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Sample records for dry biological fibrillar

  1. Fibrillar Organic Phases And Their Roles In Rigid Biological Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Park, John J.; Mayer, George

    2015-06-01

    This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby to clarify how those composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for the large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of such composites, extending to large deformations must consider such interpenetrating phases.

  2. Adhesion and sliding response of a biologically inspired fibrillar surface: experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Rocca, G Della; Guduru, P R; Gao, H

    2008-07-06

    Inspired by the adhesion mechanisms of several animal species such as geckos, beetles and flies, several efforts in designing and fabricating surface engineering strategies have been made recently to mimic the adhesive and frictional behaviour of biological foot pads. An important feature of such biological adhesion systems is the ability to switch between strong attachment and easy detachment, which is crucial for animal locomotion. Recent investigations have suggested that such a 'switching' mechanism can be achieved by the elastic anisotropy of the attachment pad, which renders the magnitude of the detachment force to be direction dependent. This suggestion is supported by the observations that the fibres of the foot pads in geckos and insects are oriented at an angle to the base and that geckos curl their toes backwards (digital hyperextension) while detaching from a surface. One of the promising bio-inspired architectures developed recently is a film-terminated fibrillar PDMS surface; this structure was demonstrated to result in superior detachment force and energy dissipation compared with a bulk PDMS surface. In this investigation, the film-terminated fibrillar architecture is modified by tilting the fibres to make the surface vertically more compliant and elastically anisotropic. The directional detachment and the sliding resistance between the tilted fibrillar surfaces and a spherical glass lens are measured: both show significant directional anisotropy. It is argued that the anisotropy introduced by the tilted fibres and the deformation-induced change in the compliance of the fibre layer are responsible for the observed anisotropy in the detachment force.

  3. Dry self-cleaning properties of hard and soft fibrillar structures.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Puthoff, Jonathan; Cohen, Michael J; Autumn, Kellar; Fearing, Ronald S

    2013-07-10

    Recently, gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives (GSAs) have been made using a variety of fabrication techniques and materials, with one made from a hard polymer having been reported to recover its shear adhesion after fouling by normal use, or "dry self-clean", a feature useful for applications in wall crawling robots, reusable adhesives, microfabrication and solar panel cleaning. This paper investigates the impact of two design parameters on the dry self-cleaning capability of GSAs by experimentally testing two GSAs after fouling with small (1 μm), medium (3-10 μm), and large (40-50 μm) particles. We found that a GSA made from a hard thermoplastic with nanoscopic fibers was able to recover 96-115% of its shear adhesion after fouling with small and large but not medium particles, while a GSA made from a soft polymer and microscopic fibers recovered 40-55% on medium and large particles, with SEM imaging revealing particles embedding within the polymer. An analysis of the contact strength between fibers, particles and substrates of various dimensions and elasticity reveals that dry self-cleaning will be more effective for GSAs fabricated with smaller fiber diameters and for GSAs fabricated from materials with smaller loss functions, such as hard thermoplastics. These results have important implications on the choice of materials and geometries used for GSAs when dry self-cleaning capability is a desired function in the material.

  4. Biomimetic mushroom-shaped fibrillar adhesive microstructure.

    PubMed

    Gorb, S; Varenberg, M; Peressadko, A; Tuma, J

    2007-04-22

    To improve the adhesive properties of artificial fibrillar contact structures, the attachment systems of beetles from the family Chrysomelidae were chosen to serve as a model. Biomimetic mushroom-shaped fibrillar adhesive microstructure inspired by these systems was characterized using a variety of measurement techniques and compared with a control flat surface made of the same material. Results revealed that pull-off force and peel strength of the structured specimens are more than twice those of the flat specimens. In contrast to the control system, the structured one is found to be very tolerant to contamination and able to recover its adhesive properties after being washed in a soap solution. Based on the combination of several geometrical principles found in biological attachment devices, the presented microstructure exhibits a considerable step towards the development of an industrial dry adhesive.

  5. Three-dimensional second-harmonic generation imaging of fibrillar collagen in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiansong; Ferbas, John; Juan, Gloria

    2012-07-01

    Multiphoton-induced second-harmonic generation (SHG) has developed into a very powerful approach for in depth visualization of some biological structures with high specificity. In this unit, we describe the basic principles of three-dimensional SHG microscopy. In addition, we illustrate how SHG imaging can be utilized to assess collagen fibrils in biological tissues. Some technical considerations are also addressed.

  6. Mueller-matrix differentiation of fibrillar networks of biological tissues with different phase and amplitude anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, A. G.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Ushenko, V. A.; Ushenko, Yu. A.; Kushnerick, L. Y.; Olar, O. V.; Pashkovskaya, N. V.; Marchuk, Yu. F.

    2016-09-01

    The work consists of investigation results of diagnostic efficiency of a new azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix method of analysis of laser autofluorescence coordinate distributions of biological tissues histological sections. A new model of generalized optical anisotropy of biological tissues protein networks is proposed in order to define the processes of laser autofluorescence. The influence of complex mechanisms of both phase anisotropy (linear birefringence and optical activity) and linear (circular) dichroism is taken into account. The interconnections between the azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix elements characterizing laser autofluorescence and different mechanisms of optical anisotropy are determined. The statistic analysis of coordinate distributions of such Mueller-matrix rotation invariants is proposed. Thereupon the quantitative criteria (statistic moments of the 1st to the 4th order) of differentiation of histological sections of uterus wall tumor - group 1 (dysplasia) and group 2 (adenocarcinoma) are estimated.

  7. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales. PMID:27211574

  8. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales.

  9. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Paris, O; Terrill, N J; Gupta, H S

    2016-05-23

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales.

  10. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen organization for interpreting the second-order susceptibility tensors in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Tuer, Adam E; Akens, Margarete K; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C; Whyne, Cari M; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-11-21

    The second-order nonlinear polarization properties of fibrillar collagen in various rat tissues (vertebrae, tibia, tail tendon, dermis, and cornea) are investigated with polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy. Three parameters are extracted: the second-order susceptibility ratio, R = [Formula: see text] ; a measure of the fibril distribution asymmetry, |A|; and the weighted-average fibril orientation, <δ>. A hierarchical organizational model of fibrillar collagen is developed to interpret the second-harmonic generation polarization properties. Highlights of the model include: collagen type (e.g., type-I, type-II), fibril internal structure (e.g., straight, constant-tilt), and fibril architecture (e.g., parallel fibers, intertwined, lamellae). Quantifiable differences in internal structure and architecture of the fibrils are observed. Occurrence histograms of R and |A| distinguished parallel from nonparallel fibril distributions. Parallel distributions possessed low parameter values and variability, whereas nonparallel distributions displayed an increase in values and variability. From the P-SHG parameters of vertebrae tissue, a three-dimensional reconstruction of lamellae of intervertebral disk is presented.

  11. Hierarchical Model of Fibrillar Collagen Organization for Interpreting the Second-Order Susceptibility Tensors in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-01-01

    The second-order nonlinear polarization properties of fibrillar collagen in various rat tissues (vertebrae, tibia, tail tendon, dermis, and cornea) are investigated with polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy. Three parameters are extracted: the second-order susceptibility ratio, R = χZZZ(2)′/χZXX(2)′; a measure of the fibril distribution asymmetry, |A|; and the weighted-average fibril orientation, 〈δ〉. A hierarchical organizational model of fibrillar collagen is developed to interpret the second-harmonic generation polarization properties. Highlights of the model include: collagen type (e.g., type-I, type-II), fibril internal structure (e.g., straight, constant-tilt), and fibril architecture (e.g., parallel fibers, intertwined, lamellae). Quantifiable differences in internal structure and architecture of the fibrils are observed. Occurrence histograms of R and |A| distinguished parallel from nonparallel fibril distributions. Parallel distributions possessed low parameter values and variability, whereas nonparallel distributions displayed an increase in values and variability. From the P-SHG parameters of vertebrae tissue, a three-dimensional reconstruction of lamellae of intervertebral disk is presented. PMID:23200043

  12. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  13. Characterization of a non-fibrillar-related collagen in the mollusc Haliotis tuberculata and its biological activity on human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Christophe; Serpentini, Antoine; Kypriotou, Magdalini; Renard, Emmanuelle; Galéra, Philippe; Lebel, Jean-Marc

    2011-10-01

    In invertebrates, members of the collagen family have been found in various phyla. Surprisingly, in mollusc, little is known about such molecules. In this study, we characterize the full-length abalone type IV collagen and we analysed its biological effects on human fibroblast in order to gain insights about this molecule in molluscs and particularly clues about its roles. We screened a cDNA library of Haliotis tuberculata hemocytes. The expression pattern of the transcript is determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. The close identity between α1(IV) C-terminal domain and the vertebrate homologue led us to produce, purify and test in vitro a recombinant protein corresponding to this region using human dermal fibroblasts cell culture. The biological effects were evaluated on proliferation and on differentiation. We found that the 5,334-bp open reading frame transcript encodes a protein of 1,777 amino acids, including an interrupted 1,502-residue collagenous domain and a 232-residue C-terminal non-collagenous domain. The expression pattern of this transcript is mainly found in the mantle and hemocytes. The recombinant protein corresponding α1(IV) C-terminal domain increased fibroblast proliferation by 69% and doubled collagen synthesis produced in primary cultures. This work provides the first complete primary structure of a mollusc non-fibrillar collagen chain and the biological effects of its C-terminal domain on human cells. In this study, we prove that the NC1 domain from a molluscan collagen can improve human fibroblast proliferation as well as differentiation.

  14. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  15. Probing the biology of dry biological systems to address the basis of seed longevity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drying cells reduces molecular mobility and slows chemical and physical reactions. As a result, dry biological systems deteriorate slowly. The time course of deterioration in a population of living cells often follows a sigmoidal pattern in which aging is occurring but no changes to viability are ...

  16. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  17. Biological N Fixation Rates in a Tropical Dry Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; Dawson, T. E.

    2005-12-01

    Because tropical legumes are usually the dominant family in forests of the Neotropics and Africa, they represent the greatest potential terrestrial cover of N-fixing species globally. Tropical dry forests therefore may have the greatest rates of biological N-fixation of any ecosystem type. Our objective was to determine the number of legume species that fix N along a successional gradient (10, 20, and 30 years) using a combination of nodule excavation, nodule incubations, and N isotopic composition of foliage. We also quantified non-symbiotic N-fixation by free-living fixers in litter and soil. We found that 21 out of 23 legume species were nodulated. Calculations of percent N from fixation, based on N isotopic composition, ranged from 1-78 percent for individual species. At the stand level, estimates of symbiotic N-fixation was 13.9, 23.1, and 27.8 kg N/ha/yr in 10, 20, and 30 year old forest, respectively. Total non-symbiotic N-fixation, based on acetylne reduction incubations of leaf litter, fine woody debris and surface soil, was 7.5 kg N/ha/yr during the dry season and 17.1 kg N/ha/yr during the wet season. Total ecosystem estimates were 38.5, 47.7, and 52.4 kg N/ha/yr in 10, 20, and 30 year old forest, respectively. Overall, we found that non-symbiotic N-fixation was a greater proportion of total biological N-fixation than has been reported in other tropical dry forests and savanas, but our total biological N-fixation values were similar.

  18. Adhesion enhancement in a biomimetic fibrillar interface.

    PubMed

    Glassmaker, Nicholas J; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2005-07-01

    Two important putative functions of the fibrillar contact interfaces commonly found in lizards and insects are to provide contact compliance and enhanced adhesion. To explore the question of whether a fibrillar architecture inherently enhances adhesion, we constructed model structures consisting of thin sheets of poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) bonded on one of their thin sides to glass plates. The PVB samples had two flat, unstructured regions interrupted by a central fibrillar region along the bonded interface. The effect of the fibrillar geometry on the performance of the adhesive bond was tested using a tensile pull-off test, in which failure occurred by interfacial crack propagation, starting at an end where a crack initiator was introduced. We observed that fibrils in all samples fail consistently at the same critical stress, which is consistent with a previous theoretical result we have determined for flaw insensitivity during fibrillar pull-off. In addition, we measured the energy release rate required to fail the interface in the fibrillar region to be about an order of magnitude greater than that in the non-fibrillar region. We present experimental evidence demonstrating that this increase results partly from dissipation of strain energy stored in the fibrils.

  19. Biological Nitrogen Fixation In Tropical Dry Forests Of Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Evidence suggests that tropical dry forests (TDF) are not nitrogen (N) deficient. This evidence includes: high losses of gaseous nitrogen during the rainy season, high ecosystem soil N stocks and high N concentrations in leaves and litterfall. Its been commonly hypothesized that biological nitrogen fixation is responsible for the high availability of N in tropical soils. However, the magnitude of this flux has rarely if ever been measured in tropical dry forests. Because of the high cost of fixing N and the ubiquity of N fixing legume trees in the TDF, at the individual tree level symbiotic fixation should be a strategy down-regulated by the plant. Our main goal was to determine the rates of and controls over symbiotic N fixation. We hypothesized that legume tree species employ a facultative strategy of nitrogen fixation and that this process responds to changes in light availability, soil moisture and nutrient supply. We tested this hypothesis both on naturally established trees in a forest and under controlled conditions in a shade house by estimating the quantities of N fixed annually using the 15N natural abundance method, counting nodules, and quantifying (field) or manipulating (shade house) the variation in important environmental variables (soil nutrients, soil moisture, and light). We found that in both in our shade house experiment and in the forest, nodulation varied among different legume species. For both settings, the 15N natural abundance approach successfully detected differences in nitrogen fixation among species. The legume species that we studied were able to regulate fixation depending on the environmental conditions. They showed to have different strategies of nitrogen fixation that follow a gradient of facultative to obligate fixation. Our data suggest that there exists a continuum of nitrogen fixation strategies among species. Any efforts to define tropical legume trees as a functional group need to incorporate this variation.

  20. Biologically Inspired Polymer Microfibrillar Arrays for Mask Sealing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Mask sealing Fibrillar adhesion Face masks Gecko adhesion Adhesion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE...donning practices. One promising area is biologically inspired dry adhesives. Geckos , spiders, beetles, flies, and many other climbing lizards and

  1. Simplified lattice model for polypeptide fibrillar transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xuhui; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2014-10-01

    Polypeptide fibrillar transitions are studied using a simplified lattice model, modified from the three-state Potts model, where uniform residues as spins, placed on a cubic lattice, can interact with neighbors to form coil, helical, sheet, or fibrillar structure. Using the transfer matrix method and numerical calculations, we analyzed the partition function and construct phase diagrams. The model manifests phase transitions among coil, helix, sheet, and fibril through parameterizing bond coupling energy ɛh,ɛs,ɛf, structural entropies sh,ss,sf of helical, sheet, and fibrillar states, and number density ρ. The phase diagrams show the transition sequence is basically governed by ɛh, ɛs, and ɛf, while the transition temperature is determined by the competition among ɛh, ɛs, and ɛf, as well as sh, ss, sf, and ρ. Furthermore, the fibrillation is accompanied with an abrupt phase transition from coil, helix, or sheet to fibril even for short polypeptide length, resembling the feature of nucleation-growth process. The finite-size effect in specific heat at transitions for the nonfibrillation case can be described by the scaling form of lattice model. With rich phase-transition properties, our model provides a useful reference for protein aggregation experiments and modeling.

  2. Terahertz spectroscopy of dry, hydrated, and thermally denatured biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope; Thomas, Robert J.; Peralta, Xomalin; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an effective technique to probe the intermolecular and collective vibrational modes of biological macromolecules at THz frequencies. To date, the vast majority of spectroscopic studies have been performed on dehydrated biomolecular samples. Given the fact that all biochemical processes occur in aqueous environments and water is required for proper protein folding and function, we hypothesize that valuable information can be gained from spectroscopic studies performed on hydrated biomolecules in their native conformation. In this study, we used a THz-TDS system that exploits photoconductive techniques for THz pulse generation and freespace electro-optical sampling approaches for detection. We used the THz spectrometer to measure the time-dependent electric field of THz waves upon interaction with water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and collagen gels. By comparing these waveforms with references, we simultaneously determined each sample's index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficients (μa) as a function of frequency. Our data show that the properties we measure for the water, PBS and collagen are comparable to those reported in the literature. In the future, we plan to examine the effect that both temperature and pH have on the optical properties of other biological macromolecules. Studies will also be performed to compare our results to those generated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen distribution for polarization-resolved SHG microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-02-01

    A hierarchical model of the organization of fibrillar collagen is developed and its implications on polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are investigated. A "ground-up" approach is employed to develop the theory for understanding of the origin of SHG from fibrillar collagen. The effects of fibril ultrastructure and fibril macroscopic organization on the second-order polarization properties of fibrillar collagen are presented in conjunction with recent ab initio results performed on a collagen triple-helix model (-GLY-PRO-HYP-)n. Various tissues containing fibrillar collagen are quantified using a polarization-resolved SHG technique, termed polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) and interpreted in light of the aforementioned theory. The method involves varying the incident laser polarization, while monitoring the SHG intensity through an analyzer. From the SHG polarization data the orientation of the fibers, in biological tissue, can be deduced. Unique PIPO signatures are observed for different rat tissues and interpreted in terms of the collagen composition, fibril ultrastructure, and macroscopic organization. Similarities and discrepancies in the second-order polarization properties of different collagen types and ultrastructures will be presented. PIPO SHG microscopy shows promise in its ability to quantify the organization of collagen in various tissues. The ability to characterize the structure of collagen in various tissue microenvironments will aid in the study of numerous collagen related biological process, including tissue diseases, wound repair, and tumor development and progression.

  4. THE STRUCTURE OF INSECT FIBRILLAR FLIGHT MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David S.

    1961-01-01

    The fine structure of fibrillar flight muscle of the mature adult beetle Tenebrio molitor is described. Although the very high frequency of contraction of fibrillar muscle has previously been in part accounted for as the result of mechanical specialization of the wing-bearing segment rather than of a correspondingly high rate of motor impulse supply, the problem of the nature of the pathway by which excitation is conducted into these large fibers remained. Therefore, particular attention has been given to the disposition and relationships of the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum in this tissue. The invading tracheoles draw with them a sheath of plasma membrane from the surface to all depths in the fiber, and it is suggested that these sheaths, together with the extensive tubular arborisations arising from them, reduce the maximum plasma membrane-to-fibril distance from the radius of the fiber to a value of less than 2 µ. The evidence presented here confirms Veratti's contention that in fibrillar muscle the "reticulum" is associated with, though entirely distinct from the fibrils. Unlike other muscles so far examined, these flight muscle fibers contain a plasma membrane reticulum only, but it is possible that elsewhere the general "sarcoplasmic reticulum" includes a component derived from the plasma membrane, likewise acting as the pathway for inward conduction of excitation. Profiles of the internalised plasma membrane in Tenebrio showing the usual triple-layered 25-25-25 A organization are frequently seen, in sections, in close association with isolated vesicles (defined by "simple" 50 A membranes) which are here considered to represent, in vestigial form, the portion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum which in other types of muscle is complex and highly developed. Such associations, in Tenebrio, between these two dissimilar elements are here termed "dyads" and the possible morphological and functional homology between these and the "triads" of other types of

  5. New Method for Monitoring the Process of Freeze Drying of Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    Alkeev, Nikolay; Averin, Stanislav; von Gratowski, Svetlana

    2015-12-01

    A capacitive sensor was proposed and tested for the monitoring and control of a freeze drying process of a vaccine against the Newcastle disease of birds. The residual moisture of the vaccine was measured by the thermogravimetric method. The vaccine activity was determined by titration in chicken embryos. It was shown that, at the stages of freezing and primary drying, a capacitive sensor measured the fraction of unfrozen liquid phase in a material and allowed one to control the sublimation stage of drying in an optimal way. This prevented the foaming of the material and shortened the total drying time approximately twice. The control range at the sublimation stage of drying expanded up to -70°C. It was found at the final stage of drying that the signal of a capacitive sensor passed through a maximum value. We supposed that this maximum corresponds to the minimum of intramolecular mobility of biological macromolecules and hence to the optimal residual moisture of the material, which ensures long-term preservation of its activity. We also suppose that using the capacitive sensor at the final stage of drying allows one to more precisely detect the time when the residual moisture of dried material reaches the optimal value.

  6. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  7. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  8. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  9. Light-assisted drying (LAD) of small volume biologics: a comparison of two IR light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Madison A.; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    Protein therapeutics have been developed to treat diseases ranging from arthritis and psoriasis to cancer. A challenge in the development of protein-based drugs is maintaining the protein in the folded state during processing and storage. We are developing a novel processing method, light-assisted drying (LAD), to dehydrate proteins suspended in a sugar (trehalose) solution for storage at supra-zero temperatures. Our technique selectively heats the water in small volume samples using near-IR light to speed dehydration which prevents sugar crystallization that can damage embedded proteins. In this study, we compare the end moisture content (EMC) as a function of processing time of samples dried with two different light sources, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Thulium fiber (1850 nm) lasers. EMC is the ratio of water to dry weight in a sample and the lower the EMC the higher the possible storage temperature. LAD with the 1064 and 1850 nm lasers yielded 78% and 65% lower EMC, respectively, than standard air-drying. After 40 minutes of LAD with 1064 and 1850 nm sources, EMCs of 0.27+/-.27 and 0.15+/-.05 gH2O/gDryWeight were reached, which are near the desired value of 0.10 gH2O/gDryWeight that enables storage in a glassy state without refrigeration. LAD is a promising new technique for the preparation of biologics for anhydrous preservation.

  10. Critical point drying for scanning electron microscopy: a semi-automatic method of preparing biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Hall, D J; Skerrett, E J; Thomas, W D

    1978-08-01

    Slow, controlled, rates of critical point bomb heating and of gas venting have been shown to improve the preservation of biological specimens in critical point drying. A procedure that represents a balance between avoidance of specimen damage and speed of operation has been developed for use with CO2 as the transitional fluid. Bomb heating is automated and controlled electronically, and manual venting of the gaseous CO2 is monitored using a gas flow meter.

  11. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  12. [Environmental and biological monitoring of occupational exposure to perchloroethylene in dry cleaning shops].

    PubMed

    Gobba, F; Rosa, P; Ghittori, S; Imbriani, M; Ferrari, G; Cavalleri, A

    1997-01-01

    Occupational exposure to perchloroethylene (PCE) was studied in a total of 106 workers in 78 dry cleaning shops in the province of Pavia, Northern, Italy. Environmental monitoring was performed by personal passive sampling. The median time weighted average (TWA) level of PCE was 57 mg/m3, i.e., about 30% of the current Threshold Limit Value (TLV) proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). However, in 12 workers exposure exceeded this limit. Biological monitoring was performed via measurement of urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA), i.e. the exposure index currently used in Italy, and urinary excretion of unmodified perchloroethylene (PCE-U) in samples collected at the end of the half-shift. Median levels of TCA and PCE were 1.03 mg/l and 17.7 micrograms/l respectively. The correlation coefficient between environmental TWA concentrations of perchloroethylene and PCE-U was 0.755 (0.809 after logarithmic transformation), compared to 0.660 for TCA values. The subjects were then classified as "low exposed" and "heavily exposed" according to whether personal exposure was lower or higher than 57 mg/m3, the median TWA value of the whole group. PCE-U levels were significantly correlated to exposure in both subgroups whereas TCA was correlated only in the "heavily exposed subjects", but not in those with lower exposure. The results of the study show that in the majority of dry cleaning shops exposure to PCE was well below the current occupational limits. Nevertheless surveillance of dry cleaners is recommended as nearly 10% of the workers exceeded the environmental and biological limits. Urinary excretion of unmodified PCE appears to be a very reliable indicator for biological monitoring of PCE exposure in dry cleaning and is also significantly correlated to exposure at low levels. The estimated biological equivalent exposure level (BEEL) for PCE-U, corresponding to the current TLV-TWA proposed by the ACGIH, is 55 micrograms/l. Urinary

  13. Shape insensitive optimal adhesion of nanoscale fibrillar structures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huajian; Yao, Haimin

    2004-01-01

    Gecko and many insects have adopted nanoscale fibrillar structures on their feet as adhesion devices. Here, we consider adhesion between a single fiber and a substrate by van der Waals or electrostatic interactions. For a given contact area A, the theoretical pull-off force of the fiber is σthA where σth is the theoretical strength of adhesion. We show that it is possible to design an optimal shape of the tip of the fiber to achieve the theoretical pull-off force. However, such design tends to be unreliable at the macroscopic scale because the pull-off force is sensitive to small variations in the tip shape. We find that a robust design of shape-insensitive optimal adhesion becomes possible only when the diameter of the fiber is reduced to length scales on the order of 100 nm. In general, optimal adhesion could be achieved by a combination of size reduction and shape optimization. The smaller the size, the less important the shape. At large contact sizes, optimal adhesion could still be achieved if the shape can be manufactured to a sufficiently high precision. The robust design of optimal adhesion at nanoscale provides a plausible explanation for the convergent evolution of hairy attachment systems in biology. PMID:15148400

  14. Liquid substitution: a versatile procedure for SEM specimen preparation of biological materials without drying or coating.

    PubMed

    Ensikat, H J; Barthlott, W

    1993-12-01

    Certain liquids with a very low vapour pressure, such as glycerol or triethylene glycol, can be used to infiltrate biological specimens so that they may be observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) without drying. The conductive properties of the fluids allow specimens to be examined either uncoated or with very thin coatings. The advantages of liquid substitution include the retention of lipids, waxes, loose particles, and surface contaminants. Since the procedure does not require expensive equipment, it offers an alternative to critical point drying or cryopreparation. For certain types of specimens, liquid substitution may represent the best preparation procedure. In addition, the fluids themselves may be imaged directly in the SEM, or indirectly by cathodoluminescence following labelling with fluorochromes.

  15. Aggregation behavior of novel heptamethine cyanine dyes upon their binding to native and fibrillar lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Vus, Kateryna; Tarabara, Ulyana; Kurutos, Atanas; Ryzhova, Olga; Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Gadjev, Nikolai; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2017-04-05

    Two newly synthesized symmetrical heptamethine cyanine dyes, AK7-5 and AK7-6, absorbing in the region of low autofluorescence of biological samples, have been tested for their ability to detect proteins aggregated into amyloid fibrils. In aqueous solution these probes possess three absorption bands corresponding to the monomer, dimer and H-aggregate species. The association of the dye with fibrillar lysozyme was followed by the enhancement of the monomer band and the reduction of the H-band. The absorption spectra measured at various fibril concentrations were analyzed in terms of the model allowing for the shift of equilibria between various dye species due to the binding of monomers and dimers of AK7-5 and AK7-6 to amyloid fibrils. The association constants and stoichiometries of the dye-fibril complexation have been evaluated. In contrast to fibrillar lysozyme, the native protein brought about strong J-aggregate formation accompanied by a marked drop in the absorbance of the dye monomer species. Quantum chemical calculations and simple docking studies showed that AK7-5 and AK7-6 monomers can bind to the grooves, running parallel to the fibril axis. Due to their ability to distinguish between the native and fibrillar protein states, the novel cyanines are recommended as complementary to existing amyloid markers.

  16. Design of biomimetic fibrillar interfaces: 2. Mechanics of enhanced adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Hui, C-Y; Glassmaker, N. J.; Tang, T.; Jagota, A.

    2004-01-01

    This study addresses the strength and toughness of generic fibrillar structures. We show that the stress sigmac required to pull a fibril out of adhesive contact with a substrate has the form sigma(c) = sigma(0)Phi(chi). In this equation, sigma(0) is the interfacial strength, Phi(chi) is a dimensionless function satisfying 0 > 1, but is flaw insensitive for chi < 1. The important parameter chi also controls the stability of a homogeneously deformed non-fibrillar (flat) interface. Using these results, we show that the work to fail a unit area of fibrillar surface can be much higher than the intrinsic work of adhesion for a flat interface of the same material. In addition, we show that cross-sectional fibril dimensions control the pull-off force, which increases with decreasing fibril radius. Finally, an increase in fibril length is shown to increase the work necessary to separate a fibrillar interface. Besides our calculations involving a single fibril, we study the concept of equal load sharing (ELS) for a perfect interface containing many fibrils. We obtain the practical work of adhesion for an idealized fibrillated interface under equal load sharing. We then analyse the peeling of a fibrillar surface from a rigid substrate and establish a criterion for ELS. PMID:16849151

  17. Biological exposure assessment to tetrachloroethylene for workers in the dry cleaning industry.

    PubMed

    McKernan, Lauralynn T; Ruder, Avima M; Petersen, Martin R; Hein, Misty J; Forrester, Christy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Ashley, David L; Butler, Mary A

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting biological tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) exposure assessments of dry cleaning employees in conjunction with evaluation of possible PCE health effects. Eighteen women from four dry cleaning facilities in southwestern Ohio were monitored in a pilot study of workers with PCE exposure. Personal breathing zone samples were collected from each employee on two consecutive work days. Biological monitoring included a single measurement of PCE in blood and multiple measurements of pre- and post-shift PCE in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in urine. Post-shift PCE in exhaled breath gradually increased throughout the work week. Statistically significant correlations were observed among the exposure indices. Decreases in PCE in exhaled breath and TCA in urine were observed after two days without exposure to PCE. A mixed-effects model identified statistically significant associations between PCE in exhaled breath and airborne PCE time weighted average (TWA) after adjusting for a random participant effect and fixed effects of time and body mass index. Although comprehensive, our sampling strategy was challenging to implement due to fluctuating work schedules and the number (pre- and post-shift on three consecutive days) and multiplicity (air, blood, exhaled breath, and urine) of samples collected. PCE in blood is the preferred biological index to monitor exposures, but may make recruitment difficult. PCE TWA sampling is an appropriate surrogate, although more field intensive. Repeated measures of exposure and mixed-effects modeling may be required for future studies due to high within-subject variability. Workers should be monitored over a long enough period of time to allow the use of a lag term.

  18. Biological exposure assessment to tetrachloroethylene for workers in the dry cleaning industry

    PubMed Central

    McKernan, Lauralynn T; Ruder, Avima M; Petersen, Martin R; Hein, Misty J; Forrester, Christy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Ashley, David L; Butler, Mary A

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting biological tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) exposure assessments of dry cleaning employees in conjunction with evaluation of possible PCE health effects. Methods Eighteen women from four dry cleaning facilities in southwestern Ohio were monitored in a pilot study of workers with PCE exposure. Personal breathing zone samples were collected from each employee on two consecutive work days. Biological monitoring included a single measurement of PCE in blood and multiple measurements of pre- and post-shift PCE in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in urine. Results Post-shift PCE in exhaled breath gradually increased throughout the work week. Statistically significant correlations were observed among the exposure indices. Decreases in PCE in exhaled breath and TCA in urine were observed after two days without exposure to PCE. A mixed-effects model identified statistically significant associations between PCE in exhaled breath and airborne PCE time weighted average (TWA) after adjusting for a random participant effect and fixed effects of time and body mass index. Conclusion Although comprehensive, our sampling strategy was challenging to implement due to fluctuating work schedules and the number (pre- and post-shift on three consecutive days) and multiplicity (air, blood, exhaled breath, and urine) of samples collected. PCE in blood is the preferred biological index to monitor exposures, but may make recruitment difficult. PCE TWA sampling is an appropriate surrogate, although more field intensive. Repeated measures of exposure and mixed-effects modeling may be required for future studies due to high within-subject variability. Workers should be monitored over a long enough period of time to allow the use of a lag term. PMID:18412959

  19. Detailed characterization of mechanical properties and molecular mobility within dry seed glasses: relevance to the physiology of dry biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Walters, Christina

    2011-11-01

    Slow movement of molecules in glassy matrices controls the kinetics of chemical and physical reactions in dry seeds. Variation in physiological activity among seeds suggests that there are differences in mobility among seed glasses. Testing this hypothesis is difficult because few tools are available to measure molecular mobility within dry seeds. Here, motional properties within dry pea cotyledons were assessed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The technique detected several molecular relaxations between -80 and +80°C and gave a more detailed description of water content-temperature effects on molecular motion than previously understood from studies of glass formation in seeds at glass transition (Tg). Diffusive movement is delimited by the α relaxation, which appears to be analogous to Tg. β and γ relaxations were also detected at temperatures lower than α relaxations, clearly demonstrating intramolecular motion within the glassy matrix of the pea cotyledon. Glass transitions, or the mechanical counterpart α relaxation, appear to be less relevant to seed aging during dry storage than previously thought. On the other hand, β relaxation occurs at temperature and moisture conditions typically used for seed storage and has established importance for physical aging of synthetic polymer glasses. Our data show that the nature and extent of molecular motion varies considerably with moisture and temperature, and that the hydrated conditions used for accelerated aging experiments and ultra-dry conditions sometimes recommended for seed storage give greater molecular mobility than more standard seed storage practices. We believe characterization of molecular mobility is critical for evaluating how dry seeds respond to the environment and persist through time.

  20. Mimotopes of conformational epitopes in fibrillar beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Petrushina, Irina; Manoutcharian, Karen; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2004-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) beta-amyloid peptide accumulates in the brain in different forms including fibrils. Amyloid fibrils could be recognized as foreign by the mature immune system since they are not present during its development. Thus, using mouse antisera raised against the fibrillar form of Abeta42, we have screened two phage peptide libraries for the presence of foreign conformational mimotopes of Abeta. Antisera from wild type animals recognized predominately peptides with the EFRH motif from Abeta42 sequence, whereas amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice recognized mainly phage clones that mimic epitopes (mimotopes) within the fibrillar Abeta42 but lack sequence homology with this peptide.

  1. Detailed characterization of mechanical properties and molecular mobility within dry seed glasses: relevance to the physiology of dry biological systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular motion slows when seeds form a glassy matrix, conferring longevity during dry storage. However, seeds inevitably age and variation in aging rates suggests differences in mobility among seed glasses. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to distinguish elastic and viscous motion with...

  2. Structural, physicochemical and biological properties of spray-dried wine powders.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Czyżowska, Agata; Ambroziak, Wojciech; Adamiec, Janusz

    2017-08-01

    Different fruit wines, chokeberry, blackcurrant and blueberry, were spray-dried using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and inulin (IN). The structural, physicochemical, and biological properties of the spray-dried wine powders were studied over 12months of storage in darkness at 8°C. Identification and quantification of single phenolic compounds before and after storage revealed that HP-β-CD had a positive effect on anthocyanin retention during storage for all microcapsules tested. Similar decreases in anthocyanin were found for blackcurrant and chokeberry powders, ranging from 7.3 to 8.9% with HP-β-CD and 12.3 to 12.5% with IN. Levels of anthocyanin losses in blueberry wine microcapsules were much greater: 19.9% (HP-β-CD) and 22.7% (IN). The high antiradical activities of blackcurrant and chokeberry wine microcapsules were stable and remained unchanged during storage. All wine microcapsules revealed significant activity against medically important bacterial strains. The HP-β-CD samples showed generally higher activity against the test microorganisms compared to IN microcapsules, especially at concentrations of 100mg/mL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Soft grippers using micro-fibrillar adhesives for transfer printing.

    PubMed

    Song, Sukho; Sitti, Metin

    2014-07-23

    The adhesive characteristics of fibrillar adhesives on a soft deformable membrane are reported. A soft gripper with an inflatable membrane covered by elastomer mushroom-shaped microfibers have a superior conformation to non-planar 3D part geometries, enabling the transfer printing of various parts serially or in parallel.

  4. Biological damage induced by ionizing cosmic rays in dry Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Kranz, A R; Bork, U; Bucker, H; Reitz, G

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 dry seeds containing embryos of the crucifer plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, were flown in orbit for 13 days on the Kosmos 1887 satellite. The seeds were fixed on CNd detectors and stored in units of Biorack type I/O. One unit was exposed inside, another one outside the satellite. The temperature profile of the flown seeds inside the satellite was simulated on earth in an identical backup control sample (BC). An additional control (SC) was studied with the original seeds sample. By use of the CNd-detector, HZE-tracks were measured with a PC-assisted microscope. The biological damages were investigated by growing the seeds under controlled climatic conditions. The following biological endpoints of the cosmic radiation damage were studied: germination, radicle length, sublethality, morphological aberrations, flower development, tumorization, embryo lethality inside the siliques. The summarized damage (D) and the mutation frequencies of embyronic lethal genes were calculated. The following results were obtained: the damages increase significantly in orbit at all biological endpoints; germination and fiowerings especially, as well as embryo lethality of fruits and lethal mutation frequency, were maximum mostly for HZE-hit seeds. Additionally, an increase of damage was observed for the seeds of the outside-exposed Biorack in comparison to the inside ones, which was probably caused by less radiation shielding and free space vacuum. The significance of the results obtained is discussed with respect to stress and risk and, thus, the quality of the RBE-factors and heavy ionizing radiation all needed for the very definition of radiation protection standards in space.

  5. Structure–Function Relationships of Pre-Fibrillar Protein Assemblies in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, F.; Shanmugam, A.; Bitan, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases, are characterized pathognomonically by the presence of intra- and/or extracellular lesions containing proteinaceous aggregates, and by extensive neuronal loss in selective brain regions. Related non-neuropathic systemic diseases, e.g., light-chain and senile systemic amyloidoses, and other organ-specific diseases, such as dialysis-related amyloidosis and type-2 diabetes mellitus, also are characterized by deposition of aberrantly folded, insoluble proteins. It is debated whether the hallmark pathologic lesions are causative. Substantial evidence suggests that these aggregates are the end state of aberrant protein folding whereas the actual culprits likely are transient, pre-fibrillar assemblies preceding the aggregates. In the context of neurodegenerative amyloidoses, the proteinaceous aggregates may eventuate as potentially neuroprotective sinks for the neurotoxic, oligomeric protein assemblies. The pre-fibrillar, oligomeric assemblies are believed to initiate the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to synaptic dysfunction, neuronal loss, and disease-specific regional brain atrophy. The amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which is believed to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD), is considered an archetypal amyloidogenic protein. Intense studies have led to nominal, functional, and structural descriptions of oligomeric Aβ assemblies. However, the dynamic and metastable nature of Aβ oligomers renders their study difficult. Different results generated using different methodologies under different experimental settings further complicate this complex area of research and identification of the exact pathogenic assemblies in vivo seems daunting. Here we review structural, functional, and biological experiments used to produce and study pre-fibrillar Aβ assemblies, and highlight similar studies of proteins involved in related diseases. We discuss challenges that contemporary

  6. Structure-function relationships of pre-fibrillar protein assemblies in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, F; Shanmugam, A; Bitan, G

    2008-06-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases, are characterized pathognomonically by the presence of intra- and/or extracellular lesions containing proteinaceous aggregates, and by extensive neuronal loss in selective brain regions. Related non-neuropathic systemic diseases, e.g., light-chain and senile systemic amyloidoses, and other organ-specific diseases, such as dialysis-related amyloidosis and type-2 diabetes mellitus, also are characterized by deposition of aberrantly folded, insoluble proteins. It is debated whether the hallmark pathologic lesions are causative. Substantial evidence suggests that these aggregates are the end state of aberrant protein folding whereas the actual culprits likely are transient, pre-fibrillar assemblies preceding the aggregates. In the context of neurodegenerative amyloidoses, the proteinaceous aggregates may eventuate as potentially neuroprotective sinks for the neurotoxic, oligomeric protein assemblies. The pre-fibrillar, oligomeric assemblies are believed to initiate the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to synaptic dysfunction, neuronal loss, and disease-specific regional brain atrophy. The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), which is believed to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD), is considered an archetypal amyloidogenic protein. Intense studies have led to nominal, functional, and structural descriptions of oligomeric Abeta assemblies. However, the dynamic and metastable nature of Abeta oligomers renders their study difficult. Different results generated using different methodologies under different experimental settings further complicate this complex area of research and identification of the exact pathogenic assemblies in vivo seems daunting. Here we review structural, functional, and biological experiments used to produce and study pre-fibrillar Abeta assemblies, and highlight similar studies of proteins involved in related diseases. We discuss challenges that

  7. Evaluation of Nanoparticle Tracking for Characterization of Fibrillar Protein Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis T.; Lu, Xiaomeng; Fan, Yamin; Murphy, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidogenesis is the process of formation of protein aggregates with fibrillar morphology. Because amyloidogenesis is linked to neurodegenerative disease, there is interest in understanding the mechanism of fibril growth. Kinetic models of amyloidogenesis require data on the number concentration and size distribution of aggregates, but this information is difficult to obtain using conventional methods. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is a relatively new technique that may be uniquely suited for obtaining these data. In NTA, the two-dimensional (2-D) trajectory of individual particles is tracked, from which the diffusion coefficient, and, hence, hydrodynamic radius is obtained. Here we examine the validity of NTA in tracking number concentration and size of DNA, as a model of a fibrillar macromolecule. We use NTA to examine three amyloidogenic materials: beta-amyloid, transthyretin, and polyglutamine-containing peptides. Our results are instructive in demonstrating the advantages and some limitations of single-particle diffusion measurements for investigating aggregation in protein systems. PMID:25843955

  8. Fibrillar films obtained from sodium soap fibers and polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Zawko, Scott A; Schmidt, Christine E

    2011-08-01

    An objective of tissue engineering is to create synthetic polymer scaffolds with a fibrillar microstructure similar to the extracellular matrix. Here, we present a novel method for creating polymer fibers using the layer-by-layer method and sacrificial templates composed of sodium soap fibers. Soap fibers were prepared from neutralized fatty acids using a sodium chloride crystal dissolution method. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) of polystyrene sulfonate and polyallylamine hydrochloride were deposited onto the soap fibers, crosslinked with glutaraldehyde, and then the soap fibers were leached with warm water and ethanol. The morphology of the resulting PEM structures was a dense network of fibers surrounded by a nonfibrillar matrix. Microscopy revealed that the PEM fibers were solid structures, presumably composed of polyelectrolytes complexed with residual fatty acids. These fibrillar PEM films were found to support the attachment of human dermal fibroblasts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nanoscale helium ion microscopic analysis of collagen fibrillar changes following femtosecond laser dissection of human cornea.

    PubMed

    Riau, Andri K; Poh, Rebekah; Pickard, Daniel S; Park, Chris H J; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, femtosecond lasers have emerged as an important tool to perform accurate and fine dissections with minimal collateral damage in biological tissue. The most common surgical procedure in medicine utilizing femtosecond laser is LASIK. During the femtosecond laser dissection process, the corneal collagen fibers inevitably undergo biomechanical and thermal changes on a sub-micro- or even a nanoscale level, which can potentially lead to post-surgical complications. In this study, we utilized helium ion microscopy, complemented with transmission electron microscopy to examine the femtosecond laser-induced collagen fibrillar damage in ex vivo human corneas. We found that the biomechanical damage induced by laser etching, generation of tissue bridges, and expansion of cavitation bubble and its subsequent collapse, created distortion to the surrounding collagen lamellae. Femtosecond laser-induced thermal damage was characterized by collapsed collagen lamellae, loss of collagen banding, collagen coiling, and presence of spherical debris. Our findings have shown the ability of helium ion microscopy to provide high resolution images with unprecedented detail of nanoscale fibrillar morphological changes in order to assess a tissue damage, which could not be resolved by conventional scanning electron microscopy previously. This imaging technology has also given us a better understanding of the tissue-laser interactions in a nano-structural manner and their possible effects on post-operative wound recovery.

  10. Conducting polymers with immobilised fibrillar collagen for enhanced neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Zhilian; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2011-10-01

    Conducting polymers with pendant functionality are advantageous in various bionic and organic bioelectronic applications, as they allow facile incorporation of bio-regulative cues to provide bio-mimicry and conductive environments for cell growth, differentiation and function. In this work, polypyrrole substrates doped with chondroitin sulfate (CS), an extracellular matrix molecule bearing carboxylic acid moieties, were electrochemically synthesized and conjugated with type I collagen. During the coupling process, the conjugated collagen formed a 3-dimensional fibrillar matrix in situ at the conducting polymer interface, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy under aqueous physiological conditions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurement confirmed no significant reduction in the electroactivity of the fibrillar collagen-modified conducting polymer substrates. Rat pheochromocytoma (nerve) cells showed increased differentiation and neurite outgrowth on the fibrillar collagen, which was further enhanced through electrical stimulation of the underlying conducting polymer substrate. Our study demonstrates that the direct coupling of ECM components such as collagen, followed by their further self-assembly into 3-dimensional matrices, has the potential to improve the neural-electrode interface of implant electrodes by encouraging nerve cell attachment and differentiation.

  11. Crystalline fibrillar gel formation in aqueous surfactant-antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Linet Rose; Tata, B V R; Sreejith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is a well-known cationic surfactant capable to micellize into diverse morphologies in aqueous medium. We observed the formation of an opaque gel state from aqueous CTAB solution in the presence of the aromatic additive, para-coumaric acid (PCA). Optical microscopic images revealed the presence of large fibrils in the system at room temperature. Gel nature of the fibrils was confirmed by rheological measurements. Presence of interstitial water in the fibrils was recognized with Raman spectroscopy. On heating the sample above 30 (°) C, the fibrillar gel state changes to a transparent liquid state with Newtonian flow properties. Dynamic light scattering study hinted the presence of small micelles in the solution above 30 (°) C. Thus the system showed a temperature-dependent structural transition from opaque water-swollen gel to transparent micellar liquid. The formation of water-swollen fibrillar network is attributed to surfactant-additive intermolecular interactions in aqueous medium. Transition to micelle phase above 30 (°) C is related to Kraft transition which is observed at significantly lower temperature for CTAB in the absence of PCA. The structural features of PCA play a key role in promoting fibrillar network formation and elevating the Kraft transition in aqueous solution of CTAB.

  12. Interactions of Lipid Membranes with Fibrillar Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are an intriguing class of protein aggregates with distinct physicochemical, structural and morphological properties. They display peculiar membrane-binding behavior, thus adding complexity to the problem of protein-lipid interactions. The consensus that emerged during the past decade is that amyloid cytotoxicity arises from a continuum of cross-β-sheet assemblies including mature fibrils. Based on literature survey and our own data, in this chapter we address several aspects of fibril-lipid interactions, including (i) the effects of amyloid assemblies on molecular organization of lipid bilayer; (ii) competition between fibrillar and monomeric membrane-associating proteins for binding to the lipid surface; and (iii) the effects of lipids on the structural morphology of fibrillar aggregates. To illustrate some of the processes occurring in fibril-lipid systems, we present and analyze fluorescence data reporting on lipid bilayer interactions with fibrillar lysozyme and with the N-terminal 83-residue fragment of amyloidogenic mutant apolipoprotein A-I, 1-83/G26R/W@8. The results help understand possible mechanisms of interaction and mutual remodeling of amyloid fibers and lipid membranes, which may contribute to amyloid cytotoxicity.

  13. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schmitz, Patrick; Bota, Marian; Gerber, Ursula; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Fuss, Christian; Enachescu, Marius; Bendas, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences. PMID:24064603

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of Gecko-inspired Fibrillar Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongkwan

    Over the last decade, geckos' remarkable ability to stick to and climb surfaces found in nature has motivated a wide range of scientific interest in engineering gecko-mimetic surface for various adhesive and high friction applications. The high adhesion and friction of its pads have been attributed to a complex array of hairy structures, which maximize surface area for van der Waals interaction between the toes and the counter-surface. While advances in micro- and nanolithography technique have allowed fabrication of increasingly sophisticated gecko mimetic surfaces, it remains a challenge to produce an adhesive as robust as that of the natural gecko pads. In order to rationally design gecko adhesives, understanding the contact behavior of fibrillar interface is critical. The first chapter of the dissertation introduces gecko adhesion and its potential applications, followed by a brief survey of gecko-inspired adhesives. Challenges that limit the performance of the current adhesives are presented. In particular, it is pointed out that almost all testing of gecko adhesives have been on clean, smooth glass, which is ideal for adhesion due to high surface energy and low roughness. Surfaces in application are more difficult to stick to, so the understanding of failure modes in low energy and rough surfaces is important. The second chapter presents a fabrication method for thermoplastic gecko adhesive to be used for a detailed study of fibrillar interfaces. Low-density polyethylene nanofibers are replicated from a silicon nanowire array fabricated by colloidal lithography and metal-catalyzed chemical etching. This process yields a highly ordered array of nanofibers over a large area with control over fiber diameter, length, and number density. The high yield and consistency of the process make it ideal for a systematic study on factors that affect adhesion and friction of gecko adhesives. The following three chapters examine parameters that affect macroscale friction of

  15. Some Structural Observations of Self-Assembling, Fibrillar Gels Composed of Two-Directional Bolaform Arborols

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.

    2005-01-12

    Arborols are dumbbell shaped molecules (bolaform amphiphiles) in which a hydrophobic spacer separates two hydrophilic end groups. They are a valuable model for naturally occurring fibers, such as actin or amyloid. Applications to materials science can be envisioned. On cooling from warm aqueous or methanolic solutions, arborols spontaneously assemble into long fibers. When the solutions are above a certain concentration that depends on the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, this leads to thermally reversible gels stabilized by a mechanism that is poorly understood. With the help of wide angle X-ray scattering, details of the arborol fiber and gel structure were obtained on wet gels. The characteristic dimensions of the fibers vary in a sensible fashion with the molecular specifics. Solvent character appears to affect the average domain length of arborols stacked into fibers. Fluorescently labeled arborols were prepared. The label does not prevent incorporation into the fibrillar structure, rendering fibril bundles visible in wet gels. Bundles are visible in concentrated gels, but not in less concentrated sols. These results are consistent with observations of dried arborols using atomic force microscopy and with previously published freeze-fracture electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering experiments on dried gels.

  16. Storage Stability of Dried Microsclerotia of the Biological Control Pathogen Mycoleptodiscus Terrestris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    well as reproductive organisms in a great many fungal species (Webster and Weber 2007). They have been reported as capable of surviving for long... asexual spores (sporogenic germination), or by sexual fruit bodies (carpogenic germination) (Webster and Weber 2007). Plating of dried microsclerotia

  17. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  18. Polymorphism of fibrillar structures depending on the size of assembled Aβ17-42 peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Mookyung; Kang, Mooseok; Chang, Iksoo

    2016-01-01

    The size of assembled Aβ17-42 peptides can determine polymorphism during oligomerization and fibrillization, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. Starting from separate random monomers, various fibrillar oligomers with distinct structural characteristics were identified using discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations based on a coarse-grained protein model. From the structures observed in the simulations, two characteristic oligomer sizes emerged, trimer and paranuclei, which generated distinct structural patterns during fibrillization. A majority of the simulations for trimers and tetramers formed non-fibrillar oligomers, which primarily progress to off-pathway oligomers. Pentamers and hexamers were significantly converted into U-shape fibrillar structures, meaning that these oligomers, called paranuclei, might be potent on-pathway intermediates in fibril formation. Fibrillar oligomers larger than hexamers generated substantial polymorphism in which hybrid structures were readily formed and homogeneous fibrillar structures appeared infrequently. PMID:27901087

  19. Low-frequency spectroscopic analysis of monomeric and fibrillar lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Hidayatul A; Fischer, Bernd M; Bradley, Andrew P; Jones, Inke; Abbott, Derek; Middelberg, Anton P J; Falconer, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to generate far-infrared and low-frequency spectral measurements of monomeric lysozyme and lysozyme fibrils. The formation of lysozyme fibrils was verified by the Thioflavin T assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was evident in the FT-IR spectra that between 150 and 350 cm(-1) the two spectra diverge, with the lysozyme fibrils showing higher absorbance intensity than the monomeric form. The broad absorption phenomenon is likely due to light scattered from the fibrillar architecture of lysozyme fibrils as supported by simulation of Rayleigh light scattering. The lack of discrete phonon-like peaks suggest that far-infrared spectroscopy cannot detect vibrational modes between the highly ordered hydrogen-bonded beta-pleated sheets of the lysozyme subunit.

  20. Design of biomimetic fibrillar interfaces: 1. Making contact.

    PubMed Central

    Glassmaker, N. J.; Himeno, T.; Hui, C-Y; Kim, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the contact behaviour of simple fibrillar interfaces designed to mimic natural contact surfaces in lizards and insects. A simple model of bending and buckling of fibrils shows that such a structure can enhance compliance considerably. Contact experiments on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) fibrils confirm the model predictions. Although buckling increases compliance, it also reduces adhesion by breaking contact between fibril ends and the substrate. Also, while slender fibrils are preferred from the viewpoint of enhanced compliance, their lateral collapse under the action of surface forces limits the aspect ratio achievable. We have developed a quantitative model to understand this phenomenon, which is shown to be in good agreement with experiments. PMID:16849150

  1. Metal-mediated formation of fibrillar ABri amyloid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Ashcroft, Alison E; Korchazhkina, Olga V; Exley, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    British amyloid (ABri) peptide is precipitated as amyloid fibrils in pathological lesions which are characteristic of familial British dementia. Unlike for other amyloidogenic peptides which have been implicated in neurodegenerative disease, for example, Abeta in Alzheimer's disease and alpha synuclein in Parkinson's disease, nothing is yet known as to whether metals mediate the formation of ABri amyloid fibrils. We show herein that a concentration of ABri, which had not previously been shown to spontaneously form amyloid, formed fibrils when incubated for 12 months at 37 degrees C. The additional presence of Al(III), in particular, or Fe(III) increased significantly both the number and the size of the fibrillar amyloid deposits which were very similar in appearance to amyloid described in hippocampal plaques in familial British dementia. Co-incubation of ABri with either Zn(II) or Cu(II) precipitated the peptide but did not result in the formation of amyloid fibrils.

  2. Role of fibrillar Tenascin-C in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Zhiyu; Chen, Ming; Li, Dajiang; Li, Zhihua; Xiong, Yan; Dong, Jiahong; Li, Xiaowu

    2009-04-01

    Interaction of cancer cells with stroma cells facilitates tumor progression by rebuilding the existing extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment. In the tumor, upregulation of Tenascin-C (Tn-C) expression potentially can alter tumor behavior. However, the molecular mechanisms by which tumor-stroma interactions affect the tumor microenvironment have not been well characterized. In this study, we analyzed the expression of fibrillar Tn-C (fTn-C) in human metastatic pancreatic cancers. After co-culturing two pancreatic cancer cell lines, highly metastatic BxPc3 cells and non-metastatic PaCa2 cells, with stromal fibroblasts (SF), we evaluated the roles of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activation and SF in promoting Tn-C organization. Next, we evaluated whether fibrillar Tn-C promotes pancreatic cancer cell movement using cell adhesion and migration assays. Finally, we observed the relationship between MMP-2 activation and fTn-C formation in vivo by injecting the BxPc3 and PaCa2 cells into nude mice. We found that fTn-C was increased in metastatic pancreatic cancer. The fTn-C expression correlated with MMP-2 activity. In the in vitro co-culture, fTn-C organization was found only in BxPc3/SF co-cultures, and required the participation of active MMP-2. The fTn-C reduced cell adhesion and promote pancreatic cancer cell migration by decreasing the adhesive interactions between integrin alpha6beta1 and the ECM. The in vivo tumorigenesis analysis showed that the fTn-C formation and active MMP-2 were significantly increased in the BxPc3 tumors, compared to the PaCa2 tumors. These results demonstrate that Tn-C deposition into the ECM requires participation of active MMP-2 and SF. The deposited Tn-C could promote pancreatic cancer progression.

  3. [Blood sampling using "dried blood spot": a clinical biology revolution underway?].

    PubMed

    Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Blood testing using the dried blood spot (DBS) is used since the 1960s in clinical analysis, mainly within the framework of the neonatal screening (Guthrie test). Since then numerous analytes such as nucleic acids, small molecules or lipids, were successfully measured on the DBS. While this pre-analytical method represents an interesting alternative to classic blood sampling, its use in routine is still limited. We review here the different clinical applications of the blood sampling on DBS and estimate its future place, supported by the new methods of analysis as the LC-MS mass spectrometry.

  4. An integrated view on how the management of the dry period length of lactating cows could affect mammary biology and defence.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, A; Capuco, A V; De Spiegeleer, B; Peelman, L; Stevens, M; Collier, R J; Burvenich, C

    2010-10-01

    The dry period is necessary to facilitate cell turnover in the bovine mammary gland and to optimize milk production in the next lactation. An 8-week dry period has long been the golden standard of management for dairy cows. Genetic improvements and new management technologies have led to higher milk production and a need for re-evaluation of the dry period length. Over the last decade, dry period length has been proposed to be shortened or eliminated mainly from an economic point of view. However, the influence of modified dry period length on the immune defence of the bovine mammary gland and the occurrence of new intramammary infections has not yet been appreciated. The objective of this review is to discuss the bovine mammary gland biology, defence and systemic health when the dry period length is modified. Shortening or eliminating the dry period may minimize or remove the impact of milk accumulation at dry off, thereby lessening the immunodeficiency of the dam that is characteristic of this period. Composition of mammary secretions may change and the extent of tissue remodelling may be reduced when the dry period is reduced or eliminated. Additionally, impact of the dry period length on energy and nutritional status, and on hormonal and local regulatory factors, lead us to hypothesize that changing the dry period length might also affect the response to intramammary infection. It is concluded that there is a need to integrate mammary gland biology and defence mechanisms in studies dealing with modified dry period lengths. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. THE EFFECTS ON BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS OF FREEZING AND DRYING BY VACUUM SUBLIMATION

    PubMed Central

    Greiff, Donald; Pinkerton, Henry

    1954-01-01

    A vacuum sublimation apparatus is described which will permit, (a) the removal of water from virus suspensions at temperatures ranging down to –80°C., (b) continuous operation with a minimum of attention from the investigator, (c) sealing off of samples at operating pressures (10–5 mm. Hg), (d) simultaneous lyophilization of aliquot samples at different temperatures, (e) isolation of a portion of the apparatus without disturbing the remainder of the system, and (f) determination of the end-point of sublimation without disturbing the samples. The time required for drying 0.1 ml. of influenza virus suspension was shown to increase markedly with decrease of temperature, 8 days being required for dehydration at –80°C. in contrast to 2 days at –30°C. and 1 day at 0°C. PMID:13163340

  6. Effect of biological treatment of the ceramic mass on the drying and firing of facing tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.V.; Sidorova, V.A.; Skripnik, V.P.; Solnyshkina, T.N.; Vainberg, S.N.; Vlasov, A.S.; Yashchenko, O.I.

    1985-12-01

    The authors studied the ceramic masses of the Minsk Building Materials Production complex (MZSM) and the Kishinev FinishingMaterials Plant (KZOM) having the following compositions: MZSM--48% Vesejovsk VGP clay, 22% nepheline concentrate, 17% quartz sand, 8% dolomite, 5% title scrap, and above 100% 3% bentonite, 0.1% soda ash, and 0.28% liquid glass; KZOM-48% Veselovsk VGP clay, 28% nepheline-syenite, 8% limestone filings (scrap), 16% title scrap, and, above 100%, 1% bentonite and 3% sodium tripolyphosphate. Improving the quality of ceramic tiles and reducing the mineral and fuel-energy consumption in their production are among the practical industrial problems. This paper discusses a method of solving them by improving the drying and firing processes of the products.

  7. RNA Profiling for the Identification of the Tissue Origin of Dried Stains in Forensic Biology.

    PubMed

    Hanson, E K; Ballantyne, J

    2010-07-01

    Examination of crime scene items for biological evidence typically begins with a preliminary screening for the presence of biological fluids in order to identify possible sources of DNA. Conventional biochemical and immunological assays employed for this screening require multiple tests to be performed in a serial manner, can consume a significant amount of valuable evidentiary material, and can require a significant amount of time and labor for completion. Moreover, the presence of several biological fluids, such as saliva, vaginal secretions, and menstrual blood, cannot be conclusively identified using current methods. Due to the disadvantages of conventional body fluid testing, some operational crime laboratories have chosen to bypass the body fluid identification process and proceed directly to DNA analysis. However, while reducing the time spent on each case, this "shortcut" could result in a failure to provide important probative information regarding the nature of the crime as well as result in increased cost to crime laboratories if unnecessary DNA testing is performed. In the past several years, a number of forensic researchers have attempted to develop molecular-based approaches to body fluid identification that would provide operational crime laboratories with significantly improved specificity. This has resulted in an increased interest in the use of RNA profiling strategies for the identification of forensically relevant biological fluids. This review provides an overview of studies carried out on the use of both messenger RNA and small (micro) RNA profiling. The results of these studies are encouraging and presage the routine identification the tissue source(s) of forensic evidence using molecular-based approaches.

  8. TUBULAR AND FIBRILLAR COMPONENTS OF MATURE AND DIFFERENTIATING SIEVE ELEMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Cronshaw, James; Esau, Katherine

    1967-01-01

    An ontogenetic study of the sieve element protoplast of Nicotiana tabacum L. by light and electron microscopy has shown that the P-protein component (slime) arises as small groups of tubules in the cytoplasm. These subsequently enlarge to form comparatively large compact masses of 231 ± 2.5 (SE)A (n = 121) tubules, the P-protein bodies. During subsequent differentiation of the sieve element, the P-protein body disaggregates and the tubules become dispersed throughout the cell. This disaggregation occurs at about the same stage of differentiation of the sieve elements as the breakdown of the tonoplast and nucleus. Later, the tubules of P-protein are reorganized into smaller striated 149 ± 4.5 (SE)A (n = 43) fibrils which are characteristic of the mature sieve elements. The tubular P-protein component has been designated P1-protein and the striated fibrillar component P2-protein. In fixed material, the sieve-plate pores of mature sieve elements are filled with proteinaceous material which frays out into the cytoplasm as striated fibrils of P2-protein. Our observations are compatible with the view that the contents of contiguous mature sieve elements, including the P-protein, are continuous through the sieve-plate pores and that fixing solutions denature the proteins in the pores. They are converted into the electron-opaque material filling the pores. PMID:6050947

  9. Modulation of the gelation efficiency of fibrillar and spherical aggregates by means of thiolation.

    PubMed

    Munialo, Claire D; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Broersen, Kerensa; van der Linden, Erik; Martin, Anneke H

    2013-11-27

    Fibrillar and spherical aggregates were prepared from whey protein isolate (WPI). These aggregates were thiolated to a substantial degree to observe any impact on functionality. Sulfur-containing groups were introduced on these aggregates which could be converted to thiol groups by deblocking. Changes on a molecular and microstructural level were studied using tryptophan fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. The average size (nm) of spherical aggregates increased from 38 to 68 nm (blocked variant) and 106 nm (deblocked variant) after thiolation, whereas the structure of fibrillar aggregates was not affected. Subsequently, gels containing these different aggregates were prepared. Rheological measurements showed that thiolation decreased the gelation concentration and increased gel strength for both WPI fibrillar and spherical aggregates. This effect was more pronounced upon thiolation of preformed fibrillar aggregates. The findings suggest that thiolation at a protein aggregate level is a promising strategy to increase gelation efficiency.

  10. Influence of Disturbance on Soil Respiration in Biologically Crusted Soil during the Dry Season

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wu, Bin; Zha, Tian-shan; Jia, Xin; Qin, Shu-gao; Shao, Chen-xi; Liu, Jia-bin; Lai, Zong-rui; Fa, Ke-yu

    2013-01-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss), as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60–70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration. PMID:24453845

  11. Biological activity of a standardized freeze-dried platelet derivative to be used as cell culture medium supplement.

    PubMed

    Muraglia, Anita; Ottonello, Chiara; Spanò, Raffaele; Dozin, Beatrice; Strada, Paolo; Grandizio, Michele; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Serum of animal origin and in particular fetal bovine serum is the most commonly utilized cell culture medium additive for in vitro cell growth and differentiation. However, several major concerns have been raised by the scientific community regarding the use of animal sera for human cell-based culture applications. Among the possible alternatives to the animal serum, platelet-derived compounds have been proposed since more than 10 years. Nevertheless, the high degree of variability between the different platelet preparations, and the lack of standardized manufacturing and quality control procedures, made difficult to reach a consensus on the applicability of this novel cell culture medium supplement. In this study, we describe the preparation of a standardized platelet-rich plasma (PRP) derivative obtained starting from human-certified buffy coat samples with a defined platelet concentration and following protocols including also freeze-drying, gamma irradiation and biological activity testing prior the product release as cell culture medium additive. Biological activity testing of the different preparations was done by determining the capability of the different PRP preparations to sustain human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clone formation and proliferation. Taking advantage of a developed MSC in vitro clonogenicity test, we also determined biological activity and stability of the freeze-dried gamma-sterilized PRP preparations after their storage for different times and at different temperatures. The PRP effects on cell proliferation were determined both on primary cell cultures established from different tissues and on a cell line. Results were compared with those obtained in "traditional" parallel control cultures performed in the presence of bovine serum [10% fetal calf serum (FCS)]. Compared to FCS, the PRP addition to the culture medium increased the MSC colony number and average size. In primary cell cultures and in cell line cultures, the PRP

  12. Technical Stability and Biological Variability in MicroRNAs from Dried Blood Spots: A Lung Cancer Therapy-Monitoring Showcase.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Mustafa; Laufer, Thomas; Backes, Christina; Schrörs, Hannah; Fehlmann, Tobias; Ludwig, Nicole; Kohlhaas, Jochen; Meese, Eckart; Wehler, Thomas; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Different work flows have been proposed to use miRNAs as blood-borne biomarkers. In particular, the method used for collecting blood from patients can considerably influence the diagnostic results. We explored whether dried blood spots (DBSs) facilitate stable miRNA measurements and compared its technical stability with biological variability. First, we tested the stability of DBS samples by generating from 1 person 18 whole-genome-wide miRNA profiles of DBS samples that were exposed to different temperature and humidity conditions. Second, we investigated technical reproducibility by performing 7 replicates of DBS again from 1 person. Third, we investigated DBS samples from 53 patients with lung cancer undergoing different therapies. Across these 3 stages, 108 genome-wide miRNA profiles from DBS were generated and evaluated biostatistically. In the stability analysis, we observed that temperature and humidity had an overall limited influence on the miRNomes (average correlation between the different conditions of 0.993). Usage of a silica gel slightly diminished DBS' technical reproducibility. The 7 technical replicates had an average correlation of 0.996. The correlation with whole-blood PAXGene miRNomes of the same individual was remarkable (correlation of 0.88). Finally, evaluation of the samples from the 53 patients with lung cancer exposed to different therapies showed that the biological variations exceeded the technical variability significantly (P < 0.0001), yielding 51 dysregulated miRNAs. We present a stable work flow for profiling of whole miRNomes on the basis of samples collected from DBS. Biological variations exceeded technical variations significantly. DBS-based miRNA profiles will potentially further the translational character of miRNA biomarker studies. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Aβ peptide fibrillar architectures controlled by conformational constraints of the monomer.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Kristoffer; Ohman, Anders; Olofsson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Anomalous self-assembly of the Aβ peptide into fibrillar amyloid deposits is strongly correlated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ fibril extension follows a template guided "dock and lock" mechanism where polymerisation is catalysed by the fibrillar ends. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR (H/D-exchange NMR), we have analysed the fibrillar structure and polymerisation properties of both the highly aggregation prone Aβ1-40 Glu22Gly (Aβ(40Arc)) and wild type Aβ1-40 (Aβ(40WT)). The solvent protection patterns from H/D exchange experiments suggest very similar structures of the fibrillar forms. However, through cross-seeding experiments monitored by SPR, we found that the monomeric form of Aβ(40WT) is significantly impaired to acquire the fibrillar architecture of Aβ(40Arc). A detailed characterisation demonstrated that Aβ(40WT) has a restricted ability to dock and isomerise with high binding affinity onto Aβ(40Arc) fibrils. These results have general implications for the process of fibril assembly, where the rate of polymerisation, and consequently the architecture of the formed fibrils, is restricted by conformational constraints of the monomers. Interestingly, we also found that the kinetic rate of fibril formation rather than the thermodynamically lowest energy state determines the overall fibrillar structure.

  14. Trans-cellular propagation of Tau aggregation by fibrillar species.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2012-06-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Trans-cellular Propagation of Tau Aggregation by Fibrillar Species*

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22461630

  16. N-terminal region of myelin basic protein reduces fibrillar amyloid-β deposition in Tg-5xFAD mice.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Xu, Feng; Liao, Mei-Chen; Davis, Judianne; Robinson, John K; Van Nostrand, William E

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by extensive deposition of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. Previously, myelin basic protein (MBP) was identified to be a potent inhibitor to Aβ fibril formation, and this inhibitory activity was localized to the N-terminal residues 1-64, a fragment designated MBP1. Here, we show that the modest neuronal expression of a fusion protein of the biologically active MBP1 fragment and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (MBP1-EGFP) significantly improved the performance of spatial learning memory in Tg-5xFAD mice, a model of pathologic Aβ accumulation in brain. The levels of insoluble Aβ and fibrillar amyloid were significantly reduced in bigenic Tg-5xFAD/Tg-MBP1-EGFP mice. Quantitative stereological analysis revealed that the reduction in amyloid was because of a reduction in the size of fibrillar plaques rather than a decrease in plaque numbers. The current findings support previous studies showing that MBP1 inhibits Aβ fibril formation in vitro and demonstrate the ability of MBP1 to reduce Aβ pathology and improve behavioral performance.

  17. The effect of model soil contamination with Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb on the biological properties of soils in the dry steppe and semidesert regions of southern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, S. I.; Spivakova, N. A.; Kazeev, K. Sh.

    2011-09-01

    Model soil contamination with Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb in the dry steppes and semideserts of southern Russia has worsened the biological soil properties. With respect to the degree of deterioration of the biological properties, the soils can be arranged in the following sequence: dark chestnut soils > chestnut soils > light chestnut soils > brown semidesert soils > sandy brown semidesert soils. The sequence of metal oxides according to the adverse effect on the biological soil properties is as follows: CrO3 > CuO ≥ PbO ≥ NiO.

  18. Experimental microbial contamination and disinfection of dry (vapour) shipper dewars designed for short-term storage and transportation of cryopreserved germplasm and other biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Bielanski, A

    2005-04-15

    Cryopreservation, storage and transport of cryopreserved germplasm without the risk of disease transmission is of great concern to animal and human health authorities. Here we report on the efficacy of microbial decontamination of the liquid nitrogen (LN) dry (vapour) shippers used for short-term storage and transportation of germplasm and other biological specimens. Dry shippers containing either a hydrophobic or a non-hydrophobic LN absorbent were experimentally contaminated with high titers of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococus aureus, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1). Biocidals with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and gas vapours of formalin and ethylene oxide were used for disinfection of the dewars. Among the biocidals used, treatment with sodium hypochlorite solution, the quaternary ammonium-based disinfectants and peracetic acid were the most effective and useful for dry shippers with a hydrophobic LN absorbent. None of the bacterial or viral microorganisms were detected in samples of semen and embryos stored in dry shippers following their disinfection with these biocides. An application of some other disinfectants, due to their foaming properties or to the permeability of the absorbent hydrophobic membrane (HM) was not effective or may have caused irreversible damage to the LN absorbent. Gas sterilization by ethylene oxide in contrast to formalin was fully effective for both types of dry shippers.

  19. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  20. Pathological tendons maintain sufficient aligned fibrillar structure on ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC).

    PubMed

    Docking, S I; Cook, J

    2016-06-01

    Structural disorganization in the tendon is associated with tendinopathy, with little research investigating whether disorganization overwhelms the overall structural integrity of the tendon. This study investigated the mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of aligned fibrillar structure as detected by ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in the pathological and normal Achilles and patellar tendons. Ninety-one participants had their Achilles and/or patellar tendons scanned using UTC to capture a three-dimensional image of the tendon and allow a semi-quantification of the echopattern. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure (echo type I + II) and disorganized structure (echo type III + IV) was calculated based on UTC algorithms. Each tendon was classified as either pathological or normal based solely on gray-scale ultrasound. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.001) in the pathological tendon compared with the normal tendon, despite the pathological tendon containing greater amounts of disorganized structure (P ≤ 0.001). A significant relationship was observed between the mean CSA of disorganized structure and anteroposterior diameter of the Achilles (R(2)  = 0.587) and patellar (R(2)  = 0.559) tendons. This study is the first to show that pathological tendons have sufficient levels of aligned fibrillar structure. Pathological tendons may compensate for areas of disorganization by increasing in tendon thickness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  2. New Altered Non-Fibrillar Collagens in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Role in the Remodeling Process

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ana; Tarazón, Estefanía; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Lago, Francisca; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), cardiac failure is accompanied by profound alterations of extracellular matrix associated with the progression of cardiac dilation and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Recently, we reported alterations of non-fibrillar collagen expression in ischemic cardiomyopathy linked to fibrosis and cardiac remodeling. We suspect that expression changes in genes coding for non-fibrillar collagens may have a potential role in DCM development. Objectives This study sought to analyze changes in the expression profile of non-fibrillar collagen genes in patients with DCM and to examine relationships between cardiac remodeling parameters and the expression levels of these genes. Methods and Results Twenty-three human left ventricle tissue samples were obtained from DCM patients (n = 13) undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 10) for RNA sequencing analysis. We found increased mRNA levels of six non-fibrillar collagen genes, such as COL4A5, COL9A1, COL21A1, and COL23A1 (P < 0.05 for all), not previously described in DCM. Protein levels of COL8A1 and COL16A1 (P < 0.05 for both), were correspondingly increased. We also identified TGF-β1 significantly upregulated and related to both COL8A1 and COL16A1. Interestingly, we found a significant relationship between LV mass index and the gene expression level of COL8A1 (r = 0.653, P < 0.05). Conclusions In our research, we identified new non-fibrillar collagens with altered expression in DCM, being COL8A1 overexpression directly related to LV mass index, suggesting that they may be involved in the progression of cardiac dilation and remodeling. PMID:27936202

  3. Inulin sugar glasses preserve the structural integrity and biological activity of influenza virosomes during freeze-drying and storage.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jørgen; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2007-09-01

    Influenza virosomes are reconstituted influenza virus envelopes that may be used as vaccines or as carrier systems for cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. Here we present a procedure to generate influenza virosomes as a stable dry-powder formulation by freeze-drying (lyophilization) using an amorphous inulin matrix as a stabilizer. In the presence of inulin the structural integrity and fusogenic activity of virosomes were fully preserved during freeze-drying. For example, the immunological properties of the virosomes, i.e. the HA potency in vitro and the immunogenic potential in vivo, were maintained during lyophilization in the presence of inulin. In addition, compared to virosomes dispersed in buffer, inulin-formulated virosomes showed substantially prolonged preservation of the HA potency upon storage. Also the capacity of virosomes to mediate cellular delivery of macromolecules was maintained during lyophilization in the presence of inulin and upon subsequent storage. Specifically, when dispersed in buffer, virosomes with encapsulated plasmid DNA lost their transfection activity completely within 6 weeks, whereas their transfection activity was fully preserved for at least 12 weeks after incorporation in an inulin matrix. Thus, in the presence of inulin as a stabilizing agent, the shelf-life of influenza virosomes with and without encapsulated macromolecules was considerably prolonged. Formulation of influenza virosomes as a dry-powder is advantageous for storage and transport and offers the possibility to develop needle-free dosage forms, e.g. for oral, nasal, pulmonal, or dermal delivery.

  4. Influence of the freeze-drying process on the physicochemical and biological properties of pre-heated amphotericin B micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Scheyla D V S; Silva-Filho, Miguel A; Silva, Christian A; Araújo, Ivonete B; Silva, Acarilia E; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F; Oliveira, Anselmo G; Egito, E Sócrates T

    2014-06-01

    The moderate heat treatment of amphotericin B (AmB) in its micellar form (M-AmB) results in superaggregates (H-AmB) that present a substantially lower toxicity and similar activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the H-AmB behavior after a freeze-drying process. H-AmB and M-AmB micelles were evaluated before and after freeze-drying concerning their physicochemical and biological properties by spectrophotometry and activity/toxicity assay, respectively. Four concentrations of M-AmB and H-AmB were studied aiming to correlate their aggregation state and the respective biological behavior: 50 mg L(-1), 5 mg L(-1), 0.5 mg L(-1), and 0.05 mg L(-1). Then, potassium leakage and hemoglobin leakage from red blood cells were used to evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity, respectively. The efficacy of M-AmB and H-AmB formulations was assessed by potassium leakage from Candida albicans and by the broth microdilution method. After heating, in addition to an evident turbidity, a slight blueshift from 327 to 323 nm was also observed at the concentrations of 50 and 5 mg L(-1) for H-AmB. Additionally, an increase in the absorbance at 323 nm at the concentration of 0.5 mg L(-1) was detected. Concerning the toxicity, H-AmB caused significantly lower hemoglobin leakage than M-AmB. These results were observed for H-AmB before and after freeze-drying. However, there was no difference between H-AmB and M-AmB concerning their activity. Accordingly, the freeze-drying cycle did not show any influence on the behavior of heated formulations, highlighting the suitability of such a method to produce a new AmB product with a long shelf life and with both greater efficiency and less toxicity.

  5. Infrared nanospectroscopy characterization of oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates during amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, F. S.; Longo, G.; Faggiano, S.; Lipiec, E.; Pastore, A.; Dietler, G.

    2015-07-01

    Amyloids are insoluble protein fibrillar aggregates. The importance of characterizing their aggregation has steadily increased because of their link to human diseases and material science applications. In particular, misfolding and aggregation of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3 is implicated in spinocerebellar ataxia-3. Infrared nanospectroscopy, simultaneously exploiting atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, can characterize at the nanoscale the conformational rearrangements of proteins during their aggregation. Here we demonstrate that we can individually characterize the oligomeric and fibrillar species formed along the amyloid aggregation. We describe their secondary structure, monitoring at the nanoscale an α-to-β transition, and couple these studies with an independent measurement of the evolution of their intrinsic stiffness. These results suggest that the aggregation of Josephin proceeds from the monomer state to the formation of spheroidal intermediates with a native structure. Only successively, these intermediates evolve into misfolded aggregates and into the final fibrils.

  6. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives.

  7. Preparation of High-Density Fibrillar Collagen Matrices that Mimic Desmoplastic Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Artym, Vira V.

    2016-01-01

    The stroma of invasive tumors becomes enriched in dense fibrillar collagen as a result of the desmoplastic reaction. This desmoplastic collagen exerts profound effects on tumor and normal cells. In view of these findings, it is important to develop novel in vitro cell systems that mimic this desmoplastic extracellular matrix in order to permit cell studies under in vivo-like conditions. This Unit provides a protocol and troubleshooting guide for the preparation of high density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrices that closely model the desmoplastic collagenous matrix of malignant tumors. It then describes the use of this HDFC matrix for in vitro cell studies of invadopodia formation and function in extracellular matrix invasion. In addition, this Unit also provides a detailed protocol for immuno-labeling of invadopodial proteins and detection of HDFC matrix degradation associated with invadopodia to permit invadopodia visualization using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26930554

  8. Dynamics of fibrillar precursors of shishes as a function of stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, Luigi; Cavallo, Dario; Van Erp, Tim B.; Ma, Zhe; Housmans, Jan-Willem; Fernandez-Ballester, Lucia; Peters, Gerrit W. M.

    2010-11-01

    Shishes are fibrillar crystallites that can be created by deforming a polymer melt. The formation of shishes takes place when flow is strong enough to stretch molecules. In the early stages, bundles of stretched molecules with pre-crystalline order form metastable precursors whose stability depends on their size and, hence, on the stress level. We find that for a specific isotactic polypropylene, close to the nominal melting point, a stress larger than 0.10 MPa leads to stable fibrillar precursors that are partially crystalline immediately after flow. On the other hand, below 0.10 MPa, the aspect ratio of precursors tends to unity and the lack of crystallinity makes these structures prone to dissolution.

  9. Changes in cell, matrix compartment, and fibrillar collagen volumes between growth-plate zones.

    PubMed

    Noonan, K J; Hunziker, E B; Nessler, J; Buckwalter, J A

    1998-07-01

    To define the contributions of changes in cell, matrix compartment, and fibrillar collagen volumes to longitudinal bone growth, we measured the differences in cell, pericellular/territorial matrix and interterritorial matrix volumes, and fibrillar collagen concentrations between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones of the proximal tibial physes of six miniature pigs. The mean numerical density of cells decreased from 110,000 cells/mm3 in the upper proliferative zone to 59,900 cells/mm3 in the lower hypertrophic zone. The mean cell volume increased nearly 5-fold (from 1,174 to 5,530 microm3), and the total matrix volume per cell increased 46% (from 8,040 to 11,760 microm3/cell) between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones. Both the pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell and the interterritorial matrix volume per cell increased between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones; the pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell increased 61% (from 4,580 to 7,390 microm3/cell), whereas the interterritorial matrix volume per cell increased 26% (from 3,460 to 4,370 microm3/cell). The total increase in mean cell volume of 4,356 microm3 exceeded the total increase in mean matrix volume per cell of 3,720 microm3; the total mean pericellular/territorial matrix volume per cell increased more than the total mean interterritorial matrix volume per cell (2,810 compared with 910 microm3/cell). Fibrillar collagen concentration was greater in the interterritorial matrix than in the pericellular/territorial matrix in both zones and increased in both matrix compartments between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones. The amount of fibrillar collagen per cell also increased in both matrix compartments between the upper proliferative and lower hypertrophic zones (from 1,720 to 3,100 microm3/cell in the pericellular/territorial matrix and from 1,490 to 2,230 microm3/cell in the interterritorial matrix; thus, the total

  10. Automated determination of fibrillar structures by simultaneous model building and fiber diffraction refinement.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; André, Ingemar

    2015-07-01

    For highly oriented fibrillar molecules, three-dimensional structures can often be determined from X-ray fiber diffraction data. However, because of limited information content, structure determination and validation can be challenging. We demonstrate that automated structure determination of protein fibers can be achieved by guiding the building of macromolecular models with fiber diffraction data. We illustrate the power of our approach by determining the structures of six bacteriophage viruses de novo using fiber diffraction data alone and together with solid-state NMR data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of molecular replacement from monomeric and fibrillar templates by solving the structure of a plant virus using homology modeling and protein-protein docking. The generated models explain the experimental data to the same degree as deposited reference structures but with improved structural quality. We also developed a cross-validation method for model selection. The results highlight the power of fiber diffraction data as structural constraints.

  11. Biologically inspired polymer microfibers with spatulate tips as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2006-12-01

    Being inspired by gecko foot hairs, microfibers with flat spatulate tips are proposed as repeatable adhesives. They are fabricated by molding a master template fabricated using deep reactive ion etching and the notching effect. Fabricated polyurethane fiber arrays with 4.5μm fiber and 9μm tip diameter demonstrated macroscale adhesion pressures up to 18N/cm2 and overall work of adhesion up to 11J/m2 on a 6mm diameter glass hemisphere for a preload pressure of 12N/cm2. These results show around four times higher adhesion and five times higher overall work of adhesion as compared to the flat polyurethane surface.

  12. Establishing correlations in the en-mass migration of dermal fibroblasts on oriented fibrillar scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sisi; Clark, Richard A F; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2015-10-01

    Wound healing proceeds via fibroblast migration along three dimensional fibrillar substrates with multiple angles between fibers. We have developed a technique for preparation of three dimensional fibrillar scaffolds with where the fiber diameters and the angles between adjacent fiber layers could be precisely controlled. Using the agarose droplet method we were able to make accurate determinations of the dependence of the migration speed, focal adhesion distribution, and nuclear deformation on the fiber diameter, fiber spacing, and angle between adjacent fiber layers. We found that on oriented single fiber layers, whose diameters exceeded 1 μm, large focal adhesion complexes formed in a linear arrangement along the fiber axis and cell motion was highly correlated. On multi layered scaffolds most of the focal adhesion sites reformed at the junction points and the migration speed was determined by the angle between adjacent fiber layers, which followed a parabolic function with a minimum at 30°. On these surfaces we observed a 25% increase in the number of focal adhesion points and a similar decrease in the degree of nuclear deformation, both phenomena associated with decreased mobility. These results underscore the importance of substrate morphology on the en-mass migration dynamics. En-mass fibroblast migration is an essential component of the wound healing process which can determine rate and scar formation. Yet, most publications on this topic have focused on single cell functions. Here we describe a new apparatus where we designed three dimensional fibrillar scaffolds with well controlled angles between junction points and highly oriented fiber geometries. We show that the motion of fibroblasts undergoing en-mass migration on these scaffolds can be controlled by the substrate topography. Significant differences in cell morphology and focal adhesions was found to exist between cells migrating on flat versus fibrillar scaffolds where the migration speed was

  13. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of fibrillar amyloid-β peptide degradation by human mononuclear phagocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Kiyota, Tomomi; Walsh, Shannon M.; Liu, Jianuo; Kipnis, Jonathan; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination therapy of AD animal models and patients strongly suggests an active role of brain mononuclear phagocytes in immune-mediated clearance of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in brain. Although Aβ uptake by macrophages can be regulated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, their effects on macrophage-mediated Aβ degradation are poorly understood. To better understand this mechanism of degradation, we examined whether pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines affect the degradation of Aβ using primary cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and microglia using pulse-chase analysis of fibrillar and oligomer 125I-Aβ40 and Aβ42. Initial uptake of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 was 40% and its degradation was saturated by 120 hrs in both MDM and microglia, compared to an initial uptake of oligomeric Aβ less than 0.5% and saturation of degradation within 24 hrs. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased the intracellular retention of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 by inhibiting degradation, whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), but not IL-13 and IL-27, enhanced degradation. Fibrillar Aβ degradation in MDM is sensitive to lysosomal and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors but insensitive to proteasomal and neprilysin inhibitors. IFN-γ and TNF-α directly reduced the expression of IDE and chaperone molecules (Hsp70 and Hsc70), which are involved in refolding of aggregated proteins. Co-culture of MDM with activated, but not naïve T cells, suppressed Aβ degradation in MDM, which was partially blocked by a combination of neutralizing antibodies against pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines suppress Aβ degradation in MDM, whereas select anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines antagonize these effects. PMID:18768842

  14. Prospects and limitations of the rational engineering of fibrillar collagens

    PubMed Central

    Majsterek, Ireneusz; McAdams, Erin; Adachi, Eijiro; Dhume, Shirish T.; Fertala, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant collagens are attractive proteins for a number of biomedical applications. To date, significant progress was made in the large-scale production of nonmodified recombinant collagens; however, engineering of novel collagen-like proteins according to customized specifications has not been addressed. Herein we investigated the possibility of rational engineering of collagen-like proteins with specifically assigned characteristics. We have genetically engineered two DNA constructs encoding multi-D4 collagens defined as collagen-like proteins, consisting primarily of a tandem of the collagen II D4 periods that correspond to the biologically active region. We have also attempted to decrease enzymatic degradation of novel collagen by mutating a matrix metalloproteinase 1 cleavage site present in the D4 period. We demonstrated that the recombinant collagen α-chains consisting predominantly of the D4 period but lacking most of the other D periods found in native collagen fold into a typical collagen triple helix, and the novel procollagens are correctly processed by procollagen N-proteinase and procollagen C-proteinase. The nonmutated multi-D4 collagen had a normal melting point of 41°C and a similar carbohydrate content as that of control. In contrast, the mutant multi-D4 collagen had a markedly lower thermostability of 36°C and a significantly higher carbohydrate content. Both collagens were cleaved at multiple sites by matrix metalloproteinase 1, but the rate of hydrolysis of the mutant multi-D4 collagen was lower. These results provide a basis for the rational engineering of collagenous proteins and identifying any undesirable consequences of altering the collagenous amino acid sequences. PMID:12931004

  15. PHBV/PLLA-based composite scaffolds fabricated using an emulsion freezing/freeze-drying technique for bone tissue engineering: surface modification and in vitro biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Naznin; Wang, Min

    2012-03-01

    Tissue engineering combines living cells with biodegradable materials and/or bioactive components. Composite scaffolds containing biodegradable polymers and nanosized osteoconductive bioceramic with suitable properties are promising for bone tissue regeneration. In this paper, based on blending two biodegradable and biocompatible polymers, namely poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) with incorporated nano hydroxyapatite (HA), three-dimensional composite scaffolds with controlled microstructures and an interconnected porous structure, together with high porosity, were fabricated using an emulsion freezing/freeze-drying technique. The influence of various parameters involved in the emulsion freezing/freeze-drying technique was studied for the fabrication of good-quality polymer scaffolds based on PHBV polymers. The morphology, mechanical properties and crystallinity of PHBV/PLLA and HA in PHBV/PLLA composite scaffolds and PHBV polymer scaffolds were studied. The scaffolds were coated with collagen in order to improve wettability. During in vitro biological evaluation study, it was observed that SaOS-2 cells had high attachment on collagen-coated scaffolds. Significant improvement in cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity for HA-incorporated composite scaffolds was observed due to the incorporation of HA. After 3 and 7 days of culture on all scaffolds, SaOS-2 cells also had normal morphology and growth. These results indicated that PHBV/PLLA-based scaffolds fabricated via an emulsion freezing/freeze-drying technique were favorable sites for osteoblastic cells and are promising for the applications of bone tissue engineering.

  16. Specific fluorescent detection of fibrillar alpha-synuclein using mono- and trimethine cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Volkova, K D; Kovalska, V B; Balanda, A O; Losytskyy, M Yu; Golub, A G; Vermeij, R J; Subramaniam, V; Tolmachev, O I; Yarmoluk, S M

    2008-02-01

    With the aim of searching of novel amyloid-specific fluorescent probes the ability of series of mono- and trimethine cyanines based on benzothiazole, pyridine and quinoline heterocycle end groups to recognize fibrillar formations of alpha-synuclein (ASN) was studied. For the first time it was revealed that monomethine cyanines can specifically increase their fluorescence in aggregated ASN presence. Dialkylamino-substituted monomethine cyanine T-284 and meso-ethyl-substituted trimethine cyanine SH-516 demonstrated the higher emission intensity and selectivity to aggregated ASN than classic amyloid stain Thioflavin T, and could be proposed as novel efficient fluorescent probes for fibrillar ASN detection. Studies of structure-function dependences have shown that incorporation of amino- or diethylamino- substituents into the 6-position of the benzothiazole heterocycle yields in a appearance of a selective fluorescent response to fibrillar alpha-synuclein presence. Performed calculations of molecular dimensions of studied cyanine dyes gave us the possibility to presume, that dyes bind with their long axes parallel to the fibril axis via insertion into the neat rows (so called 'channels') running along fibril.

  17. Fibrillar seeds alleviate amyloid-β cytotoxicity by omitting formation of higher-molecular-weight oligomers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-hui; Liu, Qian; Sun, Xun; Yu, Ji-sheng; Zhao, De-sheng; Yu, Ye-ping; Luo, Jun-jie; Hu, Jia; Yu, Zhi-wu; Zhao, Yu-fen; Li, Yan-mei

    2013-09-27

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides can exist in distinct forms including monomers, oligomers and fibrils, consisting of increased numbers of monomeric units. Among these, Aβ oligomers are implicated as the primary toxic species as pointed by multiple lines of evidence. It has been suggested that toxicity could be rendered by the soluble higher-molecular-weight (high-n) Aβ oligomers. Yet, the most culpable form in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains elusive. Moreover, the potential interaction among the insoluble fibrils that have been excluded from the responsible aggregates in AD development, Aβ monomers and high-n oligomers is undetermined. Here, we report that insoluble Aβ fibrillar seeds can interact with Aβ monomers at the stoichiometry of 1:2 (namely, each Aβ molecule of seed can bind to two Aβ monomers at a time) facilitating the fibrillization by omitting the otherwise mandatory formation of the toxic high-n oligomers during the fibril maturation. As a result, the addition of exogenous Aβ fibrillar seeds is seen to rescue neuronal cells from Aβ cytotoxicity presumably exerted by high-n oligomers, suggesting an unexpected protective role of Aβ fibrillar seeds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Contact with fibrillar collagen inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by up-regulating p27KIP1

    PubMed Central

    Henriet, Patrick; Zhong, Zhi-Duan; Brooks, Peter C.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2000-01-01

    It is known that the extracellular matrix regulates normal cell proliferation, and it is assumed that anchorage-independent malignant cells escape this regulatory function. Here we demonstrate that human M24met melanoma cells remain responsive to growth regulatory signals that result from contact with type I collagen and that the effect on proliferation depends on the physical structure of the collagen. On polymerized fibrillar collagen, M24met cells are growth arrested at the G1/S checkpoint and maintain high levels of p27KIP1 mRNA and protein. In contrast, on nonfibrillar (denatured) collagen, the cells enter the cell cycle, and p27KIP1 is down-regulated. These growth regulatory effects involve contact between type I collagen and the collagen-binding integrin α2β1, which appears restricted in the presence of fibrillar collagen. Thus melanoma cells remain sensitive to negative growth regulatory signals originating from fibrillar collagen, and the proteolytic degradation of fibrils is a mechanism allowing tumor cells to escape these restrictive signals. PMID:10944199

  19. Molecular and ultrastructural studies of a fibrillar collagen from octocoral (Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Sella, Ido; Madhurapantula, Rama S; Antipova, Olga; Mandelberg, Yael; Kashman, Yoel; Benayahu, Dafna; Benayahu, Yehuda

    2017-07-13

    We report here the biochemical, molecular and ultrastructural features of a unique organization of fibrillar collagen extracted from the octocoral Sarcophyton ehrenbergi Collagen, the most abundant protein in the animal kingdom, is often defined as a structural component of extra-cellular matrices in metazoans. In the present study, collagen fibers were extracted from the mesenteries of S. ehrenbergi polyps. These fibers are organized as filaments and further compacted as coiled fibers. The fibers are uniquely long, reaching an unprecedented length of tens of centimeters. The diameter of these fibers is 9 ±0.37 µm.The amino acid content of these fibers was identified using chromatography and revealed close similarity in content to mammalian type I and II collagens. The ultrastructural organization of the fibers was characterized by means of high resolution microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The fibers are composed of fibrils and fibril bundles in the range of 15 to 35 nm. These data indicate a fibrillar collagen possessing structural aspects of both types I and II, a highly interesting and newly described form of fibrillar collagen organization. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Biologic comparison of inhaled insulin formulations: Exubera™ and novel spray-dried engineered particles of dextran-10.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Philip J; Cherrington, Alan; Dobry, Dan E; Edgerton, Dale; Friesen, Dwayne T; Hobbs, Charles; Leach, Chet L; Murri, Brice; Neal, Doss; Lyon, David K; Vodak, David T; Reed, Matthew D

    2014-12-01

    Inhaled peptides and proteins have promise for respiratory and systemic disease treatment. Engineered spray-dried powder formulations have been shown to stabilize peptides and proteins and optimize aerosol properties for pulmonary delivery. The current study was undertaken to investigate the in vitro and in vivo inhalation performance of a model spray-dried powder of insulin and dextran 10 in comparison to Exubera™. Dextrans are a class of glucans that are generally recognized as safe with optimum glass transition temperatures well suited for spray drying. A 70% insulin particle loading was prepared by formulating with 30% (w/v) dextran 10. Physical characterization revealed a "raisin like" particle. Both formulations were generated to produce a similar bimodal particle size distribution of less than 3.5 μm MMAD. Four female Beagle dogs were exposed to each powder in a crossover design. Similar presented and inhaled doses were achieved with each powder. Euglycemia was achieved in each dog prior and subsequent to dosing and blood samples were drawn out to 245 min post-exposure. Pharmacokinetic analyses of post-dose insulin levels were similar for both powders. Respective dextran 10-insulin and Exubera exposures were similar producing near identical area under the curve (AUC), 7,728 ± 1,516 and 6,237 ± 2,621; concentration maximums (C max), 126 and 121 (μU/mL), and concentration-time maximums, 20 and 14 min, respectively. These results suggest that dextran-10 and other dextrans may provide a novel path for formulating peptides and proteins for pulmonary delivery.

  1. Chemical composition and biological value of spray dried porcine blood by-products and bone protein hydrolysate for young chickens.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, D; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Orda, J; Skorupińska, J; Słupczyńska, M; Kuryszko, J

    2011-10-01

    The chemical composition of spray dried porcine blood by-products is characterised by wide variation in crude protein contents. In spray dried porcine blood plasma (SDBP) it varied between 670-780 g/kg, in spray dried blood cells (SDBC) between 830-930 g/kg, and in bone protein hydrolysate (BPH) in a range of 740-780 g/kg. Compared with fish meal, these feeds are poor in Met and Lys. Moreover, in BPH deep deficits of Met, Cys, Thr and other amino acids were found. The experiment comprised 7 dietary treatments: SDBP, SDBC, and BPH, each at an inclusion rate of 20 or 40 g/kg diet, plus a control. The addition of 20 or 40 g/kg of the analysed meals into feeds for very young chickens (1-28 d post hatch) significantly decreased the body weight (BW) of birds. Only the treatments with 40 g/kg of SDBP and SDBC showed no significant difference in BW as compared with the control. There were no significant differences between treatments and type of meal for feed intake, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations in blood. Addition of bone protein and blood cell meals to feed decreased the IgG concentration in blood and caused shortening of the femur and tibia bones. However, changes in the mineral composition of bones were not significantly affected by the type of meal used. The blood by-products, which are rich in microelements, improved retention of Ca and Cu only. In comparison to control chickens, significantly better accretion of these minerals was found in treatments containing 20 g/kg of SDBP or 40 g/kg of SDBC. Great variability in apparent ileal amino acid digestibility in chickens was determined. In this respect, some significant differences related to the type of meal fed were confirmed for Asp, Pro, Val, Tyr and His. In general, the apparent ileal digestibility of amino acids was about 2-3 percentage units better in chickens fed on diets containing the animal by products than in control birds.

  2. Complex formation of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) anthocyanins during freeze-drying and its influence on their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Correa-Betanzo, Julieta; Padmanabhan, Priya; Corredig, Milena; Subramanian, Jayasankar; Paliyath, Gopinadhan

    2015-03-25

    Biological activity of polyphenols is influenced by their uptake and is highly influenced by their interactions with the food matrix. This study evaluated the complex formation of blueberry polyphenols with fruit matrixes such as pectin and cellulose and their effect on the biological and antiproliferative properties of human colon cell lines HT-29 and CRL 1790. Free or complexed polyphenols were isolated by dialyzing aqueous or methanolic blueberry homogenates. Seven phenolic compounds and thirteen anthocyanins were identified in blueberry extracts. Blueberry extracts showed varying degrees of antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, as well as α-glucosidase activity. Fruit matrix containing cellulose and pectin, or purified polygalacturonic acid and cellulose, did not retain polyphenols and showed very low antioxidant or antiproliferative activities. These findings suggest that interactions between polyphenols and the food matrix may be more complex than a simple association and may play an important role in the bioefficacy of blueberry polyphenols.

  3. Fibrillar polysaccharides in marine macromolecular organic matter as imaged by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, P.H.; Balnois, E.; Wilkinson, K.J.; Zhang, J.; Buffle, J.; Guo, L.

    1998-07-01

    A consensus is now emerging that the structure of organic macromolecules will determine their function in aquatic systems. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are highly complementary techniques for the study of natural colloids and can, when used together, reveal complementary information about the relative abundance and structures of aquatic macromolecules and colloids. In this study, colloid samples from the Gulf of Mexico and Middle Atlantic Bight of nominal sizes 1--200 nm were collected by cross-flow ultrafiltration, diafiltered, and freeze-dried. Rehydrated colloids were analyzed in parallel by AFM and TEM using standardized techniques. Results from estuarine, surface-, and deep-water samples show that an important fraction of colloidal organic matter (COM) consists of fibrillar material, which is rich in polysaccharides and fresher (i.e., has a younger radiocarbon age) than the bulk COM. This result is important because COM makes up 30--70% of oceanic and estuarine nominally dissolved organic matter. Other microparticles appear to be quasi-spherical, often attached to the fibrils like pearls. In the surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Middle Atlantic Bight, and Trinity River, fibrils with diameters of 1--3 nm and lengths of 100--2,000 nm were predominant. Although fibrils were also observed in samples from the benthic nepheloid layer in the Gulf of Mexico (1,600 m) and Middle Atlantic Bight (2,600 m), a much greater heterogeneity of colloid and macromolecule shapes and sizes was observed in these deeper waters.

  4. Governing biological material at the intersection of care and research: the use of dried blood spots for biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Conor M.W.; van El, Carla G.; Faulkner, Alex; Cornel, Martina C.

    2012-01-01

    A series of governance issues currently surrounds the multiple uses and multiple users of dried blood spots (DBS) for research purposes. Internationally there is a discussion on storing DBS resulting from newborn screening for public health and using them as the basis for large biobank-like collections to facilitate biomedical research. If such a transformation were to be formalized, then DBS would sit at the intersection of care (ie, public health) and research, with the mechanisms through which such a collection could be managed not totally self-evident. What is more, a DBS collection raises questions about the fuzzy boundaries between privacy and anonymity; how to control or define quality control uses of DBS; medical vs nonmedical uses; as well as benefit sharing and stakeholder involvement. Our goal here is to explore some of the key questions relating to DBS governance by way of the bio-objects and bio-objectification concepts. By embracing – rather than resisting to – the blurring of boundaries and problems in categorization that have come to characterize bio-objects and bio-objectification processes recently described in this journal, we attempt to highlight some issues that might not be currently considered, and to point to some possible directions to go (or avoid). Building from our knowledge of the current DBS situation in the Netherlands, we outline questions concerning the uses, management, collection, and storage of DBS. PMID:22911534

  5. Load sharing in bioinspired fibrillar adhesives with backing layer interactions and interfacial misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacca, Mattia; Booth, Jamie A.; Turner, Kimberly L.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Bio-inspired fibrillar adhesives rely on the utilization of short-range intermolecular forces harnessed by intimate contact at fibril tips. The combined adhesive strength of multiple fibrils can only be utilized if equal load sharing (ELS) is obtained at detachment. Previous investigations have highlighted that mechanical coupling of fibrils through a compliant backing layer gives rise to load concentration and the nucleation and propagation of interfacial flaws. However, misalignment of the adhesive and contacting surface has not been considered in theoretical treatments of load sharing with backing layer interactions. Alignment imperfections are difficult to avoid for a flat-on-flat interfacial configuration. In this work we demonstrate that interfacial misalignment can significantly alter load sharing and the kinematics of detachment in a model adhesive system. Load sharing regimes dominated by backing layer interactions and misalignment are revealed, the transition between which is controlled by the misalignment angle, fibril separation, and fibril compliance. In the regime dominated by misalignment, backing layer deformation can counteract misalignment giving rise to improved load sharing when compared to an identical fibrillar array with a rigid backing layer. This result challenges the conventional belief that stiffer (and thinner) backing layers consistently reduce load concentration among fibrils. Finally, we obtain analytically the fibril compliance distribution required to harness backing layer interactions to obtain ELS. Through fibril compliance optimization, ELS can be obtained even with misalignment. However, since misalignment is typically not deterministic, it is of greater practical significance that the array optimized for perfect alignment exhibits load sharing superior to that of a homogeneous array subject to misalignment. These results inform the design of fibrillar arrays with graded compliance capable of exhibiting improved load sharing

  6. Fabrication of injectable, cellular, anisotropic collagen tissue equivalents with modular fibrillar densities.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Benedetto; Ghezzi, Chiara E; James-Bhasin, Mark; Nazhat, Showan N

    2015-01-01

    Technological improvements in collagen gel fabrication are highly desirable as they may enable significant advances in the formation of tissue-equivalent biomaterials for regenerative medicine, three-dimensional (3D) in vitro tissue models, and injectable scaffolds for cell and drug delivery applications. Thus, strategies to modulate collagen gel fibrillar density and organization in the mesostructure have been pursued to fabricate collagenous matrices with extracellular matrix-like features. Herein, we introduce a robust and simple method, namely gel aspiration-ejection (GAE), to engineer 3D, anisotropic, cell seeded, injectable dense collagen (I-DC) gels with controllable fibrillar densities, without the use of crosslinking. GAE allows for the hybridization of collagen gels with bioactive agents for increased functionality and supports highly aligned homogenous cell seeding, thus providing I-DC gels with distinct properties when compared to isotropic DC gels of random fibrillar orientation. The hybridization of I-DC with anionic fibroin derived polypeptides resulted in the nucleation of carbonated hydroxyapatite within the aligned nanofibrillar network upon exposure to simulated body fluid, yielding a 3D, anisotropic, mineralized collagen matrix. In addition, I-DC gels accelerated the osteoblastic differentiation of seeded murine mesenchymal stem cells (m-MSCs) when exposed to osteogenic supplements, which resulted in the cell-mediated, bulk mineralization of the osteoid-like gels. In addition, and upon exposure to neuronal transdifferentiation medium, I-DC gels supported and accelerated the differentiation of m-MSCs toward neuronal cells. In conclusion, collagen GAE presents interesting opportunities in a number of fields spanning tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to drug and cell delivery.

  7. A biologically active delivery material with dried-rehydrated vesicles containing the anti-inflammatory diclofenac for potential wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Helena; Silva, Raquel; Matamá, Teresa; Silva, Carla; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds usually remain in the inflammatory phase of the healing process during several months or even years. Hence, a continuous research has been resulting in the development of wound dressings with improved performance. Herein, we report a delivery system for cutaneous wound healing, consisting of a textile material (non-woven gauzes) covered with lipidic vesicles containing diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This study also aims to compare the entrapment efficiency data with previous works and confirm that this parameter and drug amount are not directly correlated. A method of dehydration-rehydration of the liposomes presenting different sizes and lamellarities was used to assess the best conditions to attain the highest drug entrapment efficiency. Optimum conditions for the NSAID release were achieved with high phospholipid concentrations and dried-rehydrated vesicles (DRVs) prepared from multilamellar liposomes (MLVs). A chemical activation of the gauzes was performed to enhance the vesicles attachment, also contributing to a higher drug amount in the surrounding media. In spite of the entrapment efficiency being lower comparatively with other values presented by us previously, the diclofenac concentration was considerably higher in this formulation. Entrapment efficiency is, therefore, not sufficient per se to define the real amount of drug contained in the formulation. The cytocompatibility assessment in human skin fibroblasts showed that DRVs from MLVs and DRVs from large unilamellar liposomes (LUVs) with less than 750 μM of egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC), containing diclofenac, were not cytotoxic after 72 h of contact, greatly implying potential for their application in the chronic wounds healing.

  8. Long-Term In Vivo Imaging of Fibrillar Tau in the Retina of P301S Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Christian; Hoffmann, Nadine A.; Ochs, Simon M.; Burgold, Steffen; Filser, Severin; Steinbach, Sonja; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Arzberger, Thomas; Goedert, Michel; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Schmidt, Boris; Herms, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Tauopathies are widespread neurodegenerative disorders characterised by the intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Especially in Alzheimer's disease, pathological alterations in the retina are discussed as potential biomarkers to improve early diagnosis of the disease. Using mice expressing human mutant P301S tau, we demonstrate for the first time a straightforward optical approach for the in vivo detection of fibrillar tau in the retina. Longitudinal examinations of individual animals revealed the fate of single cells containing fibrillar tau and the progression of tau pathology over several months. This technique is most suitable to monitor therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing the accumulation of fibrillar tau. In order to evaluate if this approach can be translated to human diagnosis, we tried to detect fibrillar protein aggregates in the post-mortem retinas of patients that had suffered from Alzheimer's disease or Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Even though we could detect hyperphosphorylated tau, we did not observe any fibrillar tau or Aß aggregates. In contradiction to previous studies, our observations do not support the notion that Aβ or tau in the retina are of diagnostic value in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23300938

  9. Determination of Biological Variance and Validation of a Fluorometric Assay for Measurement of α-l-Iduronidase Activity in Dried Blood Spots Samples: The First Experience in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Mohammad; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Said; Alaei, Mohammad Reza; Azadi, Namam-Ali; Vakili, Rahim; Zamanfar, Daniel; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Khatami, Shohreh

    2015-07-01

    Methods for assaying lysosomal diseases in dried blood samples are very useful today due to its several advantages related to the stability of samples, its transportation, handled and analysis, and its potential use for newborn screening compared to traditional methods in leucocytes samples. For this reason, it is important to validate these assays before being used in routine laboratory. Because of different in biological markers based on ethnicity, we aimed this study to validation a DBS-based fluorometric assay for measurement of α-l-Iduronidase activity for diagnosis of MPS I patients in Iran. DBS samples were collected from 15 MPS I patients and 60 healthy age matched subjects. Diagnostic value, biological variance and α-l-Iduronidase activity were determined. DBS α-l-Iduronidase activity was significantly higher in male subjects than in female group. Using a cut-off level of 1.08 µmol/spot 20 h, sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 98 %. The linearity of test was proved and we showed that within-run and between run precision were 5.6 and 14.66 %. Measurement of α-l-Iduronidase activity in DBS samples is an accurate test for diagnosis of MPS I and because of its rapid shipping and simplicity to keeping, DBS-based enzyme activity could be considered as a useful diagnostic tool in this disease.

  10. Reaction diffusion model of the enzymatic erosion of insoluble fibrillar matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Tzafriri, Abraham R; Bercovier, Michel; Parnas, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the time course of in vivo biodegradation is a key issue in the design of an increasing number of biomedical applications such as sutures, tissue analogs and drug-delivery devices. The design of such biodegradable devices is hampered by the absence of quantitative models for the enzymatic erosion of solid protein matrices. In this work, we derive and simulate a reaction diffusion model for the enzymatic erosion of fibrillar gels that successfully reproduces the main qualitative features of this process. A key aspect of the proposed model is the incorporation of steric hindrance into the standard Michaelis-Menten scheme for enzyme kinetics. In the limit of instantaneous diffusion, the model equations are analogous to the standard equations for enzymatic degradation in solution. Invoking this analogy, the total quasi-steady-state approximation is used to derive approximate analytical solutions that are valid for a wide range of in vitro conditions. Using these analytical approximations, an experimental-theoretical method is derived to unambiguously estimate all the kinetic model parameters. Moreover, the analytical approximations correctly describe the characteristic hyperbolic dependence of the erosion rate on enzyme concentration and the zero-order erosion of thin fibers. For definiteness, the analysis of published experimental results of enzymatic degradation of fibrillar collagen is demonstrated, and the role of diffusion in these experiments is elucidated. PMID:12124264

  11. The expression patterns of minor fibrillar collagens during development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Adams, Jason S; Mcmahan, B Lane; Brown, Raquel J; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2010-01-01

    Minor fibrillar collagens are recognized as the organizers and nucleators during collagen fibrillogenesis but likely serve additional functions. The minor fibrillar collagens include collagens type V and type XI. Mutations of collagen type V and XI can cause Ehlers Danlos, Stickler’s, and Marshall’s syndromes in human. We have characterized the spatiotemporal expression patterns of Col11a1, Col11a2, Col5a1 as well as Col5a3 in zebrafish embryos by in situ hybridization. Col5a1 is expressed in developing somites, neural crest, the head mesenchyme, developing cranial cartilage, pharyngeal arches and vertebrae. Col5a3 is detected in the notochord, mesenchyme cells in the eyes and lens. Both Col11a1 and Col11a2 have similar expression patterns, including notochord, otic vesicle, and developing cranial cartilages. Zebrafish may therefore serve as a valuable vertebrate model system for the study of diseases associated with collagens type V and XI mutations. PMID:20647059

  12. Nanomechanical properties of distinct fibrillar polymorphs of the protein α-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makky, Ali; Bousset, Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Melki, Ronald

    2016-11-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) is a small presynaptic protein of 140 amino acids. Its pathologic intracellular aggregation within the central nervous system yields protein fibrillar inclusions named Lewy bodies that are the hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In solution, pure α-Syn adopts an intrinsically disordered structure and assembles into fibrils that exhibit considerable morphological heterogeneity depending on their assembly conditions. We recently established tightly controlled experimental conditions allowing the assembly of α-Syn into highly homogeneous and pure polymorphs. The latter exhibited differences in their shape, their structure but also in their functional properties. We have conducted an AFM study at high resolution and performed a statistical analysis of fibrillar α-Syn shape and thermal fluctuations to calculate the persistence length to further assess the nanomechanical properties of α-Syn polymorphs. Herein, we demonstrated quantitatively that distinct polymorphs made of the same protein (wild-type α-Syn) show significant differences in their morphology (height, width and periodicity) and physical properties (persistence length, bending rigidity and axial Young’s modulus).

  13. Capsules of the diatom Achnanthidium minutissimum arise from fibrillar precursors and foster attachment of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kroth, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Achnanthidium minutissimum is a benthic freshwater diatom that forms biofilms on submerged surfaces in aquatic environments. Within these biofilms, A. minutissimum cells produce extracellular structures which facilitate substrate adhesion, such as stalks and capsules. Both consist of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), but the microstructure and development stages of the capsules are so far unknown, despite a number of hypotheses about their function, including attachment and protection. We coupled scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to bright-field microscopy (BFM) and found that A. minutissimum capsules mostly possess an unstructured surface. However, capsule material that was mechanically stressed by being stretched between or around cells displayed fibrillar substructures. Fibrils were also found on the frustules of non-encapsulated cells, implicating that A. minutissimum capsules may develop from fibrillar precursors. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy revealed that the capsule material do not contain silicon, distinguishing it from the frustule material. We furthermore show that bacteria preferentially attach to capsules, instead of non-encapsulated A. minutissimum cells, which supports the idea that capsules mediate diatom-bacteria interactions. PMID:25834772

  14. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  15. Nanomechanical properties of distinct fibrillar polymorphs of the protein α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Makky, Ali; Bousset, Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Melki, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) is a small presynaptic protein of 140 amino acids. Its pathologic intracellular aggregation within the central nervous system yields protein fibrillar inclusions named Lewy bodies that are the hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In solution, pure α-Syn adopts an intrinsically disordered structure and assembles into fibrils that exhibit considerable morphological heterogeneity depending on their assembly conditions. We recently established tightly controlled experimental conditions allowing the assembly of α-Syn into highly homogeneous and pure polymorphs. The latter exhibited differences in their shape, their structure but also in their functional properties. We have conducted an AFM study at high resolution and performed a statistical analysis of fibrillar α-Syn shape and thermal fluctuations to calculate the persistence length to further assess the nanomechanical properties of α-Syn polymorphs. Herein, we demonstrated quantitatively that distinct polymorphs made of the same protein (wild-type α-Syn) show significant differences in their morphology (height, width and periodicity) and physical properties (persistence length, bending rigidity and axial Young’s modulus). PMID:27901068

  16. Nucleobindin 1 binds to multiple types of pre-fibrillar amyloid and inhibits fibrillization

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Barbash, Shahar; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Graham, W Vallen

    2017-01-01

    During amyloid fibril formation, amyloidogenic polypeptides misfold and self assemble into soluble pre-fibrillar aggregates, i.e., protofibrils, which elongate and mature into insoluble fibrillar aggregates. An emerging class of chaperones, chaperone-like amyloid binding proteins (CLABPs), has been shown to interfere with aggregation of particular misfolded amyloid peptides or proteins. We have discovered that the calcium-binding protein nuclebindin-1 (NUCB1) is a novel CLABP. We show that NUCB1 inhibits aggregation of islet-amyloid polypeptide associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a-synuclein associated with Parkinson’s disease, transthyretin V30M mutant associated with familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and Aβ42 associated with Alzheimer’s disease by stabilizing their respective protofibril intermediates. Kinetic studies employing the modeling software AmyloFit show that NUCB1 affects both primary nucleation and secondary nucleation. We hypothesize that NUCB1 binds to the common cross-β-sheet structure of protofibril aggregates to “cap” and stabilize soluble macromolecular complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were employed to characterize the size, shape and volume distribution of multiple sources of NUCB1-capped protofibrils. Interestingly, NUCB1 prevents Aβ42 protofibril toxicity in a cellular assay. NUCB1-stabilized amyloid protofibrils could be used as immunogens to prepare conformation-specific antibodies and as novel tools to develop screens for anti-protofibril diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:28220836

  17. The pro alpha 2(V) collagen gene is evolutionarily related to the major fibrillar-forming collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D; Bernard, M; Gargano, S; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    A number of overlapping cDNA clones, covering 5.2 kb of sequences which code for the human pro alpha 2(V) collagen chain, have been isolated. Analysis of the structural data have indicated a close evolutionary kinship between the pro alpha 2(V) chain and the major fibrillar collagen types. Isolation and analysis of an 8 kb genomic fragment has further supported this notion by revealing a homologous arrangement of nine triple-helical domain exons. These studies have therefore provided conclusive evidence which categorizes the Type V collagen as a member of the Group 1 molecules, or fibrillar-forming collagens. Images PMID:3029669

  18. Fibrillar organization of fibronectin is expressed coordinately with cell surface gangliosides in a variant murine fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    NCTC 2071A cells, a line of transformed murine fibroblasts, grow in serum-free medium, are deficient in gangliosides, synthesize fibronectin, but do not retain and organize it on the cell surface. When the cells are exposed to exogenous gangliosides, fibrillar strands of fibronectin become attached to the cell surface. A morphologically distinct variant of NCTC 2071A cells was observed to both retain cell surface fibronectin and organize it into a fibrillar network when the cells were stained with anti-fibronectin antibodies and a fluorescent second antibody. A revertant cell type appeared to resemble the parental NCTC 2071A cells in terms of morphology and fibronectin organization. All three cell types were subjected to mild NaIO4 oxidation and reduction with KB3H4 of very high specific radioactivity in order to label the sialic acid residues of surface gangliosides. The variant had much more surface gangliosides than the parental, particularly more complex gangliosides corresponding to GM1 and GD1a. The surface gangliosides of the revertant were intermediate between the parental and the variant. By using sialidase, which hydrolyzes GD1a to GM1, and 125I-labeled cholera toxin, which binds specifically to GM1, the identity and levels of these gangliosides were confirmed in the three cell types. When variant cells were exposed to sialidase for 2 d, there appeared to be little change in fibronectin organization. Concomitant treatment of the cells with the B subunit of cholera toxin, which bound to all the surface GM1 including that generated by the sialidase, however, eliminated the fibrillar network of fibronectin. In addition, exposure of the variant cells to a 70,000-mol-wt fragment of fibronectin, which lacks the cell attachment domain but contains a matrix assembly domain, inhibited the formation of fibers. Finally, all three cell types were assayed for their ability to attach to and spread on fibronectin-coated surfaces; no significant differences were found

  19. Superhydrophobic and oleophilic open-cell foams from fibrillar blends of polypropylene and polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Ali; Chu, Raymond K M; Lee, Jung H; Park, Chul B

    2014-12-10

    Effective removal of oils from water is of global significance for environmental protection. In this study, we investigate the hydrophobicity and oleophilicity of open-cell polymer foams prepared in a continuous and scalable extrusion process. The material used to prepare the open-cell foams is a fibrillar blend of polypropylene (PP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the morphology of the PP/PTFE fibrillar blend reveal that the PTFE has a fibrillar morphology in the PP matrix. SEM micrograph of the extruded foam shows the formation of an interconnected open-cell structure. Using nitrogen pycnometry, the open-cell content is estimated to be 97.7%. A typical bulk density of the open-cell foam is measured to be about 0.07 g cm(-3) corresponding to a void fraction of 92%. Thus, a large three-dimensional space is made available for oil storage. A drop of water on the cross-section of the extruded open-cell foam forms a contact angle of 160° suggesting that the open-cell foam exhibits superhydrophobicity. The open-cell foam can selectively absorb various petroleum products, such as octane, gasoline, diesel, kerosene, light crude oil, and heavy crude oil from water and the uptake capacities range from about 5 to 24 g g(-1). The uptake kinetics can be enhanced by exposing the open-cell foam to high intensity ultrasound which increases the surface porosity of the thin, impervious, foam "skin" layer. The reusability of the foam can be improved by using a matrix polymer which demonstrates superior elastic properties and prevents the foams from undergoing a large permanent deformation upon compression to "squeeze out" the oil. For example, when the PP homopolymer matrix is replaced with a PP random copolymer, the permanent deformation for 10 compressive cycles is reduced from about 30% to 10%. To the best of our knowledge, these PP-based open-cell foams outperform PP-based absorbents conventionally used for oil-spill cleanup

  20. A Pilot Study Investigating Clinical Responses and Biological Pathways of Azelastine/Fluticasone in Nonallergic Vasomotor Rhinitis before and after Cold Dry Air Provocation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Umesh; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lorentz, Holly; Sadoway, Tara; Nelson, Victoria; Patel, Piyush; Salapatek, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    Nonallergic vasomotor rhinitis (NAVMR) has been considered a diagnosis by exclusion due to unknown mechanisms or lack of diagnostic biomarkers. To determine clinical responses and biological pathways in NAVMR subjects challenged to cold dry air (CDA) in an environmental exposure chamber (EEC) pre- and posttreatment with azelastine/fluticasone (AzeFlu), 30 NAVMR subjects, prescreened for CDA-induced symptoms (approx. 14°C, <15% relative humidity, ×1 h) were randomized to treatment with AzeFlu (n = 20) or placebo (n = 10) for 2 weeks. Total nasal symptoms scores, minimum cross-sectional area, cough, and conjunctival redness were recorded at visit 1 (pretreatment) and visit 2 (posttreatment) before, during, and after CDA challenge. At both visits, nasal lavage fluid (NLF) and nasal scrapings (NS) were collected pre- and post-CDA challenge. Substance P, neurokinin-A, and calcitonin gene-related peptide concentrations in NLF were analyzed pre- and postchallenge at each visit. Their relationship with CDA-induced symptoms was determined by statistical analysis. MicroRNA sequencing from NS determined differentially expressed miRNA between the treatment groups post-CDA challenge at each visit. The minimum cross-sectional area (p < 0.05), cough count (p < 0.05), and substance P (p < 0.01) improved posttreatment with AzeFlu versus placebo. Gene targets for differentially expressed miRNAs at visit 1 were enriched for biological pathways regulating epithelial ciliogenesis and cell integrity that were modified in the AzeFlu-treated group versus placebo posttreatment. This study demonstrated the feasibility of an EEC model to investigate CDA-induced clinical responses and pathobiology in NAVMR subjects pre- and posttreatment with AzeFlu. NAVMR disease mechanisms for other nonallergic triggers can be investigated similarly. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The fibrillar structure of cement lines on resorbed root surfaces of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Domon, T; Takahashi, S; Suzuki, R; Islam, M N

    2000-08-01

    The cement lines between reparative cementum and resorbed dentin or cementum in human teeth were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with NaOH maceration. The NaOH maceration was used to remove interfibrillar substances and to observe the fibrillar architecture of the cement lines directly. Light microscopy showed that the cement lines were rich in proteoglycans with mucopolysaccharides, but deficient in collagen fibrils. The cement lines were artificially broken after treatment with hyaluronidase, which digests some of the mucopolysaccharides, but digests no collagen fibrils. Scanning electron microscopy showed that fibril intermingling occurred only in some places between reparative cementum and resorbed tissue. These findings suggested that the proteoglycans in cement lines mediate the attachment between new and old mineralized tissue.

  2. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  3. Afa, a diffuse adherence fibrillar adhesin associated with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rogéria; Ordoñez, Juana G; de Oliveira, Rosana R; Trabulsi, Luiz R; Baldwin, Thomas J; Knutton, Stuart

    2002-05-01

    O55 is one of the most frequent enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) O serogroups implicated in infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis showed that this serogroup includes two major electrophoretic types (ET), designated ET1 and ET5. ET1 corresponds to typical EPEC, whilst ET5 comprises strains with different combinations of virulence genes, including those for localized adherence (LA) and diffuse adherence (DA). Here we report that ET5 DA strains possess a DA adhesin, designated EPEC Afa. An 11.6-kb chromosomal region including the DA adhesin operon from one O55:H(-) ET5 EPEC strain was sequenced and found to encode a protein with 98% identity to AfaE-1, an adhesin associated with uropathogenic E. coli. Although described as an afimbrial adhesin, we show that both AfaE-1 and EPEC Afa possess fine fibrillar structures. This is the first characterization and demonstration of an Afa adhesin associated with EPEC.

  4. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  5. Fibrillar adhesion with no clusterisation: Functional significance of material gradient along adhesive setae of insects.

    PubMed

    Gorb, Stanislav N; Filippov, Alexander E

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that adhesive tarsal setae of beetles possess material gradients along their length. These gradients presumably represent an evolutionary optimization enhancing the adaptation to rough surfaces while simultaneously preventing clusterisation of the setae by lateral collapse. The numerical experiment of the present study has clearly demonstrated that gradient-bearing fibers with short soft tips and stiff bases have greater advantage in maximizing adhesion and minimizing clusterisation in multiple attachment-detachment cycles, if compared to the fibers with longer soft tips on the stiff bases and fibers with stiff tips on the soft bases. This study not only manifests the crucial role of gradients in material properties along the setae in beetle fibrillar adhesive system, but predicts that similar gradients must have been convergently evolved in various lineages of arthropods.

  6. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  7. Thermal Transitions of Fibrillar Collagen Unveiled by Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy of Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Matteini, Paolo; Cicchi, Riccardo; Ratto, Fulvio; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Rossi, Francesca; de Angelis, Marella; Pavone, Francesco S.; Pini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The thermal transitions of fibrillar collagen are investigated with second-harmonic generation polarization anisotropy microscopy. Second-harmonic generation images and polarization anisotropy profiles of corneal stroma heated in the 35–80°C range are analyzed by means of a theoretical model that is suitable to probe principal intramolecular and interfibrillar parameters of immediate physiological interest. Our results depict the tissue modification with temperature as the interplay of three destructuration stages at different hierarchical levels of collagen assembly including its tertiary structure and interfibrillar alignment, thus supporting and extending previous findings. This method holds the promise of a quantitative inspection of fundamental biophysical and biochemical processes and may find future applications in real-time and postsurgical functional imaging of collagen-rich tissues subjected to thermal treatments. PMID:22995490

  8. Deciphering structural intermediates and genotoxic fibrillar aggregates of albumins: a molecular mechanism underlying for degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Amani, Samreen

    2013-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins is involved in some of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. The importance of human serum albumin (HSA) stems from the fact that it is involved in bio-regulatory and transport phenomena. Here the effect of acetonitrile (ACN) on the conformational stability of HSA and by comparison, ovalbumin (OVA) has been evaluated in the presence and absence of NaCl. The results show the presence of significant amount of secondary structure in HSA at 70% ACN and in OVA at 50% ACN, as evident from far-UV Circular Dichroism (CD) and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transformed infra red spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Tryptophan and 8-Anilino-1-Naphthalene-Sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorescence indicate altered tryptophan environment and high ANS binding suggesting a compact "molten globule"-like conformation with enhanced exposure of hydrophobic surface area. However, in presence of NaCl no intermediate state was observed. Detection of aggregates in HSA and OVA was possible at 90% ACN. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and ATR-FTIR. These aggregates exhibit increase Thioflavin T (Th T) fluorescence with a red shift of Congo red (CR) absorption spectrum. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed the presence of fibrillar aggregates. Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay of these fibrillar aggregates showed the DNA damage resulting in cell necrosis confirming their genotoxic nature. Some proteins not related to any human disease form fibrils in vitro. In the present study ACN gives access to a model system to study the process of aggregation.

  9. Molecular Structure of Amyloid Fibrils Controls the Relationship between Fibrillar Size and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jin; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the prevailing view, soluble oligomers or small fibrillar fragments are considered to be the most toxic species in prion diseases. To test this hypothesis, two conformationally different amyloid states were produced from the same highly pure recombinant full-length prion protein (rPrP). The cytotoxic potential of intact fibrils and fibrillar fragments generated by sonication from these two states was tested using cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings For one amyloid state, fibril fragmentation was found to enhance its cytotoxic potential, whereas for another amyloid state formed within the same amino acid sequence, the fragmented fibrils were found to be substantially less toxic than the intact fibrils. Consistent with the previous studies, the toxic effects were more pronounced for cell cultures expressing normal isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) at high levels confirming that cytotoxicity was in part PrPC-dependent. Silencing of PrPC expression by small hairpin RNAs designed to silence expression of human PrPC (shRNA-PrPC) deminished the deleterious effects of the two amyloid states to a different extent, suggesting that the role of PrPC-mediated and PrPC-independent mechanisms depends on the structure of the aggregates. Conclusions/Significance This work provides a direct illustration that the relationship between an amyloid's physical dimension and its toxic potential is not unidirectional but is controlled by the molecular structure of prion protein (PrP) molecules within aggregated states. Depending on the structure, a decrease in size of amyloid fibrils can either enhance or abolish their cytotoxic effect. Regardless of the molecular structure or size of PrP aggregates, silencing of PrPC expression can be exploited to reduce their deleterious effects. PMID:21625461

  10. Microrheological Characterization of Collagen Systems: From Molecular Solutions to Fibrillar Gels

    PubMed Central

    Shayegan, Marjan; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where its structural organization conveys mechanical information to cells. Using optical-tweezers-based microrheology, we investigated mechanical properties both of collagen molecules at a range of concentrations in acidic solution where fibrils cannot form and of gels of collagen fibrils formed at neutral pH, as well as the development of microscale mechanical heterogeneity during the self-assembly process. The frequency scaling of the complex shear modulus even at frequencies of ∼10 kHz was not able to resolve the flexibility of collagen molecules in acidic solution. In these solutions, molecular interactions cause significant transient elasticity, as we observed for 5 mg/ml solutions at frequencies above ∼200 Hz. We found the viscoelasticity of solutions of collagen molecules to be spatially homogeneous, in sharp contrast to the heterogeneity of self-assembled fibrillar collagen systems, whose elasticity varied by more than an order of magnitude and in power-law behavior at different locations within the sample. By probing changes in the complex shear modulus over 100-minute timescales as collagen self-assembled into fibrils, we conclude that microscale heterogeneity appears during early phases of fibrillar growth and continues to develop further during this growth phase. Experiments in which growing fibrils dislodge microspheres from an optical trap suggest that fibril growth is a force-generating process. These data contribute to understanding how heterogeneities develop during self-assembly, which in turn can help synthesis of new materials for cellular engineering. PMID:23936454

  11. Deciphering Structural Intermediates and Genotoxic Fibrillar Aggregates of Albumins: A Molecular Mechanism Underlying for Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Amani, Samreen

    2013-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins is involved in some of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. The importance of human serum albumin (HSA) stems from the fact that it is involved in bio-regulatory and transport phenomena. Here the effect of acetonitrile (ACN) on the conformational stability of HSA and by comparison, ovalbumin (OVA) has been evaluated in the presence and absence of NaCl. The results show the presence of significant amount of secondary structure in HSA at 70% ACN and in OVA at 50% ACN, as evident from far-UV Circular Dichroism (CD) and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transformed infra red spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Tryptophan and 8-Anilino-1-Naphthalene-Sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorescence indicate altered tryptophan environment and high ANS binding suggesting a compact “molten globule”-like conformation with enhanced exposure of hydrophobic surface area. However, in presence of NaCl no intermediate state was observed. Detection of aggregates in HSA and OVA was possible at 90% ACN. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and ATR-FTIR. These aggregates exhibit increase Thioflavin T (Th T) fluorescence with a red shift of Congo red (CR) absorption spectrum. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed the presence of fibrillar aggregates. Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay of these fibrillar aggregates showed the DNA damage resulting in cell necrosis confirming their genotoxic nature. Some proteins not related to any human disease form fibrils in vitro. In the present study ACN gives access to a model system to study the process of aggregation. PMID:23342075

  12. Conversion of non-fibrillar beta-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Cócera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    Abeta(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular beta-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the Abeta(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90microM peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar beta-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar beta-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar beta-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) beta-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  13. Detection of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation Conformers and Modulation of SDS-Soluble Fibrillar Oligomers by Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Emily Mitchell; Lotz, Gregor P.; Yang, Guocheng; Sontag, Christopher J.; Cummings, Brian J.; Glabe, Charles G.; Muchowski, Paul J.; Thompson, Leslie Michels

    2012-01-01

    The Huntington’s disease (HD) mutation leads to a complex process of Huntingtin (Htt) aggregation into multimeric species that eventually form visible inclusions in cytoplasm, nuclei and neuronal processes. One hypothesis is that smaller, soluble forms of amyloid proteins confer toxic effects and contribute to early cell dysfunction. However, analysis of mutant Htt aggregation intermediates to identify conformers that may represent toxic forms of the protein and represent potential drug targets remains difficult. We performed a detailed analysis of aggregation conformers in multiple in vitro, cell and ex vivo models of HD. Conformation-specific antibodies were used to identify and characterize aggregation species, allowing assessment of multiple conformers present during the aggregation process. Using a series of assays together with these antibodies, several forms could be identified. Fibrillar oligomers, defined as having a β-sheet rich conformation, are observed in vitro using recombinant protein and in protein extracts from cells in culture or mouse brain and shown to be globular, soluble and non-sedimentable structures. Compounds previously described to modulate visible inclusion body formation and reduce toxicity in HD models were also tested and consistently found to alter the formation of fibrillar oligomers. Interestingly, these compounds did not alter the rate of visible inclusion formation, indicating that fibrillar oligomers are not necessarily the rate limiting step of inclusion body formation. Taken together, we provide insights into the structure and formation of mutant Htt fibrillar oligomers that are modulated by small molecules with protective potential in HD models. PMID:24086178

  14. Conversion of non-fibrillar {beta}-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Cocera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    A{beta}(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular {beta}-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the A{beta}(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90 {mu}M peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar {beta}-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar {beta}-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar {beta}-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) {beta}-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  15. Label-free detection of fibrillar collagen deposition associated with vascular elements in glioblastoma multiforme by using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L W; Wang, X F; Wu, Z Y; Lin, P H; DU, H P; Wang, S; Li, L H; Fang, N; Zhuo, S M; Kang, D Z; Chen, J X

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM-WHO grade IV) is the most common and the most aggressive form of brain tumors in adults with the median survival of 10-12 months. The diagnostic detection of extracellular matrix (ECM) component in the tumour microenvironment is of prognostic value. In this paper, the fibrillar collagen deposition associated with vascular elements in GBM were investigated in the fresh specimens and unstained histological slices by using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our study revealed the existence of fibrillar collagen deposition in the adventitia of remodelled large blood vessels and in glomeruloid vascular structures in GBM. The degree of fibrillar collagen deposition can be quantitatively evaluated by measuring the adventitial thickness of blood vessels or calculating the ratio of SHG pixel to the whole pixel of glomeruloid vascular structure in MPM images. These results indicated that MPM can not only be employed to perform a retrospective study in unstained histological slices but also has the potential to apply for in vivo brain imaging to understand correlations between malignancy of gliomas and fibrillar collagen deposition.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropathologic Estimates of Fibrillar Amyloid-β in a Patient With Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Fleisher, Adam; Chen, Kewei; Rogers, Joseph; Berk, Camryn; Reiman, Eric; Pontecorvo, Michael; Mintun, Mark; Skovronsky, Daniel; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sue, Lucia I.; Liebsack, Carolyn; Charney, Albert S.; Cole, Lauren; Belden, Christine; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Down syndrome appears to be associated with a virtually certain risk of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology by the age of 40 and a very high risk of dementia at older ages. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand florbetapir F18 has been shown to characterize fibrillar Aβ in the living human brain and to provide a close correlation with subsequent Aβ neuropathology in individuals proximate to and after the end of life. The extent to which the most frequently used PET ligands can be used to detect fibrillar Aβ in patients with Down syndrome remains to be determined. Objectives To characterize PET estimates of fibrillar Aβ burden in a Down syndrome patient very close to the end of life and to compare them with neuropathologic assessment made after his death. Design/Methods With the family’s informed consent, florbetapir PET was used to study a 55-year-old Down syndrome patient with Alzheimer disease near the end of life; his brain was donated for neuropathologic assessment when he died 14 days later. Visual ratings of cerebral florbetapir uptake were performed by trained readers who were masked to the patient’s diagnosis as part of a larger study, and an automated algorithm was used to characterize regional-to-cerebellar standard uptake value ratios in 6 cerebral regions of interest. Neuropathologic assessments were performed masked to the patient’s diagnosis or PET measurements. Results Visual ratings and automated analyses of the PET image revealed a heavy fibrillar Aβ burden in cortical, striatal, and thalamic regions, similar to that reported for patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. This matched neuropathologic findings of frequent neuritic and diffuse plaques, as well as frequent amyloid angiopathy, except for neuropathologically demonstrated frequent cerebellar diffuse plaques and amyloid angiopathy that were not detected by the PET scan. Conclusions Florbetapir PET can be used to detect increased cerebral

  17. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  18. Simultaneous determination of inorganic mercury, methylmercury, and total mercury concentrations in cryogenic fresh-frozen and freeze-dried biological reference materials.

    PubMed

    Point, David; Davis, W Clay; Garcia Alonso, J Ignacio; Monperrus, Mathilde; Christopher, Steven J; Donard, Olivier F X; Becker, Paul R; Wise, Stephen A

    2007-10-01

    Two speciated isotope dilution (SID) approaches consisting of a single-spike (SS) method and a double-spike (DS) method including a reaction/transformation model for the correction of inadvertent transformations affecting mercury species were compared in terms of accuracy, method performance, and robustness for the simultaneous determination of methylmercury (MeHg), inorganic mercury (iHg), and total mercury (HgT) concentrations in five biological Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). The SRMs consisted of oyster and mussel tissue materials displaying different mercury species concentration levels and different textural/matrix properties including freeze-dried (FD) materials (SRMs 1566b, 2976, and 2977) and cryogenically prepared and stored fresh-frozen (FF) materials (SRMs 1974a, 1974b). Each sample was spiked with (201)iHg (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) and Me(202)Hg (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements. IRMM-670) solutions and analyzed using alkaline microwave digestion, ethylation, and gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC/ICP-MS). The results obtained by the SS-SID method suggested that FF and FD materials are not always commutable for the simultaneous determination of iHg, MeHg, and HgT, due to potential transformation reactions resulting probably from the methodology and/or from the textural/matrix properties of the materials. These transformations can occasionally significantly affect mercury species concentration results obtained by SS-SID, depending on the species investigated and the materials considered. The results obtained by the DS-SID method indicated that the two classes of materials were commutable. The simultaneous and corrected concentrations of iHg, MeHg, and HgT obtained by this technique were not found to be statistically different form the certified and reference concentration together with their expanded uncertainty budgets for the five SRMs investigated, exemplifying the robustness, the

  19. Clinical and biometrical evaluation of socket preservation using demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft with and without the palatal connective tissue as a biologic membrane.

    PubMed

    Moghaddas, Hamid; Amjadi, Mohammad Reza; Naghsh, Narges

    2012-11-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction has the ability to maintain the ridge dimensions and allow the implant placement in an ideal position fulfilling both functional and aesthetic results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the palatal connective tissue as a biological membrane for socket preservation with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA). Twelve extraction sites were treated with DFDBA with (case group) and without (control group) using autogenous palatal connective tissue membrane before placement of implants. Alveolar width and height, amount of keratinized tissue, and gingival level were measured at pre-determined points using a surgical stent at two times, the time of socket preservation surgery. In both groups a decrease in all socket dimensions was found. The average decrease in socket width, height, keratinized tissue, and gingival level in case group was 1.16, 0.72, 3.58, and 1.27 mm, and in control group was 2.08, 0.86, 4.52, and 1.58 mm respectively. Statistical analysis showed that decrease in socket width (P = 0.012), keratinized tissue (P ≤ 0.001), and gingival level (P = 0.031) in case group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Results showed no meaningful difference in socket height changes when compared with case and control groups (P = 0.148). Under the limits of this study, connective tissue membrane could preserve socket width, amount of keratinized tissue, and the gingival level more effectively than DFDBA alone.

  20. An integrated view on how the management of the dry period length of lactating cows could affect mammary biology and defence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The dry period is necessary to facilitate cell turnover in the bovine mammary gland and to optimize milk production in the next lactation. An eight-week dry period has long been the golden standard of management for dairy cows. Genetic improvements and new management technologies have led to higher ...

  1. Identifying structural features of fibrillar islet amyloid polypeptide using site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Sajith A; Langen, Ralf

    2004-11-12

    Pancreatic amyloid deposits, composed primarily of the 37-residue islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), are a characteristic feature found in more than 90% of patients with type II diabetes. Although IAPP amyloid deposits are associated with areas of pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction and depletion and are thought to play a role in disease, their structure is unknown. We used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyze eight spin-labeled derivatives of IAPP in an effort to determine structural features of the peptide. In solution, all eight derivatives gave rise to electron paramagnetic resonance spectra with sharp lines indicative of rapid motion on the sub-nanosecond time scale. These spectra are consistent with a rapidly tumbling and highly dynamic peptide. In contrast, spectra for the fibrillar form exhibit reduced mobility and the presence of strong intermolecular spin-spin interactions. The latter implies that the peptide subunits are ordered and that the same residues from neighboring peptides are in close proximity to one another. Our data are consistent with a parallel arrangement of IAPP peptides within the amyloid fibril. Analysis of spin label mobility indicates a high degree of order throughout the peptide, although the N-terminal region is slightly less ordered. Possible similarities with respect to the domain organization and parallelism of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide fibrils are discussed.

  2. Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Marco; Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Pugno, Nicola M.; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    The shear failure and friction mechanisms of bioinspired adhesives consisting of elastomer arrays of microfibres terminated by mushroom-shaped tips are investigated in contact with a rigid lens. In order to reveal the interplay between the vertical and lateral loading directions, experiments are carried out using a custom friction set-up in which normal stiffness can be made either high or low when compared with the stiffness of the contact between the fibrillar adhesive and the lens. Using in situ contact imaging, the shear failure of the adhesive is found to involve two successive mechanisms: (i) cavitation and peeling at the contact interface between the mushroom-shaped fibre tip endings and the lens; and (ii) side re-adhesion of the fibre's stem to the lens. The extent of these mechanisms and their implications regarding static friction forces is found to depend on the crosstalk between the normal and lateral loading directions that can result in contact instabilities associated with fibre buckling. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic behaviour of the polyurethane material on the rate dependence of the shear response of the adhesive are accounted for. PMID:23554349

  3. Differential relationships of reactive astrocytes and microglia to fibrillar amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H; Betensky, Rebecca A; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T

    2013-06-01

    Although it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β. Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm) and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed: larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques seems to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of amyloid β. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage.

  4. The fibrillar structure of the cemento-dentinal junction in different kinds of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Domon, T; Takahashi, S; Islam, M N; Suzuki, R

    2001-10-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction was examined in human maxillary incisors, canines and premolars by scanning electron microscopy combined with NaOH maceration. The NaOH maceration was used to remove interfibrillar substances and to observe details of the fibrillar architecture. The teeth were half-sectioned longitudinally, demineralized and macerated for 3-4 days or for 10-14 days. In the 3-4 day-macerated specimens, longitudinal sections of the cemento-dentinal junction were examined. In the 10-14 day-macerated specimens, the cementum was detached and the inner cementum surface facing the cemento-dentinal junction was examined. Observations suggested that cemental fibrils intermingle with dentinal fibrils only in places at the cemento-dentinal junction in both acellular and cellular cementum. These structural features were consistent in all kinds of teeth investigated here. Using human molars, we have previously proposed that the adhesion of proteoglycans is a main factor for the cemento-dentinal attachment and that the fibril intermingling between dentin and cementum is an accessory or secondary factor. The present study suggests that this applies to other kinds of human teeth.

  5. Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Marco; Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Pugno, Nicola M; Sitti, Metin

    2013-06-06

    The shear failure and friction mechanisms of bioinspired adhesives consisting of elastomer arrays of microfibres terminated by mushroom-shaped tips are investigated in contact with a rigid lens. In order to reveal the interplay between the vertical and lateral loading directions, experiments are carried out using a custom friction set-up in which normal stiffness can be made either high or low when compared with the stiffness of the contact between the fibrillar adhesive and the lens. Using in situ contact imaging, the shear failure of the adhesive is found to involve two successive mechanisms: (i) cavitation and peeling at the contact interface between the mushroom-shaped fibre tip endings and the lens; and (ii) side re-adhesion of the fibre's stem to the lens. The extent of these mechanisms and their implications regarding static friction forces is found to depend on the crosstalk between the normal and lateral loading directions that can result in contact instabilities associated with fibre buckling. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic behaviour of the polyurethane material on the rate dependence of the shear response of the adhesive are accounted for.

  6. Physical indicators of cartilage health: the relevance of compliance, thickness, swelling and fibrillar texture.

    PubMed

    Broom, Neil D; Flachsmann, René

    2003-06-01

    This study uses a bovine patella model to compare the relative merits of on-bone compliance and thickness measurements, free-swelling behaviour, and structural imaging with differential interference contrast (DIC) light microscopy to assess the biomechanical normality of the cartilage matrix. The results demonstrate that across a spectrum of cartilage tissues from immature, mature, through to mildly degenerate, and all with intact articular surfaces, there is a consistent pattern of increased free swelling of the isolated general matrix with age and degeneration. High swelling was always associated with major structural alterations of the general matrix that were readily imaged using DIC light microscopy. Conversely, for all tissue groups, no relationship was observed between thickness vs. compliance and compliance vs. general matrix swelling. Only in the proximal aspects of the normal mature and degenerate tissues was there a correlation between thickness and general matrix swelling. Free-swelling measurements combined with fibrillar texture imaging using DIC light microscopy are therefore recommended as providing a reliable and quick method of assessing the biomechanical condition of the cartilage general matrix.

  7. Fibrillar vs crystalline nanocellulose pulmonary epithelial cell responses: Cytotoxicity or inflammation?

    PubMed

    Menas, Autumn L; Yanamala, Naveena; Farcas, Mariana T; Russo, Maria; Friend, Sherri; Fournier, Philip M; Star, Alexander; Iavicoli, Ivo; Shurin, Galina V; Vogel, Ulla B; Fadeel, Bengt; Beezhold, Donald; Kisin, Elena R; Shvedova, Anna A

    2017-03-01

    Nanocellulose (NC) is emerging as a highly promising nanomaterial for a wide range of applications. Moreover, many types of NC are produced, each exhibiting a slightly different shape, size, and chemistry. The main objective of this study was to compare cytotoxic effects of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NCF). The human lung epithelial cells (A549) were exposed for 24 h and 72 h to five different NC particles to determine how variations in properties contribute to cellular outcomes, including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and cytokine secretion. Our results showed that NCF were more toxic compared to CNC particles with respect to cytotoxicity and oxidative stress responses. However, exposure to CNC caused an inflammatory response with significantly elevated inflammatory cytokines/chemokines compared to NCF. Interestingly, cellulose staining indicated that CNC particles, but not NCF, were taken up by the cells. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the inflammatory cytokines revealed a similarity of NCF to the carbon nanofibers response and CNC to the chitin, a known immune modulator and innate cell activator. Taken together, the present study has revealed distinct differences between fibrillar and crystalline nanocellulose and demonstrated that physicochemical properties of NC are critical in determining their toxicity.

  8. Deacetylation of TFEB promotes fibrillar Aβ degradation by upregulating lysosomal biogenesis in microglia.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jintao; Zheng, Liangjun; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Xuefei; Li, Zeyang; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Zhong; Huo, Wei; Zhao, Xuyang; Shang, Shujiang; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Chen; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    Microglia play a pivotal role in clearance of Aβ by degrading them in lysosomes, countering amyloid plaque pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal dysfunction leads to insufficient elimination of toxic protein aggregates. We tested whether enhancing lysosomal function with transcription factor EB (TFEB), an essential regulator modulating lysosomal pathways, would promote Aβ clearance in microglia. Here we show that microglial expression of TFEB facilitates fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) degradation and reduces deposited amyloid plaques, which are further enhanced by deacetylation of TFEB. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we firstly confirmed acetylation as a previously unreported modification of TFEB and found that SIRT1 directly interacted with and deacetylated TFEB at lysine residue 116. Subsequently, SIRT1 overexpression enhanced lysosomal function and fAβ degradation by upregulating transcriptional levels of TFEB downstream targets, which could be inhibited when TFEB was knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of deacetylated TFEB at K116R mutant in microglia accelerated intracellular fAβ degradation by stimulating lysosomal biogenesis and greatly reduced the deposited amyloid plaques in the brain slices of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Our findings reveal that deacetylation of TFEB could regulate lysosomal biogenesis and fAβ degradation, making microglial activation of TFEB a possible strategy for attenuating amyloid plaque deposition in AD.

  9. Microglia activation mediates fibrillar amyloid-β toxicity in the aged primate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Elaine; Guo, Ling; Bu, Jing; Maloof, Marie; Khoury, Joseph El; Geula, Changiz

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The fibrillar form of Aβ (fAβ) exerts toxic effects on neurons through mechanisms not well understood. We have shown that the aged primate cortex is selectively vulnerable to fAβ toxicity at low concentrations. In addition to neuronal loss, fAβ induced massive activation of microglia in the aged rhesus cortex. We now demonstrate that inhibition of microglia activation abolishes fAβ toxicity. Injection or pump delivery of macrophage/microglia inhibitory factor (MIF) significantly reduced activation of microglia and the volume of damage caused by fAβ. Microglia isolated from aged rhesus cortex produced substantial reactive oxygen species when stimulated by fAβ, which was inhibited by MIF in a dose-dependent manner. This is the first definitive in vivo demonstration that the fAβ-induced microglia activation and inflammation mediate, at least in part, its toxic effects on neurons. Combined with our earlier observations, these findings suggest that aged primate microglia may display an exaggerated inflammatory response to fAβ when compared with young microglia. PMID:19349094

  10. Linkage studies of four fibrillar collagen genes in three pedigrees with Larsen-like syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Lasselin, C; Mellier, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P

    1992-01-01

    We report seven children from three families who had a set of common clinical features suggestive of Larsen-like syndrome, including unusual facies, bilateral dislocations of the knees and elbows, club foot, and short stature. All of the patients originated from the island of La Réunion in the Indian Ocean. The occurrence of several affected sibs in these families and the large number of consanguineous marriages on this island are consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease. Based on this hypothesis, the pedigrees were used for linkage analysis in a candidate gene assay. Lod score calculations in a pairwise study with four different fibrillar collagen genes, COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, and COL5A2, allowed us to exclude these genes as the mutant loci. Supporting this, electrophoretic analysis of collagens derived from fibroblast cultures failed to show defective molecules. We conclude that this syndrome is not a collagen disorder. Images PMID:1640425

  11. Differential Relationships of Reactive Astrocytes and Microglia to Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ). Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core Thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm), and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed; larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques appears to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of Aβ. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage. PMID:23656989

  12. Oxidized Regenerated Cellulose (Fibrillar) Reduces Risk of Postoperative Corporal Bleeding Following Inflatable Penile Prosthesis Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Alexander T; Viers, Boyd R; Liu, Alexander G; Shakir, Nabeel A; Pagliara, Travis J; Scott, Jeremy M; West, Mary L; Morey, Allen F

    2017-06-09

    To report our initial experience with oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC; Surgicel Fibrillar) as a hemostatic adjunct during inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) surgery. Beginning in April 2016, ORC pledgets were placed within the corporotomy closures of all men undergoing IPP insertion. Perioperative characteristics and outcomes including cumulative postoperative drain output were evaluated among consecutive cases with (April 2016 to October 2016) and without ORC (December 2015 to March 2016) using an identical surgical technique by a single surgeon. During the study period, 64 men underwent IPP implantation, of whom 32 (50%) received ORC. There was a significant reduction in median drain output relative to controls (33 mL vs 65 mL; P = .01). Postoperatively, ORC use was associated with a reduction in the number of patient phone calls for scrotal-related concerns in the immediate postoperative period (average 0.5 vs 1.1; P = .03). There were 3 IPP explantations in the non-ORC group (2/3 for infection)-one of which was directly related to an infected hematoma. After controlling for other clinical features, the use of ORC (β -32, 95% confidence interval: -61 to -5; P = .02) was independently associated with a reduction in drain output. ORC use during IPP corporotomy closure reduces postoperative drain output, a known risk factor for hematoma-related complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Large size fibrillar bundles of the Alzheimer amyloid beta-protein.

    PubMed

    Carrotta, Rita; Barthès, Jennifer; Longo, Alessandro; Martorana, Vincenzo; Manno, Mauro; Portale, Giuseppe; San Biagio, Pier Luigi

    2007-09-01

    Self-assembly of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) and its deposition into senile plaques are distinctive features of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta forms typical linear aggregates known as amyloid fibrils, with a diameter of a few tens of nanometers and a length spanning from hundreds of nanometers to micrometers. Fibrils eventually assemble into large size clusters and precipitate in vivo in the brain deposits. Here, we study the late stage of aggregation of Abeta(1-40) in vitro at pH 3.1. We characterize the structure of fibrillar aggregates by a combined use of different experimental techniques. Small angle light scattering, heterodyne near field scattering, large angle light scattering, ultra small angle X-ray scattering and small angle X-ray scattering measurements have been performed to highlight the structural features of amyloid bundles over several lengthscales, from nanometers to tens of micrometers. Phase contrast optical microscopy has been used to complement scattering measurements and directly visualize some morphological details. We show that elongated fibrils of Abeta with a diameter of a few nanometers are packed into large size compact bundles having a typical size of tens of micrometers. The linear morphology of fibrils is reflected in the elongated shape of bundles.

  14. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-10-23

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  15. Second harmonic generation microscopy for quantitative analysis of collagen fibrillar structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyi; Nadiarynkh, Oleg; Plotnikov, Sergey; Campagnola, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has emerged as a powerful modality for imaging fibrillar collagen in a diverse range of tissues. Because of its underlying physical origin, it is highly sensitive to the collagen fibril/fiber structure, and, importantly, to changes that occur in diseases such as cancer, fibrosis and connective tissue disorders. We discuss how SHG can be used to obtain more structural information on the assembly of collagen in tissues than is possible by other microscopy techniques. We first provide an overview of the state of the art and the physical background of SHG microscopy, and then describe the optical modifications that need to be made to a laser-scanning microscope to enable the measurements. Crucial aspects for biomedical applications are the capabilities and limitations of the different experimental configurations. We estimate that the setup and calibration of the SHG instrument from its component parts will require 2–4 weeks, depending on the level of the user’s experience. PMID:22402635

  16. Cellular inclusion bodies of mutant huntingtin exon 1 obscure small fibrillar aggregate species.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Steffen J; Weiss, Lucien E; Duim, Whitney C; Frydman, Judith; Moerner, W E

    2012-01-01

    The identities of toxic aggregate species in Huntington's disease pathogenesis remain ambiguous. While polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt) is known to accumulate in compact inclusion bodies inside neurons, this is widely thought to be a protective coping response that sequesters misfolded conformations or aggregated states of the mutated protein. To define the spatial distributions of fluorescently-labeled Htt-exon1 species in the cell model PC12m, we employed highly sensitive single-molecule super-resolution fluorescence imaging. In addition to inclusion bodies and the diffuse pool of monomers and oligomers, fibrillar aggregates -100 nm in diameter and up to -1-2 µm in length were observed for pathogenic polyQ tracts (46 and 97 repeats) after targeted photo-bleaching of the inclusion bodies. These short structures bear a striking resemblance to fibers described in vitro. Definition of the diverse Htt structures in cells will provide an avenue to link the impact of therapeutic agents to aggregate populations and morphologies.

  17. Fibrillar disruption by AC electric field induced oscillation: A case study with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shubhatam; Chakraborty, Monojit; Goley, Snigdha; Dasgupta, Swagata; DasGupta, Sunando

    2017-07-01

    The effect of oscillation induced by a frequency-dependent alternating current (AC) electric field to dissociate preformed amyloid fibrils has been investigated. An electrowetting-on-dielectric type setup has been used to apply the AC field of varying frequencies on preformed fibrils of human serum albumin (HSA). The disintegration potency has been monitored by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The experimental results suggest that the frequency of the applied AC field plays a crucial role in the disruption of preformed HSA fibrils. The extent of stress generated inside the droplet due to the application of the AC field at different frequencies has been monitored as a function of the input frequency of the applied AC voltage. This has been accomplished by assessing the morphology deformation of the oscillating HSA fibril droplets. The shape deformation of the oscillating droplets is characterized using image analysis by measuring the dynamic changes in the shape dependent parameters such as contact angle and droplet footprint radius and the amplitude. It is suggested that the cumulative effects of the stress generated inside the HSA fibril droplets due to the shape deformation induced hydrodynamic flows and the torque induced by the intrinsic electric dipoles of protein due to their continuous periodic realignment in presence of the AC electric field results in the destruction of the fibrillar species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Structure and developmental expression of a sea urchin fibrillar collagen gene.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Gambino, R

    1989-12-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones that specify a Paracentrotus lividus procollagen chain. The cDNAs code for 160 uninterrupted Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets and a 252-amino acid carboxyl propeptide. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the sea urchin polypeptide exhibits structural features that are characteristic of the fibril-forming class of collagen molecules. Partial characterization of two genomic recombinants revealed that the 3' end of the echinoid gene displays a complex organization that closely resembles that of a prototypical vertebrate fibrillar collagen gene. In situ and Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations established the size, time of appearance, and tissue distribution of the collagen transcripts in the developing sea urchin embryo. Collagen mRNA, approximately equal to 6 kilobases in size, is first detected in the forming primary mesenchyme cells of late blastulae where it progressively accumulates until the free swimming/feeding pluteus larval stage. Interestingly, collagen transcripts are also detected in the forming secondary mesenchyme cells of late gastrulae, and by the prism stage, their derivatives appear to be the most intensively labeled cells.

  19. Structure and developmental expression of a sea urchin fibrillar collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Gambino, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones that specify a Paracentrotus lividus procollagen chain. The cDNAs code for 160 uninterrupted Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets and a 252-amino acid carboxyl propeptide. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the sea urchin polypeptide exhibits structural features that are characteristic of the fibril-forming class of collagen molecules. Partial characterization of two genomic recombinants revealed that the 3' end of the echinoid gene displays a complex organization that closely resembles that of a prototypical vertebrate fibrillar collagen gene. In situ and Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations established the size, time of appearance, and tissue distribution of the collagen transcripts in the developing sea urchin embryo. Collagen mRNA, approximately equal to 6 kilobases in size, is first detected in the forming primary mesenchyme cells of late blastulae where it progressively accumulates until the free swimming/feeding pluteus larval stage. Interestingly, collagen transcripts are also detected in the forming secondary mesenchyme cells of late gastrulae, and by the prism stage, their derivatives appear to be the most intensively labeled cells. Images PMID:2594770

  20. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, D. V. Shepherd, J. H.; Cameron, R. E.; Best, S. M.; Ghose, S.; Kew, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide), NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer) or water in any of the fibres.

  1. Calcium gluconate as cross-linker improves survival and shelf life of encapsulated and dried Metarhizium brunneum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the application as biological control agents.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Pascal; Przyklenk, Michael; Vemmer, Marina; Patel, Anant V

    2017-02-01

    Calcium chloride (CC) is the most common cross-linker for the encapsulation of biocontrol microorganisms in alginate beads. The aim of this study was to evaluate if calcium gluconate (CG) can replace CC as cross-linker and at the same time improve viability after drying and rehydration, hygroscopic properties, shelf life and nutrient supply. Hence, the biocontrol fungi Metarhizium brunneum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were encapsulated in Ca-alginate beads supplemented with starch. Beads were dried and maximum survival was found in beads cross-linked with CG. Beads prepared with CG showed lower hygroscopic properties, but a higher shelf life for encapsulated fungi. Moreover, we demonstrated that gluconate has a nutritive effect on encapsulated fungi, leading to increased mycelium growth of M. brunneum and to enhanced CO2 release from beads containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The application of CG as cross-linker will pave the way towards increasing drying survival and shelf life of various, especially drying-sensitive microbes.

  2. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-12-07

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm(-2)) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  3. Mechanical and structural contribution of non-fibrillar matrix in uniaxial tension: a collagen-agarose co-gel model.

    PubMed

    Lake, Spencer P; Barocas, Victor H

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical role of non-fibrillar matrix and the nature of its interaction with the collagen network in soft tissues remain poorly understood, in part because of the lack of a simple experimental model system to quantify these interactions. This study's objective was to examine mechanical and structural properties of collagen-agarose co-gels, utilized as a simplified model system, to understand better the relationships between the collagen network and non-fibrillar matrix. We hypothesized that the presence of agarose would have a pronounced effect on microstructural reorganization and mechanical behavior. Samples fabricated from gel solutions containing 1.0 mg/mL collagen and 0, 0.125, or 0.25% w/v agarose were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy, incremental tensile stress-relaxation tests, and polarized light imaging. While the incorporation of agarose did not dramatically alter collagen network morphology, agarose led to concentration-dependent changes in mechanical and structural properties. Specifically, resistance of co-gels to volume change corresponded with differences in fiber reorientation and elastic/viscoelastic mechanics. Results demonstrate strong relationships between tissue properties and offer insight into behavior of tissues of varying Poisson's ratio and fiber kinematics. Results also suggest that non-fibrillar material may have significant effects on properties of artificial and native tissues even in tension, which is generally assumed to be collagen dominated.

  4. Dry Mouth? Don't Delay Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Dry Mouth? Don' ... or neck cancer. back to top Advice for Consumers If you have persistent dry mouth: Talk to ...

  5. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... protect your teeth may also help your dry mouth condition: Brush with a fluoride toothpaste and floss your teeth. Ask your dentist ... acids. Use a fluoride rinse or brush-on fluoride gel before ... historically to treat dry mouth, such as teas made from marshmallow or slippery ...

  6. A comparative study on the physicochemical and biological stability of IgG1 and monoclonal antibodies during spray drying process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main concern in formulation of antibodies is the intrinsic instability of these labile compounds. To evaluate the physicochemical stability of antibody in dry powder formulations, physical stability of IgG1 and a monoclonal antibody (trastuzumab) during the spray drying process was studied in a parallel study and the efficacy of some sugar based excipients in protection of antibodies was studied. Results The SDS-PAGE analysis showed no fragmentation of antibodies after spray drying in all formulations. The secondary structure of antibodies contained 40.13 to 70.19% of β structure in dry state. Also, CD spectroscopy showed the similar secondary structure for trastuzumab after reconstitution in water. ELISA analysis and cell culture studies were conducted in order to evaluate bioactivity of monoclonal antibody. Formulations containing combination of excipients provided maximum tendency of trastuzumab to attach to the ELISA antigen (86.46% ± 2.3) and maximum bioactivity when incubated with SKBr3 cell line (the cell viability was decreased to 65.99% ± 4.6). Incubation of formulations with L929 cell line proved the biocompatibility of the excipients and non-toxic composition of formulations. Conclusion The IgG1 and trastuzumab demonstrated similar behavior in spray drying process. The combination of excipients containing trahalose, hydroxypropyl beta cyclodextrin and beta cyclodextrin with proper ratio improved the physical and chemical stability of both IgG1 and monoclonal antibody. PMID:24641877

  7. Preparation of biological material for X-ray microanalysis of diffusible elements. II. Comparison of different methods of drying ultrathin cryosections cut without a trough liquid.

    PubMed

    Barnard, T; Sevéus, L

    1978-04-01

    The appearance of ultrathin, dry-cut cryosections of brown adipose tissue and liver was found to be strongly dependent upon adequate freeze-drying. If freeze-drying was inadequate, diffusion of substances could be demonstrated and freezing damage was not apparent. Diffusion was manifested as an electron dense film over structural features such as triglyceride droplet profiles and the edges of the section; when this film was thick, X-ray signals for P, S, Cl, K and Ca could be detected from it, in different proportions to those found in the section. The frequency and intensity of diffusion were lowered by decreasing the temperature in the cryochamber from about 200 K +/- 5 K to 163 K +/- 5 K by forced evaporation of liquid N2 using an extra heater. The lowest incidence of diffusion was obtained in conjunction with this device, by leaving the sections in the cryochamber for at least 2 h during drying, either over a drying agent or under moderate vacuum. Such sections showed a narrow zone (A) at the edge that lacked obvious ice-crystal damage, a thicker zone (B) of moderate ice-crystal damage and the bulk of the interior (zone C) severely damaged by freezing. Qualitatively different, reproducible X-ray spectra could be obtained from ultrastructural features even in areas showing some signs of diffusion.

  8. Fabrication and Evaluation of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA Dental Resins/Composites Containing Nano Fibrillar Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ming; Gao, Yi; Liu, Yi; Liao, Yiliang; Hedin, Nyle E.; Fong, Hao

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reinforcement of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins (without conventional glass filler) and composites (with conventional glass filler) with various mass fractions of nano fibrillar silicate (FS). Methods Three dispersion methods were studied to separate the silanized FS as nano-scaled single crystals and uniformly distribute them into dental matrices. The photo-curing behaviors of the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/FS resins were monitored in situ by RT-NIR to study the photopolymerization rate and the vinyl double bond conversion. Mechanical properties (flexural strength, elastic modulus and work of fracture) of the nano FS reinforced resins/composites were tested, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis of the acquired data. The morphology of nano FS and the representative fracture surfaces of its reinforced resins/composites were examined by SEM/TEM. Results Impregnation of small mass fractions (1 % and 2.5 %) of nano FS into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 mass ratio) dental resins/composites improved the mechanical properties substantially. Larger mass fraction of impregnation (7.5 %), however, did not further improve the mechanical properties (one way ANOVA, P > 0.05) and may even reduce the mechanical properties. The high degree of separation and uniform distribution of nano FS into dental resins/composites was a challenge. Impregnation of nano FS into dental resins/composites could result in two opposite effects: a reinforcing effect due to the highly separated and uniformly distributed nano FS single crystals, or a weakening effect due to the formation of FS agglomerates/particles. Significance Uniform distribution of highly separated nano FS single crystals into dental resins/composites could significantly improve the mechanical properties of the resins/composites. PMID:17572485

  9. Sources of Variability in Platelet Accumulation on Type 1 Fibrillar Collagen in Microfluidic Flow Assays

    PubMed Central

    Neeves, Keith B.; Onasoga, Abimbola A.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Lilly, Jessica J.; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B.; Irish, Andrew T.; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J.; Di Paola, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s−1 through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (LagT), the rate of platelet accumulation (VPLT), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to VPLT and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer LagT for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s−1 and 300 s−1. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  10. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay.

  11. Fabrication and evaluation of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins/composites containing nano fibrillar silicate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ming; Gao, Yi; Liu, Yi; Liao, Yiliang; Hedin, Nyle E; Fong, Hao

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the reinforcement of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins (without conventional glass filler) and composites (with conventional glass filler) with various mass fractions of nano fibrillar silicate (FS). Three dispersion methods were studied to separate the silanized FS as nano-scaled single crystals and uniformly distribute them into dental matrices. The photo-curing behaviors of the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/FS resins were monitored in situ by RT-NIR to study the photopolymerization rate and the vinyl double bond conversion. Mechanical properties (flexural strength, elastic modulus and work-of-fracture) of the nano FS reinforced resins/composites were tested, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis of the acquired data. The morphology of nano FS and the representative fracture surfaces of its reinforced resins/composites were examined by SEM/TEM. Impregnation of small mass fractions (1% and 2.5%) of nano FS into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 mass ratio) dental resins/composites improved the mechanical properties substantially. Larger mass fraction of impregnation (7.5%), however, did not further improve the mechanical properties (one way ANOVA, P>0.05) and may even reduce the mechanical properties. The high degree of separation and uniform distribution of nano FS into dental resins/composites was a challenge. Impregnation of nano FS into dental resins/composites could result in two opposite effects: a reinforcing effect due to the highly separated and uniformly distributed nano FS single crystals, or a weakening effect due to the formation of FS agglomerates/particles. Uniform distribution of highly separated nano FS single crystals into dental resins/composites could significantly improve the mechanical properties of the resins/composites.

  12. The hip joint: the fibrillar collagens associated with development and ageing in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    BLAND, YVETTE S.; ASHHURST, DOREEN E.

    2001-01-01

    The fibrillar collagens associated with the articular cartilages, joint capsule and ligamentum teres of the rabbit hip joint were characterised from the 17 d fetus to the 2-y-old adult by immunohistochemical methods. Initially the putative articular cartilage contains types I, III and V collagens, but when cavitation is complete in the 25 d fetus, type II collagen appears. In the 17 d fetus, the cells of the chondrogenous layers express type I collagen mRNA, but not that of type II collagen. Types III and V collagens are present throughout life, particularly pericellularly. Type I collagen is lost. In all respects, the articular cartilage of the hip joint is similar to that of the knee. The joint capsule contains types I, III and V collagens. In the fetus the ligamentum teres contains types I and V collagens and the cells express type I collagen mRNA; type III collagen is confined mainly to its surface and insertions. After birth, the same distribution remains, but there is more type III collagen in the ligament, proper. The attachment to the cartilage of the head of the femur is marked only by fibres of type I collagen traversing the cartilage; the attachment cannot be distinguished in preparations localising types III and V collagens. The attachment to the bone at the lip of the acetabulum is via fibres of types I and V collagens and little type III is present. The ligament is covered by a sheath of types III and V collagens. Type II collagen was not located in any part of the ligamentum teres. The distribution of collagens in the ligamentum teres is similar to that in the collateral ligaments of the knee. Its insertions are unusual because no fibrocartilage was detected. PMID:11215763

  13. Salt drying: a low-cost, simple and efficient method for storing plants in the field and preserving biological repositories for DNA diversity research.

    PubMed

    Carrió, Elena; Rosselló, Josep A

    2014-03-01

    Although a variety of methods have been optimized for the collection and storage of plant specimens, most of these are not suited for field expeditions for a variety of logistic reasons. Drying specimens with silica gel in polyethylene bags is currently the standard for field-sampling methods that are suitable for subsequent DNA extraction. However, silica-gel repositories are not readily available in remote areas, and its use is not very cost-effective for the long-term storage of collections or in developing countries with limited research budgets. Salting is an ancient and traditional drying process that preserves food samples by dehydrating tissues and inhibiting water-dependent cellular metabolism. We compared salt and silica-gel drying methods with respect to dehydration rates overtime, DNA quality and polymerase chain reaction(PCR) success to assess whether dry salting can be used as an effective plant preservation method for DNA analysis. Specimens from eleven plant species covering a variety of leaf structures, leaf thicknesses and water contents were analysed. Experimental work indicated that (i) levels of dehydration in sodium chloride were usually comparable to those obtained when silica gel was used, (ii) no spoilage, fungal or bacterial growth was observed for any of the species with all drying treatments and (iii) good yields of quality genomic DNA suitable for PCR applications were obtained in the salt-drying treatments. The preservation of plant tissues in commercial table salt appears to be a satisfactory, and versatile method that may be suitable in remote areas where cryogenic resources and silica repositories are not available.

  14. Vitamin B12[c-lactone], a biologically inactive corrinoid compound, occurs in cultured and dried lion's mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus) fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fei; Bito, Tomohiro; Takenaka, Shigeo; Yabuta, Yukinori; Watanabe, Fumio

    2014-02-19

    This study determined the vitamin B12 content of the edible medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus, lion's mane mushroom fruiting body, using a microbiological assay based on Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 7830. Trace levels (0.04-0.36 μg/100 g dry weight) of vitamin B12 were found in most of the dried mushroom samples, and two samples contained slightly higher levels (0.56 and 1.04 μg/100 g dry weight, respectively) of vitamin B12. We purified the corrinoid compounds from the extracts of dried lion's mane mushroom fruiting bodies using an immunoaffinity column and identified them as vitamin B12 or vitamin B12[c-lactone] (or both) based on LC/ESI-MS/MS chromatograms. This is the first report on an unnatural corrinoid, vitamin B12[c-lactone], occurring in foods. Vitamin B12[c-lactone] was simple to produce during incubation of authentic vitamin B12 and chloramine-T, an antimicrobial agent, at varying pH values (3.0-7.0) and was completely inactive in the vitamin B12-dependent bacteria that are generally used in vitamin B12 bioassays.

  15. A comprehensive guide to fuel management practices for dry mixed conifer forests in the northwestern United States: Mechanical, chemical, and biological fuel treatment methods

    Treesearch

    Theresa B. Jain; Mike A. Battaglia; Han-Sup Han; Russell T. Graham; Christopher R. Keyes; Jeremy S. Fried; Jonathan E. Sandquist

    2014-01-01

    Several mechanical approaches to managing vegetation fuels hold promise when applied to the dry mixed conifer forests in the western United States. These are most useful to treat surface, ladder, and crown fuels. There are a variety of techniques to remove or alter all kinds of plant biomass (live, dead, or decomposed) that affect forest resilience. It is important for...

  16. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  17. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm-2) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the

  18. C5a Increases the Injury to Primary Neurons Elicited by Fibrillar Amyloid Beta

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Michael X.; Namiranian, Pouya; Nguyen, Eric; Fonseca, Maria I.

    2017-01-01

    C5aR1, the proinflammatory receptor for C5a, is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, endothelial cells, and neurons. Previous work demonstrated that the C5aR1 antagonist, PMX205, decreased amyloid pathology and suppressed cognitive deficits in two Alzheimer's Disease (AD) mouse models. However, the cellular mechanisms of this protection have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, primary cultured mouse neurons treated with exogenous C5a show reproducible loss of MAP-2 staining in a dose-dependent manner within 24 hr of treatment, indicative of injury to neurons. This injury is prevented by the C5aR1 antagonist PMX53, a close analog of PMX205. Furthermore, primary neurons derived from C5aR1 null mice exhibited no MAP-2 loss after exposure to the highest concentration of C5a tested. Primary mouse neurons treated with both 100 nM C5a and 5 µM fibrillar amyloid beta (fAβ), to model what occurs in the AD brain, showed increased MAP-2 loss relative to either C5a or fAβ alone. Blocking C5aR1 with PMX53 (100 nM) blocked the loss of MAP2 in these primary neurons to the level seen with fAβ alone. Similar experiments with primary neurons derived from C5aR1 null mice showed a loss of MAP-2 due to fAβ treatment. However, the addition of C5a to the cultures did not enhance the loss of MAP-2 and the addition of PMX53 to the cultures did not change the MAP-2 loss in response to fAβ. Thus, at least part of the beneficial effects of C5aR1 antagonist in AD mouse models may be due to protection of neurons from the toxic effects of C5a. PMID:28078911

  19. Frequency of hepatocellular fibrillar inclusions in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Douro River estuary, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Carrola, João; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, António; Pires, Maria João; Rocha, Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    Liver lesions in wild fish have been associated with xenobiotic exposure. Facing reports of pollution in the Douro River estuary (north of Portugal), we have been making field surveys using fishes and targeting histopathological biomarkers of exposure and effect. Herein, we intended to better characterize and report the rate of one poorly understood lesion-hepatocellular fibrillar inclusions (HFI)-found in European flounder (Platichthys flesus). With this report, we aimed to establish sound baseline data that could be viewed as a starting point for future biomonitoring, while offering the world's second only pool of field data on such a liver toxicopathic lesion, which could be compared with data available from the UK estuaries. Sampling was done in the Douro River estuary over 1 year. A total of 72 animals were fished with nets, in spring-summer (SS) and autumn-winter (AW) campaigns. Livers were processed for histopathology and both routine and special staining procedures (alcian blue, periodic acid Schiff (PAS), tetrazonium coupling reaction). Immunohistochemistry targeted AE1/AE3 (pan cytokeratins). The severity of the HFI extent was graded using a system with four levels, varying from 0 (absence of HFI) to 3 (high relative density of cells with HFI). Cells (isolated/groups) with HFI appeared in 35 % or more of the fish, in the total samples of each season, and over 40 % in more homogeneous sub-samples. There were no significant differences when comparing samples versus sub-samples or SS versus AW. When merging the data sets from the two seasons, the frequency of fish with HFI was ≈36 % for the total sample and ≈49 % for the sub-sample. The extreme group (biggest and smallest fish) revealed a HFI frequency of only 16 %, which differed significantly from the total and sub-sampled groups. Immunostaining and PAS were negative for the HFI, and alcian blue could, at times, faintly stain the inclusions. These were positive with the tetrazonium reaction. We showed

  20. Zinc-Amyloid Interactions on a Millisecond Time-Scale Stabilize Non-Fibrillar Alzheimer Related Species

    SciTech Connect

    Noy,D.; Solomonov, I.; Sinkevich, O.; Arad, A.; Kjaer, K.; Sagi, I.

    2008-01-01

    The role of zinc, an essential element for normal brain function, in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is poorly understood. On one hand, physiological and genetic evidence from transgenic mouse models supports its pathogenic role in promoting the deposition of the amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}) in senile plaques. On the other hand, levels of extracellular ('free') zinc in the brain, as inferred by the levels of zinc in cerebrospinal fluid, were found to be too low for inducing A{beta} aggregation. Remarkably, the release of transient high local concentrations of zinc during rapid synaptic events was reported. The role of such free zinc pulses in promoting A{beta} aggregation has never been established. Using a range of time-resolved structural and spectroscopic techniques, we found that zinc, when introduced in millisecond pulses of micromolar concentrations, immediately interacts with A{beta} 1-40 and promotes its aggregation. These interactions specifically stabilize non-fibrillar pathogenic related aggregate forms and prevent the formation of A{beta} fibrils (more benign species) presumably by interfering with the self-assembly process of A{beta}. These in vitro results strongly suggest a significant role for zinc pulses in A{beta} pathology. We further propose that by interfering with A{beta} self-assembly, which leads to insoluble, non-pathological fibrillar forms, zinc stabilizes transient, harmful amyloid forms. This report argues that zinc represents a class of molecular pathogens that effectively perturb the self-assembly of benign A{beta} fibrils, and stabilize harmful non-fibrillar forms.

  1. Dendritic spine density, morphology, and fibrillar actin content surrounding amyloid-β plaques in a mouse model of amyloid-β deposition.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Caitlin M; Ciuchta, Jennifer; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Fish, Kenneth N; Abrahamson, Eric E; Murray, Patrick S; Klunk, William E; Sweet, Robert A

    2013-08-01

    Dendritic spines are the site of most excitatory synapses, the loss of which correlates with cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer disease. Substantial evidence indicates that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, either insoluble fibrillar Aβ deposited into plaques or soluble nonfibrillar Aβ species, can cause spine loss but the concurrent contributions of fibrillar Aβ and nonfibrillar Aβ to spine loss has not been previously assessed. We used multiple-label immunohistochemistry to measure spine density, size, and F-actin content surrounding plaques in the cerebral cortex in the PSAPP mouse model of Aβ deposition. Our approach allowed us to measure fibrillar Aβ plaque content and an index of nonfibrillar Aβ species concurrently. We found that spine density was reduced within 6 μm of the plaque perimeter, remaining spines were more compact, and F-actin content per spine was increased. Measures of fibrillar Aβ plaque content were associated with reduced spine density near plaques, whereas measures of nonfibrillar Aβ species were associated with reduced spine density and size but not altered F-actin content. These findings suggest that strategies to preserve dendritic spines in AD patients may need to address both nonfibrillar and fibrillar forms of Aβ and that nonfibrillar Aβ may exert spine toxicity through pathways not mediated by depolymerization of F-actin.

  2. The new evidence of nucleolar ultrastructural dynamic change: fibrillar centre (FC) fusion in G1 phase and regeneration in S phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengcai; Ying, Chen; Shang, Guangbin; Jiao, Mingda; Hongfang, Zhang

    2013-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes ribosome production starts at the end of mitosis, increases during G1, is maximal in G2 (Sirri et al., 2000) and stops during prophase (Gébrane-Younès et al., 1997). But the mechanism of the change is still uncovered. Especially in the actively growing mammalian somatic cells usually contain one or several giant fibrillar centres (GFCs) with many tiny fibrillar centre (FCs) (Koberna et al., 2002; Raška et al., 2004; Casafont et al., 2007). The process how the giant fibrillar centre (GFC) and the many tiny fibrillar centres (FCs) were formed is unknown. The present results showed there were processes of FCs fusion in G1 phase and FCs regeneration in S phase respectively in the nucleoli of A 375 cells. A few FCs fused each other in late G1 phase when the process of nucleoli fusion was completed. In S phase, a lot of tiny FCs were regenerated from the periphery of GFC, separated and scattered into nucleolar matrix in late S phase and early G2 phase. The GFC was found to be coexisted with numerous tiny FCs in the nucleolus in G2 phase. The present study provided a new evidence of nucleolar dynamic change during interphase: fibrillar centre (FC) was not to be a stable state subunit of nucleolar compartment but a highly dynamic process that may be the bases of nucleolar morphological architecture organization and its function taking place.

  3. Application of dried-droplets deposited on pre-cut filter paper disks for quantitative LA-ICP-MS imaging of biologically relevant minor and trace elements in tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Bonta, Maximilian; Hegedus, Balazs; Limbeck, Andreas

    2016-02-18

    In this work, a novel calibration approach for minor and trace element quantification in LA-ICP-MS imaging of biological tissues is presented. Droplets of aqueous standard solutions are deposited onto pre-cut pieces of filter paper, allowed to dry, and sputtered with a thin gold layer for use as pseudo-internal standard. Analysis of the standards using LA-ICP-MS is performed using radial line-scans across the filters. In contrast to conventionally used preparation of matrix-matched tissue standards, the dried-droplet approach offers a variety of advantages: The standards are easy to prepare, no characterization of the standards using acid digestion is required, no handling of biological materials is necessary, and the concentration range, as well the number of investigated analytes is almost unlimited. The proposed quantification method has been verified using homogenized tissue standards with known analyte concentrations before being applied to a human malignant mesothelioma biopsy from a patient who had not received any chemotherapeutic treatment. Elemental distribution images were acquired at a lateral resolution of 40 μm per pixel, limits of detection ranging from 0.1 μg g(-1) (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn) to 13.2 μg g(-1) (K) were reached.

  4. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  5. Determining the fibrillar orientation of bast fibres with polarized light microscopy: the modified Herzog test (red plate test) explained.

    PubMed

    Haugan, E; Holst, B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of bast fibre samples, in particular, bast fibres used in textiles, is an important issue in archaeology, criminology and other scientific fields. One of the characteristic features of bast fibres is their fibrillar orientation, referred to as Z- or S twist (or alternatively right- and left-handed fibres). An empirical test for determining the fibrillar orientation using polarized light microscopy has been known in the community for many years. It is referred to as the modified Herzog test or red plate test. The test has the reputation for never producing false results, but also for occasionally not working. However, so far, no proper justification has been provided in the literature that the 'no false results' assumption is really correct and it has also not been clear up till now, why the method sometimes does not work. In this paper, we present an analytical model for the modified Herzog test, which explains why the test never gives a false result. We also provide an explanation for why the Herzog test sometimes does not work: According to our model, the Herzog test will not work if none of the three distinct layers in the secondary cell wall is significantly thicker than the others. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. The Use of the Calcitonin Minimal Recognition Module for the Design of DOPA-Containing Fibrillar Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Fichman, Galit; Guterman, Tom; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid deposits are insoluble fibrous protein aggregates, identified in numerous diseases, which self-assemble through molecular recognition. This process is facilitated by short amino acid sequences, identified as minimal modules. Peptides corresponding to these motifs can be used for the formation of amyloid-like fibrillar assemblies in vitro. Such assemblies hold broad appeal in nanobiotechnology due to their ordered structure and to their ability to be functionalized. The catechol functional group, present in the non-coded L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) amino acid, can take part in diverse chemical interactions. Moreover, DOPA-incorporated polymers have demonstrated adhesive properties and redox activity. In this work, amyloid-like fibrillar assemblies were formed through the self-assembly of a pentapeptide containing DOPA residues, Asp-DOPA-Asn-Lys-DOPA. The design of this peptide was based on the minimal amyloidogenic recognition motif of the human calcitonin hormone, Asp-Phe-Asn-Lys-Phe, the first amyloidogenic pentapeptide identified. By substituting phenylalanine with DOPA, we obtained DOPA-functionalized amyloid-like assemblies in water. Electron microscopy revealed elongated, linear fibril-like nanometric assemblies. Secondary structure analysis indicated the presence of amyloid-characteristic β-sheet structures as well as random coil structures. Deposition of silver on the DOPA-incorporated assemblies suggested redox activity and demonstrated the applicative potential of this novel nanobiomaterial.

  7. Preferential association of serum amyloid P component with fibrillar deposits in familial British and Danish dementias: similarities with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Agueda; Lashley, Tammaryn; Ng, Douglas; Meyerson, Jordana; Braendgaard, Hans; Plant, Gordon; Bojsen-Møller, Marie; Holton, Janice; Frangione, Blas; Revesz, Tamas; Ghiso, Jorge

    2007-06-15

    Two hereditary forms of cerebrovascular amyloidosis, familial British and Danish dementias (FBD and FDD), share striking similarities with Alzheimer's disease (AD) despite structural differences among their amyloid subunits (ABri in FBD, ADan in FDD, and Abeta in AD). Neuropathological lesions in these disorders include neurofibrillary tangles, parenchymal amyloid and pre-amyloid deposits and overwhelming cerebral amyloid angiopathy co-localizing with reactive microglia and multiple amyloid associated proteins including activation products of the complement cascade. Immunohistochemical analysis of FBD and FDD brain lesions unveiled the presence of serum amyloid P-component (SAP) primarily associated with thioflavin positive amyloid deposits in spite of the significant pre-amyloid burden existing in both disorders. Using affinity chromatography and ELISA binding assays we demonstrated specific, calcium-dependent, saturable, high affinity binding interactions between SAP and ABri/ADan peptides, with dissociation constant values in the sub-nanomolar range and within the same order of magnitude as those resulting from the interaction of SAP with Alzheimer's Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42. The preferential association of SAP with fibrillar amyloid lesions and not with non-fibrillar pre-amyloid deposits is puzzling, suggesting that SAP modulates the assembly and stability of the final fibril rather than participating in the early steps of protein misfolding and oligomerization.

  8. Ribosomal genes in focus: new transcripts label the dense fibrillar components and form clusters indicative of "Christmas trees" in situ.

    PubMed

    Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Pliss, Artem; Masata, Martin; Vecerova, Jaromíra; Fialová, Markéta; Bednár, Jan; Raska, Ivan

    2002-05-27

    T he organization of transcriptionally active ribosomal genes in animal cell nucleoli is investigated in this study in order to address the long-standing controversy with regard to the intranucleolar localization of these genes. Detailed analyses of HeLa cell nucleoli include direct localization of ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization and their indirect localization via nascent ribosomal transcript mappings. On the light microscopy (LM) level, ribosomal genes map in 10-40 fluorescence foci per nucleus, and transcription activity is associated with most foci. We demonstrate that each nucleolar focus observed by LM corresponds, on the EM level, to an individual fibrillar center (FC) and surrounding dense fibrillar components (DFCs). The EM data identify the DFC as the nucleolar subcompartment in which rRNA synthesis takes place, consistent with detection of rDNA within the DFC. The highly sensitive method for mapping nascent transcripts in permeabilized cells on ultrastructural level provides intense and unambiguous clustered immunogold signal over the DFC, whereas very little to no label is detected over the FC. This signal is strongly indicative of nascent "Christmas trees" of rRNA associated with individual rDNA genes, sampled on the surface of thin sections. Stereological analysis of the clustered transcription signal further suggests that these Christmas trees may be contorted in space and exhibit a DNA compaction ratio on the order of 4-5.5.

  9. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies.

  10. Temperature and amplitude dependence of tension transients in glycerinated skeletal and insect fibrillar muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, R H; Steiger, G J

    1977-01-01

    1. Quick stretches and releases were applied to small bundles of glycerinated fibres of rabbit psoas and insect fibrillar flight muscle. The resulting tension changes were recorded at various temperatures and amplitudes of length change. The results from the two preparations had many features in common. At temperatures near 0 degrees C the asymmetry of the initial tension recovery after stretch and release originally reported in living frog fibres by Huxley & Simmons (1971 alpha) was very obvious. 2. The complete tension course could be described as an elastic change occurring simultaneously with the length change followed by recovery consisting of the sum of a number of exponential terms. These terms usually corresponded to the phases discernible without curve fitting, but in some cases a monotonic rise or fall of tension was seen to consist of two components only after curve fitting. 3. After either stretch or release there was a phase of rapid tension recovery towards the value before the length change. The rate constant of this phase increased as the amplitude of stretch or release was increased to about 2 nm/half sarcomere. At higher amplitudes it remained nearly constant 4. At temperatures near 0 degrees C there was a second and much slower continuation of the recovery after stretch. The rate constant of this second phase was much more sensitive to temperature than that of the first phase and it became slower with increasing amplitude of stretch. As the temperature was raised the speed of the second phase approached the speed of the first phase so that at room temperatures the initial tension recovery after stretch and release was nearly symmetrical. 5. Under many conditions these processes were followed by a change in the opposite direction, the 'delayed tension' described by earlier workers. This third phase of tension change had about the same temperature sensitivity as the second phase of the recovery seen after stretch. The tension due to stretch

  11. [Biological contamination by micromycetes in dried Boletus edulis: research of aflatoxin B1, B2 G1, G2 and ochratoxin A].

    PubMed

    Lorini, C; Rossetti, F; Palazzoni, S; Comodo, N; Bonaccorsi, G

    2008-01-01

    Aim of this survey is to identify those filamentous fungi which parasite Boletus edulis and its group and check the potential presence of secondary metabolites, specifically aflatoxin B1, total aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, in order to assess the risk to consumers' health. Forty samples of dried Boletus edulis, collected by two food industries which distribute the product in many Italian regions, have been analysed. The sampling plan has been conducted from November 2005 to March 2006, collecting 50 g from each commercial category of dried Boletus edulis available in the factory at the time of sampling. All the samples have been tested by visual macroscopic and stereoscopic assays; for some samples--those referred to commercial category presumably at higher risk--we have performed cultural assays as well, typization of isolated micromycetes, extraction and quantification of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A. Mycotoxin detection has been made by HPLC, using the UNI EN 14123 and UNI EN 14132 standard methods, respectively applied to aflatoxins determination in peanuts, pistachios, figs and paprika and to ochratoxin A in barley and coffee. Non pathogenic micromycetes, common in food products, have been frequently observed in cultural assays, while Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger have been found in some samples. However the concentration of aflatoxins was always under the quantification limit. The survey confirm that, if the cold chain is kept throughout the process and the distribution, Boletus edulis and analogue mycetes are not a favourable substratum for the growth and the development of moulds.

  12. Biological liquid crystal elastomers.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, David P; Vollrath, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) have recently been described as a new class of matter. Here we review the evidence for the novel conclusion that the fibrillar collagens and the dragline silks of orb web spiders belong to this remarkable class of materials. Unlike conventional rubbers, LCEs are ordered, rather than disordered, at rest. The identification of these biopolymers as LCEs may have a predictive value. It may explain how collagens and spider dragline silks are assembled. It may provide a detailed explanation for their mechanical properties, accounting for the variation between different members of the collagen family and between the draglines in different spider species. It may provide a basis for the design of biomimetic collagen and dragline silk analogues by genetic engineering, peptide- or classical polymer synthesis. Biological LCEs may exhibit a range of exotic properties already identified in other members of this remarkable class of materials. In this paper, the possibility that other transversely banded fibrillar proteins are also LCEs is discussed. PMID:11911772

  13. Effect of curcumin and Cu 2+/Zn 2+ ions on the fibrillar aggregates formed by the amyloid peptide and other peptides at the organic-aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J. M.; Varghese, Neenu; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-08-01

    Characteristic features of a perilous neuro-degenerative disease such as the Alzhiemer's disease is fibrillar plaque formation by the amyloid (Aβ) peptide. We have modelled the formation and disintegration of fibrils by studying the aggregate structures formed by Aβ structural motif diphenylalanine as well as insulin and bovine serum albumin at the organic-aqueous interface. Even small concentrations of curcumin in the organic medium or Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions in the aqueous medium are found to break down the fibrillar structures.

  14. Fibrillar structure and elasticity of hydrating collagen: a quantitative multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Morin, Claire; Hellmich, Christian; Henits, Peter

    2013-01-21

    It is well known that hydration of collagenous tissues leads to their swelling, as well as to softening of their elastic behavior. However, it is much less clear which microstructural and micromechanical "rules" are involved in this process. Here, we develop a theoretical approach cast in analytical mathematical formulations, which is experimentally validated by a wealth of independent tests on collagenous tissues, such as X-ray diffraction, vacuum drying, mass measurements, and Brillouin light scattering. The overall emerging picture is the following: air-drying leaves water only in the gap zones between the triple-helical collagen molecules; upon re-hydration, the extrafibrillar space is established at volumes directly proportional to the hydration-induced swelling of the (micro) fibrils, until the maximum equatorial distance between the long collagen molecules is reached. Thereafter, the volume of the fibrils stays constant, and only the extrafibrillar volume continues to grow. At all these hydration stages, the elastic behavior is governed by the same, hydration-invariant mechanical interaction pattern of only two, interpenetrating mechanical phases: transversely isotropic molecular collagen and isotropic water (or empty pores in the vacuum-dried case). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Biological and Enzymatic Activity of Soil in a Tropical Dry Forest: Desierto de la Tatacoa (Colombia) with Potential in Mars Terraforming and Other Similar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Moreno, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    Desierto de la Tatacoa has been determined to be a tropical dry forest bioma, which is located at 3° 13" N 75° 13" W. It has a hot thermal floor with 440 msnm of altitude; it has a daily average of 28° C, and a maximum of 40° C, Its annual rainfall total can be upwards of 1250 mm. Its solar sheen has a daily average of 5.8 hours and its relative humidity is between 60% and 65%. Therefore, the life forms presents are very scant, and in certain places, almost void. It was realized a completely random sampling of soil from its surface down to 6 inches deep, of zones without vegetation and with soils highly loaded by oxides of iron in order to determine the number of microorganisms per gram and its subsequent identification. It was measured the soil basal respiration. Besides, it was determined enzymatic activity (catalase, dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease). Starting with the obtained results, it is developes an alternative towards the study of soil genesis in Mars in particular, and recommendations for same process in other planets. Although the information found in the experiments already realized in Martian soil they demonstrate that doesnt exist any enzymatic activity, the knowledge of the same topic in the soil is proposed as an alternative to problems like carbonic fixing of the dense Martian atmosphere of CO2, the degradation of inorganic compounds amongst other in order to prepare the substratum for later colonization by some life form.

  16. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    PubMed

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ.

  17. Drying Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  18. Glial fibrillar acidic protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishiki, Aiko; Kamada, Maki; Kawamura, Yuki; Terao, Chiaki; Shimoda, Fumiko; Tomita, Naoki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are currently regarded as indispensable indicators for accurate differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. Although high levels of astrocyte-secreted glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been reported, the levels of GFAP in the CSF have not been fully investigated in other neurological disorders that cause dementia, such as dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In this study, we determined the levels of GFAP in the CSF of healthy control subjects and AD, DLB, and FTLD patients to address two questions: (i) Do the levels of GFAP differ among these disorders? and (ii) Can GFAP be used as a biomarker for the differential diagnosis of these neurodegenerative disorders? The levels of GFAP in AD, DLB, and FTLD patients were significantly higher than those in the healthy control subjects. Although the levels of GFAP were not significantly different between AD and DLB patients, a higher level of GFAP was observed in FTLD patients than in AD and DLB patients. It is concluded that representative neurological disorders causing dementia were associated with higher levels of GFAP in the CSF. We propose the following mechanism concerning the amount of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The increase in the release of GFAP into CSF is considered to reflect the sum of degeneration of astrocytes and astrocytosis. The sum of degeneration and astrocytosis or the GFAP release could be in the order of FTLD > DLB > AD > normal condition.

  19. CD14 and Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 are required for fibrillar Aβ-stimulated microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Reed-Geaghan, Erin G.; Savage, Julie C.; Hise, Amy G.; Landreth, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Microglia are the brain's tissue macrophages and are found in an activated state surrounding β-amyloid plaques in the Alzheimer's disease brain. Microglia interact with fibrillar β-amyloid (fAβ) through an ensemble of surface receptors composed of the α6β1 integrin, CD36, CD47, and the class A scavenger receptor. These receptors act in concert to initiate intracellular signaling cascades and phenotypic activation of these cells. However, it is unclear how engagement of this receptor complex is linked to the induction of an activated microglial phenotype. We report that the response of microglial cells to fibrillar forms of Aβ requires the participation of Toll like receptors (TLRs) and the co-receptor CD14. The response of microglia to fAβ is reliant upon CD14, which act together with TLR4 and TLR2 to bind fAβ and to activate intracellular signaling. We find that cells lacking these receptors could not initiate a Src-Vav-Rac signaling cascade leading to reactive oxygen species production and phagocytosis. The fAβ-mediated activation of p38 MAPK also required CD14, TLR4, and TLR2. Inhibition of p38 abrogated fAβ-induced reactive oxygen species production and attenuated the induction of phagocytosis. Microglia lacking CD14, TLR4, and TLR2 showed no induction of phosphorylated IκBα following fAβ. These data indicate these innate immune receptors function as members of the microglial fAβ receptor complex and identify the signaling mechanisms whereby they contribute to microglial activation. PMID:19776284

  20. Losartan inhibits the adhesion of rat platelets to fibrillar collagen--a potential role of nitric oxide and prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Matys, T; Chabielska, E; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Buczko, W

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of losartan on rat platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen. Washed platelets were counted before and after 15 minutes incubation with collagen (50 microg/ml) and the percentage of adhering platelets was calculated as the index of their adhesion. When the platelets were incubated with collagen 40.8 +/- 0.3% of the platelets adhered. Losartan produced a dose dependent decrease in a number of adhering platelets both when the drug was administered to the animals ex vivo at doses of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg (p < 0.01-0.001) or was added to the preparation of washed platelets in vitro in concentrations of 10(-8)-10(-5) M (p < 0.01-0.001). In the next step of the study we assessed the influence of L-NAME (10 mg/kg ex vivo, 30 microM in vitro) and indomethacin (2.5 mg/kg ex vivo, 30 microM in vitro) on the antiadhesive effect of losartan (10 mg/kg ex vivo, 10(-6) M in vitro). Blockade of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME partially reversed the antiadhesive effect of losartan both ex vivo and in vitro. Indomethacin diminished the inhibitory effect of losartan on platelet adhesion when administered ex vivo, but it failed to modify this parameter when added to the suspension of platelets in vitro. In conclusion, losartan reduces platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen in a dose-dependent manner. The observed action of losartan seems to be mediated mainly by endothelium- and platelet-derived nitric oxide.

  1. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide

  2. A tailless timing belt climbing platform utilizing dry adhesives with mushroom caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, J.; Liu, Y.; Sadeghi, A.; Menon, C.

    2011-11-01

    In many instances, a climbing robot that utilizes dry adhesives as an attachment method may be found to be very useful due to the inherent nature of biomimetic fibrillar dry adhesives in the applications of space, security, surveillance and nuclear reactor cleaning and maintenance. In this paper, a novel tank-like modular robot is developed that does not require a tail to provide a preload to the front of the robot while climbing. Biomimetic fibrillar dry adhesives with mushroom caps manufactured into belts are used as an attachment method. The manufacturing of the dry adhesive belts is discussed and the adhesion properties are examined. The timing belt based climbing platform (TBCP-II) utilizes two tank-like modules connected with an active joint with continual surface-robot distance measuring providing feedback for active adhesive preloading. The mechanical, electronic and software design is discussed. Reliable vertical surface climbing is achieved and the preloading strategy and response is examined. TBCP-II is shown to be capable of both horizontal to vertical and vertical to horizontal surface transfers over both inside and outside corners.

  3. Location of rRNA transcription to the nucleolar components: disappearance of the fibrillar centers in nucleoli of regenerating rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marzia; Orrico, Catia; Treré, Davide; Derenzini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The precise location of rDNA transcription to the components of mammalian cell nucleolus is still debated. This was due to the fact that all the molecules necessary for rRNA synthesis are located in two of the three components, the fibrillar centers (FCs) and the dense fibrillar component (DFC), which together with the granular component (GC) are considered to be constantly present in mammalian cell nucleoli. In the present study we demonstrated that in nucleoli of many regenerating rat hepatocytes at 15 h after partial hepatectomy the FCs were no longer present, only the DFC and the GC being detected. At this time of regeneration the rRNA transcriptional activity was three fold that of resting hepatocytes, while the synthesis of DNA was not yet significantly increased, indicating that these nucleolar changes were due to the rRNA synthesis up-regulation. The DFC appeared to be organized in numerous, small, roundish tufts of fibrils. The silver staining procedure for AgNOR proteins, which are associated with the ribosomal genes, selectively and homogeneously stained these fibrillar tufts. Immuno-gold visualization of the Upstream Binding Factor (UBF), which is associated with the promoter region and the transcribed portion of the rRNA 45S gene, demonstrated that UBF was selectively located in the fibrillar tufts. We concluded that in proliferating rat hepatocytes the increased synthesis of rRNA induced an activation of the rRNA transcription machinery located in the fibrillar centers which, by becoming associated with the ribonucleoprotein transcripts, assumed the morphological pattern of the DFC.

  4. Drying hardwood lumber

    Treesearch

    Joseph. Denig; Eugene M. Wengert; William T. Simpson

    2000-01-01

    Drying Hardwood Lumber focuses on common methods for drying lumber of different thickness, with minimal drying defects, for high quality applications. This manual also includes predrying treatments that, when part of an overall quality-oriented drying system, reduce defects and improve drying quality, especially of oak lumber. Special attention is given to drying white...

  5. Hagfish and lancelet fibrillar collagens reveal that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved in stem vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, GuangJun; Cohn, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    The origin of vertebrates was defined by evolution of a skeleton; however, little is known about the developmental mechanisms responsible for this landmark evolutionary innovation. In jawed vertebrates, cartilage matrix consists predominantly of type II collagen (Col2α1), whereas that of jawless fishes has long been thought to be noncollagenous. We recently showed that Col2α1 is present in lamprey cartilage, indicating that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved earlier than previously recognized. Here, we investigate the origin of vertebrate cartilage, and we report that hagfishes, the sister group to lampreys, also have Col2α1-based cartilage, suggesting its presence in the common ancestor of crown-group vertebrates. We go on to show that lancelets, a sister group to vertebrates, possess an ancestral clade A fibrillar collagen (ColA) gene that is expressed in the notochord. Together, these results suggest that duplication and diversification of ColA genes at the chordate–vertebrate transition may underlie the evolutionary origin of vertebrate skeletal tissues. PMID:17077149

  6. Hagfish and lancelet fibrillar collagens reveal that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved in stem vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-11-07

    The origin of vertebrates was defined by evolution of a skeleton; however, little is known about the developmental mechanisms responsible for this landmark evolutionary innovation. In jawed vertebrates, cartilage matrix consists predominantly of type II collagen (Col2alpha1), whereas that of jawless fishes has long been thought to be noncollagenous. We recently showed that Col2alpha1 is present in lamprey cartilage, indicating that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved earlier than previously recognized. Here, we investigate the origin of vertebrate cartilage, and we report that hagfishes, the sister group to lampreys, also have Col2alpha1-based cartilage, suggesting its presence in the common ancestor of crown-group vertebrates. We go on to show that lancelets, a sister group to vertebrates, possess an ancestral clade A fibrillar collagen (ColA) gene that is expressed in the notochord. Together, these results suggest that duplication and diversification of ColA genes at the chordate-vertebrate transition may underlie the evolutionary origin of vertebrate skeletal tissues.

  7. Direct inhibition of elastase and matrixmetalloproteinases and stimulation of biosynthesis of fibrillar collagens, elastin, and fibrillins by xanthohumol.

    PubMed

    Philips, Neena; Samuel, Mathew; Arena, Rosemarie; Chen, Yu-Jun; Conte, Jennifer; Natarajan, Prashanthi; Natrajan, Prashanti; Haas, Gerhard; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    In skin aging there is deterioration of the extracellular matrix's collagen and elastin fibers, from its reduced biosynthesis and increased degradation by elastase and matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs). Xanthohumol is a flavonoid isolated from the hop plant Humulus lupulus L., with anti-microbial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. The goal of this research was to investigate xanthohumol as an anti-skinaging agent via its beneficial regulation of the extracellular matrix. To this purpose, we examined the direct effect of xanthohumol on the activities of elastase and MMPs (MMPs 1, 2, and 9) and its effect on the expression (protein and/or transcription levels) of collagens (types I, III, and V), elastin, and fibrillins (1 and 2) in dermal fibroblasts. Xanthohumol significantly inhibited elastase and MMP-9 activities from its lowest concentration, and MMP-1 and MMP-2 at its higher concentrations, which implies a greater protective effect on elastin. It dramatically increased the expression of types I, III, and V collagens, and elastin, fibrillin-1, and fibrillin-2 in dermal fibroblasts. The effects were similar to those of ascorbic acid. This is the first report identifying xanthohumol's potential to improve skin structure and firmness: it simultaneously inhibits the activities of elastase/MMPs and stimulates the biosynthesis of fibrillar collagens, elastin, and fibrillins.

  8. Influence of surface pretreatment of titanium- and cobalt-based biomaterials on covalent immobilization of fibrillar collagen.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rainer; Abke, Jochen; Schnell, Edith; Scharnweber, Dieter; Kujat, Richard; Englert, Carsten; Taheri, Darius; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Collagen type-I is a major component of the extracellular matrix of most tissues and it is increasingly utilized for surface engineering of biomaterials to accelerate receptor-mediated cell adhesion. In the present study, coatings with layers of fibrillar type-I collagen were prepared on titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt alloy to improve initial osteoblast adhesion and implant-tissue integration. To suppress the quick in vivo degradation rate of collagen the deposited layers were covalently immobilized at the metal surfaces as well as chemically cross-linked. The application of different oxidation techniques to the metallic substrates resulted in surfaces with varying hydroxyl group contents, which directly influenced the amount of immobilized silane coupling agents. It was found that a high density of surface-bound coupling agents increased the stability of the covalently linked collagen layers. After coating of metallic biomaterials with a cross-linked collagen layer, an improved cellular response of human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) in vitro could be recognized.

  9. Comparative analysis of fibrillar and basement membrane collagen expression in embryos of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H R; Reiter, R S; D'Alessio, M; Di Liberto, M; Ramirez, F; Exposito, J Y; Gambino, R; Solursh, M

    1997-06-01

    The time of appearance and location of three distinct collagen gene transcripts termed 1 alpha, 2 alpha, and 3 alpha, were monitored in the developing S. purpuratus embryo by in situ hybridization. The 1 alpha and 2 alpha transcripts of fibrillar collagens were detected simultaneously in the primary (PMC) and secondary (SMC) mesenchyme cells of the late gastrula stage and subsequently expressed in the spicules and gut associated cells of the pluteus stage. The 3 alpha transcripts of the basement membrane collagen appeared earlier than 1 alpha and 2 alpha, and were first detected in the presumptive PMC at the vegetal plate of the late blastula stage. The PMC exhibited high expression of 3 alpha at the mesenchyme blastula stage, but during gastrulation the level of expression was reduced differentially among the PMC. In the late gastrula and pluteus stages, both PMC and SMC expressed 3 alpha mRNA, and thus at these stages all three collagen genes displayed an identical expression pattern by coincidence. This study thus provides the first survey of onset and localization of multiple collagen transcripts in a single sea urchin species.

  10. Monomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein exert opposite effects on the catalytic cycle that promotes the proliferation of Aβ42 aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Sean; Habchi, Johnny; Lattanzi, Veronica; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    The coaggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and α-synuclein is commonly observed in a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The complex interplay between Aβ and α-synuclein has led to seemingly contradictory results on whether α-synuclein promotes or inhibits Aβ aggregation. Here, we show how these conflicts can be rationalized and resolved by demonstrating that different structural forms of α-synuclein exert different effects on Aβ aggregation. Our results demonstrate that whereas monomeric α-synuclein blocks the autocatalytic proliferation of Aβ42 (the 42-residue form of Aβ) fibrils, fibrillar α-synuclein catalyses the heterogeneous nucleation of Aβ42 aggregates. It is thus the specific balance between the concentrations of monomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein that determines the outcome of the Aβ42 aggregation reaction. PMID:28698377

  11. Characterization of the Six Zebrafish Clade B Fibrillar Procollagen Genes, with Evidence for Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Splicing within the pro-α1(V) C-propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Guy G.; Branam, Amanda M.; Huang, Guorui; Pelegri, Francisco; Cole, William G.; Wenstrup, Richard M.; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Genes for tetrapod fibrillar procollagen chains can be divided into two clades, A and B, based on sequence homologies and differences in protein domain and gene structures. Although the major fibrillar collagen types I–III comprise only clade A chains, the minor fibrillar collagen types V and XI comprise both clade A chains and the clade B chains pro-α1(V), pro-α3(V), pro-α1(XI) and pro-α2(XI), in which defects can underlie various genetic connective tissue disorders. Here we characterize the clade B procollagen chains of zebrafish. We demonstrate that in contrast to the four tetrapod clade B chains, zebrafish have six clade B chains, designated here as pro-α1(V), proα3(V)a and b, pro-α1(XI)a and b, and pro-α2(XI), based on synteny, sequence homologies, and features of protein domain and gene structures. Spatiotemporal expression patterns are described, as are conserved and non-conserved features that provide insights into the function and evolution of the clade B chain types. Such features include differential alternative splicing of NH2-terminal globular sequences and the first case of a non-triple helical imperfection in the COL1 domain of a clade B, or clade A, fibrillar procollagen chain. Evidence is also provided for previously unknown and evolutionarily conserved alternative splicing within the pro-α1(V) C-propeptide, which may affect selectivity of collagen type V/XI chain associations in species ranging from zebrafish to human. Data presented herein provide insights into the nature of clade B procollagen chains and should facilitate their study in the zebrafish model system. PMID:20102740

  12. Non-fibrillar oligomeric species of the amyloid ABri peptide, implicated in familial British dementia, are more potent at inducing apoptotic cell death than protofibrils or mature fibrils.

    PubMed

    El-Agnaf, O M; Nagala, S; Patel, B P; Austen, B M

    2001-06-29

    Familial British dementia (FBD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with biochemical and pathological similarities to Alzheimer's disease. FBD is associated with a point mutation in the stop codon of the BRI gene. The mutation extends the length of the wild-type protein by 11 amino acids, and following proteolytic cleavage, results in the production of a cyclic peptide (ABri) 11 amino acids longer than the wild-type (WT) peptide produced from the normal gene BRI. ABri was found to be the main component of amyloid deposits in FBD brains. However, pathological examination of FBD brains has shown the presence of ABri as non-fibrillar deposits as well as amyloid fibrils. Taken together, the genetic, pathological and biochemical data support the hypothesis that ABri deposits play a central role in the pathogenesis of FBD. Here we report that ABri, but not WT peptide, can oligomerise and form amyloid-like fibrils. We show for the first time that ABri induces apoptotic cell death, whereas WT is not toxic to cells. Moreover, we report the novel findings that non-fibrillar oligomeric species of ABri are more toxic than protofibrils and mature fibrils. These findings provide evidence that non-fibrillar oligomeric species are likely to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of FBD and suggest that a similar process may also operate in other neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Dry Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... delay vision loss due to dry macular degeneration. Symptoms Dry macular degeneration symptoms usually develop gradually and without pain. They may ... of printed words Decreased intensity or brightness of ... causes total blindness. Dry macular degeneration is one of two types ...

  14. Cytochemical and immunocytochemical characterization of a fibrillar network (GP2) in pancreatic juice: possible role as a sieve in the pancreatic ductal system.

    PubMed

    Grondin, G; St-Jean, P; Beaudoin, A R

    1992-04-01

    The secretory product of the exocrine pancreas contains sedimentable and non-sedimentable materials. Electron microscopy of the pellet obtained after ultracentrifugation reveals two major components: microvesicles (pancreasomes) and a fibrillar network of small mesh size. Negative staining of an unfixed pellet demonstrated that these structures are not fixation artifacts. Cytochemical analysis showed that pancreasomes are reactive to osmication and uranyl acetate staining, whereas the fibrillar network was unreactive thereby indicating that the latter does not contain lipids; however, lead citrate staining reveals the network. Alcian blue, known to bind sulfate groups of mucosubstances, reacted strongly with the fibrillar network. The pellet was also characterized by immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies to amylase and glycoprotein 2 (GP2). Both antibodies were located only on the fibrillar network. Washing of the pellet with 100 mM KCl-250 mM NaBr had little effect on GP2 content, but reduced considerably alpha-amylase associated with the reticular matrix. It appeared that GP2 was the major component of the scaffolding that gives rise to the fibrillar network and that other proteins such as alpha-amylase could reversibly bind to it. When double-labeling immunocytochemistry was carried out on the unwashed pellet, labeling of the first antigen reduced the labeling of the second. Removal of amylase by washing the pellet increased the GP2 signal. These results indicate that amylase is bound on the GP2 network. Although the function of the GP2 network is still not clearly defined several possibilities could be envisaged at the level of the pancreatic duct system: 1) The network could drain off any aggregates or precipitates forming in small ducts. 2) The small mesh of the network would present a physical barrier to infecting bacteria that could enter into the duct system from the intestine, especially in conditions of low flow rates. 3) The network may exert a

  15. Specific soluble oligomers of amyloid-β peptide undergo replication and form non-fibrillar aggregates in interfacial environments.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Paslay, Lea C; Lyons, Daniel; Morgan, Sarah E; Correia, John J; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2012-06-15

    Aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides have been implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer disease. Among the different forms of Aβ aggregates, low molecular weight species ranging between ~2- and 50-mers, also called "soluble oligomers," have emerged as the species responsible for early synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss. Emerging evidence suggests that the neurotoxic oligomers need not be formed along the obligatory nucleation-dependant fibril formation pathway. In our earlier work, we reported the isolation of one such "off-pathway" 12-18-mer species of Aβ42 generated from fatty acids called large fatty acid-derived oligomers (LFAOs) (Kumar, A., Bullard, R. L., Patel, P., Paslay, L. C., Singh, D., Bienkiewicz, E. A., Morgan, S. E., and Rangachari, V. (2011) PLoS One 6, e18759). Here, we report the physiochemical aspects of LFAO-monomer interactions as well as LFAO-LFAO associations in the presence of interfaces. We discovered that LFAOs are a replicating strain of oligomers that recruit Aβ42 monomers and quantitatively convert them into LFAO assemblies at the expense of fibrils, a mechanism similar to prion propagation. We also found that in the presence of hexane-buffer or chloroform-buffer interfaces LFAOs are able to associate with themselves to form larger but non-fibrillar aggregates. These results further support the hypothesis that low molecular weight oligomers can be generated via non-fibril formation pathways. Furthermore, the unique replicating property of off-pathway oligomers may hold profound significance for Alzheimer disease pathology.

  16. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures.

  17. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  18. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  19. Development of dry gram-negative bacteria biocontrol products and small pilot tests against dry rot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 suppress four important storage potato maladies; dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. Studies were designed to identify methods for producing a dried, efficacious biological control product. The strains were evaluated individ...

  20. Curcumin binds to the pre-fibrillar aggregates of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and alters its amyloidogenic pathway resulting in reduced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nidhi K; Srivastava, Ankit; Katyal, Nidhi; Jain, Nidhi; Khan, M Ashhar I; Kundu, Bishwajit; Deep, Shashank

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons. Unfortunately, effective therapeutics against this disease is still not available. Almost 20% of familial ALS (fALS) is suggested to be associated with pathological deposition of superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Evidences suggest that SOD1-containing pathological inclusions in ALS exhibit amyloid like properties. An effective strategy to combat ALS may be to inhibit amyloid formation of SOD1 using small molecules. In the present study, we observed the fibrillation of one of the premature forms of SOD1 (SOD1 with reduced disulfide) in the presence of curcumin. Using ThT binding assay, AFM, TEM images and FTIR, we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits the DTT-induced fibrillation of SOD1 and favors the formation of smaller and disordered aggregates of SOD1. The enhancement in curcumin fluorescence on the addition of oligomers and pre-fibrillar aggregates of SOD1 suggests binding of these species to curcumin. Docking studies indicate that putative binding site of curcumin may be the amyloidogenic regions of SOD1. Further, there is a significant increase in SOD1 mediated toxicity in the regime of pre-fibrillar and fibrillar aggregates which is not evident in curcumin containing samples. All these data suggest that curcumin reduces toxicity by binding to the amyloidogenic regions of the species on the aggregation pathway and blocking the formation of the toxic species. Nanoparticles of curcumin with higher aqueous solubility show similar aggregation control as that of curcumin bulk. This suggests a potential role for curcumin in the treatment of ALS.

  1. Effects of contact cap dimension on dry adhesion of bioinspired mushroom-shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Dry adhesion observed in small creatures, such as spiders, insects, and geckos, has many great advantages such as repeatability and strong adhesiveness. In order to mimic these unique performances, fibrillar surface with a mushroom shaped end has drawn lots of attentions because of its advantage in efficiently enhancing adhesion compared with other sphere or simple flat ends. Here, in order to study the effects of contact cap dimension on adhesion strength, patterned surfaces of mushroom-shaped micropillars with differing cap diameters are fabricated based on the conventional photolithography and molding. The normal adhesion strength of these dry adhesives with varying cap diameters is measured with home-built equipment. The strength increases with the rise of cap diameter, and interestingly it becomes strongest when the mushroom caps join together.

  2. Dry eye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of dry eyes include: Dry environment or workplace (wind, air conditioning) Sun exposure Smoking or second-hand ... NOT smoke and avoid second-hand smoke, direct wind, and air conditioning. Use a humidifier, especially in ...

  3. Air drying of lumber.

    Treesearch

    1999-01-01

    This report describes how lumber can be air-dried most effectively under outdoor conditions and illustrates the principles and procedures of air-drying lumber that were developed through field investigations and observations of industrial practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the yarding of lumber in unit packages. Included are topics such as why lumber is dried...

  4. Kinetics of the neuroinflammation-oxidative stress correlation in rat brain following the injection of fibrillar amyloid-beta onto the hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Valdivia-Velázquez, Miguel; Acosta-Martínez, J Pablo; Ortiz, Genaro G

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe-following the injection of a single intracerebral dose of fibrillar amyloid-beta(1-40) in vivo-some correlations between proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress indicators in function of time, as well as how these variables fit in a regression model. We found a positive, significant correlation between interleukin (IL)-1beta or IL-6 and the activity of the glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px), but IL-1beta or IL-6 maintained a strong, negative correlation with the lipid peroxidation (LPO). The first 12 h marked a positive correlation between IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), but starting from the 36 h, this relationship became negative. We found also particular patterns of behavior through the time for IL-1beta, nitrites and IL-6, with parallel or sequential interrelationships. Results shows clearly that, in vivo, the fibrillar amyloid-beta (Abeta) disrupts the oxidative balance and initiate a proinflammatory response, which in turn feeds the oxidative imbalance in a coordinated, sequential way. This work contributes to our understanding of the positive feedbacks, focusing the "cytokine cycle" along with the oxidative stress mediators in a complex, multicellular, and interactive environment.

  5. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263.

  6. Dry Eye and Designer Ophthalmics

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Gordon W.; Olsakovsky, Leslie A.; Conway, Brian P.; McKown, Robert L.; Kitagawa, Kazuko; Nichols, Jason J.

    2009-01-01

    EST, proteomic, and antibody capture assays are revealing a level of tear film protein complexity far greater than previously appreciated. A systems biology approach will be needed to fully appreciate function as tear protein doses fluctuate in time through different conditions. Although consensus is growing on what fully constitutes the human tear proteome, questions remain about the source and significance of the ∼256 tear proteins designated as ‘intracellular’. Many of these may derive from normal cellular turnover and could therefore be informative. A further >183 are designated as ‘extracellular’. Surprisingly, only 4 – 5% of these appear to be dysregulated in the three forms of dry eye preliminarily examined to date. Some differ and a couple overlap, suggesting that disease-specific signatures could be identified. Future dry eye treatment might include recombinant tear protein rescue as a personalized ophthalmic approach to ocular surface disease. PMID:18677231

  7. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  8. Structure of drying costs

    SciTech Connect

    Sztabert, Z.T.

    1996-05-01

    A knowledge of cost structure and cost behavior is necessary in the management activities, particularly in the domain of investment or production decision making, as well as in the areas of production cost planning and control. Prediction and analysis of values of cost components for different technologies of drying are important when selection of a drying method and drying equipment should be done. Cost structures of lumber and coal drying processes together with an application of the factor method for prediction of the drying cost are presented.

  9. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  10. Biological and biophysics aspects of metformin-induced effects: cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and promotion of toxic amyloid pre-fibrillar aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Picone, Pasquale; Vilasi, Silvia; Librizzi, Fabio; Contardi, Marco; Nuzzo, Domenico; Caruana, Luca; Baldassano, Sara; Amato, Antonella; Mulè, Flavia; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Giacomazza, Daniela; Di Carlo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The onset of Alzheimer disease (AD) is influenced by several risk factors comprising diabetes. Within this context, antidiabetic drugs, including metformin, are investigated for their effect on AD. We report that in the C57B6/J mice, metformin is delivered to the brain where activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), its molecular target. This drug affects the levels of β-secretase (BACE1) and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), promoting processing and aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ), mainly in the cortex region. Moreover, metformin induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death by affecting the level and conformation of Translocase of the Outer Membrane 40 (TOM40), voltage-dependent anion-selective channels 1 (VDAC1) and hexokinase I (HKI), proteins involved in mitochondrial transport of molecules, including Aβ. By using biophysical techniques we found that metformin is able to directly interact with Aβ influencing its aggregation kinetics and features. These findings indicate that metformin induces different adverse effects, leading to an overall increase of the risk of AD onset. PMID:27509335

  11. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  12. Dry pressing technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dry pressing of technical ceramics is a fundamental method of producing high-quality ceramic components. The goals of dry pressing technical ceramics are uniform compact size and green density, consistent part-to-part green density and defect-free compact. Dry pressing is the axial compaction of loosely granulated dry ceramic powders (< 3% free moisture) within a die/punch arrangement. The powder, under pressure, conforms to the specific shape of the punch faces and die. Powder compaction occurs within a rigid-walled die and usually between a top and bottom punch. Press configurations include anvil, rotary, multiple-punch and multiple-action.

  13. McMurdo Dry Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the few areas of Antarctica not covered by thousands of meters of ice, the McMurdo Dry Valleys stand out in this satellite image. For a few weeks each summer temperatures are warm enough to melt glacial ice, creating streams that feed freshwater lakes that lie at the bottom of the valleys. Beneath a cap of ice these lakes remains unfrozen year-round, supporting colonies of bacteria and phytoplankton. Over the past 14 years, however, summers have been colder than usual, and the lakes are becoming more and more frozen. If the trend continues, the biological communities they support may go into hibernation. Most of Antarctica has cooled along with the Dry Valleys, in contrast to much of the rest of the Earth, which has warmed over the past 100 years. No one knows if the trend is related to global climate, or just a quirk in the weather. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument on December 18, 1999. For more information, visit: National Public Radio's Mixed Signals from Antarctica Declassified Satellite Imagery of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Image by Robert Simmon, based on data provided by the NASA GSFC Oceans and Ice Branch and the Landsat 7 Science Team

  14. Mechanisms of the self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides into fibrillar and globular structures: molecular dynamics simulations from nano- to micro-seconds.

    PubMed

    Emamyari, Soheila; Kargar, Faezeh; Sheikh-Hasani, Vahid; Emadi, Saeed; Fazli, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    The self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides in a bulk solution was studied using a combination of all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, specified concentrations of EAK16 peptides were induced to form fibrillary or globular assemblies in vitro. The results show that the combination of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the single- and double-chain levels and coarse-grained simulations on the many-chain level predicts the experimental observations reasonably well. At neutral pH conditions, EAK16-I and EAK16-II assemble into fibrillary structures, whereas EAK16-IV aggregates into globular assemblies. Mechanisms of the formation of fibrillar and globular assemblies are described using the simulation results.

  15. [Electron microscope examination of chromatin in hepatocyte nuclei within the first hourse after partial hepatectomy, II. The degree of chromatin condensation and the organization of fibrillar RNP components].

    PubMed

    Ershov, Iu V; Manteifel', V M; Batova, I N; Zelenin, A V

    1979-01-01

    The state of hepatocyte chromatin (the area occupied by the regions of condensed chromatin on ultrathin sections and the quantity of perichromatin RNP fibrils which was estimated by the area of the fibrillar zone and the concentration of fibrils within the same zone) were studied within the first hours after partial hepatectomy of guinea pigs. The area occupied by the regions of condensed chromatin on preparations with differentially revealed DNP and RNP components decreased by 12% in 2.5 hours since the operation had been performed, became normal in 5 hours, and again decreased by 30% in 9 hours. Decondensation of chromatin was accompanied with the increase of the number of perichromatin RNP fibrils, products of template activity of chromatin, and the rise of ethidium bromide binding. The binding of ethidium bromide by the chromatin of hepatocytes increased by 39% in 2.5 hours, returned to the control level in 5 hours and again increased by 22% in 9 hours.

  16. A two-year study with fibrillar beta-amyloid (Abeta) immunization in aged canines: effects on cognitive function and brain Abeta.

    PubMed

    Head, Elizabeth; Pop, Viorela; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Hill, MaryAnn; Saing, Tommy; Sarsoza, Floyd; Nistor, Michaela; Christie, Lori-Ann; Milton, Saskia; Glabe, Charles; Barrett, Edward; Cribbs, David

    2008-04-02

    Aged canines (dogs) accumulate human-type beta-amyloid (Abeta) in diffuse plaques in the brain with parallel declines in cognitive function. We hypothesized that reducing Abeta in a therapeutic treatment study of aged dogs with preexisting Abeta pathology and cognitive deficits would lead to cognitive improvements. To test this hypothesis, we immunized aged beagles (8.4-12.4 years) with fibrillar Abeta(1-42) formulated with aluminum salt (Alum) for 2.4 years (25 vaccinations). Cognitive testing during this time revealed no improvement in measures of learning, spatial attention, or spatial memory. After extended treatment (22 vaccinations), we observed maintenance of prefrontal-dependent reversal learning ability. In the brain, levels of soluble and insoluble Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) and the extent of diffuse plaque accumulation was significantly decreased in several cortical regions, with preferential reductions in the prefrontal cortex, which is associated with a maintenance of cognition. However, the amount of soluble oligomers remained unchanged. The extent of prefrontal Abeta was correlated with frontal function and serum anti-Abeta antibody titers. Thus, reducing total Abeta may be of limited therapeutic benefit to recovery of cognitive decline in a higher mammalian model of human brain aging and disease. Immunizing animals before extensive Abeta deposition and cognitive decline to prevent oligomeric or fibrillar Abeta formation may have a greater impact on cognition and also more directly evaluate the role of Abeta on cognition in canines. Alternatively, clearing preexisting Abeta from the brain in a treatment study may be more efficacious for cognition if combined with a second intervention that restores neuron health.

  17. Ordered fibrillar morphology of donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers at multiple scales via blending with flexible polymers and solvent vapor annealing: insight into photophysics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyang; Liu, Jiangang; Xu, Yaozhuo; Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Han, Yanchun

    2014-01-28

    The ordered, aligned fibrillar morphology at multiple scales of a donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated copolymer of 3,6-bis-(thiophen-2-yl)-N,N'-bis(2-octyl-1-dodecyl)-1,4-dioxo-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole and thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (PDBT-TT) was prepared via blending with flexible polymers (PS13.7k, PDBT-TT/PS = 1/10 w/w) followed by chloroform (CF) solvent vapor annealing (SVA) for 24 h. The aligned fibrillar bundles were of about 500 nm width, consisting of parallel aligned nanofibrils of ab. 10 nm width. It was found that the direction of backbones in nanofibrils was parallel to the long axis of nanofibrils, which implied an intense intra-chain conjugation associated with extended backbones and J-aggregation of PDBT-TT. This ordered morphology corresponded to the characteristic photophysical features of (i) red-shifted absorption arising from J-aggregation, (ii) larger Davydov splitting, (iii) the prevailing absorbance of J-aggregation over H-aggregation in its UV-Vis spectrum and (iv) more red-shifted max photoluminescence emission, compared with the films prepared via the other methods. By investigating the Raman spectra and XRD profiles, it is proposed that the origin of the best morphological and photophysical order is the combination of blending and SVA. The limited and "flexible" space formed due to phase separation between PDBT-TT and PS facilitated the motion of rigid PDBT-TT chains and promoted their stacking order as templates, and CF vapor assisted the conformational transition of chains to more "coil-like" to help them reorganize in a thermodynamic stable way.

  18. Tray Drying of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  19. Tray Drying of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  20. Indiana Corn Dry Mill

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this project is to perform engineering, project design, and permitting for the creation and commercial demonstration of a corn dry mill biorefinery that will produce fuel-grade ethanol, distillers dry grain for animal feed, and carbon dioxide for industrial use.

  1. Dry imaging cameras.

    PubMed

    Indrajit, Ik; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-04-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow.

  2. Infrared drying of strawberry.

    PubMed

    Adak, Nafiye; Heybeli, Nursel; Ertekin, Can

    2017-03-15

    The effects of different drying conditions, such as infrared power, drying air temperature and velocity, on quality of strawberry were evaluated. Drying time decreased with increased infrared power, air temperature and velocity. An increase in power from 100W to 300W, temperature from 60 to 80°C and velocity from 1.0m.s(-1) to 2.0m.s(-1) decreased fruit color quality index. For total phenol and anthocyanin content, 300W, 60°C, and 1.0m.s(-1) were superior to the other experimental conditions. The drying processes increased N, P and K and decreased Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu contents. The optimal conditions to preserve nutrients in infrared drying of strawberry were 200W, 100°C and 1.5m.s(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Packaged kiln dried firewood

    SciTech Connect

    Cutrara, A.

    1986-07-01

    A process is described for kiln drying firewood consisting of essentially uniform lengths of split firewood pieces, the process comprising splitting essentially uniform lengths of green tree logs to form firewood pieces, placing the firewood pieces in open mesh bags to provide a plurality of bags of firewood, placing the plurality of bags of green firewood pieces in a kiln drying oven, kiln drying the pieces at temperatures in excess of 150/sup 0/F. by moving heated air over the pieces until the pieces have an overall moisture content ranging from 15% up to 30% by weight, operating the kiln at a temperature below a level which would render the structural characteristics of the bag useless and removing the kiln dried firewood pieces in the plurality of bags from the kiln drying oven.

  4. Dry imaging cameras

    PubMed Central

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow. PMID:21799589

  5. Formation of dry gram-negative bacteria biocontrol products and small pilot tests against potato dry rot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 reduce important potato maladies in storage including dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. Experiments were conducted to identify methods for producing a dried, efficacious biological control product from one or more of these...

  6. Scaling Reversible Adhesion in Synthetic and Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Michael; Irschick, Duncan; Crosby, Alfred

    2013-03-01

    High capacity, easy release polymer adhesives, as demonstrated by a gecko's toe, present unique opportunities for synthetic design. However, without a framework that connects biological and synthetic adhesives from basic nanoscopic features to macroscopic systems, synthetic mimics have failed to perform favorably at large length scales. Starting from an energy balance, we develop a scaling approach to understand unstable interfacial fracture over multiple length scales. The simple theory reveals that reversibly adhesive polymers do not rely upon fibrillar features but require contradicting attributes: maximum compliance normal to the substrate and minimum compliance in the loading direction. We use this counterintuitive criterion to create reversible, easy release adhesives at macroscopic sizes (100 cm2) with unprecedented force capacities on the order of 3000 N. Importantly, we achieve this without fibrillar features, supporting our predictions and emphasizing the importance of subsurface anatomy in biological adhesive systems. Our theory describes adhesive force capacity as a function of material properties and geometry and is supported by over 1000 experiments, spanning both synthetic and biological adhesives, with agreement over 14 orders of magnitude in adhesive force.

  7. Freeze drying method

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  8. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  9. Dry Mouth - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hmoob) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Nepali (नेपाली) Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Ukrainian (українська ) ... नेपाली (Nepali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Russian (Русский) Expand Section Dry Mouth - English Dry Mouth - ...

  10. Dry kiln operator's manual

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson

    1991-01-01

    The modern dry kiln is a unique product of research, development, and experience. It is the only practical means now in wide use for rapid, high- volume drying of lumber to conditions necessary for maximum serviceability in housing, furniture, millwork, and many other wood products. As part of our charge to help further the efficient utilization of our nation’s timber...

  11. Acoustoconvection Drying of Meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of moisture extraction from meat samples by the acoustoconvection and thermoconvection methods has been investigated. To describe the dynamics of moisture extraction from meat, we propose a simple relaxation model with a relaxation time of 8-10 min in satisfactorily describing experimental data on acoustoconvection drying of meat. For thermoconvection drying the relaxation time is thereby 30 and 45 min for the longitudinal and transverse positions of fibers, respectively.

  12. Drying SDS-Polyacrylamide Gels.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Joseph; Russell, David W

    2006-09-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes a method for drying SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Gels containing proteins radiolabeled with (35)S-labeled amino acids must be dried before autoradiographic images can be obtained. Nonradioactive gels can also be preserved by drying.

  13. Atomic structures of fibrillar segments of hIAPP suggest tightly mated β-sheets are important for cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Krotee, Pascal; Rodriguez, Jose A; Sawaya, Michael R; Cascio, Duilio; Reyes, Francis E; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Nannenga, Brent L; Oskarsson, Marie E; Philipp, Stephan; Griner, Sarah; Jiang, Lin; Glabe, Charles G; Westermark, Gunilla T; Gonen, Tamir; Eisenberg, David S

    2017-01-01

    hIAPP fibrils are associated with Type-II Diabetes, but the link of hIAPP structure to islet cell death remains elusive. Here we observe that hIAPP fibrils are cytotoxic to cultured pancreatic β-cells, leading us to determine the structure and cytotoxicity of protein segments composing the amyloid spine of hIAPP. Using the cryoEM method MicroED, we discover that one segment, 19–29 S20G, forms pairs of β-sheets mated by a dry interface that share structural features with and are similarly cytotoxic to full-length hIAPP fibrils. In contrast, a second segment, 15–25 WT, forms non-toxic labile β-sheets. These segments possess different structures and cytotoxic effects, however, both can seed full-length hIAPP, and cause hIAPP to take on the cytotoxic and structural features of that segment. These results suggest that protein segment structures represent polymorphs of their parent protein and that segment 19–29 S20G may serve as a model for the toxic spine of hIAPP. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19273.001 PMID:28045370

  14. Biogeochemical stoichiometry of Antarctic Dry Valley ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, J. E.; Virginia, R. A.; Lyons, W. B.; McKnight, D. M.; Priscu, J. C.; Doran, P. T.; Fountain, A. G.; Wall, D. H.; Moorhead, D. L.

    2007-03-01

    Among aquatic and terrestrial landscapes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, ecosystem stoichiometry ranges from values near the Redfield ratios for C:N:P to nutrient concentrations in proportions far above or below ratios necessary to support balanced microbial growth. This polar desert provides an opportunity to evaluate stoichiometric approaches to understand nutrient cycling in an ecosystem where biological diversity and activity are low, and controls over the movement and mass balances of nutrients operate over 10-106 years. The simple organisms (microbial and metazoan) comprising dry valley foodwebs adhere to strict biochemical requirements in the composition of their biomass, and when activated by availability of liquid water, they influence the chemical composition of their environment according to these ratios. Nitrogen and phosphorus varied significantly in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems occurring on landscape surfaces across a wide range of exposure ages, indicating strong influences of landscape development and geochemistry on nutrient availability. Biota control the elemental ratio of stream waters, while geochemical stoichiometry (e.g., weathering, atmospheric deposition) evidently limits the distribution of soil invertebrates. We present a conceptual model describing transformations across dry valley landscapes facilitated by exchanges of liquid water and biotic processing of dissolved nutrients. We conclude that contemporary ecosystem stoichiometry of Antarctic Dry Valley soils, glaciers, streams, and lakes results from a combination of extant biological processes superimposed on a legacy of landscape processes and previous climates.

  15. Trigger Point Dry Needling.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Increasingly, physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to treat musculoskeletal pain, even though this treatment has been a controversial addition to practice. To better generalize to physical therapy practice the findings about dry needling thus far, the authors of a study published in the March 2017 issue of JOSPT identified the need for a systematic review examining the effectiveness of dry needling performed by physical therapists on people with musculoskeletal pain. Their review offers a meta-analysis of data from several included studies and assesses the evidence for risks of bias. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):150. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0502.

  16. Small polarons in dry DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacham, Helio; Alexandre, Simone S.; Soler, Jose M.; Artacho, Emilio

    2004-03-01

    The phenomenon of charge transport in DNA has been attracting attention of both biologists and physicists. From the biology side, there are evidences that charge injection can be associated to damage, mutation, and repair processes in DNA. From the physical sciences side, recent developments in nanotechnology now allow the measurement of currents through single DNA molecules in dried samples, which depict semiconductor behavior. Several mechanisms have been proposed for charge migration and transport in DNA. In that respect, detailed electrical transport measurements through DNA molecules containing identical base pairs (poly(dA)-poly(dT) and poly(dG)-poly(dC)) have been recently reported by Yoo et al [1]. These results fit extremely well a model in which the conduction is due to small polaron motion. In particular, these results indicate that the I-V characteristic of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA above 200 K is consistent with a small polaron hopping regime with an activation energy of 0.12 eV. In this work [2] we investigate the polaron formation in dry DNA by applying ab initio calculations to both neutral and charged fragments of dry poly(dG)-poly(dC). Our calculations show that the hole polaron in dry poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA is a clear case of small polaron. This is verified by four basic properties: (i) the small variation of the polaron binding energy as a function of the DNA fragment size, for small fragment sizes, which is an indication of polaron localization; (ii) the fact that the width of the uppermost valence band is an order of magnitude smaller than the polaron binding energy; (iii) the explicit localization of the hole wavefunction for the largest considered fragment (four base pairs), indicated by the fact that about half of the norm of the hole is localized on a single guanine site; (iv) the localization of structural deformations at the nucleotides where the hole is concentrated. Our calculations also give a polaron binding energy of 0.30 eV. This allows

  17. Bayesian Extraction of Deep UV Resonance Raman Signature of Fibrillar Cross-β Sheet Core based on H-D Exchange Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashilov, V. A.; Lednev, I. K.

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The application of conventional biophysical techniques including solution NMR and X-ray crystallography for structural characterization of fibrils is limited because they are neither crystalline nor soluble. The Bayesian approach was utilized for extracting the deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectrum of the lysozyme fibrillar β-sheet based on the hydrogen-deuterium exchange spectral data. The problem was shown to be unsolvable when using blind source separation or conventional chemometrics methods because of the 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of the species under study. Information about the mixing process was incorporated by forcing the columns of the concentration matrix to be proportional to the expected concentration profiles. The ill-conditioning of the matrix was removed by concatenating it to the diagonal matrix with entries corresponding to the known pure spectra (sources). Prior information about the spectral features and characteristic bands of the spectra was taken into account using the Bayesian signal dictionary approach. The extracted DUVRR spectrum of the cross-β sheet core exhibited sharp bands indicating the highly ordered structure. Well resolved sub-bands in Amide I and Amide III regions enabled us to assign the fibril core structure to anti-parallel β-sheet and estimate the amide group facial angle Ψ in the cross-β structure. The elaborated Bayesian approach was demonstrated to be applicable for studying correlated biochemical processes.

  18. The C-proteinase that processes procollagens to fibrillar collagens is identical to the protein previously identified as bone morphogenic protein-1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, S W; Sieron, A L; Fertala, A; Hojima, Y; Arnold, W V; Prockop, D J

    1996-01-01

    Bone morphogenic protein-1 (BMP-1) was originally identified as one of several BMPs that induced new bone formation when implanted into ectopic sites in rodents. BMP-1, however, differed from other BMPs in that it its structure was not similar to transforming growth factor beta. Instead, it had a large domain homologous to a metalloendopeptidase isolated from crayfish, an epidermal growth-factor-like domain, and three regions of internal sequence homology referred to as CUB domains. Therefore, BMP-1 was a member of the "astacin families" of zinc-requiring endopeptidases. Many astacins have been shown to play critical roles in embryonic hatching, dorsal/ventral patterning, and early developmental decisions. Here, we have obtained amino acid sequences and isolated cDNA clones for procollagen C-proteinase (EC 3.4.24.19), an enzyme that is essential for the processing of procollagens to fibrillar collagens. The results demonstrate that procollagen C-proteinase is identical to BMP-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8643539

  19. Surface contact and design of fibrillar ‘friction pads’ in stick insects (Carausius morosus): mechanisms for large friction coefficients and negligible adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Williams, John A.; Federle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Many stick insects and mantophasmids possess tarsal ‘heel pads’ (euplantulae) covered by arrays of conical, micrometre-sized hairs (acanthae). These pads are used mainly under compression; they respond to load with increasing shear resistance, and show negligible adhesion. Reflected-light microscopy in stick insects (Carausius morosus) revealed that the contact area of ‘heel pads’ changes with normal load on three hierarchical levels. First, loading brought larger areas of the convex pads into contact. Second, loading increased the density of acanthae in contact. Third, higher loads changed the shape of individual hair contacts gradually from circular (tip contact) to elongated (side contact). The resulting increase in real contact area can explain the load dependence of friction, indicating a constant shear stress between acanthae and substrate. As the euplantula contact area is negligible for small loads (similar to hard materials), but increases sharply with load (resembling soft materials), these pads show high friction coefficients despite little adhesion. This property appears essential for the pads’ use in locomotion. Several morphological characteristics of hairy friction pads are in apparent contrast to hairy pads used for adhesion, highlighting key adaptations for both pad types. Our results are relevant for the design of fibrillar structures with high friction coefficients but small adhesion. PMID:24554580

  20. Fibrillar Type I Collagen Enhances the Differentiation and Proliferation of Myofibroblasts by Lowering α2β1 Integrin Expression in Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Chu, Ming; Qian, Lijun; Wang, Junhong; Guo, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have shown that α2β1 integrin plays an important role in the development of cardiac fibrosis. However, the mechanism of how α2β1 integrin regulates the differentiation and proliferation of myofibroblasts in cardiac fibrosis through fibrillar collagen (FC) remains uncertain. We established that FC mimicked the 3-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) of fibroblasts from post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients in vivo. This allowed us to explore the differentiation and proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts on FC. Here, we report that low expression of α2β1 integrin increased protein kinase B (AKT) activation and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression. This occurred due to the instability of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in myofibroblasts on FC. We also demonstrated that FC reduced protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) activity of myofibroblasts, which was coincident with low α2β1 integrin expression and activation of AKT, but not mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK). In addition, knock-down of both β1 integrin and PP2A in fibroblasts promoted differentiation and proliferation via AKT activation and increased α-SMA expression. In summary, our study demonstrated that low α2β1 integrin expression regulated its downstream targets PTEN and AKT via crosstalk with PP2A, a critical cell signaling pathway that permits aberrant differentiation and proliferation of myofibroblasts on FC. PMID:28251149

  1. Mechanics of a fiber network within a non-fibrillar matrix: model and comparison with collagen-agarose co-gels

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Spencer P.; Hadi, Mohammad F.; Lai, Victor K.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    While collagen is recognized as the predominant mechanical component of soft connective tissues, the role of the non-fibrillar matrix (NFM) is less well understood. Even model systems, such as the collagen-agarose co-gel, can exhibit complex behavior, making it difficult to identify relative contributions of specific tissue constituents. In the present study, we developed a two-component microscale model of collagen-agarose tissue analogs and used it to elucidate the interaction between collagen and NFM in uniaxial tension. Collagen fibers were represented with Voronoi networks, and the NFM was modeled as a neo-Hookean solid. Model predictions of total normal stress and Poisson’s ratio matched experimental observations well (including high Poisson’s values of ~3), and the addition of NFM led to composition-dependent decreases in volume change and increases in fiber stretch. Because the NFM was more resistant to volume change than the fiber network, extension of the composite led to pressurization of the NFM. Within a specific range of parameter values (low shear modulus and moderate Poisson’s ratio), the magnitude of the reaction force decreased relative to this pressurization component resulting in a negative (compressive) NFM stress in the loading direction, even though the composite tissue was in tension. PMID:22565816

  2. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Pearson, Laurel N.; Parikh, Hardik I.; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Sheth, Nihar U.; York, Timothy P.; Romero, Roberto; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2017-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases) and healthy term deliveries (20 controls) to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225) of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest—fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans. PMID:28346524

  3. High-Throughput Image Analysis of Fibrillar Materials: A Case Study on Polymer Nanofiber Packing, Alignment, and Defects in Organic Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Persson, Nils E; Rafshoon, Joshua; Naghshpour, Kaylie; Fast, Tony; Chu, Ping-Hsun; McBride, Michael; Risteen, Bailey; Grover, Martha; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-10-06

    High-throughput discovery of process-structure-property relationships in materials through an informatics-enabled empirical approach is an increasingly utilized technique in materials research due to the rapidly expanding availability of data. Here, process-structure-property relationships are extracted for the nucleation, growth, and deposition of semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanofibers used in organic field effect transistors, via high-throughput image analysis. This study is performed using an automated image analysis pipeline combining existing open-source software and new algorithms, enabling the rapid evaluation of structural metrics for images of fibrillar materials, including local orientational order, fiber length density, and fiber length distributions. We observe that microfluidic processing leads to fibers that pack with unusually high density, while sonication yields fibers that pack sparsely with low alignment. This is attributed to differences in their crystallization mechanisms. P3HT nanofiber packing during thin film deposition exhibits behavior suggesting that fibers are confined to packing in two-dimensional layers. We find that fiber alignment, a feature correlated with charge carrier mobility, is driven by increasing fiber length, and that shorter fibers tend to segregate to the buried dielectric interface during deposition, creating potentially performance-limiting defects in alignment. Another barrier to perfect alignment is the curvature of P3HT fibers; we propose a mechanistic simulation of fiber growth that reconciles both this curvature and the log-normal distribution of fiber lengths inherent to the fiber populations under consideration.

  4. Magnetically responsive dry fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Bustamante, Rodney; Millán, Angel; Palacio, Fernando; Trindade, Tito; Silva, Nuno J. O.

    2013-07-01

    Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid.Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01784b

  5. Sterilization by dry heat

    PubMed Central

    Darmady, E. M.; Hughes, K. E. A.; Jones, J. D.; Prince, D.; Tuke, Winifred

    1961-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of three forms of dry heat sterilization are discussed. In addition a fourth method, consisting of heating by infrared rays in vacuo, is described. This method is particularly suitable for instruments used in the operating theatre, since it can replace an autoclave where a supply of steam is not available. Recommended times and temperatures for dry heat sterilization are detailed, and are related to the thermal death point of Cl. tetani. The dangers of recontamination during the cooling process are discussed. PMID:13719782

  6. Self-heating of dried wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Zerlottin, M; Refosco, D; Della Zassa, M; Biasin, A; Canu, P

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally studied the occurrence of spontaneous self-heating of sludge after drying, to understand its nature, course and remediation. The sludge originates from primary and biological treatment of both municipal and industrial wastewater, the latter largely dominant (approx. 90% total organic carbon, mainly from local tanneries). Dried sludge is collected into big-bags (approx. 1.5m(3)) and landfilled in a dedicated site. After several years of regular operation of the landfill, without any management or environmental issue, indications of local warming emerged, together with smoke and smelling emissions, and local subsidence. During a two year monitoring activity, temperatures locally as high as 80°C have been detected, 6-10 m deep. Experiments were carried out on large quantities of dried sludge (≈ 1t), monitoring the temperature of the samples over long periods of time (months), aiming to reproduce the spontaneous self-heating, under different conditions, to spot enhancing and damping factors. Results demonstrate that air is a key factor to trigger and modulate the self-heating. Water, in addition to air, supports and emphasizes the heating. Unusual drying operation was found to affect dramatically the self-heating activity, up to spontaneous combustion, while ordinary drying conditions yield a sludge with a moderate self-heating inclination. Temperature values as well as heating time scales suggest that the exothermic process nature is mainly chemical and physical, while microbiological activity might be a co-factor.

  7. Current Approach to Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Valim, Valéria; Trevisani, Virginia Fernandes Moça; de Sousa, Jacqueline Martins; Vilela, Verônica Silva; Belfort, Rubens

    2015-12-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disease of the tears and ocular surface that causes tear film instability with potential damage to the ocular surface. The prevalence of dry eye in the world population ranges from 6 to 34 %. It is more common in those aged over 50, and affects mainly women. Since the introduction of the Schirmer's test in 1903, other tests have been developed to evaluate dry eye, such as biomicroscopy, the tear film breakup time (BUT), vital dyes (lissamine green and rose bengal), fluorescein, leaf fern test, corneal sensitivity test, conjunctiva impression cytology, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and tear osmolarity measurement. Although there is no gold standard, it is advisable to combine at least two tests. Strategies for treating DED have recently been modified and include patient education, tear substitute, corticosteroids, secretagogues, fatty acids, immunomodulators, occlusion of lacrimal puncta surgery and, tarsorrhaphy. Biological therapy and new topical immunomodulators such as tacrolimus, tofacitinib and IL-1 receptor inhibitor are being tested. In this review, the evaluation tests for dry eye are compared and the main studies on treatment are presented, with emphasis on studies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome. The authors propose an approach for the management of dry eye.

  8. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2012-12-01

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer `smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  9. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2013-01-21

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer 'smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  10. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  11. Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-02

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys are a row of valleys west of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. They are so named because of their extremely low humidity and lack of snow and ice cover. This image was acquired December 8, 2002 by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  12. Dry piston coal feeder

    DOEpatents

    Hathaway, Thomas J.; Bell, Jr., Harold S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a solids feeder for feeding dry coal to a pressurized gasifier at elevated temperatures substantially without losing gas from the gasifier by providing a lock having a double-acting piston that feeds the coals into the gasifier, traps the gas from escaping, and expels the trapped gas back into the gasifier.

  13. Cooling of dried coal

    SciTech Connect

    Siddoway, M.A.

    1988-06-14

    This patent describes a process for noncombustibly drying particulate coal comprising: separating the coal into two wet coal streams; passing one wet coal system into a dryer to form a bed; heating air in a furnace; admitting the heated air to the dryer to fluidize the bed; withdrawing dryer exhaust gas; passing the exhaust gas through a cyclone and withdrawing coal fines from the cyclone; withdrawing a hot, dry coal stream from the dryer; blending the drier hot dry coal stream with the cyclone coal fines; withdrawing cyclone exhaust gas; wet scrubbing the cyclone exhaust gas to form a coal fines slurry and scrubber exhaust gas; passing the coal fines slurry to a sedimentation pool; blending the second wet coal stream with the drier hot dry coal stream and the cyclone coal fines; passing the latter blended stream to a cooler to form a bed; fluidizing the latter bed with ambient air; withdrawing cooler exhaust gas and passing the gas to a cyclone; passing exhaust gas from the latter cyclone to a baghouse and collecting coal fines therein; passing the latter coal fines to the furnace as fuel for heating the air; and withdrawing cooled coal from the cooler and blending the cooled coal with coal fines from the latter cyclone.

  14. Dried Fruits and Nuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current control of postharvest insect pests of dried fruits and tree nuts relies heavily on fumigants such as methyl bromide or phosphine. There is mounting pressure against the general use of chemical fumigants due to atmospheric emissions, safety or health concerns, and an increased interest in or...

  15. Infrared Drying Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    In recent years, much research has been done to explore direct printing methods, such as screen and inkjet printing, as alternatives to the traditional lithographic process. The primary motivation is reduction of the material costs associated with producing common electronic devices. Much of this research has focused on developing inkjet or screen paste formulations that can be printed on a variety of substrates, and which have similar conductivity performance to the materials currently used in the manufacturing of circuit boards and other electronic devices. Very little research has been done to develop a process that would use direct printing methods to manufacture electronic devices in high volumes. This study focuses on developing and optimizing a drying process for conductive copper ink in a high volume manufacturing setting. Using an infrared (IR) dryer, it was determined that conductive copper prints could be dried in seconds or minutes as opposed to tens of minutes or hours that it would take with other drying devices, such as a vacuum oven. In addition, this study also identifies significant parameters that can affect the conductivity of IR dried prints. Using designed experiments and statistical analysis; the dryer parameters were optimized to produce the best conductivity performance for a specific ink formulation and substrate combination. It was determined that for an ethylene glycol, butanol, 1-methoxy 2- propanol ink formulation printed on Kapton, the optimal drying parameters consisted of a dryer height of 4 inches, a temperature setting between 190 - 200°C, and a dry time of 50-65 seconds depending on the printed film thickness as determined by the number of print passes. It is important to note that these parameters are optimized specifically for the ink formulation and substrate used in this study. There is still much research that needs to be done into optimizing the IR dryer for different ink substrate combinations, as well as developing a

  16. Quality of dry ginger (Zingiber officinale) by different drying methods.

    PubMed

    E, Jayashree; R, Visvanathan; T, John Zachariah

    2014-11-01

    Ginger rhizomes sliced to various lengths of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 mm and whole rhizomes were dried from an initial moisture content of 81.3 % to final moisture content of less than 10 % by various drying methods like sun drying, solar tunnel drying and cabinet tray drying at temperatures of 50, 55, 60 and 65 °C. Slicing of ginger rhizomes significantly reduced the drying time of ginger in all the drying methods. It was observed that drying of whole ginger rhizomes under sun took the maximum time (9 days) followed by solar tunnel drying (8 days). Significant reduction in essential oil and oleoresin content of dry ginger was found as the slice length decreased. The important constituents of ginger essential oil like zingiberene, limonene, linalool, geraniol and nerolidol as determined using a gas chromatography was also found to decrease during slicing and as the drying temperature increased. The pungency constituents in the oleoresin of ginger like total gingerols and total shogoals as determined using a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography also showed a decreasing trend on slicing and with the increase in drying temperature. It was observed from the drying studies that whole ginger rhizomes dried under sun drying or in a solar tunnel drier retained the maximum essential oil (13.9 mg/g) and oleoresin content (45.2 mg/g) of dry ginger. In mechanical drying, the drying temperature of 60 °C was considered optimum however there was about 12.2 % loss in essential oil at this temperature.

  17. Dry etching of metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, D.

    1983-01-01

    The production dry etch processes are reviewed from the perspective of microelectronic fabrication applications. The major dry etch processes used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices can be divided into two categories - plasma processes in which samples are directly exposed to an electrical discharge, and ion beam processes in which samples are etched by a beam of ions extracted from a discharge. The plasma etch processes can be distinguished by the degree to which ion bombardment contributes to the etch process. This, in turn is related to capability for anisotropic etching. Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) and Ion Beam Etching are of most interest for etching of thin film metals. RIE is generally considered the best process for large volume, anisotropic aluminum etching.

  18. The questionably dry eye.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, I. A.; Seal, D. V.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the recognition of the dry eye when the clinical diagnosis is in doubt and other external eye diseases may be present. Papillary conjunctivitis is common to the dry eye as well as other pathological conditions and confuses the diagnosis. We have correlated the factors involved in the assessment for dryness. We have shown that particulate matter in the unstained tear film is associated with low tear lysozyme concentration. Tear flow and tear lysozyme are not necessarily interrelated, but a low lysozyme concentration (tear lysozyme ratio < 1.0) is associated with keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The Schirmer I test can produce false positive results, and we have suggested a modification to overcome this. This modified test will detect the eye with severely depleted lysozyme secretion, but it is unreliable for detecting the eye with moderately depleted secretion. We find that its lowest normal limit should be considered as 6 mm. Images PMID:7448154

  19. Drying of DNA droplets.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Petersen, Eric; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir A; Chen, Yong; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-07-04

    The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA was studied, as a function of DNA concentration. Drops containing very low DNA concentrations dried by maintaining a constant base, whereas those with high concentration dried with a constant contact angle. To understand this phenomenon, the distribution of the DNA inside the droplet was measured using confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the DNA was condensed mostly on the surface of the droplets. In the case of high concentration droplets, it formed a shell, whereas isolated islands were found for droplets of low DNA concentrations. Rheologic results indicate the formation of a hydro gel in the low concentration drops, whereas phase separation between the self-assembled DNA structures and the water phase occurred at higher concentration.

  20. Virtual DRI dataset development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Jonathan G.; Teaney, Brian P.; May, Christopher; Maurer, Tana; Nelson, Michael B.; Pham, Justin R.

    2017-05-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD MSD's target acquisition models have been used for many years by the military analysis community for sensor design, trade studies, and field performance prediction. This paper analyzes the results of perception tests performed to compare the results of a field DRI (Detection, Recognition, and Identification Test) performed in 2009 to current Soldier performance viewing the same imagery in a laboratory environment and simulated imagery of the same data set. The purpose of the experiment is to build a robust data set for use in the virtual prototyping of infrared sensors. This data set will provide a strong foundation relating, model predictions, field DRI results and simulated imagery.

  1. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND) is Not Associated with Increased Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits Using 11C-PiB in Middle-Aged HIV+ Participants

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.; Christensen, Jon J.; Thomas, Jewell; Venkat, Rohit; Teshome, Mengesha; Aldea, Patricia; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Clifford, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Diagnostic challenges exist for differentiating HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) from symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in HIV+ participants. Both disorders have cerebral amyloid containing plaques associated with abnormalities in amyloid beta protein 1–42 (Aβ42) metabolism. We evaluated if the amyloid-binding agent 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB) could discriminate AD from HAND in middle-aged HIV+ participants. Design 11C-PiB scanning, clinical assessment, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis were performed. χ2 and t-tests assessed differences in clinical and demographic variables between HIV+ participants and community-living individuals followed by Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) assessed for regional differences in Aβ42 using 11C-PiB. Setting ADRC and HIV clinic Participants 16 HIV+ participants (11 cognitively normal, 5 with HAND) and 19 ADRC participants (8 cognitively normal, 11 with symptomatic AD). Main Outcome Measure(s) Mean and regional 11C-PiB binding potentials Results Symptomatic AD were older (p < 0.001), had lower CSF Aβ42 (p < 0.001), and had higher CSF tau levels (p < 0.001) than other groups. Regardless of degree of impairment, HIV+ participants did not have increased 11C-PiB. Mean and regional binding potentials were elevated for symptomatic AD participants (p <0.0001). Conclusions Middle-aged HIV+ participants, even with HAND, do not exhibit increased 11C-PiB while symptomatic AD individuals have increased fibrillar Aβ42 deposition in cortical and subcortical regions. Observed dissimilarities between HAND and AD may reflect differences in Aβ42 metabolism. 11C-PiB may provide a diagnostic biomarker for distinguishing symptomatic AD from HAND in middle-aged HIV+ participants. Future cross sectional and longitudinal studies are required to assess utility of 11C-PiB in older HAND individuals. PMID:22232345

  2. Early accumulation of intracellular fibrillar oligomers and late congophilic amyloid angiopathy in mice expressing the Osaka intra-Aβ APP mutation.

    PubMed

    Kulic, L; McAfoose, J; Welt, T; Tackenberg, C; Späni, C; Wirth, F; Finder, V; Konietzko, U; Giese, M; Eckert, A; Noriaki, K; Shimizu, T; Murakami, K; Irie, K; Rasool, S; Glabe, C; Hock, C; Nitsch, R M

    2012-11-13

    Pathogenic amyloid-β peptide precursor (APP) mutations clustered around position 693 of APP-position 22 of the Aβ sequence--are commonly associated with congophilic amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hemorrhages. In contrast, the Osaka (E693Δ) intra-Aβ APP mutation shows a recessive pattern of inheritance that leads to AD-like dementia despite low brain amyloid on in vivo positron emission tomography imaging. Here, we investigated the effects of the Osaka APP mutation on Aβ accumulation and deposition in vivo using a newly generated APP transgenic mouse model (E22ΔAβ) expressing the Osaka mutation together with the Swedish (K670N/M671L) double mutation. E22ΔAβ mice exhibited reduced α-processing of APP and early accumulation of intraneuronal fibrillar Aβ oligomers associated with cognitive deficits. In line with our in vitro findings that recombinant E22Δ-mutated Aβ peptides form amyloid fibrils, aged E22ΔAβ mice showed extracellular CAA deposits in leptomeningeal cerebellar and cortical vessels. In vitro results from thioflavin T aggregation assays with recombinant Aβ peptides revealed a yet unknown antiamyloidogenic property of the E693Δ mutation in the heterozygous state and an inhibitory effect of E22Δ Aβ42 on E22Δ Aβ40 fibrillogenesis. Moreover, E22Δ Aβ42 showed a unique aggregation kinetics lacking exponential fibril growth and poor seeding effects on wild-type Aβ aggregation. These results provide a possible explanation for the recessive trait of inheritance of the Osaka APP mutation and the apparent lack of amyloid deposition in E693Δ mutation carriers.

  3. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-07-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  4. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-05-09

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  5. Superlubricity of dry nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, Enrico; Maier, Sabine; Meyer, Ernst

    2008-09-01

    We discuss how various forms of dry superlubricity, recently observed on the nanoscale, have been interpreted by simple phenomenological models. In particular, we review the cases of static and dynamic single-contact lubricity, thermolubricity, and structural lubricity. All these phenomena have been studied by friction force microscopy and explained using the classical Prandtl-Tomlinson model and its extensions, including thermal activation, temporal and spatial variations of the surface energy corrugation, and multiple-contact effects.

  6. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  7. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  8. Stabilization of Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines by Freeze Drying, Spray Drying, and Foam Drying.

    PubMed

    Lovalenti, Phillip M; Anderl, Jeff; Yee, Luisa; Nguyen, Van; Ghavami, Behnaz; Ohtake, Satoshi; Saxena, Atul; Voss, Thomas; Truong-Le, Vu

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this research is to develop stable formulations for live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) by employing the drying methods freeze drying, spray drying, and foam drying. Formulated live attenuated Type-A H1N1 and B-strain influenza vaccines with a variety of excipient combinations were dried using one of the three drying methods. Process and storage stability at 4, 25 and 37°C of the LAIV in these formulations was monitored using a TCID50 potency assay. Their immunogenicity was also evaluated in a ferret model. The thermal stability of H1N1 vaccine was significantly enhanced through application of unique formulation combinations and drying processes. Foam dried formulations were as much as an order of magnitude more stable than either spray dried or freeze dried formulations, while exhibiting low process loss and full retention of immunogenicity. Based on long-term stability data, foam dried formulations exhibited a shelf life at 4, 25 and 37°C of >2, 1.5 years and 4.5 months, respectively. Foam dried LAIV Type-B manufactured using the same formulation and process parameters as H1N1 were imparted with a similar level of stability. Foam drying processing methods with appropriate selection of formulation components can produce an order of magnitude improvement in LAIV stability over other drying methods.

  9. Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 and 5. Floor plans (Navy Yard Public Works Office 1941). In files of Cushman & Wakefield, building 501. Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Service Building, Dry Docks No. 4 & 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Dry Cleaning Sector (NAICS 8123)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The dry cleaning sector includes establishments engaged in providing laundry services and industrial launderers. Find environmental regulatory information for perchloroethylene (PERC) cleaners as well as hazardous waste regulations for dry cleaners.

  11. Simple Solutions for Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more concentrated in the tear film of dry eye patients. In hot weather, sleep with the windows shut and keep cool with air conditioning. • Dry eye patients often develop or aggravate allergies. An ...

  12. [Ocular surface investigations in dry eye].

    PubMed

    Labbé, A; Brignole-Baudouin, F; Baudouin, C

    2007-01-01

    Dry eye is a complex clinicopathological entity involving tear film, lacrimal glands, eyelids, and a wide spectrum of ocular surface cells, including epithelial, inflammatory, immune, and goblet cells. From the tightly regulated lacrimal film functions and structure, a large variety of investigations have been developed, including tear meniscus measurements, fluorophotometry, meibometry, interference pattern analysis, evaporation rate, tear osmolarity, and thermography. Dry eye conditions also interfere with the ocular surface, causing corneal irregularities that may be explored using the techniques of videokeratography and in vivo confocal microscopy, or optical impairment, as confirmed by aberrometry. At the level of ocular surface cells, impression cytology remains a standard for assessing cell alterations. It has greatly benefited from new confocal microscopy, molecular biology, and flow cytometry techniques. Biological assessment of tear proteins or other mediators is also useful. Major limits should be acknowledged, however, such as technical issues in tear film collection, especially in dry eyes, and the lack of standardization of most measurements. Tear osmolarity, electrophoresis, and dosage of normal tear proteins, such as lysozyme or lactoferrin, remain the most useful tests. Finally, some extraocular explorations such as accessory gland biopsy or serum antinuclear antibody dosage may be useful for assessing the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome.

  13. Drying hardwoods with impinging jets.

    Treesearch

    Howard N. Rosen

    1980-01-01

    Silver maple, yellow poplar, and black walnut lumber was dried in a prototype jet dryer over a range of temperatures from 120 degrees to 400 degrees Fahrenheit and air velocities from 1,000 to 9,000 fpm. Different drying schedules were developed for each type of wood. The quality of the jet-dried lumber was good and compared favorably with kiln-dried lumber.

  14. Characterization of freeze-dried gallic acid/xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Hirun, Namon; Sangfai, Tanatchaporn; Tantishaiyakul, Vimon

    2015-02-01

    Tamarind seed xyloglucan (TSX) is generally used for drug delivery systems. Gallic acid (GA) possesses various pharmacological activities. It has a good solubility and bioavailability but short half-life. To prepare a sustained-release of GA to overcome its relatively short half-life. GA was blended with TSX and freeze-dried. The physicochemical properties of freeze-dried GA and freeze-dried GA/TSX were characterized, and the release profiles of GA from these freeze-dried samples were investigated. All freeze-dried samples were characterized by PXRD, spectroscopic and thermal analyses. The dissolution studies were performed according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) XXX. According to FTIR, FT-Raman and (13)C CP/MAS NMR, the spectra of freeze-dried GA were similar to that of the anhydrous form. Nevertheless, DRIFTS and DSC were able to differentiate these two forms. The crystallinity of GA in the freeze-dried GA/TSX was the same as that of the freeze-dried GA. DSC indicates that there were interactions between GA and TSX. It was of interest that a freeze-dried sample with low amount of GA, 0.2% GA/1% TSX was mostly in an amorphous form. Moreover, all freeze-dried GA/TSX preparations demonstrated a sustained-release of GA compared to GA alone. The freeze-dried 1% GA/1% TSX provided the best sustained-release of GA of up to 240 min. TSX could change a crystal form of a small molecule to a mostly amorphous form. It was of importance that the freeze-dried GA/TSX could effectively retard the release of GA. These samples may be able to overcome the limitation for the therapeutic use of GA due to its short biological half-life.

  15. Microwave drying of wood strands

    Treesearch

    Guanben Du; Siqun Wang; Zhiyong Cai

    2005-01-01

    Characteristics of microwave drying of wood strands with different initial moisture contents and geometries were investigated using a commercial small microwave oven under different power inputs. Temperature and moisture changes along with the drying efficiency were examined at different drying scenarios. Extractives were analyzed using gas chromatography=mass...

  16. Endoscope drying and its pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, J

    2017-07-17

    Inadequate drying of endoscope channels is a possible cause of replication and survival of remaining pathogens during storage. The presence during storage of potentially contaminated water in endoscope channels may promote bacterial proliferation and biofilm formation. An incomplete drying procedure or lack of drying and not storing in a vertical position are the most usual problems identified during drying and endoscope storage. Inadequate drying and storage procedures, together with inadequate cleaning and disinfection, are the most important sources of endoscope contamination and post-endoscopic infection. Flexible endoscopes may be dried in automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs), manually, or in drying/storage cabinets. Flushing of the endoscope channels with 70-90% ethyl or isopropyl alcohol followed by forced air drying is recommended by several guidelines. Current guidelines recommend that flexible endoscopes are stored in a vertical position in a closed, ventilated cupboard. Drying and storage cabinets have a drying system that circulates and forces the dry filtered air through the endoscope channels. Endoscope reprocessing guidelines are inconsistent with one another or give no exact recommendations about drying and storage of flexible endoscopes. There is no conclusive evidence on the length of time endoscopes can be safely stored before requiring re-disinfection and before they pose a contamination risk. To minimize the risk of disease transmission and nosocomial infection, modification and revision of guidelines are recommended as required to be consistent with one another. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Desiccant drying of gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    LaCasse, G.A.; Ingvordsen, T.

    1988-09-01

    Prevention of hydrates buildup and corrosion in gas pipelines after hydrostatic testing is increasingly important to those in the gas industry. This paper outlines a dry air method used in Denmark for drying gas pipelines. The psychrometric principles, drying method, and humidity measurements are described.

  18. Major review: Exfoliation syndrome; advances in disease genetics, molecular biology, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Aboobakar, Inas F; Johnson, William M; Stamer, W Daniel; Hauser, Michael A; Allingham, R Rand

    2017-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is a common age-related disorder that leads to deposition of extracellular fibrillar material throughout the body. The most recognized disease manifestation is exfoliation glaucoma (XFG), which is a common cause of blindness worldwide. Recent developments in XFS genetics, cell biology and epidemiology have greatly improved our understanding of the etiology of this complex inherited disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of XFS pathogenesis, identifies gaps in knowledge, and discusses areas for future research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Laser polarization fluorescence of the networks of optically anisotropic biological crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Y. A.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Angelsky, A. P.; Sidor, M. I.; Bodnar, G. B.; Koval, G.; Zabolotna, N. I.; Smolarz, A.; Junisbekov, M. Sh.

    2013-01-01

    The present work is devoted to investigation of mechanisms of optical anisotropy of biological tissues polycrystalline networks and laser polarization fluorescence. The model of complex optical anisotropy, which takes into account both linear and circular birefringence, as well as linear and circular dichroism of fibrillar networks of histological sections of women reproductive sphere is proposed. The data of statistical, correlation and fractal processing of coordinate distributions of laser polarization fluorescence is provided. The technique of azimuthally invariant Mueller-matrix mapping of laser polarization fluorescence of protein networks in the tasks of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of uterus wall is elaborated.

  20. Terrestrial Planets Accreted Dry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2007-12-01

    Plate tectonics shaped the Earth, whereas the Moon is a dry and inactive desert. Mars probably came to rest within the first billion years of its history, and Venus, although internally very active, has a dry inferno for its surface. The strong gravity field of a large planet allows for an enormous amount of gravitational energy to be released, causing the outer part of the planetary body to melt (magma ocean), helps retain water on the planet, and increases the pressure gradient. The weak gravity field and anhydrous conditions prevailing on the Moon stabilized, on top of its magma ocean, a thick buoyant plagioclase lithosphere, which insulated the molten interior. On Earth, the buoyant hydrous phases (serpentines) produced by reactions between the terrestrial magma ocean and the wet impactors received from the outer Solar System isolated the magma and kept it molten for some few tens of million years. The elemental distributions and the range of condensation temperatures show that the planets from the inner Solar System accreted dry. The interior of planets that lost up to 95% of their K cannot contain much water. Foundering of their wet surface material softened the terrestrial mantle and set the scene for the onset of plate tectonics. This very same process may have removed all the water from the surface of Venus 500 My ago and added enough water to its mantle to make its internal dynamics very strong and keep the surface very young. Because of a radius smaller than that of the Earth, not enough water could be drawn into the Martian mantle before it was lost to space and Martian plate tectonics never began. The radius of a planet therefore is the key parameter controlling most of its evolutional features.

  1. Electrohydrodynamic drying of carrot slices.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic Drying of Carrot Slices

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique. PMID:25874695

  3. Drying of Complex Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Bergès, Alexis; Lu, Peter J.; Studart, André R.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Oki, Hidekazu; Davies, Simon; Weitz, David A.

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the 3D structure and drying dynamics of complex mixtures of emulsion droplets and colloidal particles, using confocal microscopy. Air invades and rapidly collapses large emulsion droplets, forcing their contents into the surrounding porous particle pack at a rate proportional to the square of the droplet radius. By contrast, small droplets do not collapse, but remain intact and are merely deformed. A simple model coupling the Laplace pressure to Darcy’s law correctly estimates both the threshold radius separating these two behaviors, and the rate of large-droplet evacuation. Finally, we use these systems to make novel hierarchical structures.

  4. Dry removal of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Elias, J D

    1981-08-01

    A method for the dry removal of friable asbestos has been developed. The Workplace Safety and Health Branch in Manitoba's Limited have co-operated in the production of an improved procedure. It was employed for the first time in the fall of 1979 when the Industrial Hygiene Section was asked for advice about removal of asbestos from a Winnipeg School Division warehouse. Fans were used to maintain the work area under negative pressure to prevent the spread of asbestos throughout the building. The exhaust air was filtered to prevent environmental contamination, and special precautions were taken to protect workers.

  5. Method of drying articles

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    1999-01-01

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

  6. Method of drying articles

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

    1999-03-23

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

  7. Drying and decontamination of raw pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying.

    PubMed

    Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Brandl, Maria T; Wang, Bini; McHugh, Tara H; Zhang, Ruihong; Pan, Zhongli

    2017-04-04

    Pistachio nuts have been associated with outbreaks of foodborne disease and the industry has been impacted by numerous product recalls due to contamination with Salmonella enterica. The current hot air drying of pistachios has low energy efficiency and drying rates, and also does not guarantee the microbial safety of products. In the study described herein, dehulled and water-sorted pistachios with a moisture content (MC) of 38.14% (wet basis) were dried in a sequential infrared and hot air (SIRHA) drier to <9% MC. The decontamination efficacy was assessed by inoculating pistachios with Enterococcus faecium, a surrogate of Salmonella enterica used for quality control in the almond industry. Drying with IR alone saved 105min (34.4%) of drying time compared with hot air drying. SIRHA drying of pistachios for 2h with infrared (IR) heat followed by tempering at a product temperature of 70°C for 2h and then by hot air drying shortened the drying time by 40min (9.1%) compared with drying by hot air only. This SIRHA method also reduced the E. faecium cell population by 6.1-logCFU/g kernel and 5.41-logCFU/g shell of pistachios. The free fatty acid contents of SIRHA dried pistachios were on par with that of hot air dried samples. Despite significant differences in peroxide values (PV) of pistachio kernels dried with the SIRHA method compared with hot air drying at 70°C, the PV were within the permissible limit of 5Meq/kg for edible oils. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of SIRHA drying in achieving simultaneous drying and decontamination of pistachios. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Advances in drying: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Topics covered in this volume include recent thoughts in modeling of drying phenomena, use of computers in rational design of drying particulates, recent advances in drying of wood, and heat/mass transfer phenomena in drying of solids. As the readers will no doubt notice, special effort is made to ensure the truly international nature of the contents of this serial publication. As existing knowledge on drying and dryers becomes more widely and readily accessible, it is expected that more and more dryers will be designed rationally rather than built solely with the benefit of empiricism.

  9. Drying and decontamination of pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pistachio industry is in need of improved drying technology as the current hot air drying has low energy efficiency and drying rate and high labor cost and also does not produce safe products against microbial contamination. In the current study, dehulled and water- sorted pistachios with a mois...

  10. [Towards a structuring fibrillar ontology].

    PubMed

    Guimberteau, J-C

    2012-10-01

    Over previous decades and centuries, the difficulty encountered in the manner in which the tissue of our bodies is organised, and structured, is clearly explained by the impossibility of exploring it in detail. Since the creation of the microscope, the perception of the basic unity, which is the cell, has been essential in understanding the functioning of reproduction and of transmission, but has not been able to explain the notion of form; since the cells are not everywhere and are not distributed in an apparently balanced manner. The problems that remain are those of form and volume and also of connection. The concept of multifibrillar architecture, shaping the interfibrillar microvolumes in space, represents a solution to all these questions. The architectural structures revealed, made up of fibres, fibrils and microfibrils, from the mesoscopic to the microscopic level, provide the concept of a living form with structural rationalism that permits the association of psychochemical molecular biodynamics and quantum physics: the form can thus be described and interpreted, and a true structural ontology is elaborated from a basic functional unity, which is the microvacuole, the intra and interfibrillar volume of the fractal organisation, and the chaotic distribution. Naturally, new, less linear, less conclusive, and less specific concepts will be implied by this ontology, leading one to believe that the emergence of life takes place under submission to forces that the original form will have imposed and oriented the adaptive finality. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Yatish T.; Gardner, Todd H.

    2014-09-25

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  12. Deep layer malt drying modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Virseda, P.; Martinez, G.; Llorca, M.

    1997-05-01

    In malt production drying operation plays an important role in the total processing cost, however there are not many studies on malt drying modeling and optimization. In this paper a deep layer malt drying mathematical model in the form of four partial differential equations is presented. To determine drying constants, malt thin layer drying experiments at several air temperatures and relative humidities were made. The model were validated at industrial scale. The greatest energy savings, approximately 5.5% in fuel and 7.5% in electric energy, were obtained by an additional (and increased) air recirculation, which is carried out during the last 6 hours of the drying process and a significant decrease of air flow-rate during the last 6 hours of the drying process.

  13. Dry EEG Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Gordo, M. A.; Sanchez-Morillo, D.; Valle, F. Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications. PMID:25046013

  14. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  15. All biology is computational biology.

    PubMed

    Markowetz, Florian

    2017-03-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science.

  16. All biology is computational biology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Here, I argue that computational thinking and techniques are so central to the quest of understanding life that today all biology is computational biology. Computational biology brings order into our understanding of life, it makes biological concepts rigorous and testable, and it provides a reference map that holds together individual insights. The next modern synthesis in biology will be driven by mathematical, statistical, and computational methods being absorbed into mainstream biological training, turning biology into a quantitative science. PMID:28278152

  17. Steam drying -- Modeling and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmerstedt, R.; Hager, J.

    1996-08-01

    The concept of steam drying originates from the mid of the last century. However, a broad industrial acceptance of the technique has so far not taken place. The paper deals with modelling the steam drying process and applications of steam drying within certain industrial sectors where the technique has been deemed to have special opportunities. In the modelling section the mass and heat transfer processes are described along with equilibrium, capillarity and sorption phenomena occurring in porous materials during the steam drying process. In addition existing models in the literature are presented. The applications discussed involve drying of fuels with high moisture contents, cattle feed exemplified by sugar beet pulp, lumber, paper pulp, paper and sludges. Steam drying is compared to flue gas drying of biofuels prior to combustion in a boiler. With reference to a current installation in Sweden, the exergy losses, as manifested by loss of co-generation capacity, are discussed. The energy saving potential when using steam drying of sugar beet pulp as compared to other possible plant configurations is demonstrated. Mechanical vapor recompression applied to steam drying is analyzed with reference to reported data from industrial plants. Finally, environmental advantages when using steam drying are presented.

  18. Dry aging of beef; Review.

    PubMed

    Dashdorj, Dashmaa; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Cho, Soohyun; Kim, Younghoon; Hwang, Inho

    2016-01-01

    The present review has mainly focused on the specific parameters including aging (aging days, temperature, relative humidity, and air flow), eating quality (flavor, tenderness and juiciness), microbiological quality and economic (shrinkage, retail yields and cost) involved beef dry aging process. Dry aging is the process where beef carcasses or primal cuts are hanged and aged for 28 to 55 d under controlling environment conditions in a refrigerated room with 0° to 4 °C and with relative humidity of 75 to 80 %. However there are various opinions on dry aging procedures and purveyors of such products are passionate about their programs. Recently, there has been an increased interest in dry aging process by a wider array of purveyors and retailers in the many countries. Dry aging process is very costly because of high aging shrinkage (6 to15 %), trims loss (3 to 24 %), risk of contamination and the requirement of highest grades meat with. The packaging in highly moisture-permeable bag may positively impact on safety, quality and shelf stability of dry aged beef. The key effect of dry aging is the concentration of the flavor that can only be described as "dry-aged beef". But the contribution of flavor compounds of proteolysis and lipolysis to the cooked dry aged beef flavor is not fully known. Also there are limited scientific studies of aging parameters on the quality and palatability of dry aged beef.

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies on low-temperature adsorption drying of fresh ginger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Xu, Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhao, Yi

    2006-03-01

    The working principle of low-temperature adsorption drying and the advantages of its application for biological materials drying were introduced in this paper. By using fresh ginger as the drying material, the effects of temperature and relative humidity on its drying characteristics were examined. The results show that the drying rate increases with the temperature increasing or the humidity decreasing. The drying time to the equilibrium is almost the same under different humidity conditions, but low equilibrium moisture content can be acquired under low humidity. The shrinkage characteristics of fresh ginger were also studied. The change of its surface appearance during the drying process was characterized by the new Charged Coupled Device (CCD) and the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) technique. A mathematical model of drying dynamics was set up according to the experiments.

  20. Dry ice blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  1. Evaluation of the dry mouth patient.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the questions "who is the dry mouth patient and how is the dry mouth patient evaluated"? It reviews the clinical features of dry mouth. It presents current treatment options for dry mouth care.

  2. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  3. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  4. Characterization of In-Drum Drying Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kroselj, V.; Jankovic, M.; Skanata, D.; Medakovic, S.; Harapin, D.; Hertl, B.

    2006-07-01

    A few years ago Krsko NPP decided to introduce In-Drum Drying technology for treatment and conditioning of evaporator concentrates and spent ion resins. The main reason to employ this technology was the need for waste volume reduction and experience with vermiculite-cement solidification that proved inadequate for Krsko NPP. Use of In-Drum Drying technology was encouraged by good experience in the field at some German and Spanish NPP's. In the paper, solidification techniques in vermiculite-cement matrix and In-Drum Drying System are described briefly. The resulting waste forms (so called solidification and dryer products) and containers that are used for interim storage of these wastes are described as well. A comparison of the drying versus solidification technology is performed and advantages as well as disadvantages are underlined. Experience gained during seven years of system operation has shown that crying technology resulted in volume reduction by factor of 20 for evaporator concentrates, and by factor of 5 for spent ion resin. Special consideration is paid to the characterization of dryer products. For evaporator concentrates the resulting waste form is a solid salt block with up to 5% bound water. It is packaged in stainless steel drums (net volume of 200 l) with bolted lids and lifting rings. The fluidized spent ion resins (primary and blow-down) are sluiced into the spent resin drying tank. The resin is dewatered and dried by electrical jacket heaters. The resulting waste (i.e. fine granulates) is directly discharged into a shielded stainless steel drum with bolted lid and lifting rings. Characterization of both waste forms has been performed in accordance with recommendations given in Characterization of Radioactive Waste Forms and Packages issued by International Atomic Energy Agency, 1997. This means that radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, biological and thermal properties of the waste form has been taken into consideration. In the paper

  5. Improvements In solar dry kiln design

    Treesearch

    E. M. Wengert

    1971-01-01

    Interest in solar drying of lumber has increased in recent years because previous results had indicated that: Drying times are shorter and final moisture contents are lower in solar drying than in air drying; much less lumber degrade occurs in solar drying when compared to air drying; and the cost of energy is less in solar drying than in kiln drying. Work in the field...

  6. Electron transfer in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. J. P.

    Electron transfer is one of the key reactions of biology not just in catalysis of oxidation/reduction reactions but in the conversion of sources of energy such as light to usable form for chemical transformations. There are then two intriguing problems. What is the nature of the matrix in which electrons flow in a biological cell after the initial charge separation due for example to the absorption of light. Here we are examining biological structures similar to man's electronic wires and the construction must be of low resistance in what are apparently insulators - organic polymers. It has been found that the electronic conduction system is largely made from metallo-proteins associated with lipid membranes. We understand much about these biological wires today. The second problem concerns the conversion of the energy captured from the light into usable chemical form. The major synthetic step in the production of biological polymers, including proteins, DNA, RNA, polysaccharides and fats, is condensation, i.e. the removal of water in the formation of amides, esters and so on. Now these condensation reactions are driven in biology by using a drying agent in water, namely the anhydride, pyrophosphate, in a special compound ATP, adenosine triphosphate. The central problem is to discover exactly how the flow of electrons can be related to the synthesis of (bound) pyrophosphate. (In a thermodynamic sense pyrophosphate is a water soluble kinetically stable drying agent comparable with solid P2O5.) In the biological systems the connection between these different classes of reaction, electron transfer and condensation, is known to be via the production of an energized gradient of protons across the biological membrane which arises from the flow of electrons across the same membrane in the electron transport wires of biology. However we do not understand thoroughly the steps which lead from electron flow in a membrane to proton gradients in that membrane, i.e. electron

  7. Comparison of drying characteristic and uniformity of banana cubes dried by pulse-spouted microwave vacuum drying, freeze drying and microwave freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Lim, Rui-Xin

    2014-07-01

    To overcome the flaws of high energy consumption of freeze drying (FD) and the non-uniform drying of microwave freeze drying (MFD), pulse-spouted microwave vacuum drying (PSMVD) was developed. The results showed that the drying time can be dramatically shortened if microwave was used as the heating source. In this experiment, both MFD and PSMVD could shorten drying time by 50% as compared to the FD process. Depending on the heating method, MFD and PSMVD dried banana cubes showed trends of expansion while FD dried samples demonstrated trends of shrinkage. Shrinkage also brought intensive structure and highest fracturability of all three samples dried by different methods. The residual ascorbic acid content of PSMVD dried samples can be as high as in FD dried samples, which were superior to MFD dried samples. The tests confirmed that PSMVD could bring about better drying uniformity than MFD. Besides, compared with traditional MFD, PSMVD can provide better extrinsic feature, and can bring about improved nutritional features because of the higher residual ascorbic acid content. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Segregation in desiccated sessile drops of biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yu Yu; Pravoslavnova, D M

    2007-04-01

    It is shown here that concurrence between advection and diffusion in a drying sessile drop of a biological fluid can produce spatial redistribution of albumen and salt. The result gives an explanation for the patterns observed in the dried drops of the biological fluids.

  9. [Tear osmolarity and dry eye].

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi-yin; Xiao, Xiang-hua; Wang, Yang-zheng; Liu, Xian-ning; Zhu, Xiu-ping

    2011-05-01

    Dry eye is a common eye disease, and its incidence rate has been escalating. The increased tear osmolarity is one of the main reasons for complaint, damage and inflammation of dry eye patients. With the breakthrough of testing technology for tear osmolarity, more research and application of tear osmolarity was reported, and papers on tear osmolarity of normal eye and dry eye in different regions were also published. In this article, the progress of the tear osmolarity research, the range of tear osmolarity and its application in diagnosis and therapy of dry eye was introduced, and the prospect for the clinical application of hypotonic artificial tears was also discussed.

  10. Space Technology for Crop Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas came up with a new method of drying agricultural crops derived from vacuum chamber technology called MIVAC, a compression of microwave vacuum drying system. A distant cousin of the home microwave oven, MIVAC dries by means of electrically- generated microwaves introduced to a crop-containing vacuum chamber. Microwaves remove moisture quickly and the very low pressure atmosphere in the chamber permits effective drying at much lower than customary temperatures. Thus energy demand is doubly reduced by lower heat requirement and by the shorter time electric power is needed.

  11. Drying rates of wood chips during compression drying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Haygreen, J.G.

    1985-04-01

    Compression drying is basically a process of forcing the free water in wood to move under high hydrostatic pressure through a solid structure. Fundamental information regarding the time- dependent characteristic of compression drying is necessary to develop efficient commercial processes. The purpose of this study is to provide an initial evaluation of the effect of some factors - pressure, wood density, and particle (chip) size - on free water extraction. Five species - aspen, balsam fir, jack pine, red maple, and red oak - were tested in this study. For each species both typical pulp size chips and particles from hammermilled chips were used. Drying rates were determined under constant ram face pressures at 500 psi, 1000 psi, 1500 psi, and 2000 psi, respectively. The concept of drying rate is one of the important factors in dealing with compression drying, especially in designing dewatering pressure cycles. The most efficient compression drying is achieved during the first two minutes. Drying rates are negligible after 3 to 4 minutes of constant pressure in the 500 to 2000 psi range. The analysis of variance for species shows highly significant differences in final moisture contents. Size of chips had a significant effect on final moisture contents. Compressed density of hammermilled chips is slightly higher than that of unrefined chips. High density chips require higher pressure to initiate effective drying rates. 8 references.

  12. The PPII-to-α-helix transition of poly-l-lysine in methanol/water solvent mixtures accompanied by fibrillar self-aggregation: An influence of fluphenazine molecules.

    PubMed

    Cieślik-Boczula, Katarzyna

    2017-08-01

    Fourier-transform infrared, vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are used to follow the structural changes of pure and fluphenazine (FPh)-mixed poly-l-lysine (PLL) triggered by variations of the methanol to water ratio in solvent mixtures. FPh molecules are used as an effective psychotic drug but with a strong Parkinson's-related side effect. To answer the question whether FPh molecules can modify the fibril development, the PLL polypeptide was used as a model of α-helix- and PPII-rich fibrils. It was stated that the presence of FPh molecules did not inhibit the creation of both types of PLL fibrils with clustering features. The methanol-poor aqueous solutions promote the formation of extended polyproline II (PPII) helices; however, the methanol-rich aqueous solutions induce the development of α-helices of both pure and FPh-mixed PLL. Unpredicted and interesting features of PLL fibrillogenesis are evidenced by the formation of uncommon fibrillar aggregates, which are developed in methanol/water solvents from PLL molecules rich in either α-helix or PPII structures. Possibility of PLL molecules to form β-sheet-, α-helix- and PPII-rich fibrils demonstrating that fibrillogenesis is a common phenomenon, and fibrillar aggregates can be based on all of the basic protein secondary structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Adam G; McClintock, Maria K

    2010-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology has made rapid progress in a number of areas including method development, novel applications and community building. In seeking to make biology “engineerable,” synthetic biology is increasing the accessibility of biological research to researchers of all experience levels and backgrounds. One of the underlying strengths of synthetic biology is that it may establish the framework for a rigorous bottom-up approach to studying biology starting at the DNA level. Building upon the existing framework established largely by the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, careful consideration of future goals may lead to integrated multi- scale approaches to biology. Here we describe some of the current challenges that need to be addressed or considered in detail to continue the development of synthetic biology. Specifically, discussion on the areas of elucidating biological principles, computational methods and experimental construction methodologies are presented. PMID:21326830

  14. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Forward Osmosis Brine Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Hyde, Deirdre; Beeler, David; Parodi, Jurek

    2015-01-01

    The Forward Osmosis Brine Drying (FOBD) system is based on a technique called forward osmosis (FO). FO is a membrane-based process where the osmotic potential between brine and a salt solution is equalized by the movement of water from the brine to the salt solution. The FOBD system is composed of two main elements, the FO bag and the salt regeneration system. This paper discusses the results of testing of the FO bag to determine the maximum water recovery ratio that can be attained using this technology. Testing demonstrated that the FO bag is capable of achieving a maximum brine water recovery ratio of the brine of 95%. The equivalent system mass was calculated to be 95 kg for a feed similar to the concentrated brine generated on the International Space Station and 86 kg for an Exploration brine. The results have indicated that the FOBD can process all the brine for a one year mission for between 11% to 10% mass required to bring the water needed to make up for water lost in the brine if not recycled. The FOBD saves 685 kg and when treating the International Space Station brine and it saves 829 kg when treating the Exploration brine. It was also demonstrated that saturated salt solutions achieve a higher water recovery ratios than solids salts do and that lithium chloride achieved a higher water recovery ratio than sodium chloride.

  16. Dry sump crankcase

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A.H.; Dichi, R.E.

    1987-06-23

    A dry sump type crankcase is described for an automotive type internal combustion engine having an intake manifold and a positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system for automatically and continuously ventilating the crankcase. The system includes an essentially atmospheric pressure fresh air inlet to the engine passing air through to the crankcase and a connection from the oil pan to the vacuum in the intake manifold establishing a constant flow of crankcase vapors. The oil pan has a baffle partitioning it into an inner oil collecting funnel-like crankcase cavity and an outer oil reservoir. The inner cavity has an opening at its lower-most point for communication of oil with the reservoir. The opening is of a controlled vertical height for creating a pressure differential across the baffle during operation of the engine. Means connects the inner cavity to the air inlet pressure side of the PCV System while connecting the reservoir to the vacuum side of the PCV system for establishing a constant pressure differential across the baffle sufficient to displace the oil against gravity and maintain the oil level in the crankcase during operation of the engine at the height of the opening in the baffle. Gravity causes the oil to seek a level higher than the opening upon shutdown of the engine and the consequential decay of vacuum in the intake manifold.

  17. Staying dry under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Paul; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Megaridis, Constantine; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Patankar, Neelesh

    2012-11-01

    Lotus leaves are known for their non-wetting properties due to the presence of surface texture. The superhydrophobic behavior arises because of the prevention of liquid water from entering the pores of the roughness. Present superhydrophobic materials rely on air trapped within the surface pores to avoid liquid permeation. This is typically unsustainable for immersed bodies due to dissolution of the air, especially under elevated pressures. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to demonstrate the non-wetting behavior of an immersed ten-nanometer pore. This is accomplished by establishing thermodynamically sustained vapor pockets of the surrounding liquid medium. Over 300,000 atoms were used to construct the nanopore geometry and simulate SPC/E water molecules. Ambient pressure was varied along two isotherms (300 K, and 500 K). This approach for vapor-stabilization could offer valuable guidance for maintaining surfaces dry even in a submerged state without relying on trapped air. The approach may be extended to control general phase behavior of water adjacent to textured surfaces. ISEN support is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  19. Dry Ice Moves on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-11

    Serina Diniega, JPL Systems Engineer, describes the discovery that Martian gullies that end in pits rather than fan deltas are likely caused by block of frozen carbon dioxide (dry ice) sliding down slopes on a cushion of carbon dioxide gas. The pits are formed as the "dry ice" sublimates away.

  20. Dry root rot of chickpea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dry root rot of chickpea is a serious disease under dry hot summer conditions, particularly in the semi-arid tropics of Ethiopia, and in central and southern India. It usually occurs at reproductive stages of the plant. Symptoms include drooping of petioles and leaflets of the tips, but not the low...

  1. Dry eye disease after LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Ţuru, L; Alexandrescu, C; Stana, D; Tudosescu, R

    2012-01-01

    LASIK is a surgical tehnique for the correction of refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia, astygmatism). It results in a reshape of the cornea with ocular surface and especially tear film disease. It is a cause for a iatrogenic dry eye syndrome. Neurogenic and inflamatory theory explain this disease. The main therapy of dry eye is the replacement with artificial tears. PMID:22574092

  2. Whey drying on porous carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Mitura, E.; Kaminski, W.

    1996-05-01

    Whey is treated very often as a waste which pollutes the natural environment. Whey which is a valuable source of protein, lacrose, vitamins and mineral salts should be utilized completely. The present paper is a proposal of whey drying on porous carriers. It is proved experimentally that the proposed drying method guarantees good product quality.

  3. Microwave Drying of Moist Coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomatov, Vl. V.; Karelin, V. A.; Sladkov, S. O.; Salomatov, Vas. V.

    2017-03-01

    Physical principles and examples of practical implementation of drying large bodies of coal by microwave radiation are considered. It is shown that energy consumption in microwave drying of brown coals decreases to 1.5-1.8 (kW·h)/ kg as compared with traditional types of drying, for which the expenditures of energy amount to 3.0 (kW·h)/kg. In using microwave drying, the technological time of drying decreases to 4 h, whereas the time of convective drying, with other things being equal, comes to 8-20 h. Parallel with microwave radiation drying, grinding of a fuel takes place, as well as entrainment of such toxic and ecologically harmful elements as mercury, chlorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and nitrogen. An analysis of the prospects of using a microwave energy for drying coal fuel has shown that microwave radiation makes it possible to considerably economize in energy, increase explosional safety, improve the ecological situation, and reduce the metal content and overall dimensions of the equipment.

  4. LASER METHODS IN BIOLOGY: Optical anisotropy of fibrous biological tissues: analysis of the influence of structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Sinichkin, Yu P.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2007-08-01

    The results of theoretical analysis of the optical anisotropy of multiply scattering fibrillar biological tissues based on the model of an effective anisotropic medium are compared with the experimental in vivo birefringence data for the rat derma obtained earlier in spectral polarisation measurements of rat skin samples in the visible region. The disordered system of parallel dielectric cylinders embedded into an isotropic dielectric medium was considered as a model medium. Simulations were performed taking into account the influence of a partial mutual disordering of the bundles of collagen and elastin fibres in derma on birefringence in samples. The theoretical optical anisotropy averaged over the spectral interval 550-650 nm for the model medium with parameters corresponding to the structural parameters of derma is in good agreement with the results of spectral polarisation measurements of skin samples in the corresponding wavelength range.

  5. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system.

    The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles.

    Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone.

    This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged

  6. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system.

    The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles.

    Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone.

    This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged

  7. Physiological versus Biological Control in Bivalve Calcite Prisms: Comparison of Euheterodonts and Pteriomorphs.

    PubMed

    Harper, Elizabeth M; Checa, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Multiple groups of bivalve molluscs produce calcitic shell layers, many of these broadly classified as "prismatic." Various pteriomorphian bivalves (such as oysters, pterioids, and mussels) secrete prismatic microstructures with high organic content and clear, strong biological control. However, we present the results of a detailed analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis, and electron backscatter diffraction to characterize the calcitic prisms in two different clades within the euheterodont bivalves: the extant Chama arcana and the extinct rudists. These results show that the form of prisms constructed is both closely similar between the two taxa and significantly different from those of the pteriomorph bivalves. Most notably, C. arcana and the extinct rudists lack the clear organic outer envelopes and uniform polygonal, cross-sectional appearance. Instead, they form interdigitating crystals of very varied diameters, with some crystals encapsulating others. We advocate retaining the term "fibrillar prisms" to classify these euheterodont microstructures. These fibrillar prisms are more closely similar to abiotic speleothem deposits than to the calcitic prisms of pteriomorph bivalves. We argue that calcite prism growth in euheterodonts is dominated by abiotic constraints whereas, in pteriomorphs (such as oysters, pterioids, and mussels), it is under strong biological control.

  8. Space and Industrial Brine Drying Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Wisniewski, Richard S.; Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali

    2014-01-01

    This survey describes brine drying technologies that have been developed for use in space and industry. NASA has long considered developing a brine drying system for the International Space Station (ISS). Possible processes include conduction drying in many forms, spray drying, distillation, freezing and freeze drying, membrane filtration, and electrical processes. Commercial processes use similar technologies. Some proposed space systems combine several approaches. The current most promising candidates for use on the ISS use either conduction drying with membrane filtration or spray drying.

  9. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, Charles

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  10. Drying of thin colloidal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Alexander F.

    2013-04-01

    When thin films of colloidal fluids are dried, a range of transitions are observed and the final film profile is found to depend on the processes that occur during the drying step. This article describes the drying process, initially concentrating on the various transitions. Particles are seen to initially consolidate at the edge of a drying droplet, the so-called coffee-ring effect. Flow is seen to be from the centre of the drop towards the edge and a front of close-packed particles passes horizontally across the film. Just behind the particle front the now solid film often displays cracks and finally the film is observed to de-wet. These various transitions are explained, with particular reference to the capillary pressure which forms in the solidified region of the film. The reasons for cracking in thin films is explored as well as various methods to minimize its effect. Methods to obtain stratified coatings through a single application are considered for a one-dimensional drying problem and this is then extended to two-dimensional films. Different evaporative models are described, including the physical reason for enhanced evaporation at the edge of droplets. The various scenarios when evaporation is found to be uniform across a drying film are then explained. Finally different experimental techniques for examining the drying step are mentioned and the article ends with suggested areas that warrant further study.

  11. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  12. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  14. Aging and dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Sullivan, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Dry eye disease is a prevalent eye disorder that in particular affects the elderly population. One of the major causes of dry eye, meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), shows increased prevalence with aging. MGD is caused by hyperkeratinization of the ductal epithelium of meibomian gland and reduced quantity and/or quality of meibum, the holocrine product that stabilizes and prevents the evaporation of the tear film. Of note, retinoids which are used in current anti-aging cosmetics may promote the development of MGD and dry eye disease. In this review, we will discuss the possible mechanisms of age-related MGD. PMID:22569356

  15. Biological properties

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2005-01-01

    There are numerous biological degradations that wood is exposed to in various environments. Biological damage occurs when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Biological organisms, such as bacteria, mold, stain, decay fungi, insects, and marine borers, depend heavily on temperature and moisture conditions to grow. A higher...

  16. Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

  17. [The use of dried grape press cake in pig fattening].

    PubMed

    Herzig, I; Tomová, M; Holub, A; Pleskac, Z

    1979-12-01

    In dried grape press cake the content of crude nutrients and ash, overall sugar, amino acids, alpha-tocopherol and gross energy was determined. In biological experiments with pigs (total of 109 animals) 10% of mixture A1 or SOL was replaced by the same amount of dried crushed grape press cake, without affecting negatively the weight gains and consumption of mixtures per unit of weight gain. Nutritional effects of grape press cake are a subject of discussion and comprise three factors: higher content of enrgy (fat and sugars) in mixtures containing press cake, anti-oxidation effect of press cake and the effect of tocopherols on the metabolism of basic nutrients.

  18. Primary DNA Damage in Dry Cleaners with Perchlorethylene Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei Hachesu, Vida; Zavar Reza, Javad; Mihanpour, Hamideh; Zare Sakhvidi, Mohammad Javad; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad

    2017-10-01

    Perchloroethylene is a halogenated solvent widely used in dry cleaning. International agency of research on cancer classified this chemical as a probable human carcinogen. To evaluate the extent of primary DNA damage in dry cleaner workers who were exposed to perchloroethylene as compared to non-exposed subjects. The effect of exposure modifying factors such as use of personal protective equipment, perceived risk, and reported safe behaviors on observed DNA damage were also studied. 59 exposed and non-exposed workers were selected from Yazd, Iran. All the 33 exposed workers had work history at least 3 months in the dry cleaning shops. Peripheral blood sampling was performed. Microscope examination was performed under fluorescent microscope (400×). Open comet software was used for image analysis. All biological analysis was performed in one laboratory. Primary DNA damage to leukocytes in dry cleaners was relatively high. The median tail length, %DNA in tail, and tail moment in exposed group were significantly higher than those in non-exposed group. There was no significant difference between smokers and nonsmokers in terms of tail length, tail moment, and %DNA in tail. There was no significant correlation between duration of employment in dry cleaning and observed DNA damage in terms of tail length, tail moment and %DNA in tail. Stratified analysis based on exposed and nonexposed category showed no significant relationship between age and observed DNA damage. Occupationally exposure to perchloroethylene can cause early DNA damage in dry cleaners.

  19. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments. PMID:26282732

  20. Sustaining dry surfaces under water.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul R; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M; Varanasi, Kripa K; Megaridis, Constantine M; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-08-18

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  1. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-08-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  2. [Biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, K; Becker, S; Wulf, H; Densow, D

    2010-08-01

    Biological weapons are weapons of mass destruction that use pathogens (bacteria, viruses) or the toxins produced by them to target living organisms or to contaminate non-living substances. In the past, biological warfare has been repeatedly used. Anthrax, plague and smallpox are regarded as the most dangerous biological weapons by various institutions. Nowadays it seems quite unlikely that biological warfare will be employed in any military campaigns. However, the possibility remains that biological weapons may be used in acts of bioterrorism. In addition all diseases caused by biological weapons may also occur naturally or as a result of a laboratory accident. Risk assessment with regard to biological danger often proves to be difficult. In this context, an early identification of a potentially dangerous situation through experts is essential to limit the degree of damage. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  3. Acid rain and dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides information on the formation of acid rain and the long-range transport of air pollutants. The effects of acid precipitation on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are highlighted and technical and policy issues associated with the delineation and implementation of control strategies for acid rain and dry deposition are covered. Dry deposition is addressed, with emphasis given to precipitation metals and organics.

  4. Drying in cyclones -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Nebra, S.A.; Silva, M.A.; Mujumdar, A.S.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics of vortex (or cyclone) dryers. The focus is on the potential of the cyclone configuration for drying of particulates. A selective review is made of the literature pertains to single phase and gas-particle flow in cyclone geometries. Recent data on drying of particulates in cyclone dryers are summarized. 56 refs.

  5. Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

  6. Morphology of drying blood pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  7. Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble email Send this article ... disease bothers the patient more. What Causes Dry Eye Syndrome? Dry eye can be caused by many ...

  8. The Kiln Drying of Wood for Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiemann, Harry D

    1919-01-01

    This report is descriptive of various methods used in the kiln drying of woods for airplanes and gives the results of physical tests on different types of woods after being dried by the various kiln-drying methods.

  9. Drying temperature effects on fish dry mass measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of tissue composition in fish often requires dry samples. Time needed to dry fish decreases as temperature is increased, but additional volatile material may be lost. Effects of 10??C temperature increases on percentage dry mass (%DM) were tested against 60??C controls for groups of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus, and alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. Lake trout %DMs were lower at greater temperatures, but not significantly different from 60??C controls. Rainbow smelt and slimy sculpin %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and differences were significant when test temperatures reached 90??C. Significant differences were not found in tests using alewives because variability in %DM was high between fish. To avoid inter-fish variability, 30 alewives were each dried successively at 60, 70, 80, and then 90??C and for all fish %DM declined at each higher temperature. In general, %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and after reaching a stable dry weight, fish did not lose additional mass if temperature remained constant. Results indicate that caution should be used when comparing dry mass related indices from fish dried at different temperatures because %DM was negatively related to temperature. The differences in %DM observed with rising temperature could account for substantial portions of the variability in reported energy values for the species tested. Differences in %DM means for the 60 vs. 80??C and 60 vs. 90??C tests for rainbow smelt and alewife could represent of from 8 to 38% of observed annual energy cycles for Lakes Ontario and Michigan.

  10. Studies on the skeletal cell wall of the cystocarpic stage of the red seaweed Iridaea undulosa B. Part II. Fractionation of the cell wall and methylation analysis of the inner core-fibrillar polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Flores, M L; Stortz1, C A; Cerezo, A S

    2000-03-16

    In order to determine the structure of the fibrillar cell wall, the material isolated from cystocarpic thalli of the red seaweed Iridaea undulosa was fractionated using different media. While classical methods produced a scarce solubilization of material, the use of lithium salts in polar aprotic solvents (dimethylsulfoxide or N, N-dimethylacetamide), had successfully extracted higher amounts of material. The final residue from the Li(+)/DMSO extraction contains cellulose and a mannan, while that from the Li(+)/DMAc extraction contains only cellulose and traces of a galactan. Methylation analyses of both residues confirm the presence of those polysaccharides, and shows that the mannan is (1-->4)-linked. Treatment with proteases suggests that the protein is efficiently shielded from digestion. All the extracts and residues contain major amounts of (glyco)proteins and/or proteins, in agreement with a previous suggestion that they are of major importance in the structure of the cell wall.

  11. New approach for dry formulation techniques for rhizobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elchin, A. A.; Mashinistova, A. V.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    50°С and 38°С, respectively. To enrich of dry product yield, 20% of sodium humate [2] was used as filling agent. As a result, concentration of viable cells in yield makes 105-106 cell/g of ADS. Low-temperature contact-convective drying in fluidized bed with use of preliminarily dried heat-carrier was evaluated at 25-30°С. Granules of humic acids (d 3 mm) served as inert carrying agent. So, the concentration of viable cells in dry product makes 108-109 cell/g of ADS. The results presented demonstrated that fluidized bed drying technique applied on rhizobacteria-based BCA had higher beneficial effect in terms of high yield as compared to spray drying. Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the grant of ISTC KR-993.2. 1. Levenfors, J.R., et al. Biological control of snow mould (Microdochium nivale) in winter cereals by Pseudomonas brassicacearum MA250. Biocontrol 2007. 2. Orlov, D.S. (1990) Soil Humic Acids and General Theory of Humification, MSU Publisher, Moscow

  12. Fibrillar Amyloid-β Accumulation Triggers an Inflammatory Mechanism Leading to Hyperphosphorylation of the Carboxyl-Terminal End of Tau Polypeptide in the Hippocampal Formation of the 3×Tg-AD Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Moreno-Campuzano, Samadhi; Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Luna-Herrera, Claudia; Mena, Raúl; Perry, George; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Luna-Muñoz, José; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-03-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative and irreversible disorder whose progressiveness is dependent on age. It is histopathologically characterized by the massive accumulation of insoluble forms of tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) asneurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, respectively. Many studies have documented that these two polypeptides suffer several posttranslational modifications employing postmortem tissue sections from brains of patients with AD. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modifications of key players in this disease, including Aβ and tau, several transgenic mouse models have been developed. One of these models is the 3×Tg-AD transgenic mouse, carrying three transgenes encoding APPSWE, S1M146V, and TauP301L proteins. To further characterize this transgenicmouse, we determined the accumulation of fibrillar Aβ as a function of age in relation to the hyperphosphorylation patterns of TauP301L at both its N- and C-terminus in the hippocampal formation by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we searched for the expression of activated protein kinases and mediators of inflammation by western blot of wholeprotein extracts from hippocampal tissue sections since 3 to 28 months as well. Our results indicate that the presence of fibrillar Aβ deposits correlates with a significant activation of astrocytes and microglia in subiculum and CA1 regions of hippocampus. Accordingly, we also observed a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α associated to neuritic plaques and glial cells. Importantly, there is an overexpression of the stress activated protein kinases SAPK/JNK and Cdk-5 in pyramidal neurons, which might phosphorylate several residues at the C-terminus of TauP301L. Therefore, the accumulation of Aβ oligomers results in an inflammatory environment that upregulates kinases involved in hyperphosphorylation of TauP301L polypeptide.

  13. A wetting and drying scheme for ROMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, John C.; Defne, Zafer; Haas, Kevin; Arango, Hernan G.

    2013-01-01

    The processes of wetting and drying have many important physical and biological impacts on shallow water systems. Inundation and dewatering effects on coastal mud flats and beaches occur on various time scales ranging from storm surge, periodic rise and fall of the tide, to infragravity wave motions. To correctly simulate these physical processes with a numerical model requires the capability of the computational cells to become inundated and dewatered. In this paper, we describe a method for wetting and drying based on an approach consistent with a cell-face blocking algorithm. The method allows water to always flow into any cell, but prevents outflow from a cell when the total depth in that cell is less than a user defined critical value. We describe the method, the implementation into the three-dimensional Regional Oceanographic Modeling System (ROMS), and exhibit the new capability under three scenarios: an analytical expression for shallow water flows, a dam break test case, and a realistic application to part of a wetland area along the Georgia Coast, USA.

  14. Gas storage in "dry water" and "dry gel" clathrates.

    PubMed

    Carter, Benjamin O; Wang, Weixing; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2010-03-02

    "Dry water" (DW) is a free-flowing powder prepared by mixing water, hydrophobic silica particles, and air at high speeds. We demonstrated recently that DW can be used to dramatically enhance methane uptake rates in methane gas hydrate (MGH). Here, we expand on our initial work, demonstrating that DW can be used to increase the kinetics of formation of gas clathrates for gases other than methane, such as CO(2) and Kr. We also show that the stability of the system toward coalescence can be increased via the inclusion of a gelling agent to form a "dry gel", thus dramatically improving the recyclability of the material. For example, the addition of gellan gum allows effective reuse over at least eight clathration cycles without the need for reblending. DW and its "dry gel" modification may represent a potential platform for recyclable gas storage or gas separation on a practicable time scale in a static, unmixed system.

  15. Biological indeterminacy.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Ralph J

    2012-09-01

    Reductionist explanations in biology generally assume that biological mechanisms are highly deterministic and basically similar between individuals. A contrasting view has emerged recently that takes into account the degeneracy of biological processes--the ability to arrive at a given endpoint by a variety of available paths, even within the same individual. This perspective casts significant doubt on the prospects for the ability to predict behavior accurately based on brain imaging or genotyping, and on the ability of neuroscience to stipulate ethics.

  16. Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental

  17. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Dunne, Krista A.

    2016-01-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. ‘Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman–Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  18. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  19. Determination of adequate moisture content for efficient dry-heat viral inactivation in lyophilized factor VIII by loss on drying and by near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Savage, M; Torres, J; Franks, L; Masecar, B; Hotta, J

    1998-06-01

    A requirement for a minimal threshold level of moisture in order for efficient virus inactivation to occur during dry heat treatment of freeze-dried coagulation factor concentrates is described. Techniques used to determine moisture content during heating were Loss on Drying and Karl Fischer. The Loss on Drying was suspected to have occasional errors as a result of sample preparation being influenced by interference from atmospheric moisture. Therefore, a non-invasive, non-destructive method for determination of residual moisture content using near infrared spectrometry (NIR) was developed for freeze-dried antihaemophilic factor (AHF). Calibration equations were determined against Loss on Drying and Karl Fischer assay methods and these equations evaluated for the predictive efficiency. Both Loss on Drying and NIR were used to evaluate the effect of moisture content on the efficiency of virus inactivation by dry heat at 80 degrees C. A minimum level of moisture of greater than 0.7%, as determined by Loss on Drying, was necessary for a virus reduction in the magnitude of 4 log10 for hepatitis A virus, porcine parvovirus and pseudorabies virus. Copyright 1998 The International Association of Biological Standardization

  20. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  1. Fragmentation of drying paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Katinka; Dombi, András; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Fragmentation of thin layers of drying granular materials on a frictional surface are studied both by experiments and computer simulations. Besides a qualitative description of the fragmentation phenomenon, the dependence of the average fragment size as a function of the layer thickness is thoroughly investigated. Experiments are done using a special nail polish, which forms characteristic crack structures during drying. In order to control the layer thickness, we diluted the nail polish in acetone and evaporated in a controlled manner different volumes of this solution on glass surfaces. During the evaporation process we managed to get an instable paint layer, which formed cracks as it dried out. In order to understand the obtained structures a previously developed spring-block model was implemented in a three-dimensional version. The experimental and simulation results proved to be in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. An earlier suggested scaling relation between the average fragment size and the layer thickness is reconfirmed.

  2. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  3. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  4. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  5. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  6. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  7. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of biology to be used in biology courses in secondary schools. Among those experiments presented are demonstrating the early stages of ferns and mosses and simple culture methods for fern prothalli. (HM)

  8. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  9. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of biology to be used in biology courses in secondary schools. Among those experiments presented are demonstrating the early stages of ferns and mosses and simple culture methods for fern prothalli. (HM)

  10. Appraisal of selected osmoprotectants and carriers for formulating Gram-negative biocontrol agents active against Fusarium dry rot on potatoes in storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of a dry formulation containing a high titer of viable cells of a Gram-negative biological control agent is a challenging and critically important step in developing the agent into a commercial product. Producing a dry formulation using methods based on air-drying is especially attrac...

  11. Solar Drying of Red Mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John L.

    Solar drying of thickened red mud is the latest method for its disposal in an economical and environmentally acceptable way. Two years full scale experience with this method in Jamaica has shown that its success depends on accurate grading of the solar drying area and accurate control of the pre-dewatering of the mud in the alumina plant. Experience with the use of deep thickening for pre-dewatering is described, together with a novel method for measurement and control of thickened mud rheology.

  12. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of reducing development time for new pharmaceutical products, formulation and process development scientists must continually look for ways to "work smarter, not harder." Within the product development arena, this means reducing the amount of trial and error empiricism in arriving at a formulation and identification of processing conditions which will result in a quality final dosage form. Characterization of the freezing behavior of the intended formulation is necessary for developing processing conditions which will result in the shortest drying time while maintaining all critical quality attributes of the freeze-dried product. Analysis of frozen systems was discussed in detail, particularly with respect to the glass transition as the physical event underlying collapse during freeze-drying, eutectic mixture formation, and crystallization events upon warming of frozen systems. Experiments to determine how freezing and freeze-drying behavior is affected by changes in the composition of the formulation are often useful in establishing the "robustness" of a formulation. It is not uncommon for seemingly subtle changes in composition of the formulation, such as a change in formulation pH, buffer salt, drug concentration, or an additional excipient, to result in striking differences in freezing and freeze-drying behavior. With regard to selecting a formulation, it is wise to keep the formulation as simple as possible. If a buffer is needed, a minimum concentration should be used. The same principle applies to added salts: If used at all, the concentration should be kept to a minimum. For many proteins a combination of an amorphous excipient, such as a disaccharide, and a crystallizing excipient, such as glycine, will result in a suitable combination of chemical stability and physical stability of the freeze-dried solid. Concepts of heat and mass transfer are valuable in rational design of processing conditions. Heat transfer by conduction

  13. Development of freeze dried vegetables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    The development of freeze dried vegetables to be used in the Apollo food system is discussed. After the initial selection and screening of vegetables, several types of freeze dried vegetables were prepared in small batches. From these small batches, two vegetables were judged satisfactory for further testing and evaluation. These vegetables, mashed potatoes and asparagus, were subjected to storage at 100 deg plus or minus 5 F. for two weeks and then taste tested. The vegetables were also tested to determine if they complied with the microbiological requirements for Apollo food. The space food prototype production guide for the vegetables is submitted.

  14. Drying leather with vacuum and toggling sequentially

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We investigated a drying method that will enable leather to be dried under vacuum and stretch sequentially to improve area yield. Vacuum drying offers fast speed at a low temperature, which would be advantageous to heat-vulnerable chrome-free leather. Adding a toggle action after vacuum drying cou...

  15. Foam-mat Drying Technology: A Review.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Z; Jideani, V A

    2015-07-13

    This article reviews various aspects of foam-mat drying such as foam-mat drying processing technique, main additives used for foam-mat drying, foam-mat drying of liquid and solid foods, quality characteristics of foam-mat dried foods and economic and technical benefits for employing foam-mat drying. Foam-mat drying process is an alternative method which allows the removal of water from liquid materials and pureed materials. In this drying process, a liquid material is converted into foam that is stable by being whipped after adding an edible foaming agent. The stable foam is then spread out in sheet or mat and dried by using hot air (40 -90°C) at atmospheric pressure. Methyl cellulose (0.25 - 2%), egg white (3 - 20%), maltodextrin (0.5 - 05%) and gum Arabic (2 - 9%) are the commonly utilised additives for the foam-mat drying process at the given range, either combined together for their effectiveness or individual effect. The foam-mat drying process is suitable for heat sensitive, viscous and sticky products which cannot be dried using other forms of drying methods such as spray drying because of the state of product. More interest has developed for foam-mat drying because of the simplicity, cost effectiveness, high speed drying and improved product quality it provides.

  16. 7 CFR 58.813 - Dry whey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry whey. 58.813 Section 58.813 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.813 Dry whey. The quality requirements for dry whey shall be in accordance with the U.S. Standards for Dry Whey. Supplemental Specifications for...

  17. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  18. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  19. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  20. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  1. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida...

  2. Dry machinability of aluminum alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Shareef, I.; Natarajan, M.; Ajayi, O. O.; Energy Technology; Department of IMET

    2005-01-01

    Adverse effects of the use of cutting fluids and environmental concerns with regard to cutting fluid disposability is compelling industry to adopt Dry or near Dry Machining, with the aim of eliminating or significantly reducing the use of metal working fluids. Pending EPA regulations on metal cutting, dry machining is becoming a hot topic of research and investigation both in industry and federal research labs. Although the need for dry machining may be apparent, most of the manufacturers still consider dry machining to be impractical and even if possible, very expensive. This perception is mainly due to lack of appropriate cutting tools that can withstand intense heat and Built-up-Edge (BUE) formation during dry machining. The challenge of heat dissipation without coolant requires a completely different approach to tooling. Special tooling utilizing high-performance multi-layer, multi-component, heat resisting, low friction coatings could be a plausible answer to the challenge of dry machining. In pursuit of this goal Argonne National Labs has introduced Nano-crystalline near frictionless carbon (NFC) diamond like coatings (DLC), while industrial efforts have led to the introduction of composite coatings such as titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) and others. Although, these coatings are considered to be very promising, they have not been tested either from tribological or from dry machining applications point of view. As such a research program in partnership with federal labs and industrial sponsors has started with the goal of exploring the feasibility of dry machining using the newly developed coatings such as Near Frictionless Carbon Coatings (NFC), Titanium Aluminum Nitride (TiAlN), and multi-layer multicomponent nano coatings such as TiAlCrYN and TiAlN/YN. Although various coatings are under investigation as part of the overall dry machinability program, this extended abstract deals with a systematic investigation of dry

  3. Biological Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyhrman, Sonya

    2004-10-01

    The ocean is arguably the largest habitat on the planet, and it houses an astounding array of life, from microbes to whales. As a testament to this diversity and its importance, the discipline of biological oceanography spans studies of all levels of biological organization, from that of single genes, to organisms, to their population dynamics. Biological oceanography also includes studies on how organisms interact with, and contribute to, essential global processes. Students of biological oceanography are often as comfortable looking at satellite images as they are electron micrographs. This diversity of perspective begins the textbook Biological Oceanography, with cover graphics including a Coastal Zone Color Scanner image representing chlorophyll concentration, an electron micrograph of a dinoflagellate, and a photograph of a copepod. These images instantly capture the reader's attention and illustrate some of the different scales on which budding oceanographers are required to think. Having taught a core graduate course in biological oceanography for many years, Charlie Miller has used his lecture notes as the genesis for this book. The text covers the subject of biological oceanography in a manner that is targeted to introductory graduate students, but it would also be appropriate for advanced undergraduates.

  4. Dry bin filler for apples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A unique dry bin filler for apples using a sequenced tray was developed to reduce bruising in packing operations. Research and commercial trials in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington State demonstrated the ability to fill bins evenly and with low damage. Cultivars with different bruising su...

  5. THE DIRT ON DRY MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T.; Dey, Arjun; Cohen, Emma; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2011-04-01

    Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we analyze the mid-infrared (3-70 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions of dry merger candidates in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. These candidates were selected by previous authors to be luminous, red, early-type galaxies with morphological evidence of recent tidal interactions. We find that a significant fraction of these candidates exhibit 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses compared to expectations for old stellar populations. We estimate that a quarter of dry merger candidates have mid-infrared-derived star formation rates greater than {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. This represents a 'frosting' on top of a large old stellar population, and has been seen in previous studies of elliptical galaxies. Further, the dry merger candidates include a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies relative to a control sample without tidal features. We therefore conclude that the star formation in these massive ellipticals is likely triggered by merger activity. Our data suggest that the mergers responsible for the observed tidal features were not completely dry, and may be minor mergers involving a gas-rich dwarf galaxy.

  6. Drying Milk With Boiler Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable energy saved in powdered-milk industry. Only special requirement boiler fired with natural gas or other clean fuel. Boiler flue gas fed to spray drier where it directly contacts product to be dried. Additional heat supplied by auxillary combustor when boiler output is low. Approach adaptable to existing plants with minimal investment because most already equipped with natural-gas-fired boilers.

  7. Microwave drying of seed cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A small lab dryer was designed for use in drying seed cotton with components of a microwave generator mounted thereon. The magnetron emitted radiation directly into the seed cotton and a fan directed air cross-flow to the radiation direction. The microwave components were a 1.1 kW magnetron, trans...

  8. Granular flow: Dry and wet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, N.; Nakanishi, H.

    2012-04-01

    Granular material is a collection of macroscopic particles that are visible with naked eyes. The non-equilibrium nature of the granular materials makes their rheology quite different from that of molecular systems. In this minireview, we present the unique features of granular materials focusing on the shear flow of dry granular materials and granule-liquid mixture.

  9. A new dry biomedical electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luce, R. S.; Cleveland, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    Electronic circuitry contains new operational amplifier which incorporates monolithic super-gain transistors. Electrode does not provide voltage amplification; instead, it acts as current amplifier to make it possible to pick up electrical potentials from surface of highly resistant dry skin.

  10. Dry Zones Around Frozen Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    The saturation pressure of water vapor above supercooled water exceeds that above ice at the same temperature. A frozen droplet will therefore grow by harvesting water vapor from neighboring supercooled condensate, which has recently been demonstrated to be a primary mechanism of in-plane frost growth on hydrophobic surfaces. The underlying physics of this source-sink interaction is still poorly understood. In this work, a deposited water droplet is frozen on a dry hydrophobic surface initially held above the dew point. We demonstrate that when the surface is then cooled beneath the dew point, the frozen droplet harvests nearby water vapor in the air. This results in an annular dry zone that forms between the frozen droplet and the forming supercooled condensation. For a given ambient temperature and humidity, the length of the dry zone varied strongly with surface temperature and weakly with droplet volume. The dependence of the dry zone on surface temperature is due to the fact that the vapor pressure gradients between the ambient and the surface and between the liquid and frozen water are both functions of temperature.

  11. Drying Milk With Boiler Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable energy saved in powdered-milk industry. Only special requirement boiler fired with natural gas or other clean fuel. Boiler flue gas fed to spray drier where it directly contacts product to be dried. Additional heat supplied by auxillary combustor when boiler output is low. Approach adaptable to existing plants with minimal investment because most already equipped with natural-gas-fired boilers.

  12. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  13. The Dirt on Dry Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Vandana; Dey, Arjun; Cohen, Emma; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Soifer, B. T.

    2011-04-01

    Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we analyze the mid-infrared (3-70 μm) spectral energy distributions of dry merger candidates in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. These candidates were selected by previous authors to be luminous, red, early-type galaxies with morphological evidence of recent tidal interactions. We find that a significant fraction of these candidates exhibit 8 and 24 μm excesses compared to expectations for old stellar populations. We estimate that a quarter of dry merger candidates have mid-infrared-derived star formation rates greater than ~1 M sun yr-1. This represents a "frosting" on top of a large old stellar population, and has been seen in previous studies of elliptical galaxies. Further, the dry merger candidates include a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies relative to a control sample without tidal features. We therefore conclude that the star formation in these massive ellipticals is likely triggered by merger activity. Our data suggest that the mergers responsible for the observed tidal features were not completely dry, and may be minor mergers involving a gas-rich dwarf galaxy.

  14. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  15. Drying rate and temperature profile for superheated steam vacuum drying and moist air drying of softwood lumber

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, S.; Dakin, M.

    1999-07-01

    Two charges of green radiata pine sapwood lumber were dried, ether using superheated steam under vacuum (90 C, 0.2 bar abs.) or conventionally using hot moist air (90/60 C). Due to low density of the drying medium under vacuum, the circulation velocity used was 10 m/s for superheated steam drying and 5.0 m/s for moist air drying, and in both cases, the flow was unidirectional. In drying, stack drying rate and wood temperatures were measured to examine the differences between the superheated steam drying and drying using hot moist air. The experimental results have shown that the stack edge board in superheated steam drying dried faster than in the hot moist air drying. Once again due to the low density of the steam under vacuum, a prolonged maximum temperature drop across load (TDAL) was observed in the superheated steam drying, however, the whole stack dried slower and the final moisture content distribution was more variable than for conventional hot moist air drying.

  16. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSTA Journal, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides hands-on biology activities using plastic bottles that allow students to become engaged in asking questions, creating experiments, testing hypotheses, and generating answers. Activities explore terrestrial and aquatic systems. (MKR)

  17. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... is required. Biological Agents Menu Overview In Focus: Ebola Frederick A. Murphy/CDC OSHA's Ebola webpage provides ... OSHA offers, visit OSHA's Workers' page. In Focus: Ebola Frederick A. Murphy/CDC OSHA's Ebola webpage provides ...

  18. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new experiments in biology are described by teachers for use in classrooms. Broad areas covered include enzyme action, growth regulation, microscopy, respiration, germination, plant succession, leaf structure and blood structure. Explanations are detailed. (PS)

  19. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSTA Journal, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides hands-on biology activities using plastic bottles that allow students to become engaged in asking questions, creating experiments, testing hypotheses, and generating answers. Activities explore terrestrial and aquatic systems. (MKR)

  20. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Ten ideas that have been tried out by the authors in schools are presented for biology teachers. The areas covered include genetics, dispersal of seeds, habituation in earthworms, respiration, sensory neurons, fats and oils. A reading list is provided. (PS)

  1. Biological monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.H.; Dillon, H.K.

    1986-02-01

    Biological monitoring is defined as the measurement and assessment of workplace agents or their metabolites in tissues, secreta, excreta, expired air, or any combination of these to evaluate exposure and health risk compared to an appropriate reference. Biological monitoring offers several advantages: it takes into account individual variability in biological activity resulting from a chemical insult. It takes into account the effects of personal physical activity and individual life styles. It is a valuable adjunct to ambient monitoring and health surveillance. The importance of chemical speciation in the toxicity of pollutants is discussed. Basic protocols for lead, aluminum, cadmium, mercury, selenium, and nickel are presented. Basic criteria for biological monitoring methods are presented. 11 references, 1 table.

  2. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Ten ideas that have been tried out by the authors in schools are presented for biology teachers. The areas covered include genetics, dispersal of seeds, habituation in earthworms, respiration, sensory neurons, fats and oils. A reading list is provided. (PS)

  3. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Some helpful ideas are proposed for use by biology teachers. Topics included are Food Webs,'' Key to Identification of Families,'' Viruses,'' Sieve Tube,'' Woodlice,'' Ecology of Oak Leaf Roller Moth,'' and Model Making.'' (PS)

  4. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new experiments in biology are described by teachers for use in classrooms. Broad areas covered include enzyme action, growth regulation, microscopy, respiration, germination, plant succession, leaf structure and blood structure. Explanations are detailed. (PS)

  5. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Some helpful ideas are proposed for use by biology teachers. Topics included are Food Webs,'' Key to Identification of Families,'' Viruses,'' Sieve Tube,'' Woodlice,'' Ecology of Oak Leaf Roller Moth,'' and Model Making.'' (PS)

  6. Inhibition of STAT3- and MAPK-dependent PGE2 synthesis ameliorates phagocytosis of fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1-42) via EP2 receptor in EMF-stimulated N9 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    He, Gen-Lin; Luo, Zhen; Shen, Ting-Ting; Li, Ping; Yang, Ju; Luo, Xue; Chen, Chun-Hai; Gao, Peng; Yang, Xue-Sen

    2016-11-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-involved neuroinflammatory processes are prevalent in several neurological conditions and diseases. Amyloid burden is correlated with the activation of E-prostanoid (EP) 2 receptors by PGE2 in Alzheimer's disease. We previously demonstrated that electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure can induce pro-inflammatory responses and the depression of phagocytosis in microglial cells, but the signaling pathways involved in phagocytosis of fibrillar β-amyloid (fAβ) in microglial cells exposed to EMF are poorly understood. Given the important role of PGE2 in neural physiopathological processes, we investigated the PGE2-related signaling mechanism in the immunomodulatory phagocytosis of EMF-stimulated N9 microglial cells (N9 cells). N9 cells were exposed to EMF with or without pretreatment with the selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and antagonists of PG receptors EP1-4. The production of endogenous PGE2 was quantified by enzyme immunoassays. The phagocytic ability of N9 cells was evaluated based on the fluorescence intensity of the engulfed fluorescent-labeled fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1-42) (fAβ42) measured using a flow cytometer and a fluorescence microscope. The effects of pharmacological agents on EMF-activated microglia were investigated based on the expressions of JAK2, STAT3, p38/ERK/JNK MAPKs, COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), and EP2 using real-time PCR and/or western blotting. EMF exposure significantly increased the production of PGE2 and decreased the phagocytosis of fluorescent-labeled fAβ42 by N9 cells. The selective inhibitors of COX-2, JAK2, STAT3, and MAPKs clearly depressed PGE2 release and ameliorated microglial phagocytosis after EMF exposure. Pharmacological agents suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2-STAT3 and MAPKs, leading to the amelioration of the

  7. Mechanical implications of the domain structure of fiber-forming collagens: comparison of the molecular and fibrillar flexibilities of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen.

    PubMed

    Silver, Frederick H; Horvath, Istvan; Foran, David J

    2002-05-21

    Fibrillar collagens store, transmit and dissipate elastic energy during tensile deformation. Results of previous studies suggest that the collagen molecule is made up of alternating rigid and flexible domains, and extension of the flexible domains is associated with elastic energy storage. In this study, we model the flexibility of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen molecules and microfibrils in order to understand the molecular basis of elastic energy storage in collagen fibers by analysing the areas under conformational plots for dipeptide sequences. Results of stereochemical modeling suggest that the collagen triple helix is made up of rigid and flexible domains that alternate with periods that are multiples of three amino acid residues. The relative flexibility of dipeptide sequences found in the flexible regions is about a factor of five higher than that found for the flexibility of the rigid regions, and the flexibility of types II and III collagen molecules appears to be higher than that found for the type I collagen molecule. The different collagen alpha1-chains were compared by correlating the flexibilities. The results suggest that the flexibilities of the alpha1-chains of types I and III collagen are more closely related than the flexibilities of the alpha1-chains in types I and II and II and III collagen. The flexible domains found in the alpha1-chains of types I-III collagen were found to be conserved in the microfibril and had periods of about 15 amino acid residues and multiples thereof. The flexibility profiles of types I and II collagen microfibrils were found to be more highly correlated than those for types I and III and II and III. These results suggest that the domain structure of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen is an efficient means for storage of elastic energy during stretching while preserving the triple helical structure of the overall molecule. It is proposed that all collagens that form fibers are designed to

  8. Isolation, characterization and biological evaluation of jellyfish collagen for use in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Addad, Sourour; Exposito, Jean-Yves; Faye, Clément; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Lethias, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens are the more abundant extracellular proteins. They form a metazoan-specific family, and are highly conserved from sponge to human. Their structural and physiological properties have been successfully used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. On the other hand, the increase of jellyfish has led us to consider this marine animal as a natural product for food and medicine. Here, we have tested different Mediterranean jellyfish species in order to investigate the economic potential of their collagens. We have studied different methods of collagen purification (tissues and experimental procedures). The best collagen yield was obtained using Rhizostoma pulmo oral arms and the pepsin extraction method (2-10 mg collagen/g of wet tissue). Although a significant yield was obtained with Cotylorhiza tuberculata (0.45 mg/g), R. pulmo was used for further experiments, this jellyfish being considered as harmless to humans and being an abundant source of material. Then, we compared the biological properties of R. pulmo collagen with mammalian fibrillar collagens in cell cytotoxicity assays and cell adhesion. There was no statistical difference in cytotoxicity (p > 0.05) between R. pulmo collagen and rat type I collagen. However, since heparin inhibits cell adhesion to jellyfish-native collagen by 55%, the main difference is that heparan sulfate proteoglycans could be preferentially involved in fibroblast and osteoblast adhesion to jellyfish collagens. Our data confirm the broad harmlessness of jellyfish collagens, and their biological effect on human cells that are similar to that of mammalian type I collagen. Given the bioavailability of jellyfish collagen and its biological properties, this marine material is thus a good candidate for replacing bovine or human collagens in selected biomedical applications.

  9. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  10. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  11. Superficial versus deep dry needling.

    PubMed

    Baldry, Peter

    2002-08-01

    Ninety percent of my patients with myofascial trigger point (MTrP) pain have this alone and are treated with superficial dry needling. Approximately 10% have concomitant MTrP pain and nerve root compression pain. These are treated with deep dry needling. SUPERFICIAL DRY NEEDLING (SDN): The activated and sensitised nociceptors of a MTrP cause it to be so exquisitely tender that firm pressure applied to it gives rise to a flexion withdrawal reflex (jump sign) and in some cases the utterance of an expletive (shout sign). The optimum strength of SDN at a MTrP site is the minimum necessary to abolish these two reactions. With respect to this patients are divided into strong, average and weak responders. The responsiveness of each individual is determined by trial and error. It is my practice to insert a needle (0.3mm x 30mm) into the tissues immediately overlying the MTrP to a depth of 5-10 mm and to leave it in situ long enough for the two reactions to be abolished. For an average reactor this is about 30secs. For a weak reactor it is several minutes. And for a strong reactor the insertion of the needle and its immediate withdrawal is all that is required. Following treatment muscle stretching exercises should be carried out, and any steps taken to eliminate factors that might lead to the reactivation of the MTrPs. DEEP DRY NEEDLING (DDN): This in my practice is only used either when primary MTrP activity causes shortening of muscle sufficient enough to bring about compression of nerve roots. Or when there is nerve compression pain usually from spondylosis or disc prolapse and the secondary development of MTrP activity. Unlike SDN, DDN is a painful procedure and one which gives rise to much post-treatment soreness.

  12. The Production of a Stable Infliximab Powder: The Evaluation of Spray and Freeze-Drying for Production

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Have, Rimko ten; Bakker, Arjen; Wagner, Koen; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Kersten, Gideon F. A.; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In prospect of developing an oral dosage form of Infliximab, for treatment of Crohn’s disease and rheumatoid arthritis, freeze-drying (vial vs Lyoguard trays) and spray-drying were investigated as production method for stable powders. Dextran and inulin were used in combination with sucrose as stabilizing excipients. The drying processes did not affect Infliximab in these formulations, i.e. both the physical integrity and biological activity (TNF binding) were retained. Accelerated stability studies (1 month at 60°C) showed that the TNF binding ability of Infliximab was conserved in the freeze-dried formulations, whereas the liquid counterpart lost all TNF binding. After thermal treatment, the dried formulations showed some chemical modification of the IgG in the dextran-sucrose formulation, probably due to Maillard reaction products. This study indicates that, with the appropriate formulation, both spray-drying and freeze-drying may be useful for (bulk) powder production of Infliximab. PMID:27706175

  13. Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in many tissues of the body and is essential to maintain moistness in the skin tissues, which contain approximately half the body’s HA mass. Due to its viscosity and moisturizing effect, HA is widely distributed as a medicine, cosmetic, food, and, recently marketed in Japan as a popular dietary supplement to promote skin moisture. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study it was found that ingested HA increased skin moisture and improved treatment outcomes for patients with dry skin. HA is also reported to be absorbed by the body distributed, in part, to the skin. Ingested HA contributes to the increased synthesis of HA and promotes cell proliferation in fibroblasts. These effects show that ingestion of HA moisturizes the skin and is expected to improve the quality of life for people who suffer from dry skin. This review examines the moisturizing effects of dry skin by ingested HA and summarizes the series of mechanisms from absorption to pharmacological action. PMID:25014997

  14. Skin aging and dry skin.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2004-08-01

    Skin aging appears to be the result of both scheduled and continuous "wear and tear" processes that damage cellular DNA and proteins. Two types of aging, chronological skin aging and photoaging, have distinct clinical and histological features. Chronological skin aging is a universal and inevitable process characterized primarily by physiologic alterations in skin function. In this case, keratinocytes are unable to properly terminally differentiate to form a functional stratum corneum, and the rate of formation of neutral lipids that contribute to the barrier function slows, causing dry, pale skin with fine wrinkles. In contrast, photoaging results from the UVR of sunlight and the damage thus becomes apparent in sun-exposed skin. Characteristics of this aging type are dry and sallow skin displaying fine wrinkles as well as deep furrows, resulting from the disorganization of epidermal and dermal components associated with elastosis and heliodermatitis. Understanding of the functions of the skin and the basic principles of moisturizer use and application is important for the prevention of skin aging. Successful treatment of dry skin with appropriate skin care products gives the impression of eternal youth.

  15. Solar drying in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, O. )

    1992-03-01

    The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) has estimated that a quarter of crops are lost through inadequate handling after harvesting. The use of solar dryers can reduce these losses and improve the quality of food. Oliver Headley of the University of the West Indies overviews a range of dryers developed in the Caribbean region. Solar dryers have been used in various parts of the Caribbean for the past eighteen years. The main types are: closed cycle dryers with separate flat plate collector; open cycle dryers with roof vanes against direct sunlight; open cycle dryers with rockbed heat storage units; open cycle dryers with chimneys for air circulation; wire basket dryers with flow through ventilation; barn roof collectors feeding packed bed dryers. During the dry season (January to April), mean daily insolation in a typical Caribbean island is about 25 MJ/m{sup 2}. With such an abundant resource, solar crop drying emerged as a preferred method for the preservation of perishable commodities. In territories without fossil fuel reserves solar energy is an obvious alternative since it does not involve expenditure of scarce foreign exchange. Research and development work in solar crop drying was conducted both at experimental sites in the University and in rural districts throughout the region. Several types of dryer were designed and tested.

  16. Electronic Nose Characterization of the Quality Parameters of Freeze-Dried Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, R.; Santonico, M.; Martinelli, E.; Paolesse, R.; Passot, S.; Fonseca, F.; Cenard, S.; Trelea, C.; Di Natale, C.

    2011-09-01

    Freeze-drying is the method of choice for preserving heat sensitive biological products such as microorganisms. The development of a fast analytical method for evaluating the properties of the dehydrated bacteria is then necessary for a proper utilization of the product in several food processes. In this paper, dried bacteria headspace is analyzed by a GC-MS and an electronic nose. Results indicate that headspace contains enough information to assess the products quality.

  17. Biological Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  18. Biological preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  19. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  20. A pea homologue of human DNA helicase I is localized within the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus and stimulated by phosphorylation with CK2 and cdc2 protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, N; Beven, A F; Shaw, P J; Tuteja, R

    2001-01-01

    DNA helicases catalyse the transient opening of duplex DNA during nucleic acid transactions. Here we report the isolation of a second nuclear DNA helicase (65 kDa) from Pisum sativum (pea) designated pea DNA helicase 65 (PDH65). The enzyme was immunoaffinity purified using an antihuman DNA helicase I (HDH I) antibody column. The purified PDH65 showed ATP- and Mg(2+)-dependent DNA and RNA unwinding activities, as well as ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity. The direction of DNA unwinding was 3' to 5' along the bound strand. Antibodies against HDH I recognized the purified PDH65, and immunodepletion with these antibodies removed the DNA and RNA unwinding and ATPase activities from purified preparations of PDH65. The DNA and RNA unwinding activities were upregulated after phosphorylation of PDH65 with CK2 and cdc2 protein kinases. By incorporation of BrUTP into pea root tissue, followed by double immunofluorescence labelling and confocal microscopy, PDH65 was shown to be localized within the dense fibrillar component of pea root nucleoli in the regions around the rDNA transcription sites. These observations suggest that PDH65 may be involved both in rDNA transcription and in the early stages of pre-rRNA processing.

  1. 27 CFR 24.202 - Dried fruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... deficient in sugar, sufficient pure dry sugar may be added to increase the total solids content to 25... exclusive of pulp). Pure dry sugar may be used for sweetening. After complete fermentation or...

  2. 27 CFR 24.202 - Dried fruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... deficient in sugar, sufficient pure dry sugar may be added to increase the total solids content to 25... exclusive of pulp). Pure dry sugar may be used for sweetening. After complete fermentation or...

  3. 27 CFR 24.202 - Dried fruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... deficient in sugar, sufficient pure dry sugar may be added to increase the total solids content to 25... exclusive of pulp). Pure dry sugar may be used for sweetening. After complete fermentation or...

  4. 27 CFR 24.202 - Dried fruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... deficient in sugar, sufficient pure dry sugar may be added to increase the total solids content to 25... exclusive of pulp). Pure dry sugar may be used for sweetening. After complete fermentation or...

  5. Thin layer solar drying of rough rice

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, M.A.; Bala, B.K. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a set of simple empirical equations for natural air flow solar drying of rough rice in mixed-mode type dryer, box-type dryer and open floor drying system. The moisture contents predicted by the equations were in good agreement with the observed values. The effect of drying air temperature on the drying rate constants for these three cases were found to be insignificant. The equilibrium moisture content appeared to be the most important variable controlling the drying rate. The highest drying rate was observed in case of mixed-mode dryer. The drying rate of box dryer was next to that of mixed-mode dryer. This study shows that the introduction of solar dryer for drying of rough rice is highly recommended in Bangladesh.

  6. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth Clinicians: Please make as many copies of this ... Philadelphia, for authoring “Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth.” Ask your family doctor to discontinue or provide ...

  8. Gaseous fuels production from dried sewage sludge via air gasification.

    PubMed

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    Gasification is a perspective alternative method of dried sewage sludge thermal treatment. For the purpose of experimental investigations, a laboratory fixed-bed gasifier installation was designed and built. Two sewage sludge (SS) feedstocks, taken from two typical Polish wastewater treatment systems, were analysed: SS1, from a mechanical-biological wastewater treatment system with anaerobic stabilization (fermentation) and high temperature drying; and (SS2) from a mechanical-biological-chemical wastewater treatment system with fermentation and low temperature drying. The gasification results show that greater oxygen content in sewage sludge has a strong influence on the properties of the produced gas. Increasing the air flow caused a decrease in the heating value of the produced gas. Higher hydrogen content in the sewage sludge (from SS1) affected the produced gas composition, which was characterized by high concentrations of combustible components. In the case of the SS1 gasification, ash, charcoal, and tar were produced as byproducts. In the case of SS2 gasification, only ash and tar were produced. SS1 and solid byproducts from its gasification (ash and charcoal) were characterized by lower toxicity in comparison to SS2. However, in all analysed cases, tar samples were toxic.

  9. Nanoceria: a Potential Therapeutic for Dry AMD.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; McGinnis, James F

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blinding diseases. The "dry" form of AMD is the most common form of AMD. In contrast to the treatable neovascular (wet) AMD, no effective treatment is available for dry AMD. In this review, we summarize the animal models and therapeutic strategies for dry AMD. The novel candidates as potential treatment targets and the potential effectiveness of nanoceria as a treatment of dry AMD are also discussed.

  10. Air drying of softwood lumber, Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Treesearch

    George R Sampson; Forrest A. Ruppert

    1985-01-01

    Air-drying rates for two stacks of 2-inch-thick white spruce were observed in the Fairbanks area during summer 1982. The air-drying rate for the same size lumber was also observed during winter 1982-83. Very little drying occurred during the winter. Drying rates in summer were correlated with average daily temperature and average daily dew point to derive predictive...

  11. Accelerating oak air drying by presurfacing

    Treesearch

    W. T. Simpson; R. C. Baltes

    1972-01-01

    A comparison was made between the air-drying rates of rough and presurfaced northern red oak and white oak. In both species, the presurfaced material was about 1/8 inch thinner than the rough material and dried faster than the rough material. The reduction in drying time depends on the method of analyzing the drying curves, but is slightly less than 10 percent.

  12. Intracellular glasses and seed survival in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Buitink, Julia; Leprince, Olivier

    2008-10-01

    So-called orthodox seeds can resist complete desiccation and survive the dry state for extended periods of time. During drying, the cellular viscosity increases dramatically and in the dry state, the cytoplasm transforms into a glassy state. The formation of intracellular glasses is indispensable to survive the dry state. Indeed, the storage stability of seeds is related to the packing density and molecular mobility of the intracellular glass, suggesting that the physico-chemical properties of intracellular glasses provide stability for long-term survival. Whereas seeds contain large amounts of soluble non-reducing sugars, which are known to be good glass formers, detailed in vivo measurements using techniques such as FTIR and EPR spectroscopy reveal that these intracellular glasses have properties that are quite different from those of simple sugar glasses. Intracellular glasses exhibit slow molecular mobility and a high molecular packing, resembling glasses made of mixtures of sugars with proteins, which potentially interact with additional cytoplasmic components such as salts, organic acids and amino acids. Above the glass transition temperature, the cytoplasm of biological systems still exhibits a low molecular mobility and a high stability, which serves as an ecological advantage, keeping the seeds stable under adverse conditions of temperature or water content that bring the tissues out of the glassy state.

  13. Characterization of artificially dried biofilms for air biofiltration studies.

    PubMed

    Cercado, Bibiana; Auria, Richard; Cardenas, Beatriz; Revah, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems associated with the operation of air biofilters is the loss of performance caused by drying of the bioactive support, as the removal capacity of contaminants by the microorganisms is dependent on their water content. In this work, biofilms from a microbial consortium adapted to toluene were grown on stainless steel slides. The biofilms were dried in stoppered flasks with saturated saline solutions to obtain final water activities of 97.4 %, 83.9 %, 74.8 % and 32 %. The biofilms were characterized by a sorption isotherm Type III with toluene; the water desorption isotherm was fitted to the BET model and the biofilm hydrophobicity was also determined. Specific oxygen consumption rates decreased at lower Aw from 60 μg O(2)/mg protein/h to zero activity. Biofilm activity, represented by a toluene consumption rate, and others physical properties presented a critical point between Aw 0.84 and 0.97. Biological activity of dried biofilms was restored either partially or completely, depending on the extent of drying and rewetting method.

  14. Drying and color characteristics of coriander foliage using convective thin-layer and microwave drying.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Mark; Meda, Venkatesh; Tabil, Lope; Opoku, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Heat sensitive properties (aromatic, medicinal, color) provide herbs and spices with their high market value. In order to prevent extreme loss of heat sensitive properties when drying herbs, they are normally dried at low temperatures for longer periods of time to preserve these sensory properties. High energy consumption often results from drying herbs over a long period. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L., Umbelliferae) was dehydrated in two different drying units (thin layer convection and microwave dryers) in order to compare the drying and final product quality (color) characteristics. Microwave drying of the coriander foliage was faster than convective drying. The entire drying process took place in the falling rate period for both microwave and convective dried samples. The drying rate for the microwave dried samples ranged from 42.3 to 48.2% db/min and that of the convective dried samples ranged from 7.1 to 12.5% db/min. The fresh sample color had the lowest L value at 26.83 with higher L values for all dried samples. The results show that convective thin layer dried coriander samples exhibited a significantly greater color change than microwave dried coriander samples. The color change index values for the microwave dried samples ranged from 2.67 to 3.27 and that of the convective dried samples varied from 4.59 to 6.58.

  15. Sverdrup's Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, J.

    2002-12-01

    Sverdrup's contribution to Biological Oceanography were more than merely substantial, they were of fundamental importance. His plan for the training of graduate students at Scripps did not recognize the traditional division of the basic disciplines into separate categories of physics, chemistry, biology and geology. He insisted that Oceanography was a multi-disciplinary subject and that all entering students should study all four subjects. Today this is not very unusual but it was in the early 50s when I took those courses. We biologists carried away from those courses an appreciation of the importance of both spatial and temporal scale. It was of clear relevance to problems of oceanic population and community biology. But there was still more to his biology. He is responsible for a very simple, but very elegant model of the regulation of oceanic primary productivity. The elements of this model are found today in the ten or so highly derivative models. He also published a map predicting global ocean productivity based on the ideas in the model plus some wonderfully intuitive thinking. This map does not differ strongly from those glorious false color ones being published today.

  16. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  17. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  18. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  19. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Organized by topic is a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Described are experiments for measuring rate of water uptake in a shoot; questions to aid students in designing experiments; rise of overhead projection to demonstrate osmosis and blood cell counting; and microbial manufacture of vinegar. (CS)

  20. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes nine biology experiments, including osmosis, genetics; oxygen content of blood, enzymes in bean seedlings, preparation of bird skins, vascularization in bean seedlings, a game called "sequences" (applied to review situations), crossword puzzle for human respiration, and physiology of the woodlouse. (CS)

  1. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes nine biology experiments, including osmosis, genetics; oxygen content of blood, enzymes in bean seedlings, preparation of bird skins, vascularization in bean seedlings, a game called "sequences" (applied to review situations), crossword puzzle for human respiration, and physiology of the woodlouse. (CS)

  2. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jager, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Describes activities which utilize plastic drink bottles and are designed to foster the development of a wide range of biological and ecological concepts. Includes instructions for making a model compost column and presents a model that illustrates open versus closed ecosystems. (DDR)

  3. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  4. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  5. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in biology and environmental education instruction, including, among others, sampling in ecology using an overhead projector, the slide finder as an aid to microscopy, teaching kidney function, and teaching wildlife conservation-sand dune systems. (SK)

  6. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  7. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  8. Biology Excursions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldock, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Provides many useful suggestions and cautions for planning and executing a biology field excursion. Specific procedures are outlined for investigating land communities and coastal areas, and a number of follow-up laboratory activities are described. The appendix provides an extensive bibliography with useful comments on the literature. (JR)

  9. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  10. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  11. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  12. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Organized by topic is a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Described are experiments for measuring rate of water uptake in a shoot; questions to aid students in designing experiments; rise of overhead projection to demonstrate osmosis and blood cell counting; and microbial manufacture of vinegar. (CS)

  13. Biologic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, KATHERINE T.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of new disease pandemics has spurred the development of biologic vaccines, which promise tremendous improvements in global and local health. Several lend themselves to the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases. But the uncertainties of whom to vaccinate raise the question of whether the health care system can make these promising products viable. PMID:22478749

  14. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in biology and environmental education instruction, including, among others, sampling in ecology using an overhead projector, the slide finder as an aid to microscopy, teaching kidney function, and teaching wildlife conservation-sand dune systems. (SK)

  15. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  16. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents content information and/or laboratory procedures and experiments on different biology topics including small-scale cultivation of watercress and its use in water-culture experiments, microbiology of the phylloplane, use of mouthbrooders in science class, and the gene. (DC)

  17. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jager, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Describes activities which utilize plastic drink bottles and are designed to foster the development of a wide range of biological and ecological concepts. Includes instructions for making a model compost column and presents a model that illustrates open versus closed ecosystems. (DDR)

  18. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  19. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents content information and/or laboratory procedures and experiments on different biology topics including small-scale cultivation of watercress and its use in water-culture experiments, microbiology of the phylloplane, use of mouthbrooders in science class, and the gene. (DC)

  20. Composite drying with simultaneous vacuum and toggling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drying is an important mechanical operation in the leather making process. Leather acquires its final texture, consistency and flexibility in the drying operation. Vacuum drying offers fast water removal at a low temperature, which is particularly advantageous to heat-vulnerable chrome-free leathe...

  1. Composite drying with simultaneous vacuum and toggling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drying is one of key steps to govern the physical properties of leather and it is where leather acquires its final texture, consistency and flexibility. Recently we have been working diligently to improve chrome-free leather by optimizing its drying process. We developed a drying method using a co...

  2. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  3. Techniques for drying thick southern pine veneer

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1964-01-01

    Thick veneers cut from southern pine are relatively easy to dry, but they are not easy to dry free of distortion. The research reported here was undertaken to compare five drying systems. Factors evaluated included rate of water loss, degree of distortion, and the effect on strength. Effects on gluability were also briefly studied.

  4. Quality drying of softwood lumber : guidebook - checklist

    Treesearch

    M. R. Milota; J. D. Danielson; R. S. Boone; D. W. Huber

    The IMPROVE Lumber Drying Program is intended to increase awareness of the lumber drying system as a critical component in the manufacture of quality lumber. One objective of the program is to provide easy-to-use tools that a kiln operator can use to maintain an efficient kiln operation and therefore contribute to lumber drying quality. This report is one component of...

  5. Quality drying of hardwood lumber : guidebook -- checklist

    Treesearch

    R. S. Boone; M. R. Milota; J. D. Danielson; D. W. Huber

    The IMPROVE Lumber Drying Program is intended to increase awareness of the lumber drying system as a critical component in the manufacture of quality lumber. One objective of the program is to provide easy-to-use tools that a kiln operator can use to maintain an efficient kiln operation and therefore improve lumber drying quality. This report is one component of the...

  6. Accelerating the kiln drying of oak

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson

    1980-01-01

    Reducing kiln-drying time for oak lumber can reduce energy requirements as well as reduce lumber inventories. In this work, l-inch northern red oak and white oak were kiln dried from green by a combination of individual accelerating techniques– presurfacing, presteaming, accelerated and smooth schedule, and high-temperature drying below 18 percent moisture content....

  7. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  8. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion of kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried...

  10. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, not pliable or leathery....

  11. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2961 Well dried. Well dried means that...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1444 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.1444 Section 51.1444 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1444 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2086 Well dried. Well dried means that...

  14. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  15. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or leathery....

  16. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, and not pliable or leathery....

  17. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2086 Well dried. Well dried means that...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, and not pliable or leathery....

  20. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2961 Well dried. Well dried means that...