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Sample records for dry mouth caused

  1. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  2. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  3. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... protect your teeth may also help your dry mouth condition: Brush with a fluoride toothpaste and floss your teeth. Ask your dentist ... acids. Use a fluoride rinse or brush-on fluoride gel before ... historically to treat dry mouth, such as teas made from marshmallow or slippery ...

  4. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  5. Dry Mouth - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hmoob) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Nepali (नेपाली) Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Ukrainian (українська ) ... नेपाली (Nepali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Russian (Русский) Expand Section Dry Mouth - English Dry Mouth - ...

  6. Evaluation of the dry mouth patient.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the questions "who is the dry mouth patient and how is the dry mouth patient evaluated"? It reviews the clinical features of dry mouth. It presents current treatment options for dry mouth care.

  7. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or at the corners of your mouth Your dentures may no longer fit well, causing sores on the gums Thirstiness Difficulty swallowing or talking Loss of your sense of taste Soreness or pain in the tongue and mouth Cavities (dental caries) Gum disease

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial to Measure Mouth Moisturization and Dry Mouth Relief in Dry Mouth Subjects Using Dry Mouth Products.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anto; Atassi, Mounir; Shneyer, Lucy; Cronin, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    This study examined ratings of two subjective aspects (moisturization and dry mouth relief) that may be changed following the use of dry mouth relief products (an oral gel, an oral rinse, or a mouth spray), in comparison to water over a period of four hours following a single supervised use on two separate occasions. This was a single-center, two site, randomized, examiner blind, four treatment arm, stratified (by dry mouth screening score at baseline), parallel group study in healthy subjects with a self-reported feeling of dry mouth. Prior to product use, subjects rated their current subjective perception of moisturization and dry mouth on an 11-point scale. Subjects then rated the two questions immediately after product use and 30, 60, 90, 120, and 240 minutes later. At the 240-minute time point, subjects also rated global efficacy questions regarding "overall" and "long-lasting" moisturization and dry mouth relief, and overall product opinion. Subjects then used their assigned products at home for three days and the procedures were repeated on Day 4. In total, 300 subjects were randomized to treatment. Compared with water, all test products showed statistically significantly greater improvements over baseline on both Day 1 and Day 4 at most time points, on the area under the curve from baseline for the moisturization and dryness questions, and after 240 minutes for the global efficacy and overall opinion assessments (all p < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the pre-dosing assessments on Day 1 versus Day 4 (p < 0.001) for both efficacy questions. Products were generally well-tolerated. Three different types of dry mouth relief products were shown to provide significant relief of dry mouth and increased feelings of moisturization compared to water using subjective questionnaires.

  9. Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth Clinicians: Please make as many copies of this ... Philadelphia, for authoring “Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth.” Ask your family doctor to discontinue or provide ...

  10. Dry Mouth? Don't Delay Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Dry Mouth? Don' ... or neck cancer. back to top Advice for Consumers If you have persistent dry mouth: Talk to ...

  11. Caries prevention for patients with dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Su, Nan; Marek, Cindy L; Ching, Victor; Grushka, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Patients with xerostomia, or dry mouth, resulting from various causes, are at higher risk for developing caries because of a loss of saliva and its benefits. A loss of saliva increases the acidity of the mouth, which affects many factors that contribute to the development of caries, such as proliferation of acid-producing bacteria, inability to buffer the acid produced by bacteria or from ingested foods, loss of minerals from tooth surfaces and inability to replenish the lost minerals, and loss of lubrication. Currently, a number of new products that can substitute for these functions of saliva or induce production of saliva are available in Canada. Some of these products are reviewed and a protocol for caries prevention in this high-risk population is proposed.

  12. Dry mouth: a critical topic for older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Phuu; Suarez-Durall, Piedad; Mulligan, Roseann

    2015-01-01

    Diminished salivary flow, or dry mouth impacts the oral health of many older adults, dentate and edentulous. As a result typical oral conditions can prove more challenging to both the patient's comfort and home care and the treatment selected by the clinician. This paper will review issues of dry mouth from a clinical and symptomatic perspective and will include the condition's causes, treatment and prevention. We performed a review of PubMed using the words: older adults, dry mouth, xerostomia, radiation-induced xerostomia, and salivary gland hypofunction. We selected 90 articles with a clinical application perspective. When it comes to treatment of dry mouth conditions, either objective or subjective, there are no easy answers as to the best course of action for a specific individual. While most of the cited studies have examined the most difficult cases of dry mouth (e.g., Sjögren's syndrome, and that seen during and post head and neck cancer treatments), there are many older adults who demonstrate dry mouth from the use of multiple medications. This paper presents a summary of the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of dry mouth (salivary hypofunction and xerostomia in older adults). It is important to understand the causes of dry mouth and to educate our patients. Starting a prevention program as early as possible considering the most practical, cost effective and efficient treatments with the best risk-benefit ratio will help to diminish dry mouth symptoms and sequelae. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interventions for the management of dry mouth: topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Furness, Susan; Worthington, Helen V; Bryan, Gemma; Birchenough, Sarah; McMillan, Roddy

    2011-12-07

    Xerostomia (the feeling of dry mouth) is a common symptom especially in older adults. Causes of dry mouth include medications, autoimmune disease (Sjögren's Syndrome), radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer, hormone disorders and infections. To determine which topical treatments for dry mouth are effective in reducing this symptom. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (28 October 2011), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4 2011), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 28 October 2011), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 28 October 2011), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 28 October 2011), AMED via OVID (1985 to 28 October 2011), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 28 October 2011). We included randomised controlled trials of topical interventions such as lozenges, sprays, mouthrinses, gels, oils, chewing gum or toothpastes for the treatment of dry mouth symptom. We classified interventions into two broad categories, saliva stimulants and saliva substitutes, and these were compared with either placebo or another intervention. We included both parallel group and crossover trials. Two or more review authors independently carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. Trial authors were contacted for additional information as required. Thirty-six randomised controlled trials involving 1597 participants met the inclusion criteria. Two trials compared saliva stimulants to placebo, nine trials compared saliva substitutes to placebo, five trials compared saliva stimulants directly with saliva substitutes, 18 trials directly compared two or more saliva substitutes, and two trials directly compared two or more saliva stimulants. Only one trial was at low risk of bias and 17 were at high risk of bias. Due to the range of interventions, comparisons and outcome measures in the trials, meta-analysis was possible for only a few comparisons. Oxygenated glycerol triester (OGT) saliva substitute

  14. Factors associated with dry mouth in dependent Japanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Kakudate, Naoki; Muramatsu, Tsukasa; Endoh, Mami; Satomura, Kazuhito; Koseki, Takeyoshi; Sato, Yuji; Ito, Kayoko; Ogasawara, Tadashi; Nakamura, Seiji; Kishimoto, Etsuo; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Uchiyama, Kimio; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kakinoki, Yasuaki

    2014-03-01

    To identify factors associated with dry mouth. Dry mouth adversely affects oropharyngeal health, particularly in elderly, and can lead to pneumonia. A better understanding of the epidemiology of dry mouth is therefore important in improving treatment strategies and oral health in high-risk elderly patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study involving 383 dependent Japanese elderly individuals (65-84 [n = 167] and ≥85 [n = 216] years) at eight long-term care facilities and hospitals. Thirty-four potential factors associated with dry mouth were examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. The primary outcome was dry mouth, as diagnosed by tongue dorsum moisture. We identified that body mass index and severity of physical disability were identified as a potential factors associated with dry mouth in the super-elderly (≥85 years) group, whereas severity of physical disability, outcome measurement time, high daily water consumption, mouth breathing, use of antidepressants and diuretics, and high frequency of daily brushing (≥2 times per day; Odds ratio: 5.56; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.52-20.00) were associated with dry mouth in the 65- to 84-year-old group. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a link between frequency of daily brushing and dry mouth and suggests that tooth brushing should be encouraged in high-risk dependent Japanese elderly (65-84 years), particularly those taking antidepressants and/or diuretics. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [New remedy for dry mouth using the gustatory-salivary reflex].

    PubMed

    Kuriwada-Satoh, Shizuko; Sasano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Patients with dry mouth are increasing in Japan due to the country's super-aging society and stressful modern society. Dry mouth affects quality of life, including difficulty with speech or swallowing, and also causes aspiration pneumonia and, respiratory infection. Moreover, dry mouth closely relates to taste dysfunction, resulting in malnutrition, a common risk of nursing care in the elderly. Against these backgrounds, dry mouth has recently been a target of social concern. Drugs for dry mouth such as M3, a muscarinic agonist, have been widely used: however, these drugs have serious side effects, such as vomiting, sweating and/or digestive disorders. We examined the gustatory-salivary reflex to explore a remedy for dry mouth. We have demonstrated that umami stimulation increases saliva from both minor- and major salivary-glands, and that the effect is longer-lasting than with the other four basic tastes. Stimulating the umami response could therefore be a safe and useful remedy for dry mouth.

  16. Factors affecting institutionalized older peoples' self-perceived dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chia; Chu, Chiao-Lee; Ho, Ching-Sung; Lan, Shou-Jen; Chen, Wen-Yi; Liang, Yia-Wung; Hsieh, Yen-Ping

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting institutionalized older peoples' self-perceived dry mouth. This cross-sectional study was conducted on elderly residents at 22 long-term care facilities. A total of 165 questionnaires were returned from 13 senior citizen welfare institutions (SCWIs) and nine nursing homes. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data obtained. The results showed that the type of long-term care (LTC) facility, regular oral examinations, wearing dentures, and the ability to chew sticky foods affected self-perceived dry mouth. This study determined an association between the type of LTC facility where the participants lived and self-perceived dry mouth. The results indicated the importance of providing oral care in order to improve and prevent dry mouth among institutionalized older people living in SCWIs who do not undergo regular oral examinations, wear dentures, and have difficulty chewing sticky foods.

  17. Correct Diagnosis Provides Relief for Those with Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... issue of AGD Impact , the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) monthly newsmagazine. Dry mouth, also known as ...

  18. Aloe vera for Dry Mouth Denture Patients – Palliative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Kumar, M Praveen; Samee, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Xerostomia (dry mouth) is dryness of the mouth which is due to reduced salivary flow. Lack of adequate saliva causes discomfort in denture wearing patients and decreases retention of dentures. The ability of saliva to wet the tissue surface is one of the most important properties for oral comfort and retention of complete denture in dry mouth patients. Aim This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the wetting ability of therapeutic Aloe vera saliva substitute and commercially available Aqwet saliva substitute on heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Contact angle of liquid saliva substitute was considered as an indicator of wettability. Materials and Methods Aloe vera liquid (Aloe vera – Group I) and Aqwet saliva substitute (Aqwet – Group II) were compared in terms of their wetting ability. Forty samples of heat-polymerized acrylic resin were fabricated and divided into two groups with 20 samples in each. Advancing, receding contact angles and angle of hysteresis were measured using contact angle goniometer and DSA4 software analysis. Mann-Whitney U test was applied for statistical analysis of the study. Results The mean advancing angle and receding angle of Group I (Aloe vera) was smaller than Group II (Aqwet). Mean angle of hysteresis of Group I (Aloe vera) was higher than Group II (Aqwet). Mann-Whitney U test revealed that there is no significant difference in contact angles between the two groups. Conclusion Wetting ability of Group I (Aloe vera) saliva substitute was found to be better compared to Group II (Aqwet) on heat-polymerized acrylic resin. PMID:28764287

  19. Dry mouth: Xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, Agnieszka M

    2016-07-01

    Mouth dryness may present as salivary gland hypofunction (SGH), xerostomia or both. It is considered one of the most underappreciated, underdiagnosed and undermanaged oral health conditions. Despite its common presentation and adverse impact on life quality, it is also generally poorly understood. Increased awareness of the condition is important in addressing these problems. This article discusses SGH and xerostomia, and the associated intra-oral and extra-oral implications. It also summarises currently available management approaches and the evidence behind them. SGH and xerostomia are complex problems. None of the currently available management approaches are entirely satisfactory. Addressing the causative or contributing factors is therefore paramount. While oral health complaints are generally left up to the dental professional to manage, the nature of mouth dryness necessitates increased dialogue between the dental and 
medical professions to ensure optimal patient care.

  20. 2. Detail gate spanning mouth of dry dock between Piers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Detail gate spanning mouth of dry dock between Piers 10 and 11, view is to southwest, with Pier 10 in distance left. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 7. View from gate spanning mouth of Dry Dock 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View from gate spanning mouth of Dry Dock 5, showing (1-r) north wall of Pier 10 and south wall of Pier 11. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Science Signaling Podcast for 6 June 2017: Calcium signaling and dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Ambudkar, Indu; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2017-06-06

    This Podcast features a conversation with Indu Ambudkar, senior author of a Research Resource that appears in the 6 June 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about how activation of the cation channel TRPM2 is involved in radiation-induced dry mouth. Patients who receive radiation therapy for head and neck cancers often develop dry mouth as a side effect, and this condition is frequently permanent. Radiation does not kill cells in the salivary gland, yet it causes the acinar cells of the gland to reduce the amount of saliva they secrete. Liu et al found that radiation-induced activation of the cation channel TRPM2 triggered cleavage of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) sensor STIM1, thus inhibiting store-operated Ca(2+) entry and interfering with saliva production. These findings identify proteins that could potentially be targeted to prevent dry mouth in patients undergoing radiation therapy.Listen to Podcast. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. [Electrostimulation for the treatment of a dry mouth feeling].

    PubMed

    Janssen, M J E J; Bots, C P; Brand, H S

    2015-10-01

    A 67-year-old woman suffered from a burning mouth feeling for 1.5 years and was referred by her dentist to a saliva clinic. At the clinic persistent xerostomia was diagnosed, and Sjögren's syndrome was suspected. After 1 year, a new measurement of the saliva secretion was carried out, which revealed a further decline in saliva secretion rate. The patient was consequently treated with an intra-oral electrostimulating device in order to stimulate the saliva secretion rate and reduce the feeling of a dry mouth. After 2 weeks, the patient experienced a considerable improvement of the subjective oral dryness.

  4. Whey protein mouth drying influenced by thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Bull, Stephanie P; Hong, Yuchun; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Parker, Jane K; Faka, Marianthi; Methven, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    Whey proteins are becoming an increasingly popular functional food ingredient. There are, however, sensory properties associated with whey protein beverages that may hinder the consumption of quantities sufficient to gain the desired nutritional benefits. One such property is mouth drying. The influence of protein structure on the mouthfeel properties of milk proteins has been previously reported. This paper investigates the effect of thermal denaturation of whey proteins on physicochemical properties (viscosity, particle size, zeta-potential, pH), and relates this to the observed sensory properties measured by qualitative descriptive analysis and sequential profiling. Mouthcoating, drying and chalky attributes built up over repeated consumption, with higher intensities for samples subjected to longer heating times (p < 0.05). Viscosity, pH, and zeta-potential were found to be similar for all samples, however particle size increased with longer heating times. As the pH of all samples was close to neutral, this implies that neither the precipitation of whey proteins at low pH, nor their acidity, as reported in previous literature, can be the drying mechanisms in this case. The increase in mouth drying with increased heating time suggests that protein denaturation is a contributing factor and a possible mucoadhesive mechanism is discussed.

  5. Protein and mucin retention on oral mucosal surfaces in dry mouth patients.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rashida; Osailan, Samira M; Challacombe, Stephen J; Urquhart, David; Proctor, Gordon B

    2010-06-01

    Oral homeostasis depends largely on proteins and mucins present in saliva that coat all oral surfaces. The present study compared the protein composition of residual fluid on mucosal surfaces in subjects with normal salivary flow with that of patients with dry mouth caused by salivary hypofunction. Samples of residual mucosal fluid were collected using paper strips and then analysed by protein electrophoresis and immunoblotting. In both patients and controls, residual fluids on mucosal surfaces (except the anterior tongue in control subjects) had higher protein concentrations than unstimulated whole-mouth saliva. High-molecular-weight mucin (MUC5B) was present in greater amounts on the anterior tongue than on other surfaces in control subjects. In dry mouth patients who were unable to provide a measurable saliva sample, MUC5B was often still present on all mucosal surfaces but in reduced amounts on the anterior tongue. The membrane-bound mucin, MUC1, was prominent on buccal and labial surfaces in patients and controls. Statherin was still present on surfaces that were dried to remove salivary fluid, suggesting that it may be adsorbed as a protein pellicle. It is concluded that oral mucosal surfaces in dry mouth patients can retain MUC5B and other salivary proteins, although the functional integrity of these proteins is uncertain.

  6. [Dry mouth; possible cause--pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Vissink, A; van Nieuw Amerongen, A; Wesseling, H; 's-Gravenmade, E J

    1992-03-01

    Many elderly complain about oral dryness. This complaint can be the result of the use of drugs, because many drugs, such as anti-depressives, anti-psychotics and anti-hypertensives, have an anti-cholinergic or anti-adrenergic action. Knowledge of this potential side-effect of drugs as well as adjustment of schedules of drug usage may result in (partly) relief of dryness-related complaints. In this paper first of all mechanisms that underly negative regulation of salivary secretion are discussed. An overview is given of drugs with an salivary secretion inhibitory action. In addition, suggestions are presented to manage drug-induced hyposalivation.

  7. Dry Mouth and Dietary Quality Among Older Adults in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Chen, Haiying; Bell, Ronny A.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Kohrman, Teresa; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To quantify: (1) prevalence of dry mouth; (2) association of dry mouth with beverage intake and dietary quality; and (3) association of dry mouth with self-reported dietary accommodations to oral health deficits. Design Cross-sectional study; data from self-reports. Participants A multi-stage cluster sampling design was used to recruit 622 participants aged 60+ from rural North Carolina counties with substantial African American and American Indian populations. Measurements Data included the 11-item Xerostomia Inventory (XI); higher scores connote greater impact from dry mouth; a food frequency questionnaire (converted into Health Eating Index-2005 scores); and survey items on foods modified before consumption or avoided due to oral health problems. Results Dry mouth was associated with being female, lower education, and income below the poverty level. Although overall beverage consumption did not vary with dry mouth, consumption of certain sugar-sweetened beverages was positively associated with dry mouth. Overall dietary quality did not differ with dry mouth, but more severe dry mouth was associated with lower intake of whole grains and higher intakes of total fruits. Dry mouth was strongly associated with self-reported modification and avoidance of foods. Those in the highest tertile of dry mouth were more likely to modify several foods compared to the lowest tertile, and were more likely to avoid three or more foods. Conclusion Older adults appear to modify foods or selectively avoid foods in response to perceived dry mouth. Despite these behaviors, dry mouth does not result in reduced dietary quality. PMID:21391935

  8. Side Effects: Mouth and Throat Problems

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatments may cause dental, mouth, and throat side effects such as changes in taste (dysgeusia), dry mouth (xerostomia), infections, mouth sores, pain or swelling in your mouth (oral mucositis), sensitivity to foods, and swallowing problems.

  9. The Impact of Dry Mouth on Fluid Intake and Overactive Bladder Symptoms in Women taking Fesoterodine

    PubMed Central

    Weissbart, Steven J.; Lewis, Rusell; Smith, Ariana L; Harvie, Heidi H; Miller, Janis M; Arya, Lily A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the long-term relationships between dry mouth, fluid intake and overactive bladder symptoms in women undergoing treatment with fesoterodine. We hypothesize that women who experience dry mouth will increase their fluid intake and worsen their urinary symptoms. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective ancillary study to a 9 month open-label trial of fesoterodine for women with urgency urinary incontinence. Fluid intake was measured and compared according to reported dry mouth. Multivariable analysis was used to study the interaction between dry mouth, fluid intake and urinary symptoms. Results During the study, women without dry mouth (n=407) significantly reduced their fluid intake (mean decrease of 172.1 mL, median decrease of 118.3 mL, p= 0.02), while women with dry mouth (n=91) did not (mean decrease of 95.8 mL, median decrease of 118.3 mL, p=0.54). On univariable analysis, a greater proportion of women who experienced dry mouth reported improvement in their urinary symptoms compared to women without dry mouth (60.5% versus 47.2%, p=0.03). On multivariable analysis, Black/ African American women were less likely to report dry mouth (OR 0.4 95%CI 0.2–0.9, p=0.03) and older women were less likely to report improvement in urinary symptoms (OR 0.98 95%CI 0.96–0.99, p= 0.003). Factors not associated with improvement in urinary symptoms on multiple regression were dry mouth, baseline fluid intake volume, change in fluid intake volume, and caffeine intake volume. Conclusions In women with overactive bladder receiving fesoterodine, dry mouth may prevent women from restricting fluid intake, but does not diminish treatment efficacy. PMID:26682757

  10. Impact of Dry Mouth on Fluid Intake and Overactive Bladder Symptoms in Women taking Fesoterodine.

    PubMed

    Weissbart, Steven J; Lewis, Rusell; Smith, Ariana L; Harvie, Heidi S; Miller, Janis M; Arya, Lily A

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the long-term relationships between dry mouth, fluid intake and overactive bladder symptoms in women undergoing treatment with fesoterodine. We hypothesized that women who experienced dry mouth would increase their fluid intake and worsen their urinary symptoms. We conducted a prospective ancillary study to a 9-month open-label trial of fesoterodine for women with urgency urinary incontinence. Fluid intake was measured and compared according to reported dry mouth. Multivariable analysis was used to study the interaction between dry mouth, fluid intake and urinary symptoms. During the study 407 women without dry mouth significantly reduced their fluid intake (mean decrease 172.1 ml, median 118.3 ml, p = 0.02), while 91 women with dry mouth did not (mean decrease 95.8 ml, median 118.3 ml, p = 0.54). On univariable analysis a greater proportion of women who experienced dry mouth reported improvement in their urinary symptoms compared to women without dry mouth (60.5% vs 47.2%, p = 0.03). On multivariable analysis black women were less likely to report dry mouth (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9, p = 0.03) and older women were less likely to report improvement in urinary symptoms (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-0.99, p = 0.003). Factors not associated with improvement in urinary symptoms on multiple regression were dry mouth, baseline fluid intake volume, change in fluid intake volume and caffeine intake volume. In women with overactive bladder receiving fesoterodine dry mouth may prevent restriction of fluid intake but does not diminish treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of oral drying and astringent liquids on the perception of mouth wetness.

    PubMed

    Guest, Steve; Essick, Greg; Young, Mike; Phillips, Nicola; McGlone, Francis

    2008-03-18

    A feeling of mouth dryness occurs from actual drying of the oral surfaces or from sampling astringent substances such as polyphenols (e.g., tannins in brewed tea and wine), which bind proline-rich proteins in saliva to reduce its lubricity. Here we investigated the interactions between physical drying and the effect of polyphenols on the subjective state of oral hydration. Twelve subjects rated the perceived wetness/dryness of their mouth using a labeled magnitude scale, after the mouth was dried with air for 35 s, or the subjects waited for an equal period of time during which the mouth was not dried. Subsequently, 1.5 mL volumes of an astringent solution (5 g L(-1) tannic acid in distilled water), distilled drinking water, or a sweet solution (40 g L(-1) sugar in mango tea with no tannins) were introduced into the mouth. After swishing and swallowing, the subject rated the wetness of the mouth for 4.3 min. The liquids were found to differ in their ability to wet the mouth (p<0.0001). The least wet sensations were reported for the astringent solution, on average; however, the differences among liquids were not equally pronounced at all times during the observation period (p<0.02). When the mouth was normally hydrated (i.e., had not been dried), the wetting effectiveness of the three liquids, based on the ratings, differed most greatly immediately after they had been received and swallowed. In contrast, when the mouth was dried, the liquids did not differ at this time. That the astringent solution did not have less wetting effectiveness in the dried mouth was attributed to the absence of precipitable salivary proteins. The findings suggest that the refreshment value of astringent drinks, based on their perceived wetting effectiveness, may vary with the state of oral hydration.

  12. Relieving Dry Mouth: Varying Levels of pH Found in Bottled Water.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Bailey Jean; Spencer, Angela; Haywood, Van; Konchady, Gayathri

    2017-07-01

    It is estimated that 30% of people older than 60 years suffer from hyposalivation or dry mouth. Drinking water frequently has been recommended as a safe, non-pharmacologic way to combat hyposalivation. The saliva in patients with dry mouth is acidic. Beverages consumed daily may have an erosive potential on teeth. The pH and the mineral content of the beverage determine its erosive potential. An acidic beverage, therefore, may have harmful effects on mineralized tooth structures, causing erosion of enamel, dentin, and cementum. Because bottled water is both convenient and easily available, the authors tested the pH of eight common brands of bottled water. (One brand included two different bottle types, for a total of nine bottled waters tested.) To standardize the pH electrode, pH buffers of 4.7 and 10 were used. The pH was measured using the Denver Instruments basic pH meter. Six recordings were used for each brand and then averaged to report the pH. Two of the bottled water samples tested were below the critical level of 5.2 pH to 5.5 pH, the level at which erosion of enamel occurs. Six of the samples tested were below the critical pH of 6.8, at which erosion of root dentin occurs. The authors conclude that both patients and clinicians incorrectly presume bottled water to be innocuous. Clinicians should be cognizant of the erosive potential of different brands of bottled water to both educate patients and to recommend water with neutral or alkaline pH for patients with symptoms of dry mouth to prevent further deterioration and demineralization of tooth structure.

  13. Dry mouth and denture plaque microflora in complete denture and palatal obturator prosthesis wearers.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Mamoru; Nishi, Yasuhiro; Seto, Katsura; Kamashita, Yuji; Nagaoka, Eiichi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of dry mouth with denture plaque microflora in patients with palatal obturator prostheses from the viewpoint of infection control. Thirty palatal obturator prosthesis wearers were compared with 30 healthy maxillary complete denture wearers. Dry mouth was examined using a moisture-checking device and was diagnosed by the measured moisture levels. Denture plaque was collected by rubbing the mucosal surface of the denture with a swab; collected microorganisms were cultured and identified using culture-dependent methods. The number of colonising microorganisms and prevalence of microorganisms were examined according to the type of prostheses and presence of dry mouth using nonparametric tests and frequency analysis (α = 0.05). The prevalence of Candida spp. and Staphylococcus spp. in palatal obturator prostheses was significantly higher than that in complete dentures. In palatal obturator prostheses, the total number of colonising microorganisms showed no significant differences between the groups with and without dry mouth on each side of the prostheses. However, the prevalence of Candida spp. and Staphylococcus spp. in the group with dry mouth was significantly higher than that in the group without dry mouth. The number of microorganisms and moisture levels of palatal obturator prosthesis wearers showed a significantly negative correlation with Candida spp. and Staphylococcus spp., but a positive correlation with Neisseria spp. It was concluded that palatal obturator prosthesis wearers with a dry mouth have greater colonisation by Candida spp. and Staphylococcus spp. than do complete denture wearers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Perception of dry mouth in a sample of community-dwelling older adults in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Nokubi, T; Sajima, H; Kobayashi, S; Hata, K; Ono, T; Ettinger, R L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of perceived dry mouth among a group of independently-living elderly persons in Japan, and to determine its association with general disease, medication, and dental status, as well as its effect on oral function. The study population consisted of participants of the Senior Citizens' College. The subjective sensations of oral dryness on waking and while eating a meal were measured by a questionnaire. The number of usable questionnaires was 1003 or 77.9%. The mean age of the subjects was 66.3 +/- 4.2 years, and 53.0% were male. More than one-third (37.8%) of the subjects reported oral dryness on waking. Only 9.1% of them noticed a subjective feeling of dry mouth during eating. Persons who had at least one of these symptoms made up 41.0%. A multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated the following results: Perception of dry mouth on waking was more frequent among males (p < 0.001), persons who had a low BMI (p < 0.05), and those taking two or more prescribed drugs (p < 0.01). Sensation of dry mouth when eating was more frequent among subjects with a low BMI (p < 0.001) and those who wore a denture in the maxillary arch (p < 0.05). Perception of dry mouth when eating was associated with self-assessed chewing ability (p < 0.01) and dissatisfaction with speaking clearly (p < 0.05), as well as dental status. However, dissatisfaction with tasting a meal had a significant relationship with the reports of mouth dryness on waking (p < 0.01). Our findings suggest that a substantially higher percentage of persons have the perception of dry mouth on waking than when eating, which was associated with medications, being male, and having a low BMI. This perception may influence oral function, especially the reported dissatisfaction with tasting foods.

  15. Changes in Saliva Rheological Properties and Mucin Glycosylation in Dry Mouth.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, N M A; Shirlaw, P; Pramanik, R; Carpenter, G H; Proctor, G B

    2015-12-01

    Saliva is vital for the maintenance of normal oral physiology and mucosal health. The loss of salivary function can have far-reaching consequences, as observed with dry mouth, which is associated with increased orodental disease, speech impairment, dysphagia, and a significant negative effect on quality of life. The timely diagnosis of oral dryness is vital for the management of orodental disease and any associated often-undiagnosed systemic disease (e.g., Sjögren syndrome). Our aim was to investigate differences in mucin glycoproteins and saliva rheological properties between sufferers and nonsufferers of dry mouth in order to understand the relationship between saliva composition, rheological properties, and dryness perception and provide additional potential diagnostic markers. All patients exhibited objective and subjective oral dryness, irrespective of etiology. Over half of the patients (n = 20, 58.8%) had a saliva secretion rate above the gland dysfunction cutoff of 0.1 mL/min. Mucin (MUC5B and MUC7) concentrations were generally similar or higher in patients. Despite the abundance of these moisture-retaining proteins, patients exhibited reduced mucosal hydration (wetness) and significantly lower saliva spinnbarkeit (stringiness), suggesting a loss of the lubricating and retention/adhesion properties of saliva, which, at least partially, are associated with mucin glycoproteins. Over 90% of patients with dry mouth (DMPs) consistently had unstimulated whole mouth saliva (UWMS) spinnbarkeit below the proposed normal cutoff (10 mm). Further analysis of mucins revealed the reduced glycosylation of mucins in DMPs compared to healthy controls. Our data indicate that UWMS mucin concentrations are not reduced in dry mouth but that the mucin structure (glycosylation) is altered. UWMS from DMPs had reduced spinnbarkeit, the assessment of which, in conjunction with sialometry, could improve sensitivity for the diagnosis of dry mouth. Additionally, it may be useful to

  16. Comparison of peripheral anticholinergic effects of antidepressants: dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Rafaelsen, O J; Clemmesen, L; Lund, H; Mikkelsen, P L; Bolwig, T G

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one healthy volunteers were given single doses of placebo or antidepressants corresponding to average daily doses of patient medications. Spontaneous whole mouth and parotid salivation was measured two, six, and ten hours after drug administration in session 1; in session 2 after ten hours. The results indicate that a subdivision of antidepressants into four groups can be made according to inhibitory effect on salivation: (a) isocarboxazide and lithium citrate with no effect, (b) zimelidine and nomifensine with slight effect, (c) imipramine oxide and mianserin with moderate effect and (d) maprotiline, nortriptyline, clomipramine, imipramine, and amitriptyline with pronounced effect. Research implications and predictive value for new antidepressants are discussed.

  17. A randomized clinical trial in subjects with dry mouth evaluating subjective perceptions of an experimental oral gel, an oral rinse and a mouth spray compared to water.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anto; Siddiqi, Muhammad; Cronin, Matthew; DiLauro, Thomas S; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2016-02-01

    This multicenter, randomized, parallel group study analyzed the effectiveness of an experimental oral gel, a commercially available oral rinse and a commercially available mouth spray versus water alone at relieving self-reported symptoms of dry mouth over a 28-day home use treatment period. The effects of the study treatments on dry mouth-related quality of life (QoL) were also investigated. Eligible subjects were stratified by dry mouth severity (mild, moderate or severe) and randomized to receive one of the study treatments. Prior to first use they completed a questionnaire designed to assess their baseline dry mouth-related QoL. Following first use and on Day 8 (2 hours post-treatment only) and Day 29, subjects completed the modified Product Performance and Attributes Questionnaire (PPAQ) I at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 hours post-treatment. Subjects further assessed treatment performance using the PPAQ II questionnaire on Days 8 and 29 and the dry mouth-related QoL questionnaire on Day 29. In 396 randomized subjects almost all comparisons of responses to PPAQ I, including those for the primary endpoint (response to PPAQ I Question 1 'Relieving the discomfort of dry mouth' after 2 hours on Day 29), were statistically significant in favor of active treatment groups versus water (P < 0.05). All comparisons of responses to PPAQ II on Days 8 and 29 were statistically significant in favor of active treatments versus water (P < 0.05). Moreover, nearly all comparisons for dry mouth-related QoL scores on Day 29 were statistically significant in favor of the active treatments versus water. All the dry mouth management strategies in this trial were well tolerated.

  18. A new medication for treatment of dry mouth in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    al-Hashimi, I; Taylor, S E

    2001-04-01

    Traditionally, treatment of dry mouth in SS is focused on palliative measures (using salivary substitutes). However, due to the dynamic nature of the oral cavity, the salivary substitute is removed from the mouth during swallowing. Therefore, the duration of effect of salivary substitutes is short. Another drawback is that salivary substitutes do not provide the protective roles of saliva. Effective treatment of dry mouth requires increasing salivary output. Gustatory stimulation of the salivary glands with sugar free gum and sugar free candies may be effective in inducing salivary output, however, they impose significant inconvenience on the patient which can compromise compliance. Pharmacological stimulants provide an alternative effective measure and improve compliance. Both Salagen and Evoxac are FDA approved salivary stimulants. They are effective, and safe given awareness of their indications, contraindications, potential adverse effects, and patient's tolerance.

  19. The Null Effect of Chewing Gum During Hemodialysis on Dry Mouth.

    PubMed

    Duruk, Nazike; Eşer, Ismet

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of chewing gum during hemodialysis on dry mouth and its symptoms. The imposition of fluid restriction and the use of medications that reduce saliva production may lead to dry mouth. This study is a randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover experimental study. The subjects consisted of 61 hemodialysis patients recruited from 4 dialysis centers in southern Turkey. The data were collected using a Patient Identification Form, a Form for Assessing the Symptoms of Dry Mouth, and a Patient Follow-up Form. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of flow rates. The salivary flow rates of the patients increased during the first hour on the day when gum was chewed, and this increase was statistically significant. However, no significant difference was found between the salivary flow rates at the 0- and 4-hour time points on the day when gum was chewed (P > .05). In addition, the salivary pH values were in the normal range on both days, although the pH values tended to be more acidic on the day when gum was not chewed. Overall, it was found that chewing gum for 15 minutes each hour during a hemodialysis session did not increase the saliva amount, maintain the pH value of the saliva within a normal range, or control dry mouth symptoms.

  20. Small bowel obstruction caused by dried apple

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sally; Hong, Khiem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel obstruction in a virgin abdomen is an uncommon surgical condition. While malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease and foreign body are the main reported causes, undigested food bezoar causing bowel obstruction is a rare entity. We report a case of small bowel obstruction secondary to dried preserved apple having re-expanded within the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case A 69 year old male presented with severe abdominal distension, generalized abdominal tenderness and obstipation for 1 week. Small bowel obstruction (SBO) was confirmed on plain abdominal X-ray and CT imaging. An emergency explorative laparatomy identified a sausage-shaped intra-luminal foreign body obstructing the distal ileum. An enterotomy was performed which revealed a rehydrated, donut-shaped piece of dried apple. Discussion Swallowed items that pass through the pylorus rarely cause obstruction as they are usually small enough to pass through the rest of the bowel without difficulty. We postulate that in our patient that the dried apple was originally small enough to pass through the pylorus. However during small bowel, its’ highly absorbable nature resulted in an increase in size that prevented its’ passage through the ileocecal valve. A simple in-vitro experiment discovered that dried apple has a potential to reabsorb fluid and expand up to 35% of its initial size within 72 h. Conclusion This report illustrates the potential for dried food substances to cause intra-luminal SBO after significant expansion with rehydration. PMID:25841159

  1. Testing pilocarpine drops for dry mouth in advanced cancer using n-of-1 trials: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Nikles, Jane; Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Hardy, Janet; Agar, Meera; Senior, Hugh; Carmont, Sue-Ann; Schluter, Philip J; Good, Phillip; Vora, Rohan; Currow, David

    2015-12-01

    Dry mouth is a common and troublesome symptom in palliative care. Pilocarpine is a cholinergic agent that promotes salivation. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using n-of-1 trials to test pilocarpine drops compared to placebo, for patients of palliative care units with advanced cancer, who experienced dry mouth. This was an N-of-1 study, in which each participant was offered three cycles of pilocarpine drops 4% (6 mg tds) (3 days) and placebo drops (3 days) in random order. Participants were patients of specialist palliative care services with advanced cancer assessed as having a dry mouth, defined as having a score of ⩾ 3 on an 11-point self-rated xerostomia numerical rating scale, from any cause. Patients self-completed a diary using validated symptom and quality-of-life scores. The randomisation order was unmasked at the end of each person's trial by a clinician independent of the trial to allow a treatment decisions for individual patients to be made. Nine patients completed at least 1 cycle; 33 cycles of data were completed in total, comprising 438 doses of pilocarpine. Four patients completed the trial: two responded and two did not. Most withdrawals related to deteriorating condition, unacceptable toxicity, non-compliance with study procedures or withdrawal of consent. Many issues contributed to slow recruitment and high withdrawal rate. The formulation of pilocarpine drops proved unacceptable to most participants. More work is required to determine an appropriate formulation, dose and method of delivery and then a retest of pilocarpine drops for this symptom. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Mouth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard to eat, drink or even smile. Some common mouth problems include Cold sores - painful sores on the lips and around the mouth, caused by a virus Canker sores - painful sores in the mouth, caused ...

  3. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself? About Stephen J. Schueler, M.D News Advertising How It Works FAQ for Consumers FAQ for Physicians Testimonials Site Map Terms of Use Contact Us FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a ...

  4. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Błochowiak, Katarzyna; Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20-72 years (average: 28.25 years). Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions.

  5. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years). Results Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions. PMID:26985175

  6. Potential sources of mouth drying in beverages fortified with dairy proteins: A comparison of casein- and whey-rich ingredients.

    PubMed

    Withers, C A; Lewis, M J; Gosney, M A; Methven, L

    2014-03-01

    Oral nutritional supplement drinks (ONS) are beverages high in dairy proteins that are prescribed to individuals at risk of malnutrition. Consumption of ONS is poor in elderly care facilities, with patients commenting that the sensory attributes of these drinks reduce their enjoyment and willingness to consume. Mouth drying is an attribute of ONS found to build with repeated consumption, which may further limit liking of these products. This study investigated the sources of drying sensations by sequential profiling, with a trained sensory panel rating a range of model milk systems and ONS over repeated sips and during after-effects. Sequential profiling found that fortification of milk with both caseinate and whey protein concentrate significantly increased the perception of mouth drying over repeated consumption, increasing by between 35 and 85% over consumption of 40mL. Enrichment of ONS with either whey protein concentrate or milk protein concentrate to a total protein content of 8.7% (wt/wt) resulted in whey and casein levels of 4.3:4.4% and 1.7:7.0% respectively. The product higher in whey protein was substantially more mouth drying, implying that whey proteins may be the most important contributor to mouth drying in ONS. However, efforts to mask mouth drying of protein-fortified milk by increasing sweetness or fat level were unsuccessful at the levels tested. Increasing the viscosity of protein-fortified milk led to a small but significant reduction in mouth drying. However, this approach was not successful when tested within complete ONS. Further analysis is required into the mechanism of protein-derived mouth drying to mask negative sensations and improve the enjoyment and consumption of protein-rich ONS. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Two Persons with Multiple Disabilities Use a Mouth-Drying Response to Reduce the Effects of Their Drooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.

    2009-01-01

    These two studies involved a boy and a man with multiple disabilities, who were taught to use a mouth-drying response to reduce the effects of their drooling. Both studies relied on microswitch technology to monitor the drying response and follow it with positive stimulation (i.e., during intervention). In Study I, the boy performed the drying…

  8. Two Persons with Multiple Disabilities Use a Mouth-Drying Response to Reduce the Effects of Their Drooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.

    2009-01-01

    These two studies involved a boy and a man with multiple disabilities, who were taught to use a mouth-drying response to reduce the effects of their drooling. Both studies relied on microswitch technology to monitor the drying response and follow it with positive stimulation (i.e., during intervention). In Study I, the boy performed the drying…

  9. Role of Oral Mucosal Fluid and Electrolyte Absorption and Secretion in Dry Mouth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo H; Castro, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Dry mouth is induced by dehydration of the oral mucosa, resulting from an imbalance of fluid supply and clearance within the oral cavity. Saliva is the major source of oral mucosal fluid, whereas oral fluid clearance includes evaporation and swallowing. Oral mucosal fluid absorption has been suggested to play a critical role in oral fluid clearance; over-absorption of water and ions across the oral mucosa under certain conditions may be a major component for oral fluid imbalance, leading to mucosal dehydration. While numerous studies have confirmed that the oral mucosa absorbs fluid and electrolytes, the pathways and mechanisms mediating the absorption remain undefined. The transcellular pathway regulating oral mucosal epithelial absorption includes aquaporins, epithelial Na+ channel and/or Na+/H+ exchanger, whereas the paracellular transport is likely to be mediated by tight junctions. The regulatory mechanisms of these pathways require further elucidation. It remains unclear whether the oral mucosa also secretes fluid and ions into the oral cavity. Although intercellular lipids secreted by epithelial cells form the major barrier to paracellular water and ion transport, the role and regulation of these lipids in oral mucosal hydration in physiological and pathological conditions need further investigation. Delineation of these mechanisms will be conducive to the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions for dry mouth.

  10. Impact of dry mouth and hyposalivation on oral health-related quality of life of elderly Japanese.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Kazunori; Matsuda, Ken-ichi; Morii, Kentaro; Wada, Masahiro; Hazeyama, Tomohiro; Nokubi, Takashi; Ettinger, Ronald L

    2007-02-01

    To determine the association of hyposalivation and the perception of dry mouth with oral health-related quality of life for independently living elderly. The study sample consisted of 287 participants (mean age, 66.1 years) at a Senior Citizen educational system. Stimulated salivary flow rates during chewing were measured. The OHIP-14 to measure the impact of oral conditions on health-related quality of life was used, and summary OHIP-14 scores combining the response codes for the 14 items were analyzed. A logistic regression analysis showed that a higher OHIP-14 score indicating a poorer quality of life was related to fewer residual teeth, perception of dry mouth on eating (OR: 4.01, P = .012) and hyposalivation (OR: 2.71, P = .006). It is suggested that both dry mouth and hyposalivation are important problems influencing the quality of life in independently living, relatively healthy elderly Japanese.

  11. Successful Treatment of Dry Mouth and Dry Eye Symptoms in Sjögren's Syndrome Patients With Oral Pilocarpine: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Adjustment Study.

    PubMed

    Papas, Athena S; Sherrer, Yvonne S; Charney, Michael; Golden, Harvey E; Medsger, Thomas A; Walsh, Bridget T; Trivedi, Madhu; Goldlust, Barry; Gallagher, Susan C

    2004-08-01

    : Sjögren's syndrome is characterized by the presence of xerostomia and/or xerophthalmia. Pilocarpine, a muscarinic cholinergic agonist, has been proven to be efficacious in treating radiation-induced xerostomia (up to 30 mg/day) and symptoms of dry mouth in Sjögren's patients (up to 20 mg/day). : To compare the safety and efficacy of oral pilocarpine (dose-adjusted) versus placebo in the treatment of dry eye and dry mouth symptoms in Sjögren's syndrome at 6 and 12 weeks. : In this 11-center, 256-patient placebo-controlled study, the safety and efficacy of oral pilocarpine (20 mg to 30 mg daily) for relief of Sjögren's-related dry mouth and dry eye symptoms was assessed. Changes in symptoms and salivary flow were measured over 12 weeks. : Compared with placebo, salivary flow was significantly increased in the pilocarpine group (Pdry mouth (Pdry eyes (Pdry mouth symptoms was noted at 20 mg/day, and significant relief in ocular symptoms, including lower artificial tear requirement, was noted after the dose was increased to 30 mg/day.

  12. Prevalence of oral mucositis, dry mouth, and dysphagia in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Aielli, Federica; Adile, Claudio; Ferrera, Patrizia; Valle, Alessandro; Fusco, Flavio; Caruselli, Amanda; Cartoni, Claudio; Massimo, Pizzuto; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Porzio, Giampiero

    2015-11-01

    Oral symptoms can be a sign of an underlying systemic condition and have a significant impact on quality of life, nutrition, and cost of care, while these lesions are often studied in the context of cancer treatment. However, information regarding oral symptoms in advanced cancer patients is poor. The aim of this multicenter study was to determine the prevalence and the characteristics of oral symptoms in a large population of advanced cancer patients. A consecutive sample of patients with advanced cancer for a period of 6 months was prospectively assessed for an observational study. At time of admission, the epidemiological characteristics, surgery-radiotherapy of head and neck, and oncologic treatments in the last month were recorded. The presence of mucositis, dry mouth, and dysphagia was assessed by clinical examination and patients' report and their intensity recorded. Patients were also asked whether they had limitation on nutrition of hydration due to the local condition. Six hundred sixty-nine patients were surveyed in the period taken into consideration. The mean age was 72.1 years (SD 12.3), and 342 patients were males. The primary tumors are listed in Table 1. The prevalence of mucositis was 22.3 %. The symptom relevantly reduced the ingestion of food or fluids and was statistically associated with the Karnofsky level and head and neck cancer. The prevalence of dry mouth was 40.4 %, with a mean intensity of 5.4 (SD 2.1). Several drugs were concomitantly given, particularly opioids (78 %), corticosteroids (75.3 %), and diuretics (70.2 %). Various and nonhomogeneous treatments were given for dry mouth, that was statistically associated with current or recent chemotherapy, and hematological tumors. The prevalence of dysphagia was 15.4 % with a mean intensity of 5.34 (SD 3). Dysphagia for liquids was observed in 52.4 % of cases. A high level of limitation for oral nutrition due to dysphagia was found, and in 53.4 % of patients, alternative routes to the oral

  13. Hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by coxsackievirus A6, Thailand, 2012.

    PubMed

    Puenpa, Jiratchaya; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Linsuwanon, Piyada; Korkong, Sumeth; Thongkomplew, Siwanat; Vichaiwattana, Preyaporn; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2013-04-01

    In Thailand, hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is usually caused by enterovirus 71 or coxsackievirus A16. To determine the cause of a large outbreak of HFMD in Thailand during June-August 2012, we examined patient specimens. Coxsackievirus A6 was the causative agent. To improve prevention and control, causes of HFMD should be monitored.

  14. Comparison of the effect of the linseed extract Salinum and a methyl cellulose preparation on the symptoms of dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G; Johansson, G; Attström, R; Edwardsson, S; Glantz, P O; Larsson, K

    1995-07-01

    The effect of a linseed extract Salinum and a sodium carboxymethyl cellulose preparation called MAS-84 was compared with regard to its effect on the symptoms of dry mouth. Twenty patients with xerostomia, who had been treated for cancer in the head and neck by radiation were recruited from the clinic for maxillofacial surgery, Malmo University Hospital. Following radiation treatment the salivation was severely reduced. The symptoms of a general feeling of a dry mouth, difficulties in chewing and swallowing, taste disturbances, problems with speech and mouth burning were registered on a subjective verbal rating scale. In addition plaque index and gingival bleeding were determined. The study design was crossover and performed single blind. The experimental period was 7 weeks. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. One group used Salinum and the other MAS-84 for 3 weeks. The fourth week was a wash out period and for the next three weeks the patients shifted preparation. Each of the preparations was used ad libitum. Registrations of the various parameters were undertaken on days 0, 7 and 21 of the respective period. At the initial examination all patients reported considerable disturbances from mouth-dryness. These symptoms were reduced in 15 patients during the Salinum period and in 9 during the MAS-84 period. The relief was significantly more pronounced during the use of Salinum compared to that during the use of the methyl cellulose preparation. On day 21 plaque and gingival bleeding were significantly reduced during the Salinum period but not during the MAS-84 period. The results of the present study confirm those of a previous pilot study and indicate that the linseed mucilage significantly reduced the symptoms of dry mouth. This effect increased with increasing time of saliva substitute use. The linseed mucilage Salinum appeared to be a suitable saliva replacement in mouth dry patients.

  15. Effectiveness of saliva substitute products in the treatment of dry mouth in the elderly: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matear, David W; Barbaro, John

    2005-01-01

    The aging population is susceptible to developing dry mouth (xerostomia). Elderly patients present all of the major risk factors to acquiring dry mouth which include systemic diseases and disorders, such as diabetes and depression, and the use of numerous medications, including anti-hypertensives and anti-depressants. The consequences of untreated dry mouth are severe limitations of masticatory function and speech, and increased risk of developing caries, periodontal diseases and fungal infections. Assessment of xerostomia, which includes a set of signs and symptoms that impact on the individual, can only be fully explored through a thorough medical history, intra-oral examination and recording the subjective views of patients. This study suggests a methodology for the assessment of xerostomia through a xerostomia questionnaire, which was used to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of a saliva substitute product (Biotène) in the treatment of xerostomia in 20 elderly patients exhibiting both severe and moderate symptoms. Wilcoxon signed-ranked tests revealed significant improvements in the number and severity of symptoms between the pre-test and the post-test groups. Biotène products were also found to be effective in the treatment of both severe and moderate symptoms of xerostomia. Biotène saliva substitutes are an acceptable and effective method of treatment for elderly people suffering from dry mouth.

  16. Promoting Mouth-Drying Responses to Reduce Drooling Effects by Persons with Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Study of Two Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.; Pichierri, Sabrina; Groeneweg, Jop

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the use of microswitch technology to promote mouth-drying responses and thereby reduce the effects of drooling by two adults with severe intellectual and multiple disabilities. Mouth-drying responses were performed via a special napkin that contained pressure sensors, a microprocessor and an MP3 to monitor the responses and…

  17. Promoting Mouth-Drying Responses to Reduce Drooling Effects by Persons with Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Study of Two Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Smaldone, Angela; La Martire, Maria L.; Pichierri, Sabrina; Groeneweg, Jop

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the use of microswitch technology to promote mouth-drying responses and thereby reduce the effects of drooling by two adults with severe intellectual and multiple disabilities. Mouth-drying responses were performed via a special napkin that contained pressure sensors, a microprocessor and an MP3 to monitor the responses and…

  18. [Temporomandibular injury: a cause of limited mouth opening].

    PubMed

    Luz, J G; Seroli, W; Yamamoto, M K; Pereira, M F

    1990-01-01

    A case of limitation of jaw opening caused by an intentional knife wound to the temporomandibular region is presented. The chief complaint was pain and restricted jaw movement. Treatment consisted of the administration of antiinflammatory agent. Recovery was complete and without complications, normal jaw opening being obtained. The possibility that the inflammatory process stimulates muscular spasm is emphasized.

  19. Epididymitis caused by coxsackievirus A6 in association with hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Tytti; Osterback, Riikka; Kuisma, Jani; Ylipalosaari, Pekka

    2014-12-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) caused hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with a unique manifestation of epididymitis. The patient underwent operation due to suspicion of testicular torsion. Epididymitis was diagnosed by ultrasound examination. Enterovirus was detected from epididymal fluid by PCR and typed by partial sequencing of viral protein 1 as CV-A6.

  20. Epididymitis Caused by Coxsackievirus A6 in Association with Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Österback, Riikka; Kuisma, Jani; Ylipalosaari, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) caused hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with a unique manifestation of epididymitis. The patient underwent operation due to suspicion of testicular torsion. Epididymitis was diagnosed by ultrasound examination. Enterovirus was detected from epididymal fluid by PCR and typed by partial sequencing of viral protein 1 as CV-A6. PMID:25232161

  1. Signs of oral dryness in relation to salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity and dry mouth complaints

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Najat MA

    2007-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the signs of oral dryness in relation to different salivary variables and to correlate subjective complaints of oral dryness with salivary flow rate. Methods 312 unmedicated healthy individuals belonging to three age groups, (6–11, 12–17, and 18–40 years) were examined clinically for signs of oral dryness. Resting and stimulated saliva were collected to determine flow rate, pH and buffering capacity. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on subjective sensation of dry mouth. Results Dry lip and dry mucosa were present in 37.5% and 3.2% of the sample respectively. The proportion of subjects who complained of oral dryness (19%) showed a stimulated salivary flow rate significantly lower than non complainers. Dry lip was significantly related to low resting flow rate but pH and buffering capacity did not show any significant relation to dry lip. Dry mucosa was not related to any of the above mentioned parameters. Conclusion The finding that the stimulated salivary flow rate was reduced in subjects complaining of dry mouth is of great clinical relevance, since the reduction is expected to be reflected in compromising various salivary functions. PMID:17996105

  2. Formulation design and optimization of mouth dissolve tablets of nimesulide using vacuum drying technique.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Mukesh; Patel, Madhabhai; Amin, Avani; Agrawal, Ruchi; Dave, Rikita; Bariya, Nehal

    2004-04-26

    The purpose of this research was to develop mouth dissolve tablets of nimesulide. Granules containing nimesulide, camphor, crospovidone, and lactose were prepared by wet granulation technique. Camphor was sublimed from the dried granules by exposure to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability, wetting time, and disintegration time. In the investigation, a 32 full factorial design was used to investigate the joint influence of 2 formulation variables: amount of camphor and crospovidone. The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that for obtaining a rapidly disintegrating dosage form, tablets should be prepared using an optimum concentration of camphor and a higher percentage of crospovidone. A contour plot is also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the disintegration time and percentage friability. A checkpoint batch was also prepared to prove the validity of the evolved mathematical model. Sublimation of camphor from tablets resulted in superior tablets as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The systematic formulation approach helped in understanding the effect of formulation processing variables.

  3. Limited mouth opening of unknown cause cured by diagnostic coronoidectomy: a new clinical entity?

    PubMed

    Lehman, H; Fleissig, Y; Abid-el-raziq, D; Nitzan, D W

    2015-03-01

    Limited mouth opening is a constant annoyance and can be life-threatening should intubation be needed. The causes are numerous and are categorised as intra-articular or extra-articular, which are often difficult to distinguish. We present what we regard as a new clinical entity - long-standing limited mouth opening of unknown cause - and describe our treatment. Four female patients presented with limited mouth opening and lateral and protrusive movements within normal limits, which were typical of restriction of extra-articular origin. However, the radiological findings were within normal limits, with no visible cause of the restriction. All four were treated by bilateral coronoidectomy that resulted in the immediate return of mouth opening to within normal limits that was preserved over subsequent years. Histopathological examination showed atrophy and degenerative changes in the temporalis band that had been attached to the coronoid, which accounts for the stiffness of the temporalis muscle but does not explain the pathogenesis. In the light of this "diagnostic coronoidectomy" further studies are required to document the underlying pathological changes and to develop more accurate imaging that will enable correct diagnosis in future.

  4. A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Intervention to Relieve Thirst and Dry Mouth in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puntillo, Kathleen; Arai, Shoshana R.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Stotts, Nancy A.; Nelson, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test an intervention bundle for thirst intensity, thirst distress, and dry mouth, which are among the most pervasive, intense, distressful, unrecognized, and under-treated symptoms in ICU patients, but for which data-based interventions are lacking. Methods Single-blinded, randomized clinical trial in three ICUs in a tertiary medical center in urban California. 252 cognitively intact patients reporting thirst intensity (TI) and/or thirst distress (TD) scores ≥ 3 on 0–10 numeric rating scales (NRS) were randomized to Intervention or Usual Care groups. A Research Team Nurse (RTN#1) obtained patients’ pre-procedure TI and TD scores and reports of dry mouth. She then administered a thirst bundle to the Intervention group: oral swab wipes, sterile ice cold water sprays, and a lip moisturizer, or observed patients in the Usual Care group. RTN#2, blinded to group assignment, obtained post-procedure TI and TD scores. Up to 6 sessions per patient were conducted across two days. Results Multilevel linear regression determined that the average decreases in TI and TD scores from pre-procedure to post-procedure were significantly greater in the Intervention group (2.3 and 1.8 NRS points, respectively) versus the Usual Care group (0.6 and 0.4 points, respectively) (p < 0.05). The Usual Care group was 1.9 times more likely than the Intervention group to report dry mouth for each additional session on Day 1. Conclusion This simple, inexpensive thirst bundle significantly decreased ICU patients’ thirst and dry mouth and can be considered a practice intervention for patients experiencing thirst. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicalTrials.gov (NCT01015755). PMID:24894026

  5. A randomized clinical trial of an intervention to relieve thirst and dry mouth in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Puntillo, Kathleen; Arai, Shoshana R; Cooper, Bruce A; Stotts, Nancy A; Nelson, Judith E

    2014-09-01

    To test an intervention bundle for thirst intensity, thirst distress, and dry mouth, which are among the most pervasive, intense, distressful, unrecognized, and undertreated symptoms in ICU patients, but for which data-based interventions are lacking. This was a single-blinded randomized clinical trial in three ICUs in a tertiary medical center in urban California. A total of 252 cognitively intact patients reporting thirst intensity (TI) and/or thirst distress (TD) scores ≥3 on 0-10 numeric rating scales (NRS) were randomized to intervention or usual care groups. A research team nurse (RTN#1) obtained patients' pre-procedure TI and TD scores and reports of dry mouth. She then administered a thirst bundle to the intervention group: oral swab wipes, sterile ice-cold water sprays, and a lip moisturizer, or observed patients in the usual care group. RTN#2, blinded to group assignment, obtained post-procedure TI and TD scores. Up to six sessions per patient were conducted across 2 days. Multilevel linear regression determined that the average decreases in TI and TD scores from pre-procedure to post-procedure were significantly greater in the intervention group (2.3 and 1.8 NRS points, respectively) versus the usual care group (0.6 and 0.4 points, respectively) (p < 0.05). The usual care group was 1.9 times more likely than the intervention group to report dry mouth for each additional session on day 1. This simple, inexpensive thirst bundle significantly decreased ICU patients' thirst and dry mouth and can be considered a practice intervention for patients experiencing thirst.

  6. Management of dry mouth: assessment of oral symptoms after use of a polysaccharide-based oral rinse.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Villines, Dana C; Singh, Mabi; Papas, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Salivary dysfunction is associated with a range of oral/dental issues, and management of oral symptoms may improve oral function and overall quality of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate oral symptoms and function in a xerostomic population after use of a proprietary topical for dry mouth, Moisyn (Synedgen Inc., Claremont, CA), which is a polysaccharide-based product. A pre- and post-test survey was completed by 57 patients with xerostomia. Patients rated their common oral symptoms, based on the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey, before and after 1-week use of Moisyn rinse and spray. Saliva production under resting and chewing stimulation was also assessed. Most patients reported relief from dry mouth symptoms and thick saliva (81.7% and 76.0%, respectively) for more than 30 minutes after product use. Statistically significant reductions were found in 15 of 33 oral symptoms. Symptom improvement ranged from 10.7% to 28.4% for thick saliva, 8.4% to 30.6% for pain, 5.5% to 30.4% for dry mouth, and 12% to 21.3% for taste/diet change. Whole unstimulated/resting saliva improved by 100%, and whole stimulated saliva improved by 23.8%. These findings suggest that the product has utility in symptom control in patients with xerostomia and may lead to an increase in saliva production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Efficacy of an Herbal Compound on Dry Mouth in Patients With Head and Neck Cancers: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Ahmad; Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Choopani, Rasool; Ghobadi, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Dry mouth is a common complication of radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. This study compared the efficacy of an herbal compound containing Malva sylvestris and Alcea digitata (Boiss) with artificial saliva (Hypozalix) for improving the symptoms of dry mouth in head and neck cancer patients. The study examined a total of 62 subjects assigned to 2 groups. The herbal compound and Hypozalix were administered for 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed using the visual analog scale and by grading the degree of dry mouth. Both groups showed a significant difference between visual analog scale before and following intervention. There was also a significant difference in visual analog scale between groups at 4 weeks after onset of intervention. The herbal group showed a significant difference between the grade of dry mouth before and after intervention, but no change was observed for grade of dry mouth in the Hypozalix group. This study supports the efficacy of the herbal compound for controlling symptoms of dry mouth in head and neck cancer patients.

  8. Changes in the palatal dimensions of mouth breathing children caused by nasal obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indiarti, I. S.; Setyanto, D. B.; Kusumaningrum, A.; Budiardjo, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    During children’s growth and development, the breathing process plays an important role in craniofacial growth, especially of the palate. Nose breathing can stimulate the lateral growth of the maxilla, thus making the palate flat. Disturbances in nose breathing caused by nasal obstruction such as allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea can lead to a mouth breathing habit in children. This habit can cause palatal dimension changes such as a narrow V-shaped maxillary arch and a high palatal vault. This study analyzed the relationship between the mouth breathing habit in children who have nasal obstruction and palatal dimension changes. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with a consecutive sampling method on children 7-18 years old with a history of allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea in the Pediatric Respirology and Pediatric Immunology Allergy Outpatient Clinic Kiara Maternal and Child Health Center at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta. The palatal dimensions were measured by the height and transversal width of the hard palate of castings of each child’s upper dental arch using vernier calipers. Palatal dimension changes were found in children with a mouth breathing habit due to nasal obstruction.

  9. An Unusual Cause of Bleeding on the Floor of Mouth: Leech Infestation.

    PubMed

    Kantekin, Yunus; Sarı, Kamran; Özkırış, Mahmut; Kapusuz Gencer, Zeliha

    2015-12-01

    Leech infestation is a very rare phenomenon in humans. It mostly occurs in humans when rural untreated water is drunk or while swimming in streams or lakes. When leeches adhere to the mucous membrane, they ingest blood. Thus, they can sometimes cause severe anemia that may require blood transfusion. We report a case that was referred to emergency service with bleeding in the floor of the mouth. A 10-year-old child was referred to the emergency service of a city hospital with a complaint of swelling in the floor of the mouth and spitting of blood. The patient was promptly taken to the operating room. Using local anesthesia, a surgical incision was made, and a moving, dark brown foreign body was removed from the floor of the mouth and identified as a leech. Leech endoparasitism should be considered as a cause of unexplained anemia due to bleeding from the throat. Accordingly, leech infestation must be considered in differential diagnosis when a patient complains of spitting of blood, hoarseness, or dysphagia.

  10. A novel Enterovirus 96 circulating in China causes hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Sun, Yisuo; Ma, Jinmin; Zhou, Shuru; Fang, Wei; Ye, Jiawei; Tan, Limei; Ji, Jingkai; Luo, Dan; Li, Liqiang; Li, Jiandong; Fang, Chunxiao; Pei, Na; Shi, Shuo; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Gong, Sitang; Xu, Xun

    2017-02-07

    Enterovirus 96 (EV-96) is a recently described member of the species Enterovirus C and is associated with paralysis and myelitis. In this study, using metagenomic sequencing, we identified a new enterovirus 96 strain (EV-96-SZ/GD/CHN/2014) as the sole pathogen causing hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). A genomic comparison showed that EV-96-SZ/GD/CHN/2014 is most similar to the EV-96-05517 strain (85% identity), which has also been detected in Guangdong Province. This is the first time that metagenomic sequencing has been used to identify an EV-96 strain shown to be associated with HFMD.

  11. Pancreatitis in hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Deng, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Jian-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Some viruses, including certain members of the enterovirus genus, have been reported to cause pancreatitis, especially Coxsackie virus. However, no case of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) associated with pancreatitis has been reported so far. We here report a case of EV71-induced hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) presenting with pancreatitis in a 2-year-old girl. This is the first report of a patient with acute pancreatitis in HFMD caused by EV71. We treated the patient conservatively with nasogastric suction, intravenous fluid and antivirals. The patient’s symptoms improved after 8 d, and recovered without complications. We conclude that EV71 can cause acute pancreatitis in HFMD, which should be considered in differential diagnosis, especially in cases of idiopathic pancreatitis. PMID:26877620

  12. Pancreatitis in hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Deng, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Jian-Qiang

    2016-02-14

    Some viruses, including certain members of the enterovirus genus, have been reported to cause pancreatitis, especially Coxsackie virus. However, no case of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) associated with pancreatitis has been reported so far. We here report a case of EV71-induced hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) presenting with pancreatitis in a 2-year-old girl. This is the first report of a patient with acute pancreatitis in HFMD caused by EV71. We treated the patient conservatively with nasogastric suction, intravenous fluid and antivirals. The patient's symptoms improved after 8 d, and recovered without complications. We conclude that EV71 can cause acute pancreatitis in HFMD, which should be considered in differential diagnosis, especially in cases of idiopathic pancreatitis.

  13. Burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson's disease: dopamine as cure or cause?

    PubMed

    Coon, Elizabeth A; Laughlin, Ruple S

    2012-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome has been reported as being more common in Parkinson's disease patients than the general population. While the pathophysiology is unclear, decreased dopamine levels and dopamine dysregulation are hypothesized to play a role. We report a patient with Parkinson's disease who developed burning mouth syndrome with carbidopa/levodopa. Our patient had resolution of burning mouth symptoms when carbidopa/levodopa was replaced with a dopamine agonist. Based on our patient's clinical course, in conjunction with earlier studies assessing the relationship between burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson's disease, we discuss a potential role for dopamine in burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Evaluation of the Oral Tolerance of Three Fluoride Toothpaste Formulations in a Dry Mouth Population: Results from Two Randomized Studies.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anto; Ward, John; Shneyer, Lucy; Skinner, Jacob; Jeal, Nathan; Cronin, Matthew; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the oral tolerance of three experimental toothpaste formulations containing sodium fluoride (NaF), compared with two marketed sodium monofluorophosphate (SMFP)-containing biotène® toothpastes, in a dry mouth population after 14 days (primary objective) and 7 days (secondary objective) of use. Toothpastes were tested in two separate dual-site, examiner-blind, randomized, parallel group studies in subjects (35-84 years) with self-reported dry mouth. Oral soft tissue (OST) and oral hard tissue (OHT) examinations were performed at screening, followed by a 7- to 28-day wash-in period using a control toothpaste. Subjects were randomized to receive a NaF-containing toothpaste (Study 1: commercially available toothpaste Pronamel® for Children, n = 82; Study 2: experimental plaque biofilm-loosening formula [PBF] toothpaste, n = 79; or experimental Gentle Mint toothpaste, n = 78) or a reference toothpaste (Study 1: biotène® Fresh Mint Original toothpaste [previously marketed formulation], n = 82; Study 2: biotène® Gentle Mint Gel toothpaste [previously marketed formulation], n = 77) during the 14-day treatment phase. Subjects brushed their teeth twice daily for one timed minute with a ribbon of toothpaste to cover the head of the toothbrush provided. Subjects received further OST and OHT examinations at Day 1 and Day 15, and an additional OST examination at Day 8. Adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were reported throughout the study. Study 1: At Day 15, 42 oral treatment-emergent AEs (TEAEs) were reported in 33 subjects, of which seven in five subjects (commercially available toothpaste Pronamel for Children: n = 2; control: n = 3) were considered to be treatment-related. One SAE (dyspnea) was reported in a participant who was randomized but withdrew from the study before receiving the allocated toothpaste. Study 2: At Day 15, 41 oral TEAEs were reported in 38 subjects, of which two in two subjects (experimental Gentle Mint toothpaste: n = 1

  15. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may ... mouth Images Oral thrush Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Lichen planus on the oral mucosa Mouth sores References Daniels TE, Jordan RC. ...

  16. Pharmacological interventions for preventing dry mouth and salivary gland dysfunction following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Hua, Fang; Worthington, Helen V

    2017-07-31

    .006, 1 study, 180 participants), but insufficient evidence at the end of and up to three months postradiotherapy. A further study showed no evidence of a difference at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months postradiotherapy. There was low-quality evidence that amifostine is associated with increases in: vomiting (RR 4.90, 95% CI 2.87 to 8.38; P < 0.00001, 5 studies, 601 participants); hypotension (RR 9.20, 95% CI 2.84 to 29.83; P = 0.0002, 3 studies, 376 participants); nausea (RR 2.60, 95% CI 1.81 to 3.74; P < 0.00001, 4 studies, 556 participants); and allergic response (RR 7.51, 95% CI 1.40 to 40.39; P = 0.02, 3 studies, 524 participants).We found insufficient evidence (that was of very low quality) to determine whether or not pilocarpine performed better or worse than a placebo or no treatment control for the outcomes: xerostomia, salivary flow rate, survival, and quality of life. There was some low-quality evidence that pilocarpine was associated with an increase in sweating (RR 2.98, 95% CI 1.43 to 6.22; P = 0.004, 5 studies, 389 participants).We found insufficient evidence to determine whether or not palifermin performed better or worse than placebo for: xerostomia (low quality); survival (moderate quality); and any adverse effects.There was also insufficient evidence to determine the effects of the following interventions: biperiden plus pilocarpine, Chinese medicines, bethanechol, artificial saliva, selenium, antiseptic mouthrinse, antimicrobial lozenge, polaprezinc, azulene rinse, and Venalot Depot (coumarin plus troxerutin). There is some low-quality evidence to suggest that amifostine prevents the feeling of dry mouth in people receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck (with or without chemotherapy) in the short- (end of radiotherapy) to medium-term (three months postradiotherapy). However, it is less clear whether or not this effect is sustained to 12 months postradiotherapy. The benefits of amifostine should be weighed against its high cost and side effects. There was

  17. Causes of death among laundry and dry cleaning workers.

    PubMed

    Blair, A; Decoufle, P; Grauman, D

    1979-05-01

    To make a preliminary determination as to whether a potential health hazard exists for workers exposed to dry cleaning solvents (carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene), we analyzed the causes of death of 330 deceased laundry and dry cleaning workers by the proportionate mortality method. The increased risk for malignant neoplasms resulted primarily from an excess of lung and cervical cancer and slight excesses of leukemia and liver cancer. Although the number of deaths was small, the increased risk of cancer noted in this investigation underscores the need for additional epidemiologic studies of this occupational group.

  18. Model identifies causes of nasal drying during pressurised breathing.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Nates, Roy J; Bartley, Jim

    2017-09-01

    Patients nasally breathing pressurised air frequently experience symptoms suggestive of upper airway drying. While supplementary humidification is often used for symptom relief, the cause(s) of nasal drying symptoms remains speculative. Recent investigations have found augmented air pressure affects airway surface liquid (ASL) supply and inter-nasal airflow apportionment. However the influence these two factors have on ASL hydration is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine how ASL supply and airflow apportionment affect ASL hydration status for both ambient and pressurised air breathing conditions. This is done by modifying and adapting a nasal air-conditioning and ASL supply model. Model predictions of change in inter-nasal airflow apportionment closely follow in-vivo results and demonstrate for the first time abnormal ASL dehydration occurring during augmented pressure breathing. This work quantitatively establishes why patients nasal breathing pressurised air frequently report adverse airway drying symptoms. The findings from this investigation demonstrate that both nasal airways simultaneously experience severe ASL dehydration during pressurised breathing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination of mouth swabs during production causing a major outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Bjørn G; Eriksen, Hanne-Merete; Bø, Gjermund; Hagestad, Kristian; Jacobsen, Trond; Engeset, Eva; Lassen, Jørgen; Aavitsland, Preben

    2007-01-01

    Background In 2002 we investigated an outbreak comprising 231 patients in Norway, caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and linked to the use of contaminated mouth swabs called Dent-O-Sept. Here we describe the extent of contamination of the swabs, and identify critical points in the production process that made the contamination possible, in order to prevent future outbreaks. Methods Environmental investigation with microbiological examination of production, ingredients and product, molecular typing of bacteria and a system audit of production. Results Of the 1565 swabs examined from 149 different production batches the outbreak strain of P. aeruginosa was detected in 76 swabs from 12 batches produced in 2001 and 2002. In total more than 250 swabs were contaminated with one or more microbial species. P. aeruginosa was detected from different spots along the production line. The audit revealed serious breeches of production regulations. Health care institutions reported non-proper use of the swabs and weaknesses in their purchasing systems. Conclusion Biofilm formation in the wet part of the production is the most plausible explanation for the continuous contamination of the swabs with P. aeruginosa over a period of at least 30 weeks. When not abiding to production regulations fatal consequences for the users may ensue. For the most vulnerable patient groups only documented quality-controlled, high-level disinfected products and items should be used in the oropharynx. PMID:17355630

  20. Masticatory muscle pain and progressive mouth opening limitation caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pang, Kang Mi; Park, Ji Woon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a case of masticatory muscle pain and progressive limited mouth opening secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), popularly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The symptoms were first mistaken as those of temporomandibular disorders, before fatty degeneration of all masticatory muscles were discovered on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ALS should be considered in the differential diagnosis process when the patient presents with longstanding progressive mouth opening limitation associated with pain. MRI could facilitate the diagnostic process.

  1. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  2. Genotypes of the Enterovirus Causing Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Shanghai, China, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Xu, Menghua; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Zhong, Huaqing; Dong, Niuniu; Dong, Zuoquan; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic HFMD (hand foot and mouth disease, HFMD) cases and outbreaks caused by etiologic agents other than EV71 and CA16 have increased globally. We conducted this study to investigate the prevalence and genetic characteristics of enteroviruses, especially the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses, causing HFMD in Shanghai. Clinical specimens were collected from patients with a diagnosis of HFMD. A partial length of VP1 was amplified with RT-PCR and subjected to direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using MEGA 5.0. The ages of the HFMD cases ranged from 3 to 96 months, and the male/female ratio was 1.41. The median hospital stay was 2.96 days. Up to 18.0% of patients had neurologic system complications such as encephalitis, meningoencephalitis or meningitis. Of the 480 samples, 417 were positive for enterovirus (86.9%) with RT-PCR. A total of 13 enterovirus genotypes were identified. The most frequent genotypes were CA6 (31.9%), EV71 (30.6%), CA16 (8.8%) and CA10 (7.5%). Infections with CA6, EV71, CA16 and CA10 were prevalent throughout the years of study, while the proportion of CA6 notably increased from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EV71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenogroup and CA16 was identified as B1b subgenogroup. The CA6 strains were assigned to genogroup F, whereas the CA10 strains were assigned to genogroup D. Patients infected with CA6 were typically younger, had a shorter hospital stay and had a lower incidence of neurologic system complications when compared to patients infected with EV71. Our study demonstrates that the enterovirus genotypes causing HFMD were diversified, and there was an increasing prevalence of the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses from 2012 to 2013. CA6 was the most predominant pathogen causing HFMD from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013, and it often caused relatively mild HFMD symptoms. Most severe HFMD cases were associated with EV71 infection.

  3. Genotypes of the Enterovirus Causing Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Shanghai, China, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Menghua; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Zhong, Huaqing; Dong, Niuniu; Dong, Zuoquan; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic HFMD (hand foot and mouth disease, HFMD) cases and outbreaks caused by etiologic agents other than EV71 and CA16 have increased globally. We conducted this study to investigate the prevalence and genetic characteristics of enteroviruses, especially the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses, causing HFMD in Shanghai. Clinical specimens were collected from patients with a diagnosis of HFMD. A partial length of VP1 was amplified with RT-PCR and subjected to direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using MEGA 5.0. The ages of the HFMD cases ranged from 3 to 96 months, and the male/female ratio was 1.41. The median hospital stay was 2.96 days. Up to 18.0% of patients had neurologic system complications such as encephalitis, meningoencephalitis or meningitis. Of the 480 samples, 417 were positive for enterovirus (86.9%) with RT-PCR. A total of 13 enterovirus genotypes were identified. The most frequent genotypes were CA6 (31.9%), EV71 (30.6%), CA16 (8.8%) and CA10 (7.5%). Infections with CA6, EV71, CA16 and CA10 were prevalent throughout the years of study, while the proportion of CA6 notably increased from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EV71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenogroup and CA16 was identified as B1b subgenogroup. The CA6 strains were assigned to genogroup F, whereas the CA10 strains were assigned to genogroup D. Patients infected with CA6 were typically younger, had a shorter hospital stay and had a lower incidence of neurologic system complications when compared to patients infected with EV71. Our study demonstrates that the enterovirus genotypes causing HFMD were diversified, and there was an increasing prevalence of the non-EV71 and non-CA16 enteroviruses from 2012 to 2013. CA6 was the most predominant pathogen causing HFMD from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2013, and it often caused relatively mild HFMD symptoms. Most severe HFMD cases were associated with EV71 infection. PMID:26398767

  4. Cyclical Patterns of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Caused by Enterovirus A71 in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    NikNadia, NMN; Sam, I-Ching; Rampal, Sanjay; WanNorAmalina, WMZ; NurAtifah, Ghazali; Verasahib, Khebir; Ong, Chia Ching; MohdAdib, MohdAidinniza; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an important emerging pathogen causing large epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. In Malaysia, since the first EV-A71 epidemic in 1997, recurrent cyclical epidemics have occurred every 2–3 years for reasons that remain unclear. We hypothesize that this cyclical pattern is due to changes in population immunity in children (measured as seroprevalence). Neutralizing antibody titers against EV-A71 were measured in 2,141 residual serum samples collected from children ≤12 years old between 1995 and 2012 to determine the seroprevalence of EV-A71. Reported national HFMD incidence was highest in children <2 years, and decreased with age; in support of this, EV-A71 seroprevalence was significantly associated with age, indicating greater susceptibility in younger children. EV-A71 epidemics are also characterized by peaks of increased genetic diversity, often with genotype changes. Cross-sectional time series analysis was used to model the association between EV-A71 epidemic periods and EV-A71 seroprevalence adjusting for age and climatic variables (temperature, rainfall, rain days and ultraviolet radiance). A 10% increase in absolute monthly EV-A71 seroprevalence was associated with a 45% higher odds of an epidemic (adjusted odds ratio, aOR1.45; 95% CI 1.24–1.69; P<0.001). Every 10% decrease in seroprevalence between preceding and current months was associated with a 16% higher odds of an epidemic (aOR = 1.16; CI 1.01–1.34 P<0.034). In summary, the 2–3 year cyclical pattern of EV-A71 epidemics in Malaysia is mainly due to the fall of population immunity accompanying the accumulation of susceptible children between epidemics. This study will impact the future planning, timing and target populations for vaccine programs. PMID:27010319

  5. Cyclical Patterns of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Caused by Enterovirus A71 in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    NikNadia, Nmn; Sam, I-Ching; Rampal, Sanjay; WanNorAmalina, Wmz; NurAtifah, Ghazali; Verasahib, Khebir; Ong, Chia Ching; MohdAdib, MohdAidinniza; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-03-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an important emerging pathogen causing large epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. In Malaysia, since the first EV-A71 epidemic in 1997, recurrent cyclical epidemics have occurred every 2-3 years for reasons that remain unclear. We hypothesize that this cyclical pattern is due to changes in population immunity in children (measured as seroprevalence). Neutralizing antibody titers against EV-A71 were measured in 2,141 residual serum samples collected from children ≤12 years old between 1995 and 2012 to determine the seroprevalence of EV-A71. Reported national HFMD incidence was highest in children <2 years, and decreased with age; in support of this, EV-A71 seroprevalence was significantly associated with age, indicating greater susceptibility in younger children. EV-A71 epidemics are also characterized by peaks of increased genetic diversity, often with genotype changes. Cross-sectional time series analysis was used to model the association between EV-A71 epidemic periods and EV-A71 seroprevalence adjusting for age and climatic variables (temperature, rainfall, rain days and ultraviolet radiance). A 10% increase in absolute monthly EV-A71 seroprevalence was associated with a 45% higher odds of an epidemic (adjusted odds ratio, aOR1.45; 95% CI 1.24-1.69; P<0.001). Every 10% decrease in seroprevalence between preceding and current months was associated with a 16% higher odds of an epidemic (aOR = 1.16; CI 1.01-1.34 P<0.034). In summary, the 2-3 year cyclical pattern of EV-A71 epidemics in Malaysia is mainly due to the fall of population immunity accompanying the accumulation of susceptible children between epidemics. This study will impact the future planning, timing and target populations for vaccine programs.

  6. "Dry mouth" from the perspective of traditional Persian medicine and comparison with current management.

    PubMed

    Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Choopani, Rasool

    2015-04-01

    Xerostomia is a common problem, particularly in an elderly population, with a range of causes that affect important aspects of life, such as chewing, swallowing, and speaking. Xerostomia has been explained in traditional medicine throughout history. Traditional Persian medicine, with more than 4000 years of history, consists of the sum total of all the knowledge and practices used in diagnosis, prevention, and exclusion in Iran from ancient times to the present. Based on leading Persian medical manuscripts, the current study focuses on the medieval concept of xerostomia as an important general disorder to review the aetiology of xerostomia and xerostomia types, the control and treatment of xerostomia by lifestyle modification, and medicinal plants for xerostomia suppression according to the theory and practice of traditional Persian medicine. Xerostomia was treated with 3 major approaches in traditional Persian medicine: lifestyle modification, simple single herbal remedies, and compound medicines. It appears that all the factors that cause xerostomia in current studies can be described by using the theories of traditional Persian medicine; furthermore, therapies aimed at both medicines (current and traditional) focus on protecting salivary glands and salivary flow. As a conclution while current managements of xerostomia are still inadequate and traditional approaches have found experimental support over the centuries, some of these traditional treatments may still be useful to current medicine as alternative medicine. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Safety and efficacy of an intra-oral electrostimulator for the relief of dry mouth in patients with chronic graft versus host disease: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Zadik, Yehuda; Zeevi, Itai; Luboshitz-Shon, Noa; Dakwar, Nasri; Wolff, Andy; Shapira, Michael Y.; Or, Reuven

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) often suffer from dry mouth and oral mucosal lesions. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the safety of an intra-oral electrostimulator (GenNarino) in symptomatic cGVHD patients. The secondary objective was to study the impact on the salivary gland involvement of cGVHD patients. Study Design: This paper presents a case series. The study included patients treated for 4 weeks, randomly assigned to the active device and then crossed-over to a sham-device or vice versa. The patients and clinicians were blind to the treatment delivered. Data regarding oral mucosal and salivary gland involvement were collected. Results: Six patients were included in this series. Most of the intraoral areas with manifestations of cGVHD were not in contact with the GenNarino device. Two patients developed mild mucosal lesions in areas in contact with the GenNarino during the study. However, only one of them had a change in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) score for oral cGVHD. The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rate increased in 4 out of the 5 patients included in this analysis. Symptoms of dry mouth and general oral comfort improved. Conclusion: This study suggests that GenNarino is safe in cGVHD patients with respect to oral tissues. Furthermore the use of GenNarino resulted in subjective and objective improvements in dry mouth symptoms. A large scale study is needed to confirm the impact and safety of GenNarino on systemic cGVHD. Key words:Dry mouth, graft versus host disease, electrostimulation, oral mucosa, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24121920

  8. The effect of cognitive appraisal for stressors on the oral health-related QOL of dry mouth patients.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Sakano, Yuji; Saito, Ichiro; Abiko, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Dry mouth is very common symptom, and psychological factors have an influence on this symptom. Although the influence of emotional factor related to patients with oral dryness has been examined in previous studies, the cognitive factors have not been examined thus far. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of cognitive factors on patients with oral dryness. The participants were 106 patients complaining of oral dryness. They were required to complete a questionnaire measuring subjective oral dryness, oral-related QOL, cognition for stressors, and mood state. Correlational analyses revealed that OHIP-14 is significantly related to oral dryness, appraisal for effect, appraisal for threat, and commitment. These correlations were maintained even after controlling for the influence of depression and anxiety. Using oral dryness, appraisal for effect, appraisal for threat, and commitment, cluster analysis was done and three clusters (cluster-1, severe oral dryness; cluster-2, positive cognitive style: cluster-3, negative cognitive style) were extracted. The results of ANOVA showed that the group with severe oral dryness (cluster-1) had a significantly higher score on OHIP-14 than the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups with positive (cluster-2) and negative (cluster-3) cognitive style. Although the group of patients with positive cognitive style complained of more severe oral dryness than the group with negative cognitive style, no significant difference was observed between these two groups in OHIP-14. These results indicate that cognitive factors would be a useful therapeutic target for the improvement of the oral-related QOL of patients with oral dryness.

  9. The effect of cognitive appraisal for stressors on the oral health-related QOL of dry mouth patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry mouth is very common symptom, and psychological factors have an influence on this symptom. Although the influence of emotional factor related to patients with oral dryness has been examined in previous studies, the cognitive factors have not been examined thus far. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of cognitive factors on patients with oral dryness. Methods The participants were 106 patients complaining of oral dryness. They were required to complete a questionnaire measuring subjective oral dryness, oral-related QOL, cognition for stressors, and mood state. Results Correlational analyses revealed that OHIP-14 is significantly related to oral dryness, appraisal for effect, appraisal for threat, and commitment. These correlations were maintained even after controlling for the influence of depression and anxiety. Using oral dryness, appraisal for effect, appraisal for threat, and commitment, cluster analysis was done and three clusters (cluster-1, severe oral dryness; cluster-2, positive cognitive style: cluster-3, negative cognitive style) were extracted. The results of ANOVA showed that the group with severe oral dryness (cluster-1) had a significantly higher score on OHIP-14 than the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups with positive (cluster-2) and negative (cluster-3) cognitive style. Conclusion Although the group of patients with positive cognitive style complained of more severe oral dryness than the group with negative cognitive style, no significant difference was observed between these two groups in OHIP-14. These results indicate that cognitive factors would be a useful therapeutic target for the improvement of the oral-related QOL of patients with oral dryness. PMID:26019720

  10. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental and Oral Health ASCO Answers Fact Sheet: Dental and Oral Health (PDF) Español f t k e P Navigating Cancer Care More in this section Cancer Basics Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How ...

  11. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  12. Healthy Mouth for Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All ... themselves. Until they are 7 or 8 years old, you will need to help them brush. Try ...

  13. Do pilocarpine drops help dry mouth in palliative care patients: a protocol for an aggregated series of n-of-1 trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is estimated that 39,000 Australians die from malignant disease yearly. Of these, 60% to 88% of advanced cancer patients suffer xerostomia, the subjective feeling of mouth dryness. Xerostomia has significant physical, social and psychological consequences which compromise function and quality of life. Pilocarpine is one treatment for xerostomia. Most studies have shown some variation in individual response to pilocarpine, in terms of dose used, and timing and extent of response. We will determine a population estimate of the efficacy of pilocarpine drops (6 mg) three times daily compared to placebo in relieving dry mouth in palliative care (PC) patients. A secondary aim is to assess individual patients’ response to pilocarpine and provide reports detailing individual response to patients and their treating clinician. Methods/Design Aggregated n-of-1 trials (3 cycle, double blind, placebo-controlled crossover trials using standardized measures of effect). Individual trials will identify which patients respond to the medication. To produce a population estimate of a treatment effect, the results of all cycles will be aggregated. Discussion Managing dry mouth with treatment supported by the best possible evidence will improve functional status of patients, and improve quality of life for patients and carers. Using n-of-1 trials will accelerate the rate of accumulation of high-grade evidence to support clinical therapies used in PC. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry Number: 12610000840088. PMID:24176001

  14. Do pilocarpine drops help dry mouth in palliative care patients: a protocol for an aggregated series of n-of-1 trials.

    PubMed

    Nikles, Jane; Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Hardy, Janet; Agar, Meera; Senior, Hugh; Carmont, Sue-Ann; Schluter, Philip J; Good, Phillip; Vora, Rohan; Currow, David

    2013-10-31

    It is estimated that 39,000 Australians die from malignant disease yearly. Of these, 60% to 88% of advanced cancer patients suffer xerostomia, the subjective feeling of mouth dryness. Xerostomia has significant physical, social and psychological consequences which compromise function and quality of life. Pilocarpine is one treatment for xerostomia. Most studies have shown some variation in individual response to pilocarpine, in terms of dose used, and timing and extent of response.We will determine a population estimate of the efficacy of pilocarpine drops (6 mg) three times daily compared to placebo in relieving dry mouth in palliative care (PC) patients. A secondary aim is to assess individual patients' response to pilocarpine and provide reports detailing individual response to patients and their treating clinician. Aggregated n-of-1 trials (3 cycle, double blind, placebo-controlled crossover trials using standardized measures of effect). Individual trials will identify which patients respond to the medication. To produce a population estimate of a treatment effect, the results of all cycles will be aggregated. Managing dry mouth with treatment supported by the best possible evidence will improve functional status of patients, and improve quality of life for patients and carers. Using n-of-1 trials will accelerate the rate of accumulation of high-grade evidence to support clinical therapies used in PC. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry Number: 12610000840088.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out.

  16. Safety and efficacy of an intra-oral electrostimulator for the relief of dry mouth in patients with chronic graft versus host disease: Case series.

    PubMed

    Zadik, Yehuda; Zeevi, Itai; Luboshitz-Shon, Noa; Dakwar, Nasri; Wolff, Andy; Shapira, Michael Y; Or, Reuven; Elad, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) often suffer from dry mouth and oral mucosal lesions. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the safety of an intra-oral electrostimulator (GenNarino) in symptomatic cGVHD patients. The secondary objective was to study the impact on the salivary gland involvement of cGVHD patients. This paper presents a case series. The study included patients treated for 4 weeks, randomly assigned to the active device and then crossed-over to a sham-device or vice versa. The patients and clinicians were blind to the treatment delivered. Data regarding oral mucosal and salivary gland involvement were collected. Six patients were included in this series. Most of the intraoral areas with manifestations of cGVHD were not in contact with the GenNarino device. Two patients developed mild mucosal lesions in areas in contact with the GenNarino during the study. However, only one of them had a change in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) score for oral cGVHD. The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rate increased in 4 out of the 5 patients included in this analysis. Symptoms of dry mouth and general oral comfort improved. This study suggests that GenNarino is safe in cGVHD patients with respect to oral tissues. Furthermore the use of GenNarino resulted in subjective and objective improvements in dry mouth symptoms. A large scale study is needed to confirm the impact and safety of GenNarino on systemic cGVHD.

  17. Early detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected cattle using a dry filter air sampling system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of high economic impact. Early detection of FMD virus (FMDV) is fundamental for rapid outbreak control. Air sampling collection has been demonstrated as a useful technique for detection of FMDV RNA in infected animals, related to ...

  18. Effects of A Novel Disc Formulation on Dry Mouth Symptoms and Enamel Remineralization in Patients With Hyposalivation: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jessica; Firmalino, Miracle Vania; Anbarani, Afarin Golabgir; Takesh, Thair; Epstein, Joel; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the in vivo effects in patients with hyposalivation of a novel slowly dissolving adhering test disc upon on enamel remineralization, oral biofilm, salivary production, pH and buffering, gingival health, and on self-evaluation of oral well-being. Five subjects with xerostomia wore custom made retainers carrying 5 demineralized enamel chips for periods of 1 week each. In 1 study arm, subjects used the test agent plus oral hygiene self-care; in the other they used oral hygiene self-care only, with a 1 week washout in between arms. The treatment sequence was randomized. Before and after each study arm Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and Sulcus Bleeding Index (mSBI) were recorded. Clinical plaque staining was quantified using digital image analysis. Saliva production, pH and buffering capacity were recorded. Subjects completed a self-evaluation questionnaire for oral comfort. Enamel samples underwent standardized Knoop microhardness testing to quantify mineralization status. Plaque presence and clinical Plaque Indices decreased significantly with test agent use (p<0.05). Five-minute saliva production almost doubled 10 and 40 minutes after oral test disc insertion (significant, p<0.05). Salivary pH buffering improved in 4/5 subjects with disc use. All demineralized tooth samples re-hardened intraorally (p>0.05). The discs favorably impacted eating problems and dental sensitivity. Subjects were positive about disc flavor and mouth feel. Using established in vivo techniques, the effects of a novel product in xerostomic patients were evaluated and quantified. The adhering disc facilitated eating, reduced dental sensitivity, improved saliva production and buffering capacity, reduced plaque, and alleviated xerostomia symptoms. Xerostomia management is challenging. A novel dry mouth disc was effective in alleviating dry mouth symptoms.

  19. Synonymous Deoptimization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Causes Attenuation In Vivo while Inducing a Strong Neutralizing Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Medina, Gisselle N.; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Koster, Marla; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens, including poliovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid-coding region (P1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite the introduction of 489 nucleotide changes (19%), synonymous deoptimization of the P1 region rendered a viable FMDV progeny. The resulting strain was stable and reached cell culture titers similar to those obtained for wild-type (WT) virus, but at reduced specific infectivity. Studies in mice showed that 100% of animals inoculated with the FMDV A12 P1 deoptimized mutant (A12-P1 deopt) survived, even when the animals were infected at doses 100 times higher than the dose required to cause death by WT virus. All mice inoculated with the A12-P1 deopt mutant developed a strong antibody response and were protected against subsequent lethal challenge with WT virus at 21 days postinoculation. Remarkably, the vaccine safety margin was at least 1,000-fold higher for A12-P1 deopt than for WT virus. Similar patterns of attenuation were observed in swine, in which animals inoculated with A12-P1 deopt virus did not develop clinical disease until doses reached 1,000 to 10,000 times the dose required to cause severe disease in 2 days with WT A12. Consistently, high levels of antibody titers were induced, even at the lowest dose tested. These results highlight the potential use of synonymous codon pair deoptimization as a strategy to safely attenuate FMDV and further develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to control such a feared livestock disease. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most feared viral diseases that can affect livestock. Although this disease appeared to be contained in developed nations by the end of the last century, recent outbreaks in Europe, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, etc., have demonstrated that infection can spread rapidly, causing

  20. Detection and characterization of viruses causing hand, foot and mouth disease from children in Seri Kembangan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ling, Beh Poay; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Harmal, Nabil Saad; Yubbu, Putri; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2014-12-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral infection among infants and children. The major causative agents of HFMD are enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16). Recently, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) infections were reported in neighboring countries. Infected infants and children may present with fever, mouth/throat ulcers, rashes and vesicles on hands and feet. Moreover, EV71 infections might cause fatal neurological complications. Since 1997, EV71 caused fatalities in Sarawak and Peninsula Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to identify and classify the viruses which detected from the patients who presenting clinical signs and symptoms of HFMD in Seri Kembangan, Malaysia. From December 2012 until July 2013, a total of 28 specimens were collected from patients with clinical case definitions of HFMD. The HFMD viruses were detected by using semi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (snRT-PCR). The positive snRT-PCR products were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the viruses were performed. 12 of 28 specimens (42.9%) were positive in snRT-PCR, seven are CVA6 (58.3%), two CVA16 (16.7%) and three EV71 (25%). Based on phylogenetic analysis studies, EV71 strains were identified as sub-genotype B5; CVA16 strains classified into sub-genotype B2b and B2c; CVA6 strains closely related to strains in Taiwan and Japan. In this study, HFMD in Seri Kembangan were caused by different types of Enterovirus, which were EV71, CVA6 and CVA16.

  1. Quantitative studies and taste reconstitution experiments of the sour and lingering mouthful orosensation in a debittered extract of traditional Japanese dried and fermented skipjack tuna (hongarebushi).

    PubMed

    Haseleu, Gesa; Lubian, Elisabetta; Mueller, Stefan; Shi, Feng; Koenig, Thorsten

    2013-04-03

    Hongarebushi, Japanese dried skipjack tuna and a high quality ingredient of Japanese dashi, was investigated for its taste active composition. The recent investigation focused on a debittered fish fraction, which revealed a strong umami and salt impact accompanied with a pleasant and pronounced sourness. Whereas the umami and salt tastes could be correlated to monosodium glutamate (MSG), ribonucleotides, and mineral salts, the pleasant sourness was not exclusively induced by organic acids. The essential compound imparting the sour orosensation, persistence, and mouthfulness of the debittered skipjack tuna extract was investigated, and omission experiments emphasized the impact of N-acetylglutamic acid (NAG) on the overall taste sensation of the debittered fish extract. This metabolite, which is known to be present as a minor constituent in animal- and plant-derived foods, was quantified in this study for the first time in seafood, soybean products, dried shiitake mushrooms, and dried fish in notable amounts. Furthermore, it was described for the first time as an essential taste contributor to the nonvolatile profile of a foodstuff, in this case of a debittered extract of hongarebushi.

  2. Virus Excretion from Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Carrier Cattle and Their Potential Role in Causing New Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Aravindh Babu R; Mahapatra, Mana; Gubbins, Simon; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-01

    The role of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) carrier cattle in causing new outbreaks is still a matter of debate and it is important to find out these carrier animals by post-outbreak serosurveillance to declare freedom from FMDV infection. In this study we explore the differences in viral shedding between carrier and non-carrier animals, quantify the transmission rate of FMDV infection from carriers to susceptible animals and identify potential viral determinants of viral persistence. We collected nasal and saliva samples from 32 vaccinated and 7 unvaccinated FMDV carrier cattle and 48 vaccinated and 13 unvaccinated non-carrier cattle (total n=100) during the acute phase of infection (up to 28 days post-challenge) and then from limited number of animals up to a maximum 168 days post-challenge. We demonstrate that unvaccinated cattle excrete significantly higher levels of virus for longer periods compared with vaccinated cattle and this is independent of whether or not they subsequently become carriers. By introducing naïve cattle in to the FMDV carrier population we show the risk of new outbreaks is clearly very low in controlled conditions, although there could still be a potential threat of these carrier animals causing new outbreaks in the field situation. Finally, we compared the complete genome sequences of viruses from carrier cattle with the challenge virus and found no evidence for viral determinants of the carrier state.

  3. Reversible occlusion of donor vessel caused by mouth opening after superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis in adult moyamoya patients.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Toshiro; Abe, Hiroshi; Miki, Koichi; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-09-01

    The authors experienced an intriguing phenomenon in 2 adult patients with moyamoya disease. Mouth opening caused reversible occlusion of the donor superficial temporal artery (STA), and the patients exhibited transient cerebral ischemic symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of such occlusion and the mechanism of this phenomenon. Twelve consecutive adult patients with moyamoya disease (15 affected sides) who underwent STA-middle cerebral artery anastomosis were included in this study. Ultrasound examination was performed more than 3 months postoperatively to determine whether mouth opening affected blood flow of the donor STA and led to any ischemic symptoms within 1 minute. Computed tomography angiography was performed during both mouth opening and mouth closing, when blood flow changes of the donor STA were recognized. Under wide mouth opening, steno-occlusion of the donor STA occurred in 5 of 15 sides (33.3%). On 1 side (6.7%), complete occlusion induced ischemic symptoms. Steno-occlusion occurred by at least 2 mechanisms: either the stretched temporalis muscle pushed the donor STA against the edge of the bone window, or the redundant donor STA kinked when the muscle was stretched. Even with temporary occlusion of the donor STA, ischemic symptoms seem to rarely occur. However, to avoid the "big bite ischemic phenomenon," the authors recommend securing a sufficient distance between the donor STA and the edge of the bone window and avoiding a redundant course of the donor STA within the muscle layer.

  4. Socio-ecological factors and hand, foot and mouth disease in dry climate regions: a Bayesian spatial approach in Gansu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Faxiang; Liu, Xinfeng; Ren, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongpeng; Liu, Haixia; Wei, Kongfu; Yang, Xiaoting; Cheng, Yao; Zheng, Yunhe; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Li, Juansheng; Meng, Lei; Hu, Wenbiao

    2017-01-01

    The influence of socio-ecological factors on hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) were explored in this study using Bayesian spatial modeling and spatial patterns identified in dry regions of Gansu, China. Notified HFMD cases and socio-ecological data were obtained from the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention, Gansu Yearbook and Gansu Meteorological Bureau. A Bayesian spatial conditional autoregressive model was used to quantify the effects of socio-ecological factors on the HFMD and explore spatial patterns, with the consideration of its socio-ecological effects. Our non-spatial model suggests temperature (relative risk (RR) 1.15, 95 % CI 1.01-1.31), GDP per capita (RR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.01-1.39) and population density (RR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.19-3.17) to have a significant effect on HFMD transmission. However, after controlling for spatial random effects, only temperature (RR 1.25, 95 % CI 1.04-1.53) showed significant association with HFMD. The spatial model demonstrates temperature to play a major role in the transmission of HFMD in dry regions. Estimated residual variation after taking into account the socio-ecological variables indicated that high incidences of HFMD were mainly clustered in the northwest of Gansu. And, spatial structure showed a unique distribution after taking account of socio-ecological effects.

  5. Socio-ecological factors and hand, foot and mouth disease in dry climate regions: a Bayesian spatial approach in Gansu, China.

    PubMed

    Gou, Faxiang; Liu, Xinfeng; Ren, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongpeng; Liu, Haixia; Wei, Kongfu; Yang, Xiaoting; Cheng, Yao; Zheng, Yunhe; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Li, Juansheng; Meng, Lei; Hu, Wenbiao

    2017-01-01

    The influence of socio-ecological factors on hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) were explored in this study using Bayesian spatial modeling and spatial patterns identified in dry regions of Gansu, China. Notified HFMD cases and socio-ecological data were obtained from the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention, Gansu Yearbook and Gansu Meteorological Bureau. A Bayesian spatial conditional autoregressive model was used to quantify the effects of socio-ecological factors on the HFMD and explore spatial patterns, with the consideration of its socio-ecological effects. Our non-spatial model suggests temperature (relative risk (RR) 1.15, 95 % CI 1.01-1.31), GDP per capita (RR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.01-1.39) and population density (RR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.19-3.17) to have a significant effect on HFMD transmission. However, after controlling for spatial random effects, only temperature (RR 1.25, 95 % CI 1.04-1.53) showed significant association with HFMD. The spatial model demonstrates temperature to play a major role in the transmission of HFMD in dry regions. Estimated residual variation after taking into account the socio-ecological variables indicated that high incidences of HFMD were mainly clustered in the northwest of Gansu. And, spatial structure showed a unique distribution after taking account of socio-ecological effects.

  6. Mouth Rinses

    MedlinePlus

    ... and bad breath. Anti-cavity mouth rinse uses fluoride to protect against tooth decay. Mouth rinses are ... anti-plaque/anti-gingivitis rinses or anti-cavity fluoride rinses, for example. Dentists will prescribe special rinses ...

  7. Early Detection of Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus from Infected Cattle Using A Dry Filter Air Sampling System.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, J M; Brito, B; Hartwig, E; Smoliga, G R; Perez, A; Arzt, J; Rodriguez, L L

    2017-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of high economic impact. Early detection of FMD virus (FMDV) is fundamental for rapid outbreak control. Air sampling collection has been demonstrated as a useful technique for detection of FMDV RNA in infected animals, related to the aerogenous nature of the virus. In the current study, air from rooms housing individual (n = 17) or two groups (n = 4) of cattle experimentally infected with FDMV A24 Cruzeiro of different virulence levels was sampled to assess the feasibility of applying air sampling as a non-invasive, screening tool to identify sources of FMDV infection. Detection of FMDV RNA in air was compared with first detection of clinical signs and FMDV RNA levels in serum and oral fluid. FMDV RNA was detected in room air samples 1-3 days prior (seven animals) or on the same day (four animals) as the appearance of clinical signs in 11 of 12 individually housed cattle. Only in one case clinical signs preceded detection in air samples by one day. Overall, viral RNA in oral fluid or serum preceded detection in air samples by 1-2 days. Six individually housed animals inoculated with attenuated strains did not show clinical signs, but virus was detected in air in one of these cases 3 days prior to first detection in oral fluid. In groups of four cattle housed together, air detection always preceded appearance of clinical signs by 1-2 days and coincided more often with viral shedding in oral fluid than virus in blood. These data confirm that air sampling is an effective non-invasive screening method for detecting FMDV infection in confined to enclosed spaces (e.g. auction barns, milking parlours). This technology could be a useful tool as part of a surveillance strategy during FMD prevention, control or eradication efforts. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Relationships between medication intake, complaints of dry mouth, salivary flow rate and composition, and the rate of tooth demineralization in situ.

    PubMed

    Bardow, A; Nyvad, B; Nauntofte, B

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the relationships between the rate of tooth demineralisation and medication intake, subjective feeling of dry mouth, saliva flow, saliva composition and the salivary level of lactobacilli. The study group consisted of 28 subjects that were divided into three groups according to their unstimulated whole saliva flow rate. Group 1 had an unstimulated saliva low rate < or =0.16 ml/min (n=10), group 2 had one from 0.17--0.30 ml/min (n=9), and group 3 had one >0.30 ml/min (n=9). The rate of tooth demineralization was determined as mineral loss assessed by quantitative microradiography of human root surfaces, exposed to the oral environment for 62 days in situ. The unstimulated and stimulated saliva flow rates, pH, bicarbonate, calcium, phosphate, and protein concentrations, as well as the degree of saturation of saliva with hydroxyapatite and the saliva buffer capacity were determined. The results showed that almost all subjects developed demineralization, albeit at highly varying rates. Eighty-five percent of the subjects in group 1, 33% of the subjects in group 2, and 0% of the subjects in group 3 developed mineral loss above the mean mineral loss for all the root surfaces in this experiment. Futhermore, group 1 differed significantly from groups 2 and 3 in having a higher medication intake, a more pronounced feeling of dry mouth, lower stimulated saliva flow rate, lower stimulated bicarbonate concentration, lower unstimulated and stimulated compositional outputs (bicarbonate, calcium, phosphate, and protein), and a higher Lactobacillus level. The best explanatory variable for high mineral loss in this study was a low unstimulated saliva flow rate. In conclusion, our results suggest that an unstimulated salivary flow rate < or =0.16 ml/min as described by Navazesh et al. (1992), is a better indicator of increased caries risk due to impaired salivation, than the currently accepted definition of hyposalivation (unstimulated saliva

  9. Mouth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Mouth ProblemsMouth problems, such as sores, are very common. Follow this chart for more information about mouth problems in adults.Our trusted Symptom Checker is ...

  10. Changes of circulating Th22 cells in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yidong; Long, Quan; Yang, Xianzhi; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Huang, Li; Mao, Qifen; Huo, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Zhe; Xie, Guoliang; Zheng, Shufa; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22+CD4+T (Th22) cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and infectious diseases, although the role of Th22 cells remains largely unclear in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71). This study aims to explore the role of circulating IL-22+IL-17A−CD4+T (cTh22) cells in children with EV71-associated HFMD. We found that during the acute stage of illness, the frequencies of cTh22 and circulating IL-22+IL-17A+CD4+T (IL-22+cTh17) cells in CD4+T cells infrom affected patients, and especially in severely affected patients, were significantly higher than in healthy controls (HC). The major source of IL-22 production was cTh22 cells, partially from cTh17 cells. Moreover, the protein and mRNA levels of IL-22, IL-17A, IL-23, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly different among the mild patients, severe patients and HC, as well as AHR and RORγt mRNA levels. A positive correlation was found between plasma IL-22 levels and cTh22 cell frequencies, and cTh17 cell and IL-22+ cTh17 cell frequencies. Furthermore, the frequencies of cTh22 were significantly decreased in the convalescent patients. Our findings indicated that cTh22 cells could play critical roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 infection, and are potential therapeutic targets for patients with EV71-associated HFMD. PMID:28030850

  11. Changes of circulating Th22 cells in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dawei; Zhong, Fengyun; Lin, Jie; Wu, Yidong; Long, Quan; Yang, Xianzhi; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Huang, Li; Mao, Qifen; Huo, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Zhe; Xie, Guoliang; Zheng, Shufa; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yu

    2017-04-25

    Interleukin (IL)-22+CD4+T (Th22) cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and infectious diseases, although the role of Th22 cells remains largely unclear in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71). This study aims to explore the role of circulating IL-22+IL-17A-CD4+T (cTh22) cells in children with EV71-associated HFMD. We found that during the acute stage of illness, the frequencies of cTh22 and circulating IL-22+IL-17A+CD4+T (IL-22+cTh17) cells in CD4+T cells infrom affected patients, and especially in severely affected patients, were significantly higher than in healthy controls (HC). The major source of IL-22 production was cTh22 cells, partially from cTh17 cells. Moreover, the protein and mRNA levels of IL-22, IL-17A, IL-23, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly different among the mild patients, severe patients and HC, as well as AHR and RORγt mRNA levels. A positive correlation was found between plasma IL-22 levels and cTh22 cell frequencies, and cTh17 cell and IL-22+ cTh17 cell frequencies. Furthermore, the frequencies of cTh22 were significantly decreased in the convalescent patients. Our findings indicated that cTh22 cells could play critical roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 infection, and are potential therapeutic targets for patients with EV71-associated HFMD.

  12. Dry mouth as an initial sign of food-borne botulism: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Maddalena; Scoditti, Umberto; Angelini, Monica; de Giampaulis, Piero; Borrini, Bianca Maria; Macaluso, Guido Maria; Pavesi, Giovanni; Vescovi, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    Botulism is a rare neuroparalytic disease caused by a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. There are different clinical types of botulism. Early diagnosis of the condition is essential for effective treatment. We report a case of food-borne botulism in identical twins characterized by severe initial oral involvement and a review of the literature about the condition.

  13. Effects of combination oral care on oral health, dry mouth and salivary pH of intubated patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chun Sun; Shin, Yong Soon

    2016-10-01

    Intubated patients are at risk of oral health problems. Although a variety of oral care regimens for intubated patients have been studied, there is a lack of research on the effects of combination oral care that includes tooth brushing, chlorhexidine and cold water. This open-labelled, randomized, controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effects of combination oral care on oral health status. Participants aged 20 years and older were recruited on the first day after intubation through convenience sampling in a medical intensive care unit. Random assignment was performed using an internet randomization service. The primary outcome was oral health status. Data were collected during May and June 2013. Participants were randomized to one of two groups (23 intervention and 21 control). The final analysis included 18 patients with combination oral care and 17 in the control group. The intervention group had better oral health (effect size = 1.56), less dry mouth and higher salivary pH than the control group. Any additional burden of providing combination oral care to patients who are mechanically ventilated is worthwhile in terms of clinical outcomes.

  14. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron)  Infection in the mouth, such as a yeast infection  Acid reflux TREATMENT Your doctor will help ... the underlying medical condition, such as diabetes or yeast infection, is treated. If a drug is causing ...

  15. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron) Infection in the mouth, such as a yeast infection Acid reflux Back to Top Treatment Your ... the underlying medical condition, such as diabetes or yeast infection, is treated. If a drug is causing ...

  16. Delayed mouth-caecum transit of a lactulose labelled liquid test meal in patients with steatorrhoea caused by partially treated coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C; Lee, Y C; Edge, C; Ralphs, D N; Stewart, J S; Bloom, S R; Silk, D B

    1987-01-01

    Mouth-caecum transit time (M-CTT) of a lactulose labelled liquid test meal has been measured in 27 coeliac patients and 10 healthy controls using the breath hydrogen technique. Although all patients were urged to maintain a gluten free diet, not all did, and there was, therefore, a wide range in the severity of fat malabsorption within the patient group. Gastric emptying of a 113Indium DTPA-labelled liquid test meal was also assessed in separate studies on six healthy controls and 11 of the coeliac patients. Fasting breath hydrogen concentrations and the response to lactulose, as assessed both by the rate of rise, and the peak breath hydrogen concentration reached, showed no difference between coeliacs and controls, regardless of the presence or absence of steatorrhoea. Mouth-caecum transit time in the 16 coeliac patients with steatorrhea (faecal fat greater than 7 g/24 h) was, however, significantly prolonged being 158 +/- 18 minutes (mean +/- SEM), compared with 70 +/- 9 minutes for the controls (p less than 0.02), and 83 +/- 15 minutes for the 11 coeliacs without steatorrhoea (p less than 0.002). Mouth-caecum transit time in the coeliac patients was linearly related to the 24 hour faecal fat excretion, r = 0.55, n = 27, p less than 0.01. Slow mouth-caecum transit in the coeliacs with steatorrhoea was not caused by delayed gastric emptying as the t1/2 for coeliacs with steatorrhoea was within the normal range. Coeliacs with delayed mouth-caecum transit had impaired insulin release but the postprandial profiles of the other peptides measured (cholecystokinin, GIP, secretin, motilin, neurotensin, enteroglucagon, and peptide YY) were all within the normal range in this group of partially treated coeliac patients. PMID:3678957

  17. Chlorhexidine gel and less difficult surgeries might reduce post-operative pain, controlling for dry socket, infection and analgesic consumption: a split-mouth controlled randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haraji, A; Rakhshan, V

    2015-03-01

    Reports on post-surgical pain are a few, controversial and flawed (by statistics and analgesic consumption). Besides, it is not known if chlorhexidine can reduce post-extraction pain adjusting for its effect on prevention of infection and dry socket (DS). We assessed these. A total of 90 impacted mandibular third molars of 45 patients were extracted. Intra-alveolar 0·2% chlorhexidine gel was applied in a split-mouth randomised design to one-half of the sockets. None of the included patients took antibiotics or analgesics afterwards. In the first and third post-operative days, DS formation and pain levels were recorded. Predictive roles of the risk factors were analysed using fixed-effects (classic) and multilevel (mixed-model) multiple linear regressions (α = 0·05, β≤0·1). In the first day, pain levels were 5·56 ± 1·53 and 4·78 ± 1·43 (out of 10), respectively. These reduced to 3·22 ± 1·41 and 2·16 ± 1·40. Pain was more intense on the control sides [both P values = 0·000 (paired t-test)]. Chlorhexidine had a significant pain-alleviating effect (P = 0·0001), excluding its effect on DS and infection. More difficult surgeries (P = 0·0201) and dry sockets were more painful (P = 0·0000). Age had a marginally significant negative role (P = 0·0994). Gender and smoking had no significant impact [P ≥ 0·7 (regression)]. The pattern of pain reduction differed between dry sockets and healthy sockets [P = 0·0102 (anova)]. Chlorhexidine can reduce pain, regardless of its infection-/DS-preventive effects. Simpler surgeries and sockets not affected by alveolar osteitis are less painful. Smoking and gender less likely affect pain. The role of age was not conclusive and needs future studies.

  18. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  19. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  20. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, classical swine fever, or swine vesicular disease exists. 94.17 Section 94.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE...

  1. The Physiological Suppressing Factors of Dry Forage Intake and the Cause of Water Intake Following Dry Forage Feeding in Goats — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunagawa, Katsunori; Nagamine, Itsuki

    2016-01-01

    The goats raised in the barn are usually fed on fresh grass. As dry forage can be stored for long periods in large amounts, dry forage feeding makes it possible to feed large numbers of goats in barns. This review explains the physiological factors involved in suppressing dry forage intake and the cause of drinking following dry forage feeding. Ruminants consume an enormous amount of dry forage in a short time. Eating rates of dry forage rapidly decreased in the first 40 min of feeding and subsequently declined gradually to low states in the remaining time of the feeding period. Saliva in large-type goats is secreted in large volume during the first hour after the commencement of dry forage feeding. It was elucidated that the marked suppression of dry forage intake during the first hour was caused by a feeding-induced hypovolemia and the loss of NaHCO3 due to excessive salivation during the initial stages of dry forage feeding. On the other hand, it was indicated that the marked decrease in feed intake observed in the second hour of the 2 h feeding period was related to ruminal distension caused by the feed consumed and the copious amount of saliva secreted during dry forage feeding. In addition, results indicate that the marked decreases in dry forage intake after 40 min of feeding are caused by increases in plasma osmolality and subsequent thirst sensations produced by dry forage feeding. After 40 min of the 2 h dry forage feeding period, the feed salt content is absorbed into the rumen and plasma osmolality increases. The combined effects of ruminal distension and increased plasma osmolality accounted for 77.6% of the suppression of dry forage intake 40 min after the start of dry forage feeding. The results indicate that ruminal distension and increased plasma osmolality are the main physiological factors in suppression of dry forage intake in large-type goats. There was very little drinking behavior observed during the first hour of the 2 h feeding period most

  2. The Physiological Suppressing Factors of Dry Forage Intake and the Cause of Water Intake Following Dry Forage Feeding in Goats - A Review.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Katsunori; Nagamine, Itsuki

    2016-02-01

    The goats raised in the barn are usually fed on fresh grass. As dry forage can be stored for long periods in large amounts, dry forage feeding makes it possible to feed large numbers of goats in barns. This review explains the physiological factors involved in suppressing dry forage intake and the cause of drinking following dry forage feeding. Ruminants consume an enormous amount of dry forage in a short time. Eating rates of dry forage rapidly decreased in the first 40 min of feeding and subsequently declined gradually to low states in the remaining time of the feeding period. Saliva in large-type goats is secreted in large volume during the first hour after the commencement of dry forage feeding. It was elucidated that the marked suppression of dry forage intake during the first hour was caused by a feeding-induced hypovolemia and the loss of NaHCO3 due to excessive salivation during the initial stages of dry forage feeding. On the other hand, it was indicated that the marked decrease in feed intake observed in the second hour of the 2 h feeding period was related to ruminal distension caused by the feed consumed and the copious amount of saliva secreted during dry forage feeding. In addition, results indicate that the marked decreases in dry forage intake after 40 min of feeding are caused by increases in plasma osmolality and subsequent thirst sensations produced by dry forage feeding. After 40 min of the 2 h dry forage feeding period, the feed salt content is absorbed into the rumen and plasma osmolality increases. The combined effects of ruminal distension and increased plasma osmolality accounted for 77.6% of the suppression of dry forage intake 40 min after the start of dry forage feeding. The results indicate that ruminal distension and increased plasma osmolality are the main physiological factors in suppression of dry forage intake in large-type goats. There was very little drinking behavior observed during the first hour of the 2 h feeding period most

  3. Managing the care of patients with Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth: comorbidities, medication use and dental care considerations.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark; Epstein, Joel; Villines, Dana

    2014-12-01

    As North Americans live longer, have more chronic conditions and take more medications, adverse oral events are likely to increase and aggravate the symptoms of Sjögren syndrome (SS). A total of 151 adults who self-reported having SS and who had a mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of 65.8 (11.5) years completed a survey that included questions about basic demographic information, current medical conditions, medications used (prescription and over the counter [OTC]) and the use of oral products to manage SS symptoms. Owing to the self-reporting process in our survey, the term "SS" in our study population represented a mixture of people with SS and people with dry mouth symptoms. The mean (SD) number of daily medications recorded as prescription, OTC and oral care products were 4.9 (3.5), 4.5 (2.8) and 4.6 (1.4), respectively. Participants with four or more comorbid medical conditions (n = 74; 49.0 percent) had significant differences (P < .05) in oral symptoms compared with those who had fewer than four (n = 75; 49.7 percent). Participants who were taking fewer than four prescription and OTC medications daily (n = 61; 40.4 percent) has significant differences (P < .05) in voice hoarseness compared with those taking four or more prescription and OTC medications daily (n = 54; 35.8 percent). The survey results indicated that medication use and comorbid medical conditions demonstrated significant differences and may have had a substantial impact on the oral symptoms in adults who self-reported having SS.

  4. Instability of bacteriophages in spray-dried trehalose powders is caused by crystallization of the matrix.

    PubMed

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Meeus, Joke; Lavigne, Rob; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2014-09-10

    Spray drying is a valuable technique in pharmaceutical dosage formulation, capable of producing amorphous, spherical powders, suitable for pulmonary deposition and further downstream processing. In this study, we show that spray drying bacteriophages together with trehalose results in an amorphous powder matrix with high glass transition temperature (between 116 and 118°C), typical for amorphous trehalose. These powders are stable at low temperatures (4°C) and relative humidity (0%). However, high humidity causes crystallization of the amorphous matrix, destroying the embedded phages. Furthermore, storage at higher temperature (25°C) causes thermal instability of the embedded phages. The results show that storage conditions are important parameters to take into account in phage therapy development. The resulting particles are hollow spheres, with suitable aerodynamic diameters for deposition into the deep lungs. This opens possibilities to use these phage-containing powder formulations to tackle pulmonary infectious diseases, especially caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens.

  5. Activity-guided identification of (S)-malic acid 1-O-D-glucopyranoside (morelid) and gamma-aminobutyric acid as contributors to umami taste and mouth-drying oral sensation of morel mushrooms (Morchella deliciosa Fr.).

    PubMed

    Rotzoll, Nina; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-05-18

    Although morel mushrooms are widely used as tasty ingredients in savory dishes, knowledge of the key compounds evoking their attractive taste is still very fragmentary. In the present study, taste activity-guided fractionation of an aqueous morel extract by means of the recently developed taste dilution analysis (TDA) enabled the localization of several umami-like-tasting fractions as well as a fraction imparting an intense mouth-drying sensation to the oral cavity. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), LC-MS, and amino acid analysis led to the successful identification of gamma-aminobutyric acid as the chemical inducer of the mouth-drying and mouth-coating oral sensations imparted by the morel extract. Besides the well-known umami-like taste contributors L-glutamic acid, L-aspartic acid, and succinic acid, an additional HILIC fraction was isolated and evaluated as tasting umami-like. LC-MS and NMR studies revealed that this fraction consisted of a mixture of (S)-malic acid 1-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside and (S)-malic acid 1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, the structure of which could be successfully confirmed by independent synthesis. To the best of our knowledge, this morel-derived glycoside, which we named (S)-morelid, has previously not been reported in any food products. Sensory analysis of aqueous solutions of the compounds identified revealed threshold concentrations of 0.02 mmol/L for the mouth-drying effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid and 6.0 mmol/L for the umami-like, slightly sour taste of (S)-morelid.

  6. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, S. I.; Eltawil, N. M.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Amin, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During open orthopaedic surgery, joints may be exposed to air, potentially leading to cartilage drying and chondrocyte death, however, the long-term effects of joint drying in vivo are poorly understood. We used an animal model to investigate the subsequent effects of joint drying on cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods The patellar groove of anaesthetised rats was exposed (sham-operated), or exposed and then subjected to laminar airflow (0.25m/s; 60 minutes) before wounds were sutured and animals recovered. Animals were monitored for up to eight weeks and then sacrificed. Cartilage and chondrocyte properties were studied by histology and confocal microscopy, respectively. Results Joint drying caused extensive chondrocyte death within the superficial regions of cartilage. Histology of dried cartilage demonstrated a loss of surface integrity at four weeks, fibrillations at eight weeks, and an increased modified Mankin score (p < 0.001). Cartilage thickness increased (p < 0.001), whereas chondrocyte density decreased at four weeks (p < 0.001), but then increased towards sham-operated levels (p < 0.01) at eight weeks. By week eight, chondrocyte pairing/clustering and cell volume increased (p < 0.05; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions These in vivo results demonstrated for the first time that as a result of laminar airflow, cartilage degeneration occurred which has characteristics similar to those seen in early osteoarthritis. Maintenance of adequate cartilage hydration during open orthopaedic surgery is therefore of paramount importance. Cite this article: Dr A. Hall. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:137–144. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000594. PMID:27114348

  7. Clinical efficacy of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh and a commercially available breath-freshening dentifrice in reducing mouth-odor-causing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Joe; Pilch, Shira; Williams, Malcolm I; Cummins, Diane

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this double-blind clinical study was to compare the long-lasting overnight (10- to 12-hour) and 4-hour effects of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh toothpaste to a commercial fluoridated breath-freshening dentifrice in controlling the level of mouth-odor-causing bacteria. Thirty-two adult men and women from New Jersey participated in the randomized, crossover design clinical study. After a 1-week "washout" period of brushing with a regular fluoride dentifrice, subjects refrained from dental hygiene, eating, and drinking in preparation for the morning visit. After providing a baseline salivary sample, subjects were issued a soft-bristled toothbrush and instructed to brush their teeth twice a day (once in the morning and once before bed) for 1 minute with the assigned test dentifrice. After a 7-day product use cycle, the subjects returned to the test site, having refrained from dental hygiene, eating, and drinking. Subjects provided an overnight salivary sample (10 to 12 hours postbrushing). Subjects then ate, brushed for 1 minute with the assigned dentifrice, and returned for 2- and 4-hour postbrushing evaluations. Subjects refrained from dental hygiene, eating, or drinking during the 4-hour evaluation period. To collect the oral microflora samples, subjects rinsed with 10 mL of sterile water for 10 seconds and deposited their samples into sterile tubes. Each collected sample was serially diluted in sterile phosphate-buffered saline and duplicate-plated onto lead acetate agar. When plated onto this medium, mouth-odor-causing bacteria that produce hydrogen sulfide appear as dark pigmented colonies. After 96 hours of incubation, hydrogen-sulfide-producing bacteria were counted, expressed as log colony-forming units per milliliter, and reduction from baseline was calculated. The results of this clinical study support the conclusion that Colgate Total Advanced Fresh provides a significantly greater reduction in mouth-odor-causing bacteria than a commercial

  8. Clinical and Histological Findings of Denture Stomatitis as Related to Intraoral Colonization Patterns of C. albicans, Salivary Flow, and Dry Mouth

    PubMed Central

    AlTarawneh, Sandra; Bencharit, Sompop; Mendoza, Luisito; Curran, Alice; Barrow, David; Barros, Silvana; Preisser, John; Loewy, Zvi G.; Gendreau, Linda; Offenbacher, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Multifactorial etiological factors contribute to denture stomatitis (DS), a type of oral candidiasis; however, unlike other oral candidiasis, DS can occur in a healthy person wearing a denture. In this study, we therefore attempt to explore the association between candida, denture, and mucosal tissue using 1) exfoliative cytology, 2) the candidal levels present in saliva, on mucosal tissues and on denture surfaces, and 3) the salivary flow rate and xerostomic symptoms. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study enrolled 32 edentulous participants, 17 without DS as controls and 15 with DS (Newton’s classification type II and III). Participants with systemic or other known oral conditions were excluded. Participants completed a xerostomia questionnaire, and salivary flow rates were measured. Samples of unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and stimulated whole saliva (SWS) were collected. UWS was used for fungal culturing. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain and quantitative exfoliative cytology were performed on samples from affected and unaffected mucosa from each participant. Levels of Candida species (albicans and non-albicans) were determined in salivary samples (expressed as colony-forming units, CFU), as well as from swab samples obtained from denture fitting surfaces, in addition to affected and unaffected mucosa. Results There were no significant differences in salivary flow rates, mucosal wetness, or frequency of reported dry mouth comparing participants with and without DS. Exfoliative cytology of mucosal smears demonstrated significantly higher (P = 0.02) inflammatory cell counts in DS patients, as compared with smears of healthy denture-wearers. C. albicans was significantly more prevalent in saliva (P = 0.03) and on denture surfaces (P = 0.002) of DS participants, whereas mucosal candidal counts and the presence of cytological hyphae did not show significant difference comparing DS to healthy participants. Conclusions In this investigation, we

  9. Mouth Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rich in fruits and vegetables. The vitamins and antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables may help reduce your risk of mouth cancer. Avoid excessive sun exposure to your lips. Protect the skin on your lips from the sun by staying ...

  10. Trichothecene mycotoxins associated with potato dry rot caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Javier A; Schwarz, Paul B; Gillespie, James; Rivera-Varas, Viviana V; Secor, Gary A

    2010-03-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a known producer of trichothecene mycotoxins in cereal hosts, has been recently documented as a cause of dry rot of potato tubers in the United States. Due to the uncertainty of trichothecene production in these tubers, a study was conducted to determine the accumulation and diffusion of trichothecenes in potato tubers affected with dry rot caused by F. graminearum. Potato tubers of cv. Russet Burbank were inoculated with 14 F. graminearum isolates from potato, sugar beet, and wheat and incubated at 10 to 12 degrees C for 5 weeks to determine accumulation of trichothecenes in potato tubers during storage. Twelve of the isolates were classified as deoxynivalenol (DON) genotype and two isolates were as nivalenol (NIV) genotype. Trichothecenes were detected only in rotted tissue. DON was detected in all F. graminearum DON genotype isolates up to 39.68 microg/ml in rotted potato tissue. Similarly, both NIV genotype isolates accumulated NIV in rotted potato tissue up to 18.28 microg/ml. Interestingly, isolates classified as genotype DON accumulated both DON and NIV in the dry rot lesion. Potato tubers were then inoculated with two isolates of F. graminearum chemotype DON and incubated up to 7 weeks at 10 to 12 degrees C and assayed for DON diffusion. F. graminearum was recovered from >53% of the isolations from inoculated tubers at 3 cm distal to the rotted tissue after 7 weeks of incubation but DON was not detected in the surrounding tissue. Based in this data, the accumulation of trichothecenes in the asymptomatic tissue surrounding dry rot lesions caused by F. graminearum is minimal in cv. Russet Burbank potato tubers stored for 7 weeks at customary processing storage temperatures.

  11. Dry-wet variations and cause analysis in Northeast China at multi-time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qi; Pan, Feifei; Pan, Xuebiao; Hu, Liting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Pengyu; Wei, Pei; Pan, Zhihua

    2017-07-01

    Global warming has caused unevenly distributed changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration, which has and will certainly impact on the wet-dry variations. Based on daily meteorological data collected at 91 weather stations in Northeast China (NEC), the spatiotemporal characteristics of dry and wet climatic variables (precipitation, crop reference evapotranspiration (ET0), and humid index (HI)) are analyzed, and the probable reasons causing the changes in these variables are discussed during the period of 1961-2014. Precipitation showed non-significant trend over the period of 1961-2014, while ET0 showed a significant decreasing trend, which led to climate wetting in NEC. The period of 2001-2012 exhibited smaller semiarid area and larger humid area compared to the period of 1961-1980, indicating NEC has experienced wetting process at decadal scale. ET0 was most sensitive to relative humidity, and wind speed was the second most sensitive variable. Sunshine hours and temperature were found to be less influential to ET0 in the study area. The changes in wind speed in the recent 54 years have caused the greatest influence on ET0, followed by temperature. For each month, wind speed was the most significant variable causing ET0 reduction in all months except July. Temperature, as a dominant factor, made a positive contribution to ET0 in February and March, as well as sunshine hours in June and July, and relative humidity in August and September. In summary, NEC has experienced noticeable climate wetting due to the significantly decreasing ET0, and the decrease in wind speed was the biggest contributor for the ET0 reduction. Although agricultural drought crisis is expected to be partly alleviated, regional water resources management and planning in Northeast China should consider the potential water shortage and water conflict in the future because of spatiotemporal dry-wet variations in NEC.

  12. Meth mouth.

    PubMed

    Heng, Christine K; Badner, Victor M; Schiop, Luminita Adela

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a drug traditionally sought by groups living on the fringes of society. But now, it has entered the mainstream. Over the last five years, meth has seen a surge in abuse, media coverage and attention from law-enforcement officers. Meth mouth is characterized by rampant caries, typically on the smooth surfaces of dentition. This article gives a history of meth use and abuse. It describes the condition of meth mouth and its etiology. Treatment options and other dental considerations are discussed.

  13. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Truong, T. A.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Limoli, C. L.; Turner, N. D.; Halloran, B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or anti-inflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss. Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Thus, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth. PMID:26867002

  14. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-Fard, Y; Shahnazari, M; Alwood, J S; Truong, T A; Tahimic, C G T; Limoli, C L; Turner, N D; Halloran, B; Globus, R K

    2016-02-11

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or anti-inflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss. Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Thus, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.

  15. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schreurs, A. -S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Truong, T. A.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Limoli, C. L.; Turner, N. D.; Halloran, B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-02-11

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or antiinflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss. Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.

  16. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Schreurs, A. -S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; ...

    2016-02-11

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or antiinflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss.more » Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.« less

  17. Changes in the chemical composition of basil caused by different drying procedures.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Luigi Francesco; Forni, Elisabetta; Viscardi, Daniela; Nani, Renato Carlo

    2003-06-04

    Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) leaves were dried using a microwave oven at atmospheric pressure or two traditional methods: air-drying at 50 degrees C and freeze-drying. The microwave-drying was carried out at different powers and times on raw basil leaves, while for air and freeze-drying techniques, both raw and blanched leaves were used. The raw and dried basil was analyzed for selected aroma compounds by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-selected-ion-monitoring, the chlorophyll a and b by HPLC and the color by a reflected-light colorimeter. For dried samples microwaved for 1 min at 270, 2 min at 440, 1 min at 650, and 1 min at 1100 W, the percentage retentions of the characteristic volatile compounds (eucalyptol, linalool, eugenol, and methyl eugenol) were higher than in the samples dried by traditional methods, with the exception of freeze-dried unblenched basil. Microwave drying allowed a larger retention of chlorophyll pigments than air-drying and freeze-drying (with or without blanching) and preserved the color of the raw basil. Microwave drying requires a much shorter treatment and implied the simultaneous blanching of the material.

  18. The lancelet and ammocoete mouths.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kinya; Kaji, Takao

    2008-10-01

    The evolutionary history of the vertebrate mouth has long been an intriguing issue in comparative zoology. When the prevertebrate state was considered, the oral structure in adult lancelets (amphioxus) was traditionally referred to because of its general similarity to that of the ammocoete larva of lampreys. The larval mouth in lancelets, however, shows a peculiar developmental mode. Reflecting this, the affinity of the lancelet mouth has long been argued, but is still far from a consensus. The increase in available data from molecular biology, comparative developmental biology, paleontology, and other related fields makes it prudent to discuss morphological homology and homoplasy. Here, we review how the lancelet mouth has been interpreted in the study of evolution of the vertebrate mouth, as well as recent advances in chordate studies. With this background of increased knowledge, our innervation analysis supports the interpretation that the morphological similarity in the oral apparatus between ammocoetes and lancelets is a homoplasy caused by their similar food habits.

  19. Diagnosis of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by EV71 and other enteroviruses by a one-step, single tube, duplex RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bingfu; Zhang, Jianhua; You, Xianhui; Dong, Chen; Cheng, Xianfeng; Dai, Xing; Meng, Jihong

    2012-11-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is caused mainly by enterovirus 71 (EV71) and other enteroviruses (EVs) such as Coxsackie A16 in China. EV71 infection can lead to severe clinical manifestations and even death. Other EVs, however, generally cause mild symptoms. Thus, early and accurate distinction of EV71 from other EVs for HFMD will offer significant benefits. A one-step, single tube, duplex RT-PCR assay is described in the present study to detect simultaneously EV71 and other EVs. The primers used for the duplex RT-PCR underwent screening and optimization. The detection threshold was 0.001 TCID(50)/ml for EV71 and 0.01 TCID(50)/ml for other EVs. The positive rate of enterovirus detection in 165 clinical samples reached 68.5%, including 46.1% for EV71 and 22.4% for other EVs. Of all the severe HFMD cases, EV71 was responsible for 85.3% cases. The positive rate of EV71 fell markedly by day 8 after onset. In addition, sequencing of EV71 specific amplicons from duplex RT-PCR revealed that C4a was the predominant subgenotype of EV71 circulating in Nanjing, China. The accuracy and reliability of the assay suggest strongly that the one-step, single tube, duplex RT-PCR will be useful for early diagnosis and monitoring of EV71 and other EV infections.

  20. Sensory-guided identification of N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-alpha-amino acids as contributors to the thick-sour and mouth-drying orosensation of stewed beef juice.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Tessa; Kunert, Christof; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-05-26

    Sensory-guided fractionation of stewed beef juice using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, PFPP-HPLC, and HILIC combined with analytical sensory techniques led to the identification of the dipeptides beta-alanyl-N-methyl-L-histidine and beta-alanyl-L-histidine, as well as the creatinine derivatives N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)aminopropionic acid, N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)aminoacetic acid, and N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)amino-4,5,6-trihydroxyhexanoic acid as taste modulators in stewed beef juice. Model experiments demonstrated for the first time that the latter three N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-alpha-amino acids are formed by Maillard-type reactions from creatinine and reducing hexoses. Quantitative analysis, followed by taste recombination and omission experiments, revealed that subthreshold concentrations of these taste modulators enhance the typical thick-sour and mouth-drying orosensation and the mouthfulness imparted by stewed beef juice, although none of these compounds exhibited any significant intrinsic taste when tasted individually in water.

  1. [Rash and fever illness caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 needs to be distinguished from hand, foot and mouth disease].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuang-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Sun, Qiang; Li, Jing; Li, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ying; Wen, Xiao-Yun; Yan, Dong-Mei; Huang, Guo-Hong; Zhang, Bao-Min; Zhang, Bo; An, Hong-Qiu; Li, Hui; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2013-06-01

    An epidemic of rash and fever illnesses suspected of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred in Gansu Province of China in 2008, laboratory tests were performed in order to identify the pathogen that caused this epidemic. Eight clinical specimens collected from the 4 patients (each patient has throat swab and herpes fluid specimens) with rash and febrile illness, were inoculated onto RD and HEp-2 cells for virus isolation, and the viral nucleic acid was then extracted with the positive virus isolates, the dual-channel real-time reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect the nucleic acid of human enterovirus (HEV) in the viral isolates at the same time. For the viral isolates with the negative results of HEV, a sequence independent single primer amplification technique (SISPA) was used for "unknown pathogen" identification. Totally, 6 viral isolates were identified as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Comprehensive analyses results of the clinical manifestations of the patients, epidemiological findings and laboratory test indicated that this epidemic of rash and febrile illness was caused by HSV-1. The differences among the gG region of 6 HSV-1 isolates at nucleotide level and amino acid level were all small, and the identities were up to 98. 8% and 97.9%, respectively, showing that this outbreak was caused by only one viral transmission chain of HSV-1. HSV-1 and other viruses that cause rash and febrile illnesses need differential diagnosis with HFMD. The etiology of rash and febrile illness is sometimes difficult to distinguish from the clinical symptoms and epidemiological data, the laboratory diagnosis is therefore critical.

  2. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoppay, Jaisri R; De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine N

    2013-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition that is characterized by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa without obvious clinical examination findings. This syndrome has complex characteristics, but its cause remains largely enigmatic, making treatment and management of patients with BMS difficult. Despite not being accompanied by evident organic changes, BMS can significantly reduce the quality of life for such patients. Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to diagnose and manage patients with BMS as a part of comprehensive care.

  3. Patients with burning mouth sensations. A clinical investigation of causative factors in a group of "compete denture wearers" Jordanian population.

    PubMed

    Mukatash-Nimri, Gadeer Elea; Al-Nimri, Marwan A; Al-Jadeed, Omar G; Al-Zobe, Zaid R; Aburumman, Khuzama K; Masarwa, Nader A

    2017-01-01

    To find out the prevalence of "true" burning mouth syndrome and study the association between patients' spontaneous complaints of burning mouth and systemic conditions in a group of middle age and elderly "denture wearers" patients in Jordan. A group of 129 patients (112 female and 17 male) of "complete denture wearers" subjects aged 40 years and over attended prosthetic clinic at King Hussein Medical Hospital complaining from oral burning, with no oral lesion possibly responsible for the burning sensations were selected. Assessment of oral and general status was done based on questioners, detailed history taking, medical records and extra and intraoral examination. The existed complete dentures retention, stability, jaw relationship and the free way space were evaluated. The current blood test and instrumental protocol for examination of patients with burning mouth complains were performed for each patient. Then those studied patients with burning mouth sensations including "true" burning mouth syndrome have been compared to the controls with regard to the presence of local problem, undermined local, systemic or psychological disease. The diagnosis of "true" burning mouth syndrome was established in (2.3%) of the studied population two females and one male. In most patients (58%) more than one site was affected. Significant positive associations were found between local factors (i.e., wearing complete dentures with unsatisfactory retention or jaw relationship, dry mouth or candidasis) and patients suffering from burning mouth sensation. The results also show that some systemic or psychological disorders were significantly more present among patients with burning mouth symptoms when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Spontaneous symptoms of burning mouth without mucosal signs should be considered as a manifestation of undermind pathology and/or distress, and the multi-factorial causes of burning mouth syndrome and sensation need to be referred to the

  4. Synonymous deoptimization of the foot-and-mouth disease virus P1 coding region causes attenuation in vivo while inducing a strong neutralizing antibody response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens including polio, respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid coding region (P1 region) of the cDNA infectious clone of foot-and-mouth disease vi...

  5. Mouth Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... them know what to expect during the evaluation. Warning signs Certain symptoms and characteristics are cause for ... should see their doctor or dentist when convenient. Warning signs suggest a higher risk of cancer, and ...

  6. An increase of dry season length over southern Amazonia, its causes and implication to climate projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Yin, L.

    2013-05-01

    Observations from several independent sources suggest that the dry season length (DSL) has increased over southern Amazonia since 1979, primarily due to a delay of its ending dates (DSE). Whether such a change is entirely due to natural climate variability or a result of combine natural variability and anthropogenic forced change will be assessed through a process-based analysis. The observed changes appear to be greater than those simulated by the global climate models that participated in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5) forced by both historical and future anthropogenic and natural forcing. Such a discrepancy is unlikely due to under-representation of natural variability and more likely due to underestimate the sensitivity of the dry season length to external forcing. Consequently, the climate projections of these models may underestimate the future changes of the dry season length and its impact on rainforests. Our study suggests that it is imperative that monitoring, quantification, and understanding of changes of rainfall seasonality over southern Amazonia be improved.

  7. Does estrogen deficiency cause lacrimal gland inflammation and aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice?

    PubMed

    Rahimi Darabad, Raheleh; Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Zakka, Fouad R; Barabino, Stefano; Sullivan, David A

    2014-10-01

    Researchers have proposed that estrogen deficiency will lead to a Sjögren's syndrome (SjS)-like lacrimal gland inflammation, aqueous tear deficiency and dry eye. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this proposal is correct. Lacrimal glands were obtained from adult, age-matched wild type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, in which estrogen synthesis is completely eliminated. Tissues were also obtained from autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice as inflammation controls. Tear volumes in WT and ArKO mice were measured and glands were processed for molecular biological and histological evaluation. Our results demonstrate that estrogen absence does not lead to a SjS-like inflammation in lacrimal tissue or to an aqueous-deficient dry eye. There was no upregulation of genes associated with inflammatory pathways in lacrimal glands of male or female ArKO mice. Such inflammatory activity was prominent in autoimmune MRL/lpr tissues. We also found no evidence of inflammation in lacrimal gland tissue sections of estrogen-deficient mice, and tear volumes of ArKO males were actually increased as compared to those WT controls. Interestingly, our study did show that estrogen absence influences the expression of thousands of lacrimal gland genes, and that this impact is sex- and genotype-specific. Our findings demonstrate that estrogen absence is not a risk factor for the development of SjS-like lacrimal gland inflammation or for aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Does estrogen deficiency cause lacrimal gland inflammation and aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice?

    PubMed Central

    Darabad, Raheleh Rahimi; Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M.; Jakobiec, Frederick A.; Zakka, Fouad R.; Barabino, Stefano; Sullivan, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that estrogen deficiency will lead to a Sjögren's syndrome (SjS)-like lacrimal gland inflammation, aqueous tear deficiency and dry eye. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this proposal is correct. Lacrimal glands were obtained from adult, age-matched wild type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, in which estrogen synthesis is completely eliminated. Tissues were also obtained from autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice as inflammation controls. Tear volumes in WT and ArKO mice were measured and glands were processed for molecular biological and histological evaluation. Our results demonstrate that estrogen absence does not lead to a SjS-like inflammation in lacrimal tissue or to an aqueous-deficient dry eye. There was no upregulation of genes associated with inflammatory pathways in lacrimal glands of male or female ArKO mice. Such inflammatory activity was prominent in autoimmune MRL/lpr tissues. We also found no evidence of inflammation in lacrimal gland tissue sections of estrogen-deficient mice, and tear volumes of ArKO males were actually increased as compared to those WT controls. Interestingly, our study did show that estrogen absence influences the expression of thousands of lacrimal gland genes, and that this impact is sex- and genotype-specific. Our findings demonstrate that estrogen absence is not a risk factor for the development of SjS-like lacrimal gland inflammation or for aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice. PMID:25084452

  9. Mouth Problems and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... orientation. This information is for people who have mouth (oral) problems related to HIV infection. It explains ... look like. It also describes where in the mouth they occur and how they are treated. They ...

  10. Capillary flow as the cause of ring stains from dried liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, Robert D.; Bakajin, Olgica; Dupont, Todd F.; Huber, Greb; Nagel, Sidney R.; Witten, Thomas A.

    1997-10-01

    When a spilled drop of coffee dries on a solid surface, it leaves a dense, ring-like deposit along the perimeter (Fig. 1a). The coffee-initially dispersed over the entire drop-becomes concentrated into a tiny fraction of it. Such ring deposits are common wherever drops containing dispersed solids evaporate on a surface, and they influence processes such as printing, washing and coating. Ring deposits also provide a potential means to write or deposit a fine pattern onto a surface. Here we ascribe the characteristic pattern of the deposition to a form of capillary flow in which pinning of the contact line of the drying drop ensures that liquid evaporating from the edge is replenished by liquid from the interior. The resulting outward flow can carry virtually all the dispersed material to the edge. This mechanism predicts a distinctive power-law growth of the ring mass with time-a law independent of the particular substrate, carrier fluid or deposited solids. We have verified this law by microscopic observations of colloidal fluids.

  11. Alterations in fruit and vegetable beta-carotene and vitamin C content caused by open-sun drying, visqueen-covered and polyethylene-covered solar-dryers.

    PubMed

    Ndawula, J; Kabasa, J D; Byaruhanga, Y B

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of three drying methods (open sun drying, visqueen-covered solar dryer and polyethylene-covered solar dryer) on b-carotene and vitamin C content of edible portions of mango fruit (Mangifera indica) and cowpea leaves (Vigna unguiculata). Commercial samples were analysed for vitamin C by titrimetry and b-carotene by spectrophotometry at 450 nm. Differences in vitamin retention and loss associated with the three drying methods were assessed by analysis of variance and least significant difference (LSD) at (p<0.05. The fresh cowpea leaf b-carotene and vitamin C content was 140.9 and 164.3 mg / 100g DM respectively and decreased (p<0.05) with drying. Open sun drying method caused the greatest b-carotene and vitamin C loss (58% and 84% respectively), while the visqueen-covered solar dryer caused the least loss (34.5% and 71% respectively). Blanching cowpea leaves improved b-carotene and vitamin C retention by 15% and 7.5% respectively. The b-carotene and vitamin C content of fresh ripe mango fruit was 5.9 and 164.3 mg/100g DM respectively. Similar to effects on cowpea leaves, the mango micronutrient content decreased (p<0.05) with drying. The open sun drying method caused the greatest b-carotene (94.2%) and vitamin C (84.5%) loss, while the visqueen-covered solar dryer caused the least (73 and 53% respectively). These results show that the three solar drying methods cause significant loss of pro-vitamin A and vitamin C in dried fruits and vegetables. However, open sun drying causes the most loss and the visqueen-covered solar dryer the least, making the later a probable better drying technology for fruit and vegetable preservation. The drying technologies should be improved to enhance vitamin retention.

  12. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  13. Burning Mouth Syndrome: update.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Eugenia; Salas, Enric Jané; López López, José

    2014-06-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder that predominately affects middle-aged women in the postmenopausal period. The condition is distinguished by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa and the absence of any clinical signs. The etiology of BMS is complex and it includes a variety of factors. Local, systemic and psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression are listed among the possible causes of BMS. BMS may sometimes be classified as BMS Type I, II or III. Although this syndrome is not accompanied by evident organic alterations and it does not present health risks, it can significantly reduce the patient's quality of life. This study analyzes the available literature related to BMS, and makes special reference to its therapeutic management. The pages that follow will also discuss the diagnostic criteria that should be respected, etiological factors, and clinical aspects. We used the PubMed database and searched it by using the keywords "burning mouth syndrome", "BMS and review", and "burning mouth and review", in the title or abstract of the publication. BMS treatment usually steers towards the management of the symptoms; however, the specific local factors that could play a significant role in worsening the oral burning sensation should be eradicated. The most widely accepted treatment options that show variable results include tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs; nevertheless there are other therapies that can also be carried out. Professionals that work in the field of dentistry should formulate standardized symptomatic and diagnostic criteria in order to more easily identify the most effective and reliable strategies in BMS treatment through multidisciplinary research.

  14. Mathematical modeling of pattern formation caused by drying of colloidal film under a mask.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Vodolazskaya, Irina V; Sakharova, Lyudmila V

    2016-02-01

    In our model, we simulate an experiment (D.J. Harris, H. Hu, J.C. Conrad, J.A. Lewis, Patterning colloidal films via evaporative lithography, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 148301 (2007)). A thin colloidal sessile droplet is allowed to dry out on a horizontal hydrophilic surface. A mask just above the droplet predominantly allows evaporation from the droplet free surface directly beneath the holes in the mask. We consider one special case, when the holes in the mask are arranged so that the system has rotational symmetry of order m . We use a speculative evaporative flux to mimic the real system. Advection, diffusion, and sedimentation are taken into account. FlexPDE is utilized to solve an advection-diffusion equation using the finite element method. The simulation demonstrates that the colloidal particles accumulate below the holes as the solvent evaporates. Diffusion can reduce this accumulation.

  15. Fire in Ghana's dry forest: Causes, frequency, effects and management interventions

    Treesearch

    Sandra Opoku Agyemang; Michael Muller; Victor Rex Barnes

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the number of fires, area burned, causes and seasonality of fires over a ten year period from 2002-2012 and investigates different fire management strategies and their effectiveness in the Afram headwaters forest reserve in Ghana. Data were collected from interviews of stakeholders in two communities adjacent to the reserve, and from 2002-2012 fire...

  16. Hookworm - mouth of the organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This photograph shows the front section of the hookworm, and the mouth parts which it uses to ... blood for nourishment, are visible. Three species of hookworm cause infection in the United States, including this ...

  17. Warm Dry Weather Conditions Cause of 2016 Fort McMurray Wild Forest Fire and Associated Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azevedo, S. C.; Singh, R. P.; da Silva, E. A., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    The climate change is evident from the increasing temperature around the world, day to day life and increasing frequency of natural hazards. The warm and dry conditions are the cause of frequent forest fires around the globe. Forest fires severely affect the air quality and human health. Multi sensor satellites and dense network of ground stations provide information about vegetation health, meteorological, air quality and atmospheric parameters. We have carried out detailed analysis of satellite and ground data of wild forest fire that occurred in May 2016 in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. This wild forest fire destroyed 10 per cent of Fort McMurray's housing and forced more than 90,000 people to evacuate the surrounding areas. Our results show that the warm and dry conditions with low rainfall were the cause of Fort McMurray wild fire. The air quality parameters (particulate matter, CO, ozone, NO2, methane) and greenhouse gases measured from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) satellite show enhanced levels soon after the forest fire. The emissions from the forest fire affected health of population living in surrounding areas up to 300 km radius.

  18. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamala, K A; Sankethguddad, S; Sujith, S G; Tantradi, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  19. [Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia)].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia) is manifested by oral pin and tingling sensations, numbness and even burning and severe pains, more frequently in the tongue. Unpleasant sensations may involve the anterior two thirds of the tongue or be extended to the front part of the hard palate and the mucous membrane of the lower lip. This condition is characterized by "mirror" and "food dominant" symptoms, disordered salivation, dysgeusia, or psychological disorders. The disease shows a chronic course. Its etiology may be multifactorial. There are no universally accepted diagnostic criteria; the diagnosis of glossalgia is made to rule out all other causes. A thorough examination should be conducted to establish a differential diagnosis. Glossalgia occurs primarily in middle-aged and elderly people. Women get sick much more frequently than men of the same age. Glossalgia remains difficult to treat. Continuous symptomatic treatment and follow-up help relieve its symptoms.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele

    2012-01-01

    According to the International Association for the Study of Pain, burning mouth Syndrome (BMS) is defined as a burning pain in the tongue or other oral mucous membrane in the absence of clinical signs or laboratory findings. The etiology is unknown and presents a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. The management of BMS is still not satisfactory. The prognosis is poor and the burning sensation can last for many years causing a dramatic impact on the patient's quality of life. It is important to distinguish between true BMS and symptomatic burning sensation which occurs when the burning sensation is secondary to a local or systemic pathologic condition. Currently, there are no defined diagnostic criteria for BMS. A diagnosis is usually reached by exclusion of other diseases. This may lead to misdiagnoses, presenting an obstacle to successful treatment.

  1. Hyper-dry conditions provide new insights into the cause of extreme floods after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.; Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    A catastrophic wildfire in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado provided a unique opportunity to investigate soil conditions immediately after a wildfire and before alteration by rainfall. Measurements of near-surface (θ; and matric suction, ψ), rainfall, and wind velocity were started 8 days after the wildfire began. These measurements established that hyper-dryconditions (θ 3 cm-3; ψ > ~ 3 x 105 cm) existed and provided an in-situ retention curve for these conditions. These conditions exacerbate the effects of water repellency (natural and fire-induced) and limit the effectiveness of capillarity and gravity driven infiltration into fire-affected soils. The important consequence is that given hyper-dryconditions, the critical rewetting process before the first rain is restricted to the diffusion–adsorption of water-vapor. This process typically has a time scale of days to weeks (especially when the hydrologic effects of the ash layer are included) that is longer than the typical time scale (minutes to hours) of some rainstorms, such that under hyper-dryconditions essentially no rain infiltrates. The existence of hyper-dryconditions provides insight into why, frequently during the first rain storm after a wildfire, nearly all rainfall becomes runoff causing extremefloods and debris flows.

  2. Isolation and characterization of two strains of Fusarium oxysporum causing potato dry rot in Solanum tuberosum in Colombia.

    PubMed

    García Bayona, Leonor; Grajales, Alejandro; Cárdenas, Martha Emiliana; Sierra, Roberto; Lozano, Gabriel; Garavito, Manuel Fernando; Cepero de García, María Caridad; Bernal, Adriana; Jiménez, Pedro; Restrepo, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum has worldwide distribution and causes severe vascular wilt or root rot in many plants. Strains are classified into formae speciales based on their high degree of host specificity, of which multilocus sequence typing provides a fairly good estimate. The main aim of this study was to identify the causal agent of an infected potato tuber in Colombia. Two F. oxysporum isolates were recovered from a potato tuber showing symptoms of dry rot. Both macroscopic and microscopic morphology differences were observed between the two isolates. Koch's postulates were verified and in quantitative tuber pathogenecity trials, both isolates induced moderate dry rot. Ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial intergenic spacer region (IGS) sequences were PCR-amplified, sequenced and shown to be identical for the two isolates. A maximum parsimony phylogeny was created using F. oxysporum IGS sequences available in the Genebank database, which does not include sequences from the formae speciales tuberosi. Our two isolates were most closely related to a red clover (Trifolium pratense) pathogenic isolate and two non-pathogenic F. oxysporum isolates from birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and Lycopersicon sp. rhyzosphere (99% identity). These experiments showed that our isolates are not restricted to potato and that a molecular marker is needed to differentiate the formae speciales since the IGS and EF-1α do not have the power to do it. Copyright © 2010 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. DROUGHT IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: what/who causes abnormally dry conditions? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Loon, A.; Van Lanen, H.

    2013-12-01

    Deforestation for agriculture, reservoir construction for hydropower, groundwater abstraction for irrigation, river diversion for navigation. These are only some examples of human interventions in river basins. The consequences of these interventions can be far-reaching, but are often difficult to distinguish from natural influences on the water system, such as meteorological droughts. River basin managers in water-stressed regions need to quantify both human and natural effects on the water system to adapt their water management accordingly. ';Drought' is a natural hazard, which is caused by climatic processes and their intrinsic variability, and cannot be prevented by short-term, local water management. ';Water scarcity' refers to the long-term unsustainable use of water resources and is a process that water managers and policy makers can influence. Water scarcity and drought are keywords for river basin managers in water-stressed regions, like Australia, California, China and the Mediterranean Basin. The interrelationship between drought and water scarcity, however, is complex. In regions with low water availability and high human pressures, water scarcity situations are common and can be exacerbated by drought events. The worst situation is a multi-year drought in a (semi )arid region with high demand for water. In monitoring the hydrological system for water management purposes, it is difficult (but essential) to determine which part of the temporal variation in a hydrological variable is caused by water scarcity (human induced) and which part by drought (natural). So the urgent question of many water managers is: how to distinguish between water scarcity and drought? Here, we present a new quantitative approach to distinguish, namely the observation-modelling framework proposed by Van Loon and Van Lanen (2013) to separate natural (drought) and human (water scarcity) effects on the hydrological system. The basis of the framework is simulation of the situation

  4. [Severe limitation of mouth opening].

    PubMed

    Reiter, S; Winocur, E; Gavish, A; Eli, I

    2004-10-01

    Limitation of mouth opening is a common source of referral to an orofacial pain clinic with a proposed diagnosis of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD). The word "trismus" is defined by the American academy of orofacial pain as: "Myospasm of masticatory muscles specifically causing limited jaw opening; early symptom of tetanus". Therefore, once trismus is suspected, TMD should be ruled out. However, it is not uncommon to find the usage of this term to describe severe limitation of opening by causes other than myospasm, therefore posing the risk of misdiagnosis. The purpose of this article is to describe the differential diagnosis of hard end limitation of opening with emphasis on the clinical tools used to differentiate between muscle source of hard end limitation and other sources of hard end limitation. Several cases of hard end limitation of mouth opening are presented and through them major principles of orofacial diagnosis are discussed.

  5. [The analysis of the causes of variability of the relationship between leaf dry mass and area in plants].

    PubMed

    Vasfilov, S P

    2011-01-01

    The lamina dry mass: area ratio (LMA - Leaf Mass per Area) is a quite variable trait. Leaf dry mass consists of symplast mass (a set of all leaf protoplasts) and apoplast mass (a set of all cell walls in a leaf). The ratio between symplast and apoplast masses is positively related to any functional trait of leaf calculated per unit of dry mass. The value of this ratio is defined by cells size and their number per unit of leaf area, number of mesophyll cells layers and their differentiation between palisade and spongy ones, and also by density of cells packing. The LMA value is defined by leaf thickness and density. The extent and direction of variability in both leaf traits define the extent and direction of variability in LMA. Negative correlation between leaf thickness and density reduces the level of LMA variability. As a consequence of this correlation the following pattern emerges: the thinner a leaf, the denser it is. Changes in the traits that define the LMA value take place both within a species under the influence of environmental factors and between species that differ in leaf structure and functions. Light is the most powerful environmental factor that influences the LMA, increase in illumination leading to increase in LMA. This effect occurs during leaf growth at the expense of structural changes associated with the reduction of symplast/apoplast mass ratio. Under conditions of intense illumination, LMA may increase due to accumulation of starch. With regard to the majority of leaf functions, the mass of starch may be ascribed to apoplast. Starch accumulation in leaves is observed also under conditions of elevated CO2 concentration in the air. Under high illumination, however, LMA increases also due to increased apoplast contribution to leaf dry mass. Scarce mineral nutrition leads to LMA increase due to lowering of growth zones demands for phothosyntates and, therefore, to increase in starch content of leaves. High level of mineral nutrition during

  6. Angular absorption of light used for evaluation of structural damage to porcine meat caused by aging, drying and freezing.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Pavel; Prokopyeva, Elena; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír

    2017-04-01

    Meat as a rich source of protein is sought after by people from all over the world. It is also very susceptible to decay because of many internal and external processes affecting it. In this work an easy and quick method of detection of structural damage caused by decay or mishandling the meat is attempted by the method of angular absorption of light. The difference between structural changes due to aging, drying and freezing is explored and the resulting changes in light absorption in meat samples are presented. This work demonstrates that the measurement of optical angular dependency of absorption in relation to the muscle fibers in muscle tissue has the potential of detecting structural damage to the sample for meat quality control purposes.

  7. Mouth leak with nasal continuous positive airway pressure increases nasal airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Richards, G N; Cistulli, P A; Ungar, R G; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1996-07-01

    Nasal congestion, dry nose and throat, and sore throat affect approximately 40% of patients using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The mechanisms causing nasal symptoms are unclear, but mouth leaks causing high unidirectional nasal airflow may be important. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of mouth leak and the influence of humidification on nasal resistance in normal subjects. Nasal resistance was measured with posterior rhinomanometry in six normal subjects who deliberately produced a mouth leak for 10 min while using nasal CPAP. Nasal resistance was measured regularly for 20 min after the challenge. A series of tests were performed using air at differing temperatures and humidities. There was no change in nasal resistance when subjects breathed through their noses while on CPAP, but a mouth leak caused a large increase in resistance (at a flow of 0.5 L/s) from a baseline mean of 2.21 cm H2O/L/s to a maximum mean of 7.52 cm H2O/L/s at 1 min after the challenge. Use of a cold passover humidifier caused little change in the response (maximum mean: 8.27 cm H2O/L/s), but a hot water bath humidifier greatly attenuated the magnitude (maximum mean: 4.02 cm H2O/L/s) and duration of the response. Mouth leak with nasal CPAP leads to high unidirectional nasal airflow, which causes a large increase in nasal resistance. This response can be largely prevented by fully humidifying the inspired air.

  8. Quantification of transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus caused by an environment contaminated with secretions and excretions from infected calves.

    PubMed

    Bravo de Rueda, Carla; de Jong, Mart C M; Eblé, Phaedra L; Dekker, Aldo

    2015-04-17

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected animals can contaminate the environment with their secretions and excretions. To quantify the contribution of a contaminated environment to the transmission of FMDV, this study used calves that were not vaccinated and calves that were vaccinated 1 week prior to inoculation with the virus in direct and indirect contact experiments. In direct contact experiments, contact calves were exposed to inoculated calves in the same room. In indirect contact experiments, contact calves were housed in rooms that previously had held inoculated calves for three days (either from 0 to 3 or from 3 to 6 days post inoculation). Secretions and excretions from all calves were tested for the presence of FMDV by virus isolation; the results were used to quantify FMDV transmission. This was done using a generalized linear model based on a 2 route (2R, i.e. direct contact and environment) SIR model that included information on FMDV survival in the environment. The study shows that roughly 44% of transmission occurs via the environment, as indicated by the reproduction ratio R0(2R)environment that equalled 2.0, whereas the sum of R0(2R)contact and R0(2R)environment equalled 4.6. Because vaccination 1 week prior to inoculation of the calves conferred protective immunity against FMDV infection, no transmission rate parameters could be estimated from the experiments with vaccinated calves. We conclude that a contaminated environment contributes considerably to the transmission of FMDV therefore that hygiene measures can play a crucial role in FMD control.

  9. Molecular phylogenetic and pathogenetic characterization of Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), the cause of dry rot on potato in Iran.

    PubMed

    Chehri, Khosrow; Ghasempour, Hamid Reza; Karimi, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Members of Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are common pathogens of potato, causing dry rot in the west of Iran which involved Hamedan, Kermanshah, Eilam and Kurdistan provinces. Therefore, the objectives in this study were to isolate and identify disease-causing FSSC from infected potato tubers based on the morphological and molecular characteristics. Forty-five isolates of Fusarium were obtained from potato tubers collected from the wet market in different regions of the west of Iran and identified as FSSC through morphological characters. All of the isolates were evaluated for their pathogenicity on healthy potato tubers in the planthouse. The tubers rot symptoms were observed on the 21st day after inoculation of Fusarium isolates on the tubers tested. In the tubers inoculation tests, lesion sizes were quite variable; therefore, the measurement was done to compare the depth and width of lesion expansion among the isolates. Based on the sequence data from translation elongation factor (EF-lα) gene and internal transcript spacer (ITS) regions analysis, all of the selected FSSC isolates were divided into two major groups. This is the first report on molecular identification of FSSC strains isolated from potato tubers in Iran and Fusarium falciforme was reported for the first time in Iran.

  10. Lagrangian Tracer Transport and Dispersion in Shallow Tidal Inlets & River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Tidal Inlets & River Mouths R. T. Guza & Falk Feddersen Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, CA 92093-0209 phone: (858) 534-0585 fax...existing field capability in preparation for participation in the tidal inlet/river mouth DRI APPROACH Wave breaking occurs most of the time on...Inlet/River mouth DRI experiment at New River, N.C. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection

  11. A Method of Lyophilizing Vaccines Containing Aluminum Salts into a Dry Powder Without Causing Particle Aggregation or Decreasing the Immunogenicity Following Reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinran; Thakkar, Sachin G.; Ruwona, Tinashe B.; Williams, Robert O.; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    Many currently licensed and commercially available human vaccines contain aluminum salts as vaccine adjuvants. A major limitation with these vaccines is that they must not be exposed to freezing temperatures during transport or storage such that the liquid vaccine freezes, because freezing causes irreversible coagulation that damages the vaccines (e.g., loss of efficacy). Therefore, vaccines that contain aluminum salts as adjuvants are formulated as liquid suspensions and are required to be kept in cold chain (2–8°C) during transport and storage. Formulating vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts into dry powder that can be readily reconstituted before injection may address the limitation. Spray freeze-drying of vaccines with low concentrations of aluminum salts and high concentrations of trehalose alone, or a mixture of sugars and amino acids, as excipients can convert vaccines containing aluminum salts into dry powder, but fails to preserve the particle size and/or immunogenicity of the vaccines. In the present study, using ovalbumin as a model antigen adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide or aluminum phosphate, a commercially available tetanus toxoid vaccine adjuvanted with potassium alum, a human hepatitis B vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide, and a human papillomavirus vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, it was shown that vaccines containing a relatively high concentration of aluminum salts (i.e., up to ~1%, w/v, of aluminum hydroxide) can be converted into a dry powder by thin-film freezing followed by removal of the frozen solvent by lyophilization while using low levels of trehalose (i.e., as low as 2% w/v) as an excipient. Importantly, the thin-film freeze-drying process did not cause particle aggregation, nor decreased the immunogenicity of the vaccines. Moreover, repeated freezing-and-thawing of the dry vaccine powder did not cause aggregation. Thin-film freeze-drying is a viable platform technology to produce dry powders of

  12. Flooding in river mouths: human caused or natural events? Five centuries of flooding events in the SW Netherlands, 1500-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kraker, A. M. J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper looks into flood events of the past 500 years in the SW Netherlands, addressing the issue of what kind of flooding events have occurred and which ones have mainly natural causes and which ones are predominantly human induced. The flood events are classified into two major categories: (a) flood events that were caused during storm surges and (b) flood events which happened during warfare. From both categories a selection of flood events has been made. Each flood event is discussed in terms of time, location, extent of the flooded area and specific conditions. Among these conditions, specific weather circumstances and how long they lasted, the highest water levels reached and dike maintenance are discussed as far as flood events caused during storm surges are concerned. Flood events during warfare as both offensive and defensive strategies are relevant; the paper demonstrates that although the strategic flood events obviously were man-made, the natural feature, being the use of fresh water or sea water, of these events also played a major role. Flood events caused during storm surge may have an obvious natural cause, but the extent of the flooding and damage it caused was largely determined by man.

  13. Flooding in river mouths: human caused or natural events? Five centuries of flooding events in the SW Netherlands, 1500-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kraker, A. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks into the flooding events of the past 500 years in the SW Netherlands addressing the issue what kind of flooding events have occurred and which ones have mainly natural causes and which ones are predominantly human induced. The flooding events are classified into two major categories: (a) flooding events that were caused during storm surges and (b) flooding events which happened during war fare. From both categories a selection of flooding events has been made. Each flooding event is discussed in terms time, location, extent of the flooded area and specific conditions. Among these conditions specific weather circumstances and how long they lasted, the highest water levels reached and dike maintenance are discussed as far as flooding events caused during storm surges are concerned. About the flooding events during war fare, offensive and defensive strategies are relevant. The paper demonstrates that although the strategic flooding events obviously were man-made, the natural feature, being the use of fresh water or sea water, of these events also played a major role. Flooding events caused during storm surge may have an obvious natural cause, but the extent of the flooding and damage it caused were largely determined by man.

  14. Absence of ACAT-1 attenuates atherosclerosis but causes dry eye and cutaneous xanthomatosis in mice with congenital hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, H; Kitamine, T; Osuga, J; Tozawa, R; Chen, Z; Kaji, Y; Oka, T; Perrey, S; Tamura, Y; Ohashi, K; Okazaki, H; Yahagi, N; Shionoiri, F; Iizuka, Y; Harada, K; Shimano, H; Yamashita, H; Gotoda, T; Yamada, N; Ishibashi, S

    2000-07-14

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes esterification of cellular cholesterol. To investigate the role of ACAT-1 in atherosclerosis, we have generated ACAT-1 null (ACAT-1-/-) mice. ACAT activities were present in the liver and intestine but were completely absent in adrenal, testes, ovaries, and peritoneal macrophages in our ACAT-1-/- mice. The ACAT-1-/- mice had decreased openings of the eyes because of atrophy of the meibomian glands, a modified form of sebaceous glands normally expressing high ACAT activities. This phenotype is similar to dry eye syndrome in humans. To determine the role of ACAT-1 in atherogenesis, we crossed the ACAT-1-/- mice with mice lacking apolipoprotein (apo) E or the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), hyperlipidemic models susceptible to atherosclerosis. High fat feeding resulted in extensive cutaneous xanthomatosis with loss of hair in both ACAT-1-/-:apo E-/- and ACAT-1-/-:LDLR-/- mice. Free cholesterol content was significantly increased in their skin. Aortic fatty streak lesion size as well as cholesteryl ester content were moderately reduced in both double mutant mice compared with their respective controls. These results indicate that the local inhibition of ACAT activity in tissue macrophages is protective against cholesteryl ester accumulation but causes cutaneous xanthomatosis in mice that lack apo E or LDLR.

  15. Limited mouth opening after primary therapy of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Weber, Clemens; Dommerich, Steffen; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Kramp, Burkhard

    2010-09-01

    Patients after surgery and radiation/chemoradiation for treatment of head and neck cancer often suffer from oral complications. These problems may be caused by surgery and radiation. Patients complain, for example, of swallowing problems and limited mouth opening (trismus). The maximal interincisal mouth opening (MIO) was measured in patients treated with surgery and radiation/chemoradiation for head and neck cancer at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the University of Rostock. These patients also completed a 20-item questionnaire concerning nutritional, sensual, and speech disorders and pain. One hundred one patients (16 female and 85 male) returned the questionnaire and were included in the study. About 50% of the patients had a limited mouth opening (<36 mm); patients with oropharyngeal cancer had a significant higher risk for trismus (p = .024) than patients with other head and neck cancers, especially compared to patients with laryngeal cancer (p = .013). The questionnaire showed that especially patients with oral cancer report about problems with opening the mouth (73%), eating (65%), drinking (73%), xerostomia (92%), speech disorders (68%), and voice (62%). Patients with laryngeal cancer only reported about problems with xerostomia (62%), speech (83%), and voice (90%), similar to patients with pharyngeal cancer. About half of the patients who underwent primary treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancer developed trismus and reported about problems with opening the mouth, eating, drinking, dry mouth, voice, and speech. Trismus has a negative impact on quality of life and should be a focus in the postoperative management of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer, and, if diagnosed, special treatment should be initialized.

  16. Connective tissue disorders and the mouth.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen; Scully, Crispian

    2008-06-01

    The connective tissue disorders frequently give rise to orofacial manifestations, especially dry mouth because of Sjögren's syndrome. In addition, the systemic complications of such diseases may impact upon the provision of oral health care. The present article reviews the consequences of connective tissue disorders of relevance to oral health care providers. Connective tissue disorders can give rise to oral manifestations and systemic complications that may occasionally compromise primary oral health care.

  17. Dry Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... delay vision loss due to dry macular degeneration. Symptoms Dry macular degeneration symptoms usually develop gradually and without pain. They may ... of printed words Decreased intensity or brightness of ... causes total blindness. Dry macular degeneration is one of two types ...

  18. Diagnosis of immunodeficiency caused by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase defect by using tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Moriondo, Maria; Valleriani, Claudia; Lippi, Francesca; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Speckmann, Carsten; Borte, Stephan; Brodszki, Nicholas; Gennery, Andrew R; Weinacht, Katja; Celmeli, Fatih; Pagel, Julia; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Wittkowski, Helmut; Santisteban, Ines; Bali, Pawan; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Hershfield, Michael; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare form of autosomal recessive combined primary immunodeficiency caused by a enzyme defect leading to the accumulation of inosine, 2'-deoxy-inosine (dIno), guanosine, and 2'-deoxy-guanosine (dGuo) in all cells, especially lymphocytes. Treatments are available and curative for PNP deficiency, but their efficacy depends on the early approach. PNP-combined immunodeficiency complies with the criteria for inclusion in a newborn screening program. This study evaluate whether mass spectrometry can identify metabolite abnormalities in dried blood spots (DBSs) from affected patients, with the final goal of individuating the disease at birth during routine newborn screening. DBS samples from 9 patients with genetically confirmed PNP-combined immunodeficiency, 10,000 DBS samples from healthy newborns, and 240 DBSs from healthy donors of different age ranges were examined. Inosine, dIno, guanosine, and dGuo were tested by using tandem mass spectrometry (TMS). T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) levels were evaluated by using quantitative RT-PCR only for the 2 patients (patients 8 and 9) whose neonatal DBSs were available. Mean levels of guanosine, inosine, dGuo, and dIno were 4.4, 133.3, 3.6, and 3.8 μmol/L, respectively, in affected patients. No indeterminate or false-positive results were found. In patient 8 TREC levels were borderline and KREC levels were abnormal; in patient 9 TRECs were undetectable, whereas KREC levels were normal. TMS is a valid method for diagnosis of PNP deficiency on DBSs of affected patients at a negligible cost. TMS identifies newborns with PNP deficiency, whereas TREC or KREC measurement alone can fail. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Composition and source apportionment of PAHs in sediments at river mouths and channel in Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di; Tu, Yao-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-eight sediment samples were collected in 2009 from the bottom of river mouths near Kaohsiung Harbor (Taiwan) and the harbor channel for the analyses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentrations of total PAHs varied from 39 to 30,521 ng g(-1) (dry weight); samples collected from the mouths of Love River, Canon River, Jen-Gen River, and Salt River showed the highest PAHs concentrations. This indicates that the major sources of sediment PAHs come from those polluted urban rivers and the harbor channel. In samples collected from the Salt River mouth, approximately 43% of the PAHs are identified as PAHs with 2 or 3 rings. However, samples collected from other locations contain predominantly PAHs with 4 rings (32 to 42%) or 5 and 6 rings (36 to 44%). Emissions from traffic-related sources and waste incineration contribute to the majority of PAHs found in most channel and river mouth sediments. However, coal/oil combustion is the main cause of high concentrations of PAHs observed in the Salt River mouth sediments. Principal component analyses with multivariate linear regression (PCA/MLR) have been used to further quantify the source contributions, and the results show that the contributions of coal/oil combustion, traffic-related and waste incineration are 37%, 33% and 30%, respectively.

  20. Two Cases of Tsunami Dust Pneumonia: Organizing Pneumonia Caused by the Inhalation of Dried Tsunami Sludge after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Yamanda, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Sato, Hikari; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ueda, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Toru; Yanai, Masaru

    We report two cases of organizing pneumonia (OP) secondary to the inhalation of the dried tsunami sludge which formed during the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the consequent tsunami. After the disaster, both of these patients had been engaged in the restoration work. About half a month later, they developed shortness of breath and pulmonary infiltrates. These patients were diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia. Their biopsy specimens revealed multifocal peribronchiolitis and OP. An electron probe microanalysis of these specimens demonstrated the presence of elements from the earth's crust in the inflammatory lesions. These two cases indicate that exposure to dried tsunami sludge can cause OP.

  1. Two Cases of Tsunami Dust Pneumonia: Organizing Pneumonia Caused by the Inhalation of Dried Tsunami Sludge after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Yamanda, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Sato, Hikari; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ueda, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Toru; Yanai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of organizing pneumonia (OP) secondary to the inhalation of the dried tsunami sludge which formed during the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the consequent tsunami. After the disaster, both of these patients had been engaged in the restoration work. About half a month later, they developed shortness of breath and pulmonary infiltrates. These patients were diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia. Their biopsy specimens revealed multifocal peribronchiolitis and OP. An electron probe microanalysis of these specimens demonstrated the presence of elements from the earth's crust in the inflammatory lesions. These two cases indicate that exposure to dried tsunami sludge can cause OP. PMID:27980267

  2. Effects of intra-alveolar placement of 0.2% chlorhexidine bioadhesive gel on dry socket incidence and postsurgical pain: a double-blind split-mouth randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haraji, Afshin; Rakhshan, Vahid; Khamverdi, Naiemeh; Alishahi, Hadiseh Khanzadeh

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effects of intra-alveolar application of chlorhexidine gel on the incidence of alveolar osteitis (dry socket) and the severity of postsurgical pain. A total of 160 impacted mandibular third molars were extracted in 80 patients enrolled in this trial. In each subject, a socket was randomly selected and packed to the crest of the alveolar ridge with a gelatin sponge dressing saturated in 0.2% chlorhexidine gel. The contralateral socket was packed with a dry dressing as the placebo. None of the included patients took antibiotics or analgesics. The occurrence of dry socket and patients' pain levels were assessed at the first and third postoperative days. The data were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficient, McNemar, Wilcoxon, and chi-square tests. Chlorhexidine gel significantly reduced dry socket incidence from 32.6% to 11.3% (P ≤ .001 [McNemar and chi-square], absolute risk reduction = 21.2%, relative risk reduction = 65.4%, odds ratio = 0.263, relative risk = 0.345). It also significantly relieved postoperative pain on both sides in all the patients (P ≤ .001 [Wilcoxon]) and also in the 54 subjects who did not develop dry socket (P ≤ .001 [Wilcoxon]). Besides decreasing the incidence of dry socket, chlorhexidine gel can reduce postsurgical pain in patients with and without dry socket.

  3. Rice Chalky Ring Formation Caused by Temporal Reduction in Starch Biosynthesis during Osmotic Adjustment under Foehn-Induced Dry Wind

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hiroshi; Masumoto-Kubo, Chisato; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Morita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Foehn-like extreme hot and dry wind conditions (34°C, >2.5 kPa vapor pressure deficit, and 7 m s−1) strongly affect grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.). This is a current concern because of the increasing frequency and intensity of combined heat and water-deficit stress under climate change. Foehn-induced dry wind conditions during the grain-filling stage increase ring-shaped chalkiness as a result of spatiotemporal reduction in starch accumulation in the endosperm, but kernel growth is sometimes maintained by osmotic adjustment. Here, we assess the effects of dry wind on chalky ring formation in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Our results showed that hot and dry wind conditions that lasted for >24 h dramatically increased chalky ring formation. Hot and dry wind conditions temporarily reduced panicle water potential to –0.65 MPa; however, kernel growth was maintained by osmotic adjustment at control levels with increased transport of assimilate to the growing kernels. Dynamic tracer analysis with a nano-electrospray-ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometer and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that starch degradation was negligible in the short-term treatment. Overall expression of starch synthesis-related genes was found to be down-regulated at moderately low water potential. Because the events observed at low water potential preceded the packing of starch granules in cells, we concluded that reduced rates of starch biosynthesis play a central role in the events of cellular metabolism that are altered at osmotic adjustment, which leads to chalky ring formation under short-term hot and dry wind conditions. PMID:25330305

  4. Rice chalky ring formation caused by temporal reduction in starch biosynthesis during osmotic adjustment under foehn-induced dry wind.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hiroshi; Masumoto-Kubo, Chisato; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Morita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Foehn-like extreme hot and dry wind conditions (34°C, >2.5 kPa vapor pressure deficit, and 7 m s(-1)) strongly affect grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.). This is a current concern because of the increasing frequency and intensity of combined heat and water-deficit stress under climate change. Foehn-induced dry wind conditions during the grain-filling stage increase ring-shaped chalkiness as a result of spatiotemporal reduction in starch accumulation in the endosperm, but kernel growth is sometimes maintained by osmotic adjustment. Here, we assess the effects of dry wind on chalky ring formation in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Our results showed that hot and dry wind conditions that lasted for >24 h dramatically increased chalky ring formation. Hot and dry wind conditions temporarily reduced panicle water potential to -0.65 MPa; however, kernel growth was maintained by osmotic adjustment at control levels with increased transport of assimilate to the growing kernels. Dynamic tracer analysis with a nano-electrospray-ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometer and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that starch degradation was negligible in the short-term treatment. Overall expression of starch synthesis-related genes was found to be down-regulated at moderately low water potential. Because the events observed at low water potential preceded the packing of starch granules in cells, we concluded that reduced rates of starch biosynthesis play a central role in the events of cellular metabolism that are altered at osmotic adjustment, which leads to chalky ring formation under short-term hot and dry wind conditions.

  5. A method of lyophilizing vaccines containing aluminum salts into a dry powder without causing particle aggregation or decreasing the immunogenicity following reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Thakkar, Sachin G; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Williams, Robert O; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-04-28

    Many currently licensed and commercially available human vaccines contain aluminum salts as vaccine adjuvants. A major limitation with these vaccines is that they must not be exposed to freezing temperatures during transport or storage such that the liquid vaccine freezes, because freezing causes irreversible coagulation that damages the vaccines (e.g., loss of efficacy). Therefore, vaccines that contain aluminum salts as adjuvants are formulated as liquid suspensions and are required to be kept in cold chain (2-8°C) during transport and storage. Formulating vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts into dry powder that can be readily reconstituted before injection may address this limitation. Spray freeze-drying of vaccines with low concentrations of aluminum salts and high concentrations of trehalose alone, or a mixture of sugars and amino acids, as excipients can convert vaccines containing aluminum salts into dry powder, but fails to preserve the particle size and/or immunogenicity of the vaccines. In the present study, using ovalbumin as a model antigen adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide or aluminum phosphate, a commercially available tetanus toxoid vaccine adjuvanted with potassium alum, a human hepatitis B vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide, and a human papillomavirus vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, it was shown that vaccines containing a relatively high concentration of aluminum salts (i.e., up to ~1%, w/v, of aluminum hydroxide) can be converted into a dry powder by thin-film freezing followed by removal of the frozen solvent by lyophilization while using low levels of trehalose (i.e., as low as 2% w/v) as an excipient. Importantly, the thin-film freeze-drying process did not cause particle aggregation, nor decreased the immunogenicity of the vaccines. Moreover, repeated freezing-and-thawing of the dry vaccine powder did not cause aggregation. Thin-film freeze-drying is a viable platform technology to produce dry powders of

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. This disease has affected most areas of the world, often causing extensive epizootics in livestock, mostly farmed cattle and swine, although sheep, goats and many wild species are also susceptible...

  7. Animal health: foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  8. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most ...

  9. Image analysis of epicuticular damage to foliage caused by dry deposition of the air pollutant nitric acid

    Treesearch

    Pamela E. Padgett; Sally D. Parry; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Robert L. Heath

    2009-01-01

    Nitric acid vapor is produced by the same photochemical processes that produce ozone. In the laboratory, concentrated nitric acid is a strong acid and a powerful oxidant. In the environment, where the concentrations are much lower, it is an innocuous source of plant nitrogen. As an air pollutant, which mode of action does dry deposition of nitric...

  10. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heir, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.

  11. Clinical estimation of mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Gunjigake, Kaori

    2009-11-01

    Breathing mode was objectively determined by monitoring airflow through the mouth, measuring nasal resistance and lip-seal function, and collecting information via questionnaire on the patient's etiology and symptoms of mouth breathing. The expiratory airflow through the mouth was detected with a carbon dioxide sensor for 30 minutes at rest. Fifteen men and 19 women volunteers (mean age, 22.4 +/- 2.5 years) were classified as nasal breathers, complete mouth breathers, or partial mouth breathers based on the mean duration of mouth breathing. Nasal resistance, lip-sealing function, and the subjective symptoms of mouth breathing ascertained by questionnaire were statistically compared by using 1-way and 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the chi-square test in the breathing groups. Nasal resistance was significantly (P <0.05) greater for the mouth breathers than for the nasal breathers, and significantly (P <0.05) greater for the partial mouth breathers than for the complete mouth breathers. There were no significant differences in the subjective responses to questions about mouth breathing among the 3 groups. Detecting airflow by carbon dioxide sensor can discriminate breathing mode. Degree of nasal resistance and subjective symptoms of mouth breathing do not accurately predict breathing mode.

  12. Leaf demography and physiology of the Tapajós National Forest: could phenology cause a forest-level increase in gross primary productivity during the dry season?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, L.; Wu, J.; Prohaska, N.; Camargo, P. B. D.; Cosme, R., Jr.; Huxman, T. E.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests such as the forests of the Amazon basin are a significant component of the earth's carbon budget, yet how these forests respond to seasonal changes in weather, along with the extent to which tree biology synchronizes with seasonal cycles, are poorly understood. For evergreen forests in equatorial Amazon that experience dry seasons, most global vegetation models project a dry-season decrease in gross primary productivity (GPP). However, eddy covariance observations and remote sensing assessments suggest a late-dry season increase in GPP. Most global vegetation models assume that there is no seasonal variation in leaf phenology (cycles of leaf flush and senescence), or in leaf physiology. We conducted a case study in the Tapajos National Forest KM67 site, near Santarém, Brazil, to investigate whether leaf aging and seasonal shifts in leaf demography could cause an increase in GPP during the dry season. In a series of fieldwork campaigns beginning in August 2012, we monitored leaf demographic composition (leaf age categories) from 1-m branches collected from 20 trees representing abundant species, and we assessed how photosynthesis varies with leaf age for a subset of these trees. Our results show that photosynthetic capacity (e.g. Vcmax) is higher for leaves that matured during the most recent dry season than for older leaves from previous periods of growth. For many trees, leaf demography shifted during the dry season such that recently matured leaves replaced old leaves. For instance, leaf demography of an Erisma uncinatum, the most abundant canopy tree species at our site, had significantly more recently matured leaves, and significantly fewer old leaves, during surveys late in the dry season (after mid-October) than early in the dry season (prior to mid-September). These results suggest that shifts in leaf demography together with the effects of leaf age on leaf physiology can increase GPP during the dry season at the KM67 site. Thus, leaf

  13. Lagrangian Tracer Transport and Dispersion in Shallow Tidal Inlets & River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Tidal Inlets & River Mouths R. T. Guza & Falk Feddersen Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, CA 92093-0209 phone: (858) 534-0585 fax...our existing field capability in preparation for participation in the tidal inlet/river mouth DRI APPROACH Wave breaking occurs most of the time...AND SUBTITLE Lagrangian Tracer Transport and Dispersion in Shallow Tidal Inlets & River Mouths 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  14. Multistate outbreak of human Salmonella infections caused by contaminated dry dog food--United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    2008-05-16

    During January 1, 2006-December 31, 2007, CDC collaborated with public health officials in Pennsylvania, other states, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a prolonged multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund infections in humans. A total of 70 cases of S. Schwarzengrund infection with the outbreak strain (XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] pattern JM6X01.0015) were identified in 19 states, mostly in the northeastern United States. This report describes the outbreak investigation, which identified the source of infection as dry dog food produced at a manufacturing plant in Pennsylvania. This investigation is the first to identify contaminated dry dog food as a source of human Salmonella infections. After handling pet foods, pet owners should wash their hands immediately, and infants should be kept away from pet feeding areas.

  15. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  16. Neither dust nor black carbon causing apparent albedo decline in Greenland's dry snow zone: Implications for MODIS C5 surface reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polashenski, Chris M.; Dibb, Jack E.; Flanner, Mark G.; Chen, Justin Y.; Courville, Zoe R.; Lai, Alexandra M.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Bergin, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Remote sensing observations suggest Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) albedo has declined since 2001, even in the dry snow zone. We seek to explain the apparent dry snow albedo decline. We analyze samples representing 2012-2014 snowfall across NW Greenland for black carbon and dust light-absorbing impurities (LAI) and model their impacts on snow albedo. Albedo reductions due to LAI are small, averaging 0.003, with episodic enhancements resulting in reductions of 0.01-0.02. No significant increase in black carbon or dust concentrations relative to recent decades is found. Enhanced deposition of LAI is not, therefore, causing significant dry snow albedo reduction or driving melt events. Analysis of Collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data indicates that the decline and spectral shift in dry snow albedo contains important contributions from uncorrected Terra sensor degradation. Though discrepancies are mostly below the stated accuracy of MODIS products, they will require revisiting some prior conclusions with C6 data.

  17. Computed tomographic evaluation of mouth breathers among paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Farid, MM; Metwalli, N

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Mouth breathing causes many serious problems in the paediatric population. It has been maintained that enlarged adenoids are principally responsible for mouth breathing. This study was designed to evaluate whether other mechanical obstacles might predispose the child to mouth breathing. Methods 67 children with ages ranging from 10 to 15 years were studied and grouped into mouth-breathers and nose-breathers. The children first underwent axial CT scans of the brain for which they were originally referred. In addition, they were subjected to a limited coronal CT examination of the paranasal sinuses. Congenital anatomical variations as well as inflammatory changes were assessed. Results 87% of mouth-breathing children had hypertrophied adenoids, 77% had maxillary sinusitis, 74% had pneumatized middle concha, 55% had a deviated nasal septum, 55% had hypertrophied inferior conchae, 45% had ethmoidal sinusitis and 23% showed frontal sinusitis. Such changes were significantly less prevalent in nose-breathers. 12.9% of mouth-breathing children did not have adenoids. Of these children, only 3.3% had one or more congenital or inflammatory change whereas the other 9.6% showed a completely normal CT scan signifying the incidence of habitual non-obstructive mouth breathing. Conclusions It is clear that adenoids have a dominant role in causing mouth breathing. Yet, we recommend that paediatricians should assess other mechanical obstacles if mouth breathing was not corrected after adenoidectomy. Further research should be performed to test the validity of correction of such factors in improving the quality of life of mouth-breathing children. PMID:20089737

  18. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part two.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, S; Chamley, C

    2013-04-01

    This is the second part of a two-part article on oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. This article covers basic oral hygiene and management of oral health problems: oral candidiasis, coated tongue/dirty mouth, dry mouth, hypersalivation, ulceration, painful mouth, stomatitis and mucositis. The article also covers treating patients who are immunocompromised and the need to educate families and carers in the basic principles of oral care, including the importance of preventing cross-infection. Part one outlined oral assessment and discussed the adaptation of the Nottingham Oral Health Assessment Tool (Freer 2000).

  19. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Rajesh, E.; Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms. PMID:26015707

  20. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2010-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition characterized by burning of the oral mucosa, with or without dysgeusia and xerostomia, in the setting of no underlying systemic disease or identifiable abnormalities on physical examination or laboratory testing. BMS disproportionately affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of the disease is unknown; no single treatment has proven universally successful. In light of these shortcomings, having a practical approach to the evaluation and management of patients with BMS can improve both patient quality of life and physician satisfaction.

  1. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Grushka, Miriam; Su, Nan

    2016-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an enigmatic, misunderstood, and under-recognized painful condition. Symptoms associated with BMS can be varied, thereby providing a challenge for practitioners and having a negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for patients. Management also remains a challenge for practitioners because it is currently only targeted for symptom relief without a definitive cure. There is an urgent need for further investigations to determine the efficacy of different therapies because this is the only way viable therapeutic options can be established for patients with this chronic and painful syndrome.

  2. Allelopathic inhibition of photosynthesis in the red tide-causing marine alga, Scrippsiella trochoidea (Pyrrophyta), by the dried macroalga, Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changpeng; Liao, Heping; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-07-01

    The red tide-causing microalga, Scrippsiella trochoidea was co-cultured with different quantities of dried macroalga Gracilaria lemaneiformis under laboratory conditions, to characterize the allelopathic inhibition effect of the seaweed on photosynthesis of the microalga. Photosynthetic oxygen evolution was measured, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence transient O-J-I-P (O, J, I and P point in primary photochemistry reaction curve in photosystem II) curves associated with its specific parameters were determined. A concentration-dependent inhibition of S. trochoidea was observed when the dried seaweed was added. The rate of light-saturated maximum photosynthetic oxygen evolution (Pmax) was markedly decreased, and the O-J-I-P curve coupled with its specific parameters was reduced. The inhibitory effects of the macroalga on the microalga, according to the JIP-test (the relative fluorescence analysis based on O-J-I-P curve) and the activity of oxygen evolution, include a decrease in the number of active reaction centers, the blocking-up of the electron transport chain, and the damage to the oxygen-evolving complex. This study suggests that dried G. lemaneiformis is effective in inhibiting photosynthesis of S. trochoidea, and could thus be a potential candidate for mitigating S. trochoidea blooms.

  3. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2013-02-07

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and metabolic disorders, as well as drug reactions. BMS has clear predisposition to peri-/post menopausal females. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated and involves peripheral and central neuropathic pathways. Clinical diagnosis relies on careful history taking, physical examination and laboratory analysis. Treatment is often tedious and is aimed at correction of underlying medical conditions, supportive therapy, and behavioral feedback. Drug therapy with alpha lipoic acid, clonazepam, capsaicin, and antidepressants may provide symptom relief. Psychotherapy may be helpful. Short term follow up data is promising, however, long term prognosis with treatment is lacking. BMS remains an important medical condition which often places a recognizable burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate recognition and treatment.

  4. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  5. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later.

  6. [Materials for mouth protectors].

    PubMed

    Kloeg, E F; Collys, K

    2003-01-01

    Taking into account the number of teeth which are yearly irreversible traumatised during sport activities, the general use of mouthguards would contribute positively to the prevention of dental injuries. Custom-made mouthguards are more comfortable to wear and offer better retention and protection than stock and mouth-formed mouthguards. Different kinds of materials are available on the market for the construction of mouthguards. A polyethylene-polyvinylacetate copolymer (EVA) is the most suitable material. EVA allows the inclusion of hard or soft layers within the mouthguard. The thickness of a mouthguard is important for the reduction of applied forces to teeth: energy absorption capacity increases with material thickness. Increased thickness however, is associated with a reduction of comfort. Therefore, it is important that dentists take the patients' wishes and demands on both comfort and protection into consideration. A description of the clinical and technical method for the construction of a custom made mouthguard is given.

  7. Nature and causes of protracted droughts in southeast Australia: Comparison between the Federation, WWII, and Big Dry droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.

    2009-11-01

    Three protracted droughts have occurred during the instrumental history of Southeast Australia (SEA) - the “Federation” (˜1895-1902), “World War II” (˜1937-1945) and the “Big Dry” (˜1997-present). This paper compares the nature and causes of these droughts in order to better inform drought management strategies in SEA. It is shown that the three droughts differ in terms of severity, spatial footprint, seasonality and seasonal rainfall make-up. This diversity arises due to the fact that the droughts are driven by different climatic teleconnections with the Pacific, Indian and Southern Oceans. Importantly, this study highlights potential flaws with drought forecasting and management in SEA and emphasises the need for further research into understanding and representing hydroclimatic drivers of drought.

  8. Pain Part 8: Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beneng, Kiran; Renton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a rare but impactful condition affecting mainly post-menopausal women resulting in constant pain and significant difficulty with eating, drinking and daily function. The aetiology of BMS remains an enigma. Recent evidence suggests it likely to be neuropathic in origin, the cause of which remains unknown. There is no cure for this condition and the unfortunate patients remain managed on a variety of neuropathic pain medication, salivary substitutes and other non-medical interventions that help the patient 'get through the day'. Some simple strategies can assist both clinician and patient to manage this debilitating condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: The dental team will recognize patients presenting with burning mouth syndrome. They are difficult patients to manage and are often referred to secondary care and, ultimately, depend on their general medical practitioners for pain management.

  9. Novel mouth-exercising device for oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Patil, Smita P

    2012-10-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in progressive juxtaepithelial fibrosis of the oral soft tissues and can cause increasing difficulty in mastication, swallowing, speaking, and mouth opening. The treatment of severe trismus requires a combination of surgical release and physiotherapy. Often physiotherapy alone can modify tissue remodeling in OSMF to increase oral opening. This article describes the fabrication and use of a new mouth-exercising device that helps the patient to squeeze/stretch the cheek mucosa to increase elasticity. The device can be used as a sole treatment modality or can be used in association with pharmacological and surgical treatment modalities for OSMF. Improvement in mouth opening was observed in four OSMF patients treated with a mouth-exercising device for 6 months as a sole treatment modality. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Rupture of the stomach following mouth-to-mouth respiration

    PubMed Central

    Solowiejczyk, M.; Wapnick, S.; Koren, E.; Mandelbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    Successful repair and survival after rupture of the stomach in a patient who received mouth-to-mouth respiration is presented. We were able to find only one report in the literature where rupture of the stomach occurred following this manoeuvre—the patient did not survive. The possible aetiological factors and measures designed to avoid this complication are discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4469046

  11. ERK-GluR1 phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons is involved in pain associated with dry tongue

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Yuka; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kubo, Asako; Chen, Jui Yen; Noma, Noboru; Batbold, Dulguun; Imamura, Yoshiki; Sessle, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dry mouth is known to cause severe pain in the intraoral structures, and many dry mouth patients have been suffering from intraoral pain. In development of an appropriate treatment, it is crucial to study the mechanisms underlying intraoral pain associated with dry mouth, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying pain related to dry mouth, the dry-tongue rat model was developed. Hence, the mechanical or heat nocifensive reflex, the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphorylated GluR1-IR immunohistochemistries, and the single neuronal activity were examined in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats. Results The head-withdrawal reflex threshold to mechanical, but not heat, stimulation of the tongue was significantly decreased on day 7 after tongue drying. The mechanical, but not heat, responses of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis nociceptive neurons were significantly enhanced in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells was also significantly increased in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis following noxious stimulation of the tongue in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The decrement of the mechanical head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWT) was reversed during intracisternal administration of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 inhibitor, PD98059. The trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neuronal activities and the number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells following noxious mechanical stimulation of dried tongue were also significantly decreased following intracisternal administration of PD98059 compared to vehicle-administrated rats. Increased number of the phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells was observed in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats, and the number of

  12. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  13. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as “an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions.” BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients. PMID:26929531

  14. Mouth and Teeth (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection, a dentist might need to remove them. Human teeth are made up of four different types of ... previous continue Normal Development of the Mouth and Teeth Humans are diphyodont, meaning that they develop two sets ...

  15. Dynamics of river mouth deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagherazzi, Sergio; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Nardin, William; Leonardi, Nicoletta; Canestrelli, Alberto; Falcini, Federico; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Mariotti, Giulio; Rowland, Joel C.; Slingerland, Rudy L.

    2015-09-01

    Bars and subaqueous levees often form at river mouths due to high sediment availability. Once these deposits emerge and develop into islands, they become important elements of the coastal landscape, hosting rich ecosystems. Sea level rise and sediment starvation are jeopardizing these landforms, motivating a thorough analysis of the mechanisms responsible for their formation and evolution. Here we present recent studies on the dynamics of mouth bars and subaqueous levees. The review encompasses both hydrodynamic and morphological results. We first analyze the hydrodynamics of the water jet exiting a river mouth. We then show how this dynamics coupled to sediment transport leads to the formation of mouth bars and levees. Specifically, we discuss the role of sediment eddy diffusivity and potential vorticity on sediment redistribution and related deposits. The effect of waves, tides, sediment characteristics, and vegetation on river mouth deposits is included in our analysis, thus accounting for the inherent complexity of the coastal environment where these landforms are common. Based on the results presented herein, we discuss in detail how river mouth deposits can be used to build new land or restore deltaic shorelines threatened by erosion.

  16. Organization and evolution of mating-type genes in three Stagonosporopsis species causing gummy stem blight of cucurbits and leaf spot and dry rot of papaya.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao-Xi; Gottilla, Thomas M; Brewer, Marin Talbot

    2017-10-01

    Population divergence and speciation of closely related lineages can result from reproductive differences leading to genetic isolation. An increasing number of fungal diseases of plants and animals have been determined to be caused by morphologically indistinguishable species that are genetically distinct, thereby representing cryptic species. We were interested in identifying if mating systems among three Stagonosporopsis species (S. citrulli, S. cucurbitacearum, and S. caricae) causing gummy stem blight (GSB) of cucurbits or leaf spot and dry rot of papaya differed, possibly underlying species divergence. Additionally, we were interested in identifying evolutionary pressures acting on the genes controlling mating in these fungi. The mating-type loci (MAT1) of three isolates from each of the three species were identified in draft genome sequences. For the three species, MAT1 was structurally identical and contained both mating-type genes necessary for sexual reproduction, which suggests that all three species are homothallic. However, both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 were divergent among species showing rapid evolution with a much greater number of amino acid-changing substitutions detected for the reproductive genes compared with genes flanking MAT1. Positive selection was detected in MAT1-2-1, especially in the highly conserved high mobility group (MATA_HMG-box) domain. Thus, the mating-type genes are rapidly evolving in GSB fungi, but a difference in mating systems among the three species does not underlie their divergence. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electromyographic muscle EMG activity in mouth and nasal breathing children.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Eliane C; Marchiori, Susana C; da Silva, Ana Maria T

    2004-04-01

    Mouth breathing may cause changes in muscle activity, because an upper airway obstruction leads may cause a person to extend his/her head forward, demanding a higher inspiratory effort on the accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoids). This purpose of this study is to compare, using electromyography (EMG), the activity pattern the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius muscles in mouth breathing children and nasal breathing children. Forty-six children, ages 8-12 years, 33 male and 13 female were included. The selected children were divided into two groups: Group I consisted of 26 mouth breathing children, and Group II, 20 nasal breathing children. EMG recordings were made using surface electrodes bilaterally in the areas of the sternocleidomastoideus and upper trapezius muscles, while relaxed and during maximal voluntary contraction. The data were analyzed using the Kruskall-Wallis statistical test. The results indicated higher activity during relaxation and lower activity during maximal voluntary contraction in mouth breathers when compared to the nasal breathers. It is suggested that the activity pattern of the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius muscles differs between mouth breathing children and nasal breathing children. This may be attributed to changes in body posture which causes muscular imbalance. Because of the limitations of surface EMG, the results need to be confirmed by adding force measurements and repeating the experiments with matched subjects.

  18. Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble email Send this article ... disease bothers the patient more. What Causes Dry Eye Syndrome? Dry eye can be caused by many ...

  19. Neither Dust Nor Black Carbon Causing Apparent Albedo Decline in Greenland's Dry Snow Zone; Uncorrected Sensor Degradation Impacting MODIS C5 Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polashenski, C.; Dibb, J. E.; Flanner, M.; Chen, J.; Courville, Z.; Lai, A.; Schauer, J. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Bergin, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Observations suggest the Greenland ice sheet albedo has declined since 2001, even in the dry snow zone (DSZ). We seek to explain the apparent DSZ albedo decline. We analyze samples representing 2012-2014 snowfall across NW Greenland for absorbing impurities (black carbon and dust) and model their impacts on snow albedo. Albedo reductions due to absorbing impurities are small, averaging 0.003, with episodic enhancements resulting in reductions of 0.01-0.02. No significant increase in black carbon or dust concentrations relative to recent decades is indicated. Enhanced deposition of absorbing impurities is not, therefore, causing significant albedo reduction in the DSZ or driving recent melt events. Analysis of MODIS surface reflectance indicates that the decline and spectral shift in DSZ albedo seen in C5 MODIS data contains contributions from uncorrected Terra sensor degradation. The discrepancies between Terra and Aqua are generally below the stated accuracy of MODIS products (0.05), but since discussions of Greenland albedo trends below this level are common in the literature, the identification of these discrepancies likely requires revisiting conclusions about the trends and spectral signature of Greenland DSZ albedo after C6 data is released.

  20. Analysis of archived newborn dried blood spots (DBS) identifies congenital cytomegalovirus as a major cause of unexplained pediatric sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Lucy; Sharon, Bazak; Huang, Tina C; Meyer, Abby C; Gravel, Kristin E; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Swanson, Elizabeth C; Herd, Hannah E; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Coverstone, Kirsten R; McCann, Mark; Schleiss, Mark R

    2017-06-07

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is the most common non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). However, accurate diagnosis of cCMV as the etiology of SNHL is problematic beyond the neonatal period. This study therefore examined whether cCMV infection could be identified retrospectively in children presenting with unexplained SNHL to a multidisciplinary diagnostic outpatient otolaryngology clinic at an academic medical center in Minnesota. Over a 4-year period, 57 patients with an age range of 3months to 10years with unexplained SNHL were recruited to participate in this study. Informed consent was obtained to test the archived dried blood spots (DBS) of these patients for cCMV infection by real-time PCR, targeting a highly conserved region of the CMV UL83 gene. Results were normalized to recovery of an NRAS gene control. Chart review was conducted to identify subjects who underwent genetic testing and/or neurodiagnostic imaging to investigate possible genetic, syndromic, or anatomical causes of SNHL. In total, 15 of the 57 children with unexplained SNHL tested positive for CMV DNA in their DBS (26%). A mean viral load of 8.3×10(4) (±4.1×10(4)) [range, 1×10(3)-6×10(5)] copies/μg DNA was observed in subjects retrospectively diagnosed with cCMV. No statistically significant correlation was found between viral load and SNHL severity. A retrospective DBS analysis demonstrated that 26% of patients presenting with unexplained SNHL in childhood had cCMV. DBS testing is useful in the retrospective diagnosis of cCMV, and may provide definitive diagnostic information about the etiology of SNHL. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. [Dermoid cyst in the floor of the mouth with tongue fistula: a case report].

    PubMed

    Pingfan, Wu; Zhenge, Lei; Jian, Wu; Linlin, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Dermoid cysts in the floor of the mouth with tongue fistula are unusual lesions. This study reported a case of dermoid cyst in the floor of the mouth with tongue fistula, analyzed the causes of such formation, and discussed the appropriate diagnosis and treatment methods by reviewing relevant literature.

  2. First Report of Pratylenchus neglectus, Pratylenchus thornei and Paratylenchus hametus nematodes causing yield reduction to dry land peas and lentils in Idaho

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In June 2006, stunted, chlorotic, plants in large patches were observed in two 100-acre fields of dry land peas (Pisum sativum) in Latah County Idaho which resulted in 90% and 75% crop loss. In the same region a 300 acre field of dry land lentils (Lens culinaris) also had plants showing poor growth,...

  3. Protection to homologous and heterologous challenge in pigs immunized with vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease type O caused an epidemic in East Asia during 2010/2011.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Nam; Lee, Seo-Yong; Chu, Jia-Qi; Lee, Yeo-Joo; Kim, Rae-Hyung; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dong-Seob; Kim, Byounghan; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious infectious disease, and the use of vaccines is known to be effective for its prevention. In 2010/2011, there was an epidemic of the South East Asia (SEA) topotype in East Asian countries. We adapted the SEA topotype virus isolated in November 2010 in Korea in cells to analyze the characteristics of the virus and evaluate its possibility as a vaccine. After cell culture adaptation, the FMD virus particle 146S was purified to develop an inactivated oil vaccine for SEA or other topotypes. To measure its immunogenicity, pigs were inoculated with the experimental vaccine at different concentrations of the antigen. The results indicated that the groups immunized with at least 7.5 μg antigen were protected from homologous challenge. The immunized pigs were also protected against heterologous virus (ME-SA topotype) challenge. The genetic variations between the two field isolates and the adapted vaccine strains were identified in six amino acids by complete genome sequencing.

  4. Inhalability of micron particles through the nose and mouth.

    PubMed

    Se, Camby Mei King; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2010-03-01

    Aspiration efficiencies from nose and mouth inhalations are investigated at low and high inhalation rates by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software CFX 11. A realistic human head with detailed facial features was constructed. Facial features were matched to represent the 50th percentile of a human male, aged between 20 and 65 years old, based on anthropometric data. The constant freestream velocity was 0.2 ms(-1), normal to the face, and inhalation rates through the mouth and nose were 15 liters per minute (LPM) for light breathing and 40 LPM for heavy breathing. It was found that the flow field in the near breathing region exhibited vertical direction caused by the presence of the torso where the airstream diverges as it flows around and over the body. The critical area concept was used as a tool to determine the aspiration efficiency of particles. Comparisons between critical areas for the nose and mouth inhalations show similar geometric properties such as the area's shape, and its vertical distance location on the x-z plane located at y = 80 cm upstream. The critical area sizes were found to be slightly larger for the mouth inhalation mainly due to the larger mouth area and also the aligned orientation of the mouth to the upstream flow, whereas the nose is perpendicular to the upstream flow. This study was undertaken to establish the flow field in the near breathing region that will help to characterize the flow and particle field for initial boundary conditions leading to a more holistic modeling approach of respiration through the internal nasal cavity and mouth.

  5. Mouth and neck radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... of salt and 2 tablespoons (30 grams) of baking soda in 4 cups (1 liter) of water DO NOT use rinses that have alcohol in them. You may use an antibacterial rinse 2 to 4 times a day for gum disease. To further take care of your mouth: DO NOT eat foods or drink beverages that ...

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. An outbreak of FMD can have a significant economic impact because of the restrictions on international trade of susceptible animals and their products with FMD-free countries. In this chapter we discuss vario...

  7. Coxsackievirus A6 and hand, foot, and mouth disease, Finland.

    PubMed

    Osterback, Riikka; Vuorinen, Tytti; Linna, Mervi; Susi, Petri; Hyypiä, Timo; Waris, Matti

    2009-09-01

    During fall 2008, an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with onychomadesis (nail shedding) as a common feature occurred in Finland. We identified an unusual enterovirus type, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6), as the causative agent. CVA6 infections may be emerging as a new and major cause of epidemic HFMD.

  8. Coxsackievirus A6 and Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Österback, Riikka; Vuorinen, Tytti; Linna, Mervi; Susi, Petri; Hyypiä, Timo

    2009-01-01

    During fall 2008, an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with onychomadesis (nail shedding) as a common feature occurred in Finland. We identified an unusual enterovirus type, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6), as the causative agent. CVA6 infections may be emerging as a new and major cause of epidemic HFMD. PMID:19788821

  9. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  10. Mouth Dryness or Thick Saliva

    MedlinePlus

    ... breads, rolls Pasta, rice Pretzels, chips Dry cereal Fruits and vegetables Canned and fresh fruits that have a lot of moisture, like oranges and peaches Vegetables in sauce Bananas, dried fruit Vegetables, unless in a sauce or with a ...

  11. Association between oral habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Grippaudo, C; Paolantonio, E G; Antonini, G; Saulle, R; La Torre, G; Deli, R

    2016-10-01

    The ratio of bad habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion is an important issue in view of prevention and early treatment of disorders of the craniofacial growth. While bad habits can interfere with the position of the teeth and normal pattern of skeletal growth, on the other hand obstruction of the upper airway, resulting in mouth breathing, changes the pattern of craniofacial growth causing malocclusion. Our crosssectional study, carried out on 3017 children using the ROMA index, was developed to verify if there was a significant correlation between bad habits/mouth breathing and malocclusion. The results showed that an increase in the degree of the index increases the prevalence of bad habits and mouth breathing, meaning that these factors are associated with more severe malocclusions. Moreover, we found a significant association of bad habits with increased overjet and openbite, while no association was found with crossbite. Additionally, we found that mouth breathing is closely related to increased overjet, reduced overjet, anterior or posterior crossbite, openbite and displacement of contact points. Therefore, it is necessary to intervene early on these aetiological factors of malocclusion to prevent its development or worsening and, if already developed, correct it by early orthodontic treatment to promote eugnatic skeletal growth.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in mouth breathing children.

    PubMed

    Izu, Suemy Cioffi; Itamoto, Caroline Harumi; Pradella-Hallinan, Márcia; Pizarro, Gilberto Ulson; Tufik, Sérgio; Pignatari, Shirley; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mouth breathing is associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy - which is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea among children. Despite the importance of this matter, there are only a handful of studies showing the relationship between OSAS and mouth breathing. to determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep disorders in mouth breathing children and study its correlation with otorhinolaryngological findings. Retrospective cohort study. Data analysis from 248 medical charts of mouth breathing children seen at the Pediatric Otolaryngologic Division of a large medical institution between the years of 2000 and 2006. All patients had nasofibroscopy and or Cavum radiographs and polysomnographic exams. According to the Apnea index, patients were classified as primary snorers (AI<1); and as OSAS (>1). From 248 patients included in the study, 144 (58%) were primary snorers and 104 (42%) had OSAS. The most prevalent otorhinolaryngological findings were adenotonsillar hypertrophy (n=152; 61.2%), tonsilar hypertrophy (n=17; 6.8%), adenoid hypertrophy (n=37; 14.9%), rhinitis (n=155; 62.5%) and secretory otitis (n=36; 14.5%). primary snoring and OSAS are frequent findings in mouth breathing children. The most frequent otorhinolaryngological disorder in children with OSAS is adenotonsillar hypertrophy with or without rhinitis.

  13. Etiology, clinical manifestations and concurrent findings in mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Rubens Rafael; Rocha, Regina Lunardi; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Guerra, Angela Francisca Marques

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the etiology, main clinical manifestations and other concurrent findings in mouth-breathing children aged 3 to 9 years and resident in the urban area of Abaeté (MG), Brazil. This study was based on a representative random sample of the town population, of 23,596 inhabitants. Clinical diagnosis of mouth-breathing was defined as a combination of snoring, sleeping with mouth open, drooling on the pillow and frequent or intermittent nasal obstruction. Children with a clinical diagnosis of mouth-breathing underwent nasal endoscopy, allergy skin tests and X ray of the rhinopharynx, full blood tests, eosinophil counts, total IgE assay and fecal parasitology. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 10.5. The main causes of mouth-breathing were: allergic rhinitis (81.4%), enlarged adenoids (79.2%), enlarged tonsils (12.6%), and obstructive deviation of the nasal septum (1.0%). The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathers were: sleeping with mouth open (86%), snoring (79%), itchy nose (77%), drooling on the pillow (62%), nocturnal sleep problems or agitated sleep (62%), nasal obstruction (49%), and irritability during the day (43%). Certain clinical manifestations are very common among mouth-breathing children. These manifestations must be recognized and considered in the clinical diagnosis of mouth-breathing.

  14. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Francisco J; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; López-Jornet, Pía

    2015-05-16

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is mainly found in middle aged or elderly women and is characterized by intense burning or itching sensation of the tongue or other regions of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by xerostomia and dysgeusia. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during the evening and at night. Although BMS classically has been attributed to a range of factors, in recent years evidence has been obtained relating it peripheral (sensory C and/or trigeminal nerve fibers) or central neuropathic disturbances (involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system). The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Patient management is based on the avoidance of causes of oral irritation and the provision of psychological support. Drug treatment for burning sensation in primary BMS of peripheral origin can consist of topical clonazepam, while central type BMS appears to improve with the use of antidepressants such as duloxetine, antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin, or amisulpride.

  15. Mouth in Foot Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, Daniel C; Agee, Willie A; Pires, Valerie L; Yim, Duke G; Ngauy, Viseth

    2015-01-01

    Toothpicks are commonly used household items that rarely cause serious injury or infection. Toothpick-related injuries often occur due to ingestion with subsequent trauma/infection at distal sites within the gastrointestinal tract; however, cardiovascular, pleural, and soft tissue infections have been reported. Eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus found in oral flora associated with bite wound infections. A few case reports describe E. corrodens osteomyelitis from toothpick puncture wounds. We report a case of foot cellulitis and abscess in an elderly diabetic after toothpick puncture injury that was unresponsive to empiric antibiotics. Wound cultures grew E. corrodens and rare Peptostreptococcus species. E. corrodens is resistant to first-generation cephalosporins, macrolides, aminoglycosides, clindamycin, and metronidazole. This case highlights the insidious nature of E. corrodens infections and the need to tailor empiric antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections based on the mechanism of injury. In addition, this case stresses the importance of protective footwear in diabetics and serves as a cautionary tale regarding the use of seemingly innocuous toothpicks. PMID:26793413

  16. Microbiological assessment of effects of clinical mouth rinses on common oral microbes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taiji; Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ikebe, Kazunori; Kawabata, Shigetada; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Dry mouth occurs frequently in aged individuals, as well as in patients who are hospitalized, receiving multiple drugs, undergoing radiation treatment to the head and neck, or wearing a removable denture prosthesis, use of mouth rinse being often an option for relief. In the present study, we performed microbiological assessments of subjects given three different commercially available mouth rinses commonly employed in clinical practice (Peptisal, Biotène, ConCool) to determine their effects. For bacterial clearance in vitro, Peptisal showed the highest level of suppression of oral indigenous bacteria found in both planktonic formations and biofilm. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of these agents on biofilm formation on acrylic resin plates were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Again, Peptisal proved superior, because acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial peptides by a sensitive microbial strain was rarely observed. We conclude that Peptisal is an effective mouth rinse for clearance of planktonic and biofilm microorganisms present in the oral cavity.

  17. Mandibular fracture with a mouth formed mouthguard in kickboxing.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Tetsuo; Masuda, Issei; Numa, Takehiro; Horie, Norio

    2009-04-01

    Reports of injuries caused by kickboxing, one of the contact sports that potentially causes a large number of injuries, are relatively rare. Wearing a mouthguard is obligatory in kickboxing, but the association between maxillofacial injuries and the quality of mouthguards has not been described thus far. In this article, we present a case of mandibular fracture in a 25-year-old male, who was injured during kickboxing despite wearing a mouth formed mouthguard.

  18. Full Mouth Rehabilitation in a Medically Compromised Patient with Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun

    2014-01-01

    Severely worn out dentition needs to be given definite attention as it not only affects aesthetics but can also cause psychological distress to the affected individual. It can cause chewing difficulty, temporomandibular joint problems, headaches, pain and facial collapse. Before any attempt to restore severely worn dentition, aetiology of excessive tooth wear should be established. Severe wear can result from chemical cause, mechanical cause or a combination of various causes. Dental fluorosis can also result in severe wear of teeth. Teeth sometimes become extremely porous and friable with a mottled appearance ranging from yellow to brown-black. There occurs loss of tooth substance and anatomic dental deformities resulting in un-aesthetic dentition requiring full mouth rehabilitation. Here a similar case of full mouth rehabilitation of severely worn dentition due to dental fluorosis in a 27-year-old patient is presented. This case report conjointly presents the uncommon association of diabetes insipidus with dental fluorosis. Diabetes insipidus through its characteristic symptom of polydipsia can result in intake of more than permitted dose of fluoride thus causing dental fluorosis. In literature only few cases have been reported of dental fluorosis in association of diabetes insipidus. Full mouth rehabilitation of the patient was successfully accomplished through well-planned systematic approach to simultaneously fulfill aesthetic, occlusal and functional parameters. PMID:25177654

  19. Full mouth rehabilitation in a medically compromised patient with fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun

    2014-07-01

    Severely worn out dentition needs to be given definite attention as it not only affects aesthetics but can also cause psychological distress to the affected individual. It can cause chewing difficulty, temporomandibular joint problems, headaches, pain and facial collapse. Before any attempt to restore severely worn dentition, aetiology of excessive tooth wear should be established. Severe wear can result from chemical cause, mechanical cause or a combination of various causes. Dental fluorosis can also result in severe wear of teeth. Teeth sometimes become extremely porous and friable with a mottled appearance ranging from yellow to brown-black. There occurs loss of tooth substance and anatomic dental deformities resulting in un-aesthetic dentition requiring full mouth rehabilitation. Here a similar case of full mouth rehabilitation of severely worn dentition due to dental fluorosis in a 27-year-old patient is presented. This case report conjointly presents the uncommon association of diabetes insipidus with dental fluorosis. Diabetes insipidus through its characteristic symptom of polydipsia can result in intake of more than permitted dose of fluoride thus causing dental fluorosis. In literature only few cases have been reported of dental fluorosis in association of diabetes insipidus. Full mouth rehabilitation of the patient was successfully accomplished through well-planned systematic approach to simultaneously fulfill aesthetic, occlusal and functional parameters.

  20. Mouth breathing evaluation: use of Glatzel mirror and peak nasal inspiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Melo, Danielle de Lima e; Santos, Roberta Viviane Moreira; Perilo, Tatiana Vargas de Castro; Becker, Helena Maria Gonçalves; Motta, Andréa Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    To compare the use of the Glatzel mirror and peak nasal inspiratory flow in the evaluation of mouth-breathing participants and to analyze the correlation between these instruments. Sixty-four children were evaluated--32 mouth breathers and 32 nasal breathers; the children were aged 4 to 12 years. The mouth breathers were subdivided according to the cause of obstruction by a multidisciplinary team. The Glatzel mirror and peak nasal inspiratory flow were used in both groups to evaluate patency and nasal airflow. Data were then subjected for statistical analysis. The Glatzel mirror allowed us to differentiate the breathing mode considering gender, age, weight, height, and body mass index, but it did not help in identifying the cause of mouth breathing. The peak nasal inspiratory flow did not allow differentiation of the breathing mode and identification of the cause of mouth breathing. In our sample, there was no correlation between the instruments used. The Glatzel mirror was reliable in identifying participants with and without nasal obstruction, although it was not possible to differentiate subgroups of mouth breathers using this instrument. The peak nasal inspiratory flow showed differences only between nasal breathers and surgical mouth breathers. Low correlation was found between these two instruments.

  1. Evaluation of maxillary arterial blood flow in anesthetized cats with the mouth closed and open.

    PubMed

    Barton-Lamb, A L; Martin-Flores, M; Scrivani, P V; Bezuidenhout, A J; Loew, E; Erb, H N; Ludders, J W

    2013-06-01

    The mouth-gag is a common tool used in veterinary medicine during oral and transoral procedures in cats but its use has recently been associated with the development of blindness. The goal of this study was to investigate whether maximal opening of the mouth affects maxillary artery blood flow in six anesthetized cats. To assess blood flow, the electroretinogram (ERG), brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were evaluated qualitatively with the mouth closed and open. During dynamic computer tomography (CT) examinations, detection of contrast medium in the maxillary artery was quantified by measuring the Hounsfield units (HUs). The peak HU, time to peak and mean HU were determined. Changes ⩾10% of these parameters were considered indicative of altered blood flow. ERG and BAER were normal with the mouth closed in all cats, but was abnormal with the mouth opened maximally in two cats and one cat, respectively. During MRA, blood flow was undetected in either maxillary artery in one cat and reduced in the right maxillary artery in two cats, when the mouth was open. During CT, the peak HU decreased ⩾10% in three cats, the time to peak was ⩾10% longer in two cats, and the mean HU was ⩾10% lower in one cat when the mouth was open. No cat developed apparent blindness or deafness. Maximal opening of the mouth caused alterations in several indicators of blood flow in some individual cats. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Wu, Kai-Ming; Wang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Hung-Pin; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2013-10-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of clinically apparent mucosal alterations. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palate. In addition to a burning sensation, the patients with BMS may also complain unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms: primary and secondary BMS. The primary BMS is essential or idiopathic, in which the organic local/systemic causes cannot be identified and a neuropathological cause is likely. The diagnosis of primary BMS depends mainly on exclusion of etiological factors. The secondary BMS is caused by local, systemic, and/or psychological factors; thus, its diagnosis depends on identification of the exact causative factor. When local, systemic or psychological factors are present, treatment or elimination of these factors usually results in a significant clinical improvement of BMS symptoms. Vitamin, zinc, or hormone replacement therapy has been found to be effective for reducing the oral burning or pain symptom in some BMS patients with deficiency of the corresponding factor. If patients still have the symptoms after the removal of potential causes, drug therapy should be instituted. Previous randomized controlled clinical trials found that drug therapy with capsaicin, alpha-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and antidepressants may provide relief of oral burning or pain symptom. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms.

  3. [Hand, foot and mouth disease].

    PubMed

    Barriere, H; Berger, M; Billaudel, S

    1976-11-16

    Two characteristic cases encountered in young adults led the authors to present the hand foot and mouth syndrome. They report the characteristic distribution and vesicular appearance of the lesions. The course was benign. The viral origin of the disease was more or less easily confirmed by cell culture, inoculation in new born mice and demonstration of antibodies. Usually the virus was a Coxackie A 16. However in one of the authors cases, an Echo 11 was demonstrated. The apparent rareness of the disease may be explained by lack of recognition.

  4. Comparison of mouth-to-mouth, mouth-to-mask and mouth-to-face-shield ventilation by lay persons.

    PubMed

    Paal, Peter; Falk, Markus; Sumann, Günther; Demetz, Florian; Beikircher, Werner; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ellerton, John; Brugger, Hermann

    2006-07-01

    A prospective randomised study on 70 volunteers without previous first aid education (42 males, 28 females, mean age 17) was performed to compare mouth-to-mouth ventilation (MMV, n = 24) versus mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (MPV, n = 25) and mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (MFV, n =21), and to evaluate if an instruction period of 10 min would be sufficient to teach lay persons artificial ventilation. Every volunteer performed three ventilation series using a bench model of an unprotected airway. MMV and MPV show higher mean tidal volume (TV) than MFV (values of series 3: 976 +/- 454 and 868 +/- 459 versus 604 +/- 328 ml, P = 0.002 and P = 0.025, respectively). We found a higher inter-individual variation in TV than in previous studies (P = 0.031). The recommended TV of 700-1000 ml was reached in only 23%, most frequently with MPV (MMV 16.7%, MPV 32%, MFV 19%) but the difference was not significant (P = 0.391). However, we found a significantly higher percentage with a TV below 700 ml with MFV (MMV 33.3%, MPV 36%, MFV 66.7% P = 0.047) and a significantly higher percentage of TV exceeding 1000 ml with MMV (MMV 50%, MPV 32%, MFV 14.3%) (P = 0.039). "Stomach" inflation was highest with MMV (79.2%) followed by MPV (52%) and MFV (42.9%) (P = 0.034). We found further differences between the sexes; males produced a higher TV (P = 0.003) and a higher percentage of stomach inflation (P = 0.029). MPV showed the best ventilation quality. It resulted in a more adequate TV than MMV and MFV and lower stomach inflation than MMV. Only a relatively low percentage of ventilations were within the recommended range for TV and this may be related to the short training duration. We found different performances between the sexes, a high inter-individual variation and mainly a low ventilation quality. Therefore, further studies have to focus more on teaching duration, sex differences and ventilation quality.

  5. Postural disorders in mouth breathing children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neiva, Patricia Dayrell; Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Mendes, Polyana Leite; Zabjek, Karl; Becker, Helena Gonçalves; Mathur, Sunita

    2017-07-05

    Mouth breathing syndrome can cause sleep disturbances that compromise the performance of children in school. It might also cause postural abnormalities involving the head and cervical spine; however, the association between postural abnormalities and mouth breathing in children is unclear. To assess the methodological quality of studies and determine if there is an association between mouth breathing and postural disorders in children. Databases comprised MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, LILACS, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Registrar of Controlled Trials. Searches were until March 2016 and included studies that evaluated postural disorders in children diagnosed with mouth breathing. The Downs and Black checklist was used to evaluate the quality of the evidences. Ten studies were included totaling 417 children from 5 to 14 years. Two studies used the New York State Postural Rating Scale, seven used photography and one used motion capture to measure posture. The methods used to analyze the data included the Postural Analysis Software (SAPO), Fisiometer, ALCimagem and routines in MATLAB program. Quality assessment resulted in low scores (<14) for all the studies. The main areas of weakness were a clear description of the participants, of the methods used to access posture, of the principal confounders and lack of power analysis. External and internal validity were also threatened by the lack of a representative sample and blinding of the participants and assessors, respectively. The review provides low evidence that mouth-breathing pattern in children between the ages 5-14 years is associated with postural deviations. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. [Relationship between abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-wu; Li, Hong-fa; Wang, Qiu-rui; Xu, Hao; He, Jing-nan

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing. Thirty-eight patients with abnormal swallowing and 38 patients with normal swallowing were selected. All patients presented with no airway constriction. The age range of the patients was 11-14 years old. The number of patients with mouth breathing was calculated. Statistical analysis (χ(2) test) was performed. The number of patients with mouth breathing in the abnormal swallowing group (17, 45%) was significantly higher than that in the normal swallowing group (5, 13%) (χ(2) = 9.212, P = 0.002). Abnormal swallowing was related to mouth breathing.

  7. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder. PMID:23411996

  8. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  9. Burning mouth syndrome and mast cell activation disorder.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2011-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic diffuse oral pain syndrome affecting ∼1% of the general population, is diagnosed when explanatory oral pathology and other identifiable causes are absent. BMS has been recognized for decades, but its etiology remains unknown and has not previously been attributed to mast cell disease. Three cases of BMS are reported in which evidence of an underlying mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) was found; all 3 patients' oral pain responded well to MCAD-directed therapy. Mediators released from mast cells have a wide range of local and remote effects and potentially may cause the neuropathic changes and/or inflammation thought to lead to the symptoms of BMS. Mast cell disease either in oral tissue or at sites remote from the mouth should be considered in the differential diagnosis of BMS.

  10. Idiopathic burning mouth syndrome: a common treatment-refractory somatoform condition responsive to ECT.

    PubMed

    McGirr, Alexander; Davis, Lindsay; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel

    2014-04-30

    Somatic symptom disorders are common causes of disability and suffering, and can pose significant management challenges. Idiopathic burning mouth syndrome is a challenging somatic symptom disorder with relatively high prevalence, particularly among post-menopausal women. Here, we present the case of a woman with severe treatment refractory idiopathic burning mouth syndrome and comorbid major depressive disorder, who was successfully treated with bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy. This case highlights the potential effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy in idiopathic burning mouth syndrome when other treatment options have been exhausted.

  11. Causes and implications of dry season control of tropical wet forest tree growth at very high water levels: direct vs. indirect limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierick, D.; Oberbauer, S. F.; O'Brien, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of tropical rain forests in the global carbon cycle, uncertainty remains on how these ecosystems will be affected by climate change. Previous studies in a Costa Rican lowland tropical rain forest (La Selva Biological Station, Sarapiqui, Costa Rica) revealed a significant, positive relationship between tree diameter increment and January to April dry season precipitation that extended up to high rainfall totals (Clark et al. 2010). Proposed mechanisms include a direct limitation of water availability or closely linked indirect controls such as altered micrometeorological conditions (direct vs. diffuse light, atmospheric humidity) and changes in plant phenology or C-allocation. Using an experimental approach we aim to test the hypothesis that water availability in the dry season directly controls tree diameter growth despite the high precipitation levels normally encountered (long term average for Jan-Apr is 890 mm). At three sites within the La Selva Biological Station a paired experimental and control plot were established. Each plot was 900 m2 in size and had at least 20 trees with diameter at breast height (dbh) over 10 cm. In the experimental plots we used irrigation to simulate a minimum daily precipitation equivalent to 10 mm.d-1 during the dry seasons of 2011 and 2012. This simulated precipitation amount matches the highest dry season total recorded for the years 1998 to 2009. The main response variables measured in experimental and control plots were monthly dendrometer-band diameter growth of trees above 10 cm dbh, sap flux density of a subset of trees and bi-weekly leaf litter production. Belowground variables included soil moisture, fine root production and soil respiration. Soil moisture data confirmed that experimental plots experienced consistently high water availability in the top 30 cm of the soil profile during the dry season, while control plots experienced repeated drying and rewetting of the soil. This difference in water

  12. Dermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, T.B.; Paplanus, S.H.; Chernin, M.M.; Coulthard, S.W.

    1983-12-01

    Dermoid cysts are a rare cause of head and neck masses; those arising in this region account for only 7% of all dermoid cysts. Because of their rarity, they are unfamiliar to most radiologists and are not well covered in the radiologic literature. The authors recently saw a patient with a large dermoid cyst arising from the floor of the mouth and extending into the left neck. the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the lesion was most striking and may be typical.

  13. Mouths of the Amazon River, Brazil, South America

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-08-08

    STS046-80-009 (31 July-8 Aug. 1992) --- A view of the mouth of the Amazon River and the Amazon Delta shows a large sediment plume expanding outward into the Atlantic Ocean. The sediment plume can be seen hugging the coast north of the Delta. This is caused by the west-northwest flowing Guyana Current. The large island of Marajo is partially visible through the clouds.

  14. Land application of mine water causes minimal uranium loss offsite in the wet-dry tropics: Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Saqib; Streten, Claire; Parry, David L; McGuinness, Keith A; Lu, Ping; Gibb, Karen S

    2015-11-01

    Ranger Uranium Mine (RUM) is situated in the wet-dry tropics of Northern Australia. Land application (irrigation) of stockpile (ore and waste) runoff water to natural woodland on the mine lease is a key part of water management at the mine. Consequently, the soil in these Land Application Areas (LAAs) presents a range of uranium (U) and other metals concentrations. Knowledge of seasonal and temporal changes in soil U and physicochemical parameters at RUM LAAs is important to develop suitable management and rehabilitation strategies. Therefore, soil samples were collected from low, medium, high and very high U sites at RUM LAAs for two consecutive years and the effect of time and season on soil physicochemical parameters particularly U and other major solutes applied in irrigation water was measured. Concentrations of some of the solutes applied in the irrigation water such as sulphur (S), iron (Fe) and calcium (Ca) showed significant seasonal and temporal changes. Soil S, Fe and Ca concentration decreased from year 1 to year 2 and from dry to wet seasons during both years. Soil U followed the same pattern except that we recorded an increase in soil U concentrations at most of the RUM LAAs after year 2 wet season compared to year 2 dry season. Thus, these sites did not show a considerable decrease in soil U concentration from year 1 to year 2. Sites which contained elevated U after wet season 2 also had higher moisture content which suggests that pooling of U containing rainwater at these sites may be responsible for elevated U. Thus, U may be redistributed within RUM LAAs due to surface water movement. The study also suggested that a decrease in U concentrations in LAA soils at very high U (>900 mg kg(-1)) sites is most likely due to transport of particulate matter bound U by surface runoff and U may not be lost from the surface soil due to vertical movement through the soil profile. Uranium attached to particulate matter may reduce its potential for environmental

  15. The effects of parafunctional habit control and topical lubricant on discomforts associated with burning mouth syndrome (BMS).

    PubMed

    Kho, Hong-Seop; Lee, Ji-Sun; Lee, Eun-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The BMS is a common chronic pain condition which mainly affects old women. The high prevalence of oral parafunctional habits and dry mouth symptoms in patients with BMS suggests that inflammation at the subclinical level due to repetitive microtrauma may cause burning mouth sensations. In this study, using a comprehensive questionnaire, we have investigated the efficacy of oral habit control and use of topical lubricant or corticosteroid on oral complaints associated with BMS. Twenty-five patients with BMS (1 man and 24 women, mean age 59.4+/-8.3 years) were included to investigate the effects of habit control and topical lubricant on discomforts associated with BMS. Another 29 patients (2 men and 27 women, mean age 55.0+/-10.6 years) were included to investigate the effects of habit control and topical dexamethasone (DXM). The burning and aching qualities of discomfort, and the effect of oral complaints on daily life were significantly decreased by both types of treatments. However, there were no significant differences between the different treatment groups. The salivary flow rate did not affect the treatment outcome. We concluded that the concomitant prescription of topical lubricants with oral habit control is an effective initial approach for patients with BMS.

  16. Formulation and evaluation of aceclofenac mouth-dissolving tablet.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Shailendra Singh; Dahima, Rashmi

    2011-04-01

    Aceclofenac has been shown to have potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities similar to indomethacin and diclofenac, and due to its preferential Cox-2 blockade, it has a better safety than conventional Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) with respect to adverse effect on gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Aceclofenac is superior from other NSAIDs as it has selectivity for Cox-2, a beneficial Cox inhibitor is well tolerated, has better Gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability and improved cardiovascular safety when compared with other selective Cox-2 inhibitor. To provide the patient with the most convenient mode of administration, there is need to develop a fast-disintegrating dosage form, particularly one that disintegrates and dissolves/disperses in saliva and can be administered without water, anywhere, any time. Such tablets are also called as "melt in mouth tablet." Direct compression, freeze drying, sublimation, spray drying, tablet molding, disintegrant addition, and use of sugar-based excipients are technologies available for mouth-dissolving tablet. Mouth-dissolving tablets of aceclofenac were prepared with two different techniques, wet granulation and direct compression, in which different formulations were prepared with varying concentration of excipients. These tablets were evaluated for their friability, hardness, wetting time, and disintegration time; the drug release profile was studied in buffer Phosphate buffered Saline (PBS) pH 7.4. Direct compression batch C3 gave far better dissolution than the wet granulation Batch F2, which released only 75.37% drug, and C3, which released 89.69% drug in 90 minutes.

  17. In vitro antimicrobial effects of commercially available mouth-wetting agents.

    PubMed

    Güneri, Pelin; Alpöz, Esin; Epstein, Joel B; Çankaya, Hülya; Ateş, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Products have been developed to provide palliation for persons with dry mouth. In addition to mouth-wetting agents, some products incorporate antimicrobial constituents with the goal of improving oral microbial defenses. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the potential antimicrobial and antifungal effects of two commercially available saliva substitutes on Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans by using the agar-well diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity as measured by the size of the inhibition zone growth for S. mutans and L. acidophilus was observed only with Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse® and BioXtra® gel. The zone of inhibition of Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse was larger than that of BioXtra gel (p= 0.00, p < 0.01). No anticandidal effect was seen with any of the test products. The pH of the preparations, the variations between the amount of active ingredients within the products, and the potential antimicrobial effects of inactive ingredients should be investigated to determine the factors that impacted microbial inhibition. © 2011 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Candida in mouth or on dummy?

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D J; Coughlin, R P; Poskitt, E M

    1985-01-01

    Mouth and dummy swabs for Candida spp. were obtained from 100 children under 18 months old admitted with acute medical conditions. Forty four per cent of dummies were colonised by Candida spp. Children who sucked dummies had clinical thrush and positive mouth swabs for candida more frequently than those who did not. PMID:4004318

  19. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children may be more likely than adults to be exposed to pesticides following a residential application as a result of hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children less ...

  20. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children, as compared to adults, are more likely to be exposed after a pesticide application due to potential hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children <60 months of...

  1. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children, as compared to adults, are more likely to be exposed after a pesticide application due to potential hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children <60 months of...

  2. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children may be more likely than adults to be exposed to pesticides following a residential application as a result of hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children less ...

  3. [Dehydration due to "mouth broken"].

    PubMed

    Meijler, D P M; van Mossevelde, P W J; van Beek, R H T

    2012-09-01

    Two children were admitted to a medical centre due to dehydration after an oral injury and the extraction of a tooth. One child complained of "mouth broken". Dehydration is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance in children. Babies and young children are prone to dehydration due to their relatively large body surface area, the high percentage extracellular fluid, and the limited ability of the kidneys to conserve water. After the removal ofa tooth, after an oral trauma or in case of oral discomfort, a child is at greater risk of dehydration by reduced fluid and food intake due to oral pain and/or discomfort and anxiety to drink. In those cases, extra attention needs to be devoted to the intake of fluids.

  4. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  5. Early life lead exposure causes gender-specific changes in the DNA methylation profile of DNA extracted from dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arko; Heredia, Nicole; Senut, Marie-Claude; Hess, Matthew; Land, Susan; Qu, Wen; Hollacher, Kurt; Dereski, Mary O; Ruden, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Aims In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that early life lead (Pb) exposure associated DNA methylation (5mC) changes are dependent on the sex of the child and can serve as biomarkers for Pb exposure. Methods In this pilot study, we measured the 5mC profiles of DNA extracted from dried blood spots (DBS) in a cohort of 43 children (25 males and 18 females; ages from 3 months to 5 years) from Detroit. Result & Discussion We found that the effect of Pb-exposure on the 5-mC profiles can be separated into three subtypes: affected methylation loci which are conserved irrespective of the sex of the child (conserved); affected methylation loci unique to males (male-specific); and affected methylation loci unique to females (female-specific). PMID:26077427

  6. Willingness to administer mouth-to-mouth ventilation in a first response program in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mecrow, Tom Stefan; Rahman, Aminur; Mashreky, Saidur Rahman; Rahman, Fazlur; Nusrat, Nahida; Scarr, Justin; Linnan, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Timely mouth-to-mouth ventilation is critical to resuscitate drowning victims. While drowning is frequent, there are no lay persons trained in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in rural Bangladesh. As part of a feasibility study to create a first response system in a conservative Islamic village environment, a pilot was undertaken to examine willingness to provide mouth-to-mouth ventilation for drowning resuscitation. A questionnaire was administered to 721 participants at the beginning of a village-based CPR training course. Trainees were asked regarding willingness to administer mouth-to-mouth ventilation on a variety of hypothetical victims. Responses were tabulated according to the age, sex and relationship of the trainee to the postulated victim. Willingness to deliver mouth-to-mouth ventilation was influenced by sex of a potential recipient and relationship to the trainee. Adolescent participants were significantly more willing to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation on someone of the same sex. Willingness increased for both sexes when the postulated victim was an immediate family member. Willingness was lower with extended family members and lowest with strangers. Adult trainees were more likely to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation than adolescent trainees in any scenario. Adults express more willingness to resuscitate a broader range of drowning victims than adolescents. However in rural Bangladesh, adolescents are more likely to be in close proximity to a drowning in progress. Further efforts are needed to increase willingness of adolescents to provide resuscitation to drowning victims. However, despite potential cultural limitations, trained responders appear to be willing to give mouth-to-mouth ventilation to various recipients. Final determination will require evidence on response outcomes which is being collected.

  7. Toxic encephalopathy after taking dried seeds of Datura stramonium in two elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Suk, Seung-Han; Kwak, Yong-Tae

    2009-09-01

    An altered mentality, or delirium, is a common medical condition of the elderly in emergency medicine or neurology clinics. Among causes of this, toxic etiology due to an anticholinergic agent is not rare. The authors present two elderly women who were brought to an emergency room because of anticholinergic syndrome. The patients displayed agitative behavior, confusion, urinary retention, dry mouth and dilated pupils within 3 h of ingesting the dried seeds of Datura stramonium which has been used as a herbal medicine or as a traditional folk remedy for relieving coughing and asthma in Korea. They were discharged with a complete recovery after receiving conservative therapy for 5 days. Physicians of emergency medicine should be mindful of anticholinergic syndrome due to herbal medicine when the elderly with a history of delirium come to a hospital.

  8. Salivation induced better lacrimal gland function in dry eyes.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, T; Ghising, R

    2009-12-01

    The dry eye syndrome is a common eye symptom causing blurry vision. To meet the demand of the modem world students and professionals are compelled to expose themselves to the computer screen for long stretch of time, which is one of the causes of dry eye. It is not always feasible to instil eyes with artificial tears time to time to protect them from dryness. Rather to adopt any simple physiological process associated with optimum lacrimation is a better option to keep eyes moist during computer works. Volunteers (n = 22) having mild dry eyes participated in this study. Tear production was assessed by Schirmer test by keeping Schirmer strip on ocular surface for 5 minutes and recording the length of the moistened area. Then the subject was allowed to keep a piece of lopsy candy (a sour fruit pulp mixed with sugar that is sweet and sour in taste) in mouth for 5 minutes that caused salivation. During salivation, again tear production was assessed. [It was standardized in such a way that, the length of the moistened strip will be 25 - 30 mm for normal eyes, 15 - 10 mm for dry eye, 06 - 10 mm for mild dry eye, 02 - 05 mm for moderate dryness and 00 - 01 mm for severe dry eye.] Tear production was found to be increased significantly (supported by increased length of moistened area of Schirmer strip) during salivation especially in dry eye in all volunteers. The lacrimal gland is the major contributor to the aqueous layer of the tear film which consists of water, electrolytes and proteins; secretion of which are under tight neural control. Anticholinergic agents play an important role in ocular dryness because of hypo-secretion. The sensory root of facial nucleus contains efferent preganglionic parasympathetic fibers for submandibular and sublingual salivary gland and lacrimal gland. The sensory root conveys gustatory fibers from the presulcul area (anterior two-third) of the tongue via the chorda tympani and via the palatine and greater petrosal nerve, taste fibers from

  9. Burning mouth syndrome: a retrospective study of 140 cases in a sample of Catalan population.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Sánchez, Maria F; Jordana-Comín, Xavier; García-Sívoli, Carlos E

    2005-01-01

    The results of analyzing etiologic and clinical factors, and their connection with the burning mouth syndrome (BMS) in a sample of Catalan (Barcelona, Spain) population are presented in this work. The purpose of this study is to establish connections between BMS and the following variables: age, sex, overt depression, masked depression, cancerophobia, dry mouth, foreign body sensation in the mouth, and burning. 140 clinical cases of patients diagnosed with the disease and 140 cases of control patients are studied here. The data were statistically analyzed to study connections as well as the disease and variables frequency. The obtained results will help understanding possible connections of the studied etiologic and clinical factors with the disease, as well as the course of BMS, and its consequences in the Catalan population.

  10. Decreased chewing activity during mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H-Y; Yamaguchi, K

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the effect of mouth breathing on the strength and duration of vertical effect on the posterior teeth using related functional parameters during 3 min of gum chewing in 39 nasal breathers. A CO(2) sensor was placed over the mouth to detect expiratory airflow. When no airflow was detected from the mouth throughout the recording period, the subject was considered a nasal breather and enrolled in the study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded during 3 min of gum chewing. The protocol was repeated with the nostrils occluded. The strength of the vertical effect was obtained as integrated masseter muscle EMG activity, and the duration of vertical effect was also obtained as chewing stroke count, chewing cycle variation and EMG activity duration above baseline. Baseline activity was obtained from the isotonic EMG activity during jaw movement at 1.6 Hz without making tooth contact. The duration represented the percentage of the active period above baseline relative to the 3-min chewing period. Paired t-test and repeated analysis of variance were used to compare variables between nasal and mouth breathing. The integrated EMG activity and the duration of EMG activity above baseline, chewing stroke count and chewing cycle significantly decreased during mouth breathing compared with nasal breathing (P<0.05). Chewing cycle variance during mouth breathing was significantly greater than nasal breathing (P<0.05). Mouth breathing reduces the vertical effect on the posterior teeth, which can affect the vertical position of posterior teeth negatively, leading to malocclusion.

  11. Mouth Sores Caused by Cancer Treatment: How to Cope

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the seventh day after chemotherapy treatment ends. Head or neck radiation therapy Only radiation aimed at your head ... May 30, 2017. Oral complications of chemotherapy and head/neck radiation (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer. ...

  12. Endoscope drying and its pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, J

    2017-07-17

    Inadequate drying of endoscope channels is a possible cause of replication and survival of remaining pathogens during storage. The presence during storage of potentially contaminated water in endoscope channels may promote bacterial proliferation and biofilm formation. An incomplete drying procedure or lack of drying and not storing in a vertical position are the most usual problems identified during drying and endoscope storage. Inadequate drying and storage procedures, together with inadequate cleaning and disinfection, are the most important sources of endoscope contamination and post-endoscopic infection. Flexible endoscopes may be dried in automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs), manually, or in drying/storage cabinets. Flushing of the endoscope channels with 70-90% ethyl or isopropyl alcohol followed by forced air drying is recommended by several guidelines. Current guidelines recommend that flexible endoscopes are stored in a vertical position in a closed, ventilated cupboard. Drying and storage cabinets have a drying system that circulates and forces the dry filtered air through the endoscope channels. Endoscope reprocessing guidelines are inconsistent with one another or give no exact recommendations about drying and storage of flexible endoscopes. There is no conclusive evidence on the length of time endoscopes can be safely stored before requiring re-disinfection and before they pose a contamination risk. To minimize the risk of disease transmission and nosocomial infection, modification and revision of guidelines are recommended as required to be consistent with one another. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, Marvin J.; Baxt, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. The disease was initially described in the 16th century and was the first animal pathogen identified as a virus. Recent FMD outbreaks in developed countries and their significant economic impact have increased the concern of governments worldwide. This review describes the reemergence of FMD in developed countries that had been disease free for many years and the effect that this has had on disease control strategies. The etiologic agent, FMD virus (FMDV), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is examined in detail at the genetic, structural, and biochemical levels and in terms of its antigenic diversity. The virus replication cycle, including virus-receptor interactions as well as unique aspects of virus translation and shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis, is discussed. This information has been the basis for the development of improved protocols to rapidly identify disease outbreaks, to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, and to begin to identify and test novel vaccine candidates. Furthermore, this knowledge, coupled with the ability to manipulate FMDV genomes at the molecular level, has provided the framework for examination of disease pathogenesis and the development of a more complete understanding of the virus and host factors involved. PMID:15084510

  14. Coastal Processes Study of San Bernard River Mouth, Texas: Stability and Maintenance of Mouth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    This report documents an investigation of the coastal and inlet physical processes acting at the San Bernard River mouth, Texas. The U.S. Army...Brazos River and the San Bernard River and vicinity. In recent years, a spit has grown from northeast to southwest across the San Bernard River mouth...for maintaining the San Bernard River mouth. The San Bernard River is located in north-central Texas and flows through the alluvial valleys of the

  15. Precision attachments for the partially dentate mouth

    PubMed Central

    Preiskel, H W

    1974-01-01

    Some uses of precision attachments in restoring the partially dentate mouth are considered. These devices are indicated where neither the clasp-retained denture nor the fixed bridge is entirely suitable. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4614689

  16. [Epidermoid cyst of the mouth floor].

    PubMed

    Sanjuán Rodríguez, S; Morán Penco, J M; Ruiz Orpez, A; Santamaria Ossorio, J I; Berchi García, F J

    2003-07-01

    The epidermoid cysts are frequent during childhood, however mouth floor location are very unusual, because of their more difficult diagnosis and therapeutic approach. We present a 5 years old male, symptoms free until a week before, when his parents noticed a well defined mass in the mouth floor. A physical examination leaded to the diagnosis of possible epidermoid cyst. The tumor was excised through an introral approach. A review of different diagnostic means and surgical management are undertaken.

  17. Dynamics of Mouth Opening in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jason A.; Hyland, Callen; Steele, Robert E.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Hydra, a simple freshwater animal famous for its regenerative capabilities, must tear a hole through its epithelial tissue each time it opens its mouth. The feeding response of Hydra has been well-characterized physiologically and is regarded as a classical model system for environmental chemical biology. However, due to a lack of in vivo labeling and imaging tools, the biomechanics of mouth opening have remained completely unexplored. We take advantage of the availability of transgenic Hydra lines to perform the first dynamical analysis, to our knowledge, of Hydra mouth opening and test existing hypotheses regarding the underlying cellular mechanisms. Through cell position and shape tracking, we show that mouth opening is accompanied by changes in cell shape, but not cellular rearrangements as previously suggested. Treatment with a muscle relaxant impairs mouth opening, supporting the hypothesis that mouth opening is an active process driven by radial contractile processes (myonemes) in the ectoderm. Furthermore, we find that all events exhibit the same relative rate of opening. Because one individual can open consecutively to different amounts, this suggests that the degree of mouth opening is controlled through neuronal signaling. Finally, from the opening dynamics and independent measurements of the elastic properties of the tissues, we estimate the forces exerted by the myonemes to be on the order of a few nanoNewtons. Our study provides the first dynamical framework, to our knowledge, for understanding the remarkable plasticity of the Hydra mouth and illustrates that Hydra is a powerful system for quantitative biomechanical studies of cell and tissue behaviors in vivo. PMID:26958895

  18. Dynamics of Mouth Opening in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason A; Hyland, Callen; Steele, Robert E; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2016-03-08

    Hydra, a simple freshwater animal famous for its regenerative capabilities, must tear a hole through its epithelial tissue each time it opens its mouth. The feeding response of Hydra has been well-characterized physiologically and is regarded as a classical model system for environmental chemical biology. However, due to a lack of in vivo labeling and imaging tools, the biomechanics of mouth opening have remained completely unexplored. We take advantage of the availability of transgenic Hydra lines to perform the first dynamical analysis, to our knowledge, of Hydra mouth opening and test existing hypotheses regarding the underlying cellular mechanisms. Through cell position and shape tracking, we show that mouth opening is accompanied by changes in cell shape, but not cellular rearrangements as previously suggested. Treatment with a muscle relaxant impairs mouth opening, supporting the hypothesis that mouth opening is an active process driven by radial contractile processes (myonemes) in the ectoderm. Furthermore, we find that all events exhibit the same relative rate of opening. Because one individual can open consecutively to different amounts, this suggests that the degree of mouth opening is controlled through neuronal signaling. Finally, from the opening dynamics and independent measurements of the elastic properties of the tissues, we estimate the forces exerted by the myonemes to be on the order of a few nanoNewtons. Our study provides the first dynamical framework, to our knowledge, for understanding the remarkable plasticity of the Hydra mouth and illustrates that Hydra is a powerful system for quantitative biomechanical studies of cell and tissue behaviors in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  20. A bulky dermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Boko, E; Amaglo, K; Kpemissi, E

    2014-04-01

    Bulky dermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth are very rare and may pose a problem of diagnosis. They also raise problems for the anesthesiologist and surgeon. We report the first case to be described in Togo. A 23-year-old man was admitted for a submental submandibular sublingual mass. It was soft, depressable, painless, without adenopathies, raising the tongue against the palate and creating a "second tongue-like" aspect. Resection on intra-oral route removed an intact cyst of 13cm long axis. Histology diagnosed dermoid cyst. Dermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth present as a submental sublingual mass, which may cause dyspnea and disorders of swallowing, chewing and/or vocal function. Differential diagnosis concerns sublingual, submental and cervical masses. Definitive diagnosis is founded on the histology specimen. Imaging may assist diagnosis. Intubation may be problematic. The resection approach may be intra-oral or cervical. Dermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth are rare. They may induce functional disorder. An intra-oral approach is preferable when possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Guidelines proposal for clinical recognition of mouth breathing children

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria Christina Thomé; Casagrande, Camila Ferreira; Teixeira, Lícia Pacheco; Finck, Nathalia Silveira; de Araújo, Maria Teresa Martins

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mouth breathing (MB) is an etiological factor for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) during childhood. The habit of breathing through the mouth may be perpetuated even after airway clearance. Both habit and obstruction may cause facial muscle imbalance and craniofacial changes. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to propose and test guidelines for clinical recognition of MB and some predisposing factors for SDB in children. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 110 orthodontists regarding their procedures for clinical evaluation of MB and their knowledge about SDB during childhood. Thereafter, based on their answers, guidelines were developed and tested in 687 children aged between 6 and 12 years old and attending elementary schools. RESULTS: There was no standardization for clinical recognition of MB among orthodontists. The most common procedures performed were inefficient to recognize differences between MB by habit or obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines proposed herein facilitate clinical recognition of MB, help clinicians to differentiate between habit and obstruction, suggest the most appropriate treatment for each case, and avoid maintenance of mouth breathing patterns during adulthood. PMID:26352843

  2. Guidelines proposal for clinical recognition of mouth breathing children.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Maria Christina Thomé; Casagrande, Camila Ferreira; Teixeira, Lícia Pacheco; Finck, Nathalia Silveira; de Araújo, Maria Teresa Martins

    2015-01-01

    Mouth breathing (MB) is an etiological factor for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) during childhood. The habit of breathing through the mouth may be perpetuated even after airway clearance. Both habit and obstruction may cause facial muscle imbalance and craniofacial changes. The aim of this paper is to propose and test guidelines for clinical recognition of MB and some predisposing factors for SDB in children. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 110 orthodontists regarding their procedures for clinical evaluation of MB and their knowledge about SDB during childhood. Thereafter, based on their answers, guidelines were developed and tested in 687 children aged between 6 and 12 years old and attending elementary schools. There was no standardization for clinical recognition of MB among orthodontists. The most common procedures performed were inefficient to recognize differences between MB by habit or obstruction. The guidelines proposed herein facilitate clinical recognition of MB, help clinicians to differentiate between habit and obstruction, suggest the most appropriate treatment for each case, and avoid maintenance of mouth breathing patterns during adulthood.

  3. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies.

  4. Mouth of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. Mouth of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  6. Temporomandibular Disorders in Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disease characterized by absence of any lesions and burning of the oral mucosa associated to a sensation of dry mouth and/or taste alterations. The purpose of our study is to estimate signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in patients with BMS and to investigate for the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four BMS patients were enrolled; BMS subtype was established according to the classification of Lamey. After a gnathological evaluation, according to the protocol of the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders, patients were classified by RDC/TMD criteria. The data were compared and analyzed using a chi-square test to describe the existence of an association between BMS and TMD. RESULTS: 65.9% the BMS patients showed disorders classified as primary signs and symptoms of TMD according to RDC / TMD criteria, and 72.7% showed parafunctional habits. The chi-square test revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.035) between BMS and TMD. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that there is a possible relationship not yet well understood between BMS and TMD, may be for neurophatic alterations assumed for BMS that could be also engaged in TMD pathogenesis. PMID:24273452

  7. Salt Fluxes in a Complex River Mouth System of Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Nuno; Lencart e Silva, João D.; Dias, João Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of velocity and salinity near the mouth and head of the Espinheiro channel (Ria de Aveiro lagoon, Portugal) are used to study the local variation of physical water properties and to assess the balance, under steady conditions, between the seaward salt transport induced by river discharge and the landward dispersion induced by various mixing mechanisms. This assessment is made using data sampled during complete tidal cycles. Under the assumption that the estuarine tidal channel is laterally homogeneous and during moderate tidal periods (except for one survey), currents and salinity data were decomposed into various spatial and temporal means and their deviations. Near the channel's mouth, the main contributions to the salt transport are the terms due to freshwater discharge and the tidal correlation. Near the channel's head, this last term is less important than the density driven circulation, which is enhanced by the increase in freshwater discharge. The remaining terms, which are dependent on the deviations from the mean depth have a smaller role in the results of salt transport. The computed salt transport per unit width of a section perpendicular to the mean flow is in close agreement to the sum of the advective and dispersive terms (within or very close to 12%). An imbalance of the salt budget across the sections is observed for all the surveys. Considerations are made on how this approach can inform the management of hazardous contamination and how to use these results to best time the release of environmental flows during dry months. PMID:23071793

  8. Salt fluxes in a complex river mouth system of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Nuno; Lencart E Silva, João D; Dias, João Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of velocity and salinity near the mouth and head of the Espinheiro channel (Ria de Aveiro lagoon, Portugal) are used to study the local variation of physical water properties and to assess the balance, under steady conditions, between the seaward salt transport induced by river discharge and the landward dispersion induced by various mixing mechanisms. This assessment is made using data sampled during complete tidal cycles. Under the assumption that the estuarine tidal channel is laterally homogeneous and during moderate tidal periods (except for one survey), currents and salinity data were decomposed into various spatial and temporal means and their deviations. Near the channel's mouth, the main contributions to the salt transport are the terms due to freshwater discharge and the tidal correlation. Near the channel's head, this last term is less important than the density driven circulation, which is enhanced by the increase in freshwater discharge. The remaining terms, which are dependent on the deviations from the mean depth have a smaller role in the results of salt transport. The computed salt transport per unit width of a section perpendicular to the mean flow is in close agreement to the sum of the advective and dispersive terms (within or very close to 12%). An imbalance of the salt budget across the sections is observed for all the surveys. Considerations are made on how this approach can inform the management of hazardous contamination and how to use these results to best time the release of environmental flows during dry months.

  9. Dry Ice Moves on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-11

    Serina Diniega, JPL Systems Engineer, describes the discovery that Martian gullies that end in pits rather than fan deltas are likely caused by block of frozen carbon dioxide (dry ice) sliding down slopes on a cushion of carbon dioxide gas. The pits are formed as the "dry ice" sublimates away.

  10. Dry eye disease after LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Ţuru, L; Alexandrescu, C; Stana, D; Tudosescu, R

    2012-01-01

    LASIK is a surgical tehnique for the correction of refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia, astygmatism). It results in a reshape of the cornea with ocular surface and especially tear film disease. It is a cause for a iatrogenic dry eye syndrome. Neurogenic and inflamatory theory explain this disease. The main therapy of dry eye is the replacement with artificial tears. PMID:22574092

  11. [Accuracy of partial-mouth examination protocols in periodontal epidemiological surveys: a systemic review].

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of partial- mouth periodontal examination (PMPE) protocols frequently used in epidemiological periodontal surveys. Articles in English or Chinese published before Jan 31st 2014 were searched, which compared the results of PMPE protocols with those of gold-standard protocol, i.e.full-mouthmesialbuccal-midbuccal-distobuccal-mesiolingual-midlingual-distolingual (MB-B-DB-ML-L-DL) protocol. Twelve articles were included and nine that frequently used PMPE protocols were evaluated. All these protocols underestimated the prevalence scores. For prevalence of probing depth (PD) ≥ 4 mm, 6 mm and attachment loss (AL) ≥ 4 mm, 6 mm, smaller amount of underestimation was observed in community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) teeth (-12.6%--3.5%), full-mouth MB-B-DB (-16.1%--3.5%), full-mouth MB-B-DL (-10.8%--6.1%) and half-mouth MB-B-DB-ML-L-DL (-23.6%--2.0%) protocols. For severity and extent estimates, half-mouth MB-B-DB-ML- L-DL provided lowest biased results (relative bias: -1.0%- 1.1% for severity and -6.7%-0.1% for extent). Full-and half-mouth MB-B-DB also performed well, with relative bias within ± 5.0% in most cases. CPITN overestimated the severity and extent of periodontal disease, the relative bias of which amounted to 42.3% and 38.1%, respectively. Half-mouth MB-B-DB-ML-L-DL and full-mouth MB-B-DB protocols caused lower biased results in prevalence, severity and extent estimates of PD and AL.

  12. Application of mouth gag and temporomandibular joint pain and trismus in tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Nasir Akram; Mehmood, Talat; Abid, Omair

    2015-04-01

    To determine the effect of duration of application of mouth gag on Temporomandibular (TM) joint pain and trismus after tonsillectomy. Descriptive study. Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Combined Military Hospital, Nowshera, from February to July 2012. A total of 40 patients undergoing tonsillectomy, in mouth opening prior to surgery was measured as inter incisor distance in cms. A stop watch was used to calculate the time of application of mouth gag. Mouth opening was again measured 06 hours after the surgery. Difference between the two readings was considered as trismus score and categorized as mild (1 cm), moderate (2 cm) and severe (3 cm). Patient was asked to score pain on a visual analogue scale (0 - 9). Score 0 was categorized as no pain; 1 - 3 as mild pain; 4 - 6 as moderate pain; 7 - 9 as severe pain. Spearman's rank correlation was used for finding correlation between time of mouth gag application and study outcome (pain and trismus). Trismus as observed by difference in inter incisor distance was mild in 11 patients; moderate in 15 patients and severe in 14 patients 06 hours after the surgery. Eleven (27.5%) had mild pain over temporomandibular joint, 15 (37.5%) had moderate and 14 (35%) had severe pain 06 hours after the surgery. Direct relationship was observed between duration of application of mouth gag with postoperative pain and trismus. Significant strong correlation was observed between length of mouth opening to severity of pain and trismus (rs = 0.738; p < 0.001). Duration of mouth gag application should be reduced to cause less TM joint pain and trismus in early postoperative period in tonsillectomy.

  13. The mouth and dis/ability.

    PubMed

    Liddiard, K; Goodley, D

    2016-06-01

    Our aims in this paper are threefold. First, to understand how the mouth reveals the kinds of human beings that are de/valued in specific national locations and in global discourses with special attention on disability. Second, to subject the mouth to analysis from critical disability studies, specifically, an approach we describe as dis/ability studies. Third, to ask how the mouth might work as a site of resistance for disabled people. The paper begins by providing an introduction to critical disability studies, a perspective that foregrounds disability as the primary focus for thinking through the ways in which the body and society are shaped together. We move in this literature review towards a dis/ability studies approach that recognises the simultaneous processes of disablism (the exclusion of people with impairments) and ableism (the system by which standards of human autonomy and capability are made as key indicators of human worth). We then analyse the mouth in relation to pathologisation, human enhancement and resistance. We conclude with some final thoughts on the offerings of a dis/ability studies approach to those of interested with the intersections of the mouth and society.

  14. Mouth sticks: their past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Toor nee Bachoo, I K; Tabiat-Pour, S; Critchlow, S B

    2015-09-11

    Patients with physical disabilities precluding functional use of their limbs can benefit enormously from the expertise of the dental profession. The dental clinician is able to not only meet the routine oral health needs of these patients, but possesses the unique skills and knowledge to provide specialised oral prosthetic appliances which can facilitate a range of independent activities. Mouth sticks, as they are commonly known, are dental prostheses that are held intra-orally by the patient and manipulated to perform numerous actions such as drawing, writing and painting. They have been well documented within dental and occupational therapy literature and reports of their fabrication date back over 150 years, albeit in a very rudimentary form. The enduring value of mouth sticks to the physically disabled population is that they can provide a degree of self-reliance which would otherwise not be afforded to them. This article discusses the evolution of mouth sticks, principles of mouth stick design, patient selection criteria and treatment planning considerations. We present two recent clinical cases where mouth sticks have been indicated and have been indispensable to the user, detailing the clinical and laboratory stages involved.

  15. Statement on mouth cancer diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Kirby, J

    2014-01-01

    The number of people being diagnosed with mouth cancer (oral cancer) is increasing, with notable rises in incidence in younger people and in females. There are certain lifestyle habits that can increase the risk of mouth cancer, such as smoking or chewing tobacco, drinking alcohol above recommended levels (especially in those who also smoke), and chewing betel nut (areca nut). Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of some types of mouth cancer, and too much sun exposure may also raise the risk of lip cancers. The signs and symptoms of mouth cancer can often be seen or felt, and any red or white patch, ulcer or lump can be an early sign if it lasts for three or more weeks. If people notice any of these changes, they should seek help from their dentist, doctor, or another healthcare professional without delay, because if mouth cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, when the lesions are small, treatment is generally less complicated and more effective.

  16. The origin of mouth-exhaled ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Metsälä, M; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L

    2014-09-01

    It is known that the oral cavity is a production site for mouth-exhaled NH3. However, the mechanism of NH3 production in the oral cavity has been unclear. Since bacterial urease in the oral cavity has been found to produce ammonia from oral fluid urea, we hypothesize that oral fluid urea is the origin of mouth-exhaled NH3. Our results show that under certain conditions a strong correlation exists between oral fluid urea and oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) (rs = 0.77, p < 0.001). We also observe a strong correlation between oral fluid NH3 and mouth-exhaled NH3 (rs = 0.81, p < 0.001). We conclude that three main factors affect the mouth-exhaled NH3 concentration: urea concentration, urease activity and oral fluid pH. Bacterial urease catalyses the hydrolysis of oral fluid urea to ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3). Oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) and pH determine the concentration of oral fluid NH3, which evaporates from oral fluid into gas phase and turns to mouth-exhaled NH3.

  17. Aging and dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Sullivan, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Dry eye disease is a prevalent eye disorder that in particular affects the elderly population. One of the major causes of dry eye, meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), shows increased prevalence with aging. MGD is caused by hyperkeratinization of the ductal epithelium of meibomian gland and reduced quantity and/or quality of meibum, the holocrine product that stabilizes and prevents the evaporation of the tear film. Of note, retinoids which are used in current anti-aging cosmetics may promote the development of MGD and dry eye disease. In this review, we will discuss the possible mechanisms of age-related MGD. PMID:22569356

  18. Effect of acyclovir on radiation- and chemotherapy-induced mouth lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Bubley, G.J.; Chapman, B.; Chapman, S.K.; Crumpacker, C.S.; Schnipper, L.E. )

    1989-06-01

    Several chemotherapeutic regimens and radiation therapy, if delivered to the oral mucosa, are associated with a high frequency of mouth lesions. The cause of this side effect is not known for certain, but in past studies it has sometimes been associated with the ability to culture herpes simplex virus type 1 from the mouth. In a double-blind prospective trial, patients with head and neck tumors treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were treated with either acyclovir or placebo. Although the frequency of culture-positive herpes simplex virus was low in the untreated group, it was significantly lower, zero, in the acyclovir-treated group. However, there were no differences in the frequency or type of mouth lesions experienced by patients receiving either radiation or chemotherapy who were taking acyclovir or placebo. These results suggest that herpes simplex virus is not a frequent cause or complication of oral lesions afflicting this patient population.

  19. Burning mouth syndrome: an enigmatic disorder.

    PubMed

    Javali, M A

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa, often unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and may be accompanied by xerostomia and altered taste. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of mouth. This disorder is one of the most common, encountered in the clinical practice. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin; however the exact underlying etiology remains uncertain. This article discusses several aspects of BMS, updates current knowledge about the etiopathogenesis and describes the clinical features as well as the diagnosis and management of BMS patients.

  20. Drying Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  1. Cryotherapy for Treatment of Mouth Mucocele

    PubMed Central

    Aulakh, Kamaldeep K; Brar, Ramandeep S; Azad, Anurag; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Jyoti, Bhuvan

    2016-01-01

    A mucocele is a common salivary gland disorder that most commonly affects young adults. A 35-year-old female patient reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, with the chief complaint of swelling on the left side of floor of mouth. The aim of this case report is to present the management of mucocele present in floor of the mouth in a young female patient using liquid nitrogen cryosurgery. The present case report has also discussed mechanism of action, current protocol of cryosurgery with emphasis on clinical pros and cons along with the clinical outcomes. PMID:27843280

  2. Cryotherapy for Treatment of Mouth Mucocele.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Kamaldeep K; Brar, Ramandeep S; Azad, Anurag; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Jyoti, Bhuvan

    2016-01-01

    A mucocele is a common salivary gland disorder that most commonly affects young adults. A 35-year-old female patient reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, with the chief complaint of swelling on the left side of floor of mouth. The aim of this case report is to present the management of mucocele present in floor of the mouth in a young female patient using liquid nitrogen cryosurgery. The present case report has also discussed mechanism of action, current protocol of cryosurgery with emphasis on clinical pros and cons along with the clinical outcomes.

  3. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide

  4. The benefits of planar circular mouths on suction feeding performance.

    PubMed

    Skorczewski, Tyler; Cheer, Angela; Wainwright, Peter C

    2012-08-07

    Suction feeding is the most common form of prey capture across aquatic feeding vertebrates and many adaptations that enhance efficiency and performance are expected. Many suction feeders have mechanisms that allow the mouth to form a planar and near-circular opening that is believed to have beneficial hydrodynamic effects. We explore the effects of the flattened and circular mouth opening through computational fluid dynamics simulations that allow comparisons with other mouth profiles. Compared to mouths with lateral notches, we find that the planar mouth opening results in higher flow rates into the mouth and a region of highest flow that is positioned at the centre of the mouth aperture. Planar mouths provide not only for better total fluid flow rates through the mouth but also through the centre of the mouth near where suction feeders position their prey. Circular mouths are shown to provide the quickest capture times for spherical and elliptical prey because they expose the prey item to a large region of high flow. Planar and circular mouths result in higher flow velocities with peak flow located at the centre of the mouth opening and they maximize the capacity of the suction feeders to exert hydrodynamic forces on the prey.

  5. The benefits of planar circular mouths on suction feeding performance

    PubMed Central

    Skorczewski, Tyler; Cheer, Angela; Wainwright, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Suction feeding is the most common form of prey capture across aquatic feeding vertebrates and many adaptations that enhance efficiency and performance are expected. Many suction feeders have mechanisms that allow the mouth to form a planar and near-circular opening that is believed to have beneficial hydrodynamic effects. We explore the effects of the flattened and circular mouth opening through computational fluid dynamics simulations that allow comparisons with other mouth profiles. Compared to mouths with lateral notches, we find that the planar mouth opening results in higher flow rates into the mouth and a region of highest flow that is positioned at the centre of the mouth aperture. Planar mouths provide not only for better total fluid flow rates through the mouth but also through the centre of the mouth near where suction feeders position their prey. Circular mouths are shown to provide the quickest capture times for spherical and elliptical prey because they expose the prey item to a large region of high flow. Planar and circular mouths result in higher flow velocities with peak flow located at the centre of the mouth opening and they maximize the capacity of the suction feeders to exert hydrodynamic forces on the prey. PMID:22319101

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals including cattle, pigs, sheep and many wildlife species. It can cause enormous economic losses when incursions occur into countries which are normally disease free. In addition, it has long-term effects within countries where the disease is endemic due to reduced animal productivity and the restrictions on international trade in animal products. The disease is caused by infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), a picornavirus. Seven different serotypes (and numerous variants) of FMDV have been identified. Some serotypes have a restricted geographical distribution, e.g. Asia-1, whereas others, notably serotype O, occur in many different regions. There is no cross-protection between serotypes and sometimes protection conferred by vaccines even of the same serotype can be limited. Thus it is important to characterize the viruses that are circulating if vaccination is being used for disease control. This review describes current methods for the detection and characterization of FMDVs. Sequence information is increasingly being used for identifying the source of outbreaks. In addition such information can be used to understand antigenic change within virus strains. The challenges and opportunities for improving the control of the disease within endemic settings, with a focus on Eurasia, are discussed, including the role of the FAO/EuFMD/OIE Progressive Control Pathway. Better control of the disease in endemic areas reduces the risk of incursions into disease-free regions. PMID:24308718

  7. Four cases of atopic dermatitis complicated by Sjögren's syndrome: link between dry skin and autoimmune anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kitaba, Shun; Matsui, Saki; Iimuro, Eriko; Nishioka, Megumi; Kijima, Akiko; Umegaki, Noriko; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2011-09-01

    We report four adult cases of atopic dermatitis (AD) complicated by Sjögren's syndrome (SS). The patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for AD and SS. All cases showed persistent itchy dry skin and eczematous lesions complicated by sicca symptoms including dry eyes and dry mouth with moderate joint pain. One case manifested annular erythema and another manifested widespread discoid erythema. To investigate the underlying cause of dry skin in these cases, sweating function was evaluated using a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) in which the axon reflex is stimulated by acetylcholine iontophoresis. The sweating latency time was significantly prolonged in eczematous skin of AD and AD/SS compared to normal controls. Axon reflex (AXR) sweat volume was also significantly reduced in AD (normal and eczematous skin) and AD/SS (normal and eczema) compared to normal control. In contrast, the direct sweat volume of lesional or non-lesional AD skin induced by direct stimulation with acetylcholine was only slightly reduced compared to that in normal controls, but not in SS and lesional skin of AD/SS patients. These results suggest that the impaired sweat response in AD is attributable to an abnormal sudomotor axon reflex, which is accelerated and modulated when complicated by SS resulting in dry skin in the present cases.

  8. Zoology: A New Mouth for Amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Vladimir; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-05-09

    Deuterostomes - a key subdivision of animals - are characterized by the mouth developing anteriorly as a rupture between the outer epithelium and the foregut wall. A new study of amphioxus challenges this view and proposes separate evolutionary origins of deuterostome oral openings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mouth Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Mouth Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hmong (Hmoob) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Hmong (Hmoob) ...

  10. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Induction of foot-and-mouth disease virus specific cytotoxic T cell killing by vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) continues to be a significant threat to the health and economic value of livestock species. This acute infection is caused by the highly contagious FMD virus which infects cloven-hoofed animals including large and small ruminants and swine. Current vaccine strategies are...

  12. Differential replication of foot-and-mouth disease viruses in mice determine lethality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult C57BL/6J mice have been used to study foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) biology. In this work, two variants of an FMDV A/Arg/01 strain exhibiting differential pathogenicity in adult mice were identified and characterized: a non-lethal virus (A01NL) caused mild signs of disease, whereas a let...

  13. Development of vaccines toward the global control and eradication of foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most economically and socially devastating diseases affecting animal agriculture throughout the world. Although mortality is low, millions of animals have been killed in efforts to rapidly control and eradicate FMD. The causing virus (FMDV) is a highly vari...

  14. Understanding the mechanism of interferon-induced protection against foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes a highly contagious disease that rapidly spreads among many susceptible species. Vaccination with an inactivated whole virus antigen in formulation with adjuvant, or with a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) ab...

  15. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  16. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are You ... Problems Too? Remember Are You Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If ...

  17. CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTHLINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTH-LINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH OF PLATTE RIVER CANYON. VIEW TO WEST - High Line Canal, Mouth of South Platte River to confluence with Second Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  18. Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162649.html Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study Listerine's maker has ... A commercial brand of mouthwash can help control gonorrhea bacteria in the mouth, and daily use may ...

  19. River flow control on intertidal mudflat sedimentation in the mouth of a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvilliez, Antoine; Lafite, Robert; Deloffre, Julien; Lemoine, Maxence; Langlois, Estelle; Sakho, Issa

    2015-06-01

    during dry periods, and they deposit a smaller quantity of sediment (- 23% of total deposition mass per event). Because of the lower flow rates coupled with the impacts of local development, the flood tides have become dominant. This contributes to the addition of sandy or silty sediments on the mudflat, of which the slope has increased 450% over 8 years caused by erosion.

  20. A hemangioma on the floor of the mouth presenting as a ranula.

    PubMed

    Skoulakis, Charalampos E; Khaldi, Lubna; Serletis, Demetre; Semertzidis, Themistoklis

    2008-11-01

    A painless, bluish, submucosal swelling on one side of the floor of the mouth usually indicates the presence of a ranula. Rarely, such a swelling may be caused by an inflammatory disease process in a salivary gland, a neoplasm in the sublingual salivary gland, a lymphatic nodular swelling, or embryologic cysts. We report a patient with swelling in the floor of her mouth that was clinically diagnosed as a ranula. Suspicion arose during surgery that it was a vascular tumor and, on histologic testing, the swelling was confirmed to be a hemangioma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of a hemangioma presenting as a ranula.

  1. Nanoceria: a Potential Therapeutic for Dry AMD.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; McGinnis, James F

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blinding diseases. The "dry" form of AMD is the most common form of AMD. In contrast to the treatable neovascular (wet) AMD, no effective treatment is available for dry AMD. In this review, we summarize the animal models and therapeutic strategies for dry AMD. The novel candidates as potential treatment targets and the potential effectiveness of nanoceria as a treatment of dry AMD are also discussed.

  2. Drying hardwood lumber

    Treesearch

    Joseph. Denig; Eugene M. Wengert; William T. Simpson

    2000-01-01

    Drying Hardwood Lumber focuses on common methods for drying lumber of different thickness, with minimal drying defects, for high quality applications. This manual also includes predrying treatments that, when part of an overall quality-oriented drying system, reduce defects and improve drying quality, especially of oak lumber. Special attention is given to drying white...

  3. Maximal and submaximal mouth opening with mouth gags in cats: implications for maxillary artery blood flow.

    PubMed

    Martin-Flores, M; Scrivani, P V; Loew, E; Gleed, C A; Ludders, J W

    2014-04-01

    The use of spring-loaded mouth gags in cats can be associated with the development of central neurological deficits, including blindness. In this species, the maxillary arteries are the main source of blood supply to the retinae and brain. Spring-loaded gags generate constant force after placement that could contribute to bulging of the soft tissues between the mandible and the tympanic bulla. Under these circumstances, the maxillary arteries can become compressed as they course between these osseous structures. Smaller gags that might apply less force to the mouth were investigated to determine if they preserved maxillary artery blood flow. Six healthy adult cats were anesthetized. Electroretinography (ERG) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were performed without the use of a mouth gag and during submaximal (plastic mouth gags of 20, 30 and 42 mm in length between canine teeth) and maximal mouth opening. Maximal mouth opening produced alterations in ERG waveforms consistent with circulatory compromise in 1/6 cats and reductions in signal intensity during MRA in 4/6 cats. Placement of a 42 mm plastic gag produced a reduction in MRA signal in 1/6 cats. No changes were observed with smaller gags. The force applied against the mouth was significantly higher with the spring-loaded gag than with any other gags. The use of a smaller mouth gags was associated with fewer alterations of indicators of maxillary artery blood flow. Nevertheless, a 42 mm plastic gag, equivalent to the size of a needle cap, resulted in an abnormal MRA in one cat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Observations of Intense Internal Mixing at the Mouth of the Laurentian Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, C. I.; Yankovsky, A. E.; Yashayaev, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Laurentian Channel (LC) acts as a pathway for the Atlantic Slope Water propagating inland into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and playing important role in ventilation of the Gulf. The volumetric transport of this inland flow is in part controlled by mixing processes and the entrainment of Cold Intermediate Water. The present study assesses the conditions for the LC internal mixing in the upper 200 m. Two high resolution transects were conducted across the channel, one near the LC mouth (at the shelfbreak), and another further inshore at the Cabot Strait. These transects comprised two data types, CTD measurements from a Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) that yielded a high resolution density sampling, and velocity profiles from a 75 kHz shipboard ADCP. The energetic internal mixing at the mouth was evident in frequent areas of inverse stratification. These inverses were much less numerous in the Cabot St. The gradient Richardson number (Ri) was estimated on the transects and it was found that at the mouth more than 50% of the sampled area was characterized by Ri < 0.25. Energetic interior overturnings at the mouth could be caused by the internal wave energy convergence into the channel. The ADCP measurements and the geostrophic velocity estimate revealed a rich submesoscale eddy field at the mouth in the upper layer of the water column with a vorticity shear at ~80 m depth. The observed vortical features could further enhance the internal wave breaking.

  5. Bulbar muscle MRI changes in patients with SMA with reduced mouth opening and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Wadman, Renske I; van Bruggen, H Willemijn; Witkamp, Theo D; Sparreboom-Kalaykova, Stanimira I; Stam, Marloes; van den Berg, Leonard H; Steenks, Michel H; van der Pol, W Ludo

    2014-09-16

    We performed a study in patients with proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to determine the prevalence of reduced maximal mouth opening (MMO) and its association with dysphagia as a reflection of bulbar dysfunction and visualized the underlying mechanisms using MRI. We performed a cross-sectional study of MMO in 145 patients with SMA types 1-4 and 119 healthy controls and used MRI in 12 patients to visualize mandibular condylar shape and sliding and the anatomy of muscle groups relevant for mouth opening and closing. We analyzed associations of reduced MMO with SMA severity and complaints of dysphagia. Reduced MMO was defined as an interincisal distance ≤ 35 mm and was found in none of the healthy controls and in 100%, 79%, 50%, and 7% of patients with SMA types 1, 2, 3a, and 3b/4, respectively. MRI showed severe fatty degeneration of the lateral pterygoid muscles that mediate mouth opening by allowing mandibular condylar sliding but relatively mild involvement of the mouth closing muscles in patients with reduced MMO. Reduced MMO was associated with SMA type, age, muscle weakness, and dysphagia (p < 0.05). Reduced MMO is common in SMA types 1-3a and is mainly caused by fatty degeneration of specific mouth opening muscles. Reduced MMO is a sign of bulbar dysfunction in SMA. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Alongshore sediment bypassing as a control on river mouth morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Nardin, William; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    River mouths, shoreline locations where fluvial and coastal sediments are partitioned via erosion, trapping, and redistribution, are responsible for the ultimate sedimentary architecture of deltas and, because of their dynamic nature, also pose great management and engineering challenges. To investigate the interaction between fluvial and littoral processes at wave-dominated river mouths, we modeled their morphologic evolution using the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Model experiments replicate alongshore migration of river mouths, river mouth spit development, and eventual spit breaching, suggesting that these are emergent phenomena that can develop even under constant fluvial and wave conditions. Furthermore, we find that sediment bypassing of a river mouth develops though feedbacks between waves and river mouth morphology, resulting in either continuous bypassing pathways or episodic bar bypassing pathways. Model results demonstrate that waves refracting into the river mouth bar create a zone of low alongshore sediment transport updrift of the river mouth, which reduces sediment bypassing. Sediment bypassing, in turn, controls the river mouth migration rate and the size of the river mouth spit. As a result, an intermediate amount of river discharge maximizes river mouth migration. The fraction of alongshore sediment bypassing can be predicted from the balance between the jet and the wave momentum flux. Quantitative comparisons show a match between our modeled predictions of river mouth bypassing and migration rates observed in natural settings.

  7. Changing the culture of mouth care: mouth care without a battle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Barrick, Ann Louise

    2014-02-01

    Culture change aims to fundamentally improve care provision in a manner consistent with individual preferences. However, few studies of culture change have focused on the quality of daily care, despite the fact that system-wide efforts are important to assure the effectiveness, adoption, and sustainability of person-centered care to meet daily needs. This paper describes a new culture change practice, Mouth Care Without a Battle. The focus on mouth care is predicated on the important association between person-centered support for oral hygiene and quality of life. Mouth Care Without a Battle is a person-centered approach to quality mouth care for persons with cognitive and physical impairment. It was developed by an interdisciplinary team of clinician researchers based on literature review, consultation with experts, environmental scan of existing programs, and testing in nursing homes. Building from the success of Bathing Without a Battle, Mouth Care Without a Battle was evaluated in terms of changed care practices and outcomes, developed into a training program, and packaged for dissemination as a digital video disk (DVD) and website. The development and evaluation of Mouth Care Without a Battle demonstrate attention to the areas necessary to establish the evidence-base for culture change, to ultimately empower and support staff to provide care to achieve quality outcomes. As illustrated in this paper, it is beneficial to build the evidence base for culture change by attending to care processes and outcomes benefiting all residents, ability to implement culture change, and costs of implementation.

  8. Mouth Care in Nursing Homes: Knowledge, Beliefs, and Practices of Nursing Assistants

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Rita A.; Munro, Cindy L.; Grap, Mary Jo; Schubert, Christine M.; Ligon, Mary; Spigelmyer, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of nursing assistants (NAs) providing oral hygiene care to frail elders in nursing homes, with the intent of developing an educational program for NAs. Methods The study occurred in two economically and geographically diverse nursing homes. From a sample size of 202 NAs, 106 returned the 19-item Oral Care Survey. Results The NAs reported satisfactory knowledge regarding the tasks associated with providing mouth care. The NAs believed that tooth loss was a natural consequence of aging. They reported that they provided mouth care less frequently than is optimal but cited challenges such as caring for persons exhibiting care-resistive behaviors, fear of causing pain, and lack of supplies. Conclusion Nurses are in a powerful position to support NAs in providing mouth care by ensuring that they have adequate supplies and knowledge to respond to resistive behaviors. PMID:19345849

  9. Mouth care in nursing homes: knowledge, beliefs, and practices of nursing assistants.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Rita A; Munro, Cindy L; Grap, Mary Jo; Schubert, Christine M; Ligon, Mary; Spigelmyer, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of nursing assistants (NAs) providing oral hygiene care to frail elders in nursing homes, with the intent of developing an educational program for NAs. The study occurred in two economically and geographically diverse nursing homes. From a sample size of 202 NAs, 106 returned the 19-item Oral Care Survey. The NAs reported satisfactory knowledge regarding the tasks associated with providing mouth care. The NAs believed that tooth loss was a natural consequence of aging. They reported that they provided mouth care less frequently than is optimal but cited challenges such as caring for persons exhibiting care-resistive behaviors, fear of causing pain, and lack of supplies. Nurses are in a powerful position to support NAs in providing mouth care by ensuring that they have adequate supplies and knowledge to respond to resistive behaviors.

  10. EV71 vaccines: a first step towards multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel H

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 have emerged as neurotropic viruses responsible for severe neurological complications and a serious public health threat across the Asia-Pacific region. Formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV71 but not against coxsackievirus A16 infections. The development of a bivalent formalin-inactivated EV71/FI coxsackievirus A16 vaccine should be the next step towards that of multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines which should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses and echovirus 30. This editorial summarizes the major challenges faced by the development of hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

  11. [Onychomadesis associated with mouth, hand and foot disease].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Bruno; Taliercio, Vanina; Hornos, Lorena; Luna, Paula; Abad, María Eugenia; Larralde, Margarita

    2013-12-01

    Onychomadesis is the spontaneous, complete shedding of the nail from its proximal side, without pain or inflammation, following nail matrix arrest. This disorder is uncommon in children and it can occur in fingernails, toenails or both. It may be secondary to systemic disorders, Kawasaki disease, bullous dermatoses, drugs, paronychia, stress and radiotherapy. Since 2000, Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) has been described as a cause of onychomadesis, and has been associated with outbreaks of this condition in different regions of the world. HFMD is an infection characterized by vesicular and erosive stomatitis in combination with a vesicular eruption in palms and soles. It occurs in small children during summer and autumn months, and it is caused by coxsackie virus. We present a study that reflects the current situation of onychomadesis in Argentinian children and shows a strong association between this disorder and HFMD, suggesting that onychomadesis is a new manifestation of a previously known disease.

  12. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, Charles

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  13. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Aravindhan, R; Vidyalakshmi, Santhanam; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Satheesh, C; Balasubramanium, A Murali; Prasad, V Srinivas

    2014-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS.

  14. [Burning sensation in oral cavity--burning mouth syndrome in everyday medical practice].

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Imre

    2012-09-30

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) refers to chronic orofacial pain, unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women. BMS is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, typically on the tongue or in other areas of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by other sensory disorders such as dry mouth or taste alterations. Probably of multifactorial origin, and often idiopathic, with a still unknown etiopathogenesis in which local, systemic and psychological factors are implicated. Currently there is no consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. This study reviews the literature on this syndrome, with special reference to the etiological factors that may be involved and the clinical aspects they present. The diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management are discussed with reference to the most recent studies.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Aravindhan, R.; Vidyalakshmi, Santhanam; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Satheesh, C.; Balasubramanium, A. Murali; Prasad, V. Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS. PMID:25210377

  16. The structure of vocal sounds produced with the mouth closed or with the mouth open in treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Gridi-Papp, Marcos

    2008-05-01

    Frogs and toads mostly call with their mouths shut, unlike many other vertebrates. Sound is generated when air crosses the larynx, but there is no direct airflow to the external environment and radiation occurs at the skin. This study directly compares the acoustic output obtained from euthanized frogs with the mouth open against the output obtained with the mouth closed during activation of the larynx by airflow. With the mouth closed, the vocal sac was inflated and the acoustic energy was concentrated in the same harmonics as in the advertisement call, whereas with the mouth open, energy was spread in a wide range of harmonics. The acoustic output at the dominant frequency was more intense with the mouth closed than with the mouth open. More sound was radiated through the vocal sac and head than through the rest of the body. The spectral differences between open and closed mouth treatments matched the differences observed between natural advertisement calls, produced with the mouth closed, and distress calls, produced with the mouth open. By calling with the mouth closed, treefrogs can potentially produce advertisement calls with the energy concentrated in a narrower frequency range than with the mouth open.

  17. Rapid Induction of Therapeutic Hypothermia Using Transnasal High Flow Dry Air.

    PubMed

    Chava, Raghuram; Zviman, Menekhem; Raghavan, Madhavan Srinivas; Halperin, Henry; Maqbool, Farhan; Geocadin, Romergryko; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Rosen, Benjamin A; Tandri, Harikrishna

    2017-03-01

    Early induction of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is recommended in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA); however, currently no reliable methods exist to initiate cooling. We investigated the effect of high flow transnasal dry air on brain and body temperatures in adult porcine animals. Adult porcine animals (n = 23) under general anesthesia were subject to high flow of transnasal dry air. Mouth was kept open to create a unidirectional airflow, in through the nostrils and out through the mouth. Brain, internal jugular, and aortic temperatures were recorded. The effect of varying airflow rate and the air humidity (0% or 100%) on the temperature profiles were recorded. The degree of brain cooling was measured as the differential temperature from baseline. A 10-minute exposure of high flow dry air caused rapid cooling of brain and gradual cooling of the jugular and the aortic temperatures in all animals. The degree of brain cooling was flow dependent and significantly higher at higher airflow rates (0.8°C ± 0.3°C, 1.03°C ± 0.6°C, and 1.3°C ± 0.7°C for 20, 40, and 80 L, respectively, p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Air temperature had minimal effect on the brain cooling over 10 minutes with similar decrease in temperature at 4°C and 30°C. At a constant flow rate (40 LPM) and temperature, the degree of cooling over 10 minutes during dry air exposure was significantly higher compared to humid air (100% saturation) (1.22°C ± 0.35°C vs. 0.21°C ± 0.12°C, p < 0.001). High flow transnasal dry air causes flow dependent cooling of the brain and the core temperatures in intubated porcine animals. The mechanism of cooling appears to be evaporation of nasal mucus as cooling is mitigated by humidifying the air. This mechanism may be exploited to initiate TH in CA.

  18. Burning mouth syndrome - a common dental problem in perimenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ślebioda, Zuzanna; Szponar, Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by the presence of burning, paresthesia or pain of the oral mucosa in the absence of pathologic lesions revealed during the clinical examination. Moreover, the pain may be accompanied by oral dryness, hypersensitivity to some food compounds and taste disorders. Etiopathogenesis of this condition remains unclear. Potential local causative factors include among the others mechanical irritation, parafunctions and dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system, contact allergy to dental materials and electro-galvanic phenomena. Potential systemic causes include diabetes mellitus, B group vitamin deficiency (vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12), folic acid and iron deficiency, hormonal imbalance, gastrointestinal diseases, psychiatric and neurological disorders and drug-induced side effects. The hypothesis concerning the role of hormonal changes in the development of BMS seems to be confirmed by a high incidence of this condition in perimenopausal women. Up to now, due to an unclear etiology of the disease, the treatment is very often ineffective and mainly symptomatic, which may exacerbate patient's anxiety and discomfort. In this paper we present the main etiologic factors of the burning mouth syndrome. We discuss the basic diagnostic and therapeutic methods and the influence of hormonal replacement therapy on the course of BMS based on the current medical reports.

  19. Effect of fluoride mouth rinses on various orthodontic archwire alloys tested by modified bending test: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kamna; Chandra, Pavan Kumar; Kamat, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    Fluorides can cause corrosion and degradation in mechanical properties of commonly used archwires by forming hydrofluoric acid HF and causing disruption of protective titanium oxide layer. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the change in load deflection characteristics of Ni-Ti, Cu Ni-Ti, S.S, and β-Ti wires on immersing in fluoride mouth rinses of two types- Phosflur and neutral NaF mouth rinse utilizing a modified bending test and comparing it to control. Round preformed wires were immersed in 10 ml of control and test solution (Phosflur and S-Flo mouth rinse) for 1.5 hours and incubated at 37°C. Modified bending test was carried out to evaluate load-deflection characteristics of different wires using Instron. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine if statistically significant difference exist among the mean load values obtained at various deflections in control and test solutions. There was no statistically significant reduction in load deflection characteristics of Ni-Ti, copper Ni-Ti, β-Ti, and S.S wires on immersing in Phosflur mouth rinse and neutral sodium fluoride mouth rinses as compared to control at 2.5 and 1 mm of deflection in unloading phase. Phosflur and a neutral sodium fluoride mouth rinse did not affect the mechanical bending properties of Ni-Ti, copper Ni-Ti, B-Ti, and SS wires in in vitro conditions.

  20. Mouth Cancer for Clinicians. Part 8: Referral.

    PubMed

    Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Scully, Crispian

    2016-03-01

    A MEDLINE search early in 2015 revealed more than 250,000 papers on head and neck cancer; over 100,000 on oral cancer; and over 60,000 on mouth cancer. Not all publications contain robust evidence. We endeavour to encapsulate the most important of the latest information and advances now employed in practice, in a form comprehensible to healthcare workers, patients and their carers. This series offers the primary care dental team in particular, an overview of the aetiopathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and multidisciplinary care of mouth cancer, the functional and psychosocial implications, and minimization of the impact on the quality of life of patient and family. Clinical Relevance: This article offers the dental team an overview of referral procedures; oral diagnosis is not always simple and a second opinion can be valuable to all concerned in cases of doubt.

  1. Mouth Cancer for Clinicians. Part 1: Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Scully, Crispian

    2015-04-01

    A MEDLINE search early in 2015 revealed more than 250,000 papers on head and neck cancer; over 100,000 on oral cancer; and over 60,000 on mouth cancer. Not all publications contain robust evidence. We endeavour to encapsulate the most important of the latest information and advances now employed in practice, in a form comprehensible to healthcare workers, patients and their carers. This series offers the primary care dental team, in particular, an overview of the aetiopathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and multidisciplinary care of mouth cancer, the functional and psychosocial implications, and minimization of the impact on the quality of life of patient and family. Clinical Relevance: This article offers the dental team a simplified overview of carcinogenesis, and a review of cancers that affect the oral region.

  2. Imaging of pediatric floor of mouth lesions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachael M; Chapman, Teresa; Horn, David L; Paladin, Angelisa M; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2013-03-01

    There is a vast spectrum of pathology that afflicts the floor of mouth in children. These span inflammatory conditions, vascular malformations, developmental anomalies, benign tumors and malignancies. While this area is readily evaluated on clinical exam, imaging is often performed to better characterize the disorder prior to management. The imaging modalities most frequently utilized are US, CT and MR. The purpose of this article is to describe the primary conditions that occur in this location in children so that radiologists may provide an appropriate differential diagnosis. These include ranula, venolymphatic malformation, dermoid, teratoma, foregut duplication cyst, hairy polyp, thyroglossal duct cyst and rhabdomyosarcoma. For each pathological condition, there will be a focus on describing its imaging manifestation. Floor of mouth anatomy, imaging approach during both prenatal and postnatal life and etiologies will be discussed. Surgical considerations and operative photographs will also be presented.

  3. Social media: the word of mouth revolution.

    PubMed

    Garven, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Many dental practices today find themselves uncertain about the new social media universe, and in particular with how to relate to younger patients. The power of social networking is its immediate access to the word of mouth exchange of information, and the word of mouth avenue itself is recognized as the single most effective form of advertising. To tap into that phenomenon, begin by investing a small amount of time and effort to understand the basics of social networking. Sign up for Facebook and Twitter. First-hand experience interacting in a social network is the vital first step. The bottom line is simply this: To begin to understand this new arena of communication, you first have to join the conversation.

  4. Methamphetamine abuse and "meth mouth" in Europe.

    PubMed

    De-Carolis, Carlo; Boyd, Geraldine-A; Mancinelli, Luca; Pagano, Stefano; Eramo, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    With easy chemical synthesis from its precursor, methamphetamine (MA) is now widespread in many countries. The abuse of methamphetamine is associated with several negative effects on health, because MA is a neurotoxin and a dangerous central nervous system stimulant. It changes levels of neurotransmitters in the brain, releasing dopamine and inhibiting nor epinephrine uptake which increases sympathetic nervous system activity and can lead to cardiac arrhythmia, hypertension and tachypnea. The consequences of MA abuse are clearly manifested in oral diseases (like "meth mouth") which is characterised by extensive caries, teeth grinding with ensuing dental wear and trismus. The present review was designed to fill the gap in knowledge about methamphetamine abuse in the European Union (EU) and to illustrate the main clinical effects of prolonged use. After describing the pharmacology and systemic effects of methamphetamine and concentrating on its effects on the mouth, the present review compares the epidemiology and incidence of abuse in the world, particularly the USA and the EU.

  5. Psychological profile in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al Quran, Firas A M

    2004-03-01

    Thirty-two patients with burning mouth syndrome and 32 matched control subjects were evaluated for their personality profile using a comprehensive, reliable, and validated inventory. All subjects were requested to complete the Neo PI-R questionnaire that measures the 5 dimensions of personality and their facets. A t-test and univariate correlations (Pearson's correlation coefficient) were used to compare the 2 groups. Results show high significant differences in some personality factors. Neuroticism and all its facets, which include anxiety, angry hostility, depression, self-consciousness, impulsiveness and vulnerability, were significant at P<.001. Other domains like extraversion, openness, and conscientiousness showed significant differences also (P<.05). Many personality characteristics differentiate burning mouth syndrome patients from controllers according to the Neo PI-R and this should affect the treatment plan according to the identified characteristics.

  6. Burning mouth syndrome and secondary oral burning.

    PubMed

    Minor, Jacob S; Epstein, Joel B

    2011-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex disorder of unclear etiology that is most prevalent in perimenopausal women. It is often accompanied by dysguesia and subjective xerostomia. Recent evidence implicates both central and peripheral neuropathies, possibly representing a phantom pain syndrome in some patients. Ensuring that the patient's oral burning is not secondary to some other local or systemic factor is central to appropriate management. Current standard therapies include clonazepam, paroxetine, and cognitive behavioral therapy, and several promising new alternatives are described.

  7. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  8. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  9. Pristionchus pacificus daf-16 is essential for dauer formation but dispensable for mouth form dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akira; Bento, Gilberto; Bartelmes, Gabi; Dieterich, Christoph; Sommer, Ralf J

    2011-04-01

    The nematode Pristionchus pacificus shows two forms of phenotypic plasticity: dauer formation and dimorphism of mouth form morphologies. It can therefore serve as a model for studying the evolutionary mechanisms that underlie phenotypic plasticity. Formation of dauer larvae is observed in many other species and constitutes one of the most crucial survival strategies in nematodes, whereas the mouth form dimorphism is an evolutionary novelty observed only in P. pacificus and related nematodes. We have previously shown that the same environmental cues and steroid signaling control both dauer formation and mouth form dimorphism. Here, we examine by mutational analysis and whole-genome sequencing the function of P. pacificus (Ppa) daf-16, which encodes a forkhead transcription factor; in C. elegans, daf-16 is the target of insulin signaling and plays important roles in dauer formation. We found that mutations in Ppa-daf-16 cause strong dauer formation-defective phenotypes, suggesting that Ppa-daf-16 represents one of the evolutionarily conserved regulators of dauer formation. Upon strong dauer induction with lophenol, Ppa-daf-16 individuals formed arrested larvae that partially resemble wild-type dauer larvae, indicating that Ppa-daf-16 is also required for dauer morphogenesis. By contrast, regulation of mouth form dimorphism was unaffected by Ppa-daf-16 mutations and mutant animals responded normally to environmental cues. Our results suggest that mechanisms for dauer formation and mouth form regulation overlap partially, but not completely, and one of two key transcriptional regulators of the dauer regulatory network was either independently co-opted for, or subsequently lost by, the mouth form regulatory network.

  10. Pilocarpine

    MedlinePlus

    ... dry mouth caused by radiotherapy in people with head and neck cancer and to treat dry mouth in people ... mouth caused by radiotherapy in people who have head and neck cancer, it is usually taken three times a ...

  11. Patterns, risk factors and characteristics of reported and perceived foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Mwiine, Frank N; Muwanika, Vincent B; Okurut, Anna Rose Ademun; Siegismund, Hans R; Alexandersen, Soren

    2010-10-01

    Patterns of outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Uganda were elucidated from spatial and temporal retrospective data retrieved from monthly reports from District Veterinary Officers (DVOs) to the central administration for the years spanning 2001-2008. An assessment of perceived FMD occurrence, risk factors and the associated characteristics was made based on semi-structured questionnaires administered to the DVOs. During this period, a total of 311 FMD outbreaks were reported in 56 (70%) out of Uganda's 80 districts. The number of reported FMD outbreaks changed over time and by geographical regions. Occurrence of FMD was significantly associated with the dry season months (p = 0.0346), the time when animals movements are more frequent. The average number of FMD outbreaks was higher for some sub-counties adjacent to national parks than for other sub-counties, whilst proximity to international border only seemed to play a role at the southern border. DVOs believed that the major risk factor for FMD outbreaks was animal movements (odds ratio OR 50.8, confidence interval CI 17.8-144.6) and that most outbreaks were caused by introduction of sick animals.

  12. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  13. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. PMID:27279742

  14. Mouth of the Amazon River as seen from STS-58

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-10-30

    STS058-107-083 (18 Oct.-1 Nov. 1993) --- A near-nadir view of the mouth of the Amazon River, that shows all signs of being a relatively healthy system, breathing and exhaling. The well-developed cumulus field over the forested areas on both the north and south sides of the river (the view is slightly to the west) shows that good evapotranspiration is underway. The change in the cloud field from the moisture influx from the Atlantic (the cloud fields over the ocean are parallel to the wind direction) to perpendicular cloud fields over the land surface are normal. This change in direction is caused by the increased surface roughness over the land area. The plume of the river, although turbid, is no more or less turbid than it has been reported since the Portuguese first rounded Brasil's coast at the end of the 15th Century.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: current clinical, physiopathologic, and therapeutic data.

    PubMed

    Ducasse, Déborah; Courtet, Philippe; Olie, Emilie

    2013-01-01

    Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as an "intraoral burning for which no medical or dental cause was found." Lifetime prevalence ranges from 3.7% to 18% - 40% in the elderly. There is no consensus among experts on the diagnostic criteria of BMS, the etiology is poorly understood, and there are no existing clinical guidelines. Therefore, BMS is often underdiagnosed and its management complex. For patients with BMS, this lack of clinical expertise may result in decreased quality of life and increased psychological distress.We conducted a systematic review to identify clinical features, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies for BMS. We discuss the multifactorial origin, involving peripheral nerve dysfunction and hormonal dysfunction, as well as psychological traits. We also describe the results of randomized clinical trials for each treatment through a pathophysiologic approach. This review should help clinicians recognize BMS, understand its pathophysiology, and gain an enhanced scientific understanding of therapeutic alternatives.

  16. Association between Mouth Breathing and Atopic Dermatitis in Japanese Children 2–6 years Old: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Kawaminami, Shingo; Shin, Teruki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Kohno, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiya, Atsushi; Tani, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    As mouth breathing is associated with asthma and otitis media, it may be associated with other diseases. Therefore, this population-based cross-sectional study evaluated the association of mouth breathing with the prevalences of various diseases in children. Preschool children older than 2 years were included. A questionnaire was given to parents/guardians at 13 nurseries in Tokushima City. There were 468 valid responses (45.2%). We defined a subject as a mouth breather in daytime (MBD) if they had 2 or more positive items among the 3 following items: “breathes with mouth ordinarily,” “mouth is open ordinarily,” and “mouth is open when chewing.” We defined subjects as mouth breathers during sleep (MBS) if they had 2 or more positive items among the following 3 items: “snoring,” “mouth is open during sleeping,” and “mouth is dry when your child gets up.” The prevalences of MBD and MBS were 35.5% and 45.9%, respectively. There were significant associations between MBD and atopic dermatitis (odds ratio [OR]: 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–4.2), MBS and atopic dermatitis (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3–4.2), and MBD and asthma (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2–4.0). After adjusting for history of asthma and allergic rhinitis; family history of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis; and nasal congestion; both MBD (OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.3–5.4) and MBS (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 1.8–9.2) were significantly associated with atopic dermatitis. In preschool children older than 2 years, both MBD and MBS may be associated with the onset or development of atopic dermatitis. PMID:25915864

  17. Association between Mouth Breathing and Atopic Dermatitis in Japanese Children 2-6 years Old: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Kawaminami, Shingo; Shin, Teruki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Kohno, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiya, Atsushi; Tani, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    As mouth breathing is associated with asthma and otitis media, it may be associated with other diseases. Therefore, this population-based cross-sectional study evaluated the association of mouth breathing with the prevalences of various diseases in children. Preschool children older than 2 years were included. A questionnaire was given to parents/guardians at 13 nurseries in Tokushima City. There were 468 valid responses (45.2%). We defined a subject as a mouth breather in daytime (MBD) if they had 2 or more positive items among the 3 following items: "breathes with mouth ordinarily," "mouth is open ordinarily," and "mouth is open when chewing." We defined subjects as mouth breathers during sleep (MBS) if they had 2 or more positive items among the following 3 items: "snoring," "mouth is open during sleeping," and "mouth is dry when your child gets up." The prevalences of MBD and MBS were 35.5% and 45.9%, respectively. There were significant associations between MBD and atopic dermatitis (odds ratio [OR]: 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-4.2), MBS and atopic dermatitis (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3-4.2), and MBD and asthma (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-4.0). After adjusting for history of asthma and allergic rhinitis; family history of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis; and nasal congestion; both MBD (OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.3-5.4) and MBS (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 1.8-9.2) were significantly associated with atopic dermatitis. In preschool children older than 2 years, both MBD and MBS may be associated with the onset or development of atopic dermatitis.

  18. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior.

    PubMed

    Huete-Alcocer, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM): electronic word of mouth (eWOM), considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contributing to a better understanding of the potential of both.

  19. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huete-Alcocer, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM): electronic word of mouth (eWOM), considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contributing to a better understanding of the potential of both. PMID:28790950

  20. An evaluation of the significance of mouth and hand contamination for lead absorption in lead-acid battery workers.

    PubMed

    Far, H S; Pin, N T; Kong, C Y; Fong, K S; Kian, C W; Yan, C K

    1993-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the role of ingestion through hand and mouth contamination in the absorption of lead in 25 lead-acid battery workers. Levels of personal exposure to airborne lead ranged from 0.004 to 2.58 mg/m3 [geometric mean 0.098, with 25% of samples exceeding threshold limit values (ACGIH) of 0.15 mg/m3]; the mean (SD) blood lead level was 48.9 (10.8) micrograms/dl. Mean hand lead contents increased 33-fold from preshift levels on Monday mornings (33.5 micrograms/500 ml) to midshift levels on Thursday afternoons (1121 micrograms/500 ml). Mouth lead contents increased 16-fold from 0.021 micrograms/50 ml on Mondays to 0.345 micrograms/50 ml on Thursdays. The typical Malay racial habit of feeding with bare hands and fingers without utensils (closely associated with mouth and hand lead levels on Mondays) explained the bulk of the variance in blood lead levels (40%), with mouth lead on Thursdays (closely associated with poor personal hygiene) explaining a further 10%. Air lead was not a significant explanatory variable. The implementation of a programme of reinforcing hand-washing and mouth-rinsing practices resulted in a reduction of the blood lead level by 11.5% 6 months later. These results indicate that parenteral intake from hand and mouth contamination is an important cause of lead absorption in lead-exposed workers.

  1. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers.

    PubMed

    Krug, Peter W; Larson, Christopher R; Eslami, Angelique C; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2012-04-23

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contaminated agriculture facilities to return to food production. Wood surfaces are prevalent at these locations, but there is no standardized method for porous surface disinfection; commercial disinfectants are only certified for use on hard, nonporous surfaces. To model porous surface disinfection in the laboratory, FMDV and ASFV stocks were dried on wood coupons and exposed to citric acid or sodium hypochlorite. We found that 2% citric acid was effective at inactivating both viruses dried on a wood surface by 30 min at 22°C. While 2000 ppm sodium hypochlorite was capable of inactivating ASFV on wood under these conditions, this chemical did not meet the 4-log disinfection threshold for FMDV. Taken together, our data supports the use of chemical disinfectants containing at least 2% citric acid for porous surface disinfection of FMDV and ASFV.

  2. The ascidian mouth opening is derived from the anterior neuropore: reassessing the mouth/neural tube relationship in chordate evolution.

    PubMed

    Veeman, Michael T; Newman-Smith, Erin; El-Nachef, Danny; Smith, William C

    2010-08-01

    The relative positions of the brain and mouth are of central importance for models of chordate evolution. The dorsal hollow neural tube and the mouth have often been thought of as developmentally distinct structures that may have followed independent evolutionary paths. In most chordates however, including vertebrates and ascidians, the mouth primordia have been shown to fate to the anterior neural boundary. In ascidians such as Ciona there is a particularly intimate relationship between brain and mouth development, with a thin canal connecting the neural tube lumen to the mouth primordium at larval stages. This so-called neurohypophyseal canal was previously thought to be a secondary connection that formed relatively late, after the independent formation of the mouth primordium and the neural tube. Here we show that the Ciona neurohypophyseal canal is present from the end of neurulation and represents the anteriormost neural tube, and that the future mouth opening is actually derived from the anterior neuropore. The mouth thus forms at the anterior midline transition between neural tube and surface ectoderm. In the vertebrate Xenopus, we find that although the mouth primordium is not topologically continuous with the neural tube lumen, it nonetheless forms at this same transition point. This close association between the mouth primordium and the anterior neural tube in both ascidians and amphibians suggests that the evolution of these two structures may be more closely linked than previously appreciated. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between halitosis and mouth breathing in children

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Lara Jansiski; Bachiega, Joanna Carolina; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Laranja, Lorena Tristão; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a correlation between halitosis and mouth breathing in children. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-five children between 3 and 14 years of age were divided into two groups (nasal and mouth breathing) for the assessment of halitosis. A descriptive analysis was conducted on the degree of halitosis in each group. The chi-square test was used for comparison between groups, with a 5% level of significance. RESULTS: There was a significantly greater number of boys with the mouth-breathing pattern than girls. A total of 23.6% of the participants had no mouth odor, 12.7% had mild odor, 12.7% had moderate odor and 50.9% had strong odor. There was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of halitosis was high among the children evaluated, and there was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. PMID:21808855

  4. Association between halitosis and mouth breathing in children.

    PubMed

    Motta, Lara Jansiski; Bachiega, Joanna Carolina; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Laranja, Lorena Tristão; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between halitosis and mouth breathing in children. Fifty-five children between 3 and 14 years of age were divided into two groups (nasal and mouth breathing) for the assessment of halitosis. A descriptive analysis was conducted on the degree of halitosis in each group. The chi-square test was used for comparison between groups, with a 5% level of significance. There was a significantly greater number of boys with the mouth-breathing pattern than girls. A total of 23.6% of the participants had no mouth odor, 12.7% had mild odor, 12.7% had moderate odor and 50.9% had strong odor. There was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. The occurrence of halitosis was high among the children evaluated, and there was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing.

  5. Novel sensors for the Artificial Mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeghlaf, Lyes; Mielle, Patrick; Maratray, Jacques; Launay, Jérôme; Temple-Boyer, Pierre; Salles, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Similarly to human chewing, tasty compounds are released in saliva during the food piece mastication in the `Artificial Mouth', and so, are available continuously. Glutamate is present in numerous food, as taste enhancer, has a nice and sought "umami" taste, specific receptors and different inter individual sensitivities, and is a fair marker of the release of tasty compounds. The three sensors (for pH, salt, or glutamate concentration) have the same size, so they are easily interchangeable. Up to now, only one kind of parameter may be analysed at a time by the different sensors. Nevertheless, combined electrodes may be developed in the future.

  6. Osteolipoma of floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Raghunath, Vandana; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumours composed mainly of mature adipose tissue. Histological variants of lipomas have been named according to the type of tissue present and they include fibrolipoma, angiolipoma, osteolipoma, chondrolipoma and others. Osteolipoma, a classic lipoma with osseous metaplasia, is a very rare histological variant. Owing to the rarity of oral osteolipomas, we report an uncommon case of osteolipoma located on the floor of the mouth of a 20-year-old female patient and include a review of the literature. PMID:26113591

  7. Osteolipoma of floor of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Vandana; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha

    2015-06-25

    Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumours composed mainly of mature adipose tissue. Histological variants of lipomas have been named according to the type of tissue present and they include fibrolipoma, angiolipoma, osteolipoma, chondrolipoma and others. Osteolipoma, a classic lipoma with osseous metaplasia, is a very rare histological variant. Owing to the rarity of oral osteolipomas, we report an uncommon case of osteolipoma located on the floor of the mouth of a 20-year-old female patient and include a review of the literature. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. [Burning mouth syndrome - a joint biopsychosocial approach].

    PubMed

    Arpone, Francesca; Combremont, Florian; Weber, Kerstin; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2016-02-10

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a medical condition that is often refractory to conventional diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Patients suffering from BMS can benefit from a biopsychosocial approach in a joint, medical-psychological consultation model. Such a consultation exists at Geneva University Hospitals, involving the collaboration of the maxillo-facial and oral surgery division and the division of liaison psychiatry and crisis intervention, in order to take into account the multiple factors involved in BMS onset and persistence. This article will describe BMS clinical presentation, and present an integrate approach to treat these patients.

  9. A flipped spoon and chin prompt to increase mouth clean.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jack; Piazza, Cathleen C; Groff, Rebecca A; Kozisek, Jennifer M

    2011-01-01

    We treated the liquid refusal of a 15-month-old girl using 2 antecedent manipulations: flipped spoon and chin prompt. Use of the chin prompt in the absence of the flipped spoon failed to produce increases in mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing). By contrast, modest increases in mouth clean resulted from the implementation of the flipped spoon alone. The greatest increases in mouth clean resulted from the combination of the 2 manipulations.

  10. Mouth breathing, another risk factor for asthma: the Nagahama Study.

    PubMed

    Izuhara, Y; Matsumoto, H; Nagasaki, T; Kanemitsu, Y; Murase, K; Ito, I; Oguma, T; Muro, S; Asai, K; Tabara, Y; Takahashi, K; Bessho, K; Sekine, A; Kosugi, S; Yamada, R; Nakayama, T; Matsuda, F; Niimi, A; Chin, K; Mishima, M

    2016-07-01

    Allergic rhinitis, a known risk factor for asthma onset, often accompanies mouth breathing. Mouth breathing may bypass the protective function of the nose and is anecdotally considered to increase asthma morbidity. However, there is no epidemiological evidence that mouth breathing is independently associated with asthma morbidity and sensitization to allergens. In this study, we aimed to clarify the association between mouth breathing and asthma morbidity and allergic/eosinophilic inflammation, while considering the effect of allergic rhinitis. This community-based cohort study, the Nagahama Study, contained a self-reporting questionnaire on mouth breathing and medical history, blood tests, and pulmonary function testing. We enrolled 9804 general citizens of Nagahama City in the Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Mouth breathing was reported by 17% of the population and was independently associated with asthma morbidity. The odds ratio for asthma morbidity was 1.85 (95% CI, 1.27-2.62) and 2.20 (95% CI, 1.72-2.80) in subjects with mouth breathing alone and allergic rhinitis alone, which additively increased to 4.09 (95% CI, 3.01-5.52) when mouth breathing and allergic rhinitis coexisted. Mouth breathing in nonasthmatics was a risk for house dust mite sensitization, higher blood eosinophil counts, and lower pulmonary function after adjusting for allergic rhinitis. Mouth breathing may increase asthma morbidity, potentially through increased sensitization to inhaled allergens, which highlights the risk of mouth-bypass breathing in the 'one airway, one disease' concept. The risk of mouth breathing should be well recognized in subjects with allergic rhinitis and in the general population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths ...study wave-current interaction, and contribute to a comprehensive community data set of coastal inlet and river mouth processes, 2) better understand...Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  12. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    unlimited. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths Tim T. Janssen Theiss Research, El Granada, CA 94018 t: 415 609 5359 ; e...river mouth processes, 2) better understand the role of current shear, wave inhomogeneity and nonlinearity in wave-current interaction through...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  13. Extreme Wave Statistics within the Mouth of the Columbia River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS EXTREME WAVE STATISTICS WITIDN THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER Thesis Advisor: Co...Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS EXTREME WAVE STATISTICS WITHIN THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER 6. AUTHOR: Calter L. Johnston 7...in the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) dming the peak of ebb tide in May and June of2013. Over three separate collection days, effects of opposing

  14. The effect of mouth breathing on chewing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagaiwa, Miho; Gunjigake, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effect of mouth breathing on chewing efficiency by evaluating masticatory variables. Ten adult nasal breathers with normal occlusion and no temporomandibular dysfunction were selected. Subjects were instructed to bite the chewing gum on the habitual side. While breathing through the mouth and nose, the glucide elution from the chewing gum, number of chewing strokes, duration of chewing, and electromyography (EMG) activity of the masseter muscle were evaluated as variables of masticatory efficiency. The durations required for the chewing of 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 250 strokes were significantly (P < .05) longer while breathing through the mouth. There was no significant difference in the glucide elution rate (%) for each chewing stroke between nose and mouth breathings. The glucide elution rates for 1- and 3-minute chewing were significantly (P < .05) lower while breathing through the mouth. However, there was no significant difference in the glucide elution rate for 5-minute chewing between nose and mouth breathings. While chewing for 1, 3, and 5 minutes, the chewing stroke and EMG activity of the masseter muscle were significantly (P < .05) lower during mouth breathing. It takes a longer amount of time to complete chewing to obtain higher masticatory efficiency when breathing through the mouth. Therefore, mouth breathing will decrease the masticatory efficiency if the duration of chewing is restricted in everyday life.

  15. Using acoustic sensors to discriminate between nasal and mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2012-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing.

  16. [A study of urease activity of mouth cavity microflora].

    PubMed

    Bykov, S É; Bykov, A S

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the prevalence of mouth cavity urealytic microflora and determination of the level of its enzymatic activity depending on concentration and amount of urea solution taken as a substrate. 62 randomly chosen patients at the age of 5-64 took part in the study. Each of them rinsed the mouth with 50 ml of 1% urea solution. Before and after rinsing the concentration of ammonia in the mouth cavity air was measured. In patients with highest and lowest activity of mouth cavity urealytic microflora a series of tests was carried out including mouth rinsing with urea solution in various concentrations and amounts and measuring ammonia concentration before and after rinsing. Obtained results were analyzed using mathematical statistics methods. It was found that in 91% ± 1.8% of randomly chosen patients (p < 0.05) mouth cavity microflora showed apparent urease activity. The lowest concentration (0.0625% in 50 ml) and volume (0.5 ml of 1% solution) levels of urea solution were obtained that can exert negative influence on the results of helicobacteriosis diagnosis by means of mouth cavity air analysis. Urealytic microflora in the mouth cavity is very common and may constitute a factor that decreases the specificity of helicobacteriosis diagnosis by means of the methods based on detection of indicators of gas metabolites resulting from the enzymatic reaction in air samples taken from the mouth cavity after oral administration of urea.

  17. Full mouth versus quadrant treatment in chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Anjana

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the management of chronic periodontitis, including methods of non-surgical therapy such as full mouth disinfection, full mouth debridement and conventional quadrant-by-quadrant therapy. Manual searches of Medline and Embase databases provided the relevant studies. Multiple randomised controlled trials (RCTs) selected for the paper failed to show any significant differences between the quadrant-wise treatment and full mouth debridement and modalities. This review demonstrates that there is no known difference in treatment outcomes between full mouth debridement and traditional quadrant therapy. Further RCTs are necessary to assess clinical effectiveness of chemical adjunct use.

  18. Simplified models for exhaled airflow from a cough with the mouth covered.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Lin, C-H; Jiang, Z; Chen, Q

    2014-12-01

    Covering a cough can be useful in reducing the transmission of airborne infectious diseases. However, no simple method is available in the literature for predicting the exhaled airflow from a cough with the mouth covered. This investigation used smoke to visualize the airflow exhaled by 16 human subjects. Their mouths were covered by a tissue, a cupped hand, a fist, and an elbow with and without a sleeve. This study then developed simplified models for predicting the airflow on the basis of the smoke visualization data. In addition, this investigation performed numerical simulations to assess the influence of mouth coverings on the receptor's exposure to exhaled particles. It was found that covering a cough with a tissue, a cupped hand, or an elbow can significantly reduce the horizontal velocity and cause the particles to move upward with the thermal plumes generated by a human body. In contrast with an uncovered cough, a covered cough or a cough with the head turned away may prevent direct exposure. This study developed simplified models for predicting the exhaled airflow from a cough with the mouth covered. The proposed models can easily be used to investigate the risk of transmission of airborne infectious diseases in enclosed environments. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  20. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  1. Treatment of Burning Mouth Syndrome With Amisulpride

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cerdeira, Carmen; Sanchez-Blanco, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a frequently occurring disease characterized by a burning or painful sensation in the tongue and/or other oral sites without clinical mucosal abnormalities or lesions. Its etiopathology is unknown, although local, systemic, and psychological factors have been associated with BMS. The syndrome is multifactorial, and its management remains unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study was to obtain preliminary data regarding the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride in BMS treatment. Methods The subjects were treated with amisulpride (50 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Efficacy assessment included a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HASM-A), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Efficacy Index (CGI-EI). Results The treatment regimens resulted in a significant improvement in burning mouth symptoms from baseline at week 24, as indicated by the quantitative mean illness duration VAS score, HAM-D, and HAM-A. Amisulpride appears to be effective and patients show a rapid response to treatment. No serious adverse effects were encountered in these patients. Conclusions Amisulpride is effective and well tolerated as a short-term treatment. It is particularly efficacious at the start of treatment and has shorter response latency. Double-blind placebo-controlled trials are needed for further assessment of the efficacy of amisulpride in BMS treatment. PMID:22719802

  2. Nonsyndromic palate Synechia with floor of mouth

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Sharan; Bütow, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the embryological basis, sequela and management of intraoral synechia, and to report on the incidence of this condition at a facial cleft deformity clinic (FCDC), with specific attention to two rare cases of mucosal bands involving the floor of the mouth and palate. Review of the literature and a retrospective analysis of FCDC and case report of two cases. During the period of 30 years (1983–2013), the FCDC - University of Pretoria has managed in excess of 4000 cases. A review of the clinic statistics revealed only six cases in which intraoral synechiae occurred. The rarity of this condition at the FCDC is in keeping with the rare incidence in the international literature. Four syndromic cases were identified. Three cases were cleft palate lateral synechia syndrome, and one was an orofacial digital syndrome. Two nonsyndromic cases were identified, and both cases involved the floor of the mouth and palate. The attending physicians and surgeons should be aware of the most appropriate timing for management of this condition, in order to avoid unwanted sequelae. Supportive care should be provided, and emergency airway protocol should be available for all cases. A differential diagnosis should be considered which includes syndromic conditions. PMID:26389045

  3. Assessment and treatment of chronic hand mouthing.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Eileen M; Iwata, Brian A; Zhou, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Hand mouthing (HM) is a chronic problem in many individuals with intellectual disabilities. Although the prevalence of mouthing has been estimated, data on the frequency, severity, or functions of the behavior were not included. In Study 1, we examined the prevalence and risk of HM. Results obtained from interviews showed that the prevalence of HM in two institutional samples (N = 802) was 12.7%, whereas direct observation yielded a lower estimate of prevalence (8%). Moreover, a large proportion of observed HM (39.1%) was self-injurious in nature. In Study 2, we used modified functional analyses (FAs) to examine the HM of 64 individuals. Results indicated that maintenance by automatic reinforcement accounted for 98.4% of the cases (all but one case). In Study 3, we implemented a progressive series of interventions for HM exhibited by 14 individuals. The following interventions were implemented in sequential order: (a) noncontingent reinforcement (NCR, effective with 6 subjects), (b) either NCR plus differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) plus response blocking (effective with 5 subjects) or NCR plus response blocking only (effective with 2 subjects), and (c) NCR plus brief manual restraint (effective with 1 subject). © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  4. The practical evaluation and management of patients with symptoms of a sore burning mouth.

    PubMed

    Steele, John C

    2016-01-01

    There are many etiologic factors to consider in a patient who presents with symptoms or sensations of a sore burning mouth. These range from local causes within the oral cavity to underlying systemic disease, including psychologic factors. This paper aims to describe the different clinical presentations and to outline a systematic approach to the evaluation and management of such patients. The clinician will be directed to the relevant diagnosis by following the traditional medical model of taking a focused history, performing a thorough clinical examination, considering the potential differential diagnoses, and requesting pertinent and appropriate investigations. The various differential diagnoses and broad treatment options will also be discussed and outlined. This paper will not, however, discuss burning mouth syndrome (oral dysesthesia), which is a diagnosis of exclusion, whereby the oral mucosa is clinically normal and there are no identifiable medical or dental causes to account for the patient's symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Prasad, Maruthi; Haldal, Sindhu

    2014-07-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary disorder expressing a group of conditions which cause developmental alterations in the structure of enamel. This disorder has an adverse impact on oral health and also hampers the quality of life of the individual causing physiologic problems. The treatment of such patients would not only upgrade their quality-of-life, but also improve their self-esteem. The correction of such severely worn out dentition may require extensive restorative treatment to achieve appropriate results. It is important to identify the factors that contribute to the excessive wear and loss of vertical dimension. The correction of the defects has to be done without violating the biologic or mechanical principles. Full mouth rehabilitation in such patients improves esthetics, function and comfort. The following case report presents a systematic approach in rehabilitating a case of AI hypoplastic type using full mouth metal reinforced porcelain restorations.

  6. Full Mouth Rehabilitation of a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, P; Prasad, Maruthi; Haldal, Sindhu

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary disorder expressing a group of conditions which cause developmental alterations in the structure of enamel. This disorder has an adverse impact on oral health and also hampers the quality of life of the individual causing physiologic problems. The treatment of such patients would not only upgrade their quality-of-life, but also improve their self-esteem. The correction of such severely worn out dentition may require extensive restorative treatment to achieve appropriate results. It is important to identify the factors that contribute to the excessive wear and loss of vertical dimension. The correction of the defects has to be done without violating the biologic or mechanical principles. Full mouth rehabilitation in such patients improves esthetics, function and comfort. The following case report presents a systematic approach in rehabilitating a case of AI hypoplastic type using full mouth metal reinforced porcelain restorations. PMID:25214738

  7. Mouth or Throat Pain or Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... with milk Crackers, hard-crust breads, salted rolls Fruits and vegetables Soft, non-acidic fruit and vegetables, ... toast, hard rolls, dry crackers, English muffins, bagels Fruits and vegetables Cooked or blenderized fruits and vegetables ...

  8. Coxsackievirus A6-induced hand-foot-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Campbell L; Chu, Emily Y; Introcaso, Camille E; Schaffer, Andras; James, William D

    2013-12-01

    Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is an acute, self-limited, highly contagious viral illness that commonly affects children younger than 5 years. It is most typically caused by enterovirus 71 or coxsackievirus A16 and results in asymptomatic infection or mild disease. Immunocompetent adults are rarely affected. Recently, there have been increasing reports of a more severe form of HFMD associated with fevers, joint pains, and widespread painful eruptions. Some of these patients required hospitalization for supportive care. These severe cases were most commonly caused by coxsackievirus A6. We describe a 37-year-old white man with widespread, crusted, pruritic papules on the scalp, ears, and face and a purpuric and targetoid painful vesicular eruption on his hands and feet, with associated fevers, neurologic symptoms, and arthritis, who required hospitalization for supportive care. His infection with coxsackievirus A6 was confirmed based on polymerase chain reaction from his oral mucosa and cutaneous vesicle fluid. Dermatologists should be familiar with the severe variant of HFMD caused by coxsackievirus A6, include it in their differential diagnosis of acute febrile blistering diseases, and be aware that certain patients may require hospitalization.

  9. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed. PMID:26009802

  10. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed.

  11. Terrestrial Planets Accreted Dry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2007-12-01

    Plate tectonics shaped the Earth, whereas the Moon is a dry and inactive desert. Mars probably came to rest within the first billion years of its history, and Venus, although internally very active, has a dry inferno for its surface. The strong gravity field of a large planet allows for an enormous amount of gravitational energy to be released, causing the outer part of the planetary body to melt (magma ocean), helps retain water on the planet, and increases the pressure gradient. The weak gravity field and anhydrous conditions prevailing on the Moon stabilized, on top of its magma ocean, a thick buoyant plagioclase lithosphere, which insulated the molten interior. On Earth, the buoyant hydrous phases (serpentines) produced by reactions between the terrestrial magma ocean and the wet impactors received from the outer Solar System isolated the magma and kept it molten for some few tens of million years. The elemental distributions and the range of condensation temperatures show that the planets from the inner Solar System accreted dry. The interior of planets that lost up to 95% of their K cannot contain much water. Foundering of their wet surface material softened the terrestrial mantle and set the scene for the onset of plate tectonics. This very same process may have removed all the water from the surface of Venus 500 My ago and added enough water to its mantle to make its internal dynamics very strong and keep the surface very young. Because of a radius smaller than that of the Earth, not enough water could be drawn into the Martian mantle before it was lost to space and Martian plate tectonics never began. The radius of a planet therefore is the key parameter controlling most of its evolutional features.

  12. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... they are used. (2) The employer may not mix together dry chemical extinguishing agents of different... assure that the dry chemical supply is free of moisture which may cause the supply to cake or form...

  13. Air-drying of Robusta eucalyptus lumber

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1964-01-01

    A study of air-drying 4/4 Eucalyptus robusta lumber in Hilo, Hawaii showed that during typical summer weather it can be dried to below 20 percent moisture content in 2-1/2 months. Grade reduction in 36 percent of the lumber was caused by end splits, insect damage, warp, and surface checking.

  14. A dynamic model of mouth closing movements in clariid catfishes: the role of enlarged jaw adductors.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Aerts, Peter; Adriaens, Dominique; Herrel, Anthony

    2005-05-07

    Some species of Clariidae (air breathing catfishes) have extremely large (hypertrophied) jaw closure muscles. Besides producing higher bite forces, the enlarged muscles may also cause higher accelerations of the lower jaw during rapid mouth closure. Thus, jaw adductor hypertrophy could potentially also enable faster mouth closure. In this study, a forward dynamic model of jaw closing is developed to evaluate the importance of jaw adductor hypertrophy on the speed of mouth closure. The model includes inertia, pressure, tissue resistance and hydrodynamic drag forces on the lower jaw, which is modelled as a rotating half-ellipse. Simulations are run for four clariid species showing a gradual increase in jaw adductor hypertrophy (Clarias gariepinus, Clariallabes longicauda, Gymnallabes typus and Channallabes apus). The model was validated using data from high-speed videos of prey captures in these species. In general, the kinematic profiles of the fastest mouth closure from each species are reasonably well predicted by the model. The model was also used to compare the four species during standardized mouth closures (same initial gape angle, travel distance and cranial size). These simulations suggest that the species with enlarged jaw adductors have an increased speed of jaw closure (in comparison with the non-hypertrophied C. gariepinus) for short lower jaw rotations and when feeding at high gape angles. Consequently, the jaw system in these species seems well equipped to capture relatively large, evasive prey. For prey captures during which the lower jaw rotates freely over a larger distance before impacting the prey, the higher kinematic efficiency of the C. gariepinus jaw system results in the fastest jaw closures. In all cases, the model predicts that an increase in the physiological cross-sectional area of the jaw muscles does indeed contribute to the speed of jaw closure in clariid fish.

  15. Neural representations of ethologically relevant hand/mouth synergies in the human precentral gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Desmurget, Michel; Richard, Nathalie; Harquel, Sylvain; Baraduc, Pierre; Szathmari, Alexandru; Mottolese, Carmine; Sirigu, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Complex motor responses are often thought to result from the combination of elemental movements represented at different neural sites. However, in monkeys, evidence indicates that some behaviors with critical ethological value, such as self-feeding, are represented as motor primitives in the precentral gyrus (PrG). In humans, such primitives have not yet been described. This could reflect well-known interspecies differences in the organization of sensorimotor regions (including PrG) or the difficulty of identifying complex neural representations in peroperative settings. To settle this alternative, we focused on the neural bases of hand/mouth synergies, a prominent example of human behavior with high ethological value. By recording motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials in the PrG of patients undergoing brain surgery (2–60 y), we show that two complex nested neural representations can mediate hand/mouth actions within this structure: (i) a motor representation, resembling self-feeding, where electrical stimulation causes the closing hand to approach the opening mouth, and (ii) a motor–sensory representation, likely associated with perioral exploration, where cross-signal integration is accomplished at a cortical site that generates hand/arm actions while receiving mouth sensory inputs. The first finding extends to humans’ previous observations in monkeys. The second provides evidence that complex neural representations also exist for perioral exploration, a finely tuned skill requiring the combination of motor and sensory signals within a common control loop. These representations likely underlie the ability of human children and newborns to accurately produce coordinated hand/mouth movements, in an otherwise general context of motor immaturity. PMID:24706796

  16. Neural representations of ethologically relevant hand/mouth synergies in the human precentral gyrus.

    PubMed

    Desmurget, Michel; Richard, Nathalie; Harquel, Sylvain; Baraduc, Pierre; Szathmari, Alexandru; Mottolese, Carmine; Sirigu, Angela

    2014-04-15

    Complex motor responses are often thought to result from the combination of elemental movements represented at different neural sites. However, in monkeys, evidence indicates that some behaviors with critical ethological value, such as self-feeding, are represented as motor primitives in the precentral gyrus (PrG). In humans, such primitives have not yet been described. This could reflect well-known interspecies differences in the organization of sensorimotor regions (including PrG) or the difficulty of identifying complex neural representations in peroperative settings. To settle this alternative, we focused on the neural bases of hand/mouth synergies, a prominent example of human behavior with high ethological value. By recording motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials in the PrG of patients undergoing brain surgery (2-60 y), we show that two complex nested neural representations can mediate hand/mouth actions within this structure: (i) a motor representation, resembling self-feeding, where electrical stimulation causes the closing hand to approach the opening mouth, and (ii) a motor-sensory representation, likely associated with perioral exploration, where cross-signal integration is accomplished at a cortical site that generates hand/arm actions while receiving mouth sensory inputs. The first finding extends to humans' previous observations in monkeys. The second provides evidence that complex neural representations also exist for perioral exploration, a finely tuned skill requiring the combination of motor and sensory signals within a common control loop. These representations likely underlie the ability of human children and newborns to accurately produce coordinated hand/mouth movements, in an otherwise general context of motor immaturity.

  17. Mouth and Teeth: How To Keep Them Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for regular check-ups and cleanings.AdultsContinuing good mouth and tooth care as an adult can help you avoid tooth ... to considerWhen you do not regularly take good care of you teeth and mouth, you could experience these problems:Cavities. Cavities are ...

  18. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Mouth and Throat Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cold foods Take these steps: Clean your mouth with care. ● ● Brush your teeth and tongue after each meal and before you go to bed. Use a very soft toothbrush or cotton swabs. ● ● Use toothpaste or gel that has fluoride in it. ● ● Rinse your mouth with the baking soda, salt, and water mix ...

  19. A Coat Reduces Mouthing: It Worked in My Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Annette M.

    1988-01-01

    A coat was adapted for a 20-year-old severely handicapped woman to control her practice of "mouthing" her hands and clothing. Velcro strips attached to the coat held the student's arms down long enough to allow for differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior, which successfully reduced the rate of mouthing. (JDD)

  20. A Coat Reduces Mouthing: It Worked in My Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Annette M.

    1988-01-01

    A coat was adapted for a 20-year-old severely handicapped woman to control her practice of "mouthing" her hands and clothing. Velcro strips attached to the coat held the student's arms down long enough to allow for differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior, which successfully reduced the rate of mouthing. (JDD)

  1. A Flipped Spoon and Chin Prompt to Increase Mouth Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Jack; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Groff, Rebecca A.; Kozisek, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    We treated the liquid refusal of a 15-month-old girl using 2 antecedent manipulations: flipped spoon and chin prompt. Use of the chin prompt in the absence of the flipped spoon failed to produce increases in mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing). By contrast, modest increases in mouth clean resulted from the implementation of the flipped…

  2. 4. LIGHTHOUSE SITE OFFSHORE AT MOUTH OF FEDERAL CHANNEL, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. LIGHTHOUSE SITE OFFSHORE AT MOUTH OF FEDERAL CHANNEL, AND WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE WATER TOWARD THE BUILDINGS OF THE FORMER ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION, ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  3. Interventions for treating burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Roddy; Forssell, Heli; Buchanan, John Ag; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Weldon, Jo C; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2016-11-18

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a term used for oral mucosal pain (burning pain or discomfort in the tongue, lips or entire oral cavity) without identifiable cause. General population prevalence varies from 0.1% to 3.9%. Many BMS patients indicate anxiety, depression, personality disorders and impaired quality of life (QoL). This review updates the previous versions published in 2000 and 2005. To determine the effectiveness and safety of any intervention versus placebo for symptom relief and changes in QoL, taste, and feeling of dryness in people with BMS. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 31 December 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 11) in the Cochrane Library (searched 31 December 2015), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 31 December 2015), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 31 December 2015). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any treatment against placebo in people with BMS. The primary outcomes were symptom relief (pain/burning) and change in QoL. Secondary outcomes included change in taste, feeling of dryness, and adverse effects. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Outcome data were analysed as short-term (up to three months) or long-term (three to six months). We included 23 RCTs (1121 analysed participants; 83% female). Interventions were categorised as: antidepressants and antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, cholinergics, dietary supplements, electromagnetic radiation, physical barriers, psychological therapies, and topical treatments.Only one RCT was assessed at low risk of bias overall, four RCTs' risk of bias was unclear, and 18

  4. Liquid Crystal Research Shows Deformation By Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These images, from David Weitz's liquid crystal research, show ordered uniform sized droplets (upper left) before they are dried from their solution. After the droplets are dried (upper right), they are viewed with crossed polarizers that show the deformation caused by drying, a process that orients the bipolar structure of the liquid crystal within the droplets. When an electric field is applied to the dried droplets (lower left), and then increased (lower right), the liquid crystal within the droplets switches its alignment, thereby reducing the amount of light that can be scattered by the droplets when a beam is shone through them.

  5. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength in Mouth Breathers: Clinical Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Andrade da Cunha, Renata; Andrade da Cunha, Daniele; Assis, Roberta Borba; Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo; Justino da Silva, Hilton

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The child who chronically breathes through the mouth may develop a weakness of the respiratory muscles. Researchers and clinical are seeking for methods of instrumental evaluation to gather complementary data to clinical evaluations. With this in mind, it is important to evaluate breathing muscles in the child with Mouth Breathing. Objective To develop a review to investigate studies that used evaluation methods of respiratory muscle strength in mouth breathers. Data Synthesis  The authors were unanimous in relation to manovacuometry method as a way to evaluate respiratory pressures in Mouth Breathing children. Two of them performed with an analog manovacuometer and the other one, digital. The studies were not evaluated with regard to the method efficacy neither the used instruments. Conclusion There are few studies evaluating respiratory muscle strength in Mouth Breathing people through manovacuometry and the low methodological rigor of the analyzed studies hindered a reliable result to support or refuse the use of this technique. PMID:25992108

  6. An overview of burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Carmen; Di Stasio, Dario; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Gentile, Enrica; Guida, Agostino; Maio, Claudio; Tammaro, Mariasofia; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterised by the presence of a burning sensation in the oral mucosa in the absence of any clinically apparent mucosal sign. It occurs more commonly in older women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palates. Besides the burning sensation, patients with BMS may complain of unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. The exact pathophysiology of primary BMS remains unknown. A major challenge for the clinician is the treatment of BMS: identifying possible causative factors is the first step, but BMS is often idiopathic. Drug therapy, in addition to behavioural therapy and psychotherapy, may help to eliminate the symptoms. Considering the growing incidence of BMS in older people, further research is required to determine the true efficacy of current management strategies for patients with this disorder.

  7. Genomics and outbreaks: foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Freimanis, G L; Di Nardo, A; Bankowska, K; King, D J; Wadsworth, J; Knowles, N J; King, D P

    2016-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an animal pathogen of global economic significance. Identifying the sources of outbreaks plays an important role in disease control; however, this can be confounded by the ease with which FMDV can spread via movement of infected livestock and animal products, aerosols or fomites, e.g. contaminated persons and objects. As sequencing technologies have advanced, this review highlights the uses of viral genomic data in helping to understand the global distribution and transboundary movements of FMDV, and the role that these approaches have played in control and surveillance programmes. The recent application of next-generation sequencing platforms to address important epidemiological and evolutionary challenges is discussed with particular reference to the advent of 'omics' technologies.

  8. Relationship between vocal symptoms in college students and their possible causes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Léslie Piccolotto; Guerra, Juliana Ranzani; Loiola, Camila Miranda; Ghirardi, Ana Carolina de Assis Moura

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Studies to understand the vocal profile of a population are important to plan collective health measures. The prevalence of vocal symptoms can be indicative of vocal disorder and must be investigated to support measures to prevent vocal diseases. Aim: To characterize vocal symptoms in college students and their possible causes, and to analyze the association between hoarseness, vocal fatigue, phlegm, and burning in the throat with the possible causes mentioned. Method: Prospective study of 517 students who answered a questionnaire about their general heath and vocal symptoms and causes. We used the study of proportions, measures of central tendency, and a chi-square test to associate the presence of symptoms and possible causes. Results: Symptoms most often mentioned: dry mouth (21%), dry throat (18.2%), phlegm (17.9%). Causes most often cited: high respiratory disease (39%), intense voice use (24%), smoking (24%). Hoarseness was associated with heavy use of voice and high respiratory disease; vocal fatigue with intense voice use, stress, and digestive problems; burning in the throat with intensive voice use, high respiratory disease, and pollution; phlegm with smoking, and upper respiratory and digestive problems. Conclusion: Not only do aspects of health and the voice interfere with its production, the external environment and habits influence the vocal symptoms of this population as well. PMID:25991950

  9. Genome Sequence of Coxsackievirus A6, Isolated during a Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Finland in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Satu; Merilahti, Pirjo; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Blomqvist, Soile; Roivainen, Merja; Laiho, Asta; Susi, Petri; Waris, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Reports of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A6 have increased worldwide after the report of the first outbreak in Finland in 2008. The complete genome of the first outbreak strain from a vesicle fluid specimen was determined. PMID:25323709

  10. Genome Sequence of Coxsackievirus A6, Isolated during a Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Finland in 2008.

    PubMed

    Osterback, Riikka; Koskinen, Satu; Merilahti, Pirjo; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Blomqvist, Soile; Roivainen, Merja; Laiho, Asta; Susi, Petri; Waris, Matti

    2014-10-16

    Reports of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A6 have increased worldwide after the report of the first outbreak in Finland in 2008. The complete genome of the first outbreak strain from a vesicle fluid specimen was determined. Copyright © 2014 Österback et al.

  11. Suppression of Swine NK Cell Function During Acute Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes an economically devastating disease. This highly acute infection has multiple negative effects on the innate response, presumably contributing to the rapid spread of virus within the host. Understanding the regulation of in...

  12. Control of foot-and-mouth disease by using replication-defective human adenoviruses to deliver vaccines and biotherapeutics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  13. Effect of foot-and-mouth disease virus on the frequency, phenotype and function of circulating dendritic cells in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious virus that causes one of the most devastating diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. Disease symptoms in FMDV-infected animals appear within 2 to 3 days of exposure. Dendritic cells (DC) play an essential role in protective immune responses agai...

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O phylodynamics: genetic variability associated with epidemiological factors in Pakistan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the most challenging aspects of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) control is the high genetic variability of the FMD virus (FMDV). In endemic settings such as the Indian subcontinent, this variability has resulted in the emergence of pandemic strains that have spread widely and caused devastating ...

  15. Poly ICLC increases the potency of a replication-defective human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus 5 vector carrying the FMDV capsid coding region of serotype A24 Cruzeiro (Ad5-CI-A24-2B) protects swine and cattle against FM...

  16. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  17. One-leg standing time with eyes open: comparison between the mouth-opened and mouth-closed conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi; Kanehisa, Yayoi; Ozaki, Yoshie; Iwasa, Yasuyuki; Fukuizumi, Takaki; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Many studies report a significant relationship between the one-leg standing time with the eyes open and the occlusal relationship. To determine the association between proprioception (the periodontal membrane vs muscle spindle) to the one-leg standing time, the authors compared the one-leg standing time with eyes open between mouth-opened and mouth-closed conditions. The study participants were 107 healthy, elderly patients. The authors measured the one-leg standing time with eyes open between mouth-opened and mouth-closed conditions. The one-leg standing time was significantly shorter with the mouth opened (21·1±19·1 seconds) than with the mouth closed (25·1±21·4 seconds). Patients whose one-leg standing time was equal or shorter with the mouth opened than with the mouth closed were not different from the other patients with regard to age, handgrip strength, BMI, and the number of remaining teeth. The vertical mandibular position may affect body balance.

  18. Mouth-watering words: Articulatory inductions of eating-like mouth movements increase perceived food palatability.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Boecker, Lea

    2016-04-01

    We explored the impact of consonantal articulation direction of names for foods on expected palatability for these foods (total N = 256). Dishes (Experiments 1-2) and food items (Experiment 3) were labeled with names whose consonants either wandered from the front to the back of the mouth (inward, e.g., PASOKI) or from the back to the front of the mouth (outward; e.g., KASOPI). Because inward (outward) wandering consonant sequences trigger eating-like (expectoration-like) mouth movements, dishes and foods were rated higher in palatability when they bore an inward compared to an outward wandering name. This effect occurred already under silent reading and for hungry and satiated participants alike. As a boundary condition, this articulation effect did occur when also additional visual information on the product was given (Experiment 3), but vanished when this visual information was too vivid and rich in competing palatability cues (Experiment 2). Future marketing can exploit this effect by increasing the appeal of food products by using inward wandering brand names, that is, names that start with the lips and end in the throat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lateral cephalometry: A simple and economical clinical guide for assessment of nasopharyngeal free airway space in mouth breathers.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Navneet; Godhane, Alkesh V

    2010-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal obstruction by adenoid enlargement is one of the main causes of mouth breathing. Cephalometric radiographs and rhinomanometric tests to evaluate nasal obstruction have been available for several decades. Various lines and areas have been interpreted by number of investigators to implicate the enlarged adenoid in a casual relationship with mouth breathing and the subsequent effect on vertical facial growth. The aim of this paper is to review lateral cephalometric tracing methods combined with newer Auto-cad surface area measurement program so that assessment of the nasopharyngeal free airway space can be done based on it, before more rigorous ear-nose-throat follow up is needed for the patient.

  20. Lateral cephalometry: A simple and economical clinical guide for assessment of nasopharyngeal free airway space in mouth breathers

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Navneet; Godhane, Alkesh V.

    2010-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal obstruction by adenoid enlargement is one of the main causes of mouth breathing. Cephalometric radiographs and rhinomanometric tests to evaluate nasal obstruction have been available for several decades. Various lines and areas have been interpreted by number of investigators to implicate the enlarged adenoid in a casual relationship with mouth breathing and the subsequent effect on vertical facial growth. The aim of this paper is to review lateral cephalometric tracing methods combined with newer Auto-cad surface area measurement program so that assessment of the nasopharyngeal free airway space can be done based on it, before more rigorous ear-nose-throat follow up is needed for the patient. PMID:22114385

  1. Dry eye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of dry eyes include: Dry environment or workplace (wind, air conditioning) Sun exposure Smoking or second-hand ... NOT smoke and avoid second-hand smoke, direct wind, and air conditioning. Use a humidifier, especially in ...

  2. Recent advances in drying and dehydration of fruits and vegetables: a review.

    PubMed

    Sagar, V R; Suresh Kumar, P

    2010-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are dried to enhance storage stability, minimize packaging requirement and reduce transport weight. Preservation of fruits and vegetables through drying based on sun and solar drying techniques which cause poor quality and product contamination. Energy consumption and quality of dried products are critical parameters in the selection of drying process. An optimum drying system for the preparation of quality dehydrated products is cost effective as it shortens the drying time and cause minimum damage to the product. To reduce the energy utilization and operational cost new dimensions came up in drying techniques. Among the technologies osmotic dehydration, vacuum drying, freeze drying, superheated steam drying, heat pump drying and spray drying have great scope for the production of quality dried products and powders.

  3. Increased oxygen load in the prefrontal cortex from mouth breathing: a vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Sayaka; Oka, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Kayoko; Kato, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who habitually breathe through the mouth are more likely than nasal breathers to have sleep disorders and attention deficit hyperactive disorder. We hypothesized that brain hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might be different for mouth and nasal breathing. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex during mouth breathing and nasal breathing in healthy adults (n=9) using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. The angle k, calculated from changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin and indicating the degree of oxygen exchange, was significantly higher during mouth breathing (P<0.05), indicating an increased oxygen load. Mouth breathing also caused a significant increase in deoxyhemoglobin, but oxyhemoglobin did not increase. This difference in oxygen load in the brain arising from different breathing routes can be evaluated quantitatively using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. Phase responses could help to provide an earlier and more reliable diagnosis of a patient’s habitual breathing route than a patient interview. PMID:24169579

  4. Increased oxygen load in the prefrontal cortex from mouth breathing: a vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sano, Masahiro; Sano, Sayaka; Oka, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Kayoko; Kato, Toshinori

    2013-12-04

    Individuals who habitually breathe through the mouth are more likely than nasal breathers to have sleep disorders and attention deficit hyperactive disorder. We hypothesized that brain hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might be different for mouth and nasal breathing. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex during mouth breathing and nasal breathing in healthy adults (n=9) using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. The angle k, calculated from changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin and indicating the degree of oxygen exchange, was significantly higher during mouth breathing (P<0.05), indicating an increased oxygen load. Mouth breathing also caused a significant increase in deoxyhemoglobin, but oxyhemoglobin did not increase. This difference in oxygen load in the brain arising from different breathing routes can be evaluated quantitatively using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. Phase responses could help to provide an earlier and more reliable diagnosis of a patient's habitual breathing route than a patient interview.

  5. Anthropogenic Impacts on Coastal Processes at Guadiaro River Mouth (Cádiz, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, J. Javier

    2014-05-01

    The mouth of Guadiaro river (Cadiz, south of Spain) opens to the Alboran basin of the Mediterranean Sea, between the Spanish and North African coasts, next to the Strait of Gibraltar, where the Spanish coastal orientation is NNE-SSW, so that the stretch is mainly affected by eastern ("Levantes") wind and wave action. The river sources are in Grazalema Sierra (Cádiz), western Penibetic ridge, and although the Spanish Mediterranean facade is climatically dry and supports a very irregular rainfall regime, rains in that "Sierra" are among the highest and homogeneous in Spain throughout the year, much more than in the rest of the ridge. Maybe that is why the Guadiaro estuary has remained functional until preset years while all other river mouths estuaries were filled to become deltas along the eighteenth century (Diez, 1996). As most of Spanish rivers, the Guadiaro had suffered a major regulatory process and an upstream transfer has been recently implemented from its basin to the Atlantic through Guadalete river basin, therefore the mouth flow is becoming reduced, especially in its peaks. The closure of its mouth, favoured by the reduced flow of the river in a low tide basin sea, has been studied several times in the last decades (Muñoz et al, 2010), mainly because the spit closing it grows in the NNE direction when alongshore transport occurs mainly, and almost permanently, in the opposite direction. This paper is mainly based on most of those documents, whose researches have used numerical models such as SMC and MIKE 21, obtaining relevant results on the refraction but not diffraction. Two successive main structural actions that can have modified coastal processes were introduced in the environment of the mouth: a couple of jetties (1973), one of which was soon removed (1975), and the marina and harbour of Sotogrande (whose breakwater was built in 1986 and extended 1n 1994)). The influence of these elements is not well reflected in the numerical models. In this

  6. Upgraded technology for contingent stimulation of mouth wiping by two persons with drooling and profound developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Pichierri, Sabrina; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Many persons with developmental and physical disabilities experience drooling (i.e., loss of saliva from the mouth). Technology was recently developed to help two of these persons reduce the negative effects of drooling by increasing mouth-wiping responses. This study upgraded our initial approach and tested it with the two persons who we previously treated. Upgrading ensured that all technology components, including the stimulation sources, were on the participant's body and that stimulation for mouth wiping caused no (or limited) environmental disturbance. We also conducted a social validation assessment of the new technology and its effects, employing university students as social raters. Evidence showed that the participants used the upgraded technology successfully in settings attended by varieties of other persons. The university students involved in the social validation viewed the use of the technology as enjoyable, beneficial, and environmentally acceptable, and they largely supported it.

  7. Air drying of lumber.

    Treesearch

    1999-01-01

    This report describes how lumber can be air-dried most effectively under outdoor conditions and illustrates the principles and procedures of air-drying lumber that were developed through field investigations and observations of industrial practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the yarding of lumber in unit packages. Included are topics such as why lumber is dried...

  8. Epidermoid Cyst in the Floor of the Mouth of a 3-Year-Old

    PubMed Central

    Pascual Dabán, Rossana; García Díez, Eloy; González Navarro, Beatriz; López-López, José

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are a rare entity in the oral cavity and are even less frequent in the floor of the mouth, representing less than 0.01% of all the cases. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with a growth in the floor of the mouth with 2 months of evolution and without changes since it was discovered by her parents. The lesion was asymptomatic; it did not cause dysphagia, dyspnea, or any other alteration. A CT scan with contrast was done which revealed the location and exact size of the lesion, allowing an intraoral approach for its excision. The histological examination confirmed the clinical speculation of an epidermoid cyst. PMID:25694831

  9. Mouth breathing in obstructive sleep apnea prior to and during nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Ruhle, Karl Heinz; Nilius, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) often complain of dryness of mouth and throat prior to and during nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). It is believed that this is due to mouth breathing (MB). However, the association between mouth breathing and apneas/hypopneas and the effect of CPAP on MB has not been studied. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to assess the frequency and duration of episodes of MB prior to and during treatment with nCPAP. MB was recorded prior to and during nCPAP with a closely fitting mouth mask connected to a pneumotachograph and nasal flow was measured via nasal prongs. MB episodes were expressed as the number of events divided by total sleep time x 60, to give the MB event index per hour of sleep. MB time divided by total sleep time x 60 was calculated in minutes to get the MB time index per hour of sleep. Eleven male patients with OSAS (mean age 57.9 +/- 8.3 years, body mass index 30.2 +/- 3.8) were recruited to the study. Prior to nCPAP, the apnea/hypopnea index was 55.8 +/- 26 and decreased during nCPAP to 8.0 +/- 3.4. The lowest SaO2 measured was 82.9 +/- 4.7%, and increased to 87.5 +/- 2.7% under nCPAP. The mean nCPAP was 7.8 +/- 1.6 cm H2O. MB event index per hour of sleep decreased from 35.2 +/- 19.7 prior to treatment to 5.0 +/- 5.2 under nCPAP (p < 0.01). In 52.2 +/- 27.4% of obstructive respiratory events, MB started at the end of an apnea/hypopnea episode, decreasing to 8.5 +/- 12.5% with nCPAP treatment. MB time index per hour of sleep was reduced from 13.5 +/- 10.2 min prior to treatment to 4.6 +/- 5.5 min under nCPAP (p < 0.05). In OSAS patients, MB episodes often appear at the termination of an apnea/hypopnea episode. In many cases, MB episodes can be markedly reduced by nCPAP treatment. When patients on nCPAP complain of dry mouth, appropriate measurements should be performed to verify MB. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A Qualitative Evaluation of Hand Drying Practices among Kenyans

    PubMed Central

    Person, Bobbie; Schilling, Katharine; Owuor, Mercy; Ogange, Lorraine; Quick, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Background Recommended disease prevention behaviors of hand washing, hygienic hand drying, and covering one’s mouth and nose in a hygienic manner when coughing and sneezing appear to be simple behaviors but continue to be a challenge to successfully promote and sustain worldwide. We conducted a qualitative inquiry to better understand current hand drying behaviors associated with activities of daily living, and mouth and nose covering practices, among Kenyans. Methods and Findings We conducted 7 focus group discussions; 30 in-depth interviews; 10 structured household observations; and 75 structured observations in public venues in the urban area of Kisumu; rural communities surrounding Kisumu; and a peri-urban area outside Nairobi, Kenya. Using a grounded theory approach, we transcribed and coded the narrative data followed by thematic analysis of the emergent themes. Hand drying, specifically on a clean towel, was not a common practice among our participants. Most women dried their hands on their waist cloth, called a leso, or their clothes whether they were cooking, eating or cleaning the nose of a young child. If men dried their hands, they used their trousers or a handkerchief. Children rarely dried their hands; they usually just wiped them on their clothes, shook them, or left them wet as they continued with their activities. Many people sneezed into their hands and wiped them on their clothes. Men and women used a handkerchief fairly often when they had a runny nose, cold, or the flu. Most people coughed into the air or their hand. Conclusions Drying hands on dirty clothes, rags and lesos can compromise the benefits of handwashing. Coughing and sneezing in to an open hand can contribute to spread of disease as well. Understanding these practices can inform health promotion activities and campaigns for the prevention and control of diarrheal disease and influenza. PMID:24069302

  11. Respiratory volume perception through the nose and mouth determined noninvasively.

    PubMed

    Fox, J; Kreisman, H; Colacone, A; Wolkove, N

    1986-08-01

    The relative importance of the nose vs. the mouth in the perception of respiratory volumes has never been assessed, nor have previous respiratory perception studies been performed noninvasively. Using respiratory inductive plethysmography, we monitored 12 normal subjects noninvasively when breathing either exclusively through the nose or mouth. The sensation of inspired volume mouth breathing was compared with that of nose breathing over a wide range of the inspiratory capacity. The psychophysical techniques of tidal volume duplication, tidal volume doubling, and magnitude estimation were utilized. A just noticeable difference was calculated from the constant error of the tidal volume duplication trials. The exponents for magnitude estimation were 1.06 and 1.07 for nose and mouth breathing, respectively. The other psychophysical techniques also revealed no differences in nose and mouth volume perception. These results suggest that tidal volume changes are perceived equally well through the nose and mouth. Furthermore, the location of the receptors, important in volume perception, is probably at a distal point common to the nose and mouth.

  12. On the Conventionalization of Mouth Actions in Australian Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Trevor; van Roekel, Jane; Schembri, Adam

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the conventionalization of mouth actions in Australian Sign Language. Signed languages were once thought of as simply manual languages because the hands produce the signs which individually and in groups are the symbolic units most easily equated with the words, phrases and clauses of spoken languages. However, it has long been acknowledged that non-manual activity, such as movements of the body, head and the face play a very important role. In this context, mouth actions that occur while communicating in signed languages have posed a number of questions for linguists: are the silent mouthings of spoken language words simply borrowings from the respective majority community spoken language(s)? Are those mouth actions that are not silent mouthings of spoken words conventionalized linguistic units proper to each signed language, culturally linked semi-conventional gestural units shared by signers with members of the majority speaking community, or even gestures and expressions common to all humans? We use a corpus-based approach to gather evidence of the extent of the use of mouth actions in naturalistic Australian Sign Language-making comparisons with other signed languages where data is available--and the form/meaning pairings that these mouth actions instantiate.

  13. Hedgehog activity controls opening of the primary mouth.

    PubMed

    Tabler, Jacqueline M; Bolger, Trióna G; Wallingford, John; Liu, Karen J

    2014-12-01

    To feed or breathe, the oral opening must connect with the gut. The foregut and oral tissues converge at the primary mouth, forming the buccopharyngeal membrane (BPM), a bilayer epithelium. Failure to form the opening between gut and mouth has significant ramifications, and many craniofacial disorders have been associated with defects in this process. Oral perforation is characterized by dissolution of the BPM, but little is known about this process. In humans, failure to form a continuous mouth opening is associated with mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway members; however, the role of Hh in primary mouth development is untested. Here, we show, using Xenopus, that Hh signaling is necessary and sufficient to initiate mouth formation, and that Hh activation is required in a dose-dependent fashion to determine the size of the mouth. This activity lies upstream of the previously demonstrated role for Wnt signal inhibition in oral perforation. We then turn to mouse mutants to establish that SHH and Gli3 are indeed necessary for mammalian mouth development. Our data suggest that Hh-mediated BPM persistence may underlie oral defects in human craniofacial syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hedgehog activity controls opening of the primary mouth

    PubMed Central

    Tabler, Jacqueline M.; Bolger, Trióna G.; Wallingford, John; Liu, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    To feed or breathe, the oral opening must connect with the gut. The foregut and oral tissues converge at the primary mouth, forming the buccopharyngeal membrane (BPM), a bilayer epithelium. Failure to form the opening between gut and mouth has significant ramifications, and many craniofacial disorders have been associated with defects in this process. Oral perforation is characterized by dissolution of the BPM, but little is known about this process. In humans, failure to form a continuous mouth opening is associated with mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway members; however, the role of Hh in primary mouth development is untested. Here, we show, using Xenopus, that Hh signaling is necessary and sufficient to initiate mouth formation, and that Hh activation is required in a dose-dependent fashion to determine the size of the mouth. This activity lies upstream of the previously demonstrated role for Wnt signal inhibition in oral perforation. We then turn to mouse mutants to establish that SHH and Gli3 are indeed necessary for mammalian mouth development. Our data suggest that Hh-mediated BPM persistence may underlie oral defects in human craniofacial syndromes. PMID:25300580

  15. Structure of drying costs

    SciTech Connect

    Sztabert, Z.T.

    1996-05-01

    A knowledge of cost structure and cost behavior is necessary in the management activities, particularly in the domain of investment or production decision making, as well as in the areas of production cost planning and control. Prediction and analysis of values of cost components for different technologies of drying are important when selection of a drying method and drying equipment should be done. Cost structures of lumber and coal drying processes together with an application of the factor method for prediction of the drying cost are presented.

  16. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  17. Mouth breathing, "nasal disuse," and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo-Young; Guilleminault, Christian; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Sullivan, Shannon S

    2015-12-01

    Adenotonsillectomy (T&A) may not completely eliminate sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), and residual SDB can result in progressive worsening of abnormal breathing during sleep. Persistence of mouth breathing post-T&As plays a role in progressive worsening through an increase of upper airway resistance during sleep with secondary impact on orofacial growth. Retrospective study on non-overweight and non-syndromic prepubertal children with SDB treated by T&A with pre- and post-surgery clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) evaluations including systematic monitoring of mouth breathing (initial cohort). All children with mouth breathing were then referred for myofunctional treatment (MFT), with clinical follow-up 6 months later and PSG 1 year post-surgery. Only a limited subgroup followed the recommendations to undergo MFT with subsequent PSG (follow-up subgroup). Sixty-four prepubertal children meeting inclusion criteria for the initial cohort were investigated. There was significant symptomatic improvement in all children post-T&A, but 26 children had residual SDB with an AHI > 1.5 events/hour and 35 children (including the previous 26) had evidence of "mouth breathing" during sleep as defined [minimum of 44 % and a maximum of 100 % of total sleep time, mean 69 ± 11 % "mouth breather" subgroup and mean 4 ± 3.9 %, range 0 and 10.3 % "non-mouth breathers"]. Eighteen children (follow-up cohort), all in the "mouth breathing" group, were investigated at 1 year follow-up with only nine having undergone 6 months of MFT. The non- MFT subjects were significantly worse than the MFT-treated cohort. MFT led to normalization of clinical and PSG findings. Assessment of mouth breathing during sleep should be systematically performed post-T&A and the persistence of mouth breathing should be treated with MFT.

  18. Efficacy of mouth opening exercises in treating trismus after maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-hong; Ao, Hong-wei; Lin, Qing; Xu, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Patients with maxillary tumor often suffer from trismus after maxillectomy, which could turn out to be a permanent sequela without proper intervention. In this study, the efficacy of mouth opening exercises in preventing and treating trismus was observed in patients with maxillary tumor early after their operations. At the same time, radiotherapy as an influencing factor for the mouth opening exercises was evaluated. In this study, 22 patients with maxillary oncology began their mouth opening exercises at an early stage (1-2 weeks) after maxillectomy. They were divided into two groups based on the principle of voluntariness: 11 patients in group 1 chose TheraBites as their instruments of mouth opening exercises, and the other 11 in group 2 chose stacked tongue depressors to help their exercises. All participants were trained to exercise 3-5 times a day, 30-40 oscillations at one time, with a 2-second pause at their maximum possible mouth open position. The maximal interincisor distances (MID) of patients were measured and recorded by a single investigator every week after the beginning of the mouth opening exercises. Medical information and the responses of patients were also recorded. Initial and final MIDs were calculated by SPSS 13.0. The changes of the mouth aperture every week during exercises in both groups were described in figures, and there were statistical increases in the final MIDs compared with the initial ones. However, no significant differences were achieved between groups 1 and 2 (P > 0.05). Radiotherapy seemed to have no negative impact on the mouth opening results during the exercises. Physical mouth opening exercises should be executed early after maxillectomy for the prevention and treatment of trismus, especially for those who had radiotherapy as part of antitumor treatments.

  19. Development of prenatal lateralization: evidence from fetal mouth movements.

    PubMed

    Reissland, N; Francis, B; Aydin, E; Mason, J; Exley, K

    2014-05-28

    Human lateralized behaviors relate to the asymmetric development of the brain. Research of the prenatal origins of laterality is equivocal with some studies suggesting that fetuses exhibit lateralized behavior and other not finding such laterality. Given that by around 22weeks of gestation the left cerebral hemisphere compared to the right is significantly larger in both male and female fetuses we expected that the right side of the fetal face would show more movement with increased gestation. This longitudinal study investigated whether fetuses from 24 to 36weeks of gestation showed increasing lateralized behaviors during mouth opening and whether lateralized mouth movements are related to fetal age, gender and maternal self-reported prenatal stress. Following ethical approval, fifteen healthy fetuses (8 girls) of primagravid mothers were scanned four times from 24 to 36-gestation. Two types of mouth opening movements - upper lip raiser and mouth stretch - were coded in 60 scans for 10min. We modeled the proportion of right mouth opening for each fetal scan using a generalized linear mixed model, which takes account of the repeated measures design. There was a significant increase in the proportion of lateralized mouth openings over the period increasing by 11% for each week of gestational age (LRT change in deviance=10.92, 1df; p<0.001). No gender differences were found nor was there any effect of maternally reported stress on fetal lateralized mouth movements. There was also evidence of left lateralization preference in mouth movement, although no evidence of changes in lateralization bias over time. This longitudinal study provides important new insights into the development of lateralized mouth movements from 24 to 36 weeks of gestation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Traumatic Displacement of Maxillary Permanent Canine into the Vestibule of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Masayasu; Ito, Michiko; Katayama, Hanon; Nishijima, Hiroaki; Shimotori, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Airi; Tanaka, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Dentoalveolar injuries are common and are caused by many factors. Dental trauma requires special consideration when a missing tooth or tooth fracture accompanies soft tissue laceration. A tooth or its fragment occasionally penetrates into soft tissue and may cause severe complications. This report presents a case of delayed diagnosis and management of a displaced tooth in the vestibule of the mouth following dentoalveolar injury. This report suggests that radiography can lead to an early diagnosis and surgical removal of an embedded tooth in the soft tissue. PMID:26000177

  1. Phonological similarity effect is abolished by a silent mouthing task.

    PubMed

    Saito, S

    1993-04-01

    This experiment was designed to examine the effect of silent mouthing on the phonological similarity effect. 16 undergraduates were tested for serial recall of visually presented letter sequences that were either phonologically similar or dissimilar. The letter sequences had to be remembered under two conditions, a control condition and a silent mouthing condition in which subjects had to articulate irrelevant words silently during the study period. Analysis showed the clear advantage of the dissimilar sequence over the similar one in the control condition. In contrast, this phonological similarity effect disappeared in the silent mouthing condition. This result is consistent with the working memory model.

  2. Burning mouth syndrome: a discussion of a complex pathology.

    PubMed

    Zur, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex pathology for which there is very little information about the etiology and pathogenesis. This lack of knowledge leaves patients with suboptimal treatments. This article discusses the existing scientific evidence about this disease. Since topical oral use of clonazepam have been shown to be effective and safe to treat some patients suffering with burning mouth syndrome, formulations including clonazepam are included with this article. Compounding topical preparations of clonazepam offers opportunities for compounding pharmacists to be more involved in improving the quality of life of burning mouth syndrome patients.

  3. Local anesthesia of the temporomandibular joint to reduce pain during mouth opening for dental treatment in a patient with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Seong In; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Lee, Jong Ho; Chang, Juhea

    2016-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, severe neuromuscular disorder in which degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spine progressively weakens and ultimately paralyzes the proximal muscles. It occurs in one per 6,000-10,000 infants, and is a genetic disorder with the second-highest mortality rate worldwide. An 18-year-old male patient with SMA was referred for general anesthesia for difficulty in performing dental treatment due to limited mouth opening caused by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. However, the patient had a high risk of general anesthesia complications, so TMJ pain during mouth opening was reduced through local anesthesia of the TMJ. Fortunately, the anesthesia was successful in reducing pain during mouth opening, enabling the patient to receive dental treatment with an adequate mouth opening.

  4. Introduction and history of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mahy, B W J

    2005-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has been recognized as a significant epidemic disease threatening the cattle industry since the sixteenth century, and in the late nineteenth century it was shown by Loeffler and Frosch to be caused by a submicroscopic, filterable transmissible agent, smaller than any known bacteria. The agent causing FMD was thus the first virus of vertebrates to be discovered, soon after the discovery of tobacco mosaic virus of plants. It was not until 1920 that a convenient animal model for the study of FMD virus was established by Waldmann and Pape, using guinea-pigs, and with the later development of in vitro cell culture systems for the virus, the chemical and physical properties of FMD virus were elucidated during the remainder of the twentieth century, culminating in 1989 with a complete description of the three-dimensional structure of the virion. FMD virus is classified as a species in the Aphthovirus genus of the family Picornaviridae. The virus is acid labile, and the genome RNA contains a characteristic tract of polyC located about 360 nucleotides from the 5' terminus. Seven main serotypes exist throughout the world, as well as numerous subtypes. The World Reference Laboratory for FMD is located at Pirbright, Surrey, UK and undertakes surveillance of FMD epidemics by serotyping as well as by genotyping isolates of the virus. A major epidemic of FMD occurred in the UK in 2001 and was caused by a virulent strain of FMD virus with origins in Asia. The advantages and some disadvantages of controlling FMD outbreaks by vaccination are discussed.

  5. The Asian free-reed mouth organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottingham, James P.

    2002-11-01

    Mouth-blown instruments employing a free reed coupled to a pipe resonator have long been known and used throughout East and Southeast Asia. Details of the origin and development of these instruments are not known, but are closely connected with the history and prehistory of a multitude of ethnic groups. These instruments exemplify a pipe-resonator coupling significantly different from the standard wind instruments of European origin. The free reed used is approximately symmetric, often operating on both directions of air flow. In some cases the reed is at or near one end of a closed pipe, but in other examples the reed is mounted in the side of a resonator open at both ends. The instruments can be either multiple pipe instruments with one pipe per note, or a pipe with a single reed and tone holes. A number of experimental studies have been conducted on examples of Asian free-reed instruments, primarily the khaen, bawu, and sheng. These include studies of reed vibration, measurements of sound spectra, and impedance measurements of the pipes. Comparisons have been made between experimental results and theoretical work on the coupling of reed vibration with the pipe resonator.

  6. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS): evaluation of thyroid and taste.

    PubMed

    Femiano, F; Gombos, F; Esposito, V; Nunziata, M; Scully, Crispian

    2006-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic, intraoral burning sensation seen mainly in middle-aged and post-menopausal females, without identifiable oral lesions or abnormal laboratory findings, but often associated with psychogenic disorders such as depression. The latter can have a range of causes, including hormonal. Since there may be connections between BMS, psychogenic changes, hormonal changes and taste abnormalities, we have examined aspects of taste and thyroid function. We selected 50 patients with BMS (study group) and 50 healthy subjects (control group) and analysed their ability to taste bitter, acid and spicy substances and analysed their thyroid function and Undertook thyroid echography. Taste sensation was normal in all controls. However, 30 of the patients with BMS reported ageusia for bitter taste and 2 had ageusia for acid. The use of pepper sauce (Tabasco) (spicy substance) produced a strong burning to the tongue in 28 patients of the BMS group but only in 10 controls. No control patients showed abnormality of thyroid function or echograpic abnormality. Five patients in the BMS group had biochemical evidence of hypothyroidism, 4 patients had raised levels of thyroid auto-antibodies and, of the 41 remaining BMS patients, most (34) had thyroid echographic changes indicative of nodularity. Hypothyroidism may be responsible for a negative influence on taste and consequent increase in trigeminal sensorial sensation (tactile, thermal and painful sensation).

  7. A practitioner's primer on foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jeffrey M B

    2004-04-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is caused by an RNA virus of the genus Aphthovirus; 7 immunologically distinct serotypes of the virus have been identified. Susceptible species are mainly domestic and wild even-toed ungulates, such as cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, bison, and deer. All body fluids of infected animals can contain the virus and are considered infective. The primary mode of transmission is animal-to-animal transmission through inhalation or ingestion of aerosols containing the virus. The virus can also be spread mechanically by contaminated organic debris and fomites and can survive for 48 hours on human oral and nasal mucosa and be spread to uninfected animals in this manner. There is a rapid progression of clinical signs after an animal becomes infected, and the virus spreads rapidly throughout a herd. Clinical signs include excessive salivation; fever; vesicles and erosions of the oral and nasal mucosa, coronary band, interdigital area, and teats; lameness; sloughing of claws; reluctance to move; anorexia; mastitis; decreased milk production; and abortion or weak newborns. In mature animals, FMD has high morbidity and low mortality rates. Infected animals can become inapparent carriers of the virus.

  8. Foot and mouth disease: a look from the wild side.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Genevieve V; Domenech, Joseph; Thiermann, Alex R; Karesh, William B

    2013-10-01

    We review the literature and discuss control options regarding foot and mouth disease (FMD) in wildlife around the world. There are more than 100 species of wild, feral, laboratory, or domesticated animals that have been infected naturally or experimentally with FMD virus. Apart from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in sub-Saharan Africa, wildlife has not been demonstrated to play a significant role in the maintenance of FMD. More often, wildlife are passively infected when outbreaks of FMD occur in domestic livestock, and, in some wild ungulates, infection results in severe disease. Efforts to control FMD in wildlife may not be successful when the disease is endemic in livestock and may cause more harm to wildlife, human livelihoods, and domestic animals. Currently in sub-Saharan Africa, the complete eradication of FMD on a subcontinental scale in the near term is not possible, given the presence of FMD-infected African buffalo and the existence of weak veterinary infrastructures in some FMD-endemic countries. Therefore efforts to control the disease should be aimed at improved vaccines and improved use of vaccines, improved livestock management practices, and utilization of programs that can help in disease control such as the FMD Progressive Control Program and regulatory frameworks that facilitate trade such zonation, compartmentalization, and commodity-based trade. Though not meeting the definition of wildlife used in this review, feral domestic animals warrant a special concern with regard to FMD control.

  9. 2500 years of changing shoreline accretion rates at the mouths of the Mekong River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besset, Manon; Tamura, Toru; Anthony, Edward; Brunier, Guillaume; Saito, Yoshiki; Dussouillez, Philippe; Lap Nguyen, Van; Ta, Oahn

    2016-04-01

    The Mekong River delta prograded rapidly in a relatively sheltered bight in the South China Sea under the influence of high fluvial sediment supply 5300 to 3500 years ago, developing from an estuary into a delta. This >200 km seaward growth resulted in increasing exposure of the delta to ocean waves that led to a more wave-influenced mode of progradation characterized by the construction of numerous sets of beach ridges in the eastern sector of the delta, which shows a system of multiple distributary mouths. The growth pattern of this river-mouth sector over the last 2500 years has been determined from OSL dating of these beach-ridge deposits, while the most up-to-date trends (1950-2014) have been highlighted from the analysis of maps and satellite images. The OSL ages show that the area of the delta in the mouths sector remained nearly constant till about 500 yr BP, following which significant accretion occurred, possibly in response to changes in catchment land-use and monsoon rainfall and attendant river water and sediment discharge. A fine-tuned analysis of changes since 1950 shows dominant but fluctuating accretion, with two periods of erosion. The first (1965-1973) occurred in the course of the second Indochina war, and the second more recently from 2003 to 2011, followed by mild recovery between 2011 and 2014. These fluctuations most likely reflect changes in sediment supply caused by the vicissitudes of war and its effect on vegetation cover, as well as variations in monsoon rainfall and discharge, and, for the most recent period, massive sand mining in the river and deltaic channels. Accretion of the mouths sector has gone apace, over the same recent multi-decadal period, with large-scale erosion of the muddy shores of the delta in the western South China Sea and the Gulf of Thailand, thus suggesting that the mouths sector may be increasingly sequestering sediment to the detriment of the rest of the delta shoreline. The accretion in the mouths sector is

  10. Oropharyngeal Control of Hand-Mouth Coordination in Newborn Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochat, Philippe; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Identifies a coordinative structure of action that integrates hand and mouth activities within hours after birth. Found that presenting neonates with a sucrose solution focused gross motor patterns of hand movement on the oral and perioral regions. (SKC)

  11. Hardness and shock absorption of silicone rubber for mouth guards.

    PubMed

    Auroy, P; Duchatelard, P; Zmantar, N E; Hennequin, M

    1996-04-01

    Silicone rubbers have general properties that make them suitable for the fabrication of custom-made mouth guards. This study evaluated the shock absorption properties and Shore A hardness of several silicone rubbers and derived products, compared their values with those of materials commonly used for the manufacture of mouth guards, and correlated the shock absorption and transmission abilities of these different materials with their Shore hardness. Silicone rubbers absorb shock better than the materials currently used for custom-made mouth guards. In addition, to adapt mouth guards to particular sports, the properties of the silicone rubbers can be appropriately modified by the addition of oils or glass fiber reinforcement. Statistical analysis of hardness values and transmitted forces for the 27 materials tested indicates that the maximum transmitted force increases with hardness. However, this relationship is not linear, and departure from linearity is greatest for minimal and maximal hardness values.

  12. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER MOUTH OF FISH LADDER AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER MOUTH OF FISH LADDER AT ROCK OUTCROPPING, SHOWING NATURAL CARVED ROCK POOLS, UPPER PORTION OF FISH LADDER VISIBLE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST (UPSTREAM) - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  13. Efficient approach to Chinese phoneme mouth-shape recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiao; Ma, Shaoping; Zhang, Bo

    2001-09-01

    Recent research results show the recognition rates of all kinds mouth-shape recognition systems are not high enough because of the improper feature selection and extraction for mouth-shape images and the false classification for those features on the boundary of different categories. This paper presents a statistical approach, called CPMSR, for mouth-shape recognition at the phoneme level. The feature-extracting module for this approach is based on research results of phonetics and personal investigation at a deaf school. The analyzing module employs Support Vector Machine (SVM) technique, which is a useful tool dealing with boundary points problem. With these improvements our experiment achieved the satisfactory recognition rate of over 90% for 5 vowels and 24 consonants' mouth-shapes.

  14. 10. General oblique view of steel pedestrian bridge spanning mouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. General oblique view of steel pedestrian bridge spanning mouth of raceway; view to northwest. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  15. 21. DETAILED FRONTAL VIEW WEST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING MOUTHS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAILED FRONTAL VIEW WEST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING MOUTHS WITH ROLLERS FOR MOVING TRAYS IN AND OUT OF THE OVENS. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  16. Foot-and-mouth disease virus L peptidase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) comprise the genus Aphthovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Seven genera within this family, Aphthoviruses, Cardioviruses, Erboviruses (ERBV), Kobuviruses, Senecaviruses, Sapeloviruses, and Tescho...

  17. 2. Photocopy of 1827 map of mouth of Cuyahoga River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of 1827 map of mouth of Cuyahoga River from Corps of Engineers files, Buffalo District. This is the earliest map of the Cleveland Harbor in the Corps' files. - Cleveland Breakwater at Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. Development and evolution of the vertebrate primary mouth

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Vladimír; Horácek, Ivan; Cerny, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate oral region represents a key interface between outer and inner environments, and its structural and functional design is among the limiting factors for survival of its owners. Both formation of the respective oral opening (primary mouth) and establishment of the food-processing apparatus (secondary mouth) require interplay between several embryonic tissues and complex embryonic rearrangements. Although many aspects of the secondary mouth formation, including development of the jaws, teeth or taste buds, are known in considerable detail, general knowledge about primary mouth formation is regrettably low. In this paper, primary mouth formation is reviewed from a comparative point of view in order to reveal its underestimated morphogenetic diversity among, and also within, particular vertebrate clades. In general, three main developmental modes were identified. The most common is characterized by primary mouth formation via a deeply invaginated ectodermal stomodeum and subsequent rupture of the bilaminar oral membrane. However, in salamander, lungfish and also in some frog species, the mouth develops alternatively via stomodeal collar formation contributed both by the ecto- and endoderm. In ray-finned fishes, on the other hand, the mouth forms via an ectoderm wedge and later horizontal detachment of the initially compressed oral epithelia with probably a mixed germ-layer derivation. A very intriguing situation can be seen in agnathan fishes: whereas lampreys develop their primary mouth in a manner similar to the most common gnathostome pattern, hagfishes seem to undergo a unique oropharyngeal morphogenesis when compared with other vertebrates. In discussing the early formative embryonic correlates of primary mouth formation likely to be responsible for evolutionary–developmental modifications of this area, we stress an essential role of four factors: first, positioning and amount of yolk tissue; closely related to, second, endoderm formation during

  19. Development and evolution of the vertebrate primary mouth.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Vladimír; Horácek, Ivan; Cerny, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate oral region represents a key interface between outer and inner environments, and its structural and functional design is among the limiting factors for survival of its owners. Both formation of the respective oral opening (primary mouth) and establishment of the food-processing apparatus (secondary mouth) require interplay between several embryonic tissues and complex embryonic rearrangements. Although many aspects of the secondary mouth formation, including development of the jaws, teeth or taste buds, are known in considerable detail, general knowledge about primary mouth formation is regrettably low. In this paper, primary mouth formation is reviewed from a comparative point of view in order to reveal its underestimated morphogenetic diversity among, and also within, particular vertebrate clades. In general, three main developmental modes were identified. The most common is characterized by primary mouth formation via a deeply invaginated ectodermal stomodeum and subsequent rupture of the bilaminar oral membrane. However, in salamander, lungfish and also in some frog species, the mouth develops alternatively via stomodeal collar formation contributed both by the ecto- and endoderm. In ray-finned fishes, on the other hand, the mouth forms via an ectoderm wedge and later horizontal detachment of the initially compressed oral epithelia with probably a mixed germ-layer derivation. A very intriguing situation can be seen in agnathan fishes: whereas lampreys develop their primary mouth in a manner similar to the most common gnathostome pattern, hagfishes seem to undergo a unique oropharyngeal morphogenesis when compared with other vertebrates. In discussing the early formative embryonic correlates of primary mouth formation likely to be responsible for evolutionary-developmental modifications of this area, we stress an essential role of four factors: first, positioning and amount of yolk tissue; closely related to, second, endoderm formation during

  20. Occlusal concepts in full mouth rehabilitation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Bhawana; Ladha, Komal; Lalit, Aaruti; Dwarakananda Naik, B

    2014-12-01

    Restoration of occlusion in patients with severely worn dentition is a challenging situation as every case is unique in itself. There is great apprehension involved in reconstructing debilitated dentition due to widely divergent views concerning the choice of an appropriate occlusal scheme for successful full mouth rehabilitation. This article is an overview of the various occlusal concepts/philosophies in full mouth rehabilitation which will help the clinician select an appropriate occlusal scheme for an individual case.

  1. Management of antithrombotic therapy before full-mouth extraction.

    PubMed

    Powless, R Andrew; Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2013-06-01

    The management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy before full-mouth extraction is a major concern for dentists. Approach should vary depending on the risk of bleeding and adverse cardiac events. We have adapted a more conservative approach with continuation of antiplatelet therapy in the majority of patients while implementing local hemostatic measures with good outcomes. Specific recommendations are provided for antiplatelet therapy before mouth extraction.

  2. 33. NEARLY VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. NEARLY VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE FEDERAL CHANNEL, LOOKING TO THE NORTHWEST. NEITHER ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION NOR OAKLAND NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER HAVE BEEN BUILT. No date, probably mid-1930's. U.S. Navy photograph. Original print on file at the National Archives, San Bruno, California. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  3. 30. VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE FEDERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE FEDERAL CHANNEL, SCALE 1:14,400. TO THE SOUTH OF THE CHANNEL ARE THE RUNWAYS OF THE FORMER ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION; TO THE NORTH ARE THE BERTHS AND BUILDINGS OF THE FORMER NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER, OAKLAND. Date and time of photography '12-9-98 10:51." - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. Gross Anatomy of Pampas Deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, Linnaeus 1758) Mouth and Pharynx.

    PubMed

    Pérez, W; Vazquez, N; Ungerfeld, R

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the anatomy of the mouth and pharynx of the pampas deer, and to consider its evolutionary feeding niche according to those characteristics. Gross dissections of the mouth and pharynx were performed in 15 animals, 10 adult females and five young animals under 1 year (three males and two females), all dead by causes unrelated to this anatomical region. The upper lip entered in the constitution of a pigmented nasolabial plane. The masseter muscles weighed 43.8 ± 3.5 g and represented 0.23% of body weight, which corresponds to ruminants of feeders intermediate to grazers and browsers. Parotid glands represented 0.08% of the body weight, characteristic that also categorize the pampas deer as belonging to the intermediate feeding group. The dental formula was the same of the domestic ruminants. The upper incisors and canines were absent, and instead of them, there was a dental pad (Pulvinus dentalis). The upper canine teeth were present only in the deciduous dentition. The existence of a brachydont dentition turns Ozotoceros very vulnerable to continuous use as there is no compensatory teeth growth. The particular anatomy of the mouth and lips of this animal was adapted to a very selective feeding, taking highly nutritious sprouts beyond plant category. In conclusion and in addition to previous studies of anatomy of the digestive organs in this species, pampas deer may be categorized as belonging to the intermediate type of feeding.

  5. A potential trigger for pine mouth: a case of a homozygous PTC taster

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Davide S.; Howard, Louisa; VanWaes, Carter; Drayna, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Pine mouth, also known as Pine Nut Syndrome (PNS), is an uncommon dysgeusia that generally begins 12–48 hours after consuming pine nuts. It is characterized by a bitter metallic taste, usually amplified by the consumption of other foods, which lasts 2–4 weeks. Recent findings have correlated this disorder with the consumption of nuts of the species Pinus armandii, but no potential triggers or common underlying medical causes have been identified in individuals affected by this syndrome. We report a 23-year-old patient affected by pine mouth that also underwent a PTC taste test and was found to be a taster for this compound. TAS2R38 genotyping demonstrated this subject was a homozygous carrier of the PAV taster haplotype. We therefore hypothesize that homozygous PTC taster status may be a potential contributor for pine mouth events. Although based on a single observation, this research suggests a connection between genetically determined bitter taste perception and the occurrence of pine nut dysgeusia events. PMID:26463018

  6. A potential trigger for pine mouth: a case of a homozygous phenylthiocarbamide taster.

    PubMed

    Risso, Davide S; Howard, Louisa; VanWaes, Carter; Drayna, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Pine mouth, also known as pine nut syndrome, is an uncommon dysgeusia that generally begins 12 to 48 hours after consuming pine nuts. It is characterized by a bitter metallic taste, usually amplified by the consumption of other foods, which lasts 2 to 4 weeks. Recent findings have correlated this disorder with the consumption of nuts of the species Pinus armandii, but no potential triggers or common underlying medical causes have been identified in individuals affected by this syndrome. We report a 23-year-old patient affected by pine mouth who also underwent a phenylthiocarbamide taste test and was found to be a taster for this compound. TAS2R38 genotyping demonstrated that this subject was a homozygous carrier of the proline-alanine-valine taster haplotype. We, therefore, hypothesize that homozygous phenylthiocarbamide taster status may be a potential contributor for pine mouth events. Although based on a single observation, this research suggests a connection between genetically determined bitter taste perception and the occurrence of pine nut dysgeusia events.

  7. The effect of mouth breathing on dentofacial morphology of growing child.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S; Pandey, R K; Nagar, A; Agarwal, S P; Gupta, V K

    2012-01-01

    The oral mode of respiration cause postural adaptations of structures in the head and neck region producing the effect on the positional relationship of the jaws. The aim of this study is to verify the skeletal relationship of mouth and nose breathing child. A cross sectional study was performed to assess the association of changed mode of respiration with dentofacial growth. One hundred children among which 54 were mouth breathers and 46 were nasal breathers of 6-12 years of age were submitted to clinical examination and cephalometric radiographical analysis. Statistical analysis : Chi-square test for proportions and independent sample's "t" test for parametric data is used. The mean values of N-Me (P<0.001) ANS-Me (P<0.001) and SN-GoGn (P<0.001) for mouth breathers is significantly higher. ArGo-GoMe (P=0.003) and (P<0.011) for 6-9 and 9-12 years age group, respectively, were significantly low in nasal breathers group. Changed mode of respiration was associated with increased facial height, mandibular plane angle and gonial angle.

  8. Demineralization of teeth in mouth-breathing patients undergoing maxillary expansion.

    PubMed

    Bakor, Silvia Fuerte; Pereira, Julio César Motta; Frascino, Silvana; Ladalardo, Thereza Christinna Cellos Gonçalves Pinheiro; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice

    2010-01-01

    Mouth breathing may cause deformities on the dental arch and be a risk factor for caries and periodontal disease; fixed orthodontic appliances compound the problem. to evaluate mineralization of tooth enamel and the oral cariogenic microbiota of mouth breathers that are using maxillary expanders. a prospective study of 20 mouth-breathing patients with maxillary atresia, aged from 09 to 13 years. Enamel mineralization was measured using a fluorescence technique, before installing the expander and after its removal. The cariogenic microbiota was evaluated by the No Caries®. The t test (p<0.05) was applied for the statistical analysis, and the oral microbiota was analyzed by incidence. there was a statistically significant difference in the enamel mineralization level after maxillary expansion; the mean value was 3.08. The colorimetric test showed that the caries development potential was reduced in 45%, increased in 15%, and unaltered in 40% after maxillary expander use. there was a statistically significant difference in enamel mineralization after maxillary expansion; this difference was within the clinically normal range; the cariogenic potential increased in a small number of patients during orthodontic treatment.

  9. Cough gastric pressure and maximum expiratory mouth pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Man, William D-C; Kyroussis, Dimitris; Fleming, Tracey A; Chetta, Alfredo; Harraf, Farzaneh; Mustfa, Naveed; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John

    2003-09-15

    Maximal expiratory mouth pressure is a well established test that is used to assess expiratory muscle strength. However, low values are difficult to interpret, as they may result from technical difficulties in performing the test, particularly in patients with facial muscle weakness or bulbar dysfunction. We hypothesized that measuring the gastric pressure during a cough, a natural maneuver recruiting the expiratory muscles, might prove to be a useful additional test in the assessment of expiratory muscle function. Mouth expiratory and cough gastric pressures were measured in 99 healthy volunteers to obtain normal values and in 293 patients referred for respiratory muscle assessment to compare the two measurements. Between-occasion within-subject coefficient of variation, assessed in 24 healthy volunteers, was 10.3% for mouth pressure and 6.9% for cough. Mean +/- SD cough gastric pressure for normal males was 214.4 +/- 42.2 and 165.1 +/- 34.8 cm H2O for females. In 171 patients deemed weak by a low mouth expiratory pressure, 42% had a normal cough gastric pressure. In 105 patients deemed weak by a low cough gastric pressure, 5.7% had a normal expiratory mouth pressure. Low maximal expiratory mouth pressures do not always indicate expiratory muscle weakness. Cough gastric pressure provides a useful complementary test for the assessment of expiratory muscle strength.

  10. Postural alterations and pulmonary function of mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Waleska da; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Guimarães, Fernando Silva; Menezes, Sara Lucia Siveira de

    2010-01-01

    Mouth-breathing children have changes in their stomatognathic system, which result in head projection, stress increase in the scapular belt muscles and postural adaptations. Although thoracic shape and posture can influence ventilatory dynamics, we didn't find studies addressing pulmonary function of mouth-breathing children. this study aimed at analyzing the posture of mouth-breathing children, and studying the existence of correlations between posture and pulmonary volumes. prospective, observational and cross-sectional study, where the posture and pulmonary function of 17 mouth-breathing children and of 17 nasal-breathing children were evaluated by means of photogrammetry and forced spirometry. when compared to nasal-breathing, mouth-breathing subjects presented an increment in head projection and cervical lordosis, forwarded gravity center and reduced pulmonary volumes. There was an association between head projection and forced vital capacity, and between postural alterations and age. mouth-breathing children have postural alterations which increases with age and also reduced spirometry values. The vital capacity reduction correlates negatively with head projection.

  11. [Prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school].

    PubMed

    Felcar, Josiane Marques; Bueno, Izabele Rafael; Massan, Ana Carolina Silva; Torezan, Roberta Pereira; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article is to identify the prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school. 496 questionnaires were answered by 1st and 4th grade children's parents or sponsors in order to identify mouth-breathing. There were questions about habits, sleeping, behavior, eating, personal care and breathing. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between mouth-breathing and nose-breathing among the groups. To measure the exposure effect of the explanatory variables on mouth breathing, the test of logistic regression was used and its magnitude was calculated through Odds Ratio. The statistical significance was set at 5%, and the rate of returned questionnaires was 84.5%. The prevalence of the mouthbreathing over this population was 56.8%. The average age was 7 years old (6-9). There was no significant statistical difference between genders, considering 49.1% male and 50.9% female. The final model of logistic regression identified the variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores as factors that predict the occurrence of the mouth-breathing. The prevalence of mouthbreathing was similar to related in the literature. The variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores may be factors that predict the occurrence of mouth-breathing.

  12. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  13. EUV extendibility via dry development rinse process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayan, Safak; Zheng, Tao; De Simone, Danilo; Vandenberghe, Geert

    2016-03-01

    Conventional photoresist processing involves resist coating, exposure, post-exposure bake, development, rinse and spin drying of a wafer. DDRP mitigates pattern collapse by applying a special polymer material (DDRM) which replaces the exposed/developed part of the photoresist material before wafer is spin dried. As noted above, the main mechanism of pattern collapse is the capillary forces governed by surface tension of rinse water and its asymmetrical recession from both sides of the lines during the drying step of the develop process. DDRP essentially eliminates these failure mechanisms by replacing remaining rinse water with DDRM and providing a structural framework that support resist lines from both sides during spin dry process. Dry development rinse process (DDRP) eliminates the root causes responsible for pattern collapse of photoresist line structures. Since these collapse mechanisms are mitigated, without the need for changes in the photoresist itself, achievable resolution of the state-of-the-art EUV photoresists can further be improved.

  14. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  15. Dry pressing technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dry pressing of technical ceramics is a fundamental method of producing high-quality ceramic components. The goals of dry pressing technical ceramics are uniform compact size and green density, consistent part-to-part green density and defect-free compact. Dry pressing is the axial compaction of loosely granulated dry ceramic powders (< 3% free moisture) within a die/punch arrangement. The powder, under pressure, conforms to the specific shape of the punch faces and die. Powder compaction occurs within a rigid-walled die and usually between a top and bottom punch. Press configurations include anvil, rotary, multiple-punch and multiple-action.

  16. Willingness to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation by health care providers: a survey.

    PubMed

    Boucek, Charles D; Phrampus, Paul; Lutz, John; Dongilli, Thomas; Bircher, Nicholas G

    2009-08-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mouth-to-mouth ventilation (MTM) is only effective if rescuers are willing to perform it. To assess the degree of willingness or reluctance in performing MTM, a survey including 17 hypothetical scenarios was created. In each scenario health hazards for the rescuer needed to be balanced against the patient's need for MTM. Respondents were recruited from health care workers attending courses at a medical simulation center. Respondents reported their willingness or reluctance to perform MTM for each scenario using a 4 point scale. The questionnaire had responses by 560 health care workers. Reluctance to perform MTM varied with the scenario. Some health care workers refused to ventilate patients who could benefit from MTM. In all scenarios even when resuscitation was both futile and potentially hazardous, some health care workers were willing to perform MTM. Age and level of experience tend to reduce the propensity to engage in MTM. Parental propensity to ventilate one's own child was stronger than any other motivator. HIV infection is not the only condition for which rescuers hesitate to perform MTM. Bag-valve-mask devices for mechanical ventilation should be available in all locations where health care workers may be called upon to resuscitate apneic patients making the decision to perform MTM moot.

  17. Probiotics: health benefits in the mouth.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, Iva; Meurman, Jukka H

    2009-12-01

    Probiotics or health-beneficial bacteria have only recently been introduced in dentistry and oral medicine after years of successful use in mainly gastro-intestinal disorders. The concept of bacteriotherapy and use of health-beneficial micro-organisms to heal diseases or support immune function was first introduced in the beginning of the 20th century. Later the concept lead to the development of modem dairy industry and even today most probiotic strains are lactobacilli or bifidobacteria used in milk fermentation. The mechanisms of probiotic action are mainly unknown but the inter-microbial species interactions are supposed to play a key role in this together with their immuno-stimulatory effects. The introduction of probiotic bacteria in the mouth calls for ascertainment of their particular safety. Since acid production from sugar is detrimental to teeth, care must be taken not to select strains with high fermentation capacity. The first randomized controlled trials have nevertheless shown that probiotics may control dental caries in children due to their inhibitory action against cariogenic streptococci. Less evidence exists on their role in periodontal disease or oral yeast infections. Furthermore the best vehicles for oral probiotic applications need to be assessed. So far mainly dairy products have been investigated but other means such as probiotics in chewing gums or lozenges have also been studied. From the clinical practitioner's point of view direct recommendations for the use of probiotics cannot yet be given. However, scientific evidence so far indicates that probiotic therapy may be a reality also in dentistry and oral medicine in the future.

  18. [Burning mouth syndrome: pathogenic and therapeutic concepts].

    PubMed

    Ferensztajn, Ewa; Łojko, Dorota; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition characterized by pain, burning sensations and dryness within an oral mucosa, without any clinical changes of the latter. It occurs approximately seven times more frequently in women, mostly in perimenopausal age. The psychiatric aspect of BMS is significant: the most frequent co-morbidities are depression and anxiety disorders, and a number of psychotropic drugs play an essential role in its treatment. In the present review, the most important pathogenic and treatment concepts of BMS have been discussed. The BMS may be similar to neuropathic pain and has some related pathogenic elements with fibromyalgia and the restless leg syndrome. In primary BMS, the features of presynaptic dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons and deficiency of endogenous dopamine levels have been demonstrated. Other neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenaline, histamine as well as hormonal and inflammatory factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of BMS. In the pharmacological treatment of BMS a variety of drugs have been used including benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the final part of the paper, the possibility of using atypical antipsychotic drug, olanzapine, in the treatment of BMS has been discussed. In the context of the recent studies on this topic, a case of female patient with the BMS lasting more than ten years has been mentioned, in whom the treatment with olanzapine brought about a rapid and significant reduction of symptoms. The probable mechanism of the therapeutic effect of olanzapine in BMS can include its effect on dopaminergic receptors and probably also on histaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic ones.

  19. Microwave-assisted drying of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) fruits: Drying kinetics, polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidant capacity, colour and texture.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Magdalena; Michalska, Anna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of hot air convective drying (HACD), microwave vacuum drying (MWVD) and their combination (HACD+MWVD) on the drying kinetics, colour, total polyphenols, anthocyanins antioxidant capacity and texture of frozen/thawed blueberries. Drying resulted in reduction of total polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity (69 and 77%, respectively). The highest content of total polyphenols was noted after HACD at 90°C. Lower air temperature and prolonged exposure to oxygen resulted in greater degradation of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. Drying processes caused a significant decrease (from 70 to 95%) in the content of anthocyanins. The highest content of anthocyanins and the strongest antioxidant capacity was found in blueberries dried using HACD at 90°C+MWVD. Among drying methods, HACD at 90°C+MWVD satisfied significant requirements for dried fruits i.e. short drying time and improved product quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dry sump crankcase

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A.H.; Dichi, R.E.

    1987-06-23

    A dry sump type crankcase is described for an automotive type internal combustion engine having an intake manifold and a positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system for automatically and continuously ventilating the crankcase. The system includes an essentially atmospheric pressure fresh air inlet to the engine passing air through to the crankcase and a connection from the oil pan to the vacuum in the intake manifold establishing a constant flow of crankcase vapors. The oil pan has a baffle partitioning it into an inner oil collecting funnel-like crankcase cavity and an outer oil reservoir. The inner cavity has an opening at its lower-most point for communication of oil with the reservoir. The opening is of a controlled vertical height for creating a pressure differential across the baffle during operation of the engine. Means connects the inner cavity to the air inlet pressure side of the PCV System while connecting the reservoir to the vacuum side of the PCV system for establishing a constant pressure differential across the baffle sufficient to displace the oil against gravity and maintain the oil level in the crankcase during operation of the engine at the height of the opening in the baffle. Gravity causes the oil to seek a level higher than the opening upon shutdown of the engine and the consequential decay of vacuum in the intake manifold.

  1. Opposition of carbohydrate in a mouth-rinse solution to the detrimental effect of mouth rinsing during cycling time trials.

    PubMed

    Gam, Sharon; Guelfi, Kym J; Fournier, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    Studies have reported that rinsing the mouth with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution improves cycling time-trial performance compared with rinsing with a placebo solution. However, no studies have compared the effect of mouth rinsing with a no-mouth-rinse control condition. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a CHO mouth rinse with those of a placebo rinse and a no-rinse condition. Ten male cyclists completed three 1,000-kJ cycling time trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. At every 12.5% of the time trial completed, participants were required to rinse their mouths for 5 s with either a 6.4% maltodextrin solution (CHO), water (WA), or no solution (CON). Heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded every 25% of the time trial completed. Time to completion was faster in both CHO (65.7 ± 11.07 min) and CON (67.6 ± 12.68 min) than in WA (69.4 ± 13.81 min; p = .013 and p = .042, respectively). The difference between CHO and CON approached significance (p = .086). There were no differences in heart rate or RPE between any conditions. In summary, repeated mouth rinsing with water results in decreased performance relative to not rinsing at all. Adding CHO to the rinse solution appears to oppose this fall in performance, possibly providing additional benefits to performance compared with not rinsing the mouth at all. This brings into question the magnitude of the effect of CHO mouth rinsing reported in previous studies that did not include a no-rinse condition.

  2. Mercury levels in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from the Warta Mouth National Park, northwestern Poland.

    PubMed

    Lanocha, Natalia; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Budis, Halina; Podlasinska, Joanna; Jedrzejewska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    This is the first report on mercury (Hg) levels in the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and brain of raccoon in Europe. It studied Hg concentration in 24 raccoons from the Warta Mouth National Park, northwestern Poland by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The highest total Hg concentrations in the raccoon were found in the liver (maximum, 18.45 mg/kg dry weight), while the lowest in the brain (maximum, 0.49 mg/kg dw). In adult raccoons, Hg concentrations in the liver, kidney, and brain were higher than in immature individuals (p<0.001), while similar in skeletal muscle in both age groups. Our results are consistent with studies by other authors conducted in North America in areas with similar environmental conditions.

  3. Drought and Winter Drying (Pest Alert)

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service

    Drought and winter drying have periodically caused major damage to trees. Drought reduces the amount of water available in the soil. In the case of winter drying, the water may be in the soil, but freezing of the soil makes the water unavailable to the tree. In both cases, more water is lost through transpiration than is available to the plant. Symptoms of drought and...

  4. Emissions of perchloroethylene from dry cleaned fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichenor, Bruce A.; Sparks, Leslie E.; Jackson, Merrill D.; Guo, Zhishi; Mason, Mark A.; Michelle Plunket, C.; Rasor, Susan A.

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emissions of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: (a) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning into a home affects the indoor concentration of perchloroethylene, and (b) the effectiveness of 'airing out' dry cleaned clothes in reducing perchloroethylene emissions. Small chamber tests were conducted to determine perchloroethylene emission characteristics for three fabrics at several air exchange rates. Test house studies were conducted to determine the indoor concentration of perchloroethylene due to the placement of dry cleaned clothing in the house. Based on the study results, and assuming that test conditions were representative of normal dry cleaning and consumer practices, the following conclusions were reached. Emissions from freshly dry cleaned clothing cause elevated levels of perchloroethylene in residences. For the three fabrics tested, 'airing out' of dry cleaned clothing by consumers for short time periods (4-8 h) will not be effective in reducing perchloroethylene emissions. Adsorptive surfaces (i.e. sinks) in residences may have a major impact on consumer exposure to perchloroethylene. It is emphasized that these conclusions are based on the results of the study reported. Significant variations in dry cleaning practices and/or in the mix of fabrics and clothing being cleaned could provide different results and conclusions.

  5. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  6. Tray Drying of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  7. Tray Drying of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  8. Indiana Corn Dry Mill

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this project is to perform engineering, project design, and permitting for the creation and commercial demonstration of a corn dry mill biorefinery that will produce fuel-grade ethanol, distillers dry grain for animal feed, and carbon dioxide for industrial use.

  9. Superficial versus deep dry needling.

    PubMed

    Baldry, Peter

    2002-08-01

    Ninety percent of my patients with myofascial trigger point (MTrP) pain have this alone and are treated with superficial dry needling. Approximately 10% have concomitant MTrP pain and nerve root compression pain. These are treated with deep dry needling. SUPERFICIAL DRY NEEDLING (SDN): The activated and sensitised nociceptors of a MTrP cause it to be so exquisitely tender that firm pressure applied to it gives rise to a flexion withdrawal reflex (jump sign) and in some cases the utterance of an expletive (shout sign). The optimum strength of SDN at a MTrP site is the minimum necessary to abolish these two reactions. With respect to this patients are divided into strong, average and weak responders. The responsiveness of each individual is determined by trial and error. It is my practice to insert a needle (0.3mm x 30mm) into the tissues immediately overlying the MTrP to a depth of 5-10 mm and to leave it in situ long enough for the two reactions to be abolished. For an average reactor this is about 30secs. For a weak reactor it is several minutes. And for a strong reactor the insertion of the needle and its immediate withdrawal is all that is required. Following treatment muscle stretching exercises should be carried out, and any steps taken to eliminate factors that might lead to the reactivation of the MTrPs. DEEP DRY NEEDLING (DDN): This in my practice is only used either when primary MTrP activity causes shortening of muscle sufficient enough to bring about compression of nerve roots. Or when there is nerve compression pain usually from spondylosis or disc prolapse and the secondary development of MTrP activity. Unlike SDN, DDN is a painful procedure and one which gives rise to much post-treatment soreness.

  10. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  11. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Anna M; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts.

  12. CHO Mouth Rinsing Improves Neuromuscular Performance During Isokinetic Fatiguing Exercise.

    PubMed

    Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Patrizio, Federica; Felici, Francesco; Nicolò, Andrea; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2016-12-14

    To determine whether repeated CHO mouth rinsing would improve neuromuscular performance during high intensity fatiguing contractions. 18 young men (26.1±5.0 yr; 22.9±1,9 BMI) performed 3 maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICPRE). Immediately after, they completed 10 s mouth rinse with either 6.4% maltodextrine solution [MAL] or 7.1% glucose solution [GLU] or water [W] or artificially sweetened solution [PLA] or a control trial with no rinse [CON] in a cross over protocol. 5 sets of 30 isokinetic fatiguing contractions at 180°s(-1) and a MVICPOST with their elbow flexors were performed after each mouth rinse. Mechanical and electromyographic signals (EMG) were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle and parameters of interest analyzed. 1) When rinsing the mouth with a solution containing CHO, independently of the sweetness, isokinetic performance was enhanced as shown by the greater total work achieved in comparison with CON; 2) the decay of torque and mean fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) recorded at the end of the fatiguing task was lower when rinsing the mouth with GLU compared to CON; 3) the torque recorded during the MVICPOST was greater with CHO with respect to CON and this was associated to a lower decay of MFCV. CHO mouth rinse counteracts the fatigue-induced decline in neuromuscular performance, supporting the notion that CHO rinse may activate positive afferent signals able to modify the motor output. Repeated mouth rinsing with sweet and non-sweet CHO-containing solutions can improve neuromuscular performance during an isokinetic intermittent fatiguing task.

  13. Dry imaging cameras.

    PubMed

    Indrajit, Ik; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-04-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow.

  14. Infrared drying of strawberry.

    PubMed

    Adak, Nafiye; Heybeli, Nursel; Ertekin, Can

    2017-03-15

    The effects of different drying conditions, such as infrared power, drying air temperature and velocity, on quality of strawberry were evaluated. Drying time decreased with increased infrared power, air temperature and velocity. An increase in power from 100W to 300W, temperature from 60 to 80°C and velocity from 1.0m.s(-1) to 2.0m.s(-1) decreased fruit color quality index. For total phenol and anthocyanin content, 300W, 60°C, and 1.0m.s(-1) were superior to the other experimental conditions. The drying processes increased N, P and K and decreased Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu contents. The optimal conditions to preserve nutrients in infrared drying of strawberry were 200W, 100°C and 1.5m.s(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Packaged kiln dried firewood

    SciTech Connect

    Cutrara, A.

    1986-07-01

    A process is described for kiln drying firewood consisting of essentially uniform lengths of split firewood pieces, the process comprising splitting essentially uniform lengths of green tree logs to form firewood pieces, placing the firewood pieces in open mesh bags to provide a plurality of bags of firewood, placing the plurality of bags of green firewood pieces in a kiln drying oven, kiln drying the pieces at temperatures in excess of 150/sup 0/F. by moving heated air over the pieces until the pieces have an overall moisture content ranging from 15% up to 30% by weight, operating the kiln at a temperature below a level which would render the structural characteristics of the bag useless and removing the kiln dried firewood pieces in the plurality of bags from the kiln drying oven.

  16. Dry imaging cameras

    PubMed Central

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow. PMID:21799589

  17. A randomised crossover comparison of mouth-to-face-shield ventilation and mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation by surf lifeguards in a manikin.

    PubMed

    Adelborg, K; Bjørnshave, K; Mortensen, M B; Espeseth, E; Wolff, A; Løfgren, B

    2014-07-01

    Thirty surf lifeguards (mean (SD) age: 25.1 (4.8) years; 21 male, 9 female) were randomly assigned to perform 2 × 3 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin using mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (AMBU LifeKey) and mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (Laerdal Pocket Mask). Interruptions in chest compressions, effective ventilation (visible chest rise) ratio, tidal volume and inspiratory time were recorded. Interruptions in chest compressions per cycle were increased with mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (mean (SD) 8.6 (1.7) s) compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (6.9 (1.2) s, p < 0.0001). The proportion of effective ventilations was less using mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (199/242 (82%)) compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (239/240 (100%), p = 0.0002). Tidal volume was lower using mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (mean (SD) 0.36 (0.20) l) compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (0.45 (0.20) l, p = 0.006). No differences in inspiratory times were observed between mouth-to-face-shield ventilation and mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation. In conclusion, mouth-to-face-shield ventilation increases interruptions in chest compressions, reduces the proportion of effective ventilations and decreases delivered tidal volumes compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. The effect of povidone-iodine and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque Streptococcus mutans count in 6- to 12-year-old school children: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Neeraja, R; Anantharaj, A; Praveen, P; Karthik, V; Vinitha, M

    2008-01-01

    Treating a carious tooth in children with high caries experience by providing a restoration does not cure the disease. If the unfavorable oral environment that caused the cavity persists so will the disease and more restorations will be required in future. Treating the oral infection by reducing the number of cariogenic microorganisms and establishing a favorable oral environment to promote predominantly remineralization of tooth structure over time will stop the caries process. The present study was conducted: (1) To evaluate the efficacy of povidone-iodine and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque Streptococcus mutans when used as an adjunct to restoration. (2) To compare the anti-microbial effect of 1% povidone-iodine and 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque S. mutans count. Forty-five study participants in the age group of 6-12 years with dmft (decay component) of three or four were selected from one government school in Bangalore city. They were divided into three groups after the restorative treatment. Group-A, Group-B, and Group-C received 1% povidone-iodine mouth rinse, 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth rinse and placebo mouth rinse, respectively, twice daily for 14 days. The plaque sample was collected and S. mutans count was estimated at six phases: (1) Baseline, (2) 3 weeks after restoration, (3) First day after mouth rinse therapy, (4) 15 days after mouth rinse therapy, (5) 1 month and (6) 3 months after mouth rinse therapy After the restoration the percentage change in S. mutans count was 28.4%. Immediately after mouth rinse therapy there was significant reduction in S. mutans count in all the three groups. After which the count started to increase gradually and after 3 months the bacterial counts in the povidone-iodine group and placebo group were almost near the postrestorative count. Mouth rinses can be used as adjunct to restoration for short duration as temporary measure in reduction of S. mutans count and restorations provide longer effect. In case a

  19. Symptomatic Floor-of-Mouth Swelling with Neck Extension in a 14-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Kristin; Ryan, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    A plunging ranula is a soft-tissue mass stemming from a mucous extravasation cyst of the sublingual gland which can herniate through the mylohyoid muscle. We describe a case in which a 14-year-old girl presented with a rapidly expanding mass on the floor of her mouth affecting her ability to swallow and speak and causing tracheal compression. The patient was initially managed conservatively with antibiotics and steroids; however, the mass continued to expand necessitating emergent bedside incision and drainage and subsequent surgical intervention. The pathophysiology and management options for ranulas are also discussed herein. PMID:25548707

  20. Screening of Sera for Antibodies to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viral Antigens by Radial Immunodiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, G. G.; Cowan, K. M.; McVicar, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Radial immunodiffusion procedures have been developed for testing bovine sera for the presence of antibody activity against three foot-and-mouth disease virus types and a virus infection-associated antigen. Reactions with virus antigens were obtained as early as 4 days after infection, and the virus type causing the response was identified. The procedure had the advantages of great sensitivity for the detection of antibody and the ease with which antibodies to a variety of antigens could be detected. Images PMID:4344090