in the medicated core-shell fibers could permeate through the stratum corneum smoothly. Hence, the core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fiber matrix could provide a potential application in transdermal patches.

  9. Inhibition by Levorphanol and Related Drugs of Amino Acid Transport by Isolated Membrane Vesicles from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mary J. C.; Simon, Eric J.

    1975-01-01

    Levorphanol inhibits the transport of the amino acids proline and lysine by cytoplasmic membrane vesicles derived from Escherichia coli. The degree of inhibition increases with increasing levorphanol concentration and ranges from 26% at 10−6 M levorphanol to 92% at 10−3 M levorphanol. The effect is independent of the energy source, since levorphanol inhibits proline uptake to the same extent in the presence of 20 mM d-lactate or 20 mM succinate and in the absence of an exogenous energy source. Levorphanol does not irreversibly alter the ability of membrane vesicles to transport proline, since incubation of membrane vesicles for 15 min in the presence of 0.25 mM levorphanol, a concentration which inhibits proline transport by more than 75%, has no effect on the rate of proline transport by these vesicles once the drug is removed. Both the maximum velocity and the Km of proline transport are modified by levorphanol, hence, the type of inhibition produced by levorphanol is mixed. The inhibitor constant (Ki) for levorphanol inhibition of proline transport is approximately 3 × 10−4 M. Membrane vesicles incubated in the presence of levorphanol accumulate much less proline at the steady state than do control vesicles. Furthermore, the addition of levorphanol to membrane vesicles preloaded to the steady state with proline produces a marked net efflux of proline. Levorphanol does not block either temperature-induced efflux or exchange of external proline with [14C]proline present in the intravesicular pool. Dextrorphan, the enantiomorph of levorphanol, and levallorphan, the N-allyl analogue of levorphanol, inhibit proline and lysine transport in a similar manner. Possible mechanisms of the effects of these drugs on cell membranes are discussed. PMID:1096802

  10. Synergistic Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma and Drug Loaded Core-shell Nanoparticles on Inhibiting Breast Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Lee, Se-Jun; Castro, Nathan J; Yan, Dayun; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-26

    Nano-based drug delivery devices allowing for effective and sustained targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors have revolutionized cancer treatment. As an emerging biomedical technique, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ionized non-thermal gas mixture composed of various reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and UV photons, shows great potential for cancer treatment. Here we seek to develop a new dual cancer therapeutic method by integrating promising CAP and novel drug loaded core-shell nanoparticles and evaluate its underlying mechanism for targeted breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized via co-axial electrospraying. Biocompatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) was selected as the polymer shell to encapsulate anti-cancer therapeutics. Results demonstrated uniform size distribution and high drug encapsulation efficacy of the electrosprayed nanoparticles. Cell studies demonstrated the effectiveness of drug loaded nanoparticles and CAP for synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell growth when compared to each treatment separately. Importantly, we found CAP induced down-regulation of metastasis related gene expression (VEGF, MTDH, MMP9, and MMP2) as well as facilitated drug loaded nanoparticle uptake which may aid in minimizing drug resistance-a major problem in chemotherapy. Thus, the integration of CAP and drug encapsulated nanoparticles provides a promising tool for the development of a new cancer treatment strategy.

  11. Synergistic Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma and Drug Loaded Core-shell Nanoparticles on Inhibiting Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Lee, Se-Jun; Castro, Nathan J.; Yan, Dayun; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Nano-based drug delivery devices allowing for effective and sustained targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors have revolutionized cancer treatment. As an emerging biomedical technique, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ionized non-thermal gas mixture composed of various reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and UV photons, shows great potential for cancer treatment. Here we seek to develop a new dual cancer therapeutic method by integrating promising CAP and novel drug loaded core-shell nanoparticles and evaluate its underlying mechanism for targeted breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized via co-axial electrospraying. Biocompatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) was selected as the polymer shell to encapsulate anti-cancer therapeutics. Results demonstrated uniform size distribution and high drug encapsulation efficacy of the electrosprayed nanoparticles. Cell studies demonstrated the effectiveness of drug loaded nanoparticles and CAP for synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell growth when compared to each treatment separately. Importantly, we found CAP induced down-regulation of metastasis related gene expression (VEGF, MTDH, MMP9, and MMP2) as well as facilitated drug loaded nanoparticle uptake which may aid in minimizing drug resistance-a major problem in chemotherapy. Thus, the integration of CAP and drug encapsulated nanoparticles provides a promising tool for the development of a new cancer treatment strategy. PMID:26917087

  12. VX-509 (Decernotinib)-Mediated CYP3A Time-Dependent Inhibition: An Aldehyde Oxidase Metabolite as a Perpetrator of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Craig; Maltais, Francois; Laitinen, Leena; Liao, Shengkai; Tsao, Hong; Chakilam, Ananthsrinivas; Hariparsad, Niresh

    2016-08-01

    (R)-2-((2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methyl-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)butanamide (VX-509, decernotinib) is an oral Janus kinase 3 inhibitor that has been studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often receive multiple medications, such as statins and steroids, to manage the signs and symptoms of comorbidities, which increases the chances of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Mechanism-based inhibition is a subset of time-dependent inhibition (TDI) and occurs when a molecule forms a reactive metabolite which irreversibly binds and inactivates drug-metabolizing enzymes, potentially increasing the systemic load to toxic concentrations. Traditionally, perpetrating compounds are screened using human liver microsomes (HLMs); however, this system may be inadequate when the precipitant is activated by a non-cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated pathway. Even though studies assessing competitive inhibition and TDI using HLM suggested a low risk for CYP3A4-mediated DDI in the clinic, VX-509 increased the area under the curve of midazolam, atorvastatin, and methyl-prednisolone by approximately 12.0-, 2.7-, and 4.3-fold, respectively. Metabolite identification studies using human liver cytosol indicated that VX-509 is converted to an oxidative metabolite, which is the perpetrator of the DDIs observed in the clinic. As opposed to HLM, hepatocytes contain the full complement of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and can be used to assess TDI arising from non-P450-mediated metabolic pathways. In the current study, we highlight the role of aldehyde oxidase in the formation of the hydroxyl-metabolite of VX-509, which is involved in clinically significant TDI-based DDIs and represents an additional example in which a system-dependent prediction of TDI would be evident.

  13. Inhibition of CREB Activity in the Dorsal Portion of the Striatum Potentiates Behavioral Responses to Drugs of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Stefania; Pittenger, Christopher; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The striatum participates in multiple forms of behavioral adaptation, including habit formation, other forms of procedural memory, and short- and long-term responses to drugs of abuse. The cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) family of transcription factors has been implicated in various forms of behavioral plasticity, but its role in the dorsal portion of the striatum-has been little explored. We previously showed that in transgenic mice in which CREB function is inhibited in the dorsal striatum, bidirectional synaptic plasticity and certain forms of long-term procedural memory are impaired. Here we show, in startling contrast, that inhibition of striatal CREB facilitates cocaine- and morphine-place conditioning and enhances locomotor sensitization to cocaine. These findings propose CREB as a positive regulator of dorsal striatum-dependent procedural learning but a negative regulator of drug-related learning. PMID:19826621

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit calpain activity and membrane localization of calpain 2 protease.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Leloup, Ludovic; Freeman, Lisa C; Wells, Alan; Lillich, James D

    2010-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used frequently worldwide for the alleviation of pain despite their capacity to cause adverse gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. GI toxicity, once thought to be the result of non-specific inhibition of cyclooxegenase (COX) enzymes, is now hypothesized to have multiple other causes that are COX independent. In particular, NSAIDs inhibit intestinal epithelial restitution, the process by which barrier function in intestinal mucosa is restored at sites of epithelial wounds within hours through cell spreading and migration. Accordingly, recent evidence indicates that the expression of calpain proteases, which play a key role in cell migration, is decreased by NSAIDs that inhibit cell migration in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Here, we examine the effect of NSAIDs on calpain activity and membrane expression in IEC-6 cells. Indomethacin, NS-398, and SC-560 inhibited calpain activity and decreased expression of calpain 2 in total membrane fractions and in plasma membranes involved in cell attachment to the substrate. Additionally, we demonstrated that inhibition of calpain activity by NSAIDs or ALLM, a calpain inhibitor, limits cell migration and in vitro wound healing of IEC-6 cells. Our results indicate that NSAIDs may inhibit cell migration by decreasing calpain activity and membrane-associated expression of calpain 2. Our results provide valuable insight into the mechanisms behind NSAID-induced GI toxicity and provide a potential pathway through which these negative side effects can be avoided in future members of the NSAID class. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of human drug-metabolising cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzyme activities in vitro by uremic toxins.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Kyra J; Rowland, Andrew; Polasek, Thomas M; Miners, John O

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the potential inhibitory effects of uremic toxins on the major human hepatic drug-metabolising cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes in vitro. Benzyl alcohol, p-cresol, indoxyl sulfate, hippuric acid and a combination of the four uremic toxins were co-incubated with human liver microsomes and selective probe substrates for the major human drug-metabolising CYP and UGT enzymes. The percentage of enzyme inhibition was calculated by measuring the rates of probe metabolite formation in the absence and presence of the uremic toxins. Kinetics studies were conducted to evaluate the K i values and mechanism(s) of the inhibition of CYP2E1, CYP3A4, UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 by p-cresol. The individual uremic toxins inhibited CYP and UGT enzymes to a variable extent. p-Cresol was the most potent individual inhibitor, producing >50% inhibition of CYP2E1, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 at a concentration of 100 μM. The greatest inhibition was observed with UGT1A9. p-Cresol was shown to be an uncompetitive inhibitor of UGT1A9, with unbound K i values of 9.1 and 2.5 μM in the absence and presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively. K i values for p-cresol inhibition of human liver microsomal CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and UGT1A1 ranged from 43 to 89 μM. A combination of the four uremic toxins produced >50% decreases in the activities of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, UGT1A9 and UGT2B7. Uremic toxins may contribute to decreases in drug hepatic clearance in individuals with kidney disease by inhibition of hepatic drug-metabolising enzymes.

  16. Use of Telemorace Inhibition in Combination with Anti-Cancer Drugs to Induce Cell Death in Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    mitotic spindle, excluding specificity for DNA -damaging agents at least in the context of the mutant hTR. Altogether, our data indicate that interfering...drugs upon telomerase inhibition in HeLa cells, and suggested a specific interaction between telomer- ase and the DNA repair process in human cells (11...response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and

  17. EGFR inhibition evokes innate drug resistance in lung cancer cells by preventing Akt activity and thus inactivating Ets-1 function.

    PubMed

    Phuchareon, Janyaporn; McCormick, Frank; Eisele, David W; Tetsu, Osamu

    2015-07-21

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About 14% of NSCLCs harbor mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite remarkable progress in treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), only 5% of patients achieve tumor reduction >90%. The limited primary responses are attributed partly to drug resistance inherent in the tumor cells before therapy begins. Recent reports showed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is an important determinant of this innate drug resistance. In contrast, we demonstrate that EGFR inhibition promotes innate drug resistance despite blockade of RTK activity in NSCLC cells. EGFR TKIs decrease both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt protein kinase pathways for a short time, after which the Ras/MAPK pathway becomes reactivated. Akt inhibition selectively blocks the transcriptional activation of Ets-1, which inhibits its target gene, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), a negative regulator specific for ERK1/2. As a result, ERK1/2 is activated. Furthermore, elevated c-Src stimulates Ras GTP-loading and activates Raf and MEK kinases. These observations suggest that not only ERK1/2 but also Akt activity is essential to maintain Ets-1 in an active state. Therefore, despite high levels of ERK1/2, Ets-1 target genes including DUSP6 and cyclins D1, D3, and E2 remain suppressed by Akt inhibition. Reduction of DUSP6 in combination with elevated c-Src renews activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which enhances cell survival by accelerating Bim protein turnover. Thus, EGFR TKIs evoke innate drug resistance by preventing Akt activity and inactivating Ets-1 function in NSCLC cells.

  18. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Growth of Infected T Cells by the Immunosuppressive Drugs Cyclosporin A and FK 506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpas, Abraham; Lowdell, Mark; Jacobson, S. Kim; Hill, Fergal

    1992-09-01

    The effects of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK 506 were studied on cells chronically infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as well as on uninfected and newly infected cells. When cells chronically infected with HIV-1 or with HIV-2 were cocultivated with uninfected cells in the presence of cyclosporin A or FK 506 there was a delay in the formation of syncytia and of cytopathic effects. This inhibitory effect was not due to decreased membrane expression of CD4. In addition, there was an ≈100-fold reduction in the yield of infectious HIV-1 when the infected cells were grown in the presence of these drugs, a finding consistent with other evidence of decreased HIV expression. Both drugs were found to inhibit the growth of chronically infected cells at concentrations that did not inhibit the growth of the uninfected cells. These results, demonstrating that cyclosporin A and FK 506 interfere with HIV production and selectively inhibit the growth of infected cells, suggest that they may be useful in the treatment of this infection and indicate further cellular targets for antiviral agents.

  19. Mutual Help for the Widowed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ruby Banks

    1972-01-01

    The Widowed Service Line, a mutual help program in metropolitan Boston that provided service by telephone, effectively meeting the various problems and needs of differing stages of widowhood, is described. (Author)

  20. Uncertainty relation for mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeloch, James; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2014-12-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal uncertainty relation between the quantum and classical mutual informations between pairs of quantum systems. Specifically, we propose that the sum of the classical mutual information, determined by two mutually unbiased pairs of observables, never exceeds the quantum mutual information. We call this the complementary-quantum correlation (CQC) relation and prove its validity for pure states, for states with one maximally mixed subsystem, and for all states when one measurement is minimally disturbing. We provide results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggesting that the CQC relation is generally valid. Importantly, we also show that the CQC relation represents an improvement to an entropic uncertainty principle in the presence of a quantum memory, and that it can be used to verify an achievable secret key rate in the quantum one-time pad cryptographic protocol.

  1. Appropriate risk criteria for OATP inhibition at the drug discovery stage based on the clinical relevancy between OATP inhibitors and drug-induced adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Nakakariya, Masanori; Goto, Akihiko; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2016-10-01

    DDI could be caused by the inhibition of OATP-mediated hepatic uptakes. The aim of this study is to set the risk criteria for the compounds that would cause DDI via OATP inhibition at the drug discovery stage. The IC50 values of OATP inhibitors for human OATP-mediated atorvastatin uptake were evaluated in the expression system. In order to set the risk criteria for OATP inhibition, the relationship was clarified between OATP inhibitory effect and severe adverse effects of OATP substrates, rhabdomyolysis, hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice. Rhabdomyolysis would be caused in the atorvastatin AUC more than 9-fold of that at a minimum therapeutic dose. The atorvastatin AUC was 6- to 9-fold increased with the OATP inhibitors of which IC50 values were ≤1 μmol/L. Hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice would be caused with the OATP inhibitors of which IC50 values were ≤6 μmol/L. This investigation showed that the compounds with IC50 of ≤1 μmol/L would have high risk for OATP-mediated DDI that would cause severe side effects. Before the detailed analysis based on the dosage, unbound fraction in blood and effective concentration to evaluate the clinical DDI potency, this criteria enable high throughput screening and optimize lead compounds at the drug discovery stage.

  2. The antimalarial drug mefloquine inhibits cardiac inward rectifier K+ channels: evidence for interference in PIP2-channel interaction.

    PubMed

    López-Izquierdo, Angélica; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Rodríguez-Martínez, Martín; Ferrer, Tania; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Sánchez-Chapula, José A

    2011-04-01

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine was found to inhibit the KATP channel by an unknown mechanism. Because mefloquine is a Cationic amphiphilic drug and is known to insert into lipid bilayers, we postulate that mefloquine interferes with the interaction between PIP2 and Kir channels resulting in channel inhibition. We studied the inhibitory effects of mefloquine on Kir2.1, Kir2.3, Kir2.3(I213L), and Kir6.2/SUR2A channels expressed in HEK-293 cells, and on IK1 and IKATP from feline cardiac myocytes. The order of mefloquine inhibition was Kir6.2/SUR2A ≈ Kir2.3 (IC50 ≈ 2 μM) > Kir2.1 (IC50 > 30 μM). Similar results were obtained in cardiac myocytes. The Kir2.3(I213L) mutant, which enhances the strength of interaction with PIP2 (compared to WT), was significantly less sensitive (IC50 = 9 μM). In inside-out patches, continuous application of PIP2 strikingly prevented the mefloquine inhibition. Our results support the idea that mefloquine interferes with PIP2-Kir channels interactions.

  3. A retrospective drug use evaluation of cabergoline for lactation inhibition at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    AlSaad, Doua; ElSalem, Samah; Abdulrouf, Palli Valapila; Thomas, Binny; Alsaad, Tayseer; Ahmed, Afif; AlHail, Moza

    2016-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is considered as gold standard for infant nutrition and should be interrupted only when a compelling indication exists. Certain medical conditions such as abortion, stillbirth, HIV infection, or infant galactosemia and certain medications such as chemotherapy necessitate lactation inhibition to protect the health of mother and infant. Drug use evaluation (DUE) studies are done to explore the current practice in a setting and help to identify areas in which further information and education may be needed by clinicians. Objective The aim of this study was to conduct a DUE of cabergoline to assess indications for lactation inhibition, dosage regimen, and its safety. Method A retrospective cross-sectional DUE study was conducted over a period of 4 months from September 1, 2013, till December 31, 2013, at the Women’s Hospital, Qatar. All cabergoline prescriptions written for lactation inhibition within 10 days of delivery or abortion were included in the study. A descriptive data analysis was undertaken. Results Of the 85 patients included, stillbirth (50.6%) was considered as the main reason for lactation inhibition, followed by abortion (27.1%) and neonatal death (12.9%). The remaining 9.4% of the patients had live baby, and the majority of them were prescribed cabergoline for lactation inhibition because their maternal medical conditions required the use of drugs with insufficient safety data (n=6). Seventy-four percent of patients received cabergoline at accurate time and dose. However, 14% of the patients had preexisting hypertensive disorder and 58.3% of them were diagnosed as uncontrolled hypertension. Conclusion The current DUE study found that cabergoline was mainly used to inhibit lactation for patients with stillbirth, abortion, and neonatal death. In mothers who use medications for other medical conditions, benefits and risks of breastfeeding should be carefully balanced before prescribing cabergoline. Current prescribing pattern

  4. Drugs designed to inhibit human p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation treat Toxoplasma gondii and Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuang; Daniel, Benjamin J; Brumlik, Michael J; Burow, Matthew E; Zou, Weiping; Khan, Imtiaz A; Wadsworth, Scott; Siekierka, John; Curiel, Tyler J

    2007-12-01

    We recently showed that the pyridinylimidazoles SB203580 and SB202190, drugs designed to block human p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, also inhibited replication of the medically important intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii in cultured human fibroblasts through a direct effect on the parasite. We now show that additional pyridinylimidazole and imidazopyrimidine p38 MAPK inhibitors inhibit intracellular T. gondii replication in vitro and protect mice against fatal T. gondii infection. Mice surviving infection following treatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors were resistant to subsequent T. gondii challenge, demonstrating induction of protective immunity. Thus, drugs originally developed to block human p38 MAPK activation are useful for treating T. gondii infection without inducing significant immunosuppression. MAPK inhibitors combined with either of the approved anti-Toxoplasma drugs sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine resulted in improved survival among mice challenged with a fatal T. gondii inoculum. A MAPK inhibitor also treated mice infected with the Microsporidium parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi, suggesting that MAPK inhibitors represent a novel class of agents that may have a broad spectrum of antiparasitic activity. Preliminary studies implicate a T. gondii MAPK homologue as the target of drug action, suggesting possibilities for more-selective agents.

  5. Inhibition of FAAH and activation of PPAR: new approaches to the treatment of cognitive dysfunction and drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Panlilio, Leigh V; Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-04-01

    Enhancing the effects of endogenously-released cannabinoid ligands in the brain might provide therapeutic effects more safely and effectively than administering drugs that act directly at the cannabinoid receptor. Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) prevent the breakdown of endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), prolonging and enhancing the effects of these ligands when they are naturally released. This review considers recent research on the effects of FAAH inhibitors and PPAR activators in animal models of addiction and cognition (specifically learning and memory). These studies show that FAAH inhibitors can produce potentially therapeutic effects, some through cannabinoid receptors and some through PPAR. These effects include enhancing certain forms of learning, counteracting the rewarding effects of nicotine and alcohol, relieving symptoms of withdrawal from cannabis and other drugs, and protecting against relapse-like reinstatement of drug self-administration. Since FAAH inhibition might have a wide range of therapeutic actions but might also share some of the adverse effects of cannabis, it is noteworthy that at least one FAAH-inhibiting drug (URB597) has been found to have potentially beneficial effects but no indication of liability for abuse or dependence. Although these areas of research are new, the preliminary evidence indicates that they might lead to improved therapeutic interventions and a better understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying addiction and memory.

  6. Inhibition of FAAH and activation of PPAR: New approaches to the treatment of cognitive dysfunction and drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Panlilio, Leigh V.; Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing the effects of endogenously-released cannabinoid ligands in the brain might provide therapeutic effects more safely and effectively than administering drugs that act directly at the cannabinoid receptor. Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) prevent the breakdown of endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), prolonging and enhancing the effects of these ligands when they are naturally released. This review considers recent research on the effects of FAAH inhibitors and PPAR activators in animal models of addiction and cognition (specifically learning and memory). These studies show that FAAH inhibitors can produce potentially therapeutic effects, some through cannabinoid receptors and some through PPAR. These effects include enhancing certain forms of learning, counteracting the rewarding effects of nicotine and alcohol, relieving symptoms of withdrawal from cannabis and other drugs, and protecting against relapse-like reinstatement of drug self-administration. Since FAAH inhibition might have a wide range of therapeutic actions but might also share some of the adverse effects of cannabis, it is noteworthy that at least one FAAH-inhibiting drug (URB597) has been found to have potentially beneficial effects but no indication of liability for abuse or dependence. Although these areas of research are new, the preliminary evidence indicates that they might lead to improved therapeutic interventions and a better understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying addiction and memory. PMID:23333350

  7. The irreversible covalent fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor PRN1371 exhibits sustained inhibition of FGFR after drug clearance.

    PubMed

    Venetsanakos, Eleni; Brameld, Ken A; Phan, Vernon T; Verner, Erik; Owens, Timothy D; Xing, Yan; Tam, Danny; LaStant, Jacob; Leung, Kwan; Karr, Dane E; Hill, Ronald J; Gerritsen, Mary E; Goldstein, David M; Funk, Jens Oliver; Bradshaw, J Michael

    2017-10-04

    An increasing number of cancers are known to harbor mutations, translocations, or amplifications in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family of kinases. The FGFR inhibitors evaluated in clinical trials to date have shown promise at treating these cancers. Here we describe PRN1371, an irreversible covalent inhibitor of FGFR1-4 targeting a cysteine within the kinase active site. PRN1371 demonstrated strong FGFR potency and excellent kinome-wide selectivity in a number of biochemical and cellular assays, including in various cancer cell lines exhibiting FGFR alterations. Furthermore, PRN1371 maintained FGFR inhibition in vivo, not only when circulating drug levels were high but also after the drug had been cleared from circulation, indicating the possibility of sustained FGFR inhibition in the clinic without the need for continuous drug exposure. Durable tumor regression was also obtained in multiple tumor xenografts and patient derived tumor xenograft models and was sustained even using an intermittent dosing strategy that provided drug holidays. PRN1371 is currently under clinical investigation for treatment of patients with solid tumors. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Risk factors for development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury: inhibition of hepatic basolateral bile acid transporters multidrug resistance-associated proteins 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J; Swaan, Peter W; Stewart, Paul W; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2014-04-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potential of drugs. The inhibitory effect of 88 drugs (100 μM) on MRP3- and MRP4-mediated substrate transport was measured in membrane vesicles. Drugs selected for investigation included 50 BSEP non-inhibitors (24 non-cholestatic; 26 cholestatic) and 38 BSEP inhibitors (16 non-cholestatic; 22 cholestatic). MRP4 inhibition was associated with an increased risk of cholestatic potential among BSEP non-inhibitors. In this group, for each 1% increase in MRP4 inhibition, the odds of the drug being cholestatic increased by 3.1%. Using an inhibition cutoff of 21%, which predicted a 50% chance of cholestasis, 62% of cholestatic drugs inhibited MRP4 (P < 0.05); in contrast, only 17% of non-cholestatic drugs were MRP4 inhibitors. Among BSEP inhibitors, MRP4 inhibition did not provide additional predictive value of cholestatic potential; almost all BSEP inhibitors were also MRP4 inhibitors. Inclusion of pharmacokinetic predictor variables (e.g., maximal unbound concentration in plasma) in addition to percent MRP4 inhibition in logistic regression models did not improve cholestasis prediction. Association of cholestasis with percent MRP3 inhibition was not statistically significant, regardless of BSEP-inhibition status. Inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI.

  9. Risk Factors for Development of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Inhibition of Hepatic Basolateral Bile Acid Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C.; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J.; Swaan, Peter W.; Stewart, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potential of drugs. The inhibitory effect of 88 drugs (100 μM) on MRP3- and MRP4-mediated substrate transport was measured in membrane vesicles. Drugs selected for investigation included 50 BSEP non-inhibitors (24 non-cholestatic; 26 cholestatic) and 38 BSEP inhibitors (16 non-cholestatic; 22 cholestatic). MRP4 inhibition was associated with an increased risk of cholestatic potential among BSEP non-inhibitors. In this group, for each 1% increase in MRP4 inhibition, the odds of the drug being cholestatic increased by 3.1%. Using an inhibition cutoff of 21%, which predicted a 50% chance of cholestasis, 62% of cholestatic drugs inhibited MRP4 (P < 0.05); in contrast, only 17% of non-cholestatic drugs were MRP4 inhibitors. Among BSEP inhibitors, MRP4 inhibition did not provide additional predictive value of cholestatic potential; almost all BSEP inhibitors were also MRP4 inhibitors. Inclusion of pharmacokinetic predictor variables (e.g., maximal unbound concentration in plasma) in addition to percent MRP4 inhibition in logistic regression models did not improve cholestasis prediction. Association of cholestasis with percent MRP3 inhibition was not statistically significant, regardless of BSEP-inhibition status. Inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI. PMID:24154606

  10. [Dual inhibition of cholesterol using the drug combination ezetimibe/simvastatin?].

    PubMed

    Vaverková, H

    2007-04-01

    The latest clinical intervention studies of statins have shown that more aggressive reductions in LDL-cholesterol to values lower than existing target values for persons with a high risk of cardiovascular disease produce greater success in terms of halted progression and even regression of the atherosclerotic process and fewer cardiovascular events. This has lead to a series of international and national recommendations for a further reduction in target values for LDL-cholesterol, which is often difficult to achieve with the usual dosage of statins. The combination of a statin with ezetimibe, acting as a dual inhibition mechanism against the synthesis and absorption of cholesterol, reduces LDL-cholesterol significantly more than treatment with a statin in monotherapy. This allows many more patients to achieve the target value for LDL-cholesterol. At present a drug combination comprising ezetimibe 10 mg and simvastatin in all doses (10, 20, 40 and 80 mg) is being introduced into our market under the company name Inegy. In addition to reducing LDL-cholesterol by up to 61% this combination has a positive effect on a range of other parameters for lipid metabolism and inflamation. A typical initial dose of ezetimibe 10 mg/simvastatin 20 mg reduces LDL-cholesterol by around 50%, which is necessary for the stabilisation of atherosclerotic plaque. For patients requiring more aggressive reduction of LDL-cholesterol it is best to start with a dose of ezetimibe 10 mg/simvastatin 40 mg. The highest dose of 10 mg/80 mg is intended for patients with the highest level of risk and reduces LDL-cholesterol by around 60%. In all the studies that have been carried out so far, the combination of ezetimibe and statin was very well tolerated and the safety profile of this combination was the same a treatment with the statin alone. At present a wide range of large clinical studies are underway to test whether LDL-cholesterol reduction using the ezetimibe + statin combination will also

  11. Inhibition of Major Drug Metabolizing CYPs by Common Herbal Medicines used by HIV/AIDS Patients in Africa– Implications for Herb-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Awortwe, Charles; Bouic, Patrick J.; Masimirembwa, Collen M.; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential risk of common herbal medicines used by HIV-infected patients in Africa for herb-drug interactions (HDI). High throughput screening assays consisting of recombinant Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and fluorescent probes, and parallel artificial membrane permeability assays (PAMPA) were used. The potential of herbal medicines to cause HDI was ranked according to FDA guidelines for reversible inhibition and categorization of time dependent inhibition was based on the normalized ratio. CYPs 1A2 and 3A4 were most inhibited by the herbal extracts. H. hemerocallidea (IC50 = 0.63 μg/mL and 58 μg/mL) and E. purpurea (IC50 = 20 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL) were the potent inhibitors of CYPs 1A2 and 3A4 respectively. L. frutescens and H. hemerocallidea showed clear time dependent inhibition on CYP3A4. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of both H. hemerocallidea and L. frutescens before and after PAMPA were identical. The results indicate potential HDI of H. hemerocallidea, L. frutescens and E. purpurea with substrates of the affected enzymes if maximum in vivo concentration is achieved. PMID:24475926

  12. Evaluation of combinations of drugs that inhibit Ehrlich tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Cory, J G

    1981-05-01

    The nature of the inhibition of Ehrlich tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase by combinations of agents directed at the non-heme iron-containing component and the effector-binding component was studied with the use of isobolograms. From these studies, it was determined that the combinations of pyrazoloimidazole (IMPY) and dialdehyde of inosine, IMPY and deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP), IMPY and deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP), and IMPY and deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) gave synergistic inhibition of cytidine diphosphate reductase. The combination of dATP and dGTP also gave synergistic inhibition. The combinations of hydroxyurea and IMPY, 4-methyl-5-aminoisoquinoline thiosemicarbazone (MAIQ) and IMPY, and dialdehyde of inosine and dialdehyde derivative of 5'-deoxyinosine gave antagonistic inhibition. Other combinations utilizing MAIQ and dATP, MAIQ and dGTP, MAIQ and dTTP, hydroxyurea and dGTP, and hydroxyurea and dTTP gave inhibition which was additive.

  13. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits hERG channels: a cardiac arrhythmia risk.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Sandtner, Walter; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2014-03-01

    Ibogaine, an alkaloid derived from the African shrub Tabernanthe iboga, has shown promising anti-addictive properties in animals. Anecdotal evidence suggests that ibogaine is also anti-addictive in humans. Thus, it alleviates drug craving and impedes relapse of drug use. Although not licensed as therapeutic drug, and despite evidence that ibogaine may disturb the rhythm of the heart, this alkaloid is currently used as an anti-addiction drug in alternative medicine. Here, we report that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine reduce currents through human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channels. Thereby, we provide a mechanism by which ibogaine may generate life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Maltas, Jeff; Brumm, Peter; Wood, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments. PMID:27764095

  15. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Karslake, Jason; Maltas, Jeff; Brumm, Peter; Wood, Kevin B

    2016-10-01

    The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments.

  16. Oxidative stress-induced protein damage inhibits DNA repair and determines mutation risk and anticancer drug effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Elizabeth; Brem, Reto; Karran, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between sun exposure and non-melanoma skin cancer risk is well established. Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV; wavelengths 280-400 nm) is firmly implicated in skin cancer development. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against cancer by removing potentially mutagenic DNA lesions induced by UVB (280-320 nm). How the 20-fold more abundant UVA (320-400 mn) component of solar UV radiation increases skin cancer risk is not understood. We demonstrate here that the contribution of UVA to the effects of UV radiation on cultured human cells is largely independent of its ability to damage DNA. Instead, the effects of UVA reflect the induction of oxidative stress that causes extensive protein oxidation. Because NER proteins are among those damaged, UVA irradiation inhibits NER and increases the cells’ susceptibility to mutation by UVB. NER inhibition is a common consequence of oxidative stress. Exposure to chemical oxidants, treatment with drugs that deplete cellular antioxidants, and interventions that interfere with glucose metabolism to disrupt the supply of cellular reducing power all inhibit NER. Tumor cells are often in a condition of oxidative stress and one effect of the NER inhibition that results from stress-induced protein oxidation is an increased sensitivity to the anticancer drug cisplatin. Statement of implication: Since NER is both a defence against cancer a significant determinant of cell survival after treatment with anticancer drugs, its attenuation by protein damage under conditions of oxidative-stress has implications for both cancer risk and for the effectiveness of anticancer therapy. PMID:27106867

  17. Prediction of drug-drug interactions with carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide using a new in vitro assay for epoxide hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria; Bonnaillie, Pierre; Chanteux, Hugues

    2016-12-01

    1. Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic drug which is metabolized by CYP3A4 into carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. This metabolite is then detoxified by epoxide hydrolase. As carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide has been associated with neurotoxicity, it is critical to identify whether a new antiepileptic drug has the potential to inhibit epoxide hydrolase and therefore increase carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide plasma levels. 2. In this study, an in vitro assay was developed to evaluate epoxide hydrolase activity by using carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide as probe substrate. The ability of this assay to predict drug-drug interactions (DDI) at the epoxide hydrolase level was also investigated. 3. To this aim, known inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase for which in vivo data are available were used. Firstly, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide hydrolase activity was determined in liver microsomes, cytosol and hepatocytes. Thereafter, the IC50 of epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (progabide, valproic acid, valpromide and valnoctamide) was determined in liver microsomes and hepatocytes. Finally, prediction of AUC increase was performed using the in vitro data generated. 4. Interestingly, epoxide hydrolase activity was found to be much higher in human hepatocytes compared to liver microsomes/cytosol. Even though assessed on a limited number of compounds, this study demonstrated that the use of hepatocytes seems to be a more relevant model to assess and predict DDI at the epoxide hydrolase level.

  18. Clitocine targets Mcl-1 to induce drug-resistant human cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth inhibition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Li, Hua; Li, Xia; Zeng, Xueli; Wu, Ping; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Liu, Fei-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance is a major reason for therapy failure in cancer. Clitocine is a natural amino nucleoside isolated from mushroom and has been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we observed that clitocine can effectively induce drug-resistant human cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and inhibit tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Clitocine treatment inhibited drug-resistant human cancer cell growth in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Biochemical analysis revealed that clitocine-induced tumor growth inhibition is associated with activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, PARP cleavage, cytochrome c release and Bax, Bak activation, suggesting that clitocine inhibits drug-resistant cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis. Analysis of apoptosis regulatory genes indicated that Mcl-1 level was dramatically decreased after clitocine treatment. Over-expression of Mcl-1 reversed the activation of Bax and attenuated clitocine-induced apoptosis, suggesting that clitocine-induced apoptosis was at least partially by inducing Mcl-1 degradation to release Bax and Bak. Consistent with induction of apoptosis in vitro, clitocine significantly suppressed the drug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in vivo by inducing apoptosis as well as inhibiting cell proliferation. Taken together, our data demonstrated that clitocine is a potent Mcl-1 inhibitor that can effectively induce apoptosis to suppress drug-resistant human cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, and thus holds great promise for further development as potentially a novel therapeutic agent to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy.

  19. Herb–drug interaction prediction based on the high specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hai-Ying; Sun, Dong-Xue; Cao, Yun-Feng; Ai, Chun-Zhi; Qu, Yan-Qing; Hu, Cui-Min; Jiang, Changtao; Dong, Pei-Pei; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Tanaka, Naoki; Gonzalez, Frank J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Herb–drug interaction strongly limits the clinical application of herbs and drugs, and the inhibition of herbal components towards important drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as one of the most important reasons. The present study aims to investigate the inhibition potential of andrographolide derivatives towards one of the most important phase II DMEs UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Recombinant UGT isoforms (except UGT1A4)-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction and UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine (TFP) glucuronidation were employed to firstly screen the andrographolide derivatives' inhibition potential. High specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UGT2B7 was observed. The inhibition type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined for the compounds exhibiting strong inhibition capability towards UGT2B7, and human liver microsome (HLMs)-catalyzed zidovudine (AZT) glucuronidation probe reaction was used to furtherly confirm the inhibition behavior. In combination of inhibition parameters (K{sub i}) and in vivo concentration of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide, the potential in vivo inhibition magnitude was predicted. Additionally, both the in vitro inhibition data and computational modeling results provide important information for the modification of andrographolide derivatives as selective inhibitors of UGT2B7. Taken together, data obtained from the present study indicated the potential herb–drug interaction between Andrographis paniculata and the drugs mainly undergoing UGT2B7-catalyzed metabolic elimination, and the andrographolide derivatives as potential candidates for the selective inhibitors of UGT2B7. - Highlights: • Specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UGT2B7. • Herb-drug interaction related withAndrographis paniculata. • Guidance for design of UGT2B7 specific inhibitors.

  20. In vitro drug-drug interactions of budesonide: inhibition and induction of transporters and cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nancy; Cui, Donghui; Wang, Qing; Wen, Zhiming; Finkelman, Richard D; Welty, Devin

    2017-07-21

    1. Budesonide is a glucocorticoid used in the treatment of several respiratory and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Glucocorticoids have been demonstrated to induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of budesonide to act as a perpetrator or a victim of transporter- or CYP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs). 2. In vitro studies were conducted for P-gp, breast cancer resistance protein and organic anion and cation transporters (OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, OCT2) in transporter-transfected cells. Changes in mRNA expression in human hepatocytes and enzyme activity in human liver microsomes by budesonide were determined for CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A. 3. The data indicated that budesonide is a substrate of P-gp but is not a substrate or an inhibitor of the other transporters investigated. Budesonide is neither an inducer nor an inhibitor of major CYP enzymes. The effect of P-gp on budesonide disposition is anticipated to be low owing to CYP3A-mediated clearance. 4. Collectively, our data indicate there is a low risk of budesonide perpetrating clinical DDIs mediated by the transporters or CYPs studied.

  1. Cyclodextrin-Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Sustained Drug Delivery and Proliferation Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Correia, Alexandra; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Almeida, Sérgio; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-10-21

    Over the past decade, the potential of polymeric structures has been investigated to overcome many limitations related to nanosized drug carriers by modulating their toxicity, cellular interactions, stability, and drug-release kinetics. In this study, we have developed a successful nanocomposite consisting of undecylenic acid modified thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs) loaded with an anticancer drug, sorafenib, and surface-conjugated with heptakis(6-amino-6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HABCD) to show the impact of the surface polymeric functionalization on the physical and biological properties of the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Cytocompatibility studies showed that the UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs were not toxic to breast cancer cells. HABCD also enhanced the suspensibility and both the colloidal and plasma stabilities of the UnTHCPSi NPs. UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs showed a significantly increased interaction with breast cancer cells compared to bare NPs and also sustained the drug release. Furthermore, the sorafenib-loaded UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs efficiently inhibited cell proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

  2. In vitro evaluation of photosensitivity risk related to genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and inhibition by drugs.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ai; Onishi, Yuko; An, Ran; Koshiba, Shoko; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Hoshijima, Kazuyuki; Priebe, Waldemar; Yoshida, Takashi; Kometani, Satoshi; Matsubara, Takayoshi; Mikuriya, Kenta; Ishikawa, Toshihisa

    2007-12-01

    Since porphyrins are regarded as endogenous substrates for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCG2, it is hypothesized that functional impairment owing to genetic polymorphisms or inhibition of ABCG2 by drugs may result in a disruption of cellular porphyrin homeostasis. In the present study, we expressed ABCG2 genetic variants, i.e., V12M, Q141K, S441N, and F489L, as well as the wild type (WT) in Flp-In-293 cells to examine the hypothesis. Cells expressing S441N and F489L variants exhibited high levels of both cellularly accumulated pheophorbide a and photosensitivity, when those cells were incubated with pheophorbide a and irradiated with visible light. To further elucidate the significance of ABCG2 in cellular porphyrin homeostasis, we observed cellular accumulation and compartmentation of porphyrin and pheophorbide a by means of a new fluorescence microscopy technology, and found that accumulation of porphyrin and pheophorbide a in the cytoplasm compartment was maintained at low levels in Flp-In-293 cells expressing ABCG2 WT, V12M, or Q141K. When ABCG2 was inhibited by imatinib or novobiocin, however, those cells became sensitive to light. Based on these results, it is strongly suggested that certain genetic polymorphisms and/or inhibition of ABCG2 by drugs can enhance the potential risk of photosensitivity.

  3. Inhibition of two monomeric butyrylcholinesterases from rabbit liver by chlorpromazine and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Rush, R S; Main, A R; Kilpatrick, B F; Faulkner, G D

    1981-03-01

    A new form of cholinesterases has been discovered in rabbit liver; the new enzymes are monomeric butyrylcholinesterases (EC 3.1.1.8), mBuChE I and mBuChE II. These enzymes are inhibited reversibly by chlorpromazine in the pharmacologically active concentration range and they exhibit mixed competitive-noncompetitive inhibition patterns. The apparent competitive inhibition constants, Ki with chlorpromazine, are 1.8 x 10(-6) M for mBuChE I and 7.6 x 10(-6) M for mBuChE II, whereas the noncompetitive inhibition constant is 1.1 x 10(-5) M for mBuChE II as determined by spectrophotometric assay with n-butyrylthiocholine iodide substrate. Although inhibition of mBuChE I also exhibited noncompetitive behavior, a binding constant could not be determined. Human serum oligometric butyrylcholinesterase (oBuChE) was employed as a control cholinesterase and also demonstrated mixed inhibition kinetics. The competitive inhibition constant for the oBuChE was 5.5 x 10(-7) M in the low substrate region, whereas the apparent noncompetitive binding constant was 1.6 x 10(-5) M in the activated higher substrate region with n-butyrylthiocholine iodide as the substrate and chlorpromazine as the reversible inhibitor. The presence of a noncompetitive binding component indicates the presence of an operative modifier or allosteric site binding the inhibitor on both mBuChEs and the oBuChE. The inhibition constants were calculated assuming that the enzymes followed simple Michaelian kinetics.

  4. Aptamer-Drug Conjugates of Active Metabolites of Nucleoside Analogs and Cytotoxic Agents Inhibit Pancreatic Tumor Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sorah; Huang, Kai-Wen; Reebye, Vikash; Spalding, Duncan; Przytycka, Teresa M; Wang, Yijie; Swiderski, Piotr; Li, Lin; Armstrong, Brian; Reccia, Isabella; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Dimas, Konstantinos; Kusano, Tomokazu; Shively, John; Habib, Nagy; Rossi, John J

    2017-03-17

    Aptamer-drug conjugates (ApDCs) have the potential to improve the therapeutic index of traditional chemotherapeutic agents due to their ability to deliver cytotoxic drugs specifically to cancer cells while sparing normal cells. This study reports on the conjugation of cytotoxic drugs to an aptamer previously described by our group, the pancreatic cancer RNA aptamer P19. To this end, P19 was incorporated with gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), or conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) and derivative of maytansine 1 (DM1). The ApDCs P19-dFdCMP and P19-5FdUMP were shown to induce the phosphorylation of histone H2AX on Ser139 (γ-H2AX) and significantly inhibited cell proliferation by 51%-53% in PANC-1 and by 54%-34% in the gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC-1 (p ≤ 0.0001). P19-MMAE and P19-DM1 caused mitotic G2/M phase arrest and inhibited cell proliferation by up to 56% in a dose-dependent manner when compared to the control group (p ≤ 0.001). In addition, the cytotoxicity of P19-MMAE and P19-DM1 in normal cells and the control human breast cancer cell line MCF7 was minimal. These results suggest that this approach may be useful in decreasing cytotoxic side effects in non-tumoral tissue.

  5. Modeling Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Inhibition to Elucidate Interaction Risks in Early Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Ismael; Winiwarter, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The importance of transporter proteins for the disposition of drugs has become increasingly apparent during the past decade. A noted drug-drug interaction risk is the inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), key transporters for the liver uptake of the widely used statins. We show here the development of a ligand-based in silico model for interaction with OATP1B1, an important representative of the OATP family. The model is based on a structural overlay of 6 known OATP1B1 inhibitors. A data set of about 150 compounds with published OATP1B1 inhibition data was compared to the resulting "transportophor," and a similarity threshold was defined to distinguish between active and inactive molecules. In addition, using a statistical model based on physicochemical properties of the compounds as prefilter was found to enhance the overall predictivity of the model (final accuracy 0.73, specificity 074, and sensitivity 0.71, based on 126 compounds). The combined model was validated using an in-house data set (accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity were 0.63, 0.59, and 0.78, respectively; 62 compounds). The model gives also a structural overlay to the most similar template enabling visualization of where a change in a given structure might reduce the interaction with the transporter.

  6. Supramolecular photochemistry and photophysics. Mutual inhibition of host and guest photochemistry and luminescence in the adduct of an anthraceno-crown ether with Pt(bpy)(NH sub 3 ) sub 2 sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Prodi, L.; Gandolfi, M.T.; Balzani, V. ); Ballardini, R. ); Desvergne, J.P.; Bouas-Laurent, H. )

    1991-03-07

    Pt(bpy)(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} forms a 1:1 adduct with the anthraceno-crown ether 2. The adduct formation causes (i) strong changes in the absorption spectra of the two components, (ii) the quenching of the luminescence and photoreactivity of both Pt(bpy)(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and 2, and (iii) the appearance of a new, broad, low-energy emission band at 77 K. It is suggested that the adduct exhibits a sandwich-type conformation in which the Pt complex is inserted between the two aromatic moieties of 2. Such a structure allows the stabilization of the adduct via both hydrogen bonds and {pi}-{pi} interactions and accounts for the mutual protection of the two components toward their luminescence and photoreactivity.

  7. Mutually unbiased product bases for multiple qudits

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, Daniel; Pammer, Bogdan; Weigert, Stefan

    2016-03-15

    We investigate the interplay between mutual unbiasedness and product bases for multiple qudits of possibly different dimensions. A product state of such a system is shown to be mutually unbiased to a product basis only if each of its factors is mutually unbiased to all the states which occur in the corresponding factors of the product basis. This result implies both a tight limit on the number of mutually unbiased product bases which the system can support and a complete classification of mutually unbiased product bases for multiple qubits or qutrits. In addition, only maximally entangled states can be mutually unbiased to a maximal set of mutually unbiased product bases.

  8. An evaluation of the CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition potential of metoprolol metabolites and their contribution to drug-drug and drug-herb interaction by LC-ESI/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Roshan M; Bhandi, Murali Mohan; Dubey, Ajay P; Ganga Reddy, V; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Kamal, Ahmed; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Srinivas, R

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of metabolites to drug-drug interaction and drug-herb interaction using the inhibition of CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 by metoprolol (MET) and its metabolites. The peak concentrations of unbound plasma concentration of MET, α-hydroxy metoprolol (HM), O-desmethyl metoprolol (ODM) and N-desisopropyl metoprolol (DIM) were 90.37 ± 2.69, 33.32 ± 1.92, 16.93 ± 1.70 and 7.96 ± 0.94 ng/mL, respectively. The metabolites identified, HM and ODM, had a ratio of metabolic area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) to parent AUC of ≥0.25 when either total or unbound concentration of metabolite was considered. In vitro CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition by MET, HM and ODM study revealed that MET, HM and ODM were not inhibitors of CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam metabolism and CYP2D6-catalyzed dextromethorphan metabolism. However, DIM only met the criteria of >10% of the total drug related material and <25% of the parent using unbound concentrations. If CYP inhibition testing is solely based on metabolite exposure, DIM metabolite would probably not be considered. However, the present study has demonstrated that DIM contributes significantly to in vitro drug-drug interaction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  10. Optimization of drug-drug interaction study design: comparison of minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic models on prediction of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Mao, Jialin; Chien, Jenny Y; Hall, Stephen D

    2013-07-01

    Ketoconazole is a potent CYP3A inhibitor used to assess the contribution of CYP3A to drug clearance and quantify the increase in drug exposure due to a strong inhibitor. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to evaluate treatment regimens resulting in maximal CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole but have reached different conclusions. We compare two PBPK models of the ketoconazole-midazolam interaction, model 1 (Chien et al., 2006) and model 2 implemented in Simcyp (version 11), to predict 16 published treatment regimens. With use of model 2, 41% of the study point estimates of area under the curve (AUC) ratio and 71% of the 90% confidence intervals were predicted within 1.5-fold of the observed, but these increased to 82 and 100%, respectively, with model 1. For midazolam, model 2 predicted a maximal midazolam AUC ratio of 8 and a hepatic fraction metabolized by CYP3A (f(m)) of 0.97, whereas model 1 predicted 17 and 0.90, respectively, which are more consistent with observed data. On the basis of model 1, ketoconazole (400 mg QD) for at least 3 days and substrate administration within 2 hours is required for maximal CYP3A inhibition. Ketoconazole treatment regimens that use 200 mg BID underestimate the systemic fraction metabolized by CYP3A (0.86 versus 0.90) for midazolam. The systematic underprediction also applies to CYP3A substrates with high bioavailability and long half-lives. The superior predictive performance of model 1 reflects the need for accumulation of ketoconazole at enzyme site and protracted inhibition. Model 2 is not recommended for inferring optimal study design and estimation of fraction metabolized by CYP3A.

  11. Artemisinin-derived dimer ART-838 potently inhibited human acute leukemias, persisted in vivo, and synergized with antileukemic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer M.; Moynihan, James R.; Mott, Bryan T.; Mazzone, Jennifer R.; Anders, Nicole M.; Brown, Patrick A.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Liu, Jun O.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Posner, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinins, endoperoxide-containing molecules, best known as antimalarials, have potent antineoplastic activity. The established antimalarial, artesunate (AS), and the novel artemisinin-derived trioxane diphenylphosphate dimer 838 (ART-838) inhibited growth of all 23 tested acute leukemia cell lines, reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity, induced apoptosis, and increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ART-838 was 88-fold more potent that AS in vitro, inhibiting all leukemia cell lines at submicromolar concentrations. Both ART-838 and AS cooperated with several established antileukemic drugs and newer kinase inhibitors to inhibit leukemia cell growth. ART-838 had a longer plasma half-life than AS in immunodeficient NOD-SCID-IL2Rgnull (NSG) mice, remaining at effective antileukemic concentrations for >8h. Intermittent cycles of ART-838 inhibited growth of acute leukemia xenografts and primagrafts in NSG mice, at higher potency than AS. Based on these preclinical data, we propose that AS, with its established low toxicity and low cost, and ART-838, with its higher potency and longer persistence in vivo, should be further developed toward integration into antileukemic regimens. PMID:26771236

  12. Artemisinin-derived dimer ART-838 potently inhibited human acute leukemias, persisted in vivo, and synergized with antileukemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer M; Moynihan, James R; Mott, Bryan T; Mazzone, Jennifer R; Anders, Nicole M; Brown, Patrick A; Rudek, Michelle A; Liu, Jun O; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Posner, Gary H; Civin, Curt I; Chen, Xiaochun

    2016-02-09

    Artemisinins, endoperoxide-containing molecules, best known as antimalarials, have potent antineoplastic activity. The established antimalarial, artesunate (AS), and the novel artemisinin-derived trioxane diphenylphosphate dimer 838 (ART-838) inhibited growth of all 23 tested acute leukemia cell lines, reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity, induced apoptosis, and increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ART-838 was 88-fold more potent that AS in vitro, inhibiting all leukemia cell lines at submicromolar concentrations. Both ART-838 and AS cooperated with several established antileukemic drugs and newer kinase inhibitors to inhibit leukemia cell growth. ART-838 had a longer plasma half-life than AS in immunodeficient NOD-SCID-IL2Rgnull (NSG) mice, remaining at effective antileukemic concentrations for >8h. Intermittent cycles of ART-838 inhibited growth of acute leukemia xenografts and primagrafts in NSG mice, at higher potency than AS. Based on these preclinical data, we propose that AS, with its established low toxicity and low cost, and ART-838, with its higher potency and longer persistence in vivo, should be further developed toward integration into antileukemic regimens.

  13. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  14. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification.

  15. Ingredients in fruit juices interact with dasatinib through inhibition of BCRP: a new mechanism of beverage-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Brett; Unum, Jesse; Shao, Jie; An, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are a group of highly novel and target-specific anticancer drugs. Recently, most TKIs are found to be substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP). However, little information is available regarding the Pgp- or BCRP-mediated interaction of TKIs with coadministered drugs/food/beverage. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of the major ingredients of grapefruit juice (GFJ), orange juice (OJ), apple juice (AJ), and green tea on P-gp and BCRP-mediated dasatinib efflux. Among the 14 ingredients screened, only tangeretin and nobiletin moderately inhibited P-gp-mediated dasatinib efflux. In contrast, four ingredients in GFJ [i.e., bergamottin, 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB), quercetin, and kaempferol], two ingredients in OJ (tangeretin and nobiletin), and one ingredient in AJ (i.e., hesperetin) greatly inhibited BCRP-mediated dasatinib efflux at the concentration of 50 μM (p < 0.001). Further concentration-dependent studies revealed that bergamottin, DHB, tangeretin, and nobiletin are potent BCRP inhibitors, with IC₅₀ values 3.19, 5.2, 1.19, and 1.04 μM, respectively. Further in vivo investigations are warranted to evaluate the BCRP-mediated FJ-TKI interaction. Literature reports only documented the modulatory effect of FJ and green tea on CYP3A, P-gp, and OATP. Our novel finding that FJ ingredients strongly inhibit BCRP may represent a new mechanism of beverage-drug interaction.

  16. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification. PMID:26082378

  17. Inhibition of neutrophil priming and tyrosyl phosphorylation by cepharanthine, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, H; Li, M J; Matsuno, T; Yasuda, T; Utsumi, K

    1992-12-01

    Receptor-mediated superoxide (O2.-)-generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of neutrophil proteins, such as 58, 65, 84, 108 and 115 kDa, were enhanced by priming cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) [Akimura, K. et al. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 298: 703-709, 1992]. To elucidate the possible involvement of tyrosyl phosphorylation of neutrophil proteins in the enhancing mechanism of O2.- generation, the effect of cepharanthine, a biscoclaurine alkaloid that inhibits phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- and receptor-mediated O2.- generation, on the priming of human peripheral neutrophils (HPPMN) was studied. Both enhancement of formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (FMLP)-mediated O2.- generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of some neutrophil proteins, i.e., 115, 108 and 84 kDa proteins, by HHPMN after treatment with G-CSF were strongly inhibited by cepharanthine in a concentration- and treatment-time-dependent manner. In contrast, inhibition of PMA-mediated O2.- generation by cepharanthine was weak and independent of treatment time. These results suggest that cepharanthine might inhibit the priming step of neutrophil activation concomitantly with its inhibition of the tyrosyl phosphorylation of some neutrophil proteins that might underlie the mechanism for priming of neutrophils with G-CSF.

  18. Antibiotic drug tigecycline reduces neuroblastoma cells proliferation by inhibiting Akt activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Erhu; Tang, Chunling; Zhang, Weibo; Tan, Juan; Dong, Zhen; Ding, Han-Fei; Cui, Hongjuan

    2016-06-01

    As the first member of glycylcycline bacteriostatic agents, tigecycline is approved as a novel expanded-spectrum antibiotic, which is clinically available. However, accumulating evidence indicated that tigecycline was provided with the potential application in cancer therapy. In this paper, tigecycline was shown to exert an anti-proliferative effect on neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, it was found that tigecycline induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest instead of apoptosis by means of Akt pathway inhibition. In neuroblastoma cell lines, the Akt activator insulin-like growth factor-1 (hereafter referred to as IGF-1) reversed tigecycline-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, tigecycline inhibited colony formation and suppressed neuroblastoma cells xenograft formation and growth. After tigecycline treatment in vivo, the Akt pathway inhibition was confirmed as well. Collectively, our data provided strong evidences that tigecycline inhibited neuroblastoma cells growth and proliferation through the Akt pathway inhibition in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results were supported by previous studies concerning the application of tigecycline in human tumors treatment, suggesting that tigecycline might act as a potential candidate agent for neuroblastoma treatment.

  19. Liver proteomics for therapeutic drug discovery: inhibition of the cyclophilin receptor CD147 attenuates sepsis-induced acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Dear, James W.; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Aponte, Angel; Hu, Xuzhen; Constant, Stephanie L.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Sepsis-induced multi-organ failure continues to have a high mortality. The liver is an organ central to the disease pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to identify the liver proteins that change in abundance with sepsis and, therefore, identify new drug targets. Design Proteomic discovery study and drug target validation Setting Research institute laboratory Subjects Three month old C57BL/6 mice Interventions We used a mouse model of sepsis based on cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) but with fluid and antibiotic resuscitation. Liver proteins that changed in abundance were identified by difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). We compared liver proteins from 6 hr post-CLP to sham-operated mice (‘early proteins’) and 24 hr post-CLP with 6 hr post-CLP (‘late proteins’). Proteins that changed in abundance were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. We then inhibited the receptor for one protein and determined the effect on sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Results The liver proteins that changed in abundance after sepsis had a range of functions such as acute phase proteins, coagulation, ER stress, oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial proteins and nitric oxide metabolism. We found that cyclophilin increased in abundance after CLP. When the receptor for this protein, CD147, was inhibited sepsis-induced renal dysfunction was reduced. There was also a significant reduction in serum cytokine production when CD147 was inhibited. Conclusion By applying proteomics to a clinically relevant mouse model of sepsis we identified a number of novel proteins that changed in abundance. The inhibition of the receptor for one of these proteins, cyclophilin, attenuated sepsis-induced acute renal failure. The application of proteomics to sepsis research can facilitate the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:17944020

  20. Polysome shift assay for direct measurement of miRNA inhibition by anti-miRNA drugs.

    PubMed

    Androsavich, John R; Sobczynski, Daniel J; Liu, Xueqing; Pandya, Shweta; Kaimal, Vivek; Owen, Tate; Liu, Kai; MacKenna, Deidre A; Chau, B Nelson

    2016-01-29

    Anti-miRNA (anti-miR) oligonucleotide drugs are being developed to inhibit overactive miRNAs linked to disease. To help facilitate the transition from concept to clinic, new research tools are required. Here we report a novel method--miRNA Polysome Shift Assay (miPSA)--for direct measurement of miRNA engagement by anti-miR, which is more robust than conventional pharmacodynamics using downstream target gene derepression. The method takes advantage of size differences between active and inhibited miRNA complexes. Active miRNAs bind target mRNAs in high molecular weight polysome complexes, while inhibited miRNAs are sterically blocked by anti-miRs from forming this interaction. These two states can be assessed by fractionating tissue or cell lysates using differential ultracentrifugation through sucrose gradients. Accordingly, anti-miR treatment causes a specific shift of cognate miRNA from heavy to light density fractions. The magnitude of this shift is dose-responsive and maintains a linear relationship with downstream target gene derepression while providing a substantially higher dynamic window for aiding drug discovery. In contrast, we found that the commonly used 'RT-interference' approach, which assumes that inhibited miRNA is undetectable by RT-qPCR, can yield unreliable results that poorly reflect the binding stoichiometry of anti-miR to miRNA. We also demonstrate that the miPSA has additional utility in assessing anti-miR cross-reactivity with miRNAs sharing similar seed sequences.

  1. Evaluation of the effectiveness of DNA-binding drugs to inhibit transcription using the c-fos serum response element as a target.

    PubMed

    White, C M; Heidenreich, O; Nordheim, A; Beerman, T A

    2000-10-10

    Previous work has demonstrated that sequence-selective DNA-binding drugs can inhibit transcription factors from binding to their target sites on gene promoters. In this study, the potency and effectiveness of DNA-binding drugs to inhibit transcription were assessed using the c-fos promoter's serum response element (SRE) as a target. The drugs chosen for analysis included the minor groove binding agents chromomycin A(3) and Hoechst 33342, which bind to G/C-rich and A/T-rich regions, respectively, and the intercalating agent nogalamycin, which binds G/C-rich sequences in the major groove. The transcription factors targeted, Elk-1 and serum response factor (SRF), form a ternary complex (TC) on the SRE that is necessary and sufficient for induction of c-fos by serum. The drugs' abilities to prevent TC formation on the SRE in vitro were nogalamycin > Hoechst 33342 > chromomycin. Their potencies in inhibiting cell-free transcription and endogenous c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells, however, were chromomycin > nogalamycin > Hoechst 33342. The latter order of potency was also obtained for the drugs' cytotoxicity and inhibition of general transcription as measured by [(3)H]uridine incorporation. These systematic analyses provide insight into how drug and transcription factor binding characteristics are related to drugs' effectiveness in inhibiting gene expression.

  2. Retrovirus XMRV Is Inhibited by Host Proteins and Anti-HIV Drugs AZT, Tenofovir, and Raltegravir | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    A newly discovered retrovirus, XMRV, isolated from prostate cancer tissues for the first time in 2006, has recently been reported in patients with this cancer, as well as in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). However, five subsequent studies could not validate these reports. Since XMRV was isolated from the T and B cells of CFS patients, Vinay Pathak and his colleagues in the HIV Drug Resistance Program sought to determine how XMRV was countering intracellular defense mechanisms that inhibit retroviral replication in human cells.

  3. Cannabidiol, among Other Cannabinoid Drugs, Modulates Prepulse Inhibition of Startle in the SHR Animal Model: Implications for Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Fernanda F.; Levin, Raquel; Almeida, Valéria; Zuardi, Antonio W.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Crippa, José A.; Abilio, Vanessa C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that involves positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Prepulse inhibition of startle reflex (PPI) is a paradigm that assesses the sensorimotor gating functioning and is impaired in schizophrenia patients as well as in animal models of this disorder. Recent data point to the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia. Here, we focus on the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the PPI deficit of animal models of schizophrenia, with greater focus on the SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) strain, and on the future prospects resulting from these findings. PMID:27667973

  4. Large scale integration of drug-target information reveals poly-pharmacological drug action mechanisms in tumor cell line growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Richard A.; Gostev, Mikhail; Ilisavskii, Sergei; Willis, Anne E.; Melino, Gerry; Antonov, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding therapeutic mechanisms of drug anticancer cytotoxicity represents a key challenge in preclinical testing. Here we have performed a meta-analysis of publicly available tumor cell line growth inhibition assays (~ 70 assays from 6 independent experimental groups covering ~ 500 000 molecules) with the primary goal of understanding molecular therapeutic mechanisms of cancer cytotoxicity. To implement this we have collected currently available information on protein targets for molecules that were tested in the assays. We used a statistical methodology to identify protein targets overrepresented among molecules exhibiting cancer cytotoxicity with the particular focus of identifying overrepresented patterns consisting of several proteins (i.e. proteins “A” and “B” and “C”). Our analysis demonstrates that targeting individual proteins can result in a significant increase (up to 50-fold) of the observed odds for a molecule to be an efficient inhibitor of tumour cell line growth. However, further insight into potential molecular mechanisms reveals a multi-target mode of action: targeting a pattern of several proteins drastically increases the observed odds (up to 500-fold) for a molecule to be tumour cytotoxic. In contrast, molecules targeting only one protein but not targeting an additional set of proteins tend to be nontoxic. Our findings support a poly-pharmacology drug discovery paradigm, demonstrating that anticancer cytotoxicity is a product, in most cases, of multi-target mode of drug action PMID:24553133

  5. Screening of Drugs Inhibiting In vitro Oligomerization of Cu/Zn-Superoxide Dismutase with a Mutation Causing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Itsuki; Toichi, Keisuke; Tokuda, Eiichi; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Akiyama, Shuji; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene have been shown to cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1-ALS). A major pathological hallmark of this disease is abnormal accumulation of mutant SOD1 oligomers in the affected spinal motor neurons. While no effective therapeutics for SOD1-ALS is currently available, SOD1 oligomerization will be a good target for developing cures of this disease. Recently, we have reproduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers abnormally cross-linked via disulfide bonds in a test tube. Using our in vitro model of SOD1 oligomerization, therefore, we screened 640 FDA-approved drugs for inhibiting the oligomerization of SOD1 proteins, and three effective classes of chemical compounds were identified. Those hit compounds will provide valuable information on the chemical structures for developing a novel drug candidate suppressing the abnormal oligomerization of mutant SOD1 and possibly curing the disease.

  6. Inhibition of bacterial and fungal pathogens by the orphaned drug auranofin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; RajaMuthiah, Rajmohan; Souza, Ana Carolina Remondi; Eatemadpour, Soraya; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Santos, Daniel Assis; Junqueira, Juliana C; Rice, Louis B; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Background: We identified auranofin as an antimicrobial compound utilizing a high-throughput screen using a Caenorhabditis elegans–Staphylococcus aureus infection model. Results/methodology: Treatment of infected nematodes with auranofin resulted in a prolonged survival rate of 95%, reached with 0.78 μg/ml. Further investigation of the antimicrobial activity of auranofin found inhibition against S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis. Importantly, the fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans was also effectively inhibited with an MIC at 0.5 μg/ml. Auranofin appears to target the thioredoxin system. Conclusion: This work provides extensive additional data on the antibacterial effects of auranofin that includes both reference and clinical isolates and reports a novel inhibition of fungal pathogens by this compound. PMID:26808006

  7. First-line drugs inhibiting the renin angiotensin system versus other first-line antihypertensive drug classes for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hao; Lu, Zhuang; Tang, Wen Lu; Pang, Lu Wei; Wang, Gan Mi; Wong, Gavin W K; Wright, James M

    2015-01-11

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors are widely prescribed for treatment of hypertension, especially for diabetic patients on the basis of postulated advantages for the reduction of diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite widespread use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for hypertension in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, the efficacy and safety of RAS inhibitors compared to other antihypertensive drug classes remains unclear. To evaluate the benefits and harms of first-line RAS inhibitors compared to other first-line antihypertensive drugs in patients with hypertension. We searched the Cochrane Hypertension Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, EMBASE and ClinicalTrials.gov for randomized controlled trials up to November 19, 2014 and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to October 19, 2014. The WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) is searched for inclusion in the Cochrane Hypertension Group's Specialised Register. We included randomized, active-controlled, double-blinded studies with at least six months follow-up in people with primary elevated blood pressure (≥130/85 mmHg), which compared first-line RAS inhibitors with other first-line antihypertensive drug classes and reported morbidity and mortality or blood pressure outcomes. Patients with proven secondary hypertension were excluded. Two authors independently selected the included trials, evaluated the risk of bias and entered the data for analysis. We included 42 studies, involving 65,733 participants, with a mean age of 66 years. Much of the evidence for our key outcomes is dominated by a small number of large studies at a low risk of bias for most sources of bias. Imbalances in the added second-line antihypertensive drugs in some of the studies were important enough for us to downgrade the quality of the evidence.Primary outcomes were

  8. Inhibition of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase isoforms by the antiviral drug foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, O; Mitterauer, T; Nanoff, C; Hohenegger, M; Tang, W J; Freissmuth, M; Kleuss, C

    2001-02-02

    The pyrophosphate (PP(i)) analog foscarnet inhibits viral DNA-polymerases and is used to treat cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency vius infections. Nucleotide cyclases and DNA-polymerases catalyze analogous reactions, i.e. a phosphodiester bond formation, and have similar topologies in their active sites. Inhibition by foscarnet of adenylyl cyclase isoforms was therefore tested with (i) purified catalytic domains C1 and C2 of types I and VII (IC1 and VIIC1) and of type II (IIC2) and (ii) membrane-bound holoenzymes (from mammalian tissues and types I, II, and V heterologously expressed in Sf9 cell membranes). Foscarnet was more potent than PP(i) in suppressing forskolin-stimulated catalysis by both, IC1/IIC2 and VIIC1/IIC2. Stimulation of VIIC1/IIC2 by Galpha(s) relieved the inhibition by foscarnet but not that by PP(i). The IC(50) of foscarnet on membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases also depended on their mode of regulation. These findings predict that receptor-dependent cAMP formation is sensitive to inhibition by foscarnet in some, but not all, cells. This was verified with two cell lines; foscarnet blocked cAMP accumulation after A(2A)-adenosine receptor stimulation in PC12 but not in HEK-A(2A) cells. Foscarnet also inhibited soluble and, to a lesser extent, particulate guanylyl cylase. Thus, foscarnet interferes with the generation of cyclic nucleotides, an effect which may give rise to clinical side effects. The extent of inhibition varies with the enzyme isoform and with the regulatory input.

  9. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Cancer Drug Discovery: From Chemistry to Futural Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Aykut; Tutar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an important member of the chaperone protein family and it is involved in stabilization, regulation, and maintenance of oncogenic client proteins with co-chaperones. Cochaperones regulate the ATPase activity of Hsp90 and its interactions with oncogenic client proteins. Therefore, Hsp90 and its co-chaperones have become significant therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Many chemical compounds have been evaluated for Hsp90 inhibition as well as significant results were obtained in clinical trials. In this paper, we emphasize on the key roles of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in tumorigenesis and overview therapeutic strategies of Hsp90 inhibition in oncology.

  10. RND-type drug efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria: molecular mechanism and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Henrietta; Mowla, Rumana; Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Ma, Shutao

    2015-01-01

    Drug efflux protein complexes confer multidrug resistance on bacteria by transporting a wide spectrum of structurally diverse antibiotics. Moreover, organisms can only acquire resistance in the presence of an active efflux pump. The substrate range of drug efflux pumps is not limited to antibiotics, but it also includes toxins, dyes, detergents, lipids, and molecules involved in quorum sensing; hence efflux pumps are also associated with virulence and biofilm formation. Inhibitors of efflux pumps are therefore attractive compounds to reverse multidrug resistance and to prevent the development of resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Recent successes on the structure determination and functional analysis of the AcrB and MexB components of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM drug efflux systems as well as the structure of the fully assembled, functional triparted AcrAB-TolC complex significantly contributed to our understanding of the mechanism of substrate transport and the options for inhibition of efflux. These data, combined with the well-developed methodologies for measuring efflux pump inhibition, could allow the rational design, and subsequent experimental verification of potential efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). In this review we will explore how the available biochemical and structural information can be translated into the discovery and development of new compounds that could reverse drug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. The current literature on EPIs will also be analyzed and the reasons why no compounds have yet progressed into clinical use will be explored. PMID:25972857

  11. RND-type drug efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria: molecular mechanism and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Venter, Henrietta; Mowla, Rumana; Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Ma, Shutao

    2015-01-01

    Drug efflux protein complexes confer multidrug resistance on bacteria by transporting a wide spectrum of structurally diverse antibiotics. Moreover, organisms can only acquire resistance in the presence of an active efflux pump. The substrate range of drug efflux pumps is not limited to antibiotics, but it also includes toxins, dyes, detergents, lipids, and molecules involved in quorum sensing; hence efflux pumps are also associated with virulence and biofilm formation. Inhibitors of efflux pumps are therefore attractive compounds to reverse multidrug resistance and to prevent the development of resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Recent successes on the structure determination and functional analysis of the AcrB and MexB components of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM drug efflux systems as well as the structure of the fully assembled, functional triparted AcrAB-TolC complex significantly contributed to our understanding of the mechanism of substrate transport and the options for inhibition of efflux. These data, combined with the well-developed methodologies for measuring efflux pump inhibition, could allow the rational design, and subsequent experimental verification of potential efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). In this review we will explore how the available biochemical and structural information can be translated into the discovery and development of new compounds that could reverse drug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. The current literature on EPIs will also be analyzed and the reasons why no compounds have yet progressed into clinical use will be explored.

  12. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A.; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A.; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance

  13. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor

  14. Inhibition of plasma lipid oxidation induced by peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, hypochlorite, 15-lipoxygenase, and singlet oxygen by clinical drugs.

    PubMed

    Morita, Mayuko; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Niki, Etsuo

    2016-11-15

    With increasing evidence showing the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases, the effects of clinical drugs possessing antioxidant functions have received much attention. The unregulated oxidative modification of biological molecules leading to diseases is mediated by multiple oxidants including free radicals, peroxynitrite, hypochlorite, lipoxygenase, and singlet oxygen. The capacity of antioxidants to scavenge or quench oxidants depends on the nature of oxidants. In the present study, the antioxidant effects of several clinical drugs against plasma lipid oxidation induced by the aforementioned five kinds of oxidants were investigated from the production of lipid hydroperoxides, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Troglitazone acted as a potent peroxyl radical scavenger, whereas probucol and edaravone showed only moderate reactivity and carvedilol, pentoxifylline, and ebselen did not act as radical scavenger. Probucol and edaravone suppressed plasma oxidation mediated by peroxynitrite and hypochlorite. Troglitazone and edaravone inhibited 15-lipoxygenase mediated plasma lipid oxidation, the IC50 being 20 and 34μM respectively. None of the drugs used in this study suppressed plasma lipid oxidation by singlet oxygen. This study shows that the antioxidant effects of drugs depend on the nature of oxidants and that antioxidants against multiple oxidants are required to cope with oxidative stress in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Altering metabolic profiles of drugs by precision deuteration: reducing mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2D6 by paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Uttamsingh, Vinita; Gallegos, Richard; Liu, Julie F; Harbeson, Scott L; Bridson, Gary W; Cheng, Changfu; Wells, David S; Graham, Philip B; Zelle, Robert; Tung, Roger

    2015-07-01

    Selective deuterium substitution as a means of ameliorating clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions is demonstrated in this study. Carbon-deuterium bonds are more stable than corresponding carbon-hydrogen bonds. Using a precision deuteration platform, the two hydrogen atoms at the methylenedioxy carbon of paroxetine were substituted with deuterium. The new chemical entity, CTP-347 [(3S,4R)-3-((2,2-dideuterobenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yloxy)methyl)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperidine], demonstrated similar selectivity for the serotonin receptor, as well as similar neurotransmitter uptake inhibition in an in vitro rat synaptosome model, as unmodified paroxetine. However, human liver microsomes cleared CTP-347 faster than paroxetine as a result of decreased inactivation of CYP2D6. In phase 1 studies, CTP-347 was metabolized more rapidly in humans and exhibited a lower pharmacokinetic accumulation index than paroxetine. These alterations in the metabolism profile resulted in significantly reduced drug-drug interactions between CTP-347 and two other CYP2D6-metabolized drugs: tamoxifen (in vitro) and dextromethorphan (in humans). Our results show that precision deuteration can improve the metabolism profiles of existing pharmacotherapies without affecting their intrinsic pharmacologies.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of the combination between cytotoxic drug and efflux transporter inhibitors based on a tumour growth inhibition model.

    PubMed

    Sostelly, Alexandre; Payen, Léa; Guitton, Jérôme; Di Pietro, Attilio; Falson, Pierre; Honorat, Mylène; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Gèze, Annabelle; Freyer, Gilles; Tod, Michel

    2014-04-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters such as ABCG2 confer resistance to various anticancer drugs including irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN38. Early quantitative evaluation of efflux transporter inhibitors-cytotoxic combination requires quantitative drug-disease models. A proof-of-concept study has been carried out for studying the effect of a new ABCG2 transporter inhibitor, MBLI87 combined to irinotecan in mice xenografted with cells overexpressing ABCG2. Mice were treated with irinotecan alone or combined to MBLI87, and tumour size was periodically measured. To model those data, a tumour growth inhibition model was developed. Unperturbed tumour growth was modelled using Simeoni's model. Drug effect kinetics was accounted for by a Kinetic-Pharmacodynamic approach. Effect of inhibitor was described with a pharmacodynamic interaction model where inhibitor enhances activity of cytotoxic. This model correctly predicted tumour growth dynamics from our study. MBLI87 increased irinotecan potency by 20% per μmol of MBLI87. This model retains enough complexity to simultaneously describe tumour growth and effect of this type of drug combination. It can thus be used as a template to early evaluate efflux transporter inhibitors in-vivo.

  17. The relationship between the pharmacokinetics, cholinesterase inhibition and facilitation of twitch tension of the quaternary ammonium anticholinesterase drugs, neostigmine, pyridostigmine, edrophonium and 3-hydroxyphenyltrimethylammonium.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, H. E.; Calvey, T. N.; Muir, K. T.

    1979-01-01

    1 The relationship between the concentration of drug in plasma, the inhibition of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and the facilitation of neuromuscular transmission has been studied in the rat after the administration of neostigmine, pyridostigmine, edrophonium and 3-hydroxyphenyltrimethyl-ammonium (3-OH PTMA). 2 After the administration of neostigmine or pyridostigmine, acetylcholinesterase activity recovered only slowly due to the covalent nature of the inhibition. In contrast, recovery from the reversible inhibition caused by edrophonium or 3-OH PTMA was rapid and showed a direct relationship to the plasma concentration of these drugs. 3 There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the logarithm of the plasma concentration of the drugs and the increase in the tibialis twitch tension. 4 The relationship between the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and the facilitation of neuromuscular transmission was complex. When the enzyme was less than 85% inhibited no facilitation occurred. Between 85% and 98% inhibition, facilitation was linearly related to enzyme inhibition. Above 98% inhibition, facilitation was unrelated to inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:223706

  18. Inhibition of a solid phase reaction among excipients that accelerates drug release from a solid dispersion with aging.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masayasu; Hirakura, Yutaka; Yamane, Ikuro; Miyanishi, Hideo; Yokota, Shoji; Hattori, Munetaka; Kajiyama, Atsushi

    2005-11-23

    separation of the drug substance and CMEC upon production. The solid phase reaction advanced differentially in the solid dispersion depending on the degree of phase separation set initially. The use of non-aqueous solvents and/or a decrease in the coating temperatures inhibited the occurrence of phase separation upon production, thereby preventing the formation of CMEC-rich phases where the solid phase reaction occurred during storage.

  19. Effect of antipsychotic drugs on human liver cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoforms in vitro: preferential inhibition of CYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Shin, J G; Soukhova, N; Flockhart, D A

    1999-09-01

    The ability of antipsychotic drugs to inhibit the catalytic activity of five cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoforms was compared using in vitro human liver microsomal preparations to evaluate the relative potential of these drugs to inhibit drug metabolism. The apparent kinetic parameters for enzyme inhibition were determined by nonlinear regression analysis of the data. All antipsychotic drugs tested competitively inhibited dextromethorphan O-demethylation, a selective marker for CYP2D6, in a concentration-dependent manner. Thioridazine and perphenazine were the most potent, with IC(50) values (2.7 and 1.5 microM) that were comparable to that of quinidine (0.52 microM). The estimated K(i) values for CYP2D6-catalyzing dextrorphan formation were ranked in the following order: perphenazine (0.8 microM), thioridazine (1.4 microM), chlorpromazine (6.4 microM), haloperidol (7.2 microM), fluphenazine (9.4 microM), risperidone (21.9 microM), clozapine (39.0 microM), and cis-thiothixene (65.0 microM). No remarkable inhibition of other CYP isoforms was observed except for moderate inhibition of CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation by fluphenazine (K(i) = 40.2 microM) and perphenazine (K(i) = 65.1). The estimated K(i) values for the inhibition of CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A were >300 microM in almost all antipsychotics tested. These results suggest that antipsychotic drugs exhibit a striking selectivity for CYP2D6 compared with other CYP isoforms. This may reflect a remarkable commonality of structure between the therapeutic targets for these drugs, the transporters, and metabolic enzymes that distribute and eliminate them. Clinically, coadministration of these medicines with drugs that are primarily metabolized by CYP2D6 may result in significant drug interactions.

  20. Virtual screening identification of nonfolate compounds, including a CNS drug, as antiparasitic agents inhibiting pteridine reductase.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Stefania; Morandi, Federica; Motiejunas, Domantas; Nerini, Erika; Henrich, Stefan; Luciani, Rosaria; Venturelli, Alberto; Lazzari, Sandra; Calò, Samuele; Gupta, Shreedhara; Hannaert, Veronique; Michels, Paul A M; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-01-13

    Folate analogue inhibitors of Leishmania major pteridine reductase (PTR1) are potential antiparasitic drug candidates for combined therapy with dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. To identify new molecules with specificity for PTR1, we carried out a virtual screening of the Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) database to select compounds that could interact with L. major PTR1 but not with human DHFR. Through two rounds of drug discovery, we successfully identified eighteen drug-like molecules with low micromolar affinities and high in vitro specificity profiles. Their efficacy against Leishmania species was studied in cultured cells of the promastigote stage, using the compounds both alone and in combination with 1 (pyrimethamine; 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-6-ethylpyrimidine-2,4-diamine). Six compounds showed efficacy only in combination. In toxicity tests against human fibroblasts, several compounds showed low toxicity. One compound, 5c (riluzole; 6-(trifluoromethoxy)-1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylamine), a known drug approved for CNS pathologies, was active in combination and is suitable for early preclinical evaluation of its potential for label extension as a PTR1 inhibitor and antiparasitic drug candidate.

  1. Perspectives on Inhibiting β-Amyloid Aggregation through Structure-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj; Ayyannan, Senthil R; Panda, Gautam

    2015-09-01

    Targeting β-amyloid (Aβ) remains the most desired strategy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug discovery research. Many peptides that specifically target Aβ aggregates are known, encompassing efforts from both industrial and academic research settings. However, in clinical terms, not much success has been gained with peptide research; in turn, small drug-like molecules are already globally recognized as showing promise as an alternate approach. Aβ aggregation inhibitors are the most important part of the multifunctional drug design regimen for treating AD. Unfortunately, rational drug design approaches with small molecules are still in the initial stages. Herein we highlight, update, and elaborate on the structural anatomy of Aβ and known Aβ aggregation inhibitors in hopes of helping to optimize their use in structure-based drug design approaches toward inhibitors with greater specificity. Furthermore, we present the first review of efforts to target a previously uncharacterized region of acetylcholinesterase: the N-terminal 7-20 sub-region, which was experimentally elucidated to participate in Aβ aggregation and deposition.

  2. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  3. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  4. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  5. Orally Administered Mucolytic Drug l-Carbocisteine Inhibits Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomohiro; Yokota, Tsubasa; Nakayama, Shiori; Oki, Sayuri; Mutoh, Junpei; Takahashi, Satoru; Sato, Keizo

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is essential for the growth and metastasis of tumors. In this study, we found that l-carbocisteine, a widely used expectorant, potently inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. An in vivo Matrigel plug assay revealed that l-carbocisteine (2.5 mg/kg i.p. twice daily) significantly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. l-Carbocisteine also suppressed VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration, and formation of capillary-like structures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We examined the signaling pathways affected in VEGF-stimulated HUVECs, and found that l-carbocisteine significantly inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, protein kinase C (PKC) μ, and extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK) 1/2, which have been shown to be essential for angiogenesis. However, these inhibitory effects of l-carbocisteine were not observed in the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line. An in vivo study of Colon-26 tumor-bearing mice found that tumor volumes were significantly smaller in mice treated with l-carbocisteine (150 mg/kg administered orally twice daily) in comparison with vehicle-treated mice. However, l-carbocisteine had no direct effect on Colon-26 cell proliferation or ERK activation. Collectively, our results suggest that l-carbocisteine inhibits tumor angiogenesis by suppressing PLCγ/PKC/ERK signaling.

  6. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-01-01

    AIM To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. METHODS Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. RESULTS The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [3H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. CONCLUSIONS Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. PMID:21175442

  7. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Mutual Impact of Diabetes Mellitus and Tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yan Lin; Wang, Li Xia; Chen, Ming Ting

    2017-05-01

    China has a double burden of diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis, and many studies have been carried out on the mutual impact of these two diseases. This paper systematically reviewed studies conducted in China covering the mutual impact of epidemics of diabetes and tuberculosis, the impact of diabetes on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and on the tuberculosis clinical manifestation and treatment outcome, the yields of bi-directional screening, and economic evaluation for tuberculosis screening among diabetes patients. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular properties of psychopharmacological drugs determining non-competitive inhibition of 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Terfloth, Lothar; Bleich, Stefan; Wiltfang, Jens; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2009-06-01

    We developed a structure-property-activity relationship (SPAR)-model for psychopharmacological drugs acting as non-competitive 5-HT(3A) receptor antagonists by using a decision-tree learner provided by the RapidMiner machine learning tool. A single molecular descriptor, namely the molecular dipole moment per molecular weight (mu/MW), predicts whether or not a substance non-competitively antagonizes 5-HT-induced Na(+) currents. A low mu/MW is compatible with drug-cumulation in apolar lipid rafts. This study confirms that size-intensive descriptors allow the development of compact SPAR models.

  10. In vitro Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity assay: inhibition of parasite growth by incorporation of stomatocytogenic amphiphiles into the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Staerk, Dan; Christensen, Jette; Hviid, Lars; Hägerstrand, Henry; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2002-05-01

    Lupeol, which shows in vitro inhibitory activity against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 27.7 +/- 0.5 microM, was shown to cause a transformation of the human erythrocyte shape toward that of stomatocytes. Good correlation between the IC50 value and the membrane curvature changes caused by lupeol was observed. Preincubation of erythrocytes with lupeol, followed by extensive washing, made the cells unsuitable for parasite growth, suggesting that the compound incorporates into erythrocyte membrane irreversibly. On the other hand, lupeol-treated parasite culture continued to grow well in untreated erythrocytes. Thus, the antiplasmodial activity of lupeol appears to be indirect, being due to stomatocytic transformation of the host cell membrane and not to toxic effects via action on a drug target within the parasite. A number of amphiphiles that cause stomatocyte formation, but not those causing echinocyte formation, were shown to inhibit growth of the parasites, apparently via a mechanism similar to that of lupeol. Since antiplasmodial agents that inhibit parasite growth through erythrocyte membrane modifications must be regarded as unsuitable as leads for development of new antimalarial drugs, care must be exercised in the interpretation of results of screening of plant extracts and natural product libraries by an in vitro Plasmodium toxicity assay.

  11. Biofilm inhibition and drug-eluting properties of novel DMAEMA-modified polyethylene and silicone rubber surfaces.

    PubMed

    Contreras-García, Angel; Bucio, Emilio; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2011-02-01

    Poly(2-(dimethylaminoethyl) methacrylate) (pDMAEMA) was grafted to low density polyethylene (LDPE) and silicone rubber (SR) in order to make them less susceptible to microbial biofilm formation. The direct grafting of DMAEMA using γ-rays was an efficient and fast procedure for obtaining modified materials, which could be quaternized in a second step using methyl iodide. Raman spectroscopy showed that the grafting occurred only at the surface of the LDPE, but both at the surface and in the bulk of the SR. Consequently, the grafted chains caused changes in the surface-related features of the LDPE (water contact angle and viscoelastic behavior in the dry state) and in the bulk-related properties of the SR (swelling and viscoelasticity in the swollen state). The microbiological assays revealed that the grafted DMAEMA reduced Candida albicans biofilm formation (almost no biofilm on SR), while the quaternized surfaces inhibited C. albicans and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm by more than 99% compared to pristine materials. Modified LDPE and SR were capable of holding considerable amounts of nalidixic acid, an anionic antimicrobial drug, and sustained the release for several hours. In addition, the grafted materials were cytocompatible (fibroblast cell survival > 70%). In conclusion, these materials have the ability to inhibit microbial biofilm formation and at the same time act as drug-eluting systems, and for that reason may hold great promise for anti-biofouling applications.

  12. Repurposing of antiparasitic drugs: the hydroxy-naphthoquinone buparvaquone inhibits vertical transmission in the pregnant neosporosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Wong, Ho Ning; Haynes, Richard K; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-02-17

    The three anti-malarial drugs artemiside, artemisone, and mefloquine, and the naphthoquinone buparvaquone known to be active against theileriosis in cattle and Leishmania infections in rodents, were assessed for activity against Neospora caninum infection. All four compounds inhibited the proliferation of N. caninum tachyzoites in vitro with IC50 in the sub-micromolar range, but artemisone and buparvaquone were most effective (IC50 = 3 and 4.9 nM, respectively). However, in a neosporosis mouse model for cerebral infection comprising Balb/c mice experimentally infected with the virulent isolate Nc-Spain7, the three anti-malarial compounds failed to exhibit any activity, since treatment did not reduce the parasite burden in brains and lungs compared to untreated controls. Thus, these compounds were not further evaluated in pregnant mice. On the other hand, buparvaquone, shown earlier to be effective in reducing the parasite load in the lungs in an acute neosporosis disease model, was further assessed in the pregnant mouse model. Buparvaquone efficiently inhibited vertical transmission in Balb/c mice experimentally infected at day 7 of pregnancy, reduced clinical signs in the pups, but had no effect on cerebral infection in the dams. This demonstrates proof-of-concept that drug repurposing may lead to the discovery of an effective compound against neosporosis that can protect offspring from vertical transmission and disease.

  13. Inhibition of aminophylline-induced convulsions in mice by antiepileptic drugs and other agents.

    PubMed

    Czuczwar, S J; Janusz, W; Wamil, A; Kleinrok, Z

    1987-12-15

    Common antiepileptic drugs and agents affecting different neurotransmitter systems were studied against aminophylline (280 mg/kg i.p.)-induced convulsions in mice. All drugs and agents were administered i.p. Diazepam and phenobarbital antagonized the whole seizure pattern and the respective ED50 values for the clonic phase were 3.5 and 62 mg/kg. Valproate at 500 mg/kg protected fewer than 50% of mice against the clonic phase. The remaining antiepileptics (acetazolamide, up to 1,000 mg/kg; carbamazepine and diphenylhydantoin, up to 50 mg/kg; ethosuximide, 500 mg/kg and trimethadione, 400 mg/kg) were totally ineffective in this respect. Propranolol (up to 20 mg/kg), baclofen (20 mg/kg), gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (300 mg/kg), aminooxyacetic acid (20 mg/kg), clonidine (up to 0.2 mg/kg), ketamine (30 mg/kg), atropine (20 mg/kg), papaverine (50 mg/kg) and L-phenylisopropyladenosine (2 mg/kg) did not affect the clonic phase either. Only antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid excitation, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid afforded protection against aminophylline-induced clonic seizure activity. The results show that aminophylline convulsions are relatively resistant to antiepileptic drugs and suggest that antagonists of excitatory transmission are potential antiaminophylline drugs.

  14. Inhibition of bromodomain-containing protein 9 for the prevention of epigenetically-defined drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Terry D; Vartanian, Steffan; Côté, Alexandre; Bellon, Steve; Duplessis, Martin; Flynn, E Megan; Hewitt, Michael; Huang, Hon-Ren; Kiefer, James R; Murray, Jeremy; Nasveschuk, Christopher G; Pardo, Eneida; Romero, F Anthony; Sandy, Peter; Tang, Yong; Taylor, Alexander M; Tsui, Vickie; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shumei; Zawadzke, Laura; Albrecht, Brian K; Magnuson, Steven R; Cochran, Andrea G; Stokoe, David

    2017-08-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 9 (BRD9), an epigenetic "reader" of acetylated lysines on post-translationally modified histone proteins, is upregulated in multiple cancer cell lines. To assess the functional role of BRD9 in cancer cell lines, we identified a small-molecule inhibitor of the BRD9 bromodomain. Starting from a pyrrolopyridone lead, we used structure-based drug design to identify a potent and highly selective in vitro tool compound 11, (GNE-375). While this compound showed minimal effects in cell viability or gene expression assays, it showed remarkable potency in preventing the emergence of a drug tolerant population in EGFR mutant PC9 cells treated with EGFR inhibitors. Such tolerance has been linked to an altered epigenetic state, and 11 decreased BRD9 binding to chromatin, and this was associated with decreased expression of ALDH1A1, a gene previously shown to be important in drug tolerance. BRD9 inhibitors may therefore show utility in preventing epigenetically-defined drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. RGD peptide-modified multifunctional dendrimer platform for drug encapsulation and targeted inhibition of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xuedan; Alves, Carla S; Oliveira, Nilsa; Rodrigues, João; Zhu, Jingyi; Bányai, István; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoscale drug-delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the synthesis of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-conjugated generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers for anticancer drug encapsulation and targeted therapy of cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. In this study, amine-terminated G5 dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) via a thiourea linkage and RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The developed multifunctional dendrimer platform (G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD) was then used to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). We show that approximately six DOX molecules are able to be encapsulated within each dendrimer platform. The formed complexes are water-soluble, stable, and able to release DOX in a sustained manner. One- and two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied to investigate the interaction between dendrimers and DOX, and the impact of the environmental pH on the release rate of DOX from the dendrimer/DOX complexes was also explored. Furthermore, cell biological studies demonstrate that the encapsulation of DOX within the G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD dendrimers does not compromise the anticancer activity of DOX and that the therapeutic efficacy of the dendrimer/DOX complexes is solely related to the encapsulated DOX drug. Importantly, thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the developed dendrimer/drug complexes are able to specifically target αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells and display specific therapeutic efficacy to the target cells. The developed RGD peptide-targeted multifunctional dendrimers may thus be used as a versatile platform for targeted therapy of different types of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fruit juices inhibit organic anion transporting polypeptide-mediated drug uptake to decrease the oral availability of fexofenadine.

    PubMed

    Dresser, George K; Bailey, David G; Leake, Brenda F; Schwarz, Ute I; Dawson, Paul A; Freeman, David J; Kim, Richard B

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the effect of different fruits and their constituents on P-glycoprotein and organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) activities in vitro and on drug disposition in humans. P-glycoprotein-mediated digoxin or vinblastine efflux was determined in polarized epithelial cell monolayers. OATP-mediated fexofenadine uptake was measured in a transfected cell line. The oral pharmacokinetics of 120 mg fexofenadine was assessed with water, 25%-strength grapefruit juice, or normal-strength grapefruit, orange, or apple juices (1.2 L over 3 hours) in a randomized 5-way crossover study in 10 healthy subjects. Grapefruit juice and segments and apple juice at 5% of normal strength did not alter P-glycoprotein activity. Grapefruit extract reduced transport. 6',7'-Dihydroxybergamottin had modest inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 33 micromol/L). In contrast, grapefruit, orange, and apple juices at 5% of normal strength markedly reduced human OATP and rat oatp activity. 6',7'-Dihydroxybergamottin potently inhibited rat oatp3 and oatp1 (IC(50), 0.28 micromol/L). Other furanocoumarins and bioflavonoids also reduced rat oatp3 activity. Grapefruit, orange, and apple juices decreased the fexofenadine area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), the peak plasma drug concentration (C(max)), and the urinary excretion values to 30% to 40% of those with water, with no change in the time to reach C(max), elimination half-life, renal clearance, or urine volume in humans. Change in fexofenadine AUC with juice was variable among individuals and inversely dependent on value with water. Fruit juices and constituents are more potent inhibitors of OATPs than P-glycoprotein activities, which can reduce oral drug bioavailability. Results support a new model of intestinal drug absorption and mechanism of food-drug interaction.

  17. Structural basis for inhibition of a voltage-gated Ca2+ channel by Ca2+ antagonist drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lin; Gamal El-Din, Tamer M.; Swanson, Teresa M.; Pryde, David C.; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ antagonist drugs are widely used in therapy of cardiovascular disorders1,2. Three chemical classes of drugs bind to three separate, but allosterically interacting, receptor sites on CaV1.2 channels, the most prominent voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channel type in myocytes in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle3–9. The 1,4-dihydropyridines are used primarily for treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris and are thought to act as allosteric modulators of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activation, whereas phenylalkylamines and benzothiazepines are used primarily for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and are thought to physically block the pore1,2. The structural basis for the different binding, action, and therapeutic uses of these drugs remains unknown. Here we present crystallographic and functional analyses of drug binding to the bacterial homotetrameric model CaV channel CaVAb, which is inhibited by dihydropyridines and phenylalkylamines with nanomolar affinity in a state-dependent manner. The binding site for amlodipine and other dihydropyridines is located on the external, lipid-facing surface of the pore module, positioned at the interface of two subunits. Dihydropyridine binding allosterically induces an asymmetric conformation of the selectivity filter, in which partially dehydrated Ca2+ interacts directly with one subunit and blocks the pore. In contrast, the phenylalkylamine Br-verapamil binds in the central cavity of the pore on the intracellular side of the selectivity filter, physically blocking the ion-conducting pathway. Structure-based mutations of key amino-acid residues confirm drug binding at both sites. Our results define the structural basis for binding of dihydropyridines and phenylalkylamines at their distinct receptor sites on CaV channels and offer key insights into their fundamental mechanisms of action and differential therapeutic uses in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27556947

  18. The clinically approved drugs dasatinib and bosutinib induce anti-inflammatory macrophages by inhibiting the salt-inducible kinases.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, James; Prescott, Alan R; Clark, Kristopher

    2015-01-15

    Macrophages switch to an anti-inflammatory, 'regulatory'-like phenotype characterized by the production of high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to promote the resolution of inflammation. A potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases would be to administer drugs that could induce the formation of 'regulatory'-like macrophages at sites of inflammation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the clinically approved cancer drugs bosutinib and dasatinib induce several hallmark features of 'regulatory'-like macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with bosutinib or dasatinib elevates the production of IL-10 while suppressing the production of IL-6, IL-12p40 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Moreover, macrophages treated with bosutinib or dasatinib express higher levels of markers of 'regulatory'-like macrophages including LIGHT, SPHK1 and arginase 1. Bosutinib and dasatinib were originally developed as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinases Bcr-Abl and Src but we show that, surprisingly, the effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on macrophage polarization are the result of the inhibition of the salt-inducible kinases. Consistent with the present finding, bosutinib and dasatinib induce the dephosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 3 (CRTC3) and its nuclear translocation where it induces a cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene transcription programme including that of IL-10. Importantly, these effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on IL-10 gene expression are lost in macrophages expressing a drug-resistant mutant of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2). In conclusion, our study identifies the salt-inducible kinases as major targets of bosutinib and dasatinib that mediate the effects of these drugs on the innate immune system and provides novel mechanistic insights into the anti-inflammatory properties

  19. The clinically approved drugs dasatinib and bosutinib induce anti-inflammatory macrophages by inhibiting the salt-inducible kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ozanne, James; Prescott, Alan R.; Clark, Kristopher

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages switch to an anti-inflammatory, ‘regulatory’-like phenotype characterized by the production of high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to promote the resolution of inflammation. A potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases would be to administer drugs that could induce the formation of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages at sites of inflammation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the clinically approved cancer drugs bosutinib and dasatinib induce several hallmark features of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with bosutinib or dasatinib elevates the production of IL-10 while suppressing the production of IL-6, IL-12p40 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Moreover, macrophages treated with bosutinib or dasatinib express higher levels of markers of ‘regulatory’-like macrophages including LIGHT, SPHK1 and arginase 1. Bosutinib and dasatinib were originally developed as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinases Bcr-Abl and Src but we show that, surprisingly, the effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on macrophage polarization are the result of the inhibition of the salt-inducible kinases. Consistent with the present finding, bosutinib and dasatinib induce the dephosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 3 (CRTC3) and its nuclear translocation where it induces a cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene transcription programme including that of IL-10. Importantly, these effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on IL-10 gene expression are lost in macrophages expressing a drug-resistant mutant of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2). In conclusion, our study identifies the salt-inducible kinases as major targets of bosutinib and dasatinib that mediate the effects of these drugs on the innate immune system and provides novel mechanistic insights into the anti

  20. D-amphetamine and antipsychotic drug effects on latent inhibition in mice lacking dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Bay-Richter, C; O'Callaghan, M J; Mathur, N; O'Tuathaigh, C M P; Heery, D M; Fone, K C F; Waddington, J L; Moran, P M

    2013-07-01

    Drugs that induce psychosis, such as D-amphetamine (AMP), and those that alleviate it, such as antipsychotics, are suggested to exert behavioral effects via dopamine receptor D2 (D2). All antipsychotic drugs are D2 antagonists, but D2 antagonism underlies the severe and debilitating side effects of these drugs; it is therefore important to know whether D2 is necessary for their behavioral effects. Using D2-null mice (Drd2-/-), we first investigated whether D2 is required for AMP disruption of latent inhibition (LI). LI is a process of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Disruption of LI by AMP models impaired attention and abnormal salience allocation consequent to dysregulated dopamine relevant to schizophrenia. AMP disruption of LI was seen in both wild-type (WT) and Drd2-/-. This was in contrast to AMP-induced locomotor hyperactivity, which was reduced in Drd2-/-. AMP disruption of LI was attenuated in mice lacking dopamine receptor D1 (Drd1-/-), suggesting that D1 may play a role in AMP disruption of LI. Further supporting this possibility, we found that D1 antagonist SKF83566 attenuated AMP disruption of LI in WT. Remarkably, both haloperidol and clozapine attenuated AMP disruption of LI in Drd2-/-. This demonstrates that antipsychotic drugs can attenuate AMP disruption of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli in the absence of D2 receptors. Data suggest that D2 is not essential either for AMP to disrupt or for antipsychotic drugs to reverse AMP disruption of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli and further that D1 merits investigation in the mediation of AMP disruption of these processes.

  1. Nematode-bacteria mutualism: Selection within the mutualism supersedes selection outside of the mutualism.

    PubMed

    Morran, Levi T; Penley, McKenna J; Byrd, Victoria S; Meyer, Andrew J; O'Sullivan, Timothy S; Bashey, Farrah; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Lively, Curtis M

    2016-03-01

    The coevolution of interacting species can lead to codependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M-), nematodes under two different selection regimes: random selection (S-) and selection for increased virulence against arthropod hosts (S+). We found that the isolated bacteria evolved greater virulence under selection for greater virulence (M-S+) than under random selection (M-S-). In addition, the response to selection in the isolated bacteria (M-S+) caused a breakdown of the mutualism following reintroduction to the nematode. Finally, selection for greater virulence did not alter the evolutionary trajectories of bacteria passaged within the mutualism (M+S+ = M+S-), indicating that selection for the maintenance of the mutualism was stronger than selection for increased virulence. The results show that selection on isolated mutualists can rapidly breakdown beneficial interactions between species, but that selection within a mutualism can supersede external selection, potentially generating codependence over time.

  2. Nematode-Bacteria Mutualism: Selection Within the Mutualism Supersedes Selection Outside of the Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Morran, Levi T.; Penley, McKenna J.; Byrd, Victoria S.; Meyer, Andrew J.; O’Sullivan, Timothy S.; Bashey, Farrah; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Lively, Curtis M.

    2016-01-01

    The coevolution of interacting species can lead to co-dependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M−), nematodes under two different selection regimes: random selection (S−) and selection for increased virulence against arthropod hosts (S+). We found that the isolated bacteria evolved greater virulence under selection for greater virulence (M−S+) than under random selection (M−S−). In addition, the response to selection in the isolated bacteria (M−S+) caused a breakdown of the mutualism following reintroduction to the nematode. Finally, selection for greater virulence did not alter the evolutionary trajectories of bacteria passaged within the mutualism (M+S+ = M+S−), indicating that selection for the maintenance of the mutualism was stronger than selection for increased virulence. The results show that selection on isolated mutualists can rapidly breakdown beneficial interactions between species, but that selection within a mutualism can supersede external selection, potentially generating co-dependence over time. PMID:26867502

  3. Inhibition of antiviral drug cidofovir on proliferation of human papillomavirus-infected cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Dai, Lv-Xia; Chen, Ming; Li, Bei; Ding, Nana; Li, Gang; Liu, Yan-Qing; Li, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Bao-Ning; Shi, Xin-Li; Tan, Hua-Bing

    2016-11-01

    In order to evaluate the potential application value of cidofovir (CDV) in the prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and treatment of cervical cancer, the inhibitory effect of CDV on the proliferation of HPV 18-positive HeLa cells in cervical cancer was preliminarily investigated, using cisplatin (DDP) as a positive control. An MTT assay was used to analyze the effects of CDV and DDP on HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, clone formation assay and Giemsa staining were used to examine the extent of HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV and DDP. Flow cytometry was also used to detect the shape and size of apoptotic cells following propidium iodide staining, while western blot analysis identified the expression levels of of E6 and p53 proteins in HeLa cells. A cell climbing immunofluorescence technique was used to locate the subcellular position of p53 in HeLa cells. The results demonstrated that CDV and DDP inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that CDV and DDP treatments resulted in cell arrest in the S-phase, and triggered programmed cell death. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that CDV and DDP inhibited E6 protein expression and activated p53 expression in HeLa cells. Finally, the immunofluorescence results indicated that CDV and DDP inhibited the nuclear export of p53 by E6 protein, which is required for degradation of endogenous p53 by MDM2 and human papilloma virus E6. In conclusion, CDV and DDP inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, reduced the expression of E6 protein, and reinstated p53 protein activity. Thus, CDV regulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and may be a potential cervical cancer therapeutic strategy.

  4. Inhibition of antiviral drug cidofovir on proliferation of human papillomavirus-infected cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Dai, Lv-Xia; Chen, Ming; Li, Bei; Ding, Nana; Li, Gang; Liu, Yan-Qing; Li, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Bao-Ning; Shi, Xin-Li; Tan, Hua-Bing

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential application value of cidofovir (CDV) in the prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and treatment of cervical cancer, the inhibitory effect of CDV on the proliferation of HPV 18-positive HeLa cells in cervical cancer was preliminarily investigated, using cisplatin (DDP) as a positive control. An MTT assay was used to analyze the effects of CDV and DDP on HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, clone formation assay and Giemsa staining were used to examine the extent of HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV and DDP. Flow cytometry was also used to detect the shape and size of apoptotic cells following propidium iodide staining, while western blot analysis identified the expression levels of of E6 and p53 proteins in HeLa cells. A cell climbing immunofluorescence technique was used to locate the subcellular position of p53 in HeLa cells. The results demonstrated that CDV and DDP inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that CDV and DDP treatments resulted in cell arrest in the S-phase, and triggered programmed cell death. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that CDV and DDP inhibited E6 protein expression and activated p53 expression in HeLa cells. Finally, the immunofluorescence results indicated that CDV and DDP inhibited the nuclear export of p53 by E6 protein, which is required for degradation of endogenous p53 by MDM2 and human papilloma virus E6. In conclusion, CDV and DDP inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, reduced the expression of E6 protein, and reinstated p53 protein activity. Thus, CDV regulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and may be a potential cervical cancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:27882102

  5. Modeling Synergistic Drug Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth in Murine Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    product of the fabG1 gene to catalyze mycolic acid synthesis 2 Rv1185c fadD21 Non-essential Essential Non-essential Restored the disabled ability of the...mycolic acid utilization for Mycobacteria, the determination of nutrient requirements and metabolite processing steps, and the ability to probe...tuberculosis in a medium with the fatty acid propionate used as its carbon source. Similarly, we modeled the growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis by 50-O-(N

  6. Impact of polymer conformation on the crystal growth inhibition of a poorly water-soluble drug in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Schram, Caitlin J; Beaudoin, Stephen P; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility is a major hindrance to oral delivery of many emerging drugs. Supersaturated drug solutions can improve passive absorption across the gastrointestinal tract membrane as long as crystallization can be inhibited, enhancing the delivery of such poorly soluble therapeutics. Polymers can inhibit crystallization and prolong supersaturation; therefore, it is desirable to understand the attributes which render a polymer effective. In this study, the conformation of a polymer adsorbed to a crystal surface and its impact on crystal growth inhibition were investigated. The crystal growth rate of a poorly soluble pharmaceutical compound, felodipine, was measured in the presence of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) at two different pH conditions: pH 3 and pH 6.8. HPMCAS was found to be a less effective growth rate inhibitor at pH 3, below its pKa. It was expected that the ionization state of HPMCAS would most likely influence its conformation at the solid-liquid interface. Further investigation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed significant differences in the conformation of HPMCAS adsorbed to felodipine at the two pH conditions. At pH 3, HPMCAS formed coiled globules on the surface, whereas at pH 6.8, HPMCAS adsorbed more uniformly. Thus, it appeared that the reduced effectiveness of HPMCAS at pH 3 was directly related to its conformation. The globule formation leaves many felodipine growth sites open and available for growth units to attach, rendering the polymer less effective as a growth rate inhibitor.

  7. Oral Multiple Sclerosis Drugs Inhibit the In vitro Growth of Epsilon Toxin Producing Gut Bacterium, Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Rumah, Kareem R; Vartanian, Timothy K; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three oral medications approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Two of these medications, Fingolimod, and Teriflunomide, are considered to be anti-inflammatory agents, while dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is thought to trigger a robust antioxidant response, protecting vulnerable cells during an MS attack. We previously proposed that epsilon toxin from the gut bacterium, Clostridium perfringens, may initiate newly forming MS lesions due to its tropism for blood-brain barrier (BBB) vasculature and central nervous system myelin. Because gut microbiota will be exposed to these oral therapies prior to systemic absorption, we sought to determine if these compounds affect C. perfringens growth in vitro. Here we show that Fingolimod, Teriflunomide, and DMF indeed inhibit C. perfringens growth. Furthermore, several compounds similar to DMF in chemical structure, namely α, β unsaturated carbonyls, also known as Michael acceptors, inhibit C. perfringens. Sphingosine, a Fingolimod homolog with known antibacterial properties, proved to be a potent C. perfringens inhibitor with a Minimal Inhibitory Concentration similar to that of Fingolimod. These findings suggest that currently approved oral MS therapies and structurally related compounds possess antibacterial properties that may alter the gut microbiota. Moreover, inhibition of C. perfringens growth and resulting blockade of epsilon toxin production may contribute to the clinical efficacy of these disease-modifying drugs.

  8. Oral Multiple Sclerosis Drugs Inhibit the In vitro Growth of Epsilon Toxin Producing Gut Bacterium, Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Rumah, Kareem R.; Vartanian, Timothy K.; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three oral medications approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Two of these medications, Fingolimod, and Teriflunomide, are considered to be anti-inflammatory agents, while dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is thought to trigger a robust antioxidant response, protecting vulnerable cells during an MS attack. We previously proposed that epsilon toxin from the gut bacterium, Clostridium perfringens, may initiate newly forming MS lesions due to its tropism for blood-brain barrier (BBB) vasculature and central nervous system myelin. Because gut microbiota will be exposed to these oral therapies prior to systemic absorption, we sought to determine if these compounds affect C. perfringens growth in vitro. Here we show that Fingolimod, Teriflunomide, and DMF indeed inhibit C. perfringens growth. Furthermore, several compounds similar to DMF in chemical structure, namely α, β unsaturated carbonyls, also known as Michael acceptors, inhibit C. perfringens. Sphingosine, a Fingolimod homolog with known antibacterial properties, proved to be a potent C. perfringens inhibitor with a Minimal Inhibitory Concentration similar to that of Fingolimod. These findings suggest that currently approved oral MS therapies and structurally related compounds possess antibacterial properties that may alter the gut microbiota. Moreover, inhibition of C. perfringens growth and resulting blockade of epsilon toxin production may contribute to the clinical efficacy of these disease-modifying drugs. PMID:28180112

  9. An isocorydine derivative (d-ICD) inhibits drug resistance by downregulating IGF2BP3 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chao; Chen, Lijuan; Fang, Tao; Li, Hong; Tian, Hua; Liu, Junxi; Chen, Taoyang; Jiang, Guoping; Xie, Haiyang; Cui, Ying; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    In our previous studies, we reported that CD133+ cancer stem cells (CSCs) were chemoresistant in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and that isocorydine treatment decreased the percentage of CD133+ CSCs. Here, we found that a derivative of isocorydine (d-ICD) inhibited HCC cell growth, particularly among the CD133+ subpopulation, and rendered HCC cells more sensitive to sorafenib treatment. d-ICD inhibited IGF2BP3 expression in a time-dependent manner, and IGF2BP3 expression negatively correlated with d-ICD-induced growth suppression. IGF2BP3 overexpression enriched the CD133+ CSC subpopulation in HCC, enhanced tumor sphere formation and suppressed the cytotoxic effects of sorafenib and doxorubicin. The expression of drug resistance-related genes, including ABCB1 and ABCG2, and the CSC marker CD133 expression was increased after IGF2BP3 overexpression. The significance of these observations was underscored by our findings that high IGF2BP3 expression predicted poor survival in a cohort of 236 patients with HCC and positively correlated with ABCG2 and CD133 expression in vivo. These results suggested that the d-ICD may inhibit HCC cells growth by IGF2BP3 decrease and that IGF2BP3 may serve as a therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:26327240

  10. Anthelmintic drug ivermectin inhibits angiogenesis, growth and survival of glioblastoma through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Fang, Shanshan; Sun, Qiushi; Liu, Bo

    2016-11-18

    Glioblastoma is one of the most vascular brain tumour and highly resistant to current therapy. Targeting both glioblastoma cells and angiogenesis may present an effective therapeutic strategy for glioblastoma. In our work, we show that an anthelmintic drug, ivermectin, is active against glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo, and also targets angiogenesis. Ivermectin significantly inhibits growth and anchorage-independent colony formation in U87 and T98G glioblastoma cells. It induces apoptosis in these cells through a caspase-dependent manner. Ivermectin significantly suppresses the growth of two independent glioblastoma xenograft mouse models. In addition, ivermectin effectively targets angiogenesis through inhibiting capillary network formation, proliferation and survival in human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC). Mechanistically, ivermectin decreases mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential, ATP levels and increases mitochondrial superoxide in U87, T98G and HBMEC cells exposed to ivermectin. The inhibitory effects of ivermectin are significantly reversed in mitochondria-deficient cells or cells treated with antioxidants, further confirming that ivermectin acts through mitochondrial respiration inhibition and induction of oxidative stress. Importantly, we show that ivermectin suppresses phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR and ribosomal S6 in glioblastoma and HBMEC cells, suggesting its inhibitory role in deactivating Akt/mTOR pathway. Altogether, our work demonstrates that ivermectin is a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for glioblastoma. Our work also highlights the therapeutic value of targeting mitochondrial metabolism in glioblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Parental substance abuse and function of the motivation and behavioral inhibition systems in drug-naïve youth.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iliyan; Liu, Xun; Shulz, Kurt; Fan, Jin; London, Edythe; Friston, Karl; Halperin, Jeffrey M; Newcorn, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-28

    It is hypothesized that the development of substance abuse (SA) may be due to imbalance in functions of the motivation-reward and behavioral inhibition systems in the brain. This speaks to the search for biological risk factors for SA in drug-naïve children who also exhibit motivational and inhibitory control deficits; however, this type of research is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to establish a neurobiological basis for addiction vulnerability using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in drug-naïve youth with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We hypothesized that children with ADHD alone would show higher activity in regions of the motivation-reward and behavioral inhibition systems than children with ADHD and a parental history of SA. Toward this goal we scanned 20 drug-naïve children with ADHD ages 8-13 while performing an event-related reward task. High (N=10) and low (N=10) risk subjects were identified, based on parental history of SA. The effects of anticipation, conflict, and reward were assessed with appropriate linear contrasts, and between-group differences were assessed using statistical parametric mapping. The two groups did not differ on behavioral measures of the task. The fMRI results show heightened activation in the brain motivational-reward system and reduced activation of the inhibitory control system in high-risk compared to low-risk children. These results suggest that a functional mismatch between these two systems may represent one possible biological underpinning of SA risk, which is conferred by a parental history of addiction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values <50 μM), but only about 20% of the non-sDILI drugs showed this strength of inhibition in primary human hepatocytes and these drugs are associated only with cholestatic and mixed hepatocellular cholestatic (mixed) injuries. The sDILI drugs, which did not show substantial inhibition of bile salt transport activity, are likely to be associated with immune-mediated liver injury. Twenty-four drugs were also tested in monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune

  13. [Influence of ion pump-inhibiting drugs on the accumulation of ofloxacin and grepafloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Orero, A; Cantón, E; Pemán, J; Velert, M M; Bermejo, M V

    2002-12-01

    In this study we tested the influence of three ion pump-inhibiting drugs (digoxin, omeprazole and verapamil) on the accumulation of ofloxacin and grepafloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Two assay conditions were established: cell preincubation with the drug for 30 or 60 minutes before addition of quinolone, or addition of both drugs simultaneously. The maximum I/E for ofloxacin is different depending on the assay conditions: 7.69+/-0.88; 5.64+/-1.91 and 3.56+/-1.04 for the assay without preincubation and with preincubation for 30 or 60 minutes at 37 masculine C, respectively. Similarly, grepafloxacin reached the following maximums: 61.27+/-3.04; 32.18+/-3.25 and 22.52+/-3.86. Digoxin did not significantly modify the accumulation of the quinolones, but it increased the I/E compared with the control. In general, omeprazole reduced the accumulation of both quinolones. When omeprazole and ofloxacin were added together, ofloxacin's I/E was significantly lower; however, for grepafloxacin, 60 minutes of preincubation were necessary. Verapamil induced a significant increase in the I/E for both quinolones when the cells were preincubated at 10 times the plasma concentration.

  14. P-glycoprotein inhibition by the agricultural pesticide propiconazole and its hydroxylated metabolites: Implications for pesticide-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Christopher S; Marchitti, Satori A; Zastre, Jason

    2015-01-05

    The human efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1) functions as an important cellular defense system against a variety of xenobiotics; however, little information exists on whether environmental chemicals interact with P-gp. Conazoles provide a unique challenge to exposure assessment because of their use as both pesticides and drugs. Propiconazole is an agricultural pesticide undergoing evaluation by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. In this study, the P-gp interaction of propiconazole and its hydroxylated metabolites were evaluated using MDR1-expressing membrane vesicles and NIH-3T3/MDR1 cells. Membrane vesicle assays demonstrated propiconazole (IC50,122.9μM) and its metabolites (IC50s, 350.8μM, 366.4μM, and 456.3μM) inhibited P-gp efflux of a probe substrate, with propiconazole demonstrating the strongest interaction. P-gp mediated transport of propiconazole in MDR1-expressed vesicles was not detected indicating propiconazole interacts with P-gp as an inhibitor rather than a substrate. In NIH-3T3/MDR1 cells, propiconazole (1 and 10μM) led to decreased cellular resistance (chemosensitization) to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug and known MDR1 substrate. Collectively, these results have pharmacokinetic and risk assessment implications as P-gp interaction may influence pesticide toxicity and the potential for pesticide-drug interactions.

  15. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation.

  16. Inhibition of topoisomerase I by anti-cancer drug altered the endometrial cyclicity and receptivity.

    PubMed

    Liani-Leibson, K; Har-Vardi, I; Priel, E

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (topo I) is an essential nuclear enzyme involved in virtually all aspects of gene expression, and is the target of the anti-cancer drugs- camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives. Improvement of the survival rates of young women with cancer has led to the consideration of the effects of long-term chemotherapy on their fertility. The effect of anticancer drugs on ovarian function was previously investigated; however, no reports are available concerning their effect on the endometrium, whose integrity is an important factor in embryo implantation. Here we used a rat animal model to investigate the expression and activity of topo I in the various physiologic phases of the endometrium and the influence of CPT on its integrity and receptivity. The results show, for the first time, that the endometrial topo I level and activity are influenced by the physiologic phases of the endometrium (estrous cycle) and correlate with the estrogen blood concentration. Treatment with the anti-cancer drug CPT caused histological disruption of the endometrium and deleterious effect on its cyclicity. Moreover, CPT treatment significantly reduced the implantation rate of embryos, suggesting alteration in the receptivity of the endometrium. These results suggest that topo I is important for maintaining the normal physiologic cyclicity and functionality of the endometrium in rats. Anti-cancer agents that target topo I severely impair estrous cycle progression and endometrial integrity and receptivity, emphasizing the importance of addressing the effect of chemotherapy on the endometrial functionality.

  17. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

  18. An in vivo C. elegans model system for screening EGFR-inhibiting anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Ki; Sung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Kim, Sunshin; Hong, Kyeong Man; Kim, Heung Tae; Choi, Min Sung; Kwon, Jae Young; Shim, Jaegal

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a well-established target for cancer treatment. EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib, have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Although non-small cell lung carcinoma with an activating EGFR mutation, L858R, responds well to gefinitib and erlotinib, tumors with a doubly mutated EGFR, T790M-L858R, acquire resistance to these drugs. The C. elegans EGFR homolog LET-23 and its downstream signaling pathway have been studied extensively to provide insight into regulatory mechanisms conserved from C. elegans to humans. To develop an in vivo screening system for potential cancer drugs targeting specific EGFR mutants, we expressed three LET-23 chimeras in which the TK domain was replaced with either the human wild-type TK domain (LET-23::hEGFR-TK), a TK domain with the L858R mutation (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]), or a TK domain with the T790M-L858R mutations (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R]) in C. elegans vulval cells using the let-23 promoter. The wild-type hEGFR-TK chimeric protein rescued the let-23 mutant phenotype, and the activating mutant hEGFR-TK chimeras induced a multivulva (Muv) phenotype in a wild-type C. elegans background. The anti-cancer drugs gefitinib and erlotinib suppressed the Muv phenotype in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]-expressing transgenic animals, but not in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] transgenic animals. As a pilot screen, 8,960 small chemicals were tested for Muv suppression, and AG1478 (an EGFR-TK inhibitor) and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor) were identified as potential inhibitors of EGFR-mediated biological function. In conclusion, transgenic C. elegans expressing chimeric LET-23::hEGFR-TK proteins are a model system that can be used in mutation-specific screens for new anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Pluto-charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, R.P. )

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  20. Adamantyl Analogues of Paracetamol as Potent Analgesic Drugs via Inhibition of TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Goicoechea, Carlos; Alkorta, Ibon; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Quirce, Susana; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Martín, M. Isabel; Goya, Pilar; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry. PMID:25438056

  1. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS): A New Drug for Breast Cancer Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Weinstein, 2002) and support FAS inhibition as a 22 and 30 weeks of age in neu-N mice ( Boggio et al., means to selectively kill breast epithelial cells...preneoplastic lesions at about 22 weeks ( Boggio et al., 2000), the C75 treatment preceded the appearance of these lesions. Animals were monitored visually for...Alo PL, Visca P, Botti C, Galati GM, Sebastiani V, Andreano T, Di Tondo U and Pizer ES. (2001). Am. J. Clin. Pathol., 116, 129–134. Boggio K, Di

  2. Adamantyl analogues of paracetamol as potent analgesic drugs via inhibition of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Goicoechea, Carlos; Alkorta, Ibon; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Quirce, Susana; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Martín, M Isabel; Goya, Pilar; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry.

  3. Mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    The backdrop to this article is provided by the Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007), Section 1 of which is entitled 'Towards a Mutual NHS'. According to Better Health, Better Care (Scottish Government, 2007: 5): 'Mutual organisations are designed to serve their members. They are designed to gather people around a common sense of purpose. They are designed to bring the organisation together in what people often call "co-production."' The aim of this article is to précis the current knowledge of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare. In detail, it will: introduce the 'mutual' organisation; offer a historical perspective of mutuality; suggest why healthcare mutuality is important; and briefly, detail the differences in mutual health-care policy in England and Scotland. It is hoped that this analysis will help researchers and practitioners alike appreciate further the philosophy of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

  4. Gemifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug, inhibits migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jung-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Gemifloxacin (GMF) is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF- κ B and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF- α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased I κ B phosphorylation and NF- κ B nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  5. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Jung-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Gemifloxacin (GMF) is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer. PMID:24386633

  6. Inhibition of demethylase KDM6B sensitizes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohit; Sehgal, Lalit; Havranek, Ondrej; Köhrer, Stefan; Khashab, Tamer; Jain, Neeraj; Burger, Jan A.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Davis, R. Eric; Samaniego, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Histone methylation and demethylation regulate B-cell development, and their deregulation correlates with tumor chemoresistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, limiting cure rates. Since histone methylation status correlates with disease aggressiveness and relapse, we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting histone 3 Lys27 demethylase KDM6B, in vitro, using the small molecule inhibitor GSK-J4. KDM6B is overexpressed in the germinal center B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and higher KDM6B levels are associated with worse survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP. GSK-J4-induced apoptosis was observed in five (SU-DHL-6, OCI-Ly1, Toledo, OCI-Ly8, SU-DHL-8) out of nine germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Treatment with GSK-J4 predominantly resulted in downregulation of B-cell receptor signaling and BCL6. Cell lines expressing high BCL6 levels or CREBBP/EP300 mutations were sensitive to GSK-J4. Our results suggest that B-cell receptor-dependent downregulation of BCL6 is responsible for GSK-J4-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GSK-J4-mediated inhibition of KDM6B sensitizes germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to chemotherapy agents that are currently utilized in treatment regimens for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27742770

  7. Regulation of Microglial Phagocytosis by RhoA/ROCK-Inhibiting Drugs.

    PubMed

    Scheiblich, Hannah; Bicker, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation within the central nervous system (CNS) is a major component of many neurodegenerative diseases. The underlying mechanisms of neuronal loss are not fully understood, but the activation of CNS resident phagocytic microglia seems to be a significant element contributing to neurodegeneration. At the onset of inflammation, high levels of microglial phagocytosis may serve as an essential prerequisite for creating a favorable environment for neuronal regeneration. However, the excessive and long-lasting activation of microglia and the augmented engulfment of neurons have been suggested to eventually govern widespread neurodegeneration. Here, we investigated in a functional assay of acute inflammation how the small GTPase RhoA and its main target the Rho kinase (ROCK) influence microglial phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Using BV-2 microglia and human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA activation and microglial phagocytosis of neuronal cell fragments. Inhibition of the downstream effector ROCK with the small-molecule agents Y-27632 and Fasudil reduces the engulfment of neuronal debris and attenuates the production of the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide during stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results support a therapeutic potential for RhoA/ROCK-inhibiting agents as an effective treatment of excessive inflammation and the resulting progression of microglia-mediated neurodegeneration in the CNS.

  8. Inhibition of primary and metastatic tumors in mice by E-selectin-targeted polymer-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Raviv, Lior; Golan, Moran; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N; David, Ayelet

    2015-11-10

    There is currently no effective means to prevent or control metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. E-selectin, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively on inflamed and angiogenic blood vessels, plays an important role in several rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis. In this study, we assessed the in vivo antitumor efficacy of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers conjugated to an E-selectin binding peptide (Esbp, DITWDQLWDLMK) and equipped with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (P-(Esbp)-DOX) or with the proapoptotic peptide D(KLAKLAK)2 (P-(Esbp)-KLAK). Following a single intravenous injection, P-(Esbp)-DOX reduced tumor growth rate and prolonged the survival of mice bearing primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors significantly more than treatment with a non-targeted copolymer (P-DOX) or with free DOX. In an experimental B16-F10 lung metastasis model, a single intravenous dose of P-(Esbp)-DOX or P-(Esbp)-KLAK prolonged mice survival time significantly more than the non-targeted copolymers or the free drugs, and the percentage of complete tumor regression increased with increasing doses and with dosing frequency. In addition, mice pretreated with an E-selectin-targeted "drug-free" copolymer (P-(Esbp)-FITC) exhibited significantly fewer B16-F10 tumor foci in the lungs as compared with non-treated mice, demonstrating the anti-metastatic properties of the copolymer and its ability to control cancer spread through E-selectin-mediated interactions. Biodistribution analysis further confirmed the preferential accumulation of the E-selectin-targeted near-infrared fluorescently-labeled copolymer P-(Esbp)-IR783 in B16-F10 lung metastases. Taken together, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that the E-selectin targeted copolymer-drug conjugates can inhibit primary tumor growth and prevent metastases in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic analysis of the inhibition of the drug efflux protein AcrB using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Mowla, Rumana; Wang, Yinhu; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-09-08

    Multidrug efflux protein complexes such as AcrAB-TolC from Escherichia coli are paramount in multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and are also implicated in other processes such as virulence and biofilm formation. Hence efflux pump inhibition, as a means to reverse antimicrobial resistance in clinically relevant pathogens, has gained increased momentum over the past two decades. Significant advances in the structural and functional analysis of AcrB have informed the selection of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). However, an accurate method to determine the kinetics of efflux pump inhibition was lacking. In this study we standardised and optimised surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to probe the binding kinetics of substrates and inhibitors to AcrB. The SPR method was also combined with a fluorescence drug binding method by which affinity of two fluorescent AcrB substrates were determined using the same conditions and controls as for SPR. Comparison of the results from the fluorescent assay to those of the SPR assay showed excellent correlation and provided validation for the methods and conditions used for SPR. The kinetic parameters of substrate (doxorubicin, novobiocin and minocycline) binding to AcrB were subsequently determined. Lastly, the kinetics of inhibition of AcrB were probed for two established inhibitors (phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide and 1-1-naphthylmethyl-piperazine) and three novel EPIs: 4-isobutoxy-2-naphthamide (A2), 4-isopentyloxy-2-naphthamide (A3) and 4-benzyloxy-2-naphthamide (A9) have also been probed. The kinetic data obtained could be correlated with inhibitor efficacy and mechanism of action. This study is the first step in the quantitative analysis of the kinetics of inhibition of the clinically important RND-class of multidrug efflux pumps and will allow the design of improved and more potent inhibitors of drug efflux pumps. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane

  10. Cyclophilin A inhibition: targeting transition-state-bound enzyme conformations for structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Mulpuri; McGowan, Lauren C; Hamelberg, Donald

    2013-02-25

    Human Cyclophilin A (CypA) catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of the prolyl peptide ω-bond in proteins and is involved in many subcellular processes. CypA has, therefore, been identified as a potential drug target in many diseases, and the development of potent inhibitors with high selectivity is a key objective. In computer-aided drug design, selectivity is improved by taking into account the inherent flexibility of the receptor. However, the relevant receptor conformations to focus on in order to develop highly selective inhibitors are not always obvious from available X-ray crystal structures or ensemble of conformations generated using molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we show that the conformation of the active site of CypA varies as the substrate configuration changes during catalytic turnover. We have analyzed the principal modes of the active site dynamics of CypA from molecular dynamics simulations to show that similar ensembles of enzyme conformations recognize diverse inhibitors and bind the different configurations of the peptide substrate. Small nonpeptidomimetic inhibitors with varying activity are recognized by enzyme ensembles that are similar to those that tightly bind the transition state and cis configurations of the substrate. Our results suggest that enzyme-substrate ensembles are more relevant in structure-based drug design for CypA than free enzyme. Of the vast conformational space of the free enzyme, the enzyme conformations of the tightly bound enzyme-substrate complexes are the most important for catalysis. Therefore, functionalizing lead compounds to optimize their interactions with the enzyme's conformational ensemble bound to the substrate in the cis or the transition state could lead to more potent inhibitors.

  11. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  12. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  13. ZEB1 knockdown mediated using polypeptide cationic micelles inhibits metastasis and effects sensitization to a chemotherapeutic drug for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shengtao; Wu, Lei; Li, Mingxing; Yi, Huqiang; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis and drug resistance are the main causes for the failure in clinical cancer therapy. Emerging evidence suggests an intricate role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in metastasis and drug resistance. The EMT-activator ZEB1 is crucial in malignant tumor progression by linking EMT-activation and stemness-maintenance. Here, we used multifunctional polypeptide micelle nanoparticles (NP) as nanocarriers for the delivery of ZEB1 siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The nanocarriers could effectively deliver siRNA to the cytoplasm and knockdown the target gene in H460 cells and H460 xenograft tumors, leading to reduced EMT and repressed CSC properties in vitro and in vivo. The complex micelle nanoparticles with ZEB1 siRNA (siRNA-NP) significantly reduced metastasis in the lung. When DOX and siRNA were co-delivered by the nanocarriers (siRNA-DOX-NP), a synergistic therapeutic effect was observed, resulting in dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in a H460 xenograft model. These results demonstrated that the siRNA-NP or siRNA-DOX-NP complex targeting ZEB1 could be developed into a new therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment.Metastasis and drug resistance are the main causes for the failure in clinical cancer therapy. Emerging evidence suggests an intricate role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in metastasis and drug resistance. The EMT-activator ZEB1 is crucial in malignant tumor progression by linking EMT-activation and stemness-maintenance. Here, we used multifunctional polypeptide micelle nanoparticles (NP) as nanocarriers for the delivery of ZEB1 siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The nanocarriers could effectively deliver siRNA to the cytoplasm and knockdown the target gene in H460 cells and H460 xenograft tumors, leading to reduced EMT and repressed CSC properties in vitro and in vivo. The complex micelle nanoparticles with ZEB1 siRNA (siRNA-NP) significantly reduced

  14. Inhibition of amyloidogenesis by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their hybrid nitrates.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, Isaac T; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Wang, Huali; Vanni, Michael; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2011-04-14

    Poor blood-brain barrier penetration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been blamed for the failure of the selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) R-flurbiprofen in phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD). NO-donor NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs) provide an alternative, gastric-sparing approach to NSAID SALAs, which may improve bioavailability. NSAID analogues were studied for anti-inflammatory activity and for SALA activity in N2a neuronal cells transfected with human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Flurbiprofen (1) analogues were obtained with enhanced anti-inflammatory and antiamyloidogenic properties compared to 1, however, esterification led to elevated Aβ(1-42) levels. Hybrid nitrate prodrugs possessed superior anti-inflammatory activity and reduced toxicity relative to the parent NSAIDs, including clinical candidate CHF5074. Although hybrid nitrates elevated Aβ(1-42) at higher concentration, SALA activity was observed at low concentrations (≤1 μM): both Aβ(1-42) and the ratio of Aβ(1-42)/Aβ(1-40) were lowered. This biphasic SALA activity was attributed to the intact nitrate drug. For several compounds, the selective modulation of amyloidogenesis was tested using an immunoprecipitation MALDI-TOF approach. These data support the development of NO-NSAIDs as an alternative approach toward a clinically useful SALA.

  15. Drugs for hypercholesterolaemia - from statins to pro-protein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Grant, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the commonest sources of morbidity and mortality in the world. Lipids and especially low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) contribute to the risk of CVD events. Statins are the primary therapy for hypercholesterolaemia and recent evidence supports the use of ezetimibe as a second-line agent. Pro-protein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) is a regulator of LDL receptor expression. Activating mutations in PCSK9 give rise to a form of familial hypercholesterolaemia, while inactivating mutations lead to lower LDL-C levels and fewer CVD events. Therapies to inhibit PCSK9 are in development and two antibody-based therapies - alirocumab and evolocumab - have recently been licensed. This article reviews the actions of PCSK9, the novel therapeutics targeted on this molecule and how they are likely to be used in clinical practice until large scale CVD outcome studies with PCSK9 inhibitors are published. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  16. Gambogic acid inhibits growth, induces apoptosis, and overcomes drug resistance in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WEN, CHUANGYU; HUANG, LANLAN; CHEN, JUNXIONG; LIN, MENGMENG; LI, WEN; LU, BIYAN; RUTNAM, ZINA JEYAPALAN; IWAMOTO, AIKICHI; WANG, ZHONGYANG; YANG, XIANGLING; LIU, HUANLIANG

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of chemoresistance is a major limitation of colorectal cancer (CRC) therapies and novel biologically based therapies are urgently needed. Natural products represent a novel potential anticancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Garcinia hanburyi Hook. f., has been demonstrated to be highly cytotoxic to several types of cancer cells and have low toxicity to the hematopoietic system. However, the potential role of GA in colorectal cancer and its ability to overcome the chemotherapeutic resistance in CRC cells have not been well studied. In the present study, we showed that GA directly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) sensitive and 5-FU resistant colorectal cancer cells; induced apoptosis via activating JNK signaling pathway. The data, therefore, suggested an alternative strategy to overcome 5-FU resistance in CRC and that GA could be a promising medicinal compound for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:26397804

  17. Antidepressant drugs inhibit a glial 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bal, N; Figueras, G; Vilaró, M T; Suñol, C; Artigas, F

    1997-08-01

    We assessed the role of glial cells in the uptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). Primary cultures of rat and mouse cortical astrocytes took up and deaminated 5-HT. The antidepressants citalopram, clomipramine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline inhibited this process. The presence of the mRNAs for the 5-HT transporter and monoamine oxidase-A (MOA-A) was established in cultured astrocytes and in adult rat brain areas with (midbrain and brainstem) and without (frontal cortex) serotonergic cell bodies after reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization with probes complementary to the cloned neuronal 5-HT transporter and MAO-A. To examine in vivo the role of astrocytes in the elimination of 5-HT from the extracellular brain space, 5-HT was perfused through dialysis probes implanted in the frontal cortex of conscious rats and its concentration was measured at the probe outlet. Tissue 5-HT recovery was dose-dependently inhibited by the concurrent perfusion of citalopram, fluoxetine and paroxetine, showing that it essentially measured uptake through the high-affinity 5-HT transporter. Rats lesioned with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; 88% reduction of tissue 5-HT) displayed tissue 5-HT recovery slightly higher than sham-operated rats (55 +/- 2 vs. 46 +/- 3%, P < 0.001), a finding perhaps attributable to the astrogliosis induced by 5,7-DHT denervation. Rats lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine showed tissue 5-HT uptake similar to controls, suggesting negligible reuptake of 5-HT by catecholaminergic terminals. These results are consistent with the presence of a glial component of 5-HT uptake in the rodent brain, sensitive to antidepressants, which takes place through a 5-HT transporter very similar or identical to that present in neurons.

  18. Peer influences on drug self-administration: social facilitation and social inhibition of cocaine intake in male rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    One problem facing animal models of intravenous drug self-administration, particularly those examining social manipulations, is that subjects must be removed from the home environment and separated from cagemates during testing. This represents a limitation of animal models because it fails to capture the complex social environments in which drug use often occur. The aim of this study was to examine intravenous cocaine self-administration in isolated and socially housed rats, with the caveat that the socially housed subjects lived together 24 h/day, including during daily self-administration sessions. As a secondary aim, the study examined the impact of a companion that also self-administered cocaine versus a companion without access to cocaine. Male rats were obtained at weaning and reared in isolated or pair-housed conditions for 6 weeks. Rats were then implanted with intravenous catheters and transferred to custom-built operant conditioning chambers that served as home cages for the remainder of the study. For some socially housed subjects, both rats had simultaneous access to cocaine; for others, only one rat of the pair had access to cocaine. Cocaine self-administration was facilitated in socially housed rats if both members of the pair had access to cocaine; however, cocaine self-administration was inhibited if only one rat of the pair had access to cocaine. These data indicate that the self-administration behavior of a peer, not merely the presence of a peer, determines whether cocaine self-administration is facilitated or inhibited by social contact.

  19. Tolperisone-type drugs inhibit spinal reflexes via blockade of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Pál; Farkas, Sándor; Fodor, László; Bielik, Norbert; Thán, Márta; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Csejtei, Mónika; Tarnawa, István

    2005-12-01

    The spinal reflex depressant mechanism of tolperisone and some of its structural analogs with central muscle relaxant action was investigated. Tolperisone (50-400 microM), eperisone, lanperisone, inaperisone, and silperisone (25-200 microM) dose dependently depressed the ventral root potential of isolated hemisected spinal cord of 6-day-old rats. The local anesthetic lidocaine (100-800 microM) produced qualitatively similar depression of spinal functions in the hemicord preparation, whereas its blocking effect on afferent nerve conduction was clearly stronger. In vivo, tolperisone and silperisone as well as lidocaine (10 mg/kg intravenously) depressed ventral root reflexes and excitability of motoneurons. However, in contrast with lidocaine, the muscle relaxant drugs seemed to have a more pronounced action on the synaptic responses than on the excitability of motoneurons. Whole-cell measurements in dorsal root ganglion cells revealed that tolperisone and silperisone depressed voltage-gated sodium channel conductance at concentrations that inhibited spinal reflexes. Results obtained with tolperisone and its analogs in the [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate binding in cortical neurons and in a fluorimetric membrane potential assay in cerebellar neurons further supported the view that blockade of sodium channels may be a major component of the action of tolperisone-type centrally acting muscle relaxant drugs. Furthermore, tolperisone, eperisone, and especially silperisone had a marked effect on voltage-gated calcium channels, whereas calcium currents were hardly influenced by lidocaine. These data suggest that tolperisone-type muscle relaxants exert their spinal reflex inhibitory action predominantly via a presynaptic inhibition of the transmitter release from the primary afferent endings via a combined action on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

  20. Noscapine inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression andangiogenesis in vitro: a novel function for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Schnee, Tona; Ali, M Aktar; Lan, Li; Zagzag, David

    2006-05-01

    Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a common feature in solid malignancies related to oxygen deficiency. Since increased HIF-1 expression correlates with advanced disease stage, increased angiogenesis and poor prognosis, HIF-1 and its signaling pathway have become targets for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we identified noscapine to be a novel small molecule inhibitor of the HIF-1 pathway based on its structure-function relation-ships with HIF-1 pathway inhibitors belonging to the benzylisoquinoline class of plant metabolites and/or to microtubule binding agents. We demonstrate that noscapine treatment of human glioma U87MG and T98G cell lines exposed to the hypoxic mimetic agent, CoCl2, inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression and transcriptional activity as measured by decreased secretion of VEGF, a HIF-1 target gene. Inhibition of hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression was due, in part, to its ability to inhibit accumulation of HIF-1alpha in the nucleus and target it for degradation via the proteasome. One mechanism of action of microtubule binding agents is their antiangiogenic activity associated with disruption of endothelial tubule formation. We show that noscapine has similar properties in vitro. Thus, noscapine may possess novel antiangiogenic activity associated with two broad mechanisms of action: first, by decreasing HIF-1alpha expression in hypoxic tumor cells, upregulation of target genes, such as VEGF, would be decreased concomitant with its associated angiogenic activity; second, by inhibiting endothelial cells from forming blood vessels in response to VEGF stimulation, it may limit the process of neo-vascularization, correlating with antitumor activity in vivo. For more than 75 years, noscapine has traditionally been used as an oral cough suppressant with no known toxic side effects in man. Thus, the studies reported here have found a novel function for an old drug. Given its low toxicity profile, its demonstrated

  1. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF DRUG ELECTROSTATIC DIFFUSION: INHIBITION RATE STUDIES IN N1 NEURAMINIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuhui; Holst, Michael J.; McCammon, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the numerical solution of the steady-state Poisson-Boltzmann-Smoluchowski (PBS) and Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations to study diffusion in biomolecular systems. Specifically, finite element methods have been developed to calculate electrostatic interactions and ligand binding rate constants for large biomolecules. The resulting software has been validated and applied to the wild-type and several mutated avian influenza neurominidase crystal structures. The calculated rates show very good agreement with recent experimental studies. Furthermore, these finite element methods require significantly fewer computational resources than existing particle-based Brownian dynamics methods and are robust for complicated geometries. The key finding of biological importance is that the electrostatic steering plays the important role in the drug binding process of the neurominidase. PMID:19209708

  2. Drug Efflux by a Small Multidrug Resistance Protein Is Inhibited by a Transmembrane Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria use several families of membrane-embedded transporters to remove antibiotics from the cell. One such family is the small multidrug resistance proteins (SMRs) that, because of their relatively small size (ca. 110 residues with four transmembrane [TM] helices), must form (at least) dimers to efflux drugs. Here, we use a Lys-tagged synthetic peptide with exactly the same sequence as TM4 of the full-length SMR Hsmr from Halobacterium salinarum [TM4 sequence: AcA(Sar)3-VAGVVGLALIVAGVVVLNVAS-KKK (Sar = N-methylglycine)] to compete with and disrupt the native TM4-TM4 interactions believed to constitute the locus of Hsmr dimerization. Using a cellular efflux assay of the fluorescent SMR substrate ethidium bromide, we determined that bacterial cells containing Hsmr are able to remove cellular ethidium via first-order exponential decay with a rate constant (k) of 10.1 × 10−3 ± 0.7 × 10−3 s−1. Upon treatment of the cells with the TM4 peptide, we observed a saturable ∼60% decrease in the efflux rate constant to 3.7 × 10−3 ± 0.2 × 10−3 s−1. In corresponding experiments with control peptides, including scrambled sequences and a sequence with d-chirality, a decrease in ethidium efflux either was not observed or was marginal, likely from nonspecific effects. The designed peptides did not evoke bacterial lysis, indicating that they act via the α-helicity and membrane insertion propensities of the native TM4 helix. Our overall results suggest that this approach could conceivably be used to design hydrophobic peptides for disruption of key TM-TM interactions of membrane proteins and represent a valuable route to the discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:22526304

  3. Cyclosporine-inhibitable Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Transport Influences Clinical Morphine Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Konrad; Avram, Michael J.; Yermolenka, Viktar; Francis, Amber M.; Blood, Jane; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier is richly populated by active influx and efflux transporters influencing brain drug concentrations. Morphine, a drug with delayed clinical onset, is a substrate for the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein in vitro and in animals. This investigation tested whether morphine is a transporter substrate in humans. Methods Fourteen healthy volunteers received morphine (0.1 mg/kg, 1 h intravenous infusion) in a crossover study after nothing (control) or the validated P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine (5 mg/kg, 2 h infusion). Plasma and urine morphine and morphine glucuronide metabolite concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. Morphine effects were measured by miosis and analgesia. Results Cyclosporine minimally altered morphine disposition, increasing the area under the plasma morphine concentration versus time curve to 100 ± 21 versus 85 ± 24 ng/ml•hr (p < 0.05) without changing maximum plasma concentration. Cyclosporine enhanced (3.2 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.0 mm peak) and prolonged miosis, and increased the area under the miosis-time curve (18 ± 9 vs. 11 ± 5 mm-hr), plasma-effect site transfer rate constant (ke0, median 0.27 vs. 0.17 hr−1), and maximum calculated effect site morphine concentration (11.5 ± 3.7 vs. 7.6 ± 2.9 ng/ml) (all p < 0.05). Analgesia testing was confounded by cyclosporine-related pain. Conclusions Morphine is a transporter substrate at the human blood-brain barrier. Results suggest a role for P-glycoprotein or other efflux transporters in brain morphine access, although the magnitude of the effect is small, and unlikely to be a major determinant of morphine clinical effects. Efflux may explain some variability in clinical morphine effects. PMID:23851346

  4. Anti-hepatocellular carcinoma properties of the anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram discovered to enzymatically inhibit the AMPK-related kinase SNARK in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Kaku; Kato, Naoya; Chung, Raymond T.

    2016-01-01

    We recently described that the anti-apoptotic AMPK-related kinase, SNARK, promotes transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, as a potentially new therapeutic target. Here we explored FDA-approved drugs inhibiting the enzymatic activity of SNARK, using an in vitro luminescence kinase assay system. Interestingly, the long-used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF), also known as Antabuse, emerged as the top hit. Enzymatic kinetics analyses revealed that DSF inhibited SNARK kinase activity in a noncompetitive manner to ATP or phosphosubstrates. Comparative in vitro analyses of DSF analogs indicated the significance of the disulfide bond-based molecular integrity for the kinase inhibition. DSF suppressed SNARK-promoted TGF-β signaling and demonstrated anti-HCC effects. The chemical and enzymatic findings herein reveal novel pharmacological effects of and use for DSF and its derivatives, and could be conducive to prevention and inhibition of liver fibrosis and HCC. PMID:27602492

  5. Gemfibrozil, a lipid lowering drug, inhibits the activation of primary human microglia via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Malabendu; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    Microglial activation participates in the pathogenesis of various neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. However, mechanisms by which microglial activation could be controlled are poorly understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor super family with diverse effect. This study underlines the importance of PPARβ/δ in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of gemfibrozil, an FDA-approved lipid-lowering drug, in primary human microglia. Bacterial lipopolysachharides (LPS) induced the expression of various proinflammatory molecules and upregulated the expression of microglial surface marker CD11b in human microglia. However, gemfibrozil markedly suppressed proinflammatory molecules and CD11b in LPS-stimulated microglia. Human microglia expressed PPAR-β and PPAR-γ, but not PPAR-α. Interestingly, either antisense knockdown of PPAR-β or antagonism of PPAR-β by a specific chemical antagonist abrogated gemfibrozil-mediated inhibition of microglial activation. On the other hand, blocking of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ had no effect on gemfibrozil-mediated anti-inflammatory effect in microglia. These results highlight the fact that gemfibrozil regulates microglial activation by inhibiting inflammatory gene expression in a PPAR-β dependent pathway and further reinforce its therapeutic application in several neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22528839

  6. Sucrose esters increase drug penetration, but do not inhibit p-glycoprotein in caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Lóránd; Hellinger, Éva; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Kittel, Ágnes; Török, Zsolt; Füredi, András; Szakács, Gergely; Veszelka, Szilvia; Sipos, Péter; Ózsvári, Béla; Puskás, László G; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2014-10-01

    Sucrose fatty acid esters are increasingly used as excipients in pharmaceutical products, but few data are available on their toxicity profile, mode of action, and efficacy on intestinal epithelial models. Three water-soluble sucrose esters, palmitate (P-1695), myristate (M-1695), laurate (D-1216), and two reference absorption enhancers, Tween 80 and Cremophor RH40, were tested on Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 monolayers formed a good barrier as reflected by high transepithelial resistance and positive immunostaining for junctional proteins claudin-1, ZO-1, and β-catenin. Sucrose esters in nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced resistance and impedance, and increased permeability for atenolol, fluorescein, vinblastine, and rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 monolayers. No visible opening of the tight junctions was induced by sucrose esters assessed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, but some alterations were seen in the structure of filamentous actin microfilaments. Sucrose esters fluidized the plasma membrane and enhanced the accumulation of efflux transporter ligands rhodamine 123 and calcein AM in epithelial cells, but did not inhibit the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated calcein AM accumulation in MES-SA/Dx5 cell line. These data indicate that in addition to their dissolution-increasing properties sucrose esters can enhance drug permeability through both the transcellular and paracellular routes without inhibiting P-gp.

  7. Evaluation of the in vitro/in vivo drug interaction potential of BST204, a purified dry extract of ginseng, and its four bioactive ginsenosides through cytochrome P450 inhibition/induction and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Choi, Eu Jin; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Sun Ok; Jang, Min Jung; Park, Gyu Hwan; Shin, Wan Gyoon; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the potential of BST204, a purified dry extract of ginseng, to inhibit or induce human liver cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in vitro to assess its safety. In vitro drug interactions of four bioactive ginsenosides of BST204, S-Rg3, R-Rg3, S-Rh2, and R-Rh2, were also evaluated. We demonstrated that BST204 slightly inhibited CYP2C8, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP2B6 activities with IC50 values of 17.4, 26.8, 31.5, and 49.7μg/mL, respectively. BST204 also weakly inhibited UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 activities with IC50 values of 14.5, 26.6, and 31.5μg/mL, respectively. The potential inhibition by BST204 of the three UGT activities might be attributable to S-Rg3, at least in part, as its inhibitory pattern was similar to that of BST204. However, BST204 showed no time-dependent inactivation of the nine CYPs studied. In addition, BST204 did not induce CYP1A2, 2B6, or 3A4/5. On the basis of an in vivo interaction studies, our data strongly suggest that BST204 is unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition or induction of most CYPs or UGTs involved in drug metabolism in vivo. Our findings offer a clearer understanding and possibility to predict drug-drug interactions for the safe use of BST204 in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B10: Validation of Cotinine as a Selective Probe Substrate, Inhibition by UGT Enzyme-Selective Inhibitors and Antidepressant and Antipsychotic Drugs, and Structural Determinants of Enzyme Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Nair, Pramod C; Rowland, Andrew; Miners, John O

    2016-03-01

    Although there is evidence for an important role of UGT2B10 in the N-glucuronidation of drugs and other xenobiotics, the inhibitor selectivity of this enzyme is poorly understood. This study sought primarily to characterize the inhibition selectivity of UGT2B10 by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme-selective inhibitors used for reaction phenotyping, and 34 antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs that contain an amine functional group. Initial studies demonstrated that cotinine is a highly selective substrate of human liver microsomal UGT2B10. The kinetics of cotinine N-glucuronidation by recombinant UGT and human liver microsomes (± bovine serum albumin) were consistent with the involvement of a single enzyme. Of the UGT enzyme-selective inhibitors employed for reaction phenotyping, only the UGT2B4/7 inhibitor fluconazole reduced recombinant UGT2B10 activity to an appreciable extent. The majority of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs screened for effects on UGT2B10 inhibited enzyme activity with IC50 values <100 µM. The most potent inhibition was observed with the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline and doxepin and the tetracyclic antidepressant mianserin, and the structurally related compounds desloratadine and loratadine. Molecular modeling using a ligand-based approach indicated that hydrophobic and charge interactions are involved in inhibitor binding, whereas spatial features influence the potency of UGT2B10 inhibition. Respective mean Ki,u (± S.D.) values for amitriptyline, doxepin, and mianserin inhibition of human liver microsomal UGT2B10 were 0.61 ± 0.05, 0.95 ± 0.18, and 0.43 ± 0.01 µM. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation indicates that these drugs may perpetrate inhibitory drug-drug interactions when coadministered with compounds that are cleared predominantly by UGT2B10.

  9. The Antifungal Drug Itraconazole Inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2) Glycosylation, Trafficking, and Signaling in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nacev, Benjamin A.; Grassi, Paola; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Liu, Jun O.

    2011-01-01

    Itraconazole is a safe and widely used antifungal drug that was recently found to possess potent antiangiogenic activity. Currently, there are four active clinical trials evaluating itraconazole as a cancer therapeutic. Tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis, which is driven by the secretion of growth factors from the tumor itself. We report here that itraconazole significantly inhibited the binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and that both VEGFR2 and an immediate downstream substrate, phospholipase C γ1, failed to become activated after VEGF stimulation. These effects were due to a defect in VEGFR2 trafficking, leading to a decrease in cell surface expression, and were associated with the accumulation of immature N-glycans on VEGFR2. Small molecule inducers of lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, two previously reported itraconazole activities, failed to recapitulate itraconazole's effects on VEGFR2 glycosylation and signaling. Likewise, glycosylation inhibitors did not alter cholesterol trafficking or inhibit mTOR. Repletion of cellular cholesterol levels, which was known to rescue the effects of itraconazole on mTOR and cholesterol trafficking, was also able to restore VEGFR2 glycosylation and signaling. This suggests that the new effects of itraconazole occur in parallel to those previously reported but are downstream of a common target. We also demonstrated that itraconazole globally reduced poly-N-acetyllactosamine and tetra-antennary complex N-glycans in endothelial cells and induced hypoglycosylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in a renal cell carcinoma line, suggesting that itraconazole's effects extend beyond VEGFR2. PMID:22025615

  10. Sex-dependent antipsychotic capacity of 17β-estradiol in the latent inhibition model: a typical antipsychotic drug in both sexes, atypical antipsychotic drug in males.

    PubMed

    Arad, Michal; Weiner, Ina

    2010-10-01

    The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that estrogen is a natural neuroprotector in women and that exogenous estrogen may have antipsychotic potential, but results of clinical studies have been inconsistent. We have recently shown using the latent inhibition (LI) model of schizophrenia that 17β-estradiol exerts antipsychotic activity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The present study sought to extend the characterization of the antipsychotic action of 17β-estradiol (10, 50 and 150 μg/kg) by testing its capacity to reverse amphetamine- and MK-801-induced LI aberrations in gonadally intact female and male rats. No-drug controls of both sexes showed LI, ie, reduced efficacy of a previously non-reinforced stimulus to gain behavioral control when paired with reinforcement, if conditioned with two but not five tone-shock pairings. In both sexes, amphetamine (1 mg/kg) and MK-801 (50 μg/kg) produced disruption (under weak conditioning) and persistence (under strong conditioning) of LI, modeling positive and negative/cognitive symptoms, respectively. 17β-estradiol at 50 and 150 μg/kg potentiated LI under strong conditioning and reversed amphetamine-induced LI disruption in both males and females, mimicking the action of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in the LI model. 17β-estradiol also reversed MK-induced persistent LI, an effect mimicking atypical APDs and NMDA receptor enhancers, but this effect was observed in males and OVX females but not in intact females. These findings indicate that in the LI model, 17β-estradiol exerts a clear-cut antipsychotic activity in both sexes and, remarkably, is more efficacious in males and OVX females where it also exerts activity considered predictive of anti-negative/cognitive symptoms.

  11. Time-dependent inhibition and estimation of CYP3A clinical pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions using plated human cell systems.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Daniel R; Fullenwider, Cody L; Fisher, Michael B; Hutzler, J Matthew

    2012-07-01

    The current studies assessed the utility of freshly plated hepatocytes, cryopreserved plated hepatocytes, and cryopreserved plated HepaRG cells for the estimation of inactivation parameters k(inact) and K(I) for CYP3A. This was achieved using a subset of CYP3A time-dependent inhibitors (fluoxetine, verapamil, clarithromycin, troleandomycin, and mibefradil) representing a range of potencies. The estimated k(inact) and K(I) values for each time-dependent inhibitor were compared with those obtained using human liver microsomes and used to estimate the magnitude of clinical pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI). The inactivation kinetic parameter, k(inact), was most consistent across systems tested for clarithromycin, verapamil, and troleandomycin, with a high k(inact) of 0.91 min(-1) observed for mibefradil in HepaRG cells. The apparent K(I) estimates derived from the various systems displayed a range of variability from 3-fold for clarithromycin (5.4-17.7 μM) to 6-fold for verapamil (1.9-12.6 μM). In general, the inactivation kinetic parameters derived from the cell systems tested fairly replicated what was observed in time-dependent inhibition studies using human liver microsomes. Despite some of the observed differences in inactivation kinetic parameters, the estimated DDIs derived from each of the tested systems generally agreed with the clinically reported DDI within approximately 2-fold. In addition, a plated cell approach offered the ability to conduct longer primary incubations (greater than 30 min), which afforded improved ability to identify the weak time-dependent inhibitor fluoxetine. Overall, results from these studies suggest that in vitro inactivation parameters generated from plated cell systems may be a practical approach for identifying time-dependent inhibitors and for estimating the magnitude of clinical DDIs.

  12. Loss of Feedback Inhibition via D2 Autoreceptors Enhances Acquisition of Cocaine Taking and Reactivity to Drug-Paired Cues

    PubMed Central

    Holroyd, Kathryn B; Adrover, Martin F; Fuino, Robert L; Bock, Roland; Kaplan, Alanna R; Gremel, Christina M; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2015-01-01

    A prominent aspect of drug addiction is the ability of drug-associated cues to elicit craving and facilitate relapse. Understanding the factors that regulate cue reactivity will be vital for improving treatment of addictive disorders. Low availability of dopamine (DA) D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the striatum is associated with high cocaine intake and compulsive use. However, the role of D2Rs of nonstriatal origin in cocaine seeking and taking behavior and cue reactivity is less understood and possibly underestimated. D2Rs expressed by midbrain DA neurons function as autoreceptors, exerting inhibitory feedback on DA synthesis and release. Here, we show that selective loss of D2 autoreceptors impairs the feedback inhibition of DA release and amplifies the effect of cocaine on DA transmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in vitro. Mice lacking D2 autoreceptors acquire a cued-operant self-administration task for cocaine faster than littermate control mice but acquire similarly for a natural reward. Furthermore, although mice lacking D2 autoreceptors were able to extinguish self-administration behavior in the absence of cocaine and paired cues, they exhibited perseverative responding when cocaine-paired cues were present. This enhanced cue reactivity was selective for cocaine and was not seen during extinction of sucrose self-administration. We conclude that low levels of D2 autoreceptors enhance the salience of cocaine-paired cues and can contribute to the vulnerability for cocaine use and relapse. PMID:25547712

  13. The pro-oxidative drug WF-10 inhibits serial killing by primary human cytotoxic T-cells.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, G H; Balta, E; Schindler, S; Kirchgessner, H; Jahraus, B; Meuer, S; Samstag, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) play an important role in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Targeting cytotoxicity of CTLs would allow to interfere with immune-mediated tissue destruction. Here we demonstrate that WF-10, a pro-oxidative compound, inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. WF-10 did not influence early steps of target-cell killing, but impaired the ability of CTLs to detach from the initial target cell and to move to a second target cell. This reduced serial killing was accompanied by stronger enrichment of the adhesion molecule LFA-1 in the cytolytic immune synapse. LFA-1 clustering requires activation of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and was accordingly diminished in L-plastin knockdown cells. Interestingly, WF-10 likely acts through regulating L-plastin: (I) It induced L-plastin activation through phosphorylation leading to enhanced LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, and, importantly, (II) WF-10 lost its influence on target-cell killing in L-plastin knockdown cells. Finally, we demonstrate that WF-10 can improve immunosuppression by conventional drugs. Thus, while cyclosporine A alone had no significant effect on cytotoxicity of CTLs, a combination of cyclosporine A and WF-10 blocked target-cell killing synergistically. Together, our findings suggest that WF-10 - either alone or in combination with conventional immunosuppressive drugs - may be efficient to control progression of diseases, in which CTLs are crucially involved.

  14. THDP17 Decreases Ammonia Production through Glutaminase Inhibition. A New Drug for Hepatic Encephalopathy Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero-Aguilar, Pilar; Vega-Pérez, José M.; Iglesias-Guerra, Fernando; Periñán, Ignacio; Miñano, Francisco J.; Bautista, Juan; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia production is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), being intestinal glutaminase activity the main source for ammonia. Management of ammonia formation can be effective in HE treatment by lowering intestinal ammonia production. The use of glutaminase inhibitors represents one way to achieve this goal. In this work, we have performed a search for specific inhibitors that could decrease glutaminase activity by screening two different groups of compounds: i) a group integrated by a diverse, highly pure small molecule compounds derived from thiourea ranging from 200 to 800 Daltons; and ii) a group integrated by commonly use compounds in the treatment of HE. Results shown that THDP-17 (10 µM), a thiourea derivate product, could inhibit the intestinal glutaminase activity (57.4±6.7%). Inhibitory effect was tissue dependent, ranging from 40±5.5% to 80±7.8% in an uncompetitive manner, showing Vmax and Km values of 384.62 µmol min−1, 13.62 mM with THDP-17 10 µM, respectively. This compound also decreased the glutaminase activity in Caco-2 cell cultures, showing a reduction of ammonia and glutamate production, compared to control cultures. Therefore, the THDP-17 compound could be a good candidate for HE management, by lowering ammonia production. PMID:25329718

  15. CXCR4 targeted dendrimer for anti-cancer drug delivery and breast cancer cell migration inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Sarisuta, Narong

    2017-10-01

    CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 play a critical role in the metastasis of various types of cancer including breast cancer. Breast tumors preferentially metastasize to the lung, bones and distant lymph nodes, secreting high levels of CXCL12. We hypothesized that targeted inhibition of CXCR4 in breast cancer cells should suppress CXCR4-positive tumor cells toward secondary metastatic sites. In the present study, the efficacy of CXCR4 targeted dendrimers carrying DOX (LFC131-DOX-D4) on cellular binding, cytotoxicity, and migration of BT-549-Luc and T47D breast cancer cells was investigated. PAMAM dendrimers encapsulating DOX was surface functionalized with LFC131 peptide which recognized CXCR4 expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells. The LFC131-DOX-D4 bound to breast cancer cells resulting in significantly enhanced in vitro cellular toxicity as compared with non-targeted dendrimers. The LFC131-D4 exhibited remarkable reduced migration of BT-549-Luc breast cancer cells toward chemoattractant. This report demonstrated the potential utility of LFC131-dendrimer conjugates for breast cancer therapy and metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of ectopic glioma tumor growth by a potent ferrocenyl drug loaded into stealth lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Anne-Laure; Clavreul, Anne; Rousseau, Audrey; Tétaud, Clément; Vessieres, Anne; Garcion, Emmanuel; Jaouen, Gerard; Aubert, Léo; Guilbert, Matthieu; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Passirani, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a novel ferrocenyl complex (ansa-FcdiOH) was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). Stealth LNCs, prepared according to a one-step process, showed rapid uptake by cancer cells and extended blood circulation time. The ferrocenyl complex was successfully encapsulated into these LNCs measuring 40 nm with a high loading capacity (6.4%). In vitro studies showed a potent anticancer effect of ansa-FcdiOH on 9L cells with a low IC50 value (0.1 μM) associated with an oxidative stress and a dose-dependent alteration of the cell cycle. Repeated intravenous injections of stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs in ectopic glioma bearing rats induced a significant tumor growth inhibition, supported by a reduced number of proliferative cells in tumors compared to control group. Additionally, no liver damage was observed in treated animals. These results indicated that stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs might be considered as a potential new approach for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, a novel ferrocenyl complex was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules, demonstrating no liver damage, and superior tumor volume reduction compared to saline and stealth lipid nanocapsules alone in an ectopic glioma model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein expression and function by anti-diabetic drugs gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Mehran Mesgari; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a trans-membrane drug efflux pump. Several drugs are P-gp substrates. Some drugs may affect the activity of P-gp by inhibiting its function, resulting in significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs). It is critical to understand which drugs are inhibitors of P-gp so that adverse DDIs can be minimized or avoided. This study investigated the effects of gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone on the function and expression of P-gp. Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) efflux assays in Caco-2 cells and western blot testing were used to study in vitro the effect of the drugs on P-gp function and expression. The in situ rat single-pass intestinal permeability model was developed to study the effect of the drugs on P-gp function. Digoxin and verapamil were used as a known substrate and inhibitor of P-gp, respectively. Digoxin levels in intestinal perfusion samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Intestinal effective permeability (Peff) of digoxin in the presence of 0.1, 10, and 500 μM gliclazide, 100 and 7000 μM metformin, and 50 and 300 μM pioglitazone was significantly increased relative to the digoxin treated cells (P < 0.01). P-gp expression was decreased by gliclazide, metformin and pioglitazone. Intracellular accumulation of Rh 123 by the drugs increased, but the differences were not significant relative to the control cells (P > 0.05). It was found that gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone inhibited P-gp efflux activity in situ and down-regulated P-gp expression in vitro. Further investigations are necessary to confirm the obtained results and to define the mechanism underlying P-gp inhibition by the drugs. PMID:27499787

  18. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  19. Anti-Prion Drug mPPIg5 Inhibits PrPC Conversion to PrPSc

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James M.; Franke, Markus; Resenberger, Ulrike K.; Waldron, Sibeal; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Tatzelt, Jörg; Appelhans, Dietmar; Rogers, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. The ‘protein only hypothesis’ advocates that PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the cellular protein PrPC, is the main and possibly sole component of prion infectious agents. Currently, no effective therapy exists for these diseases at the symptomatic phase for either humans or animals, though a number of compounds have demonstrated the ability to eliminate PrPSc in cell culture models. Of particular interest are synthetic polymers known as dendrimers which possess the unique ability to eliminate PrPSc in both an intracellular and in vitro setting. The efficacy and mode of action of the novel anti-prion dendrimer mPPIg5 was investigated through the creation of a number of innovative bio-assays based upon the scrapie cell assay. These assays were used to demonstrate that mPPIg5 is a highly effective anti-prion drug which acts, at least in part, through the inhibition of PrPC to PrPSc conversion. Understanding how a drug works is a vital component in maximising its performance. By establishing the efficacy and method of action of mPPIg5, this study will help determine which drugs are most likely to enhance this effect and also aid the design of dendrimers with anti-prion capabilities for the future. PMID:23383136

  20. Anti-prion drug mPPIg5 inhibits PrP(C) conversion to PrP(Sc).

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James M; Franke, Markus; Resenberger, Ulrike K; Waldron, Sibeal; Simpson, Jeremy C; Tatzelt, Jörg; Appelhans, Dietmar; Rogers, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. The 'protein only hypothesis' advocates that PrP(Sc), an abnormal isoform of the cellular protein PrP(C), is the main and possibly sole component of prion infectious agents. Currently, no effective therapy exists for these diseases at the symptomatic phase for either humans or animals, though a number of compounds have demonstrated the ability to eliminate PrPSc in cell culture models. Of particular interest are synthetic polymers known as dendrimers which possess the unique ability to eliminate PrP(Sc) in both an intracellular and in vitro setting. The efficacy and mode of action of the novel anti-prion dendrimer mPPIg5 was investigated through the creation of a number of innovative bio-assays based upon the scrapie cell assay. These assays were used to demonstrate that mPPIg5 is a highly effective anti-prion drug which acts, at least in part, through the inhibition of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc) conversion. Understanding how a drug works is a vital component in maximising its performance. By establishing the efficacy and method of action of mPPIg5, this study will help determine which drugs are most likely to enhance this effect and also aid the design of dendrimers with anti-prion capabilities for the future.

  1. Solitary Inhibition of the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Efflux Transporter Results in a Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interaction with Rosuvastatin by Causing up to a 2-Fold Increase in Statin Exposure.

    PubMed

    Elsby, Robert; Martin, Paul; Surry, Dominic; Sharma, Pradeep; Fenner, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) restricts the absorption of rosuvastatin. Of the transporters important to rosuvastatin disposition, fostamatinib inhibited BCRP (IC50 = 50 nM) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1; IC50 > 10 μM), but not organic anion transporter 3, in vitro, predicting a drug-drug interaction (DDI) in vivo through inhibition of BCRP only. Consequently, a clinical interaction study between fostamatinib and rosuvastatin was performed (and reported elsewhere). This confirmed the critical role BCRP plays in statin absorption, as inhibition by fostamatinib resulted in a significant 1.96-fold and 1.88-fold increase in rosuvastatin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and Cmax, respectively. An in vitro BCRP inhibition assay, using polarized Caco-2 cells and rosuvastatin as probe substrate, was subsequently validated with literature inhibitors and used to determine BCRP inhibitory potencies (IC50) of the perpetrator drugs eltrombopag, darunavir, lopinavir, clopidogrel, ezetimibe, fenofibrate, and fluconazole. OATP1B1 inhibition was also determined using human embryonic kidney 293-OATP1B1 cells versus estradiol 17β-glucuronide. Calculated parameters of maximum enterocyte concentration [Igut max], maximum unbound hepatic inlet concentration, transporter fraction excreted value, and determined IC50 value were incorporated into mechanistic static equations to compute theoretical increases in rosuvastatin AUC due to inhibition of BCRP and/or OATP1B1. Calculated theoretical increases in exposure correctly predicted the clinically observed changes in rosuvastatin exposure and suggested intestinal BCRP inhibition (not OATP1B1) to be the mechanism underlying the DDIs with these drugs. In conclusion, solitary inhibition of the intestinal BCRP transporter can result in clinically significant DDIs with rosuvastatin, causing up to a maximum 2-fold increase in exposure, which may warrant

  2. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting drug reduces HSV-1 reactivation in the mouse eye model.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Shiro; Watanabe, Keizo; Itahashi, Motoki; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2009-03-01

    To examine the effects of COX inhibitors on suppressing HSV-1 reactivation in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were latently infected with HSV-1 and treated by 0.1% bromfenac Na eye drops, 0.1% pranoprofen eye drops, 0.1 mg oral etodolac 4 times/day, and saline for 4 days. After reactivating the latent HSV-1, we swabbed the mouse ocular surface for the culture of the infectious virus and assessed the viral loads in the eyes and trigeminal ganglia (TGs) using real-time PCR to determine the treatment efficacies. With stimulated reactivation, 10 of 24 (41.7%), 5 of 10 (50.0%), 17 of 25 (68%), and 16 of 22 eyes (72.7%) showed positive swab results in the bromfenac Na, etodolac, pranoprofen, and saline groups, respectively; and a significant difference was seen only between the bromfenac Na and saline groups (p = 0.033). None of the three drug-treated groups showed any significant difference from the saline group in the viral DNA in the eyes and TGs (p > 0.05). Bromfenac Na eye drops can suppress HSV-1 reactivation.

  3. Galectin-3 inhibition suppresses drug resistance, motility, invasion and angiogenic potential in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Yu, Yuefei; Cannon, Martin J; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Rahman, Rakhshanda L; Nguyen, Diane D; Grizzi, Fabio; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy worldwide. Since the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is incompletely understood, and there are no available screening techniques for early detection, most patients are diagnosed with advanced, incurable disease. In an effort to develop innovative and effective therapies for ovarian cancer, we tested the effectiveness of Galecti-3C in vitro. This is a truncated, dominant negative form of Galectin-3, which is thought to act by blocking endogenous Galectin-3. We produced a truncated, dominant-negative form of Galectin-3, namely Galetic-3C. Ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cells from ovarian cancer patients were treated with Galectin-3C, and growth, drug sensitivity, and angiogenesis were tested. We show, for the first time, that Galectin-3C significantly reduces the growth, motility, invasion, and angiogenic potential of cultured OC cell lines and primary cells established from OC patients. Our findings indicate that Galectin-3C is a promising new compound for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation and associated cytotoxicity by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jessica S; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) constitute an important pharmacotherapeutic class that, over the past decade, have expanded in application to a panoply of medical conditions. They have been tested for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's to reduce inflammation and also in the attempt to abrogate amyloid deposition. However, the use of NSAIDs as aggregation inhibitors has not been extensively studied in pancreatic amyloid deposition. Pancreatic amyloidosis involves the misfolding of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and contributes to the progression of type-2 diabetes in humans and felines. To ascertain their antiamyloidogenic activity, several NSAIDs were tested using fluorometric thioflavin-T assays, circular dichroism, photo-induced cross-linking assays, and cell culture. Celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, niflumic acid, nimesulide, phenylbutazone, piroxicam, sulindac, and tenoxicam reduced fibrillization at a molar ratio of 1:10. The circular dichroism spectra of diclofenac, piroxicam, and sulindac showed characteristic spectral signatures found in predominantly α-helical structures. The oligomerization of human IAPP was abrogated with diclofenac and sulindac at a molar ratio of 1:5. The cytotoxic effects of pre-incubated human IAPP on cultured INS-1 cells were noticeably reduced in the presence of diclofenac, meloxicam, phenylbutazone, sulindac, and tenoxicam at a molar ratio of 1:10. Our results demonstrate that NSAIDs can provide chemical scaffolds to generate new and promising antiamyloidogenic agents that can be used alone or as a coadjuvant therapy.

  5. Drug inhibition of HDAC3 and epigenetic control of differentiation in Apicomplexa parasites.

    PubMed

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Maubon, Danièle; Baldacci, Patricia; Ortet, Philippe; Bastien, Olivier; Bouillon, Anthony; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Pelloux, Hervé; Ménard, Robert; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2009-04-13

    Plasmodium and Toxoplasma are parasites of major medical importance that belong to the Apicomplexa phylum of protozoa. These parasites transform into various stages during their life cycle and express a specific set of proteins at each stage. Although little is yet known of how gene expression is controlled in Apicomplexa, histone modifications, particularly acetylation, are emerging as key regulators of parasite differentiation and stage conversion. We investigated the anti-Apicomplexa effect of FR235222, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). We show that FR235222 is active against a variety of Apicomplexa genera, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, and is more potent than other HDACi's such as trichostatin A and the clinically relevant compound pyrimethamine. We identify T. gondii HDAC3 (TgHDAC3) as the target of FR235222 in Toxoplasma tachyzoites and demonstrate the crucial role of the conserved and Apicomplexa HDAC-specific residue TgHDAC3 T99 in the inhibitory activity of the drug. We also show that FR235222 induces differentiation of the tachyzoite (replicative) into the bradyzoite (nonreplicative) stage. Additionally, via its anti-TgHDAC3 activity, FR235222 influences the expression of approximately 370 genes, a third of which are stage-specifically expressed. These results identify FR235222 as a potent HDACi of Apicomplexa, and establish HDAC3 as a central regulator of gene expression and stage conversion in Toxoplasma and, likely, other Apicomplexa.

  6. Drug inhibition of HDAC3 and epigenetic control of differentiation in Apicomplexa parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Maubon, Danièle; Baldacci, Patricia; Ortet, Philippe; Bastien, Olivier; Bouillon, Anthony; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Pelloux, Hervé; Ménard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium and Toxoplasma are parasites of major medical importance that belong to the Apicomplexa phylum of protozoa. These parasites transform into various stages during their life cycle and express a specific set of proteins at each stage. Although little is yet known of how gene expression is controlled in Apicomplexa, histone modifications, particularly acetylation, are emerging as key regulators of parasite differentiation and stage conversion. We investigated the anti-Apicomplexa effect of FR235222, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). We show that FR235222 is active against a variety of Apicomplexa genera, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, and is more potent than other HDACi's such as trichostatin A and the clinically relevant compound pyrimethamine. We identify T. gondii HDAC3 (TgHDAC3) as the target of FR235222 in Toxoplasma tachyzoites and demonstrate the crucial role of the conserved and Apicomplexa HDAC-specific residue TgHDAC3 T99 in the inhibitory activity of the drug. We also show that FR235222 induces differentiation of the tachyzoite (replicative) into the bradyzoite (nonreplicative) stage. Additionally, via its anti-TgHDAC3 activity, FR235222 influences the expression of ∼370 genes, a third of which are stage-specifically expressed. These results identify FR235222 as a potent HDACi of Apicomplexa, and establish HDAC3 as a central regulator of gene expression and stage conversion in Toxoplasma and, likely, other Apicomplexa. PMID:19349466

  7. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R S; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. This strategy promises to be effective against drug-resistant strains. The approach also has potential to considerably lower the risk of emergence of new drug-resistant strains. We explored tyrosine kinase Src as a

  8. Coproporphyrins in Plasma and Urine Can Be Appropriate Clinical Biomarkers to Recapitulate Drug-Drug Interactions Mediated by Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yurong; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Shen, Hong; Holenarsipur, Vinay K; Langish, Robert; Rajanna, Prabhakar; Murugesan, Senthilkumar; Gaud, Nilesh; Selvam, Sabariya; Date, Onkar; Cheng, Yaofeng; Shipkova, Petia; Dai, Jun; Humphreys, William G; Marathe, Punit

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, an open-label, three-treatment, three-period clinical study of rosuvastatin (RSV) and rifampicin (RIF) when administered alone and in combination was conducted in 12 male healthy subjects to determine if coproporphyrin I (CP-I) and coproporphyrin III (CP-III) could serve as clinical biomarkers for organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and 1B3 that belong to the solute carrier organic anion gene subfamily. Genotyping of the human OATP1B1 gene was performed in all 12 subjects and confirmed absence of OATP1B1*5 and OATP1B1*15 mutations. Average plasma concentrations of CP-I and CP-III prior to drug administration were 0.91 ± 0.21 and 0.15 ± 0.04 nM, respectively, with minimum fluctuation over the three periods. CP-I was passively eliminated, whereas CP-III was actively secreted from urine. Administration of RSV caused no significant changes in the plasma and urinary profiles of CP-I and CP-III. RIF markedly increased the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of CP-I and CP-III by 5.7- and 5.4-fold (RIF) or 5.7- and 6.5-fold (RIF+RSV), respectively, as compared with the predose values. The area under the plasma concentration curves from time 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24h) of CP-I and CP-III with RIF and RSV increased by 4.0- and 3.3-fold, respectively, when compared with RSV alone. In agreement with this finding, Cmax and AUC0-24h of RSV increased by 13.2- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when RIF was coadministered. Collectively, we conclude that CP-I and CP-III in plasma and urine can be appropriate endogenous biomarkers specifically and reliably reflecting OATP inhibition, and thus the measurement of these molecules can serve as a useful tool to assess OATP drug-drug interaction liabilities in early clinical studies.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibition overcomes drug resistance through a miRNA-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Hanigan, Christin L.; Woster, Patrick M.; Marton, Laurence J.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of specific tumor cell lines with poly- and oligoamine analogues results in a super-induction of polyamine catabolism that is associated with cytotoxicity; however, other tumor cells demonstrate resistance to analogue treatment. Recent data indicate that some of these analogues also have direct epigenetic effects. We therefore sought to determine the effects of combining specific analogues with an epigenetic targeting agent in phenotypically resistant human lung cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 when combined with (N1, N11)-bisethylnorspermine (BENSpm) or (N1, N12)-bis(ethyl)-cis-6,7-dehydrospermine tetrahydrochloride (PG-11047) synergistically induces the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), a major determinant of sensitivity to the antitumor analogues. Evidence indicates that the mechanism of this synergy includes reactivation of miR-200a, which targets and destabilizes kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) mRNA, resulting in the translocation and binding of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) to the polyamine-responsive element of the SSAT promoter. This transcriptional stimulation combined with positive regulation of SSAT mRNA and protein by the analogues results in decreased intracellular concentrations of natural polyamines and growth inhibition. The finding that an epigenetic targeting agent is capable of inducing a rate-limiting step in polyamine catabolism to overcome resistance to the antitumor analogues represents a completely novel chemotherapeutic approach. This is also the first demonstration of miRNA-mediated regulation of the polyamine catabolic pathway. Furthermore, the individual agents used in this study have been investigated clinically; therefore, translation of these combinations into the clinical setting holds promise. PMID:23943804

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibition overcomes drug resistance through a miRNA-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Hanigan, Christin L; Woster, Patrick M; Marton, Laurence J; Casero, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    The treatment of specific tumor cell lines with poly- and oligoamine analogs results in a superinduction of polyamine catabolism that is associated with cytotoxicity; however, other tumor cells show resistance to analog treatment. Recent data indicate that some of these analogs also have direct epigenetic effects. We, therefore, sought to determine the effects of combining specific analogs with an epigenetic targeting agent in phenotypically resistant human lung cancer cell lines. We show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275, when combined with (N(1), N(11))-bisethylnorspermine (BENSpm) or (N(1), N(12))-bis(ethyl)-cis-6,7-dehydrospermine tetrahydrochloride (PG-11047), synergistically induces the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), a major determinant of sensitivity to the antitumor analogs. Evidence indicates that the mechanism of this synergy includes reactivation of miR-200a, which targets and destabilizes kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) mRNA, resulting in the translocation and binding of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) to the polyamine-responsive element of the SSAT promoter. This transcriptional stimulation, combined with positive regulation of SSAT mRNA and protein by the analogs, results in decreased intracellular concentrations of natural polyamines and growth inhibition. The finding that an epigenetic targeting agent is capable of inducing a rate-limiting step in polyamine catabolism to overcome resistance to the antitumor analogs represents a completely novel chemotherapeutic approach. In addition, this is the first demonstration of miRNA-mediated regulation of the polyamine catabolic pathway. Furthermore, the individual agents used in this study have been investigated clinically; therefore, translation of these combinations into the clinical setting holds promise.

  11. Inhibition of Established Micrometastases by Targeted Drug Delivery via Cell Surface Associated GRP78

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yu Rebecca; Eckhardt, Bedrich L.; Cao, Yuan; Pasqualini, Renata; Argani, Pedram; Arap, Wadih; Ramsay, Robert G.; Anderson, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The major cause of morbidity in breast cancer is development of metastatic disease, for which few effective therapies exist. Since tumor cell dissemination is often an early event in breast cancer progression and can occur prior to diagnosis, new therapies need to focus on targeting established metastatic disease in secondary organs. We report an effective therapy based on targeting cell surface-localized glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78). GRP78 is expressed normally in the endoplasmic reticulum, but many tumors and disseminated tumor cells are subjected to environmental stresses and exhibit elevated levels of GRP78, some of which is localized at the plasma membrane. Experimental Design and Results Here we show that matched primary tumors and metastases from patients who died from advanced breast cancer also express high levels of GRP78. We utilized a peptidomimetic targeting strategy that employs a known GRP78-binding peptide fused to a pro-apoptotic moiety (designated BMTP78) and show that it can selectively kill breast cancer cells that express surface-localized GRP78. Further, in preclinical metastasis models, we demonstrate that administration of BMTP78 can inhibit primary tumor growth as well as prolong overall survival by reducing the extent of outgrowth of established lung and bone micrometastases. Conclusions The data presented here provide strong evidence that it is possible to induce cell death in established micrometastases by peptide mediated targeting of cell surface localized GRP in advanced breast cancers. The significance to patients with advanced breast cancer of a therapy that can reduce established metastatic disease should not be underestimated. PMID:23470966

  12. Inhibition of Fe(2+)- and Fe(3+)- induced hydroxyl radical production by the iron-chelating drug deferiprone.

    PubMed

    Timoshnikov, V A; Kobzeva, T V; Polyakov, N E; Kontoghiorghes, G J

    2015-01-01

    Deferiprone (L1) is an effective iron-chelating drug that is widely used for the treatment of iron-overload diseases. It is known that in aqueous solutions Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions can produce hydroxyl radicals via Fenton and photo-Fenton reactions. Although previous studies with Fe(2+) have reported ferroxidase activity by L1 followed by the formation of Fe(3+) chelate complexes and potential inhibition of Fenton reaction, no detailed data are available on the molecular antioxidant mechanisms involved. Similarly, in vitro studies have also shown that L1-Fe(3+) complexes exhibit intense absorption bands up to 800nm and might be potential sources of phototoxicity. In this study we have applied an EPR spin trapping technique to answer two questions: (1) does L1 inhibit the Fenton reaction catalyzed by Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions and (2) does UV-Vis irradiation of the L1-Fe(3+) complex result in the formation of reactive oxygen species. PBN and TMIO spin traps were used for detection of oxygen free radicals, and TEMP was used to trap singlet oxygen if it was formed via energy transfer from L1 in the triplet excited state. It was demonstrated that irradiation of Fe(3+) aqua complexes by UV and visible light in the presence of spin traps results in the appearance of an EPR signal of the OH spin adduct (TMIO-OH, a(N)=14.15G, a(H)=16.25G; PBN-OH, a(N)=16.0G, a(H)=2.7G). The presence of L1 completely inhibited the OH radical production. The mechanism of OH spin adduct formation was confirmed by the detection of methyl radicals in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. No formation of singlet oxygen was detected under irradiation of L1 or its iron complexes. Furthermore, the interaction of L1 with Fe(2+) ions completely inhibited hydroxyl radical production in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These findings confirm an antioxidant targeting potential of L1 in diseases related to oxidative damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marjorie G.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  14. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marjorie G; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-11-18

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity.

  15. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention.

  16. A Drug-Disease Model Describing the Effect of Oseltamivir Neuraminidase Inhibition on Influenza Virus Progression

    PubMed Central

    Gieschke, Ronald; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.; Smith, Patrick F.; Rayner, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    A population drug-disease model was developed to describe the time course of influenza virus with and without oseltamivir treatment and to investigate opportunities for antiviral combination therapy. Data included viral titers from 208 subjects, across 4 studies, receiving placebo and oseltamivir at 20 to 200 mg twice daily for 5 days. A 3-compartment mathematical model, comprising target cells infected at rate β, free virus produced at rate p and cleared at rate c, and infected cells cleared at rate δ, was implemented in NONMEM with an inhibitory Hill function on virus production (p), accounting for the oseltamivir effect. In congruence with clinical data, the model predicts that the standard 75-mg regimen initiated 2 days after infection decreased viral shedding duration by 1.5 days versus placebo; the 150-mg regimen decreased shedding by an additional average 0.25 day. The model also predicts that initiation of oseltamivir sooner postinfection, specifically at day 0.5 or 1, results in proportionally greater decreases in viral shedding duration of 5 and 3.5 days, respectively. Furthermore, the model suggests that combining oseltamivir (acting to subdue virus production rate) with an antiviral whose activity decreases viral infectivity (β) results in a moderate additive effect dependent on therapy initiation time. In contrast, the combination of oseltamivir with an antiviral whose activity increases viral clearance (c) shows significant additive effects independent of therapy initiation time. The utility of the model for investigating the pharmacodynamic effects of novel antivirals alone or in combination on emergent influenza virus strains warrants further investigation. PMID:26100715

  17. Intestinal toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with differential cyclooxygenase inhibition selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Saini, R Kishore; Sanyal, S Nath

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the gastrointestinal side effects of cycloxygenase (COX) inhibitor with varying selectivity, called the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz., non-selective COX-1 & 2 inhibitor--aspirin, prefentially selective COX-2 inhibitor--nimesulide and highly selective COX-2 inhibitor-celecoxib. Treatment with NSAIDs exhibited a decrease in the activity of rat intestinal brush border membrane associated enzymes such as sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase as compared to the control in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The uptake of D-glucose and L-histidine in the everted intestinal sac was found to be decreased. Also the decease of glucose and histidine uptake was found to be dependent on the substrate concentration, temperature and the time interval of incubation. The physical state and composition of brush border membrane was found to be altered as evident in the FTIR spectrum, by appearance of new peaks while disappearance of certain peaks occurred which were characteristics of the control membrane. The changes in wave number as well as peaks height were also noticed. Alterations in protein profile of the membrane were demonstrated using SDS-PAGE analysis where disappearance of few bands and change in the relative intensities of the bands were noticed and correlated with the alterations that have taken place at the molecular level. Histological studies have depicted a marked decrease in the absorption surface area such as the villi height of the intestinal segment. In addition, crypt number also deceased in the treated animals, an indication that such changes also correlate well with the changes in the transport of the end product nutrients.

  18. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  19. Structure-activity studies of Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in the Niclosamide chemotype: Identification of derivatives with improved drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Mook, Robert A; Wang, Jiangbo; Ren, Xiu-Rong; Chen, Minyong; Spasojevic, Ivan; Barak, Larry S; Lyerly, H Kim; Chen, Wei

    2015-09-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in regulation of organ development and tissue homeostasis. Dysregulated Wnt activity is one of the major underlying mechanisms responsible for many diseases including cancer. We previously reported the FDA-approved anthelmintic drug Niclosamide inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppresses colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Niclosamide is a multi-functional drug that possesses important biological activity in addition to inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Here, we studied the SAR of Wnt signaling inhibition in the anilide and salicylamide region of Niclosamide. We found that the 4'-nitro substituent can be effectively replaced by trifluoromethyl or chlorine and that the potency of inhibition was dependent on the substitution pattern in the anilide ring. Non-anilide, N-methyl amides and reverse amide derivatives lost significant potency, while acylated salicylamide derivatives inhibited signaling with potency similar to non-acyl derivatives. Niclosamide's low systemic exposure when dosed orally may hinder its use to treat systemic disease. To overcome this limitation we identified an acyl derivative of Niclosamide, DK-520 (compound 32), that significantly increased both the plasma concentration and the duration of exposure of Niclosamide when dosed orally. The studies herein provide a medicinal chemical foundation to improve the pharmacokinetic exposure of Niclosamide and Wnt-signaling inhibitors based on the Niclosamide chemotype. The identification of novel derivatives of Niclosamide that metabolize to Niclosamide and increase its drug exposure may provide important research tools for in vivo studies and provide drug candidates for treating cancers with dysregulated Wnt signaling including drug-resistant cancers. Moreover, since Niclosamide is a multi-functional drug, new research tools such as DK520 could directly result in novel treatments against bacterial and viral infection, lupus, and metabolic

  20. Inhibition of brain tumor growth by intravenous poly (β-L-malic acid) nanobioconjugate with pH-dependent drug release [corrected].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Inoue, Satoshi; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Hu, Jinwei; Konda, Bindu; Wawrowsky, Kolja A; Fujita, Manabu; Karabalin, Natalya; Sasaki, Takako; Black, Keith L; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2010-10-19

    Effective treatment of brain neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, or tumors should be possible with drug delivery through blood-brain barrier (BBB) or blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) and targeting specific types of brain cells with drug release into the cell cytoplasm. A polymeric nanobioconjugate drug based on biodegradable, nontoxic, and nonimmunogenic polymalic acid as a universal delivery nanoplatform was used for design and synthesis of nanomedicine drug for i.v. treatment of brain tumors. The polymeric drug passes through the BTB and tumor cell membrane using tandem monoclonal antibodies targeting the BTB and tumor cells. The next step for polymeric drug action was inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by specifically blocking the synthesis of a tumor neovascular trimer protein, laminin-411, by attached antisense oligonucleotides (AONs). The AONs were released into the target cell cytoplasm via pH-activated trileucine, an endosomal escape moiety. Drug delivery to the brain tumor and the release mechanism were both studied for this nanobiopolymer. Introduction of a trileucine endosome escape unit resulted in significantly increased AON delivery to tumor cells, inhibition of laminin-411 synthesis in vitro and in vivo, specific accumulation in brain tumors, and suppression of intracranial glioma growth compared with pH-independent leucine ester. The availability of a systemically active polymeric drug delivery system that passes through the BTB, targets tumor cells, and inhibits glioma growth gives hope for a successful strategy of glioma treatment. This delivery system with drug release into the brain-specific cell type could be useful for treatment of various brain pathologies.

  1. Developing a microbiological growth inhibition screening assay for the detection of 27 veterinary drugs from 13 different classes in animal feedingstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Torsten; Pellet, Terence; Boscher, Aurore; Hoffmann, Lucien

    2013-01-01

    Many regulations prohibit using veterinary drugs in feedingstuffs to protect consumers and animals alike. Within this investigation we developed a simple, cost-efficient primary screening method for detecting antibiotics and coccidiostats in animal feeds. Thirty-two veterinary drugs were originally considered. Following matrix-free testing to optimise detection, an assay based on matrix extraction with methanol/acetonitrile/phosphate buffer followed by inoculation and diffusion in agar plates was developed. Final validation was performed with 14 representative drugs (one per drug class) and four bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC11303 and ATCC27166, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538P, Micrococcus luteus ATCC9341) in bovine, lamb and swine fodder, measuring growth inhibition zones. Of the original drugs tested, 27 remained detectable in feed matrices at or below 20 mg kg(-1). Of the 14 validated representatives, two had estimated minimum detectable concentrations of 10-11 mg kg(-1), others of 5 mg kg(-1) or lower, an earlier minimum European Union inclusion rate for many veterinary drugs. No significant matrix effect on inhibition zones was detected. Per cent wrong negative deviations ranged from 0% (nine of 14 compounds) to 20-27% (two of 14), while inter-day precision based on inhibition zones had relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 6-109% (mean of 40%). When setting a 1 mm inhibition zone, the maximum observed for negative controls, as a cut-off level, no false-positives were found. While not all targeted antibiotics were detectable in complex matrices, the majority of veterinary drugs were detected with reasonable sensitivity, indicating that this method could be suitable for screening feedingstuffs prior to further confirmatory investigation of positive findings such as by LC-MS/MS.

  2. Colon tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Thaiparambil, Jose; Li, Nan; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y; Keeton, Adam B; Piazza, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicity resulting from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their clinical use for chemoprevention. Studies suggest that the mechanism may be COX independent, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here, we show that the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in colon tumor cell lysates at concentrations that inhibit colon tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. A series of chemically diverse NSAIDs also inhibited cGMP hydrolysis at concentrations that correlate with their potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth, whereas no correlation was observed with COX-2 inhibition. Consistent with its selectivity for inhibiting cGMP hydrolysis compared with cyclic AMP hydrolysis, SS inhibited the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme and increased cGMP levels in colon tumor cells. Of numerous PDE isozyme-specific inhibitors evaluated, only the PDE5-selective inhibitor MY5445 inhibited colon tumor cell growth. The effects of SS and MY5445 on cell growth were associated with inhibition of β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity to suppress the synthesis of cyclin D and survivin, which regulate tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. SS had minimal effects on cGMP PDE activity in normal colonocytes, which displayed reduced sensitivity to SS and did not express PDE5. PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in colon tumor cell lines as well as in colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas compared with normal colonic mucosa. These results suggest that PDE5 inhibition, cGMP elevation, and inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of certain NSAIDs.

  3. Poor Response Inhibition as a Predictor of Problem Drinking and Illicit Drug Use in Adolescents at Risk for Alcoholism and Other Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Wong, Maria M.; Martel, Michelle M.; Jester, Jennifer M.; Puttler, Leon I.; Glass, Jennifer M.; Adams, Kenneth M.; Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the predictive power of executive functions, in particular, response inhibition, in relation to alcohol-related problems and illicit drug use in adolescence. Method: A total of 498 children from 275 families from a longitudinal high-risk study completed executive function measures in early and late adolescence and lifetime…

  4. Poor Response Inhibition as a Predictor of Problem Drinking and Illicit Drug Use in Adolescents at Risk for Alcoholism and Other Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Wong, Maria M.; Martel, Michelle M.; Jester, Jennifer M.; Puttler, Leon I.; Glass, Jennifer M.; Adams, Kenneth M.; Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the predictive power of executive functions, in particular, response inhibition, in relation to alcohol-related problems and illicit drug use in adolescence. Method: A total of 498 children from 275 families from a longitudinal high-risk study completed executive function measures in early and late adolescence and lifetime…

  5. Postexcitatory inhibition after transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in patients with drug-induced parkinsonism and in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Masur, H; Althoff, S; Erim, Y; Oberwittler, C; Hornung, W P

    1998-03-01

    The duration of the postexcitatory inhibition after transcranial magnetic stimulation was investigated in 16 patients with drug-induced parkinsonism and in 20 healthy control individuals. In the patients, the chlorpromazine-equivalent of the neuroleptic medication was determined, and the severity of the drug-induced parkinsonism was measured using the Simpson-Angus Scale score. Group comparison (U-test) revealed a significant shorter postexcitatory inhibition in patients than in control individuals. Regression analyses showed a negative correlation between the Simpson-Angus scale score and the duration of the postexcitatory inhibition. The correlation only reached significance for a group of patients who received at least one butyrophenone derivate. No clear-cut relation was found between the chlorpromazine equivalent and the postexcitatory inhibition. These results indicate that drug-induced parkinsonism shares features of genuine Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, it seems possible to assess the extrapyramidal side effect of butyrophenone derivates, but not for other neuroleptic drugs, by means of the method described.

  6. Characterization of Long-Lasting Oatp Inhibition by Typical Inhibitor Cyclosporine A and In Vitro-In Vivo Discrepancy in Its Drug Interaction Potential in Rats.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takayuki; Masuo, Yusuke; Kogi, Tatsuya; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kato, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative assessment of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is one of the major focuses in drug development. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate in vitro-in vivo discrepancy of DDI potential for prototypical organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) using rats. Plasma concentration of pravastatin, prototypical Oatp substrate, after oral administration was increased by CsA intravenously administered at 1 d before the pravastatin administration. The ratio of the area under the curve of pravastatin to the control was much higher than the R-values calculated using the plasma unbound concentrations of CsA and the inhibition constant (Ki) assessed in isolated hepatocytes, indicating in vitro-in vivo discrepancy. This interaction with pravastatin persisted for 3 d after CsA administration, demonstrating long-lasting inhibition in vivo. The Ki value for unbound CsA in the presence of serum was comparable with that in its absence. M1, the major metabolite of CsA inhibited pravastatin uptake at much higher concentration compared with its plasma unbound concentration. Thus, the DDI potential of CsA-mediated hepatic Oatp inhibition cannot be extrapolated from in vitro data, and this could be due to the long-lasting Oatp inhibition by CsA, but not the effect of plasma protein or metabolites. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene-1 expression inhibits urethane-induced pulmonary tumorigenesis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cekanova, Maria; Lee, Seong-Ho; Donnell, Robert L; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Eling, Thomas E; Fischer, Susan M; Baek, Seung Joon

    2009-05-01

    The expression of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene-1 (NAG-1) inhibits gastrointestinal tumorigenesis in NAG-1 transgenic mice (C57/BL6 background). In the present study, we investigated whether the NAG-1 protein would alter urethane-induced pulmonary lesions in NAG-1 transgenic mice on an FVB background (NAG-1(Tg+/FVB)). NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice had both decreased number and size of urethane-induced tumors, compared with control littermates (NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) = 16 +/- 4 per mouse versus control = 20 +/- 7 per mouse, P < 0.05). Urethane-induced pulmonary adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed in control mice; however, only pulmonary adenomas were observed in NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice. Urethane-induced tumors from control littermates and NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice highly expressed proteins in the arachidonic acid pathway (cyclooxygenases 1/2, prostaglandin E synthase, and prostaglandin E(2) receptor) and highly activated several kinases (phospho-Raf-1 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2). However, only urethane-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was decreased in NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice. Furthermore, significantly increased apoptosis in tumors of NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice compared with control mice was observed as assessed by caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, fewer inflammatory cells were observed in the lung tissue isolated from urethane-treated NAG-1(Tg+/FVB) mice compared with control mice. These results paralleled in vitro assays using human A549 pulmonary carcinoma cells. Less phosphorylated p38 MAPK was observed in cells overexpressing NAG-1 compared with control cells. Overall, our study revealed for the first time that the NAG-1 protein inhibits urethane-induced tumor formation, probably mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway, and is a possible new target for lung cancer chemoprevention.

  8. Chemoprevention of Colon Cancer through Inhibition of Angiogenesis and Induction of Apoptosis by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells require nourishment for the growth of the primary tumor mass and spread of the metastatic colony. These needs are fulfilled by tumor-associated neovasculature known as angiogenesis, which also favors the transition from hyperplasia to neoplasia, that is, from a state of cellular multiplication to uncontrolled proliferation. Therefore, targeting angiogenesis is profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. Furthermore, it is important to understand the cross-communication between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the neoplastic and proinflammatory milieu. We studied the role of two important chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1] and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β]) along with VEGF and MMPs in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced chemopreventive effects in experimental colon cancer in rats. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) was used as cancer-inducing agent and three NSAIDs (celecoxib, etoricoxib, and diclofenac) were given orally as chemopreventive agents. Analysis by immunofluorescence and western blotting shows that the expression of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 was found to be significantly elevated in the DMH- treated group and notably lowered by NSAID coadministration. The expression of MCP-1 was found to be markedly decreased, whereas that of MIP-1β increased after NSAID coadministration. NSAID coadministration was also able to induce apoptosis, confirmed using studies by Hoechst/propidium iodide (PI) costaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results from the present study indicate the potential role of these chemokines along with VEGF and MMPs against angiogenesis in DMH-induced cancer. The inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis by NSAIDs were found to be possible mechanisms in the chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  9. Genetic Pharmacotherapy as an Early CNS Drug Development Strategy: Testing Glutaminase Inhibition for Schizophrenia Treatment in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Mingote, Susana; Masson, Justine; Gellman, Celia; Thomsen, Gretchen M; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Merker, Robert J; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Ernst, Rachel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic pharmacotherapy is an early drug development strategy for the identification of novel CNS targets in mouse models prior to the development of specific ligands. Here for the first time, we have implemented this strategy to address the potential therapeutic value of a glutamate-based pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia involving inhibition of the glutamate recycling enzyme phosphate-activated glutaminase. Mice constitutively heterozygous for GLS1, the gene encoding glutaminase, manifest a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, a key dimension of which is an attenuated locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. If resilience is due to glutaminase deficiency in adulthood, then glutaminase inhibitors should have therapeutic potential. However, this has been difficult to test given the dearth of neuroactive glutaminase inhibitors. So, we used genetic pharmacotherapy to ask whether adult induction of GLS1 heterozygosity would attenuate amphetamine responsiveness. We generated conditional floxGLS1 mice and crossed them with global CAG(ERT2cre∕+) mice to produce GLS1 iHET mice, susceptible to tamoxifen induction of GLS1 heterozygosity. One month after tamoxifen treatment of adult GLS1 iHET mice, we found a 50% reduction in GLS1 allelic abundance and glutaminase mRNA levels in the brain. While GLS1 iHET mice showed some recombination prior to tamoxifen, there was no impact on mRNA levels. We then asked whether induction of GLS heterozygosity would attenuate the locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. Before tamoxifen, control and GLS1 iHET mice did not differ in their response to amphetamine. One month after tamoxifen treatment, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was blocked in GLS1 iHET mice. The block was largely maintained after 5 months. Thus, a genetically induced glutaminase reduction-mimicking pharmacological inhibition-strongly attenuated the response to a propsychotic challenge, suggesting that glutaminase may be a novel target

  10. Explaining mutualism variation: a new evolutionary paradox?

    PubMed

    Heath, Katy D; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-02-01

    The paradox of mutualism is typically framed as the persistence of interspecific cooperation, despite the potential advantages of cheating. Thus, mutualism research has tended to focus on stabilizing mechanisms that prevent the invasion of low-quality partners. These mechanisms alone cannot explain the persistence of variation for partner quality observed in nature, leaving a large gap in our understanding of how mutualisms evolve. Studying partner quality variation is necessary for applying genetically explicit models to predict evolution in natural populations, a necessary step for understanding the origins of mutualisms as well as their ongoing dynamics. An evolutionary genetic approach, which is focused on naturally occurring mutualist variation, can potentially synthesize the currently disconnected fields of mutualism evolution and coevolutionary genetics. We outline explanations for the maintenance of genetic variation for mutualism and suggest approaches necessary to address them.

  11. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  12. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  13. Construction of bacteria-eukaryote synthetic mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Isao; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kayo; Kihara, Kumiko; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature but is known to be intrinsically vulnerable with regard to both population dynamics and evolution. Synthetic ecology has indicated that it is feasible for organisms to establish novel mutualism merely through encountering each other by showing that it is feasible to construct synthetic mutualism between organisms. However, bacteria-eukaryote mutualism, which is ecologically important, has not yet been constructed. In this study, we synthetically constructed mutualism between a bacterium and a eukaryote by using two model organisms. We mixed a bacterium, Escherichia coli (a genetically engineered glutamine auxotroph), and an amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, in 14 sets of conditions in which each species could not grow in monoculture but potentially could grow in coculture. Under a single condition in which the bacterium and amoeba mutually compensated for the lack of required nutrients (lipoic acid and glutamine, respectively), both species grew continuously through several subcultures, essentially establishing mutualism. Our results shed light on the establishment of bacteria-eukaryote mutualism and indicate that a bacterium and eukaryote pair in nature also has a non-negligible possibility of establishing novel mutualism if the organisms are potentially mutualistic.

  14. Effects of Pluronic and Doxorubicin on Drug Uptake, Cellular Metabolism, Apoptosis and Tumor Inhibition in Animal Models of MDR Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Li, Shu; Brynskikh, Anna M.; Sharma, Amit K.; Li, Yili; Boska, Michael; Gong, Nan; Mosley, R. Lee; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is believed to be impeded by multidrug resistance (MDR). Pluronic (triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO) were previously shown to sensitize MDR tumors to antineoplastic agents. This study uses animal models of Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL-M27) and T-lymphocytic leukemia (P388/ADR and P388) derived solid tumors to delineate mechanisms of sensitization of MDR tumors by Pluronic P85 (P85) in vivo. First, non-invasive single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and tumor tissue radioactivity sampling demonstrate that intravenous co-administration of P85 with a Pgp-substrate, 99Tc-sestamibi, greatly increases the tumor uptake of this substrate in the MDR tumors. Second, 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in live animals and tumor tissue sampling for ATP suggest that P85 and doxorubicin (Dox) formulations induce pronounced ATP depletion in MDR tumors. Third, these formulations are shown to increase tumor apoptosis in vivo by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for caspases 8 and 9. Altogether, formulation of Dox with P85 results in increased inhibition of the growth solid tumors in mice and represents novel and promising strategy for therapy of drug resistant cancers. PMID:20074598

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, prevents indometacin-induced gastric damage via inhibition of neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Yoshiro; Okamoto, Masayuki; Yokochi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyachi, Atsushi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2003-02-01

    Nabumetone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works as a prodrug and is extensively metabolized to an active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA). It is well known that neutrophil infiltration and activation are critical in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric injury, and nabumetone shows less incidence of gastrointestinal irritancy. We examined the effects of nabumetone on neutrophil activation and on indometacin-induced gastric damage. In the indometacin-induced gastric mucosal injury, rats were treated with indometacin and then nabumetone or 6MNA was orally administered. Nabumetone prevented gastric damage accompanied by the reduction of neutrophil infiltration into gastric mucosa, but such an effect was not observed with 6MNA. Nabumetone reduced the formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils to 30% of the control level in-vitro, but 6MNA did not. In addition, nabumetone prevented the fMLP-induced migration of neutrophils. Nabumetone did not inhibit O2- generation in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. These results suggest that nabumetone prevents gastric damage induced by the active metabolite, 6MNA, via the suppression of neutrophil activation in gastric mucosa.

  16. Spacer/Linker Based Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Mutual Prodrugs as Antiinflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Velingkar, V. S.; Jain, D. R.; Ahire, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Mutual prodrugs of some antiinflammatory agents were synthesized with the aim of improving the therapeutic index through prevention of gastrointestinal complications and to check the efficiency of release of the parent drug in presence of spacer. These mutual prodrugs were synthesized by direct condensation method using dicyclohexyl carbodiimide as a coupling agent and glycine as a spacer. The title compounds were characterized by spectral techniques and the release of the parent drug from mutual prodrug was studied in two different non-enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2, pH 7.4 and in 80% human plasma. All mutual prodrugs exhibited encouraging hydrolysis profile in 80% human plasma. Biological activity of title compounds was studied by carrageenan-induced paw edema method. From the results obtained, it was concluded that these compounds retain the antiinflammatory action. PMID:21694998

  17. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  18. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  19. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...

  20. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...

  1. Role of mutual punishment in the snowdrift game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    The effects of punishment on cooperation have drawn increasing attention. In this paper, we propose a new mechanism of punishment, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. We incorporate the mutual punishment into the snowdrift game. Results for well-mixed and structured populations have shown that, for no punishment or small values of punishment fine, the fraction of cooperators continuously decreases with the temptation to defect. However, for large values of punishment fine, there exists an abrupt transition point, at which the fraction of cooperators suddenly drops from 1 to 0. Compared to no punishment, mutual punishment promotes cooperation when the temptation to defect is small but inhibits cooperation when the temptation to defect is large. For weak (strong) temptation to defect, the cooperation level increases (decreases) with the punishment fine. For moderate temptation to defect, there exists an optimal value of the punishment fine that leads to the highest cooperation level.

  2. DW1029M, a novel botanical drug candidate, inhibits advanced glycation end-product formation, rat lens aldose reductase activity, and TGF-β1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Joobyoung; Lee, Hyunyong; Chang, Hwan Bong; Choi, Hyunsik; Kim, Yong Sung; Rho, Yang Kook; Seong, Seungkyoo; Choi, Dong Hwa; Park, Dongeun; Ku, Bonchul

    2014-05-15

    DW1029M is a botanical extract consisting of Morus bark and Puerariae radix, produced by Dong-Wha Pharmaceutical, for nephroprotective drug development; it has been in phase II clinical trials in Korea. In our mechanistic investigations, we found that DW1029M inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs), rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling, all of which are implicated in diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. DW1029M inhibits AGE formation via Fe(2+) chelation. The extract contains 13 active constituents that inhibit AGE formation, 8 active constituents that inhibit RLAR activity, and 1 inhibitor of TGF-β1 signaling. Our results suggest DW1029M protects against diabetic nephropathy via blockade of AGE formation, RLAR activity, and TGF-β1 signaling. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the ef